WorldWideScience

Sample records for human enzyme defects

  1. Defects in Human Nature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄靓

    2008-01-01

    By tracing the defects of society back to the defects of human nature, humanity's essence is proved to be inherent evil. Man's natural tendency to do evil remain harnessed through the controls and conventions imposed by civilization, however, when rules or civilization are weakened, man' s dark side is unleashed.

  2. cDNA and genomic cloning of human palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT), the enzyme defective in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

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    Schriner, J.E.; Yi, W.; Hofmann, S.L. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-06-15

    Palmitoyl-protein thioesterase (PPT) is a small glycoprotein that removes palmitate groups from cysteine residues in lipid-modified proteins. We recently reported mutations in PPT in patients with infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), a severe neurodegenerative disorder. INCL is characterized by the accumulation of proteolipid storage material in brain and other tissues, suggesting that the disease is a consequence of abnormal catabolism of acylated proteins. In the current paper, we report the sequence of the human PPT cDNA and the structure of the human PPT gene. The cDNA predicts a protein of 306 amino acids that contains a 25-amino-acid signal peptide, three N-linked glycosylation sites, and consensus motifs characteristic of thioesterases. Northern analysis of a human tissue blot revealed ubiquitous expression of a single 2.5-kb mRNA, with highest expression in lung, brain, and heart. The human PPT gene spans 25 kb and is composed of seven coding exons and a large eighth exon, containing the entire 3{prime}-untranslated region of 1388 bp. An Alu repeat and promoter elements corresponding to putative binding sites for several general transcription factors were identified in the 1060 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site. The human PPT cDNA sequence and gene structure will provide the means for the identification of further causative mutations in INCL and facilitate genetic screening in selected high-risk populations. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  4. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel.

  5. Decalcificated human dentin matrix in autogenous repair of skull defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@In the management of traumatic skull defect, the classical treatment has usually been adopted, i.e.,primary debridement and secondary repair of bone defect, especially in cases of open lacerated skull fracture. 1 In general, the use of prosthetic material in repair is often not so satisfactory either in China or abroad. Decalcificated human dentin matrix (DHDM)has been used in autogenous repair of traumatic skull defect in primary operation and a good curative effect has been gained since the time from September 1996 to March 1998. Clinical results and CT scanning observation are reported in the following.

  6. Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity in human serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Michio; Watanabe,Akiharu; Higashi, Toshiro; Tsuji, Takao

    1988-01-01

    Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity was detected in human serum. Serum was preincubated with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate and trypsin to activate the enzyme prior to assay. Type IV collagen, purified from human placentas and radiolabeled with [1-14C] acetic anhydride, was used as the substrate. The enzyme activity was measured at pH 7.5 and inhibited by treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or heat. The assay of type IV collagen-degrading enzyme in human serum might be useful...

  7. Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity in human serum.

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    Hashimoto,Noriaki

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available Type IV collagen-degrading enzyme activity was detected in human serum. Serum was preincubated with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate and trypsin to activate the enzyme prior to assay. Type IV collagen, purified from human placentas and radiolabeled with [1-14C] acetic anhydride, was used as the substrate. The enzyme activity was measured at pH 7.5 and inhibited by treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or heat. The assay of type IV collagen-degrading enzyme in human serum might be useful for estimating the degradation of type IV collagen.

  8. Multiple RNA processing defects and impaired chloroplast function in plants deficient in the organellar protein-only RNase P enzyme.

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    Wenbin Zhou

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA precursors undergo endoribonucleolytic processing of their 5' and 3' ends. 5' cleavage of the precursor transcript is performed by ribonuclease P (RNase P. While in most organisms RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein that harbors a catalytically active RNA component, human mitochondria and the chloroplasts (plastids and mitochondria of seed plants possess protein-only RNase P enzymes (PRORPs. The plant organellar PRORP (PRORP1 has been characterized to some extent in vitro and by transient gene silencing, but the molecular, phenotypic and physiological consequences of its down-regulation in stable transgenic plants have not been assessed. Here we have addressed the function of the dually targeted organellar PRORP enzyme in vivo by generating stably transformed Arabidopsis plants in which expression of the PRORP1 gene was suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi. PRORP1 knock-down lines show defects in photosynthesis, while mitochondrial respiration is not appreciably affected. In both plastids and mitochondria, the effects of PRORP1 knock-down on the processing of individual tRNA species are highly variable. The drastic reduction in the levels of mature plastid tRNA-Phe(GAA and tRNA-Arg(ACG suggests that these two tRNA species limit plastid gene expression in the PRORP1 mutants and, hence, are causally responsible for the mutant phenotype.

  9. Isolation of human liver angiotensin-converting enzyme by chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov IYu; Danilov, S M; Sukhova, N V

    1987-10-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1) has been isolated from human liver by chromatofocusing. The isolation procedure permitted us to obtain a 9000-fold purified enzyme with a 22% yield. Specific activity of the angiotensin-converting enzyme was 10 units/mg of protein. The molecular mass of enzyme determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions was 150,000. The isoelectric point (4.2-4.3) was also determined by chromatofocusing. The Km values of the enzyme for hippuryl-L-histidyl-L-leucine and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-histidyl-L-leucine are 5000 and 125 microM, respectively. The human liver angiotensin-converting enzyme is inhibited by bradykinin-potentiating factor SQ 20881 (IC50 = 18 nM).

  10. Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 causes congenital heart defects in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thienpont, Bernard; Zhang, Litu; Postma, Alex V;

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common major developmental anomalies and the most frequent cause for perinatal mortality, but their etiology remains often obscure. We identified a locus for CHDs on 6q24-q25. Genotype-phenotype correlations in 12 patients carrying a chromosomal deletion...... in cardiac development was further supported by its conserved expression in the developing human and zebrafish heart. Moreover, a critical, dosage-sensitive role during development was demonstrated by the cardiac defects observed upon titrated knockdown of tab2 expression in zebrafish embryos...

  11. Posttranslational modifications and dysfunction of mitochondrial enzymes in human heart failure.

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    Sheeran, Freya L; Pepe, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Deficiency of energy supply is a major complication contributing to the syndrome of heart failure (HF). Because the concurrent activity profile of mitochondrial bioenergetic enzymes has not been studied collectively in human HF, our aim was to examine the mitochondrial enzyme defects in left ventricular myocardium obtained from explanted end-stage failing hearts. Compared with nonfailing donor hearts, activity rates of complexes I and IV and the Krebs cycle enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and aconitase were lower in HF, as determined spectrophotometrically. However, activity rates of complexes II and III and citrate synthase did not differ significantly between the two groups. Protein expression, determined by Western blotting, did not differ between the groups, implying posttranslational perturbation. In the face of diminished total glutathione and coenzyme Q10 levels, oxidative modification was explored as an underlying cause of enzyme dysfunction. Of the three oxidative modifications measured, protein carbonylation was increased significantly by 31% in HF (P transport chain and Krebs cycle enzymes without altered expression of protein levels. Augmented oxidative modification of crucial enzyme subunit structures implicates dysfunction due to diminished capacity for management of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, thus contributing further to reduced bioenergetics in human HF.

  12. Marine Enzymes: Production and Applications for Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T Eswara; Imchen, M; Kumavath, R

    Marine microbial enzymes have wide applications in bioindustries. Selection of microorganisms for enzyme production at the industrial level requires good yield and high production rate. A number of enzymes such as amylase, caseinase, lipase, gelatinase, and DNases have been discovered from microbes isolated from extreme marine environments. Such enzymes are thermostable, tolerant to a varied range of pH and other harsh conditions required in industrial applications. Novelty in their structure and characteristics has shown promising scope to the researchers in academia and industry. In this chapter, we present a bird's eye view on recent research works in the field of enzyme production from marine origin as well as their potential biological applications relevant to human health. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Emerging roles of deubiquitinating enzymes in human cancer1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-ming YANG

    2007-01-01

    Protein modifications by the covalent linkage of ubiquitin have significant in-volvement in many cellular processes, including stress response, oncogenesis,viral infection, transcription, protein turnover, organelle biogenesis, DNA repair,cellular differentiation, and cell cycle control. Protein ubiquitination and subse-quent degradation by the proteasome require the participation of both ubiquitinating enzymes and deubiquitinating enzymes. Although deubiquitinatingenzymes constitute a large family in the ubiquitin system, the study of this class of proteins is still in its infant stage. Recent studies have revealed a variety of molecular and biological functions of deubiquitinating enzymes and their associa-tion with human diseases. In this review we will discuss the possible roles that deubiquitinating enzymes may play in cancers.

  14. Quasi-conformal remapping for compensation of human visual field defects - Advances in image remapping for human field defects

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    Juday, Richard D.; Loshin, David S.

    1989-01-01

    Image coordinate transformations are investigated for possible use in a low vision aid for human patients. These patients typically have field defects with localized retinal dysfunction predominately central (age related maculopathy) or peripheral (retinitis pigmentosa). Previously simple eccentricity-only remappings which do not maintain conformality were shown. Initial attempts on developing images which hold quasi-conformality after remapping are presented. Although the quasi-conformal images may have less local distortion, there are discontinuities in the image which may counterindicate this type of transformation for the low vision application.

  15. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  16. Kinetic aspects of human placental alkaline phosphatase enzyme membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, M G; Serrano, M A; Bello, J F; Cachaza, J M; Kennedy, J F

    1991-01-01

    The crosslinking of alkaline phosphatase of human placenta with human serum albumin has been optimized. During the physico-chemical characterization of this immobilized biocatalyst, special attention was paid to attributes such as the irreversibility of the enzyme support bonding, the stability of the catalytic activity, and the effects of pH and temperature on this activity. Regarding stability, patterns of denaturation are proposed, to account for inactivation curves over time and under storage/operation conditions. These patterns, in some cases, indicate the existence of different populations of immobilized enzyme molecules, with a different degree of sensitivity to denaturation. The activity vs pH profiles are clearly modified by the immobilization process. This is because the pH of the free homogeneous solution, measurable with a pH-meter, differs from the real pH of the immediate microenvironment of the immobilized enzyme molecules due to the effects of proton accumulation in the microenvironment (in the reaction catalysed by alkaline phosphatase, protons are produced), to limitations to the free diffusion of H+ and to the possible partition effects of H+ due to polar interactions with residues or molecules of the enzyme membrane. In the experimental working conditions, the apparent optimum temperatures are centered at 40 degrees C, inactivation (thermal denaturation) occurring above this temperature. In the temperature range 10-40 degrees C, the kinetic control over the overall activity of the immobilized enzyme was observed, causing the Arrhenius profiles to be linear.

  17. Defecting or not defecting: how to "read" human behavior during cooperative games by EEG measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio De Vico Fallani

    Full Text Available Understanding the neural mechanisms responsible for human social interactions is difficult, since the brain activities of two or more individuals have to be examined simultaneously and correlated with the observed social patterns. We introduce the concept of hyper-brain network, a connectivity pattern representing at once the information flow among the cortical regions of a single brain as well as the relations among the areas of two distinct brains. Graph analysis of hyper-brain networks constructed from the EEG scanning of 26 couples of individuals playing the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma reveals the possibility to predict non-cooperative interactions during the decision-making phase. The hyper-brain networks of two-defector couples have significantly less inter-brain links and overall higher modularity--i.e., the tendency to form two separate subgraphs--than couples playing cooperative or tit-for-tat strategies. The decision to defect can be "read" in advance by evaluating the changes of connectivity pattern in the hyper-brain network.

  18. Defecting or not defecting: how to "read" human behavior during cooperative games by EEG measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Fallani, F De Vico; Sinatra, R; Astolfi, L; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D; Wilke, C; Doud, A; Latora, V; He, B; Babiloni, F; 10.1371/journal.pone.0014187

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms responsible for human social interactions is difficult, since the brain activities of two or more individuals have to be examined simultaneously and correlated with the observed social patterns. We introduce the concept of hyper-brain network, a connectivity pattern representing at once the information flow among the cortical regions of a single brain as well as the relations among the areas of two distinct brains. Graph analysis of hyper-brain networks constructed from the EEG scanning of 26 couples of individuals playing the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma reveals the possibility to predict non-cooperative interactions during the decision-making phase. The hyper-brain networks of two-defector couples have significantly less inter-brain links and overall higher modularity - i.e. the tendency to form two separate subgraphs - than couples playing cooperative or tit-for-tat strategies. The decision to defect can be "read" in advance by evaluating the changes of connectivity patte...

  19. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Song; J Willer; P Scherer; J Panzer; A Kugath; E Skordalakes; R Gregg; G Willer; R Balice-Gordon

    2011-12-31

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development.

  20. Adipocyte lipases and defect of lipolysis in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langin, Dominique; Dicker, Andrea; Tavernier, Geneviève; Hoffstedt, Johan; Mairal, Aline; Rydén, Mikael; Arner, Erik; Sicard, Audrey; Jenkins, Christopher M; Viguerie, Nathalie; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Gross, Richard W; Holm, Cecilia; Arner, Peter

    2005-11-01

    The mobilization of fat stored in adipose tissue is mediated by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and the recently characterized adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), yet their relative importance in lipolysis is unknown. We show that a novel potent inhibitor of HSL does not inhibit other lipases. The compound counteracted catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis in mouse adipocytes and had no effect on residual triglyceride hydrolysis and lipolysis in HSL-null mice. In human adipocytes, catecholamine- and natriuretic peptide-induced lipolysis were completely blunted by the HSL inhibitor. When fat cells were not stimulated, glycerol but not fatty acid release was inhibited. HSL and ATGL mRNA levels increased concomitantly during adipocyte differentiation. Abundance of the two transcripts in human adipose tissue was highly correlated in habitual dietary conditions and during a hypocaloric diet, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for the two genes. Comparison of obese and nonobese subjects showed that obesity was associated with a decrease in catecholamine-induced lipolysis and HSL expression in mature fat cells and in differentiated preadipocytes. In conclusion, HSL is the major lipase for catecholamine- and natriuretic peptide-stimulated lipolysis, whereas ATGL mediates the hydrolysis of triglycerides during basal lipolysis. Decreased catecholamine-induced lipolysis and low HSL expression constitute a possibly primary defect in obesity.

  1. Bisphenol A and congenital developmental defects in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guida, Maurizio [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Troisi, Jacopo, E-mail: j.troisi@studenti.unisa.it [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Ciccone, Carla [“G. Moscati” Hospital Avellino (Italy); Granozio, Giovanni; Cosimato, Cosimo [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Sardo, Attilio Di Spiezio; Ferrara, Cinzia [Department of Medicine, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy); Guida, Marco [Department of Biology, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy); Nappi, Carmine [Department of Medicine, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy); Zullo, Fulvio [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Di Carlo, Costantino [Department of Medicine, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We show a correlation between environmental exposure to BPA and fetal malformations in humans. • We show that a reduced ability to metabolize the BPA in the mother can concur to the occurrence of malformations. • The average value of free BPA appears to be nearly three times greater in case of chromosomal malformations than the controls. - Abstract: Over 50% of the causes of fetal malformations in humans are still unknown. Recent evidence suggests the relationship between environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors and fetal malformations. Our study aims to establish the role of Bisphenol A (BPA), if any, in altering human reproduction. We enrolled 151 pregnant women who were divided into two groups: case group (CS, n = 101), women with established diagnosis of developmental defect, and control group (CL, n = 50), pregnant women with normally developed fetus. Total, free and conjugated BPA were measured in their blood using GC–MS with isotopic dilution. The results show a correlation between environmental exposure to BPA and the genesis of fetal malformations. Conjugated BPA, which was higher in the CL, casts light on the hypothesis that a reduced ability to metabolize the chemical in the mother can concur to the occurrence of malformation. In a more detailed manner, in case of chromosomal malformations, the average value of free BPA appears to be nearly three times greater than that of the controls. Similarly, in case of central and peripheral nervous system non-chromosomal malformations, the value of free BPA is nearly two times greater than that of the controls.

  2. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Swati; Singh, Ashok K.; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta

    2016-01-01

    One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED) and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM) or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27051561

  3. Aspartate aminotransferase – key enzyme in the human systemic metabolism

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    Dagmara Otto-Ślusarczyk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspartate aminotransferase is an organ - nonspecific enzyme located in many tissues of the human body where it catalyzes reversible reaction of transamination. There are two aspartate aminotransferase isoforms - cytoplasmic (AST1 and mitochondrial (AST2, that usually occur together and interact with each other metabolically. Both isoforms are homodimers containing highly conservative regions responsible for catalytic properties of enzyme. The common feature of all aspartate aminotransfeses is Lys – 259 residue covalent binding with prosthetic group - pyridoxal phosphate. The differences in the primary structure of AST isoforms determine their physico-chemical, kinetic and immunological properties. Because of the low concentration of L-aspartate (L-Asp in the blood, AST is the only enzyme, which supply of this amino acid as a substrate for many metabolic processes, such as urea cycle or purine and pyrimidine nucleotides in the liver, synthesis of L-arginine in the kidney and purine nucleotide cycle in the brain and the skeletal muscle. AST is also involved in D-aspartate production that regulates the metabolic activity at the auto-, para- and endocrine level. Aspartate aminotransferase is a part of the malate-aspartate shuttle in the myocardium, is involved in gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney, glyceroneogenesis in the adipose tissue, and synthesis of neurotransmitters and neuro-glial pathway in the brain. Recently, the significant role of AST in glutaminolysis - normal metabolic pathway in tumor cells, was demonstrated. The article is devoted the role of AST, known primarily as a diagnostic liver enzyme, in metabolism of various human tissues and organs.

  4. Molecular heterogeneity in chronic granulomatous disease: a human model of defective phagocyte superoxide production.

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    Gabig, T G; Lefker, B A

    1985-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a genetically transmitted disorder thought to result from defect(s) in the activation or turnover of the NADPH dependent O2- generating oxidase enzyme system of human neutrophils and monocytes. The normal oxidase may be a flavoprotein-cytochrome b559 complex; therefore, these components of the oxidase were quantitated in the neutrophils from patients and family members of two unrelated CGD kindreds. The male propositus from an X-linked recessive kindred had a neutrophil oxidase fraction with low FAD content (26 pmol/mg protein) and undetectable cytochrome b559 (less than 5 pmol/mg protein). The male propositus from an autosomal recessive kindred had a neutrophil oxidase fraction with low FAD content (34 pmol FAD/mg protein), but normal cytochrome b559 content (170 pmol cytochrome b559/mg protein). Both parents of this latter CGD patient had normal FAD and cytochrome b559 content in their neutrophil oxidase fraction. We conclude that the carrier state in certain X-linked recessive female carriers of CGD can be detected by partial deficiencies of both flavoprotein and cytochrome b559 components of the oxidase, whereas presumed heterozygous carriers of certain autosomal recessive CGD kindreds cannot be detected by this means.

  5. Transcriptional directionality of the human insulin-degrading enzyme promoter.

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    Zhang, Lang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Qingyang; Wang, Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Unidirectional promoters dominate among mammalian genomes. However, the mechanism through which the transcriptional directionality of promoters is accomplished remains to be clarified. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, whose promoter contains a CpG island. We previously showed that the basal promoter region of mouse IDE has bidirectional transcriptional activity, but an upstream promoter element blocks its antisense transcription. Therefore, we wonder whether the human IDE promoter contains an analogous element. Similarly, the basal promoter region of human IDE (-102 ~ +173 and -196 ~ +173 relative to the transcription start site) showed bidirectional transcriptional activity. However, the region from -348 to +173 could only be transcribed from the normal orientation, implying that an upstream promoter element between -348 and -196 blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Through promoter deletion and mutagenesis analysis, we mapped this element precisely and found that the upstream promoter element locates between -318 and -304. Furthermore, the transcription-blocking elements in the mouse and human IDE promoters inhibited the transcription of the SV40 promoter when put downstream of it. In conclusion, we identify an upstream promoter element which blocks the antisense transcription of the human IDE promoter. Our studies are helpful to clarify the transcriptional directionality of promoters.

  6. Global Profiling of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Human Gut Microbiome.

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    Tanudeep Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZyme families, encoded by human gut microflora, play a crucial role in breakdown of complex dietary carbohydrates into components that can be absorbed by our intestinal epithelium. Since nutritional wellbeing of an individual is dependent on the nutrient harvesting capability of the gut microbiome, it is important to understand how CAZyme repertoire in the gut is influenced by factors like age, geography and food habits.This study reports a comprehensive in-silico analysis of CAZyme profiles in the gut microbiomes of 448 individuals belonging to different geographies, using similarity searches of the corresponding gut metagenomic contigs against the carbohydrate active enzymes database. The study identifies a core group of 89 CAZyme families that are present across 85% of the gut microbiomes. The study detects several geography/age-specific trends in gut CAZyme repertoires of the individuals. Notably, a group of CAZymes having a positive correlation with BMI has been identified. Further this group of BMI-associated CAZymes is observed to be specifically abundant in the Firmicutes phyla. One of the major findings from this study is identification of three distinct groups of individuals, referred to as 'CAZotypes', having similar CAZyme profiles. Distinct taxonomic drivers for these CAZotypes as well as the probable dietary basis for such trends have also been elucidated. The results of this study provide a global view of CAZyme profiles across individuals of various geographies and age-groups. These results reiterate the need of a more precise understanding of the role of carbohydrate active enzymes in human nutrition.

  7. Replacement of the human topoisomerase linker domain with the plasmodial counterpart renders the enzyme camptothecin resistant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnò, Barbara; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia;

    2013-01-01

    , but it is characterized by a much faster religation rate. The hybrid enzyme is also camptothecin resistant. A 3D structure of the hybrid enzyme has been built and its structural-dynamical properties have been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis indicates that the swapped plasmodial linker samples......A human/plasmodial hybrid enzyme, generated by swapping the human topoisomerase IB linker domain with the corresponding domain of the Plasmodium falciparum enzyme, has been produced and characterized. The hybrid enzyme displays a relaxation activity comparable to the human enzyme...... in the modulation of the topoisomerase IB activity....

  8. Functional roles of ATP-binding residues in the catalytic site of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Chih; Chien, Yu-Ching; Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Chang, Gu-Gang; Liu, Guang-Yaw

    2005-09-27

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme is inhibited by ATP. The X-ray crystal structures have revealed that two ATP molecules occupy both the active and exo site of the enzyme, suggesting that ATP might act as an allosteric inhibitor of the enzyme. However, mutagenesis studies and kinetic evidences indicated that the catalytic activity of the enzyme is inhibited by ATP through a competitive inhibition mechanism in the active site and not in the exo site. Three amino acid residues, Arg165, Asn259, and Glu314, which are hydrogen-bonded with NAD+ or ATP, are chosen to characterize their possible roles on the inhibitory effect of ATP for the enzyme. Our kinetic data clearly demonstrate that Arg165 is essential for catalysis. The R165A enzyme had very low enzyme activity, and it was only slightly inhibited by ATP and not activated by fumarate. The values of K(m,NAD) and K(i,ATP) to both NAD+ and malate were elevated. Elimination of the guanidino side chain of R165 made the enzyme defective on the binding of NAD+ and ATP, and it caused the charge imbalance in the active site. These effects possibly caused the enzyme to malfunction on its catalytic power. The N259A enzyme was less inhibited by ATP but could be fully activated by fumarate at a similar extent compared with the wild-type enzyme. For the N259A enzyme, the value of K(i,ATP) to NAD+ but not to malate was elevated, indicating that the hydrogen bonding between ATP and the amide side chain of this residue is important for the binding stability of ATP. Removal of this side chain did not cause any harmful effect on the fumarate-induced activation of the enzyme. The E314A enzyme, however, was severely inhibited by ATP and only slightly activated by fumarate. The values of K(m,malate), K(m,NAD), and K(i,ATP) to both NAD+ and malate for E314A were reduced to about 2-7-folds compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. It can be concluded that mutation of Glu314 to Ala eliminated the repulsive effects

  9. DHX9 suppresses RNA processing defects originating from the Alu invasion of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Tuğçe; Avşar Ilık, İbrahim; Maticzka, Daniel; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Pessoa Rodrigues, Cecilia; Mittler, Gerhard; Manke, Thomas; Backofen, Rolf; Akhtar, Asifa

    2017-04-06

    Transposable elements are viewed as 'selfish genetic elements', yet they contribute to gene regulation and genome evolution in diverse ways. More than half of the human genome consists of transposable elements. Alu elements belong to the short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) family of repetitive elements, and with over 1 million insertions they make up more than 10% of the human genome. Despite their abundance and the potential evolutionary advantages they confer, Alu elements can be mutagenic to the host as they can act as splice acceptors, inhibit translation of mRNAs and cause genomic instability. Alu elements are the main targets of the RNA-editing enzyme ADAR and the formation of Alu exons is suppressed by the nuclear ribonucleoprotein HNRNPC, but the broad effect of massive secondary structures formed by inverted-repeat Alu elements on RNA processing in the nucleus remains unknown. Here we show that DHX9, an abundant nuclear RNA helicase, binds specifically to inverted-repeat Alu elements that are transcribed as parts of genes. Loss of DHX9 leads to an increase in the number of circular-RNA-producing genes and amount of circular RNAs, translational repression of reporters containing inverted-repeat Alu elements, and transcriptional rewiring (the creation of mostly nonsensical novel connections between exons) of susceptible loci. Biochemical purifications of DHX9 identify the interferon-inducible isoform of ADAR (p150), but not the constitutively expressed ADAR isoform (p110), as an RNA-independent interaction partner. Co-depletion of ADAR and DHX9 augments the double-stranded RNA accumulation defects, leading to increased circular RNA production, revealing a functional link between these two enzymes. Our work uncovers an evolutionarily conserved function of DHX9. We propose that it acts as a nuclear RNA resolvase that neutralizes the immediate threat posed by transposon insertions and allows these elements to evolve as tools for the post

  10. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes produced by human pathogenic Vibrio species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichi eMiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria in the genus Vibrio produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes to obtain nutrients via digestion of various protein substrates. However, the enzymes secreted by human pathogenic species have been documented to modulate the bacterial virulence. Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed vibriolysin. The vibriolysin from V. vulnificus, a causative agent of serious systemic infection, is a major toxic factor eliciting the secondary skin damage characterized by formation of the hemorrhagic brae. The vibriolysin from intestinal pathogens may play indirect roles in pathogenicity because it can activate protein toxins and hemagglutinin by the limited proteolysis and can affect the bacterial attachment to or detachment from the intestinal surface by degradation of the mucus layer. Two species causing wound infections, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus, produce another metalloproteases so-called collagenases. Although the detailed pathological roles have not been studied, the collagenase is potent to accelerate the bacterial dissemination through digestion of the protein components of the extracellular matrix. Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. The intestinal pathogens produce sufficient amounts of the metalloprotease at the small intestinal temperature; however, the metalloprotease production by extra-intestinal pathogens is much higher around the body surface temperature. On the other hand, the serine protease is expressed only in the absence of the metalloprotease.

  11. Lamin A-dependent nuclear defects in human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaffidi, Paola; Misteli, Tom

    2006-05-19

    Mutations in the nuclear structural protein lamin A cause the premature aging syndrome Hutchinson-Gilford progeria (HGPS). Whether lamin A plays any role in normal aging is unknown. We show that the same molecular mechanism responsible for HGPS is active in healthy cells. Cell nuclei from old individuals acquire defects similar to those of HGPS patient cells, including changes in histone modifications and increased DNA damage. Age-related nuclear defects are caused by sporadic use, in healthy individuals, of the same cryptic splice site in lamin A whose constitutive activation causes HGPS. Inhibition of this splice site reverses the nuclear defects associated with aging. These observations implicate lamin A in physiological aging.

  12. A recombinant human enzyme for enhanced interstitial transport of therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookbinder, L H; Hofer, A; Haller, M F; Zepeda, M L; Keller, G-A; Lim, J E; Edgington, T S; Shepard, H M; Patton, J S; Frost, G I

    2006-08-28

    Subcutaneously injected therapeutics must pass through the interstitial matrix of the skin in order to reach their intended targets. This complex, three-dimensional structure limits the type and quantity of drugs that can be administered by local injection. Here we found that depolymerization of the viscoelastic component of the interstitial matrix in animal models with a highly purified recombinant human hyaluronidase enzyme (rHuPH20) increased the dispersion of locally injected drugs, across a broad range of molecular weights without tissue distortion. rHuPH20 increased infusion rates and the pattern and extent of appearance of locally injected drugs in systemic blood. In particular, rHuPH20 changed the pharmacokinetic profiles and significantly augmented the absolute bioavailability of locally injected large protein therapeutics. Importantly, within 24 h of injection, the interstitial viscoelastic barriers were restored without histologic alterations or signs of inflammation. rHuPH20 may function as an interstitial delivery enhancing agent capable of increasing the dispersion and bioavailability of coinjected drugs that may enable subcutaneous administration of therapeutics and replace intravenous delivery.

  13. Cost-effective screening methods for various single gene defects in single cells using high magnesium and total ionic strength and restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y H

    2000-12-01

    A reliable cost-effective protocol for the diagnosis of various defective genes in single blastomeres from preimplantation embryos has been established. Single cells were lysed in alkali buffer followed by neutralization and addition of a solution containing a high concentration of sulfhydryl reducing agents and MgCl(2) in relatively high ionic strength (0.45) (solution M) with or without restriction enzyme(s). The reaction mixture was incubated at 37 degrees C for 15 min followed by heat denaturation at 95 degrees C for 10 min. Respective polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture was then added to amplify each designated DNA region. The treatment of neutralized single cell lysate with adequate restriction enzyme(s) which do not cleave the target DNA sequences but shortens the genomic template DNA strands. This may facilitate primer-template annealing. The subsequent heat denaturation of the cell lysate in solution M indeed gave better signals of amplified DNA fragments on polyacrylamide gels. Defects in Tay Sachs exons 11 and 12, CF-DeltaF508 and CF-N1303K, and genomic sequences of ZFX/ZFY were successfully detected on gels after one-step PCR amplification, especially those cell lysates treated with restriction enzymes. In conclusion, a cost-effective one-step PCR method for amplifying various specific genomic regions containing a single gene defect in single cells has been established. This protocol may be applied to genetic screening for many single defective genes of biopsied single blastomeres from preimplantation in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos.

  14. Enzymes approved for human therapy: indications, mechanisms and adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Brian A

    2015-02-01

    Research and drug developments fostered under orphan drug product development programs have greatly assisted the introduction of efficient and safe enzyme-based therapies for a range of rare disorders. The introduction and regulatory approval of 20 different recombinant enzymes has enabled, often for the first time, effective enzyme-replacement therapy for some lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher (imiglucerase, taliglucerase, and velaglucerase), Fabry (agalsidase alfa and beta), and Pompe (alglucosidase alfa) diseases and mucopolysaccharidoses I (laronidase), II (idursulfase), IVA (elosulfase), and VI (galsulfase). Approved recombinant enzymes are also now used as therapy for myocardial infarction (alteplase, reteplase, and tenecteplase), cystic fibrosis (dornase alfa), chronic gout (pegloticase), tumor lysis syndrome (rasburicase), leukemia (L-asparaginase), some collagen-based disorders such as Dupuytren's contracture (collagenase), severe combined immunodeficiency disease (pegademase bovine), detoxification of methotrexate (glucarpidase), and vitreomacular adhesion (ocriplasmin). The development of these efficacious and safe enzyme-based therapies has occurred hand in hand with some remarkable advances in the preparation of the often specifically designed recombinant enzymes; the manufacturing expertise necessary for commercial production; our understanding of underlying mechanisms operative in the different diseases; and the mechanisms of action of the relevant recombinant enzymes. Together with information on these mechanisms, safety findings recorded so far on the various adverse events and problems of immunogenicity of the recombinant enzymes used for therapy are presented.

  15. Competitive Enzyme Immunoassay for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Nidia E.; Foglia, Luis; Ayala, Sandra M.; Gall, David; Nielsen, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    The methods commonly used for human brucellosis serological testing are agglutination tests and the complement fixation test (CFT). Among the newer serological tests, primary binding assays were developed to improve sensitivity and specificity. The competitive enzyme immunoassay (CELISA) for the detection of serum antibody to Brucella is a multispecies assay which appears to be capable of differentiating vaccinal and cross-reacting antibodies from antibodies elicited by field infection in cattle. The competing monoclonal antibody used in this assay is specific for a common epitope of smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS). In this study, we compared the CELISA to the classical tests for the diagnosis of human brucellosis. The CELISA cutoff value was determined to calculate its diagnostic specificity and sensitivity. A survey was performed with 911 sera. Of the sera, 341 were from an asymptomatic population that tested negative with conventional serological tests (screening and confirmatory). Based on these samples, the CELISA specificities were determined to be 99.7 and 100% with cutoff values of 28 and 30% inhibition (%I), respectively. In a further study with 393 additional sera from an asymptomatic population found negative by the conventional screening tests, the CELISA specificities were calculated to be 96.5 and 98.8% with cutoff values of 28 and 30%I. The CELISA sensitivities were determined to be 98.3 and 94.8% with cutoff values of 28 and 30%I, respectively, for sera from 116 individuals found positive by the classical tests. For the 51 culture-positive patients, CELISA was positive for 100%, the CFT was positive for 92%, and the standard tube agglutination test (TAT) was positive for 100%. The CELISA specificity was 100% for 31 sera from patients found negative by conventional serological tests but with brucellosis-like symptoms. The CELISA is fairly rapid to perform, somewhat faster than TAT, and cross-reacts less with other antigens (or antibodies) than the

  16. The defective phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase in a temperature-sensitive prs-2 mutant of Escherichia coli is compensated by increased enzyme synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, David A.; Switzer, Robert L.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    at 25 degrees C. The mutant enzyme had nearly normal heat stability, as long as it was synthesized at 25 degrees C. In contrast, there was hardly any PRPP synthase activity or anti-PRPP synthase antibody cross-reactive material present in cells harbouring the glycine to serine alteration following...... synthase activity as a strain harbouring a plasmid-borne wild-type prs allele. In cells harbouring both mutations, the C -> T mutation appeared to compensate for the G -> A mutation by increasing the amount of a partially defective enzyme at the permissive temperature....

  17. Human myotubes from myoblast cultures undergoing senescence exhibit defects in glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan O; Just, Marlene; Rustan, Arild C

    2011-01-01

    that the observed metabolic defects accompany the induction of a senescent state. The main function of SCs is regeneration and skeletal muscle-build up. Thus, the metabolic defects observed during aging of SC-derived myotubes could have a role in sarcopenia, the gradual age-related loss of muscle mass and strength.......Adult stem cells are known to have a finite replication potential. Muscle biopsy-derived human satellite cells (SCs) were grown at different passages and differentiated to human myotubes in culture to analyze the functional state of various carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways...

  18. Respiratory mechanics in an infant with perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia treated with human recombinant enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Elena; Bober, Michael B; Davey, Lauren; Zamora, Arlene; Li Puma, Annelise B; Chidekel, Aaron; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2012-09-01

    Hypophosphatasia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficient activity of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP) and characterized by defective bone mineralization. In the perinatal lethal form, respiratory complications due to rachitic deformities of the thoracic cage and associated hypoplastic lungs are present. ENB-0040 is a bone-targeted human recombinant TNSALP fusion protein that aims to restore skeletal mineralization. The goal of this study was to characterize pulmonary and thoracic cage mechanics in an infant with the perinatal lethal form of hypophosphatasia under enzyme replacement therapy. Pulmonary function testing was performed on a preterm, 8-week-old patient with hypophosphatasia who was mechanically ventilated since birth because of severe chest wall insufficiency. The measurements consisted of respiratory impulse oscillation measurements (resistance and reactance), ventilatory mechanics (compliance and resistance), and thoracoabdominal motion (TAM) analysis. At baseline, chest wall compliance was 50% of normal, and the TAM indicated predominantly abdominal displacement. After 12 weeks of treatment, a consistent decrease in ventilator requirements and improvement in lung function and chest wall mechanics were observed and correlated with thoracic cage radiologic findings. Measurable changes in chest wall dynamics and respiratory mechanics using noninvasive technology were useful for respiratory management and therapeutic guidance of ENB-0040 treatment in this patient.

  19. Multiple defects in the respiratory chain lead to the repression of genes encoding components of the respiratory chain and TCA cycle enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Ingrid; Mucchielli, Marie-Helene; Herbert, Christopher J; Guiard, Bernard; Dujardin, Geneviève; Meunier, Brigitte

    2009-04-17

    Respiratory complexes III, IV and V are formed by components of both nuclear and mitochondrial origin and are embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Their assembly requires the auxiliary factor Oxa1, and the absence of this protein has severe consequences on these three major respiratory chain enzymes. We have studied, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the effect of the loss of Oxa1 function and of other respiratory defects on the expression of nuclear genes encoding components of the respiratory complexes and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. We observed that the concomitant decrease in the level of two respiratory enzymes, complexes III and IV, led to their repression. These genes are known targets of the transcriptional activator complex Hap2/3/4/5 that plays a central role in the reprogramming of yeast metabolism when cells switch from a fermenting, glucose-repressed state to a respiring, derepressed state. We found that the Hap4 protein, the regulatory subunit of the transcriptional complex, was present at a lower level in the oxa1 mutants whereas no change in HAP4 transcript level was observed, suggesting a posttranscriptional modulation. In addition, an altered mitochondrial morphology was observed in mutants with decreased expression of Hap2/3/4/5 target genes. We suggest that the aberrant mitochondrial morphology, presumably caused by the severely decreased level of at least two respiratory enzymes, might be part of the signalling pathway linking the mitochondrial defect and Hap2/3/4/5.

  20. Sulfatases and radical SAM enzymes: emerging themes in glycosaminoglycan metabolism and the human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Berteau, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Humans live in a permanent association with bacterial populations collectively called the microbiota. In the last 10 years, major advances in our knowledge of the microbiota have shed light on its critical roles in human physiology. The microbiota has also been shown to be a major factor in numerous pathologies including obesity or inflammatory disorders. Despite tremendous progresses, our understanding of the key functions of the human microbiota and the molecular basis of its interactions with the host remain still poorly understood. Among the factors involved in host colonization, two enzymes families, sulfatases and radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine enzymes, have recently emerged as key enzymes.

  1. Study of mitochondrial respiratory defects on reprogramming to human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S.C.; Van Bergen, Nicole J.; Jackson, Stacey; Liang, Helena; Mackey, David A.; Hernández, Damián; Lim, Shiang Y.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Trounce, Ian; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state is known to be accompanied by extensive restructuring of mitochondria and switch in metabolic requirements. Here we utilized Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) as a mitochondrial disease model to study the effects of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations and subsequent oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects in reprogramming. We obtained fibroblasts from a total of 6 LHON patients and control subjects, and showed a significant defect in complex I respiration in LHON fibroblasts by high-resolution respiratory analysis. Using episomal vector reprogramming, our results indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) generation is feasible in LHON fibroblasts. In particular, LHON-specific OXPHOS defects in fibroblasts only caused a mild reduction and did not significantly affect reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that hiPSC reprogramming can tolerate a certain degree of OXPHOS defects. Our results highlighted the induction of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1), mitochondrial fusion (MFN1, MFN2) and glycine production (GCAT) during reprogramming. However, LHON-associated OXPHOS defects did not alter the kinetics or expression levels of these genes during reprogramming. Together, our study provides new insights into the effects of mtDNA mutation and OXPHOS defects in reprogramming and genes associated with various aspects of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27127184

  2. Two independent killing mechanisms of Candida albicans by human neutrophils: evidence from innate immunity defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, R.P.; Hamme, J.L. van; Tool, A.T.; Houdt, M. van; Verkuijlen, P.J.; Herbst, M.; Liese, J.G.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Roos, D.; Berg, T.K. van den; Kuijpers, T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections, accompanied by high rates of mortality, represent an increasing problem in medicine. Neutrophils are the major effector immune cells in fungal killing. Based on studies with neutrophils from patients with defined genetic defects, we provide evidence that human neutrophils

  3. Characterization of recombinant human nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase (NMNAT), a nuclear enzyme essential for NAD synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, M; Hennig, K; Lerner, F; Niere, M; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Specht, T; Weise, C; Oei, S L; Ziegler, M

    2001-03-09

    Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase (NMNAT) is an essential enzyme in all organisms, because it catalyzes a key step of NAD synthesis. However, little is known about the structure and regulation of this enzyme. In this study we established the primary structure of human NMNAT. The human sequence represents the first report of the primary structure of this enzyme for an organism higher than yeast. The enzyme was purified from human placenta and internal peptide sequences determined. Analysis of human DNA sequence data then permitted the cloning of a cDNA encoding this enzyme. Recombinant NMNAT exhibited catalytic properties similar to the originally purified enzyme. Human NMNAT (molecular weight 31932) consists of 279 amino acids and exhibits substantial structural differences to the enzymes from lower organisms. A putative nuclear localization signal was confirmed by immunofluorescence studies. NMNAT strongly inhibited recombinant human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1, however, NMNAT was not modified by poly(ADP-ribose). NMNAT appears to be a substrate of nuclear kinases and contains at least three potential phosphorylation sites. Endogenous and recombinant NMNAT were phosphorylated in nuclear extracts in the presence of [gamma-(32)P]ATP. We propose that NMNAT's activity or interaction with nuclear proteins are likely to be modulated by phosphorylation.

  4. Human cytochrome p450 enzyme specificity for the bioactivation of estragole and related alkenylbenzenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Boersma, M.G.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Schilter, B.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of estragole to its proximate carcinogen 1 '-hydroxyestragole were identified and compared to the enzymes of importance for 1'-hydroxylation of the related alkenylbenzenes methyleugenol and safrole. Incubations with Supersomes revealed that

  5. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for the bioactivation of estragole and related alkenylbenzenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Boersma, M.G.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Schilter, B.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of estragole to its proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxyestragole were identified and compared to the enzymes of importance for 1′-hydroxylation of the related alkenylbenzenes methyleugenol and safrole. Incubations with Supersomes revealed that

  6. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant enzyme activity regulates radioresistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Carolyn J.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, cellular redox environment gained significant attention as a critical regulator of cellular responses to oxidative stress. Cellular redox environment is a balance between production of reactive oxygen species and their removal by antioxidant enzymes. We investigated the hypothesis that mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activity regulates radioresistance in human pancreatic cancer cells. Vector-control and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpressing human pancreatic c...

  7. In vitro glucuronidation kinetics of deoxynivalenol by human and animal microsomes and recombinant human UGT enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, Ronald; Warth, Benedikt; Schebb, Nils Helge; Krska, Rudolf; Koch, Matthias; Sulyok, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), formed by Fusarium species, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins contaminating food and feed worldwide. Upon ingestion, the majority of the toxin is excreted by humans and animal species as glucuronide conjugate. First in vitro data indicated that DON phase II metabolism is strongly species dependent. However, kinetic data on the in vitro metabolism as well as investigations on the specific enzymes responsible for DON glucuronidation in human are lacking. In the present study, the DON metabolism was investigated using human microsomal fractions and uridine-diphosphoglucuronyltransferases (UGTs) as well as liver microsomes from five animal species. Only two of the twelve tested human recombinant UGTs led to the formation of DON glucuronides with a different regiospecificity. UGT2B4 predominantly catalyzed the formation of DON-15-O-glucuronide (DON-15GlcA), while for UGT2B7 the DON-3-O-glucuronide (DON-3GlcA) metabolite prevailed. For human UGTs, liver, and intestinal microsomes, the glucuronidation activities were low. The estimated apparent intrinsic clearance (Clapp,int) for all human UGT as well as tissue homogenates was microsomes, moderate Clapp,int between 1.5 and 10 mL/min mg protein were calculated for carp, trout, and porcine liver. An elevated glucuronidation activity was detected for rat and bovine liver microsomes leading to Clapp,int between 20 and 80 mL/min mg protein. The obtained in vitro data points out that none of the animal models is suitable for estimating the human DON metabolism with respect to the metabolite pattern and formation rate.

  8. Identification and functional analysis of a defect in the human ALG9 gene: definition of congenital disorder of glycosylation type IL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christian G; Grubenmann, Claudia E; Eyaid, Wafaa; Berger, Eric G; Aebi, Markus; Hennet, Thierry

    2004-07-01

    Defects of lipid-linked oligosaccharide assembly lead to alterations of N-linked glycosylation known as "type I congenital disorders of glycosylation" (CDG). Dysfunctions along this stepwise assembly pathway are characterized by intracellular accumulation of intermediate lipid-linked oligosaccharides, the detection of which contributes to the identification of underlying enzymatic defects. Using this approach, we have found, in a patient with CDG, a deficiency of the ALG9 alpha 1,2 mannosyltransferase enzyme, which causes an accumulation of lipid-linked-GlcNAc(2)Man(6) and -GlcNAc(2)Man(8) structures, which was paralleled by the transfer of incomplete oligosaccharides precursors to protein. A homozygous point-mutation 1567G-->A (amino acid substitution E523K) was detected in the ALG9 gene. The functional homology between the human ALG9 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ALG9, as well as the deleterious effect of the E523K mutation detected in the patient with CDG, were confirmed by a yeast complementation assay lacking the ALG9 gene. The ALG9 defect found in the patient with CDG--who presented with developmental delay, hypotonia, seizures, and hepatomegaly--shows that efficient lipid-linked oligosaccharide synthesis is required for proper human development and physiology. The ALG9 defect presented here defines a novel form of CDG named "CDG-IL."

  9. [Progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lu, Yayao; Peng, Bo; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and uridine 5-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are critical enzymes for drug metabolism. Both chemical drugs and traditional Chinese medicines are converted to more readily excreted compounds by drug metabolizing enzymes in human livers. Because of the disparate expression of CYP and UGT enzymes among different individuals, accurate quantification of these enzymes is essential for drug pharmacology, drug-drug interactions and drug clinical applications. The research progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes in the recent decade is reviewed.

  10. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase. II. Immunological relationship between the normal and the defective enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, F; Ellis, J; Bodlund, K; Rotman, B

    1971-09-01

    Two closely related protein antigens were used to study immunogenic competition. Namely, normal beta-D-galactosidase of Escherichia coli (Z) and a genetically defective beta-D-galactosidase (AMEF) which seems to differ from the normal in one amino acid substitution. A unique characteristic of this pair of antigens is that, although they are indistinguishable in precipitation and absorption tests with antibodies, the enzymatic activity of AMEF is specifically increased several-hundredfold in the presence of antibodies directed against Z. The following results show that Z and AMEF also differ in their immunogenic ability: (a) antibodies directed against Z activated AMEF; antibodies directed against AMEF did not activate, but competed specifically with activating antibodies. (b) Animals immunized with AMEF failed to produce activating antibodies when they were subsequently challenged with Z, although the presence of some cells primed to produce activating antibodies could be demonstrated by adoptive transfer. (c) Animals preimmunized with Z were stimulated in their production of activating antibodies by AMEF challenge, although not as efficiently as with Z. A model explaining these observations by competition for the immunogenic site among antigen-sensitive cells carrying cross-reacting receptors is presented.

  11. Endothelin converting-enzyme-1 mRNA expression in human cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnemeier, H; Pinto, YM; Horkay, F; Toth, M; Juhasz-Nagy, A; Orzechowski, HD; Bohm, M; Paul, M

    1998-01-01

    Endothelin-1 converting-enzyme (ECE-1) cleaves the precursor, big-endothelin-1, to the active peptide endothelin-1. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ECE-1 mRNA expression is modified in human cardiovascular disease. Tissue samples from the left human atrium were analyzed for ECE-1 ex

  12. Circadian pancreatic enzyme pattern and relationship between secretory and motor activity in fasting humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jutta; Layer, Peter

    2002-08-01

    It is unknown whether nonparallel pancreatic enzyme output occurs under basal conditions in humans. We aimed to determine whether the circadian or wake-sleep cycle influences the relationship among pancreatic enzymes or between pancreatic secretory and jejunal motor activity. Using orojejunal multilumen intubation, we measured enzyme outputs and proximal jejunal motility index during consecutive daytime and nighttime periods in each of seven fasting, healthy volunteers. Enzyme outputs were correlated tightly during daytime phases of wakefulness and nighttime phases of sleep (r > 0.72, P activity was directly correlated with jejunal motility index (r > 0.50, P enzymes dominates throughout the circadian cycle. Nonparallel secretion during nocturnal phases of wakefulness may be due to merely circadian effects or to the coupling of the wake-sleep and the circadian cycle. The association between fluctuations of secretory and motor activity appears to be particularly tight during the night.

  13. Smoking attenuated the association between IκBα rs696 polymorphism and defective spermatogenesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B; Ding, Q; Zheng, T; Jiang, L; Li, Q; Sun, X; Bai, C; Huang, Z

    2015-11-01

    Defective spermatogenesis is prevalent in infertile men, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its aetiology are largely unknown. In this study, a proposed association between IκBα SNPs, smoking-related ROS and sperm quality was investigated. Two polymorphisms in the IκBα gene, rs2233406 and rs696 were genotyped in 342 controls and 338 patients with defective spermatogenesis from a southern Chinese population. The results showed the rs696 AA genotype to be significantly more common (21.60% versus 14.33%, P = 0.013) and the rs696 GG genotype to be significantly rarer (28.99% versus 37.13%, P = 0.024) in the cases than in the controls. After subjects were stratified into smokers and nonsmokers, these differences were only observed in nonsmokers. Further analysis showed the rs696 AA genotype to be significantly closely associated with defective spermatogenesis in all subjects (P = 0.014, OR = 1.647) and in nonsmokers (P = 0.036, OR = 1.889). In a TM3 cell model, exposure to cigarette smoke condensate was found to activate NF-κB luciferase activity and altered transcriptional level of NF-κB pathway genes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates an association between functional polymorphisms of the IκBα rs696 and cigarette smoking with the risk of defective spermatogenesis, suggesting some interaction between the NF-κB signalling pathway and smoking-related ROS in human spermatogenesis.

  14. Retinoblastoma pathway defects show differential ability to activate the constitutive DNA damage response in human tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tort, F.; Bartkova, J.; Sehested, M.

    2006-01-01

    activation. Here, we show that, in a series of human colorectal adenomas, those with deregulation of cyclin D1 and/or p16(Ink4a) showed little evidence of constitutive DNA damage response (DDR), contrary to cyclin E-overexpressing higher-grade cases. These observations were consistent with diverse cell...... culture models with differential defects of retinoblastoma pathway components, as overexpression of cyclin D1 or lack of p16(Ink4a), either alone or combined, did not elicit detectable DDR. In contrast, inactivation of pRb, the key component of the pathway, activated the DDR in cultured human or mouse...

  15. Biomaterials for promoting periodontal regeneration in human intrabony defects: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, Anton; Nikolidakis, Dimitris; Nikou, George; Ivanovic, Aleksandar; Chapple, Iain L C; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Intrabony periodontal defects are a frequent complication of periodontitis and, if left untreated, may negatively affect long-term tooth prognosis. The optimal outcome of treatment in intrabony defects is considered to be the absence of bleeding on probing, the presence of shallow pockets associated with periodontal regeneration (i.e. formation of new root cementum with functionally orientated inserting periodontal ligament fibers connected to new alveolar bone) and no soft-tissue recession. A plethora of different surgical techniques, often including implantation of various types of bone graft and/or bone substitutes, root surface demineralization, guided tissue regeneration, growth and differentiation factors, enamel matrix proteins or various combinations thereof, have been employed to achieve periodontal regeneration. Despite positive observations in animal models and successful outcomes reported for many of the available regenerative techniques and materials in patients, including histologic reports, robust information on the degree to which reported clinical improvements reflect true periodontal regeneration does not exist. Thus, the aim of this review was to summarize, in a systematic manner, the available histologic evidence on the effect of reconstructive periodontal surgery using various types of biomaterials to enhance periodontal wound healing/regeneration in human intrabony defects. In addition, the inherent problems associated with performing human histologic studies and in interpreting the results, as well as certain ethical considerations, are discussed. The results of the present systematic review indicate that periodontal regeneration in human intrabony defects can be achieved to a variable extent using a range of methods and materials. Periodontal regeneration has been observed following the use of a variety of bone grafts and substitutes, guided tissue regeneration, biological factors and combinations thereof. Combination approaches appear to

  16. Human oocytes. Error-prone chromosome-mediated spindle assembly favors chromosome segregation defects in human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcová, Zuzana; Blayney, Martyn; Elder, Kay; Schuh, Melina

    2015-06-05

    Aneuploidy in human eggs is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down syndrome. Most aneuploidy results from chromosome segregation errors during the meiotic divisions of an oocyte, the egg's progenitor cell. The basis for particularly error-prone chromosome segregation in human oocytes is not known. We analyzed meiosis in more than 100 live human oocytes and identified an error-prone chromosome-mediated spindle assembly mechanism as a major contributor to chromosome segregation defects. Human oocytes assembled a meiotic spindle independently of either centrosomes or other microtubule organizing centers. Instead, spindle assembly was mediated by chromosomes and the small guanosine triphosphatase Ran in a process requiring ~16 hours. This unusually long spindle assembly period was marked by intrinsic spindle instability and abnormal kinetochore-microtubule attachments, which favor chromosome segregation errors and provide a possible explanation for high rates of aneuploidy in human eggs.

  17. Evolution of a major drug metabolizing enzyme defect in the domestic cat and other felidae: phylogenetic timing and the role of hypercarnivory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu Shrestha

    Full Text Available The domestic cat (Felis catus shows remarkable sensitivity to the adverse effects of phenolic drugs, including acetaminophen and aspirin, as well as structurally-related toxicants found in the diet and environment. This idiosyncrasy results from pseudogenization of the gene encoding UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT 1A6, the major species-conserved phenol detoxification enzyme. Here, we established the phylogenetic timing of disruptive UGT1A6 mutations and explored the hypothesis that gene inactivation in cats was enabled by minimal exposure to plant-derived toxicants. Fixation of the UGT1A6 pseudogene was estimated to have occurred between 35 and 11 million years ago with all extant Felidae having dysfunctional UGT1A6. Out of 22 additional taxa sampled, representative of most Carnivora families, only brown hyena (Parahyaena brunnea and northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris showed inactivating UGT1A6 mutations. A comprehensive literature review of the natural diet of the sampled taxa indicated that all species with defective UGT1A6 were hypercarnivores (>70% dietary animal matter. Furthermore those species with UGT1A6 defects showed evidence for reduced amino acid constraint (increased dN/dS ratios approaching the neutral selection value of 1.0 as compared with species with intact UGT1A6. In contrast, there was no evidence for reduced amino acid constraint for these same species within UGT1A1, the gene encoding the enzyme responsible for detoxification of endogenously generated bilirubin. Our results provide the first evidence suggesting that diet may have played a permissive role in the devolution of a mammalian drug metabolizing enzyme. Further work is needed to establish whether these preliminary findings can be generalized to all Carnivora.

  18. Clinical evaluation of bioactive glass in the treatment of periodontal osseous defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, T B; Mellonig, J T; Meffert, R M; Jones, A A; Nummikoski, P V; Cochran, D L

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of bioactive glass to demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) in the treatment of human periodontal osseous defects. Fifteen systemically healthy patients (6 males and 9 females, aged 30 to 63) with moderate to advanced adult periodontitis were selected for the study. All patients underwent initial therapy, which included scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, and an occlusal adjustment when indicated, followed by re-evaluation 4 to 6 weeks later. Paired osseous defects in each subject were randomly selected to receive grafts of bioactive glass or DFDBA. Both soft and hard tissue measurements were taken the day of surgery (baseline) and at the 6-month re-entry surgery. The clinical examiner was calibrated and blinded to the surgical procedures, while the surgeon was masked to the clinical measurements. Statistical analysis was performed by using the paired Student's t test. The results indicated that probing depths were reduced by 3.07 +/- 0.80 mm with the bioactive glass and 2.60 +/- 1.40 mm with DFDBA. Sites grafted with bioactive glass resulted in 2.27 +/- 0.88 mm attachment level gain, while sites grafted with DFDBA had a 1.93 +/- 1.33 mm gain in attachment. Bioactive glass sites displayed 0.53 +/- 0.64 mm of crestal resorption and 2.73 mm bone fill. DFDBA-grafted sites experienced 0.80 +/- 0.56 mm of crestal resorption and 2.80 mm defect fill. The use of bioactive glass resulted in 61.8% bone fill and 73.33% defect resolution. DFDBA-grafted defects showed similar results, with 62.5% bone fill and 80.87% defect resolution. Both treatments provided soft and hard tissue improvements when compared to baseline (P < or = 0.0001). No statistical difference was found when comparing bioactive glass to DFDBA; however, studies with larger sample sizes may reveal true differences between the materials. This study suggests that bioactive glass is capable of producing results in the short term (6 months

  19. HEMD: an integrated tool of human epigenetic enzymes and chemical modulators for therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epigenetic mechanisms mainly include DNA methylation, post-translational modifications of histones, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNAs. All of these processes are mediated and controlled by enzymes. Abnormalities of the enzymes are involved in a variety of complex human diseases. Recently, potent natural or synthetic chemicals are utilized to establish the quantitative contributions of epigenetic regulation through the enzymes and provide novel insight for developing new therapeutics. However, the development of more specific and effective epigenetic therapeutics requires a more complete understanding of the chemical epigenomic landscape. DESCRIPTION: Here, we present a human epigenetic enzyme and modulator database (HEMD, the database which provides a central resource for the display, search, and analysis of the structure, function, and related annotation for human epigenetic enzymes and chemical modulators focused on epigenetic therapeutics. Currently, HEMD contains 269 epigenetic enzymes and 4377 modulators in three categories (activators, inhibitors, and regulators. Enzymes are annotated with detailed description of epigenetic mechanisms, catalytic processes, and related diseases, and chemical modulators with binding sites, pharmacological effect, and therapeutic uses. Integrating the information of epigenetic enzymes in HEMD should allow for the prediction of conserved features for proteins and could potentially classify them as ideal targets for experimental validation. In addition, modulators curated in HEMD can be used to investigate potent epigenetic targets for the query compound and also help chemists to implement structural modifications for the design of novel epigenetic drugs. CONCLUSIONS: HEMD could be a platform and a starting point for biologists and medicinal chemists for furthering research on epigenetic therapeutics. HEMD is freely available at http://mdl.shsmu.edu.cn/HEMD/.

  20. Determination of enzyme activity by chromatography and videodensitometry. I. Microassay of amino acid transforming enzymes in human tissue homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsai, T; Elödi, P

    1979-01-01

    A chromatographic-videodensitometric assay was found to be appropriate for measuring the activity of glutamate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, ornithine-2-oxoacid aminotransferase and histidine ammonia-lyase in human tissue homogenates. From the assay mixtures containing substrate(s), cofactor(s), buffer and tissue extract, five or ten microliters samples were taken at different time intervals and chromatographed on Dowex 50 X 8 type resin-coated chromatosheets. On each chromatoplate 50 nmoles of the amino acid to be measured were separately run as a reference for videodensitometric evaluation. By comparing the density of the reference amino acid to that of the individual samples the molar amount of amino acids formed or consumed in the reaction could be calculated. The present findings suggest that the chromatographic-videodensitometric microassay (CV-technique) is suitable for measuring the activity of amino acid transforming enzymes in minute amounts of tissue extracts.

  1. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    , since it is not solely dependent on VDR expression, but also on cellular uptake of circulating VD and presence and activity of VD metabolizing enzymes. Expression of VD metabolizing enzymes has not previously been investigated in human testis and male reproductive tract. Therefore, we performed......The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  2. THE IMPACT OF THE ENZYME STEROID 5α-REDUCTASE 2 DEFICIENCY ON UROGENITAL BIRTH DEFECT IN MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia-Irina Olaru

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research work on 5α-reductase 2 is aiming to put into evidence how a mutation of the gene codifying for this enzyme can affect the phenotype of different males, leading at a partial female phenotype.  This type of research focuses on offering a scientific explanation on different health problems affecting the normal lives of some people, even from early stages of their evolution.The experiment is focused on studying the impact of an enzyme called “steroid 5α-reductase” on the development of male urogenital components during the embryological life.  In order to study the steroid 5α-reductase 2 activity, the following procedures were used: isolation of a 5α-reductase 2 gene, genomicDNAisolation, and polymerase chain reactions.Biochemical analysis put into evidence two mutations representing opposite poles of disease manifestation, i.e. feminization of external genitalia versus predominantly male development. It suggested a correlation between clinical expression and severity of the impairment of enzyme function.  As mentioned by Imperato-McGinley, Guerrero, Gautier, & Peterson (1974, one of the mutations is called “G196S mutation.”  This mutation consists of a serine substitution for a glycine at position 196.  In this case, the level of 5α-reductase activity was sufficient to induce partial virilization.  The second type of mutation is called “G34R mutation.”  This mutation consists of an arginine substitution for glycine at position 34.  The G34R enzyme is essentially inactive, thus giving rise to the female phenotype.Mutations in the type 2 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive genetic disease of 5α-reductase deficiency.

  3. 21 CFR 110.110 - Natural or unavoidable defects in food for human use that present no health hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Natural or unavoidable defects in food for human use that present no health hazard. 110.110 Section 110.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING,...

  4. In vitro evaluation of Bacopa monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant monoamine oxidase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajbir; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Bhateria, Manisha; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2014-09-01

    Bacopa monniera is a traditional Ayurvedic medicinal plant that has been used worldwide for its nootropic action. Chemically standardized extract of B. monniera is now available as over the counter herbal remedy to enhance memory in children and adults. Considering the nootropic action of B. monniera, we evaluated the effect of clinically available B. monniera extract and six of B. monniera constituents (bacoside A3, bacopaside I, bacopaside II, bacosaponin C, bacosine, and bacoside A mixture) on recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The effect of B. monniera extract and individual constituents on human recombinant MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes was evaluated using MAO-Glo(TM) assay kit (Promega Corporation, USA), following the instruction manual. IC50 and mode of inhibition were measured for MAO enzymes. Bacopaside I and bacoside A mixture inhibited the MAO-A and MAO-B enzymes. Bacopaside I exhibited mixed mode of inhibition with IC50 and Ki values of 17.08 ± 1.64 and 42.5 ± 3.53 µg/mL, respectively, for MAO-A enzyme. Bacopaside I is the major constituent of B. monniera, which inhibited the MAO-A enzyme selectively.

  5. Enzymic synthesis of steroid sulfates XVI. Specificity and regulation of human adrenal hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J B; McDonald, D

    1983-05-01

    Pure hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (EC 2.8.2.2) of human adrenal glands possesses a wide substrate specificity towards steroids. This wide specificity has now been found to extend to simple alcohols; normal aliphatic alcohols from C3 onwards acting as substrates with C9 showing the highest rate. Increased rate was accompanied by a decrease in Km. In marked contrast to the sulfurylation of steroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone, which exhibit wave-like kinetics, the kinetics with simple alcohols were of the normal Michaelis-Menten type. By means of enzyme antibody and enzyme stability studies evidence was provided that one and the same enzyme was responsible for sulfurylation of hydroxyls on the 3- and 17- positions of steroids and simple alcohols. The data lend support to previous evidence that the enzyme controls the secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate via steroid-specific binding sites, enabling self-regulation in response to ACTH action.

  6. Human cadaveric dermal matrix for management of challenging surgical defects on the scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, William G; Hanke, C William; Petersen, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Biologic scaffolds have shown promise in patients unable to tolerate prolonged surgical closure or extensive wound care, but there has been little research in the field of Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) on human cadaveric dermis in this capacity. To evaluate the utility of human cadaveric dermis as a means of decreasing operative time, minimizing postoperative wound care, and improving aesthetic outcomes in selected patients with deep surgical defects, including those with exposed bone. Fourteen patients (8 men, 6 women) with deep postoperative defects after MMS were treated with a cadaveric dermal allograft as part or all of their postoperative wound management. Allograft placement was well tolerated, with high satisfaction levels relating to minimal postoperative wound care and aesthetic outcome. Significantly shorter operative times were noted in all patients than with primary closure or grafting. In patients with significant comorbidities, inability to tolerate extended surgical repairs, or inability to perform extensive wound care, human cadaveric dermal allografts can decrease operative time and minimize wound care complexity while providing an excellent aesthetic outcome in many cases. Shorter healing times than expected were also noted in a number of patients. The authors have indicated no significant interest with commercial supporters. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  7. Visual Field Defects and Retinal Ganglion Cell Losses in Human Glaucoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwerth, Ronald S.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The depth of visual field defects are correlated with retinal ganglion cell densities in experimental glaucoma. This study was to determine whether a similar structure-function relationship holds for human glaucoma. Methods The study was based on retinal ganglion cell densities and visual thresholds of patients with documented glaucoma (Kerrigan-Baumrind, et al.) The data were analyzed by a model that predicted ganglion cell densities from standard clinical perimetry, which were then compared to histologic cell counts. Results The model, without free parameters, produced accurate and relatively precise quantification of ganglion cell densities associated with visual field defects. For 437 sets of data, the unity correlation for predicted vs. measured cell densities had a coefficient of determination of 0.39. The mean absolute deviation of the predicted vs. measured values was 2.59 dB, the mean and SD of the distribution of residual errors of prediction was -0.26 ± 3.22 dB. Conclusions Visual field defects by standard clinical perimetry are proportional to neural losses caused by glaucoma. Clinical Relevance The evidence for quantitative structure-function relationships provides a scientific basis of interpreting glaucomatous neuropathy from visual thresholds and supports the application of standard perimetry to establish the stage of the disease. PMID:16769839

  8. Incorrect DNA methylation of the DAZL promoter CpG island associates with defective human sperm†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; Nogueira, Paulo; Carvalho, Marta; Leal, Fernanda; Cordeiro, Isabel; Calhaz-Jorge, Carlos; Gonçalves, João; Plancha, Carlos E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Successful gametogenesis requires the establishment of an appropriate epigenetic state in developing germ cells. Nevertheless, an association between abnormal spermatogenesis and epigenetic disturbances in germline-specific genes remains to be demonstrated. METHODS In this study, the DNA methylation pattern of the promoter CpG island (CGI) of two germline regulator genes—DAZL and DAZ, was characterized by bisulphite genomic sequencing in quality-fractioned ejaculated sperm populations from normozoospermic (NZ) and oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT) men. RESULTS OAT patients display increased methylation defects in the DAZL promoter CGI when compared with NZ controls. Such differences are recorded when analyzing sperm fractions enriched either in normal or defective germ cells (P< 0.001 in both cases). Significant differences in DNA methylation profiles are also observable when comparing the qualitatively distinct germ cell fractions inside the NZ and OAT groups (P= 0.003 and P= 0.007, respectively). Contrastingly, the unmethylation pattern of the DAZ promoter CGI remains correctly established in all experimental groups. CONCLUSIONS An association between disrupted DNA methylation of a key spermatogenesis gene and abnormal human sperm is described here for the first time. These results suggest that incorrect epigenetic marks in germline genes may be correlated with male gametogenic defects. PMID:20685756

  9. The impact of thickness of resorbable membrane of human origin on the ossification of bone defects: A pathohistologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bubalo Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A wide range of resorbable and nonresorbable membranes have been investigated over the last two decades. The barrier membrane protects the defect from ingrowth of soft tissue cells and allows bone progenitor cells to develop bone within a blood clot that is formed beneath the barrier membrane. The membranes are applied to reconstruct small bony defect prior to implantation, to cover dehiscences and fenestrations around dental implants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of human resorbable demineralized membrane (RHDM thickness on bone regeneration. Methods. The experiment, approved by Ethical Committee, was performed on 6 dogs and conducted into three phases. Bone defects were created in all the 6 dogs on the left side of the mandible, 8 weeks after extraction of second, third and fourth premolars. One defect was covered with RHDM 100 μ thick, one with RHDM 200 μ thick, and the third defect left empty (control defect. The histopathological analysis was done 2, 4 and 6 months after the surgery. In the third phase samples of bone tissue were taken and subjected to histopathological analysis. Results. In all the 6 dogs the defects treated with RHDM 200 μ thick showed higher level of bone regeneration in comparison with the defect treated with RHDM 100 μ thick and especially with empty defect. Conclusion. Our results demonstrated that the thicker membrane showed the least soft tissue ingrowths and promoted better bone formation at 6 months compared with a thinner one.

  10. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for bioactivation of safrole to the proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxysafrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Brand, W.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, van T.A.; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the cytochrome P450 mediated bioactivation of safrole to its proximate carcinogenic metabolite, 1'-hydroxysafrole, has been investigated for the purpose of identifying the human P450 enzymes involved. The 1'-hydroxylation of safrole was characterized in a variety of in vitro te

  11. Competitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND Few accurate data exist on the concentration of vitamin B12 in human milk. Binding of the vitamin to haptocorrin (HC) can interfere with the assay if not removed by pretreatment, and very low values can occur in women with poor B12 status. This study evaluated two competitive enzyme bind...

  12. A MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BETA-GLUCURONIDASE FOR APPLICATION IN ANTIBODY-DIRECTED ENZYME PRODRUG THERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, Hidde; VANMUIJEN, M; SCHEFFER, G; SCHEPER, RJ; PINEDO, HM; BOVEN, E

    1995-01-01

    The selectivity of anticancer agents may be improved by antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), The immunogenicity of antibody-enzyme conjugates and the low tumor to normal tissue ratio calls for the use of a human enzyme and the development of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against that enzy

  13. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase: dimeric form of the activatable mutant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway de Macario, E; Ellis, J; Guzman, R; Rotman, B

    1978-02-01

    Sedimentation analyses of AMEF, an activatable mutant beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), and the products of its reaction with Fab fragments of activating antibody show that this enzyme exists mainly as 10S dimers. Activation of AMEF by purified antibody resulted in formation of 16S tetramers. A unifying hypothesis postulating a dimer--tetramer equilibrium accounts for this observation as the counterpart of inactivation, which was shown to involve the breakdown of tetramers into inactive subunits [Roth, R. A. & Rotman, B. (1975) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 67, 1382--1390]. Conditions are described under which AMEF loses the specific antigenic determinant(s) responsible for binding activating antibody, allowing its subsequent use as an absorption to obtain immunologically purified activating antibody,

  14. Using Frogs Faces to Dissect the Mechanisms Underlying Human Orofacial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Amanda J.G.

    2016-01-01

    In this review I discuss how Xenopus laevis is an effective model to dissect the mechanisms underlying orofacial defects. This species has been particularly useful in studying the understudied structures of the developing face including the embryonic mouth and primary palate. The embryonic mouth is the first opening between the foregut and the environment and is critical for adult mouth development. The final step in embryonic mouth formation is the perforation of a thin layer of tissue covering the digestive tube called the buccopharyngeal membrane. When this tissue does not perforate in humans it can pose serious health risks for the fetus and child. The primary palate forms just dorsal to the embryonic mouth and in non-amniotes it functions as the roof of the adult mouth. Defects in the primary palate result in a median oral cleft that appears similar across the vertebrates. In humans, these median clefts are often severe and surgically difficult to repair. Xenopus has several qualities that make it advantageous for craniofacial research. The free living embryo has an easily accessible face and we have also developed several new tools to analyze the development of the region. Further, Xenopus is readily amenable to chemical screens allowing us to uncover novel gene-environment interactions during orofacial development, as well as to define underlying mechanisms governing such interactions. In conclusion, we are utilizing Xenopus in new and innovative ways to contribute to craniofacial research. PMID:26778163

  15. Retinoblastoma pathway defects show differential ability to activate the constitutive DNA damage response in human tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tort, F.; Bartkova, J.; Sehested, M.

    2006-01-01

    Loss of G(1)-S control and aberrations of the p16(Ink4a)-cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4(6)-pRb-E2F-cyclin E/CDK2 pathway are common in human cancer. Previous studies showed that oncogene-induced aberrant proliferation, such as on cyclin E overexpression, causes DNA damage and checkpoint...... culture models with differential defects of retinoblastoma pathway components, as overexpression of cyclin D1 or lack of p16(Ink4a), either alone or combined, did not elicit detectable DDR. In contrast, inactivation of pRb, the key component of the pathway, activated the DDR in cultured human or mouse...... cells, analogous to elevated cyclin E. These results highlight differential effect of diverse oncogenic events on driving the 'cancer cell cycles' and their ability to deregulate the replication-driving CDK2 kinase and to alarm the DDR as a potential anticancer barrier in accordance...

  16. Application of modified enzyme digestion method in rapid primary culture of human glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei XIANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the applied value of modified enzyme digestion method in primary culture of human glioma cells. Methods  A traditional enzyme digestion method was modified based on literatures and our work experience. The glioma cells from 32 glioma patients with different grades were primarily cultured by the modified enzyme digestion method. The morphological features of these cells were observed under an inverted phase contrast microscope. The primary cells were purified by differential adhesion during passage. The primary cells were identified by immunofluorescence technique, and the growth curves were drawn by cell proliferation assays (CCK-8 method for investigating the proliferation of the cells cultured in vitro. Results  The primary human glioma cells were successfully cultured and transferred by the new method, with a success rate of 87.5%. The cells cultured successfully in vitro showed good adherent growth, stable morphologies, thus can be passaged. Fluoroimmunoassay showed positive expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, which confirms the cultured cells were glioma cells. Cell proliferation assays revealed active cell proliferation in vitro, the higher the tumor grade, the higher the proliferative capacity. Conclusion  The modified enzyme digestion method is simpler and more efficient for primary culture of human glioma cells, and the success rate is also higher, thus being able to provide a good guarantee for fundamental research of glioma. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.06.06

  17. Effect of platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of periodontal intrabony defects in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Xiang-ying; QIAO Jing

    2006-01-01

    Background Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a kind of natural source of autologous growth factors, and has been used successfully in medical community. However, the effect of PRP in periodontal regeneration is not clear yet.This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP as an adjunct to bovine porous bone mineral (BPBM) graft in the treatment of human intrabony defects.Methods Seventeen intrabony defects in 10 periodontitis patients were randomly treated either with PRP and BPBM (test group, n=9) or with BPBM alone (control group, n=8). Clinical parameters were evaluated including changes in probing depth, relative attachment level (measured by Florida Probe and a stent), and bone probing level between baseline and 1 year postoperatively. Standardized periapical radiographs of each defect were taken at baseline, 2 weeks, and 1 year postoperatively, and analyzed by digital subtraction radiography (DSR).Results Both treatment modalities resulted in significant attachment gain, reduction of probing depth, and bone probing level at 1-year post-surgery compared to baseline. The test group exhibited statistically significant improvement compared to the control sites in probing depth reduction: (4.78 ± 0.95) mm versus (3.48±0.41) mm (P<0.01); clinical attachment gain: (4.52± 1.14) mm versus (2.85 ±0.80) mm (P<0.01);bone probing reduction:(4.56±1.04) mm versus (2.88±0.79) mm (P<0.01); and defect bone fill: (73.41±14.78)% versus (47.32±11.47)% (P<0.01). DSR analysis of baseline and 1 year postoperatively also showed greater radiographic gains in alveolar bone mass in the test group than in the control group: gray increase (580 ±50) grays versus (220 ± 32)grays (P=0.0001);area with increased gray were (5.21±1.25) mm2 versus (3.02±1.22) mm2 (P=0.0001).Conclusions The treatment with a combination of PRP and BPBM led to a significantly favorable clinical improvement in periodontal intrabony defects compared to using BPBM alone. Further studies are

  18. Influence of cleansing on stratum corneum tryptic enzyme in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepky, A G; Holtzmann, U; Siegner, R; Zirpins, S; Schmucker, R; Wenck, H; Wittern, K P; Biel, S S

    2004-10-01

    Desquamation in human skin is a well-balanced process of de novo production of corneocytes and their shedding from the skin surface. The proteolysis of corneodesmosomes is an important step in the final desquamation process. In the degradation of these adhesion molecules, the stratum corneum tryptic enzyme (SCTE) plays a key role. In initial studies with extracts of porcine epidermis, SCTE was shown to be inactivated by low concentrations of sodium lauryl ether sulphate (SLES). These in vitro findings were supported by in situ results obtained by measuring the release of fluorescent dyes coupled to trypsin-specific substrates incubated on human skin cross-sections. Moreover, in further studies, it could be demonstrated that the SCTE activity in the human horny layer decreases after in vivo application of cleansing products containing SLES. After repeated washing of human volunteers with tap water, a standard market cleansing product (SLES/betaine system) or a new improved cleansing product (SLES/betaine/disodium cocoyl glutamate system), the specific SCTE activity was determined in extracts from the uppermost layers of the stratum corneum. It could be shown that after application of the new formula the remaining SCTE activity was significantly higher than after use of the standard market formula. This ex vivo approach has proven to be very helpful for measuring surfactant effects on human skin enzymes. Using this assay, we developed an improved shower gel formula, which leads to a significantly higher skin enzyme activity after application, compared to a standard market formula.

  19. Angiotensin converting enzymes from human urine of mild hypertensive untreated patients resemble the N-terminal fragment of human angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarini, D E; Plavinik, F L; Zanella, M T; Marson, O; Krieger, J E; Hirata, I Y; Stella, R C

    2001-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was analyzed in human urine collected from mild hypertensive untreated patients. DEAE-cellulose chromatography using linear gradient elution revealed two forms of angiotensin I-converting enzyme, eluted in the conductivity of 0.75 and 1.25 mS. The fractions of each conductivity were pooled and submitted to direct gel filtration in an AcA-34 column, and the apparent molecular weights of urinary ACEs were estimated as 90 kDa (for ACE eluted in 0.75 mS) and 65 kDa (for ACE eluted in 1.25 mS). Both enzymes have a K(i) of the order of 10(-7) M for the specific inhibitors studied, and are able to hydrolyze luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and N-acetyl-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro as described for N-domain ACE. By Western blot analysis, both peaks were recognized by ACE-specific antibody Y4, confirming the molecular weight already described. A plate precipitation assay using monoclonal antibodies to the N-domain of ACE showed that both forms of ACE binds with all monoclonal antibodies to the active N-domain ACE, suggesting that these forms of human urine ACEs resemble the N-fragment of ACE. The HP2 ACE (65 kDa) is similar to low molecular weight (LMW) ACE from normal subjects, and the HP2 ACE (90 kDa) is different from high molecular weight (190 kDa) and LMW (65 kDa) normal ACEs. The 90 kDa ACE could have an important role in development of hypertension. It will be fundamental to elucidate the molecular mechanism responsible for the genesis of this isoform.

  20. A High-Throughput (HTS) Assay for Enzyme Reaction Phenotyping in Human Recombinant P450 Enzymes Using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Suhar, Tom; Glass, Lateca; Rajaraman, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme reaction phenotyping is employed extensively during the early stages of drug discovery to identify the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of new chemical entities (NCEs). Early identification of metabolic pathways facilitates prediction of potential drug-drug interactions associated with enzyme polymorphism, induction, or inhibition, and aids in the design of clinical trials. Incubation of NCEs with human recombinant enzymes is a popular method for such work because of the specificity, simplicity, and high-throughput nature of this approach for phenotyping studies. The availability of a relative abundance factor and calculated intersystem extrapolation factor for the expressed recombinant enzymes facilitates easy scaling of in vitro data, enabling in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Described in this unit is a high-throughput screen for identifying enzymes involved in the metabolism of NCEs. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the human recombinant enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4, including the calculation of the intrinsic clearance for each.

  1. Pungent ginger components modulates human cytochrome P450 enzymes in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mian; Chen, Pei-zhan; Yue, Qing-xi; Jing-quan LI; Chu, Rui-Ai; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Ginger rhizome is used worldwide as a spicy flavor agent. This study was designed to explore the potential effects of pungent ginger components, 6-, 8-, and 10-gingerol, on human cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes that are responsible for the metabolism of many prescription drugs. Methods: The activities of human CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 were analyzed using Vivid P450 assay kits. The mRNA expression of CYP3A4 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 was measured using q...

  2. Recovery of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 after fusion of defectively infected clones of U-937 cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol was used to induce polykaryon formation among U-937 cell subclones carrying defective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 proviral DNA. Fusion of cells which produced gp120-defective virions (UHC15.7) with cells unable to generate reverse transcriptase (RT) activity (UHC8 and UHC18) yielded polykaryons which made infectious viral progeny that showed normal protein profiles. Southern blot analysis of proviral DNA of cells infected with such fusion-derived virus reveal...

  3. Converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat prevents high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Munehiro; Asada, Akira; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-12-01

    We examined the involvement of the oxidative stress in high glucose-induced suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 h concentration-dependently (5.6-22.2 mol/l) inhibited human coronary endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, at 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose (22.2 mmol/l)-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat at 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-induced membrane-bound protein kinase C activity in human aortic endothelial cells. The protein kinase C inhibitors calphostin C 100 nmol/l or chelerythrine 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 h increased intracellular oxidative stress, directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by temocaprilat 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l. Bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant 100 nmol/l significantly reduced the action of temocaprilat; whereas bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-bradykinin 100 nmol/l had no effect. These findings suggest that high glucose inhibits human aortic endothelial cell proliferation and that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat inhibits high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation, possibly through suppression of protein kinase C, bradykinin B2 receptors and oxidative stress.

  4. Hepatic expression of detoxification enzymes is decreased in human obstructive cholestasis due to gallstone biliary obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Chai

    Full Text Available Levels of bile acid metabolic enzymes and membrane transporters have been reported to change in cholestasis. These alterations (e.g. CYP7A1 repression and MRP4 induction are thought to be adaptive responses that attenuate cholestatic liver injury. However, the molecular mechanisms of these adaptive responses in human obstructive cholestasis due to gallstone biliary obstruction remain unclear.We collected liver samples from cholestatic patients with biliary obstruction due to gallstones and from control patients without liver disease (n = 22 per group. The expression levels of bile acid synthetic and detoxification enzymes, membrane transporters, and the related nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors were measured.The levels of bile acid synthetic enzymes, CYP7B1 and CYP8B1, and the detoxification enzyme CYP2B6 were increased in cholestatic livers by 2.4-fold, 2.8-fold, and 1.9-fold, respectively (p<0.05. Conversely, the expression levels of liver detoxification enzymes, UGT2B4/7, SULT2A1, GSTA1-4, and GSTM1-4, were reduced by approximately 50% (p<0.05 in human obstructive cholestasis. The levels of membrane transporters, OSTβ and OCT1, were increased 10.4-fold and 1.8-fold, respectively, (p<0.05, whereas those of OSTα, ABCG2 and ABCG8 were all decreased by approximately 40%, (p<0.05 in human cholestatic livers. Hepatic nuclear receptors, VDR, HNF4α, RXRα and RARα, were induced (approximately 2.0-fold, (p<0.05 whereas FXR levels were markedly reduced to 44% of control, (p<0.05 in human obstructive cholestasis. There was a significantly positive correlation between the reduction in FXR mRNA and UGT2B4/7, SULT2A1, GSTA1, ABCG2/8 mRNA levels in livers of obstructive cholestatic patients (p<0.05.The levels of hepatic detoxification enzymes were significantly decreased in human obstructive cholestasis, and these decreases were positively associated with a marked reduction of FXR levels. These findings are consistent with impaired

  5. Quantification of human tissue transglutaminase by a luminescence sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Lachmann, Ingolf; Wagner, Uta; Osman, Awad A; Mothes, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a calcium-dependent enzyme that catalyzes crosslinking of peptidic glutamine residues with primary amines via isopeptide bonds and hydrolysis of ATP or GTP. The enzyme exerts a variety of functions at the cellular and tissue levels that may be disturbed in disease. Its role in pathoprocesses is poorly understood. For investigation of the involvement of tTG in disease, sensitive and specific assays should be available. We have developed the first sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two monoclonal antibodies (mabs) against human tTG. tTG is captured by mab 3C10 and detected by biotinylated mab 10F3. After incubation with peroxidase-conjugated streptavidin, bound tTG is visualized by peroxidase reaction applying a luminescence substrate. The detection limit was 40 pg/ml. The assay was highly reproducible. Recovery of spiked tTG in crude samples was greater than 92%. The enzyme could be detected in cellular lysates and tissue homogenates of humans. The effect of typical effectors (retinoic acid and interferon-γ) on tTG expression could be demonstrated. A low signal was also obtained in mice samples, suggesting cross-reactivity of the mabs with murine tTG. The new sandwich ELISA may be successfully applied for investigation of physiological functions of tTG and of disorders associated with inadequate tTG expression.

  6. Engineering human cytochrome P450 enzymes into catalytically self-sufficient chimeras using molecular Lego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodhia, Vikash Rajnikant; Fantuzzi, Andrea; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2006-10-01

    The membrane-bound human cytochrome P450s have essential roles in the metabolism of endogenous compounds and drugs. Presented here are the results on the construction and characterization of three fusion proteins containing the N-terminally modified human cytochrome P450s CYP2C9, CY2C19 and CYP3A4 fused to the soluble NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase domain of CYP102A1 from Bacillus megaterium. The constructs, CYP2C9/BMR, CYP2C19/BMR and CYP3A4/BMR are well expressed in Escherichia coli as holo proteins. The chimeras can be purified in the absence of detergent and the purified enzymes are both active and correctly folded in the absence of detergent, as demonstrated by circular dichroism and functional studies. Additionally, in comparison with the parent P450 enzyme, these chimeras have greatly improved solubility properties. The chimeras are catalytically self-sufficient and present turnover rates similar to those reported for the native enzymes in reconstituted systems, unlike previously reported mammalian cytochrome P450 fusion proteins. Furthermore the specific activities of these chimeras are not dependent on the enzyme concentration present in the reaction buffer and they do not require the addition of accessory proteins, detergents or phospholipids to be fully active. The solubility, catalytic self-sufficiency and wild-type like activities of these chimeras would greatly simplify the studies of cytochrome P450 mediated drug metabolism in solution.

  7. Two independent killing mechanisms of Candida albicans by human neutrophils: evidence from innate immunity defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazendam, Roel P; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; van Houdt, Michel; Verkuijlen, Paul J J H; Herbst, Martin; Liese, Johannes G; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2014-07-24

    Invasive fungal infections, accompanied by high rates of mortality, represent an increasing problem in medicine. Neutrophils are the major effector immune cells in fungal killing. Based on studies with neutrophils from patients with defined genetic defects, we provide evidence that human neutrophils use 2 distinct and independent phagolysosomal mechanisms to kill Candida albicans. The first mechanism for the killing of unopsonized C albicans was found to be dependent on complement receptor 3 (CR3) and the signaling proteins phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), but was independent of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity. The second mechanism for the killing of opsonized C albicans was strictly dependent on Fcγ receptors, protein kinase C (PKC), and reactive oxygen species production by the NADPH oxidase system. Each of the 2 pathways of Candida killing required Syk tyrosine kinase activity, but dectin-1 was dispensable for both of them. These data provide an explanation for the variable clinical presentation of fungal infection in patients suffering from different immune defects, including dectin-1 deficiency, CARD9 deficiency, or chronic granulomatous disease.

  8. Adrenal androgen hyperresponsiveness to adrenocorticotropin in women with acne and/or hirsutism: adrenal enzyme defects and exaggerated adrenarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucky, A W; Rosenfield, R L; McGuire, J; Rudy, S; Helke, J

    1986-05-01

    To determine the adrenal contribution to elevated plasma androgens in 31 young hyperandrogenemic women with acne and/or hirsutism, we compared their responses to ACTH with those of 14 normal women. Each subject was given a low dose (10 micrograms/m2) of synthetic ACTH-(1-24) (Cortrosyn) after administration of 1.5 mg dexamethasone the night before the test. Thirty and 60 min responses of plasma 17 alpha-hydroxypregnenolone (17-Preg), 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, (17-prog), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione, 11-deoxycortisol, and cortisol were measured. Eighteen (58%) patients had increased responses of at least one 17-ketosteroid or adrenal androgen precursor. All patients had cortisol responses within the range of those of the 14 normal subjects. Nine patients (29%) had evidence of steroid biosynthetic enzyme deficiencies, either mild congenital adrenal hyperplasia or the heterozygote state; after ACTH, 4 of these patients had elevated 17-prog in the range of values in heterozygote carriers of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, 2 had elevated levels of 11-deoxycortisol compatible with 11 beta-hydroxylase deficiency, and 3 had elevated levels of 17-Preg and DHEA, suggestive of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency. Another 9 subjects (29%) had 17-ketosteroid (DHEA and/or androstenedione) hyperresponsiveness to ACTH with associated elevated 17-Preg responses. As a group, their patterns suggested relatively deficient 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and relatively hyperactive C lyase without impairment of cortisol secretion. This pattern resembles exaggerated adrenarche, and we postulate that these 9 patients have hyperplasia of the zona reticularis. Neither basal levels of plasma androgens (free testosterone and DHEA sulfate) nor menstrual history predicted which patients would have abnormal ACTH responses. Although 5 of 11 (45%) patients with acne alone had abnormal responses to ACTH, 10 of 14 patients with acne and hirsutism (71%) had abnormal

  9. Expression and purification of a human, soluble Arylsulfatase A for Metachromatic Leukodystrophy enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Sabata; Consiglio, Antonella; Cavalieri, Cristina; Tiribuzi, Roberto; Costanzi, Egidia; Severini, Giovanni Maria; Emiliani, Carla; Bordignon, Claudio; Orlacchio, Aldo

    2005-05-25

    The production of active Arylsulfatase A is a key step in the development of enzyme replacement therapy for Metachromatic Leukodystrophy. To obtain large amounts of purified Arylsulfatase A for therapeutic use, we combined a retroviral expression system with a versatile and rapid purification protocol that can easily and reliably be adapted to high-throughput applications. The purification method consists of an initial ion-exchange DEAE-cellulose chromatography step followed by immuno-affinity purification using a polyclonal antibody against a 29-mer peptide of the Arylsulfatase A sequence. Immuno-adsorbed protein was eluted with a combination of acidic pH and an optimal concentration of the 29-mer peptide. This protocol reproducibly yielded approximately 100 microg of >99% pure human Arylsulfatase A, corresponding to 152 mU of enzyme activity, per liter of culture medium with properties similar to those of human non-recombinant protein.

  10. Human dipeptidyl peptidase III acts as a post-proline-cleaving enzyme on endomorphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsun, Marina; Jajcanin, Nina; Vukelić, Bojana; Spoljarić, Jasminka; Abramić, Marija

    2007-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is a zinc exopeptidase with an implied role in the mammalian pain-modulatory system owing to its high affinity for enkephalins and localisation in the superficial laminae of the spinal cord dorsal horn. Our study revealed that this human enzyme hydrolyses opioid peptides belonging to three new groups, endomorphins, hemorphins and exorphins. The enzymatic hydrolysis products of endomorphin-1 were separated and quantified by capillary electrophoresis and the kinetic parameters were determined for human DPP III and rat DPP IV. Both peptidases cleave endomorphin-1 at comparable rates, with liberation of the N-terminal Tyr-Pro. This is the first evidence of DPP III acting as an endomorphin-cleaving enzyme.

  11. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases: structures of the human liver enzymes, functional properties and evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörnvall, H; Hempel, J; von Bahr-Lindström, H; Höög, J O; Vallee, B L

    1987-01-01

    All three types of subunit of class I human alcohol dehydrogenase have been analyzed both at the protein and cDNA levels, and the structures of alpha, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 1, and gamma 2 subunits are known. The same applies to class II pi subunits. Extensive protein data are also available for class III chi subunits. In the class I human isozymes, amino acid exchanges occur at 35 positions in total, with 21-28 replacements between any pair of the alpha/beta/gamma chains. These values, compared with those from species differences between the corresponding human and horse enzymes, suggest that isozyme developments in the class I enzyme resulted from separate gene duplications after the divergence of the human and equine evolutionary lines. All subunits exhibit some unique properties, with slightly closer similarity between the human gamma and horse enzyme subunits and somewhat greater deviations towards the human alpha subunit. Differences are large also in segments close to the active site zinc ligands and other functionally important positions. Species differences are distributed roughly equally between the two types of domain in the subunit, whereas isozyme differences are considerably more common in the catalytic than in the coenzyme-binding domain. These facts illustrate a functional divergence among the isozymes but otherwise similar changes during evolution. Polymorphic forms of beta and gamma subunits are characterized by single replacements at one and two positions, respectively, explaining known deviating properties. Class II and class III subunits are considerably more divergent. Their homology with class I isozymes exhibits only 60-65% positional identity. Hence, they reflect further steps towards the development of new enzymes, with variations well above the horse/human species levels, in contrast to the class I forms. Again, functionally important residues are affected, and patterns resembling those previously established for the divergently related

  12. Gelam Honey Protects against Gamma-Irradiation Damage to Antioxidant Enzymes in Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Suzana Makpol; Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku Ahmad; Yasmin Anum Mohd Yusof; Nor Fadilah Rajab; Khairuddin Abdul Rahim; Zakiah Jubri

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the radioprotective effects of Malaysian Gelam honey on gene expression and enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) subjected to gamma-irradiation. Six groups of HDFs were studied: untreated control, irradiated HDFs, Gelam honey-treated HDFs and HDF treated with Gelam honey pre-, during- and post-irradiation. HDFs were treated with 6 mg/mL of sterilized Gelam ...

  13. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Defective interfering (DI viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8 was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1; it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  14. Primary ciliogenesis defects are associated with human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattner Jerome B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary cilia are non-motile sensory cytoplasmic organelles that have been implicated in signal transduction, cell to cell communication, left and right pattern embryonic development, sensation of fluid flow, regulation of calcium levels, mechanosensation, growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. Defects in the formation and/or function of these structures underlie a variety of human diseases such as Alström, Bardet-Biedl, Joubert, Meckel-Gruber and oral-facial-digital type 1 syndromes. The expression and function of primary cilia in cancer cells has now become a focus of attention but has not been studied in astrocytomas/glioblastomas. To begin to address this issue, we compared the structure and expression of primary cilia in a normal human astrocyte cell line with five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines. Methods Cultured normal human astrocytes and five human astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines were examined for primary cilia expression and structure using indirect immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Monospecific antibodies were used to detect primary cilia and map the relationship between the primary cilia region and sites of endocytosis. Results We show that expression of primary cilia in normal astrocytes is cell cycle related and the primary cilium extends through the cell within a unique structure which we show to be a site of endocytosis. Importantly, we document that in each of the five astrocytoma/glioblastoma cell lines fully formed primary cilia are either expressed at a very low level, are completely absent or have aberrant forms, due to incomplete ciliogenesis. Conclusions The recent discovery of the importance of primary cilia in a variety of cell functions raises the possibility that this structure may have a role in a variety of cancers. Our finding that the formation of the primary cilium is disrupted in cells derived from astrocytoma/glioblastoma tumors provides the first

  15. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  16. Assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation system in humans: what we have learned by studying its defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in the mitochondrial inner membrane is an intricate process in which many factors must interact. The OXPHOS system is composed of four respiratory chain complexes, which are responsible for electron transport and generation of the proton gradient in the mitochondrial intermembrane space, and of the ATP synthase that uses this proton gradient to produce ATP. Mitochondrial human disorders are caused by dysfunction of the OXPHOS system, and many of them are associated with altered assembly of one or more components of the OXPHOS system. The study of assembly defects in patients has been useful in unraveling and/or gaining a complete understanding of the processes by which these large multimeric complexes are formed. We review here current knowledge of the biogenesis of OXPHOS complexes based on investigation of the corresponding disorders.

  17. Bone regeneration using rhBMP-2 induction in hemimandibulectomy type defects of elderly sub-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyne, Philip J; Salina, Sergio; Nakamura, Atsushi; Audia, Franco; Shabahang, Shahrokh

    2006-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that total osseous reconstruction of large discontinuity hemimandibulectomy, critical-sized defects can be achieved easily in 8-year-old Macaca fascicularis monkeys (Boyne 1996). However the literature has indicated that animal aging decreases the BMP induction of stem cells in rats and in other rodent species. It was necessarily important that the rhBMP-2 be demonstrated in non-human primates to determine if this reduction in effectiveness also existed in the higher animals phylogenetically. The purpose of this study was to operate aged non-human primates duplicating the model used in middle-aged animals to demonstrate regeneration of hemimandibulectomy defects. This age group could be extrapolated to the 80-year-old clinic patient. Six non-human primates aged 20 years were rendered edentulous posteriorly and the mandibles allowed to heal. Three months postoperatively bilateral hemimandibulectomies were performed. The defects received BMP in a collagen sponge (Helistat) using a dose level of 0.75 mg of rhBMP-2. After the manner previously reported by Boyne (1996, 1999), at the end of four months the surgical sites were exposed by mucoperiosteal flap demonstrating complete regeneration of the critical-sized defects. The animals received two dental implants in restored areas. The implants were brought into function approximately four months later, and were allowed to function for eight months in all cases. The results indicate that the regeneration of mandibular critical-sized defects by the use of rhBMP-2 in aged animals is comparable to that of the middle-aged group. This study indicates that aged non-human primates, chronologically comparable to 80-year-old humans, respond as favorably to rhBMP-2 as do the middle-aged animals. Extrapolating the results to the clinical level, one would expect that rhBMP-2 would produce a comparable result in the regeneration of large hemimandibulectomy-type defects in clinical human patients.

  18. A study on the possible involvement of the PAX3 gene in human neural tube defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hol, F.A.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Geurds, M.P.A. [University Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are congenital malformations of the central nervous system which are generally attributed to a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Recently, the molecular defect responsible for the phenotype of the Splotch mouse, a monogenic model system for NTD, was determined. A mutation disrupts the homeodomain of the gene for Pax3. In humans, mutations in the cognate gene for PAX3 can cause Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is associated with NTD. Based on these findings, PAX3 can be regarded as a candidate gene for human NTD. To test this hypothesis we have screened the DNA of 39 familial and 70 sporadic NTD patients for mutations in the coding exons and flanking intron sequences of the PAX3 gene. SSC analysis revealed abnormal bands in exon 2, exon 5, exon 6 and exon 7 in different patients. A missense mutation was identified in exon 6 downstream from the homeodomain in several patients resulting in an amino acid substitution (Thr315Lys) in the protein. However, the same substitution was detected in unaffected controls suggesting no biological significance. Above shifts most likely represent polymorphisms that are irrelevant for NTD. A conspicuous SSC-band shift was observed in exon 5 of one familial patient with spina bifida. Sequencing revealed that the patient was heterozygous for a 5 bp deletion upstream of the homeodomain. The deletion causes a frameshift, which leads to premature termination of translation. Mild characteristics of WS were detected in several members of the family including the index patient. DNA analysis showed co-segregation of the mutation with these symptoms. Although PAX3 mutations can increase the penetrance of NTD in families with WS, our results show that their presence is not sufficient to cause NTD.

  19. Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer, and radiation. Final report. [Analysis of enzymes in human cancer tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, W.E.

    1978-09-01

    Low grade tumors of various origins are chemically very different. High grade tumors, whatever their origin, are chemically very similar to one another and to embryonic tissues. Analyses of human tumor tissues and sera from cancer patients were conducted for two new groups of enzymes expected to be informative about the physiological state of the tissue. The enzymes measured in tumors and sera were chosen because they were characteristic of fetal tissues and high grade neoplasms in rats, and could, therefore, be expected to exist in human cancers (and fetuses) and to predominate more in those of higher grade malignancies. Results indicated that the classification of enzymes (or isozymes) as fetal or adult types in the rat could be extended to man. Human cancers do contain most of the enzymes expected, and lack others, as expected. Analyses of the same enzymes in sera gave less clear results. It was recognized at the outset that no simple proportionality existed between tissue and serum levels. The tendency existed in cancer patients to have in serum elevated amounts of those enzymes characteristic of undifferentiated tissues. The abnormalities in a specific patient are conditioned by his physiological state, by the grade of his tumor, and by the mass of tumor present. The tumor mass had a very significant effect, so that monitoring this tumor burden by chemical means should be quite possible. The latest work focused on particular enzymes that have not previously been measured in cancer patients. These studies concentrated on pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P-5-C) reductase and its inhibition and on lysosomal glucosidases and phosphatases. Both groups are relatively high in fetal and neoplastic tissues.

  20. Tri-directional anaphases as a novel chromosome segregation defect in human oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverfield, Jenna; Dean, Nicola L; Nöel, Diana; Rémillard-Labrosse, Gaudeline; Paradis, Veronique; Kadoch, Isaac-Jacques; FitzHarris, Greg

    2017-06-01

    What are the chromosome segregation errors in human oocyte meiosis-I that may underlie oocyte aneuploidy? Multiple modes of chromosome segregation error were observed, including tri-directional anaphases, which we attribute to loss of bipolar spindle structure at anaphase-I. Oocyte aneuploidy is common and associated with infertility, but mechanistic information on the chromosome segregation errors underlying these defects is scarce. Lagging chromosomes were recently reported as a possible mechanism by which segregation errors occur. Long-term confocal imaging of chromosome dynamics in 50 human oocytes collected between January 2015 and May 2016. Germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes were collected from women undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles and also CD1 mice. Oocytes were microinjected with complementary RNAs to label chromosomes, and in a subset of oocytes, the meiotic spindle. Oocytes were imaged live through meiosis-I using confocal microscopy. 3D image reconstruction was used to classify chromosome segregation phenotypes at anaphase-I. Segregation phenotypes were related to spindle dynamics and cell cycle timings. Most (87%) mouse oocytes segregated chromosomes with no obvious defects. We found that 20% of human oocytes segregated chromosomes bi-directionally with no lagging chromosomes. The rest were categorised as bi-directional anaphase with lagging chromosomes (20%), bi-directional anaphase with chromatin mass separation (34%) or tri-directional anaphase (26%). Segregation errors correlated with chromosome misalignment prior to anaphase. Spindles were tripolar when tri-directional anaphases occurred. Anaphase phenotypes did not correlate with meiosis-I duration (P = 0.73). Not applicable. Oocytes were recovered at GV stage after gonadotrophin-stimulation, and the usual oocyte quality caveats apply. Whilst the possibility that imaging may affect oocyte physiology cannot be formally excluded, detailed controls and justifications are presented

  1. Effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on expression of kynurenine pathway enzymes in human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kegel Magdalena

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kynurenine pathway (KP is the main route of tryptophan degradation in the human body and generates several neuroactive and immunomodulatory metabolites. Altered levels of KP-metabolites have been observed in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders as well as in patients with affective disorders. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if skin derived human fibroblasts are useful for studies of expression of enzymes in the KP. Methods Fibroblast cultures were established from cutaneous biopsies taken from the arm of consenting volunteers. Such cultures were subsequently treated with interferon (IFN-γ 200 U/ml and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, 100 U/ml for 48 hours in serum-free medium. Levels of transcripts encoding different enzymes were determined by real-time PCR and levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA were determined by HPLC. Results At base-line all cultures harbored detectable levels of transcripts encoding KP enzymes, albeit with considerable variation across individuals. Following cytokine treatment, considerable changes in many of the transcripts investigated were observed. For example, increases in the abundance of transcripts encoding indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase or 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid oxygenase and decreases in the levels of transcripts encoding tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynurenine aminotransferases or quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase were observed following IFN-γ and TNF-α treatment. Finally, the fibroblast cultures released detectable levels of KYNA in the cell culture medium at base-line conditions, which were increased after IFN-γ, but not TNF-α, treatments. Conclusions All of the investigated genes encoding KP enzymes were expressed in human fibroblasts. Expression of many of these appeared to be regulated in response to cytokine treatment as previously reported for other cell types. Fibroblast cultures, thus, appear to be useful for studies of disease

  2. Photobiomodulation on human annulus fibrosus cells during the intervertebral disk degeneration: extracellular matrix-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Min Ho; Kim, Kyoung Soo; Yoo, Chang Min; Shin, Jae Hee; Nam, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Jin Su; Kim, Joo Han; Lee, Kwang Ho; Choi, Hyuk

    2016-05-01

    Destruction of extracellular matrix (ECM) leads to degeneration of the intervertebral disk (IVD), which is a major contributor to many spine disorders. IVD degeneration is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), which are secreted by immune cells, including macrophages and neutrophils. The cytokines modulate ECM-modifying enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in human annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. The resulting imbalance in catabolic and anabolic enzymes can cause generalized back, neck, and low back pain (LBP). Photobiomodulation (PBM) is known to regulate inflammatory responses and wound healing. The aim of this study was to mimic the degenerative IVD microenvironment, and to investigate the effect of a variety of PBM conditions (wavelength: 635, 525, and 470 nm; energy density: 16, 32, and 64 J/cm(2)) on the production of ECM-modifying-enzymes by AF cells under degenerative conditions induced by macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM), which contains pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-β secreted by macrophage during the development of intervertebral disk inflammation. We showed that the MCM-stimulated AF cells express imbalanced ratios of TIMPs (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) and MMPs (MMP-1 and MMP-3). PBM selectively modulated the production of ECM-modifying enzymes in AF cells. These results suggest that PBM can be a therapeutic tool for degenerative IVD disorders.

  3. Reduction of azo dyes and nitroaromatic compounds by bacterial enzymes from the human intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, F.; Cerniglia, C.E. [Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria from the human intestinal tract are capable of reducing azo dyes and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the corresponding aromatic amines with enzymes that have azoreductase and nitroreductase activities. The majority of bacteria with these activities belong to the genera Clostridium and Eubacterium. The azoreductases and nitroreductases from three Clostridium strains and one Eubacterium strain were studied. Both enzymes were produced constitutively in each of the bacteria; the enzymes from various bacteria had different electrophoretic mobilities. The azoreductases from all of the bacteria had immunological homology, as was evident from the cross-reactivity of an antibody raised against the azoreductase of C perfringens with azoreductases from other bacteria. Comparison of azoreductases and nitroreductases showed that they both had identical electrophoretic mobilities on polyacrylamide gels and reacted with the antibody against the azoreductase from C. perfringens. Furthermore, the nitroaromatic compounds competitively inhibited the azoreductase activity. The data indicate that the reduction of both nitroaromatic compounds and azo dyes may be carried out by the same enzyme, which is possibly a flavin adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase that is synthesized throughout the cell and not associated with any organized subcellular structure. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Residue Phe112 of the Human-Type Corrinoid Adenosyltransferase (PduO) Enzyme of Lactobacillus reuteri Is Critical to the Formation of the Four-Coordinate Co(II) Corrinoid Substrate and to the Activity of the Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mera, Paola E.; St. Maurice, Martin; Rayment, Ivan; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; UW

    2009-06-08

    ATP:Corrinoid adenosyltransferases (ACAs) catalyze the transfer of the adenosyl moiety from ATP to cob(I)alamin via a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate. At present, it is unknown how ACAs promote the formation of the four-coordinate corrinoid species needed for activity. The published high-resolution crystal structure of the ACA from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) in complex with ATP and cob(II)alamin shows that the environment around the alpha face of the corrin ring consists of bulky hydrophobic residues. To understand how these residues promote the generation of the four-coordinate cob(II)alamin, variants of the human-type ACA enzyme from L. reuteri (LrPduO) were kinetically and structurally characterized. These studies revealed that residue Phe112 is critical in the displacement of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) from its coordination bond with the Co ion of the ring, resulting in the formation of the four-coordinate species. An F112A substitution resulted in a 80% drop in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The explanation for this loss of activity was obtained from the crystal structure of the mutant protein, which showed cob(II)alamin bound in the active site with DMB coordinated to the cobalt ion. The crystal structure of an LrPduO(F112H) variant showed a DMB-off/His-on interaction between the corrinoid and the enzyme, whose catalytic efficiency was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type protein. The analysis of the kinetic parameters of LrPduO(F112H) suggests that the F112H substitution negatively impacts product release. Substitutions of other hydrophobic residues in the Cbl binding pocket did not result in significant defects in catalytic efficiency in vitro; however, none of the variant enzymes analyzed in this work supported AdoCbl biosynthesis in vivo.

  5. Biochemical and histochemical analysis of the enzyme arylsulfatase in human lesions of endodontic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqrabawi, J; Schilder, H; Toselli, P; Franzblau, C

    1993-07-01

    Lesions of endodontic origin are areas of inflammatory response which occur as a result of untreated disease process within the root canal system. Lysosomal hydrolytic arylsulfatase A and B have been identified as major enzymes initiating and propagating bone loss by degrading chondroitin-4-sulfate. The purpose of this investigation was to examine human lesions of endodontic origin for the presence of arylsulfatase A and B. Fifteen periapical lesions were obtained at the time of periapical surgery. The lesions were analyzed for the presence of arylsulfatases using the spectrophotometer by monitoring the liberated 4-nitrocatechol at 515-nm wavelength. The same lesions were examined histochemically using the electron microscope. Five control samples from healthy periodontal ligament were evaluated in a similar manner. The results showed higher levels of arylsulfatase A in lesions than in control tissues, and marked activity of arylsulfatase B in lesions, whereas no activity of this enzyme was detected in the control specimen. Histochemically, all lesions showed positive staining for enzyme activity, whereas the controls were negative. These findings indicate that arylsulfatase A and B play a role in the pathogenesis of human lesions of endodontic origin.

  6. Calcium phosphate cement as a "barrier-graft" for the treatment of human periodontal intraosseous defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Calcium phosphate cements (CPC are apparently good candidates for periodontal treatment by virtue of their biocompatibility, mouldability and osteoconductivity. However, the clinical efficacy in this regard has not been established. This study is aimed at the evaluation of the efficacy of a formulation of CPC in healing human periodontal intraosseous defects in comparison with hydroxyapatite ceramic granules. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 60 patients with periodontal defects were divided into 2 test groups and 1 control group. The defect sites in the test groups were repaired with CPC and hydroxyapatite ceramic granules (HAG. Debridement alone was given in the control group. The progress was assessed at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months observation intervals through soft tissue parameters (probing depth, attachment level and gingival recession. Results: CPC showed significantly better outcome. Probing depth reduction values of CPC, HAG and Control at 6 months were 5.40 ± 1.43, 3.75 ± 1.71 and 2.90 ± 1.48, and those at 12 months were 6.20 ± 1.80, 4.5 ± 1.91 and 2.95 ± 1.73. Clinical attachment gain values of CPC, HAG and Control at 6 months were 5.15 ± 1.50, 3.45 ± 1.96 and 2.25 ± 1.52, and those at 12 months were 5.80 ± 2.02, 3.55 ± 2.06 and 2.30 ± 1.78, In both cases the P value was < 0.001 showing high significance. The gingival recession over 12 months, for the CPC group is lesser than that in the HAG group and the value for the control group is marginally higher than both. Soft-tissue measurements were appended by postoperative radiographs and surgical re-entry in selected cases. Conclusions: Calcium phosphate cement is found to be significantly better than hydroxyapatite ceramic granules. The material could be considered as a "barrier-graft".

  7. Mutations in the Motile Cilia Gene DNAAF1 Are Associated with Neural Tube Defects in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyue Miao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are severe malformations of the central nervous system caused by complex genetic and environmental factors. Among genes involved in NTD, cilia-related genes have been well defined and found to be essential for the completion of neural tube closure (NTC. We have carried out next-generation sequencing on target genes in 373 NTDs and 222 healthy controls, and discovered eight disease-specific rare mutations in cilia-related gene DNAAF1. DNAAF1 plays a central role in cytoplasmic preassembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes, and is expressed in some key tissues involved in neural system development, such as neural tube, floor plate, embryonic node, and brain ependyma epithelial cells in zebrafish and mouse. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and functions of mutations in DNAAF1 in transfected cells to analyze the potential correlation of these mutants to NTDs in humans. One rare frameshift mutation (p.Gln341Argfs*10 resulted in significantly diminished DNAAF1 protein expression, compared to the wild type. Another mutation, p.Lys231Gln, disrupted cytoplasmic preassembly of the dynein-arm complexes in cellular assay. Furthermore, results from NanoString assay on mRNA from NTD samples indicated that DNAAF1 mutants altered the expression level of NTC-related genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the rare mutations in DNAAF1 may contribute to the susceptibility for NTDs in humans.

  8. Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Bénédicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cécile; Arkwright, Peter D; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gérard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor-encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients' CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative) T cells--accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS--revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases.

  9. Human Neutrophils Use Different Mechanisms To Kill Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia and Hyphae: Evidence from Phagocyte Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazendam, Roel P; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; Hoogenboezem, Mark; van den Berg, J Merlijn; Prins, Jan M; Vitkov, Ljubomir; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophils are known to play a pivotal role in the host defense against Aspergillus infections. This is illustrated by the prevalence of Aspergillus infections in patients with neutropenia or phagocyte functional defects, such as chronic granulomatous disease. However, the mechanisms by which human neutrophils recognize and kill Aspergillus are poorly understood. In this work, we have studied in detail which neutrophil functions, including neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, are involved in the killing of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and hyphae, using neutrophils from patients with well-defined genetic immunodeficiencies. Recognition of conidia involves integrin CD11b/CD18 (and not dectin-1), which triggers a PI3K-dependent nonoxidative intracellular mechanism of killing. When the conidia escape from early killing and germinate, the extracellular destruction of the Aspergillus hyphae needs opsonization by Abs and involves predominantly recognition via Fcγ receptors, signaling via Syk, PI3K, and protein kinase C to trigger the production of toxic reactive oxygen metabolites by the NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase. A. fumigatus induces NET formation; however, NETs did not contribute to A. fumigatus killing. Thus, our findings reveal distinct killing mechanisms of Aspergillus conidia and hyphae by human neutrophils, leading to a comprehensive insight in the innate antifungal response.

  10. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Jeong, Hyeon-Uk; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Hye Suk

    2014-01-01

    Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl)-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1), were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 μM) increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5-50 μM) did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19) or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1) in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans.

  11. External fixation of femoral defects in athymic rats: Applications for human stem cell implantation and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terasa Foo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate animal model is critical for the research of stem/progenitor cell therapy and tissue engineering for bone regeneration in vivo. This study reports the design of an external fixator and its application to critical-sized femoral defects in athymic rats. The external fixator consists of clamps and screws that are readily available from hardware stores as well as Kirschner wires. A total of 35 rats underwent application of the external fixator with creation of a 6-mm bone defect in one femur of each animal. This model had been used in several separate studies, including implantation of collagen gel, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or bone morphogenetic protein-2. One rat developed fracture at the proximal pin site and two rats developed deep tissue infection. Pin loosening was found in nine rats, but it only led to the failure of external fixation in two animals. In 8 to 10 weeks, various degrees of bone growth in the femoral defects were observed in different study groups, from full repair of the bone defect with bone morphogenetic protein-2 implantation to fibrous nonunion with collagen gel implantation. The external fixator used in these studies provided sufficient mechanical stability to the bone defects and had a comparable complication rate in athymic rats as in immunocompetent rats. The external fixator does not interfere with the natural environment of a bone defect. This model is particularly valuable for investigation of osteogenesis of human stem/progenitor cells in vivo.

  12. Exploiting the versatility of human cytochrome P450 enzymes: the promise of blue roses from biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, E M; Guengerich, F P

    2001-12-01

    The cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes involved in drug metabolism are among the most versatile biological catalysts known. A small number of discrete forms of human P450 are capable of catalyzing the monooxygenation of a practically unlimited variety of xenobiotic substrates, with each enzyme showing a more or less wide and overlapping substrate range. This versatility makes P450s ideally suited as starting materials for engineering designer catalysts for industrial applications. In the course of heterologous expression of P450s in bacteria, we observed the unexpected formation of blue pigments. Although this was initially assumed to be an artifact, subsequent work led to the discovery of a new function of P450s in intermediary metabolism and toxicology, new screens for protein engineering, and potential applications in the dye and horticulture industries.

  13. Effects of prolonged recombinant human erythropoietin administration on muscle membrane transport systems and metabolic marker enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, C; Thomsen, J J; Rentsch, R L;

    2007-01-01

    Adaptations to chronic hypoxia involve changes in membrane transport proteins. The underlying mechanism of this response may be related to concomitant occurring changes in erythropoietin (Epo) levels. We therefore tested the direct effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) treatment...... on the expression of muscle membrane transport proteins. Likewise, improvements in performance may involve upregulation of metabolic enzymes. Since Epo is known to augment performance we tested the effect of rHuEpo on some marker enzymes that are related to aerobic capacity. For these purposes eight subjects...... received 5,000 IU rHuEpo every second day for 14 days, and subsequently a single dose of 5,000 IU weekly for 12 weeks. Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after 14 weeks of rHuEpo treatment. The treatment increased hematocrit (from 44.7 to 48.8%), maximal oxygen uptake by 8.1%, and submaximal...

  14. Studies of the cytosolic thymidine kinase in human cells and comparison to the recombinantly expressed enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock Jensen, Helle

    Thymidine kinase (TK) is a key enzyme in the salvage pathway of the nucleoside metabolism catalyzing the first phosphorylation step in TTP synthesis. Human cytosolic TK (TKl) is highly cell cycle regulated. TKl is regulated on many different levels of expression and isoforms with altered enzymatic...... properties are found in cancer cells. Investigation of these factors offers possibilities to understand the molecular background for TKl expression including to clarify general regulation patterns. It also gives valuable information for constructing new nucleoside analogs for the therapy of cancer and virus...... infections. In the first part of the present investigation a sensitive test for quantitating TKl mRNA (competitive PCR) is developed and the results show that PHA stimulated lymphocytes reveal the same pattern concerning expression of TKl mRNA and TKl enzyme activity as serum-stimulated cells. This pattern...

  15. Screening and Characterization of Spontaneous Porcine Congenital Heart Defects for Gene Identification and Models of Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Rodent models of human congenital birth defects have been instrumental for gene discovery and investigation of mechanisms of disease. However, these models are limited by their small size making practiced intervention or detailed anatomic evaluation difficult. Swine have similar anato...

  16. Updated survey of the steroid-converting enzymes in human adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernof, André; Mansour, Mohamed Fouad; Pelletier, Mélissa; Boulet, Marie-Michèle; Nadeau, Mélanie; Luu-The, Van

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, adipose tissues have been increasingly known for their endocrine properties, that is, their ability to secrete a number of adipocytokines that may exert local and/or systemic effects. In addition, adipose tissues have long been recognized as significant sites for steroid hormone transformation and action. We hereby provide an updated survey of the many steroid-converting enzymes that may be detected in human adipose tissues, their activities and potential roles. In addition to the now well-established role of aromatase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) type 1, many enzymes have been reported in adipocyte cell lines, isolated mature cells and/or preadipocytes. These include 11β-HSD type 2, 17β-HSDs, 3β-HSD, 5α-reductases, sulfatases and glucuronosyltransferases. Some of these enzymes are postulated to bear relevance for adipose tissue physiology and perhaps for the pathophysiology of obesity. This elaborate set of steroid-converting enzymes in the cell types of adipose tissue deserves further scientific attention. Our work on 20α-HSD (AKR1C1), 3α-HSD type 3 (AKR1C2) and 17β-HSD type 5 (AKR1C3) allowed us to clarify the relevance of these enzymes for some aspects of adipose tissue function. For example, down-regulation of AKR1C2 expression in preadipocytes seems to potentiate the inhibitory action of dihydrotestosterone on adipogenesis in this model. Many additional studies are warranted to assess the impact of intra-adipose steroid hormone conversions on adipose tissue functions and chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes and cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Lindhardt, B O; Lauritzen, E;

    1989-01-01

    A total of 228 stored serum samples from 140 high risk individuals was examined for serological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, and HIV antigen assay. All the samples were negative in first generation enzyme...

  18. Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes of Importance for the Bioactivation of Methyleugenol to the Proximate Carcinogen 1'-Hydroxymethyleugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Boersma, M.G.; Horst, ter J.P.F.; Awad, H.M.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, van T.A.; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to elucidate the human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of methyleugenol to its proximate carcinogen 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol. Incubations with Supersomes, expressing individual P450 enzymes to a high level, revealed that P450 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19,

  19. Human cytochrome P450 enzymes of importance for the bioactivation of methyleugenol to the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Boersma, M.G.; Horst, J.P.F. ter; Awad, H.M.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, T.A. van; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    In vitro studies were performed to elucidate the human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the bioactivation of methyleugenol to its proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Incubations with Supersomes, expressing individual P450 enzymes to a high level, revealed that P450 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19,

  20. Development of a sensitive enzyme immunoassay for human epidermal growth factor (urogastrone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurobe, M; Tokida, N; Furukawa, S; Ishikawa, E; Hayashi, K

    1986-04-15

    A sensitive two-site enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) was developed, based on the sandwiching of an antigen between anti-hEGF IgG-coated polystyrene beads and anti-hEGF Fab'-linked peroxidase complex (horseradish peroxidase, EC. 1.11.1.7). This method has four advantages: the anti-hEGF Fab'-linked peroxidase complex is more stable than 125I-labelled antibody; the procedure is simple and rapid compared to bioassay; its discriminatory sensitivity is as low as 0.1 pg/assay tube; and serial dilution curves of unextracted human serum and urine samples all paralleled that of standard hEGF. The validity of the measurement of hEGF-like immunoreactivity in human serum and plasma is discussed.

  1. Possible identity of IL-8 converting enzyme in human fibroblasts as a cysteine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kensaku; Sano, Emiko; Nakaki, Toshio; Naruto, Masanobu

    2003-04-01

    A converting activity was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts, which secrete 72IL-8 and 77IL-8 in treatment with IFN-beta and poly I: poly C. 77IL-8 was significantly converted to 72IL-8 by a partially purified fraction of the culture supernatant of human diploid fibroblasts. The converting activity, which was temperature-dependent and optimal at pH 6, was completely inhibited by cysteine protease inhibitors, antipain dihydrochloride and E-64, but not by other types of protease inhibitors. These data clearly show that human diploid fibroblasts are capable of processing IL-8 to produce a mature IL-8 and that the putative converting enzyme appears to be a cysteine protease.

  2. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Darewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes. Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50% of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  3. Diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis based on the detection of anti-parasite-enzyme antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowy, N K; Schell, D; Schäfer, C; Overath, P

    1991-08-01

    A sensitive diagnostic assay for parasitic infections based on the detection of anti-enzyme antibodies is presented. All serum antibodies produced in response to parasite antigens are immobilized via their Fc domain on matrix-bound protein G. Incubation of the immobilized antibodies with saturating amounts of parasite extract results in the binding of all recognized antigens, including those directed against a specific and readily measurable enzyme. The amount of bound enzyme is proportional to the anti-enzyme antibody concentration in the serum. The application of this principle is demonstrated for the diagnosis of both human African trypanosomiasis and visceral leishmaniasis by the detection of antibodies against parasite acid phosphatases.

  4. Proteins, peptides, polysaccharides, and nucleotides with inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus and its enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Chan, Wai Yee

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, has claimed innumerable lives in the past. Many biomolecules which suppress HIV replication and also other biomolecules that inhibit enzymes essential to HIV replication have been reported. Proteins including a variety of milk proteins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, ribonucleases, antifungal proteins, and trypsin inhibitors; peptides comprising cathelicidins, defensins, synthetic peptides, and others; polysaccharides and polysaccharopeptides; nucleosides, nucleotides, and ribozymes, demonstrated anti-HIV activity. In many cases, the mechanism of anti-HIV action has been elucidated. Strategies have been devised to augment the anti-HIV potency of these compounds.

  5. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Çakir; Onur Dağliyan; Ezgi Dağyildiz; İbrahim Bariş; Ibrahim Halil Kavakli; Seda Kizilel; Metin Türkay

    2012-01-01

    Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme Bilal C¸ akir1, Onur Dag˘ liyan1, Ezgi Dag˘ yildiz1, I˙brahim Baris¸1, Ibrahim Halil Kavakli1,2*, Seda Kizilel1*, Metin Tu¨ rkay3* 1 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 3 Department of Industrial Engineering, Koc¸ University...

  6. Hepatic glucuronidation of resveratrol: interspecies comparison of enzyme kinetic profiles in human, mouse, rat, and dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Thalhammer, Theresia; Szekeres, Thomas; Jaeger, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme kinetic profiles of the formation of resveratrol-3-O-glucuronide (R3G) and resveratrol-4'-O-glucuronide (R4'G) by liver microsomes from humans, dogs, and rodents were investigated. Glucuronidation by human and dog liver microsomes to R3G and R4'G occurred for about 65% of applied resveratrol, and was significantly reduced to 10% when substrate concentration was increased 10-fold. In contrast, rodent microsomes glucuronidated about 90% of applied resveratrol independently of substrate concentration. Furthermore, in mouse and rat liver microsomes, resveratrol was almost exclusively conjugated at position 3, whereas human and dog livers also glucuronidated resveratrol at position 4' (ratio R3G:R4'G = 5:1). Interspecies differences were also found when calculating the enzyme kinetic profiles of both conjugates. Formation of R4'G in human and dog microsomes followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, while R3G showed substrate inhibition at higher resveratrol concentrations. In mouse and rat microsomes, however, both R3G and R4'G formation exhibited auto-activation kinetics. Formation of R3G and R4'G by recombinant UGT1A1 also showed substrate inhibition kinetics that led to decreased intrinsic clearance values, while UGT1A9-catalyzed glucuronidation demonstrated substrate inhibition kinetics at position 3 and Hill kinetics for the formation of R4'G. In conclusion, resveratrol glucuronidation exhibited species-dependent differences, with the dog as the animal model that most closely represents humans in terms of this process.

  7. Gelam Honey Protects against Gamma-Irradiation Damage to Antioxidant Enzymes in Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Makpol

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to determine the radioprotective effects of Malaysian Gelam honey on gene expression and enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GPx of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs subjected to gamma-irradiation. Six groups of HDFs were studied: untreated control, irradiated HDFs, Gelam honey-treated HDFs and HDF treated with Gelam honey pre-, during- and post-irradiation. HDFs were treated with 6 mg/mL of sterilized Gelam honey (w/v for 24 h and exposed to 1 Gray (Gy of gamma rays at the dose rate of 0.25 Gy/min. Gamma-irradiation was shown to down-regulate SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPx1 gene expressions (p < 0.05. Conversely, HDFs treated with Gelam honey alone showed up-regulation of all genes studied. Similarly, SOD, CAT and GPx enzyme activities in HDFs decreased with gamma-irradiation and increased when cells were treated with Gelam honey (p < 0.05. Furthermore, of the three different stages of study treatment, pre-treatment with Gelam honey caused up-regulation of SOD1, SOD2 and CAT genes expression and increased the activity of SOD and CAT. As a conclusion, Gelam honey modulates the expression of antioxidant enzymes at gene and protein levels in irradiated HDFs indicating its potential as a radioprotectant agent.

  8. Activation of recombinant human neutrophil procollagenase in the presence of doxycycline results in fragmentation of the enzyme and loss of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G N; Brandt, K D; Hasty, K A

    1996-02-01

    To determine if reduction of collagenase activity in vitro by doxycycline (doxy) is related to activation of the proenzyme, and to determine how exogenous Ca++ and Zn++ affect the reduction. Recombinant human neutrophil procollagenase was activated with trypsin or APMA. Activity was assayed on a small peptolide substrate or on 14C-acetylated collagen fibers. The molecular weight of the proenzyme, active enzyme, and enzyme fragments was determined by Western blotting, using a polyclonal antiserum raised against the recombinant proenzyme. Similar experiments were performed in the presence of EDTA, EGTA, 1,10-phenanthroline, or doxy. The effects of exogenous Ca++ and Zn++ were also tested. Doxy inhibited activity of the enzyme against both substrates. If the drug was present during activation, the yield of activity was lower than when it was added after activation of the proenzyme. Western blotting showed that activation in the presence of doxy resulted in the appearance of lower molecular weight fragments and accumulation of less active enzyme. APMA generated prominent 28- and 26-kd fragments while trypsin cleavage yield 40- and 30-kd fragments. Fragmentation of the enzyme also occurred in the presence of EDTA or EGTA, but not 1,10-phenanthroline. It was prevented by Ca++ concentrations greater than 50 mM, but was not altered by addition of Zn++ in concentrations as high as 500 microM. Inhibition of collagenase activity by doxy could be overcome by 100 mM Ca++, but addition of Zn++ had no effect. These data suggest that doxy alters the conformation of procollagenase or collagenase by binding enzyme-associated Ca++, rendering the proteins more susceptible to proteolysis and resulting in irreversible loss of enzyme protein.

  9. Correction of defective protein kinesis of human P-glycoprotein mutants by substrates and modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, T W; Clarke, D M

    1997-01-10

    There is growing evidence that abnormal protein folding or trafficking (protein kinesis) leads to diseases. We have used P-glycoprotein as a model protein to develop strategies to overcome defects in protein kinesis. Misprocessed mutants of the human P-glycoprotein are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as core-glycosylated biosynthetic intermediates and rapidly degraded. Synthesis of the mutant proteins in the presence of drug substrates or modulators such as capsaicin, cyclosporin, vinblastine, or verapamil, however, resulted in the appearance of a fully glycosylated and functional protein at the cell surface. These effects were dose-dependent and occurred within a few hours after the addition of substrate. The ability to facilitate processing of the misfolded mutants appeared to be independent of the cell lines used and location of the mutation. P-glycoproteins with mutations in transmembrane segments, extracellular or cytoplasmic loops, the nucleotide-binding domains, or the linker region were processed to the fully mature form in the presence of these substrates. These drug substrates or modulators acted as specific chemical chaperones for P-glycoprotein because they were ineffective on the deltaF508 mutant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Therefore, one possible strategy to prevent protein misfolding is to carry out synthesis in the presence of specific substrates or modulators of the protein.

  10. Distinct biochemical properties of human serine hydroxymethyltransferase compared with the Plasmodium enzyme: implications for selective inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Chatchadaporn; Maenpuen, Somchart; Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2014-06-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the transfer of a hydroxymethyl group from l-serine to tetrahydrofolate to yield glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. Our previous investigations have shown that SHMTs from Plasmodium spp. (P. falciparum, Pf; P. vivax, Pv) are different from the enzyme from rabbit liver in that Plasmodium SHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. In this report, the biochemical and biophysical properties of the Plasmodium and the human cytosolic form (hcSHMT) enzymes including ligand binding and kinetics were investigated. The data indicate that, similar to Plasmodium enzymes, hcSHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. However, hcSHMT displays many properties that are different from those of the Plasmodium enzymes. The molar absorption coefficient of hcSHMT-bound pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) is much greater than PvSHMT-bound or PfSHMT-bound PLP. The binding interactions of hcSHMT and Plasmodium SHMT with d-serine are different, as only the Plasmodium enzyme undergoes formation of a quinonoid-like species upon binding to d-serine. Furthermore, it has been noted that hcSHMT displays strong substrate inhibition by tetrahydrofolate (THF) (at THF > 40 μm), compared with SHMTs from Plasmodium and other species. The pH-activity profile of hcSHMT shows higher activities at lower pH values corresponding to a pKa value of 7.8 ± 0.1. Thiosemicarbazide reacts with hcSHMT following a one-step model [k1 of 12 ± 0.6 m(-1) ·s(-1) and k-1 of (1.0 ± 0.6) × 10(-3) s(-1) ], while the same reaction with PfSHMT involves at least three steps. All data indicated that the ligand binding environment of SHMT from human and Plasmodium are different, indicating that it should be possible to develop species-selective inhibitors in future studies. serine hydroxymethyltransferase, EC 2.1.2.1; 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, EC 1.5.1.5. © 2014 FEBS.

  11. Ex vivo effects of ibogaine on the activity of antioxidative enzymes in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Oreščanin-Dušić, Zorana; Spasojević, Ivan; Slavić, Marija; Mijušković, Ana; Paškulin, Roman; Miljević, Čedo; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-04-22

    Ibogaine is a naturally occurring alkaloid with psychotropic and metabotropic effects, derived from the bark of the root of the West African Tabernanthe iboga plant. The tribes of Kongo basin have been using iboga as a stimulant, for medicinal purposes, and in rite of passage ceremonies, for centuries. Besides, it has been found that this drug has anti-addictive effects. Previous studies have demonstrated that ibogaine changed the quantity of ATP and energy related enzymes as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes in cells thus altering redox equilibrium in a time manner. In this work, the mechanism of its action was further studied by measuring the effects of ibogaine in human erythrocytes in vitro on ATP liberation, membrane fluidity and antioxidant enzymes activity. Heparinized human blood samples were incubated with ibogaine (10 and 20 μM) at 37°C for 1h. Blood plasma was separated by centrifugation and the levels of ATP and uric acid were measured 10 min after the addition of ibogaine using standard kits. The activity of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GR) were measured in erythrocytes after incubation period. The stability of SOD1 activity was further tested through in vitro incubation with H2O2 and scanning of its electrophoretic profiles. Membrane fluidity was determined using an electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labelling method. Results showed that ibogaine treatment of erythrocytes in vitro increased ATP concentration in the blood plasma without changes in neither erythrocytes membrane fluidity nor uric acid concentration. Ibogaine also increased SOD1 activity in erythrocytes at both doses applied here. Treatment with 20 μM also elevated GR activity after in vitro incubation at 37°C. Electrophoretic profiles revealed that incubation with ibogaine mitigates H2O2 mediated suppression of SOD1 activity. Some of the effects of ibogaine seem to be mediated through

  12. Structural Basis for Flip-Flop Action of Thiamin-Dependent Enzymes Revealed by Crystal Structure of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov G.; Dominiak, Paulina M.; Sidhu, Sukdeep; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2003-01-01

    The biologically active derivative of vitamin B1; thiamin pyrophosphate; is used as cofactor by many enzymes that perform a wide range of catalytic functions in the pathways of energy production. In alpha2beta2-heterotetrameric human pyruvate dehydrogenase, the first catalytic component enzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, this cofactor is used to cleave the C(sup alpha)-C(=0) bond of pyruvate followed by reductive acetyl transfer to lipoyl-dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, the second catalytic component of the complex. The dynamic nonequivalence of two, otherwise chemically equivalent, catalytic sites have puzzled researchers from earlier functional studies of this enzyme. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of action of this enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the holoform of human pyruvate dehydrogenase at 1.958, resolution. We propose a kinetic model for the flip-flop action of this enzyme through the concerted approx. 2A, shuttle-like motion of the heterodimers. The similarity of thiamin pyrophosphate binding in human pyruvate dehydrogenase and other functionally related enzymes suggests this newly defined mechanism of shuttle-like motion of domains to be common for the family of thiamin pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes.

  13. Biophysical characterization of the dimer and tetramer interface interactions of the human cytosolic malic enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujithkumar Murugan

    Full Text Available The cytosolic NADP(+-dependent malic enzyme (c-NADP-ME has a dimer-dimer quaternary structure in which the dimer interface associates more tightly than the tetramer interface. In this study, the urea-induced unfolding process of the c-NADP-ME interface mutants was monitored using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation and enzyme activities. Here, we demonstrate the differential protein stability between dimer and tetramer interface interactions of human c-NADP-ME. Our data clearly demonstrate that the protein stability of c-NADP-ME is affected predominantly by disruptions at the dimer interface rather than at the tetramer interface. First, during thermal stability experiments, the melting temperatures of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are 8-10°C higher than those of the dimer interface mutants. Second, during urea denaturation experiments, the thermodynamic parameters of the wild-type and tetramer interface mutants are almost identical. However, for the dimer interface mutants, the first transition of the urea unfolding curves shift towards a lower urea concentration, and the unfolding intermediate exist at a lower urea concentration. Third, for tetrameric WT c-NADP-ME, the enzyme is first dissociated from a tetramer to dimers before the 2 M urea treatment, and the dimers then dissociated into monomers before the 2.5 M urea treatment. With a dimeric tetramer interface mutant (H142A/D568A, the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 2.5 M urea treatment, while for a dimeric dimer interface mutant (H51A/D90A, the dimer completely dissociated into monomers after a 1.5 M urea treatment, indicating that the interactions of c-NADP-ME at the dimer interface are truly stronger than at the tetramer interface. Thus, this study provides a reasonable explanation for why malic enzymes need to assemble as a dimer of dimers.

  14. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho YY

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Yeon Cho,1 Hyeon-Uk Jeong,1 Jeong-Han Kim,2 Hye Suk Lee1 1College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Korea; 2Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT, and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1, were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 µM increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 µM did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1 in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. Keywords: honokiol, human hepatocytes, drug interactions, cytochrome P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases

  15. Temporal and spatial distribution of mast cells and steroidogenic enzymes in the human fetal adrenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccache, Alexandre; Louiset, Estelle; Duparc, Céline; Laquerrière, Annie; Patrier, Sophie; Renouf, Sylvie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Mukai, Kuniaki; Lefebvre, Hervé; Castanet, Mireille

    2016-10-15

    Mast cells are present in the human adult adrenal with a potential role in the regulation of aldosterone secretion in both normal cortex and adrenocortical adenomas. We have investigated the human developing adrenal gland for the presence of mast cells in parallel with steroidogenic enzymes profile and serotonin signaling pathway. RT-QPCR and immunohistochemical studies were performed on adrenals at 16-41 weeks of gestation (WG). Tryptase-immunopositive mast cells were found from 18 WG in the adrenal subcapsular layer, close to 3βHSD- and CYP11B2-immunoreactive cells, firstly detected at 18 and 24 WG, respectively. Tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin receptor type 4 expression increased at 30 WG before the CYP11B2 expression surge. In addition, HDL and LDL cholesterol receptors were expressed in the subcapsular zone from 24 WG. Altogether, our findings suggest the implication of mast cells and serotonin in the establishment of the mineralocorticoid synthesizing pathway during fetal adrenal development.

  16. The lipooligosaccharide-modifying enzyme LptA enhances gonococcal defence against human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handing, Jonathan W; Criss, Alison K

    2015-06-01

    Infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) is marked by an influx of neutrophils to the site of infection. Despite a robust immune response, viable Gc can be recovered from neutrophil-rich gonorrhoeal secretions. Gc enzymatically modifies the lipid A portion of lipooligosaccharide by the addition of phosphoethanolamine to the phosphate group at the 4' position. Loss of lipooligosaccharide phosphoethanolamine transferase A (LptA), the enzyme catalysing this reaction, increases bacterial sensitivity to killing by human complement and cationic antimicrobial peptides. Here, we investigated the importance of LptA for interactions between Gc and human neutrophils. We found that lptA mutant Gc was significantly more sensitive to killing by human neutrophils. Three mechanisms underlie the increased sensitivity of lptA mutant Gc to neutrophils. (i) lptA mutant Gc is more likely to reside in mature phagolysosomes than LptA-expressing bacteria. (ii) lptA mutant Gc is more sensitive to killing by components found in neutrophil granules, including CAP37/azurocidin, human neutrophil peptide 1 and the serine protease cathepsin G. (iii) lptA mutant Gc is more susceptible to killing by antimicrobial components that are exocytosed from neutrophils, including those decorating neutrophil extracellular traps. By increasing the resistance of Gc to the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, LptA-catalysed modification of lipooligosaccharide enhances survival of Gc from the human inflammatory response during acute gonorrhoea.

  17. An evaluation of a resorbable (semirigid GTR membrane in human periodontal intraosseous defects: A clinicoradiological re-entry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Gowda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a resorbable, semi rigid guided tissue regeneration (GTR membrane in the treatment of periodontal intraosseous defects. Settings and Design: Randomized controlled clinicoradiological re-entry study. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with bilateral, identical intraosseous defects were selected. The sides for test and control group were randomly allocated to treat either with bioresorbable semi rigid membrane (test group or open flap debridement (control group. Radiographic analysis was done by comparing intraoral peri apical radiographs taken at baseline and at six months. Extended cone paralleling device with grid was used to standardize radiographs. Auto CAD software was used for the analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: Paired-t test. Results: On surgical reentry at six months, the mean reduction in depth of the defect at the test site was 2.63 mm. The mean gain in Relative attachment level was 1.75 mm. The control sites showed a statistically insignificant gain. The mean percentage defect fill assessed on radiographs using auto CAD software was 15.54%. Conclusion: The resorbable, semi-rigid GTR membrane can be effectively used for the treatment of human one-walled angular defects.

  18. Characterization of human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of cyamemazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, Christophe; Benyamina, Amine; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Baylé, Franck; Bromet, Norbert; Massiere, Frédéric; Garay, Ricardo P; Hameg, Ahcène

    2007-12-01

    Recombinant human liver microsomal enzymes of the cytochrome P450 family (CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP3A4, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1) were used to determine the metabolic fate of the antipsychotic anxiolytic agent cyamemazine. An LC/MS-MS tandem methodology was developed specifically for identifying the presence of cyamemazine and its metabolites in reaction media. All P450 enzymes investigated, with the exception of CYP2A6 and CYP2E1, degraded cyamemazine, albeit to a different extent, with CYP1A2, CYP2C8 and CYP2C19 being the most efficient (>80%). However, in microsomes prepared from native human hepatocytes, only relatively specific competitors (inhibitors and/or substrates) of CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 reduced notably the degradation cyamemazine. The main routes of cyamemazine biotransformation are N-mono-demethylation (CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and CYP2C8) and mono-oxidation (either S-oxidized or hydroxylated derivatives which could not be discriminated because characterized by the same mass value) by CYP1A2 and CYP2C9. Secondary metabolic routes yields N,N-di-demethylated and N-demethylated mono-oxidized products. Thus, under in vitro conditions, cyamemazine is extensively degraded by at least four distinct P450 enzymes, into two primary hydrophilic metabolites. These results suggest that cyamemazine detoxification process is unlikely to be significantly impaired by co-administration of therapeutic agents that are substrates of the CYP metabolic system.

  19. Human salivary alpha-amylase Trp58 situated at subsite -2 is critical for enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubbu, Narayanan; Ragunath, Chandran; Mishra, Prasunkumar J; Thomas, Leonard M; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Kandra, Lili

    2004-06-01

    The nonreducing end of the substrate-binding site of human salivary alpha-amylase contains two residues Trp58 and Trp59, which belong to beta2-alpha2 loop of the catalytic (beta/alpha)(8) barrel. While Trp59 stacks onto the substrate, the exact role of Trp58 is unknown. To investigate its role in enzyme activity the residue Trp58 was mutated to Ala, Leu or Tyr. Kinetic analysis of the wild-type and mutant enzymes was carried out with starch and oligosaccharides as substrates. All three mutants exhibited a reduction in specific activity (150-180-fold lower than the wild type) with starch as substrate. With oligosaccharides as substrates, a reduction in k(cat), an increase in K(m) and distinct differences in the cleavage pattern were observed for the mutants W58A and W58L compared with the wild type. Glucose was the smallest product generated by these two mutants in the hydrolysis oligosaccharides; in contrast, wild-type enzyme generated maltose as the smallest product. The production of glucose by W58L was confirmed from both reducing and nonreducing ends of CNP-labeled oligosaccharide substrates. The mutant W58L exhibited lower binding affinity at subsites -2, -3 and +2 and showed an increase in transglycosylation activity compared with the wild type. The lowered affinity at subsites -2 and -3 due to the mutation was also inferred from the electron density at these subsites in the structure of W58A in complex with acarbose-derived pseudooligosaccharide. Collectively, these results suggest that the residue Trp58 plays a critical role in substrate binding and hydrolytic activity of human salivary alpha-amylase.

  20. Enzyme kinetics of the human norovirus protease control virus polyprotein processing order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jared; Korba, Brent; Medvedev, Alexei; Viswanathan, Prasanth

    2013-09-01

    The human norovirus (NoV) polyprotein is cleaved into mature non-structural proteins by both mature NoV protease (Pro, NS6) and its un-cleaved precursor (ProPol, NS6-7). Processing order is well-established with 'early' and 'late' cleavages, but the governing enzymatic mechanisms are unknown. Enzyme kinetics of a GII Pro and ProPol were analyzed using synthetic peptides representing the five natural polyprotein cleavage sites. The relative efficiency of cleavage of the individual peptides was consistent with established polyprotein processing order, and primarily correlated with enzyme turnover (kcat). Enzymatic efficiencies (kcat/Km) of ProPol at all five sites were equivalent to, or greater than, that of Pro. Binding affinities (Km) for the two least efficiently cleaved sites (p20/VPg, VPg/Pro) were 2-4-fold higher than the other sites. This work further defines the role of ProPol in NoV polyprotein cleavage, and demonstrates that human norovirus polyprotein processing order is primarily an inherent property of enzymatic activity. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme: an indicator of bleomycin-induced pulmonary toxicity in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter G; Rømer, F K; Cortes, Dina

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical or radiolog......In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical...... or radiological evidence of pulmonary damage. While the static and dynamic lung function parameters were unchanged, carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) during a total of 126 days of pulsed regimen, indicating damage to the alveolar-endothelial membrane. S-ACE...... was unchanged within each treatment course but increased significantly (P less than 0.05) from the initial value to the last treatment course. Two months after cessation of treatment S-ACE returned to pretreatment values. Although the changes were modest they might mirror treatment-associated endothelial damage....

  2. Engineered human tmpk/AZT as a novel enzyme/prodrug axis for suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeya; Neschadim, Anton; Konrad, Manfred; Fowler, Daniel H; Lavie, Arnon; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2007-05-01

    Gene therapy and stem cell transplantation safety could be enhanced by control over the fate of therapeutic cells. Suicide gene therapy uses enzymes that convert prodrugs to cytotoxic entities; however, heterologous moieties with poor kinetics are employed. We describe a novel enzyme/prodrug combination for selectively inducing apoptosis in lentiviral vector-transduced cells. Rationally designed variants of human thymidylate kinase (tmpk) that effectively phosphorylate 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) were efficiently delivered. Transduced Jurkat cell lines were eliminated by AZT. We demonstrate that this schema targeted both dividing and non-dividing cells, with a novel killing mechanism involving apoptosis induction via disruption of the mitochondrial inner membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. Primary murine and human T cells were also transduced and responded to AZT. Furthermore, low-dose AZT administration to non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice injected with transduced K562 cells suppressed tumor growth. This novel suicide gene therapy approach can thus be integrated as a safety switch into therapeutic vectors.

  3. Inhibition of human P450 enzymes by natural extracts used in traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeiro, Idania; Donato, María T; Jimenez, Nuria; Garrido, Gabino; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Menendez, Roberto; Castell, José V; Gómez-Lechón, María J

    2009-02-01

    Different medicinal plants are widely used in Cuba and Mexico to treat several disorders. This paper reports in vitro inhibitory effects on the P450 system of herbal products commonly used by people in Cuba and Mexico in traditional medicine for decades. Experiments were conducted in human liver microsomes. The catalytic activities of CYP1A1/2, 2D6, and 3A4 were measured using specific probe substrates. The Heliopsis longipes extract exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition of the three enzymes, and similar effects were produced by affinin (an alkamide isolated from the H. longipes extract) and two catalytically reduced alkamides. Mangifera indica L. and Thalassia testudinum extracts, two natural polyphenol-rich extracts, diminished CYP1A1/2 and 3A4 activities, but not the CYP2D6 activity. These results suggest that these herbs inhibit the major human P450 enzymes involved in drug metabolism and could induce potential herbal-drug interactions.

  4. Low levels of human HIP14 are sufficient to rescue neuropathological, behavioural, and enzymatic defects due to loss of murine HIP14 in Hip14-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona B Young

    Full Text Available Huntingtin Interacting Protein 14 (HIP14 is a palmitoyl acyl transferase (PAT that was first identified due to altered interaction with mutant huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington Disease (HD. HIP14 palmitoylates a specific set of neuronal substrates critical at the synapse, and downregulation of HIP14 by siRNA in vitro results in increased cell death in neurons. We previously reported that mice lacking murine Hip14 (Hip14-/- share features of HD. In the current study, we have generated human HIP14 BAC transgenic mice and crossed them to the Hip14-/- model in order to confirm that the defects seen in Hip14-/- mice are in fact due to loss of Hip14. In addition, we sought to determine whether human HIP14 can provide functional compensation for loss of murine Hip14. We demonstrate that despite a relative low level of expression, as assessed via Western blot, BAC-derived human HIP14 compensates for deficits in neuropathology, behavior, and PAT enzyme function seen in the Hip14-/- model. Our findings yield important insights into HIP14 function in vivo.

  5. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 enzymes by the natural hepatotoxin safrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueng, Yune-Fang; Hsieh, Chih-Hang; Don, Ming-Jaw

    2005-05-01

    The hepatotoxin, safrole is a methylenedioxy phenyl compound, found in sassafras oil and certain other essential oils. Recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP, P450) and human liver microsomes were studied to investigate the selective inhibitory effects of safrole on human P450 enzymes and the mechanisms of action. Using Escherichia coli-expressed human P450, our results demonstrated that safrole was a non-selective inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4 in the IC(50) order CYP2E1 Safrole strongly inhibited CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP2E1 activities with IC(50) values less than 20 microM. Safrole caused competitive, non-competitive, and non-competitive inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2A6 and CYP2E1 activities, respectively. The inhibitor constants were in the order CYP1A2 safrole strongly inhibited 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation, coumarin hydroxylation, and chlorzoxazone hydroxylation activities. These results revealed that safrole was a potent inhibitor of human CYP1A2, CYP2A6, and CYP2E1. With relatively less potency, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 were also inhibited.

  6. Analysis of the human E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme protein interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markson, Gabriel; Kiel, Christina; Hyde, Russell; Brown, Stephanie; Charalabous, Panagoula; Bremm, Anja; Semple, Jennifer; Woodsmith, Jonathan; Duley, Simon; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Vidal, Marc; Komander, David; Serrano, Luis; Lehner, Paul; Sanderson, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells the stability and function of many proteins are regulated by the addition of ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like peptides. This process is dependent upon the sequential action of an E1-activating enzyme, an E2-conjugating enzyme, and an E3 ligase. Different combinations of these proteins confer substrate specificity and the form of protein modification. However, combinatorial preferences within ubiquitination networks remain unclear. In this study, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens were combined with true homology modeling methods to generate a high-density map of human E2/E3-RING interactions. These data include 535 experimentally defined novel E2/E3-RING interactions and >1300 E2/E3-RING pairs with more favorable predicted free-energy values than the canonical UBE2L3–CBL complex. The significance of Y2H predictions was assessed by both mutagenesis and functional assays. Significantly, 74/80 (>92%) of Y2H predicted complexes were disrupted by point mutations that inhibit verified E2/E3-RING interactions, and a ∼93% correlation was observed between Y2H data and the functional activity of E2/E3-RING complexes in vitro. Analysis of the high-density human E2/E3-RING network reveals complex combinatorial interactions and a strong potential for functional redundancy, especially within E2 families that have undergone evolutionary expansion. Finally, a one-step extended human E2/E3-RING network, containing 2644 proteins and 5087 edges, was assembled to provide a resource for future functional investigations. PMID:19549727

  7. Comparison of metabolism of sesamin and episesamin by drug-metabolizing enzymes in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kaori; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Wakayama, Shuto; Itoh, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kamakura, Masaki; Munetsuna, Eiji; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2012-10-01

    Sesamin and episesamin are two epimeric lignans that are found in refined sesame oil. Commercially available sesamin supplements contain both sesamin and episesamin at an approximate 1:1 ratio. Our previous study clarified the sequential metabolism of sesamin by cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase in human liver. In addition, we revealed that sesamin caused a mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) of CYP2C9, the P450 enzyme responsible for sesamin monocatecholization. In the present study, we compared the metabolism and the MBI of episesamin with those of sesamin. Episesamin was first metabolized to the two epimers of monocatechol, S- and R-monocatechols in human liver microsomes. The P450 enzymes responsible for S- and R-monocatechol formation were CYP2C9 and CYP1A2, respectively. The contribution of CYP2C9 was much larger than that of CYP1A2 in sesamin metabolism, whereas the contribution of CYP2C9 was almost equal to that of CYP1A2 in episesamin metabolism. Docking of episesamin to the active site of CYP1A2 explained the stereoselectivity in CYP1A2-dependent episesamin monocatecholization. Similar to sesamin, the episesamin S- and R-monocatechols were further metabolized to dicatechol, glucuronide, and methylate metabolites in human liver; however, the contribution of each reaction was significantly different between sesamin and episesamin. The liver microsomes from CYP2C19 ultra-rapid metabolizers showed a significant amount of episesamin dicatechol. In this study, we have revealed significantly different metabolism by P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and catechol-O-methyltransferase for sesamin and episesamin, resulting in different biological effects.

  8. Effect of insulin and glucose on adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes.

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    Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    In diabetes several aspects of immunity are altered, including the immunomodulatory action of adenosine. Our study was undertaken to investigate the effect of different glucose and insulin concentrations on activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes line SKW 6.4. The activity of adenosine deaminase in the cytosolic fraction was very low and was not affected by different glucose concentration, but in the membrane fraction of cells cultured with 25 mM glucose it was decreased by about 35% comparing to the activity in cells maintained in 5 mM glucose, irrespective of insulin concentration. The activities of 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT) and ecto-5'-NT in SKW 6.4 cells depended on insulin concentration, but not on glucose. Cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin displayed an about 60% lower activity of cytosolic 5'-NT comparing to cells maintained at 10(-11) M insulin. The activity of ecto-5'-NT was decreased by about 70% in cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin comparing to cells grown in 10(-11) M insulin. Neither insulin nor glucose had an effect on adenosine kinase (AK) activity in SKW 6.4 cells or in human B cells isolated from peripheral blood. The extracellular level of adenosine and inosine during accelerated catabolism of cellular ATP depended on glucose, but not on insulin concentration. Concluding, our study demonstrates that glucose and insulin differentially affect the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes, but changes in those activities do not correlate with the adenosine level in cell media during accelerated ATP catabolism, implying that nucleoside transport is the primary factor determining the extracellular level of adenosine.

  9. Novel Mutations in the Transcriptional Activator Domain of the Human TBX20 in Patients with Atrial Septal Defect

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    Irma Eloisa Monroy-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The relevance of TBX20 gene in heart development has been demonstrated in many animal models, but there are few works that try to elucidate the effect of TBX20 mutations in human congenital heart diseases. In these studies, all missense mutations associated with atrial septal defect (ASD were found in the DNA-binding T-box domain, none in the transcriptional activator domain. Methods. We search for TBX20 mutations in a group of patients with ASD or ventricular septal defect (VSD using the High Resolution Melting (HRM method and DNA sequencing. Results. We report three missense mutations (Y309D, T370O, and M395R within the transcriptional activator domain of human TBX20 that were associated with ASD. Conclusions. This is the first association of TBX20 transcriptional activator domain missense mutations with ASD. These findings could have implications for diagnosis, genetic screening, and patient follow-up.

  10. Localized ridge defect augmentation using human pericardium membrane and demineralized bone matrix

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    Arun Kumar Vidyadharan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion and Clinical Implications: The results suggested that HP Allograft membrane may be a suitable component for augmentation of localized alveolar ridge defects in conjunction with DBM with bone chips.

  11. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies.

  12. The respiratory burst oxidase of human neutrophils. Further studies of the purified enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, G A; DeLisle, D M; DeTogni, P; Gabig, T G; Magee, B H; Markert, M; Babior, B M

    1986-10-05

    A superoxide-forming oxidase from activated human neutrophil membranes was solubilized by two slightly different methods, then purified by "dye-affinity" chromatography. Kinetic studies of the purified preparations gave Vmax values of 5-10 mumol of O-2/min/mg of protein, and Km values for NADH and NADPH that were in reasonable agreement with values determined previously using particulate and crude solubilized preparations of the respiratory burst oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed prominent bands at 67, 48, and 32 kDa, together with some minor contaminants, whereas gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions gave a single major band that when eluted and re-electrophoresed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate showed bands at 67, 48, 32 kDa. We believe that all three bands represent oxidase components. The flavin content of the purified enzyme was 20.4 +/- 2.0 S.E. pmol of FAD/microgram of protein, whereas heme averaged 0.1 +/- 0.02 pmol/microgram and ubiquinone could not be detected. Assuming that the enzyme is composed of one 67-kDa subunit, one 48-kDa subunit, and one 32-kDa subunit (i.e. that its molecular mass is approximately 150 kDa), it can be calculated to have a turnover number of 700-1500 min-1, in agreement with a value reported previously for oxidase in a particulate O-2-forming system (Cross, A. R., Parkinson, J. F., and Jones, O. T. G. (1985) Biochem. J. 226, 881-884), and to contain the following quantities of redox carriers (mol/mol): FAD, 3.0; heme, 0.015; ubiquinone, less than 0.06. It remains to be determined whether this preparation represents the complete respiratory burst oxidase or is only the pyridine nucleotide dehydrogenating component of a more complex enzyme.

  13. Deletion of Porcn in mice leads to multiple developmental defects and models human focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome.

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    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH is a genetic disorder characterized by developmental defects in skin, skeleton and ectodermal appendages. FDH is caused by dominant loss-of-function mutations in X-linked PORCN. PORCN orthologues in Drosophila and mice encode endoplasmic reticulum proteins required for secretion and function of Wnt proteins. Wnt proteins play important roles in embryo development, tissue homeostasis and stem cell maintenance. Since features of FDH overlap with those seen in mouse Wnt pathway mutants, FDH likely results from defective Wnt signaling but molecular mechanisms by which inactivation of PORCN affects Wnt signaling and manifestations of FDH remain to be elucidated. RESULTS: We introduced intronic loxP sites and a neomycin gene in the mouse Porcn locus for conditional inactivation. Porcn-ex3-7flox mice have no apparent developmental defects, but chimeric mice retaining the neomycin gene (Porcn-ex3-7Neo-flox have limb, skin, and urogenital abnormalities. Conditional Porcn inactivation by EIIa-driven or Hprt-driven Cre recombinase results in increased early embryonic lethality. Mesenchyme-specific Prx-Cre-driven inactivation of Porcn produces FDH-like limb defects, while ectodermal Krt14-Cre-driven inactivation produces thin skin, alopecia, and abnormal dentition. Furthermore, cell-based assays confirm that human PORCN mutations reduce WNT3A secretion. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that Porcn inactivation in the mouse produces a model for human FDH and that phenotypic features result from defective WNT signaling in ectodermal- and mesenchymal-derived structures.

  14. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

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    Fang Zheng

    Full Text Available A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞ required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞. The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  15. Estrogen modification of human glutamate dehydrogenases is linked to enzyme activation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borompokas, Nikolas; Papachatzaki, Maria-Martha; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Zaganas, Ioannis; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2010-10-08

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a housekeeping enzyme central to the metabolism of glutamate. Its activity is potently inhibited by GTP (IC(50) = 0.1-0.3 μM) and thought to be controlled by the need of the cell in ATP. Estrogens are also known to inhibit mammalian GDH, but at relatively high concentrations. Because, in addition to this housekeeping human (h) GDH1, humans have acquired via a duplication event an hGDH2 isoform expressed in human cortical astrocytes, we tested here the interaction of estrogens with the two human isoenzymes. The results showed that, under base-line conditions, diethylstilbestrol potently inhibited hGDH2 (IC(50) = 0.08 ± 0.01 μM) and with ∼18-fold lower affinity hGDH1 (IC(50) = 1.67 ± 0.06 μM; p < 0.001). Similarly, 17β-estradiol showed a ∼18-fold higher affinity for hGDH2 (IC(50) = 1.53 ± 0.24 μM) than for hGDH1 (IC(50) = 26.94 ± 1.07 μM; p < 0.001). Also, estriol and progesterone were more potent inhibitors of hGDH2 than hGDH1. Structure/function analyses revealed that the evolutionary R443S substitution, which confers low basal activity, was largely responsible for sensitivity of hGDH2 to estrogens. Inhibition of both human GDHs by estrogens was inversely related to their state of activation induced by ADP, with the slope of this correlation being steeper for hGDH2 than for hGDH1. Also, the study of hGDH1 and hGDH2 mutants displaying different states of activation revealed that the affinity of estrogen for these enzymes correlated inversely (R = 0.99; p = 0.0001) with basal catalytic activity. Because astrocytes are known to synthesize estrogens, these hormones, by interacting potently with hGDH2 in its closed state, may contribute to regulation of glutamate metabolism in brain.

  16. Substrate complexes of human dipeptidyl peptidase III reveal the mechanism of enzyme inhibition

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    Kumar, Prashant; Reithofer, Viktoria; Reisinger, Manuel; Wallner, Silvia; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Human dipeptidyl-peptidase III (hDPP III) is a zinc-dependent hydrolase cleaving dipeptides off the N-termini of various bioactive peptides. Thus, the enzyme is likely involved in a number of physiological processes such as nociception and is also implicated in several forms of cancer. We present high-resolution crystal structures of hDPP III in complex with opioid peptides (Met-and Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2) as well as with angiotensin-II and the peptide inhibitor IVYPW. These structures confirm the previously reported large conformational change of the enzyme upon ligand binding and show that the structure of the closed conformation is independent of the nature of the bound peptide. The overall peptide-binding mode is also conserved ensuring the correct positioning of the scissile peptide bond with respect to the catalytic zinc ion. The structure of the angiotensin-II complex shows, how longer peptides are accommodated in the binding cleft of hDPP III. Differences in the binding modes allow a distinction between real substrates and inhibitory peptides or “slow” substrates. The latter displace a zinc bound water molecule necessitating the energetically much less favoured anhydride mechanism as opposed to the favoured promoted-water mechanism. The structural data also form the necessary framework for the design of specific hDPP III inhibitors. PMID:27025154

  17. Structure of Human Dual Specificity Protein Phosphatase 23, VHZ, Enzyme-Substrate/Product Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal,R.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a crucial role in mitogenic signal transduction and regulation of cell growth and differentiation. Dual specificity protein phosphatase 23 (DUSP23) or VHZ mediates dephosphorylation of phospho-tyrosyl (pTyr) and phospho-seryl/threonyl (pSer/pThr) residues in specific proteins. In vitro, it can dephosphorylate p44ERK1 but not p54SAPK-{beta} and enhance activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38. Human VHZ, the smallest of the catalytically active protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) reported to date (150 residues), is a class I Cys-based PTP and bears the distinctive active site signature motif HCXXGXXRS(T). We present the crystal structure of VHZ determined at 1.93 angstrom resolution. The polypeptide chain adopts the typical a{beta}a PTP fold, giving rise to a shallow active site cleft that supports dual phosphorylated substrate specificity. Within our crystals, the Thr-135-Tyr-136 from a symmetry-related molecule bind in the active site with a malate ion, where they mimic the phosphorylated TY motif of the MAPK activation loop in an enzyme-substrate/product complex. Analyses of intermolecular interactions between the enzyme and this pseudo substrate/product along with functional analysis of Phe-66, Leu-97, and Phe-99 residues provide insights into the mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis in VHZ.

  18. Structure based discovery of small molecules to regulate the activity of human insulin degrading enzyme.

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    Bilal Çakir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is an allosteric Zn(+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible.

  19. Structure based discovery of small molecules to regulate the activity of human insulin degrading enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakir, Bilal; Dağliyan, Onur; Dağyildiz, Ezgi; Bariş, İbrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda; Türkay, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is an allosteric Zn(+2) metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible.

  20. Effect of norfloxacin and moxifloxacin on melanin synthesis and antioxidant enzymes activity in normal human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota; Otręba, Michał; Miliński, Maciej; Rok, Jakub; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-03-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics provide broad-spectrum coverage for a number of infectious diseases, including respiratory as well as urinary tract infections. One of the important adverse effects of these drugs is phototoxicity which introduces a serious limitation to their use. To gain insight the molecular mechanisms underlying the fluoroquinolones-induced phototoxic side effects, the impact of two fluoroquinolone derivatives with different phototoxic potential, norfloxacin and moxifloxacin, on melanogenesis and antioxidant enzymes activity in normal human melanocytes HEMa-LP was determined. Both drugs induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The value of EC50 for these drugs was found to be 0.5 mM. Norfloxacin and moxifloxacin suppressed melanin biosynthesis; antibiotics were shown to inhibit cellular tyrosinase activity and to reduce melanin content in melanocytes. When comparing the both analyzed fluoroquinolones, it was observed that norfloxacin possesses greater inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity in melanocytes than moxifloxacin. The extent of oxidative stress in cells was assessed by measuring the activity of antioxidant enzymes: SOD, CAT, and GPx. It was observed that norfloxacin caused higher depletion of antioxidant status in melanocytes when compared with moxifloxacin. The obtained results give a new insight into the mechanisms of fluoroquinolones toxicity directed to pigmented tissues. Moreover, the presented differences in modulation of biochemical processes in melanocytes may be an explanation for various phototoxic activities of the analyzed fluoroquinolone derivatives in vivo.

  1. Multidimensional fractionation is a requirement for quantitation of Golgi-resident glycosylation enzymes from cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Hung; Chik, Jenny H L; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P

    2015-02-06

    Glycosylation results from the concerted action of glycosylation enzymes in the secretory pathway. In general, gene expression serves as the primary control mechanism, but post-translational fine-tuning of glycosylation enzyme functions is often necessary for efficient synthesis of specific glycan epitopes. While the field of glycomics has rapidly advanced, there lacks routine proteomic methods to measure expression of specific glycosylation enzymes needed to fill the gap between mRNA expression and the glycomic profile in a "reverse genomics" workflow. Toward developing this workflow we enriched Golgi membranes from two human colon cancer cell lines by sucrose density centrifugation and further mass-based fractionation by SDS-PAGE. We then applied mass spectrometry to demonstrate a doubling in the number of Golgi resident proteins identified, compared to the unenriched, low speed centrifuged supernatant of lysed cells. A total of 35 Golgi-resident glycosylation enzymes, of which 23 were glycosyltransferases, were identified making this the largest protein database so far of Golgi resident glycosylation enzymes experimentally identified in cultured human cells. We developed targeted mass spectrometry assays for specific quantitation of many of these glycosylation enzymes. Our results show that alterations in abundance of glycosylation enzymes at the protein level were generally consistent with the resultant glycomic profiles, but not necessarily with the corresponding glycosyltransferase mRNA expression as exemplified by the case of O-glycan core 1 T synthase.

  2. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot test for the confirmatory serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis

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    William H Roldán

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis, a sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB-IgG test was developed and evaluated using Toxocara canislarvae excretory-secretory antigens for detecting anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. The EITB-IgG profile of toxocariasis was characterized by comparing 27 sera from patients with toxocariasis, 110 sera from healthy subjects and 186 sera from patients with other helminth diseases (ascariasis, ancylostomiasis, trichuriasis, enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, hymenolepiasis, diphyllobothriasis, taeniasis, cysticercosis, hydatidosis and fascioliasis. Antigenic bands of 24, 28, 30, 35, 56, 117, 136 and 152 kDa were predominantly recognized in sera from all patients with toxocariasis. However, only bands of 24-35 kDa were highly specific for Toxocara infection (98.3%, whereas other antigenic bands observed displayed cross-reactivity. Additionally, when the results of the EITB-IgG test were compared to those of the ELISA-IgG test, a 100% concordance was observed for positive results in human toxocariasis cases. The concordance for negative results between the two tests for healthy subjects and patients with other helminth diseases were 96.3% and 53.7%, respectively, showing that the EITB-IgG test has a higher specificity than ELISA. In conclusion, the EITB-IgG test is a very useful tool to confirm the serological diagnosis of human toxocariasis.

  3. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot test for the confirmatory serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, William H; Espinoza, Yrma A

    2009-05-01

    To improve the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis, a sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB-IgG) test was developed and evaluated using Toxocara canislarvae excretory-secretory antigens for detecting anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies. The EITB-IgG profile of toxocariasis was characterized by comparing 27 sera from patients with toxocariasis, 110 sera from healthy subjects and 186 sera from patients with other helminth diseases (ascariasis, ancylostomiasis, trichuriasis, enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, hymenolepiasis, diphyllobothriasis, taeniasis, cysticercosis, hydatidosis and fascioliasis). Antigenic bands of 24, 28, 30, 35, 56, 117, 136 and 152 kDa were predominantly recognized in sera from all patients with toxocariasis. However, only bands of 24-35 kDa were highly specific for Toxocara infection (98.3%), whereas other antigenic bands observed displayed cross-reactivity. Additionally, when the results of the EITB-IgG test were compared to those of the ELISA-IgG test, a 100% concordance was observed for positive results in human toxocariasis cases. The concordance for negative results between the two tests for healthy subjects and patients with other helminth diseases were 96.3% and 53.7%, respectively, showing that the EITB-IgG test has a higher specificity than ELISA. In conclusion, the EITB-IgG test is a very useful tool to confirm the serological diagnosis of human toxocariasis.

  4. A sensitive two-site enzyme immunoassay for human epidermal growth factor (urogastrone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Nomoto, H; Kurobe, M; Nishimuro, S; Hiratani, H; Furukawa, S

    1985-06-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed for human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) or urogastrone, which was isolated from human urine. Our EIA system is based on the sandwiching of an antigen between anti-hEGF IgG coated on a polystyrene tube and anti-hEGF antibody Fab'-linked beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactosidase, EC 3.2.1.23). This method has the advantages that the procedures are simple and rapid and that the antibody Fab'-beta-D-galactosidase complex is more stable than radioisotope-labeled IgG. Purified hEGF is detectable at as low as 100 pg/ml, which is very sensitive compared to the radioimmuno-assays or radioreceptor assays already reported. Using this new EIA system, hEGF levels in human urine were examined. The values for normal males and females were 48.4 and 83.5 ng/mg creatinine, respectively, which shows that females excrete 1.7 times more hEGF than males.

  5. Enumeration and Characterization of Human Memory T Cells by Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assays

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    Sandra A. Calarota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT assay has advanced into a useful and widely applicable tool for the evaluation of T-cell responses in both humans and animal models of diseases and/or vaccine candidates. Using synthetic peptides (either individually or as overlapping peptide mixtures or whole antigens, total lymphocyte or isolated T-cell subset responses can be assessed either after short-term stimulation (standard ELISPOT or after their expansion during a 10-day culture (cultured ELISPOT. Both assays detect different antigen-specific immune responses allowing the analysis of effector memory T cells and central memory T cells. This paper describes the principle of ELISPOT assays and discusses their application in the evaluation of immune correlates of clinical interest with a focus on the vaccine field.

  6. Functional variants of human APE1 rescue the DNA repair defects of the yeast AP endonuclease/3'-diesterase-deficient strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Ayoub, Emily; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Fan, Jinjiang; Yang, Xiaoming; Harihar, Taramatti; Saparbaev, Murat; Ramotar, Dindial

    2014-10-01

    Human APE1 is an essential enzyme performing functions in DNA repair and transcription. It possesses four distinct repair activities acting on a variety of base and sugar derived DNA lesions. APE1 has seven cysteine residues and Cys65, and to a lesser extent Cys93 and Cys99, is uniquely involved in maintaining a subset of transcription factors in the reduced and active state. Four of the cysteines Cys93, 99, 208 and 310 of APE1 are located proximal to its active site residues Glu96, Asp210 and His309 involved in processing damaged DNA, raising the possibility that missense mutation of these cysteines could alter the enzyme DNA repair functions. An earlier report documented that serine substitution of the individual cysteine residues did not affect APE1 ability to cleave an abasic site oligonucleotide substrate in vitro, except for Cys99Ser, although any consequences of these variants in the repair of in vivo DNA lesions were not tested. Herein, we mutated all seven cysteines of APE1, either singly or in combination, to alanine and show that none of the resulting variants interfered with the enzyme DNA repair functions. Cross-specie complementation analysis reveals that these APE1 cysteine variants fully rescued the yeast DNA repair deficient strain YW778, lacking AP endonucleases and 3'-diesterases, from toxicities caused by DNA damaging agents. Moreover, the elevated spontaneous mutations arising in strain YW778 from the lack of the DNA repair activities were completely suppressed by the APE1 cysteine variants. These findings suggest that the cysteine residues of APE1 are unlikely to play a role in the DNA repair functions of the enzyme in vivo. We also examine other APE1 missense mutations and provide the first evidence that the variant Asp308Ala with normal AP endonuclease, but devoid of 3'→5' exonuclease, displays hypersensitivity to the anticancer drug bleomycin, and not to other agents, suggesting that it has a defect in processing unique DNA lesions

  7. Metabolism of Oral Turinabol by Human Steroid Hormone-Synthesizing Cytochrome P450 Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Lina; Brixius-Anderko, Simone; Hannemann, Frank; Zapp, Josef; Neunzig, Jens; Thevis, Mario; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-02-01

    The human mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP11A1, CYP11B1, and CYP11B2 are involved in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones. CYP11A1 catalyzes the side-chain cleavage of cholesterol, and CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 catalyze the final steps in the biosynthesis of gluco- and mineralocorticoids, respectively. This study reveals their additional capability to metabolize the xenobiotic steroid oral turinabol (OT; 4-chlor-17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrosta-1,4-dien-3-on), which is a common doping agent. By contrast, microsomal steroid hydroxylases did not convert OT. Spectroscopic binding assays revealed dissociation constants of 17.7 µM and 5.4 µM for CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, respectively, whereas no observable binding spectra emerged for CYP11A1. Catalytic efficiencies of OT conversion were determined to be 46 min(-1) mM(-1) for CYP11A1, 741 min(-1) mM(-1) for CYP11B1, and 3338 min(-1) mM(-1) for CYP11B2, which is in the same order of magnitude as for the natural substrates but shows a preference of CYP11B2 for OT conversion. Products of OT metabolism by the CYP11B subfamily members were produced at a milligram scale with a recombinant Escherichia coli-based whole-cell system. They were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to be 11β-OH-OT for both CYP11B isoforms, whereby CYP11B2 additionally formed 11β,18-diOH-OT and 11β-OH-OT-18-al, which rearranges to its tautomeric form 11β,18-expoxy-18-OH-OT. CYP11A1 produces six metabolites, which are proposed to include 2-OH-OT, 16-OH-OT, and 2,16-diOH-OT based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses. All three enzymes are shown to be inhibited by OT in their natural function. The extent of inhibition thereby depends on the affinity of the enzyme for OT and the strongest effect was demonstrated for CYP11B2. These findings suggest that steroidogenic cytochrome P450 enzymes can contribute to drug metabolism and should be considered in drug design and toxicity studies. Copyright © 2016 by The

  8. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  9. [Measurement of human thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies by enzyme immunoassay using recombinant human TPO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T; Ishiguro, R; Takenouchi, H; Umeki, K; Matsumoto, K; Yagihashi, S; Kato, H; Kotani, T; Ohtaki, S

    1994-03-01

    An EIA for measuring anti-TPO autoantibodies (rhTPO-EIA) was developed using recombinant human TPO expressed in CHO cells and was compared with MC-HA generally used in laboratory routine work. rhTPO-EIA showed a satisfactory reproducibility in the intra-assay test and did not have an accidental error of lots. Almost equal number of healthy females and males were measured for their IgG binding to TPO to define a normal range of anti-TPO autoantibodies. After setting 20 IU/ml as an upper limit of normal range, sera from patient with thyroid disorders were measured for their anti-TPO autoantibodies. Chronic thyroiditis and Graves' disease were highly positive, while adenoma, thyroid cancer, SLE, and RA were low in their positivity. The positive rate of anti-TPO autoantibodies was compatible to those of previous reports in each disorder. Seventy-two sera from patients with chronic thyroiditis or Graves' disease were measured for their autoantibodies by both rhTPO-EIA and MC-HA and the results were compared between both methods. A correlation coefficient was 0.486. Following absorption with thyroglobulin, sera were measured again and as the results, the correlation coefficient increased to 0.723. Therefore, MC-HA was thought to be influenced in the presence of anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies. Since rhTPO-EIA is excellent in quality and not affected by anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, it is useful and applicable to clinical diagnosis and observation of thyroid disorders.

  10. Functional Integrity of the Chimeric (Humanized) Mouse Liver: Enzyme Zonation, Physiologic Spaces, and Hepatic Enzymes and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Wang, Jason Z Ya; Quach, Holly P; Tang, Hui; Evans, David C; Li, Albert P; Silva, Jose; Pang, K Sandy

    2016-09-01

    Chimeric mouse liver models are useful in vivo tools for human drug metabolism studies; however, liver integrity and the microcirculation remain largely uninvestigated. Hence, we conducted liver perfusion studies to examine these attributes in FRGN [Fah(-/-), Rag2(-/-), and Il2rg(-/-), NOD strain] livers (control) and chimeric livers repopulated with mouse (mFRGN) or human (hFRGN) hepatocytes. In single-pass perfusion studies (2.5 ml/min), outflow dilution profiles of noneliminated reference indicators ((51)Cr-RBC, (125)I-albumin, (14)C-sucrose, and (3)H-water) revealed preservation of flow-limited distribution and reduced water and albumin spaces in hFRGN livers compared with FRGN livers, a view supported microscopically by tightly packed sinusoids. With prograde and retrograde perfusion of harmol (50 µM) in FRGN livers, an anterior sulfation (Sult1a1) over the posterior distribution of glucuronidation (Ugt1a1) activity was preserved, evidenced by the 42% lower sulfation-to-glucuronidation ratio (HS/HG) and 14% higher harmol extraction ratio (E) upon switching from prograde to retrograde flow. By contrast, zonation was lost in mFRGN and hFRGN livers, with HS/HG and E for both flows remaining unchanged. Remnant mouse genes persisted in hFRGN livers (10%-300% those of FRGN). When hFRGN livers were compared with human liver tissue, higher UGT1A1 and MRP2, lower MRP3, and unchanged SULT1A1 and MRP4 mRNA expression were observed. Total Sult1a1/SULT1A1 protein expression in hFRGN livers was higher than that of FRGN livers, consistent with higher harmol sulfate formation. The composite data on humanized livers suggest a loss of zonation, lack of complete liver humanization, and persistence of murine hepatocyte activities leading to higher sulfation.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE IN VITRO METABOLISM OF SELECTIVE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATOR USING HUMAN, RAT, AND DOG LIVER ENZYME PREPARATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Wu, Zengru; Bohl, Casey E.; Yang, Jun; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Compound S4 [S-3-(4-acetylamino-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide] is a novel nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator that demonstrates tissue-selective androgenic and anabolic effects. The purpose of this in vitro study was to identify the phase I metabolites, potential species differences in metabolism, and the cytochromes P450 (P450s) involved in the phase I metabolism of S4 using 14C-S4, recombinant P450s, and other liver enzyme preparations from human, rat, and dog. The major phase I metabolism pathways of S4 in humans were identified as deacetylation of the B-ring acetamide group, hydrolysis of the amide bond, reduction of the A-ring nitro group, and oxidation of the aromatic rings, with deacetylation being the predominant pathway observed with most of the enzyme preparations tested. Among the major human P450 enzymes tested, CYP3A4 appeared to be one of the major phase I enzymes that could be responsible for the phase I metabolism of S4 [Km = 16.1 μM, Vmax = 1.6 pmol/(pmol · min)] in humans and mainly catalyzed the deacetylation, hydrolysis, and oxidation of S4. In humans, the cytosolic enzymes mainly catalyzed the hydrolysis reaction, whereas the microsomal enzymes primarily catalyzed the deacetylation reactions. Similar phase I metabolic profiles were observed in rats and dogs as well, except that the amide bond hydrolysis seemed to occur more rapidly in rats. In summary, these results showed that the major phase I reaction of S4 in human, rat, and dog is acetamide group deacetylation. PMID:16272404

  12. Effects of Eupatilin and Jaceosidin on Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Jeong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eupatilin and jaceosidin are bioactive flavones found in the medicinal herbs of the genus Artemisia. These bioactive flavones exhibit various antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiallergic, and antitumor activities. The inhibitory potentials of eupatilin and jaceosidin on the activities of seven major human cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes were investigated using a cocktail probe assay. Eupatilin and jaceosidin potently inhibited CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 9.4 mM and 5.3 mM, respectively, and CYP2C9-catalyzed diclofenac 4-hydroxylation with IC50 values of 4.1 mM and 10.2 mM, respectively. Eupatilin and jaceosidin were also found to moderately inhibit CYP2C19-catalyzed [S]-mephenytoin 4¢-hydroxylation, CYP2D6-catalyzed bufuralol 1¢-hydroxylation, and CYP2C8-catalyzed amodiaquine N-deethylation. Kinetic analysis of human liver microsomes showed that eupatilin is a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A2 with a Ki value of 2.3 mM and a mixed-type inhibitor of CYP2C9 with a Ki value of 1.6 mM. Jaceosidin was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A2 with a Ki value of 3.8 mM and a mixed-type inhibitor of CYP2C9 with Ki value of 6.4 mM in human liver microsomes. These in vitro results suggest that eupatilin and jaceosidin should be further examined for potential pharmacokinetic drug interactions in vivo due to inhibition of CYP1A2 and CYP2C9.

  13. Transplantation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth for bone regeneration in the dog mandibular defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali; Behnia; Abbas; Haghighat; Ardeshir; Talebi; Nosrat; Nourbakhsh; Fariba; Heidari

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth(SHED) transplanted for bone regeneration in the dog mandibular defect.METHODS: In this prospective comparative study, SHEDs had been isolated 5 years ago from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. The undifferentiated stem cells were seeded into mandibular bone through-andthrough defects of 4 dogs. Similar defects in control group were filled with cell-free collagen scaffold. After 12 wk, biopsies were taken and morphometric analysis was performed. The percentage of new bone formation and foreign body reaction were measured in each case. The data were subject to statistical analysis using the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskalwalis statistical tests. Differences at P < 0.05 was considered as significant level.RESULTS: There were no significant differences between control and SHED-seeded groups in connective tissue(P = 0.248), woven bone(P = 0.248) and compact bone(P = 0.082). There were not any side effects in transplanted SHED group such as teratoma or malignancy and abnormalities in this period.CONCLUSION: SHEDs which had been isolated and characterized 5 years ago and stored with cryopreservation banking were capable of proliferation and osteogenesis after 5 years, and no immune response was observed after three months of seeded SHEDs.

  14. Undifferentiated Human Adipose-derived Stromal/Stem Cells loaded onto Wet-Spun Starch-polycaprolactone Scaffolds Enhance Bone Regeneration: Nude Mice Calvarial Defect in vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Pedro P.; Leonor, Isabel B.; Smith, Brenda J.; Dias, Isabel R.; Reis, Rui L.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2014-01-01

    The repair of large bony defects remains challenging in the clinical setting. Human adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (hASCs) have been reported to differentiate along different cell lineages, including the osteogenic. The objective of the present study was to assess the bone regeneration potential of undifferentiated hASCs loaded in starch-polycaprolactone (SPCL) scaffolds, in a critical-sized nude mice calvarial defect. Human ASCs were isolated from lipoaspirate of five female donors, cryopreserved and pooled together. Critical-sized (4 mm) calvarial defects were created in the parietal bone of adult male nude mice. Defects were either left empty, treated with an SPCL scaffold alone, or SPCL scaffold with human ASCs. Histological analysis and Micro-CT imaging of the retrieved implants were performed. Improved new bone deposition and osseointegration was observed in SPCL loaded with hASC engrafted calvarial defects as compared to control groups that showed little healing. Non differentiated human ASCs enhance ossification of non-healing nude mice calvarial defects, and wet-spun SPCL confirmed its suitability for bone tissue engineering. This study supports the potential translation for ASC use in the treatment of human skeletal defects. PMID:24123913

  15. Competitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay for vitamin B12 analysis in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Domek, Joseph M; Siddiqua, Towfida; Raqib, Rubhana; Allen, Lindsay H

    2014-06-15

    Recent discoveries of matrix interferences by haptocorrin (HC) in human milk and serum show that past analyses of vitamin B12 in samples with high HC content might have been inaccurate (Lildballe et al., 2009; Carmel & Agrawal, 2012). We evaluated two competitive enzyme-binding immunoassays for serum/plasma (IMMULITE and SimulTRAC-SNB) for B12 analysis in human milk. B12-recovery rates (United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2007) were determined to be 78.9 ± 9.1% with IMMULITE and 225 ± 108% (range 116-553%) using SimulTRAC-SNB, most likely due to the presence of excess HC. HC-interferences were not observed with the IMMULITE assay, rendering previously reported mandatory HC-removal (Lildballe et al., 2009) unnecessary. Linearity continued at low B12-concentrations (24-193 pM; r(2)>0.985). Milk B12 concentrations from Bangladeshi women (72-959 pM) were significantly lower than those from California (154-933 pM; pmilk matrix and its ability to measure low milk B12 concentrations.

  16. Identification of the Specific Interactors of the Human Lariat RNA Debranching Enzyme 1 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Masaki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step for gene expression. We have been analyzing post-splicing intron turnover steps in higher eukaryotes. Here, we report protein interaction between human Debranching enzyme 1 (hDbr1 and several factors found in the Intron Large (IL complex, which is an intermediate complex of the intron degradation pathway. The hDbr1 protein specifically interacts with xeroderma pigmentosum, complementeation group A (XPA-binding protein 2 (Xab2. We also attempted to identify specific interactors of hDbr1. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments followed by mass spectrometry analysis identified a novel protein as one of the specific interactors of hDbr1. This protein is well conserved among many species and shows the highest similarity to yeast Drn1, so it is designated as human Dbr1 associated ribonuclease 1 (hDrn1. hDrn1 directly interacts with hDbr1 through protein–protein interaction. Furthermore, hDrn1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, as hDbr1 protein does. These findings suggest that hDrn1 has roles in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which are highly likely to involve hDbr1.

  17. INDUCTION OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO HUMAN ENZYMES FOLLOWING VIRAL-INFECTION - A BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT HYPOTHESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEIJERS, RNM; LAWSON, C; LEUNISSEN, J

    1992-01-01

    Macro enzymes, i. e. complexes of normal (iso-)enzymes with an immunoglobulin, may be due to immunological cross-reactions evoked by specific viral antigenic determinants that are homologous to regions in the target enzymes. A search of the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein databank wi

  18. Phenotype prediction of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in human phase II drug/xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: perspectives on molecular evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in coding regions can lead to amino acid changes that might alter the protein’s function and account for susceptibility to disease and altered drug/xenobiotic response. Many nsSNPs have been found in genes encoding human phase II metabolizing enzymes; however, there is little known about the relationship between the genotype and phenotype of nsSNPs in these enzymes. We have identified 923 validated nsSNPs in 104 human phase II enzyme genes from the Ensembl genome database and the NCBI SNP database. Using PolyPhen, Panther, and SNAP algorithms, 44%?59% of nsSNPs in phase II enzyme genes were predicted to have functional impacts on protein function. Predictions largely agree with the available experimental annotations. 68% of deleterious nsSNPs were correctly predicted as damaging. This study also identified many amino acids that are likely to be functionally critical, but have not yet been studied experimentally. There was significant concordance between the predicted results of Panther and PolyPhen, and between SNAP non-neutral predictions and PolyPhen scores. Evolutionarily non-neutral (destabilizing) amino acid substitutions are thought to be the pathogenetic basis for the alteration of phase II enzyme activity and to be associated with disease susceptibility and drug/xenobiotic toxicity. Furthermore, the molecular evolutionary patterns of phase II enzymes were characterized with regards to the predicted deleterious nsSNPs.

  19. Identifying environmental risk factors for human neural tube defects before and after folic acid supplementation

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    Li Xinhu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birth defects are a major cause of infant mortality and disability in many parts of the world. Neural tube defects (NTDs are one of the most common types of birth defects. In 2001, the Chinese population and family planning commission initiated a national intervention program for the prevention of birth defects. A key step in the program was the introduction of folic acid supplementation. Of interest in the present study was to determine whether folic acid supplementation has the same protective effect on NTDs under various geographical and socioeconomic conditions within the Chinese population and the nature in which the influence of environmental factors varied after folic acid supplementation. Methods In this study, Heshun was selected as the region of interest as a surrogate for helping to answer some of the questions raised in this study on the impact of the intervention program. Spatial filtering in combination with GIS software was used to detect annual potential clusters from 1998 to 2005 in Heshun, and Kruskal-wallis test and multivariate regression were applied to identify the environmental risk factors for NTDs among various regions. Results In 1998, a significant (p Conclusion This suggests that the government needs to adapt the intervention measures according to local conditions. More attention needs to be paid to the poor and to people living in areas near coal mines.

  20. Histological and biochemical evaluation of perichondrial transplants in human articular cartilage defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, P; Kuijer, R; Terwindt-Rouwenhorst, E; van der Linden, Ton; Bulstra, K

    1999-01-01

    From 1986 to 1992, 88 patients with articular defects in the knee were treated with a perichondrial arthroplasty. In this study, we report on the results for 22 biopsies of grafted tissue with a mean follow-up of 21 months. Biopsies were obtained at routine arthroscopy after approximately 1 year or

  1. Homocysteine related Nutritional and Genetic Risk Factors for Human Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Verkleij-Hagoort (Anna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart defects (CHDs) belong to the most common group of major congenital malformations in newborns. Most CHDs are considered complex diseases with a multifactorial aetiology, which are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This thesis p

  2. Functional analysis of the human somatic angiotensin I-converting enzyme gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testut, P; Soubrier, F; Corvol, P; Hubert, C

    1993-08-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the regulation of systemic blood pressure and plays a major role in the renin-angiotensin and bradykinin-kinin systems, at the luminal surface of the vascular endothelia. To identify the promoter region, the transcription regulatory elements and the cell specificity of the ACE gene, five successive DNA deletions of the 5' upstream region (-1214, -754, -472, -343, -132 bp relative to the start site of transcription) were isolated and fused in sense and antisense orientations to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene in the promoterless plasmid pBLCAT3. Promoter activities were measured in transient transfection assays using three different cell lines from rabbit endothelium (RE), human embryocarcinoma (Tera-1) and hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). All five fragments of the ACE promoter region directed expression of the CAT gene when transfected into the endothelial and the embryocarcinoma cells, which contain endogenous ACE mRNA and express ACE activity. In contrast only minimal levels of promoter activity were obtained on transfection into hepatocarcinoma cells in which endogenous ACE mRNA and ACE activity were not detected. Transfection of RE and Tera-1 cells demonstrated that promoter activity was defined by the length of the ACE promoter sequence inserted into the construct. The 132 bases located upstream from the transcription start site were sufficient to confer ACE promoter activity, whereas the sequences upstream from -472 bp and between -343 bp and -132 bp were responsible for a decrease of promoter activity. Furthermore, the minimal 132 bp of the ACE promoter contains elements which direct cell-specific CAT expression. In addition, the DNA transfection study in the presence of dexamethasone suggested that the potential glucocorticoid regulatory elements, located in the sequence of the ACE promoter, are not functional.

  3. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 enzymes by Bacopa monnieri standardized extract and constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Seetha; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chung, Lip Yong

    2014-02-24

    Bacopa monnieri and the constituents of this plant, especially bacosides, possess various neuropharmacological properties. Like drugs, some herbal extracts and the constituents of their extracts alter cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, causing potential herb-drug interactions. The effects of Bacopa monnieri standardized extract and the bacosides from the extract on five major CYP isoforms in vitro were analyzed using a luminescent CYP recombinant human enzyme assay. B. monnieri extract exhibited non-competitive inhibition of CYP2C19 (IC50/Ki = 23.67/9.5 µg/mL), CYP2C9 (36.49/12.5 µg/mL), CYP1A2 (52.20/25.1 µg/mL); competitive inhibition of CYP3A4 (83.95/14.5 µg/mL) and weak inhibition of CYP2D6 (IC50 = 2061.50 µg/mL). However, the bacosides showed negligible inhibition of the same isoforms. B. monnieri, which is orally administered, has a higher concentration in the gut than the liver; therefore, this herb could exhibit stronger inhibition of intestinal CYPs than hepatic CYPs. At an estimated gut concentration of 600 µg/mL (based on a daily dosage of 300 mg/day), B. monnieri reduced the catalytic activities of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 to less than 10% compared to the total activity (without inhibitor = 100%). These findings suggest that B. monnieri extract could contribute to herb-drug interactions when orally co-administered with drugs metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19.

  4. Inhibition of Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes by Bacopa monnieri Standardized Extract and Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetha Ramasamy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacopa monnieri and the constituents of this plant, especially bacosides, possess various neuropharmacological properties. Like drugs, some herbal extracts and the constituents of their extracts alter cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes, causing potential herb-drug interactions. The effects of Bacopa monnieri standardized extract and the bacosides from the extract on five major CYP isoforms in vitro were analyzed using a luminescent CYP recombinant human enzyme assay. B. monnieri extract exhibited non-competitive inhibition of CYP2C19 (IC50/Ki = 23.67/9.5 µg/mL, CYP2C9 (36.49/12.5 µg/mL, CYP1A2 (52.20/25.1 µg/mL; competitive inhibition of CYP3A4 (83.95/14.5 µg/mL and weak inhibition of CYP2D6 (IC50 = 2061.50 µg/mL. However, the bacosides showed negligible inhibition of the same isoforms. B. monnieri, which is orally administered, has a higher concentration in the gut than the liver; therefore, this herb could exhibit stronger inhibition of intestinal CYPs than hepatic CYPs. At an estimated gut concentration of 600 µg/mL (based on a daily dosage of 300 mg/day, B. monnieri reduced the catalytic activities of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 to less than 10% compared to the total activity (without inhibitor = 100%. These findings suggest that B. monnieri extract could contribute to herb-drug interactions when orally co-administered with drugs metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19.

  5. The narrow substrate specificity of human tyrosine aminotransferase--the enzyme deficient in tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Sharada; Kirsch, Jack F

    2006-05-01

    Human tyrosine aminotransferase (hTATase) is the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transamination of tyrosine to p-hydrophenylpyruvate, an important step in tyrosine metabolism. hTATase deficiency is implicated in the rare metabolic disorder, tyrosinemia type II. This enzyme is a member of the poorly characterized Igamma subfamily of the family I aminotransferases. The full length and truncated forms of recombinant hTATase were expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. The pH-dependent titration of wild-type reveals a spectrum characteristic of family I aminotransferases with an aldimine pK(a) of 7.22. I249A mutant hTATase exhibits an unusual spectrum with a similar aldimine pK(a) (6.85). hTATase has very narrow substrate specificity with the highest enzymatic activity for the Tyr/alpha-ketoglutarate substrate pair, which gives a steady state k(cat) value of 83 s(-1). In contrast there is no detectable transamination of aspartate or other cosubstrates. The present findings show that hTATase is the only known aminotransferase that discriminates significantly between Tyr and Phe: the k(cat)/K(m) value for Tyr is about four orders of magnitude greater than that for Phe. A comparison of substrate specificities of representative Ialpha and Igamma aminotransferases is described along with the physiological significance of the discrimination between Tyr and Phe by hTATase as applied to the understanding of the molecular basis of phenylketonuria.

  6. Identification of metabolic pathways involved in the biotransformation of tolperisone by human microsomal enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmadi, Balázs; Leibinger, János; Szeberényi, Szabolcs; Borbás, Tímea; Farkas, Sándor; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Tihanyi, Károly

    2003-05-01

    The in vitro metabolism of tolperisone, 1-(4-methyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-3-(1-piperidino)-1-propanone-hydrochloride, a centrally acting muscle relaxant, was examined in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant enzymes. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements revealed methyl-hydroxylation (metabolite at m/z 261; M1) as the main metabolic route in HLM, however, metabolites of two mass units greater than the parent compound and the hydroxy-metabolite were also detected (m/z 247 and m/z 263, respectively). The latter was identified as carbonyl-reduced M1, the former was assumed to be the carbonyl-reduced parent compound. Isoform-specific cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibitors, inhibitory antibodies, and experiments with recombinant P450s pointed to CYP2D6 as the prominent enzyme in tolperisone metabolism. CYP2C19, CYP2B6, and CYP1A2 are also involved to a smaller extent. Hydroxymethyl-tolperisone formation was mediated by CYP2D6, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, but not by CYP2B6. Tolperisone competitively inhibited dextromethorphan O-demethylation and bufuralol hydroxylation (K(i) = 17 and 30 microM, respectively). Tolperisone inhibited methyl p-tolyl sulfide oxidation (K(i) = 1200 microM) in recombinant flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) and resulted in a 3-fold (p tolperisone undergoes P450-dependent and P450-independent microsomal biotransformations to the same extent. On the basis of metabolites formed and indirect evidences of inhibition studies, a considerable involvement of a microsomal reductase is assumed.

  7. Myocardial enzyme activities of black bears and comparison with those of human beings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Wan-ru; LUO Fei-li; HU Zhi-ping

    2005-01-01

    According to the principle of enzyme reaction rate, healthy pent black bears' myocardial enzyme activity is assayed by visual colorimetry and compared with that of healthy human beings. The determination at 37℃ and the statistic analysis of the experimental data work out the following findings. For male black bears, the average CK activity is 163.20U/L, the confidence interval of its expected value (127.70 to 198.70)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 39.2%; the average CK-MB activity 21.62U/L, the confidential interval (17.72 to 25.51)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 34.26%; the average LDH activity 604.20U/L, the confidence interval (524.56 to 683.83)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 23.80%; the average HBDH activity 516.70U/L, the confidence interval (453.06 to 580.34)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 22.24%; the average GOT activity 69.70U/L, the confidence interval (60.21 to 79.19)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 24.59%. For female black bears, the average CK activity is 145.50U/L, the confidence interval (114.59 to 176.21)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 38.27%; the average CK-MB activity 18.84U/L, the confidence interval (14.64 to 23.04)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 40.34%; the average LDH activity 563.70U/L, the confidence interval (473.80 to 652.60)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 28.80%; the average of HBDH activity 475.50U/L, the confidence interval (412.10 to 538.40)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 24.07%; the average of GOT activity is 62.37U/L, the confidential interval (52.54 to 72.20)U/L, and the coefficient of variation 28.46%. The male black bear's average myocardium enzyme activities are slightly higher than those of the female. But the statistical results indicate that the difference is not significant.

  8. Interactions of surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes of Mycoplasma pneumoniae with components of the human extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründel, Anne; Jacobs, Enno; Dumke, Roger

    2016-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major cause of community-acquired respiratory infections worldwide. Due to the strongly reduced genome, the number of virulence factors expressed by this cell wall-less pathogen is limited. To further understand the processes during host colonization, we investigated the interactions of the previously confirmed surface-located glycolytic enzymes of M. pneumoniae (pyruvate dehydrogenase A-C [PdhA-C], glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GapA], lactate dehydrogenase [Ldh], phosphoglycerate mutase [Pgm], pyruvate kinase [Pyk] and transketolase [Tkt]) to the human extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins fibrinogen (Fn), fibronectin (Fc), lactoferrin (Lf), laminin (Ln) and vitronectin (Vc), respectively. Concentration-dependent interactions between Fn and Vc and all eight recombinant proteins derived from glycolytic enzymes, between Ln and PdhB-C, GapA, Ldh, Pgm, Pyk and Tkt, between Lf and PdhA-C, GapA and Pyk, and between Fc and PdhC and GapA were demonstrated. In most cases, these associations are significantly influenced by ionic forces and by polyclonal sera against recombinant proteins. In immunoblotting, the complex of human plasminogen, activator (tissue-type or urokinase plasminogen activator) and glycolytic enzyme was not able to degrade Fc, Lf and Ln, respectively. In contrast, degradation of Vc was confirmed in the presence of all eight enzymes tested. Our data suggest that the multifaceted associations of surface-localized glycolytic enzymes play a potential role in the adhesion and invasion processes during infection of human respiratory mucosa by M. pneumoniae.

  9. Genetic variability of glutathione S-transferase enzymes in human populations: functional inter-ethnic differences in detoxification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimanti, Renato; Carboni, Cinzia; Baesso, Ilenia; Piacentini, Sara; Iorio, Andrea; De Stefano, Gian Franco; Fuciarelli, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione S-Transferase enzymes (GSTs) constitute the principal Phase II superfamily which plays a key role in cellular detoxification and in other biological processes. Studies of GSTs have revealed that genetic polymorphisms are present in these enzymes and that some of these are Loss-of-Function (LoF) variants, which affect enzymatic functions and are related to different aspects of human health. The aim of this study was to analyze functional genetic differences in GST enzymes among human populations. Attention was focused on LoF polymorphisms of GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTO1, GSTO2, GSTP1 and GSTT1 genes. These LoF variants were analyzed in 668 individuals belonging to six human groups with different ethnic backgrounds: Amhara and Oromo from Ethiopia; Colorado and Cayapa Amerindians and African Ecuadorians from Ecuador; and one sample from central Italy. The HapMap database was used to compare our data with reference populations and to analyze the haplotype and Linkage Disequilibrium diversity in different ethnic groups. Our results highlighted that ethnicity strongly affects the genetic variability of GST enzymes. In particular, GST haplotypes/variants with functional impact showed significant differences in human populations, according to their ethnic background. These data underline that human populations have different structures in detoxification genes, suggesting that these ethnic differences influence disease risk or response to drugs and therefore have implications for genetic association studies involving GST enzymes. In conclusion, our investigation provides data about the distribution of important LoF variants in GST genes in human populations. This information may be useful for designing and interpreting genetic association studies.

  10. FOXN1 homozygous mutation associated with anencephaly and severe neural tube defect in human athymic Nude/SCID fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorosi, S; D'Armiento, M; Calcagno, G; Russo, I; Adriani, M; Christiano, A M; Weiner, L; Brissette, J L; Pignata, C

    2008-04-01

    The forkhead, Fox, gene family comprises a diverse group of 'winged-helix' transcription factors that play important roles in development, metabolism, cancer and aging. Recently, several forkhead genes have been demonstrated to play critical roles in lymphocyte development and effector functions. Alterations of the FOXN1 gene in both mice and humans result in a severe combined immunodeficiency caused by an intrinsic defect of the thymus associated with congenital alopecia (Nude/severe combined immunodeficiency phenotype). FOXN1 is a member of the class of proteins involved in the development and differentiation of the central nervous system. We identified a human fetus homozygous for a mutation in FOXN1 gene who lacked the thymus and also had abnormal skin, anencephaly and spina bifida. Moreover, we found that FOXN1 gene is expressed in mouse developing choroid plexus. These observations suggest that FOXN1 may be involved in neurulation in humans.

  11. Human cytochrome P450 enzyme specificity for bioactivation of safrole to the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxysafrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Bogaards, J.J.P.; Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Brand, W.; Fiamegos, Y.C.; Beek, T.A. van; Alink, G.M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, the cytochrome P450 mediated bioactivation of safrole to its proximate carcinogenic metabolite, 1′-hydroxysafrole, has been investigated for the purpose of identifying the human P450 enzymes involved. The 1′-hydroxylation of safrole was characterized in a variety of in vitro te

  12. Data on cytochrome c oxidase assembly in mice and human fibroblasts or tissues induced by SURF1 defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářová, Nikola; Pecina, Petr; Nůsková, Hana; Vrbacký, Marek; Zeviani, Massimo; Mráček, Tomáš; Viscomi, Carlo; Houštěk, Josef

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes data related to a research article entitled "Tissue- and species-specific differences in cytochrome c oxidase assembly induced by SURF1 defects" [1]. This paper includes data of the quantitative analysis of individual forms of respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV present in SURF1 knockout (SURF1 (-/-) ) and control (SURF1 (+/+) ) mouse fibroblasts and tissues and in fibroblasts of human control and patients with SURF1 gene mutation. Also it includes data demonstrating response of complex IV, cytochrome c oxidase (COX), to reversible inhibition of mitochondrial translation in SURF1 (-/-) mouse and SURF1 patient fibroblast cell lines.

  13. The study of neural tube defects after the Human Genome Project and folic acid fortification of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, W D; Oleinik, O E

    2000-12-01

    The implementation of folic acid fortification will eliminate a proportion of neural tube defects (NTD). As a result, the etiologic and clinical profiles of the developmental disorder may both change. In the assessment of NTD as it evolves, the bioinformatics structure and content of the Human Genome Project will find vital application. One important development will be an enhanced understanding of the role of folic acid in global regulation of gene expression through epigenetic processes. In addition, bioinformatics will facilitate coordination of research in the basic sciences with clinical investigations to better define remaining etiologic factors.

  14. Value of the small cohort study including a physical examination for minor structural defects in identifying new human teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Christina D

    2011-03-01

    Most known human teratogens are associated with a unique or characteristic pattern of major and minor malformations and this pattern helps to establish the causal link between the teratogenic exposure and the outcome. Although traditional case-control and cohort study designs can help identify potential teratogens, there is an important role for small cohort studies that include a dysmorphological examination of exposed and unexposed infants for minor structural defects. In combination with other study design approaches, the small cohort study with a specialized physical examination fulfills a necessary function in screening for new potential teratogens and can help to better delineate the spectrum and magnitude of risk for known teratogens.

  15. Different enzyme kinetics of midazolam in recombinant CYP3A4 microsomes from human and insect sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hege; Mathiesen, Liv; Postvoll, Lillian W; Winther, Bjørn; Molden, Espen

    2009-01-01

    In vitro drug metabolism techniques with human CYP c-DNA expressed systems are frequently used to predict human drug metabolism in vivo. The aim of this study was to compare midazolam enzyme kinetics in recombinant expressed CYP3A4 microsomes from human and insect cells. The amounts of 1'- hydroxymidazolam and 4-hydroxymidazolam formed in CYP3A4 microsomes from transfected human liver epithelial cells (T5-3A4 microsomes) and baculovirus-infected insect cells (with and without coexpressed cytochrome b(5)) were analysed by LC-MS. Enzyme kinetic parameters were estimated by nonlinear regression. Mean K(m) for the formation of 1'-hydroxymidazolam was 3- and 4-fold higher in T5-3A4 microsomes than in insect microsomes (pmicrosomes was reflected by significantly lower Cl(int) compared to insect microsomes (pmicrosomes displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, while insect microsomes showed substrate inhibition kinetics. The different enzyme kinetics of midazolam observed in recombinant CYP3A4 microsomes from human and insect sources, especially the substantially higher K(m) obtained in human microsomes compared to insect microsomes, should be further evaluated since it may have implications for correlations to in vivo situation.

  16. Rare variants in NR2F2 cause congenital heart defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K; Mercer, Catherine L; Gerety, Sebastian S; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Swaminathan, G Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Louw, Jacoba; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M; O'Kelly, Ita M; Salmon, Anthony P; Bu'lock, Frances A; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Fitzpatrick, David F; Wilson, David I; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10(-7)) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters.

  17. Quantifiable mRNA transcripts for tamoxifen-metabolising enzymes in human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Maneesh N; Stringfellow, Helen F; Walsh, Michael J; Ashton, Kate M; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Abdo, Khalil R; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Phillips, David H; Martin, Francis L

    2008-07-10

    Tamoxifen has been used in the management of receptor-positive breast cancer for >20 years. Usage confers an elevated risk of developing endometrial carcinoma. Its mechanism of carcinogenicity remains unresolved with controversy as to whether or not this is mediated through a genotoxic mechanism. Usage is not only associated with an elevated occurrence of endometrioid endometrial carcinoma, but also type 2 and mixed epithelial-stromal tumours (MESTs) that have a poorer prognosis. Following hysterectomy, endometrial tissues (n=18) classified as benign (n=6), non-tamoxifen-associated carcinoma (n=6) and tamoxifen-associated carcinoma (n=6) were obtained; quantitative gene expression was performed. Employing real-time RT-PCR, the relative gene expressions of phase I/II metabolic enzymes CYP1A2, CYP1B1 and CYP3A4, cathechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and SULT2A1 were ascertained. Measurable mRNA transcripts, especially for those genes associated with tamoxifen bioactivation, were quantifiable in all the tissues examined. Whether this is evidence that generation of genotoxic tamoxifen metabolites may occur in human endometrial tissue remains to be ascertained.

  18. Human liver enzymes responsible for metabolic elimination of tyramine; a vasopressor agent from daily food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Toshiro; Murayama, Norie; Umeyama, Hiromi; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Dietary tyramine is associated with hypertensive crises because of its ability to induce the release of catecholamines. The roles of monoamine oxidase (MAO); flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO); and cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) were studied in terms of the enzymatic elimination of tyramine in vitro at a substrate concentration of 1.0 µM; which is relevant to in vivo serum concentrations. Tyramine elimination by human liver supernatant fractions was decreased by ˜70% in the absence of NADPH. Pargyline; an MAO inhibitor; decreased tyramine elimination rates by ˜30%. Among recombinant P450 and FMO enzymes; CYP2D6 had a high activity in terms of tyramine elimination. Tyramine elimination rates were inhibited by quinidine and significantly correlated with bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation activities (a CYP2D6 marker). Liver microsomes genotyped for CYP2D6*10/*10 and CYP2D6*4/*4 showed low and undetectable activities; respectively; compared with the wild-type CYP2D6*1/*1. The present results suggest that tyramine is eliminated mainly by polymorphic CYP2D6. Tyramine toxicity resulting from differences in individual metabolic elimination is thus genetically determined.

  19. Evaluation of an enzyme immunoassay for estrogen receptors in human breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, R I; Colin, P; Francis, A B; Keshra, R; Finlay, P; Williams, M; Elston, C W; Blamey, R W; Griffiths, K

    1986-08-01

    An estrogen receptor enzyme immunoassay kit (ER-EIA) has been evaluated in 70 human breast carcinomas against a routine cytoplasmic [3H]estradiol binding assay (ERU). A linear correlation between the ER-EIA and the ERU was observed for binding values up to 400 fmol/mg of cytosol protein. Above this value, the ERU underestimates the concentration of receptor. The ERU gave a lower number of estrogen receptor-positive tumors (50 of 70) than did the ER-EIA assay (59 of 70). In the ERU-negative ER-EIA-positive tumors, receptor values as determined by the ER-EIA assay all fell below 50 fmol/mg of protein (mean, 19.9 +/- 4.2 fmol/mg of protein). Application of an exchange procedure which estimates the total steroid binding capacity of the cytosol gave positive results in 7 of 9 ERU-negative ER-EIA-positive tumors (mean, 16.9 +/- 2.95 fmol/mg of protein). Subdivision of the binding data according to the menopausal status of the patient indicates low receptor values in premenopausal women by each assay. A correlation between the ER-EIA assay and the histological grade of tumors was observed; Grade I well-differentiated tumors were all positive, while Grade II and III tumors were 86% and 75% positive, respectively. No correlation between the ER-EIA assay and tumor lymph node stage or tumor size was observed.

  20. Enzyme catalysed production of sialylated human milk oligosaccharides and galactooligosaccharides by Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Jesper; Larsen, Dorte M; Michalak, Malwina; Li, Haiying; Kjærulff, Louise; Kirpekar, Finn; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Forssten, Sofia; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2014-03-25

    A Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (E.C. 3.2.1.18) was cloned into Pichia pastoris and expressed. The pH and temperature optimum of the enzyme was determined as pH 5.7 and 30°C. Using casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) and lactose as sialyl-donor and acceptor respectively, the optimal donor/acceptor ratio for the trans-sialidase catalysed 3'-sialyllactose production was found to be 1:4. Quantitative amounts of 3'-sialyllactose were produced from CGMP and lactose at a yield of 40mg/g CGMP. The 3'-sialyllactose obtained exerted a stimulatory effect on selected probiotic strains, including different Bifidobacterium strains in single culture fermentations. The trans-sialidase also catalysed the transfer of sialic acid from CGMP to galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) and to the human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) backbone lacto-N-tetraose (LNT) to produce 3'-sialyl-GOS, including doubly sialylated GOS products, and 3'-sialyl-LNT, respectively. This work thus provides proof of the concept of producing 3'-sialyllactose and potentially other sialylated HMOs as well as sialylated GOS enzymatically by trans-sialidase activity, while at the same time providing valorisation of CGMP, a co-processing product from cheese manufacture.

  1. Genomic Analysis of the Human Gut Microbiome Suggests Novel Enzymes Involved in Quinone Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Thiele, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinone and menaquinone are membrane lipid-soluble carriers of electrons that are essential for cellular respiration. Eukaryotic cells can synthesize ubiquinone but not menaquinone, whereas prokaryotes can synthesize both quinones. So far, most of the human gut microbiome (HGM) studies have been based on metagenomic analysis. Here, we applied an analysis of individual HGM genomes to the identification of ubiquinone and menaquinone biosynthetic pathways. In our opinion, the shift from metagenomics to analysis of individual genomes is a pivotal milestone in investigation of bacterial communities, including the HGM. The key results of this study are as follows. (i) The distribution of the canonical pathways in the HGM genomes was consistent with previous reports and with the distribution of the quinone-dependent reductases for electron acceptors. (ii) The comparative genomics analysis identified four alternative forms of the previously known enzymes for quinone biosynthesis. (iii) Genes for the previously unknown part of the futalosine pathway were identified, and the corresponding biochemical reactions were proposed. We discuss the remaining gaps in the menaquinone and ubiquinone pathways in some of the microbes, which indicate the existence of further alternate genes or routes. Together, these findings provide further insight into the biosynthesis of quinones in bacteria and the physiology of the HGM. PMID:26904004

  2. A functionally atypical amidating enzyme from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Gunnar R; Niciu, Mark J; Stewart, Michael T; Brennan, Gerry; Omar, Hanan; Halton, David W; Mains, Richard; Eipper, Betty A; Maule, Aaron G; Day, Tim A

    2004-01-01

    Many neuropeptide transmitters require the presence of a carboxy-terminal alpha-amide group for biological activity. Amidation requires conversion of a glycine-extended peptide intermediate into a C-terminally amidated product. This post-translational modification depends on the sequential action of two enzymes (peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase or PHM, and peptidyl-alpha-hydroxyglycine alpha-amidating lyase or PAL) that in most eukaryotes are expressed as separate domains of a single protein (peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase or PAM). We identified a cDNA encoding PHM in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. Transient expression of schistosome PHM (smPHM) revealed functional properties that are different from other PHM proteins; smPHM displays a lower pH-optimum and, when expressed in mammalian cells, is heavily N-glycosylated. In adult worms, PHM is found in the trans-Golgi network and secretory vesicles of both central and peripheral nerves. The widespread occurrence of PHM in the nervous system confirms the important role of amidated neuropeptides in these parasitic flatworms. The differences between schistosome and mammalian PHM suggest that it could be a target for new chemotherapeutics.

  3. Fructose-1,6-diphosphatase deficiency: Another enzyme defect which can present itself with the clinical features of “tyrosinosis”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, H.D.; Bree, P.K. de; Ketting, D.; Sprang, F.J. van; Wadman, S.K.

    1974-01-01

    An infant with a picture of hereditary liver disease corresponding in many respects with so-called “tyrosinosis” is described. The primary defect appeared to be fructose-l,6-diphosphatase deficiency, which was not recognized during the patient's life. Many abnormalities of amino acid metabolism

  4. Global developmental gene expression and pathway analysis of normal brain development and mouse models of human neuronal migration defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramparo, Tiziano; Libiger, Ondrej; Jain, Sonia; Li, Hong; Youn, Yong Ha; Hirotsune, Shinji; Schork, Nicholas J; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2011-03-01

    Heterozygous LIS1 mutations are the most common cause of human lissencephaly, a human neuronal migration defect, and DCX mutations are the most common cause of X-linked lissencephaly. LIS1 is part of a protein complex including NDEL1 and 14-3-3ε that regulates dynein motor function and microtubule dynamics, while DCX stabilizes microtubules and cooperates with LIS1 during neuronal migration and neurogenesis. Targeted gene mutations of Lis1, Dcx, Ywhae (coding for 14-3-3ε), and Ndel1 lead to neuronal migration defects in mouse and provide models of human lissencephaly, as well as aid the study of related neuro-developmental diseases. Here we investigated the developing brain of these four mutants and wild-type mice using expression microarrays, bioinformatic analyses, and in vivo/in vitro experiments to address whether mutations in different members of the LIS1 neuronal migration complex lead to similar and/or distinct global gene expression alterations. Consistent with the overall successful development of the mutant brains, unsupervised clustering and co-expression analysis suggested that cell cycle and synaptogenesis genes are similarly expressed and co-regulated in WT and mutant brains in a time-dependent fashion. By contrast, focused co-expression analysis in the Lis1 and Ndel1 mutants uncovered substantial differences in the correlation among pathways. Differential expression analysis revealed that cell cycle, cell adhesion, and cytoskeleton organization pathways are commonly altered in all mutants, while synaptogenesis, cell morphology, and inflammation/immune response are specifically altered in one or more mutants. We found several commonly dysregulated genes located within pathogenic deletion/duplication regions, which represent novel candidates of human mental retardation and neurocognitive disabilities. Our analysis suggests that gene expression and pathway analysis in mouse models of a similar disorder or within a common pathway can be used to define

  5. Evolutionary developmental pathology and anthropology: A new field linking development, comparative anatomy, human evolution, morphological variations and defects, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Smith, Christopher M; Ziermann, Janine M

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new subfield of the recently created field of Evolutionary-Developmental-Anthropology (Evo-Devo-Anth): Evolutionary-Developmental-Pathology-and-Anthropology (Evo-Devo-P'Anth). This subfield combines experimental and developmental studies of nonhuman model organisms, biological anthropology, chordate comparative anatomy and evolution, and the study of normal and pathological human development. Instead of focusing on other organisms to try to better understand human development, evolution, anatomy, and pathology, it places humans as the central case study, i.e., as truly model organism themselves. We summarize the results of our recent Evo-Devo-P'Anth studies and discuss long-standing questions in each of the broader biological fields combined in this subfield, paying special attention to the links between: (1) Human anomalies and variations, nonpentadactyly, homeotic transformations, and "nearest neighbor" vs. "find and seek" muscle-skeleton associations in limb+facial muscles vs. other head muscles; (2) Developmental constraints, the notion of "phylotypic stage," internalism vs. externalism, and the "logic of monsters" vs. "lack of homeostasis" views about human birth defects; (3) Human evolution, reversions, atavisms, paedomorphosis, and peromorphosis; (4) Scala naturae, Haeckelian recapitulation, von Baer's laws, and parallelism between phylogeny and development, here formally defined as "Phylo-Devo parallelism"; and (5) Patau, Edwards, and Down syndrome (trisomies 13, 18, 21), atavisms, apoptosis, heart malformations, and medical implications.

  6. Islet expression of the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanosine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1) in human type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon Kun-Ho; Wang-Rodriguez Jessica; Dib Sergio A.; Anachkov Kamen A; Tyrberg Björn; Levine Fred

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background It has become increasingly clear that β-cell failure plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Free-radical mediated β-cell damage has been intensively studied in type 1 diabetes, but not in human type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we studied the protein expression of the DNA repair enzyme Ogg1 in pancreases from type 2 diabetics. Ogg1 was studied because it is the major enzyme involved in repairing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine DNA adducts, a lesion previously o...

  7. Protective Potential of Antioxidant Enzymes as Vaccines for Schistosomiasis in a Non-Human Primate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Queiroz, Claudia; Nyakundi, Ruth; Ogongo, Paul; Rikoi, Hitler; Egilmez, Nejat K.; Farah, Idle O.; Kariuki, Thomas M.; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a major cause of morbidity in the world. The challenge today is not so much in the clinical management of individual patients, but rather in population-based control of transmission in endemic areas. Despite recent large-scale efforts, such as integrated control programs aimed at limiting schistosomiasis by improving education and sanitation, molluscicide treatment programs and chemotherapy with praziquantel, there has only been limited success. There is an urgent need for complementary approaches, such as vaccines. We demonstrated previously that anti-oxidant enzymes, such as Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S peroxidase (GPX), when administered as DNA-based vaccines induced significant levels of protection in inbred mice, greater than the target 40% reduction in worm burden compared to controls set as a minimum by the WHO. These results led us to investigate if immunization of non-human primates with antioxidants would stimulate an immune response that could confer protection as a prelude study for human trials. Issues of vaccine toxicity and safety that were difficult to address in mice were also investigated. All baboons in the study were examined clinically throughout the study and no adverse reactions occurred to the immunization. When our outbred baboons were vaccinated with two different formulations of SOD (SmCT-SOD and SmEC-SOD) or one of GPX (SmGPX), they showed a reduction in worm number to varying degrees, when compared with the control group. More pronounced, vaccinated animals showed decreased bloody diarrhea, days of diarrhea, and egg excretion (transmission), as well as reduction of eggs in the liver tissue and in the large intestine (pathology) compared to controls. Specific IgG antibodies were present in sera after immunizations and 10 weeks after challenge infection compared to controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, mesenteric, and inguinal node cells from vaccinated animals proliferated and

  8. Pituitary Adenoma With Paraganglioma/Pheochromocytoma (3PAs) and Succinate Dehydrogenase Defects in Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Bullova, Petra; Giubellino, Alessio; Quezado, Martha; Mastroyannis, Spyridon A.; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Wassif, Christopher A.; Raygada, Margarita; Rentia, Nadia; Dye, Louis; Cougnoux, Antony; Koziol, Deloris; Sierra, Maria de La Luz; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Malchoff, Carl; Moline, Jessica; Eng, Charis; Maher, Louis James; Pacak, Karel; Lodish, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Context: Germline mutations in genes coding succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits A, B, C, and D have been identified in familial paragangliomas (PGLs)/pheochromocytomas (PHEOs) and other tumors. We described a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma (PA) caused by SDHD mutation in a patient with familial PGLs. Additional patients with PAs and SDHx defects have since been reported. Design: We studied 168 patients with unselected sporadic PA and with the association of PAs, PGLs, and/or pheochromocytomas, a condition we named the 3P association (3PAs) for SDHx germline mutations. We also studied the pituitary gland and hormonal profile of Sdhb+/− mice and their wild-type littermates at different ages. Results: No SDHx mutations were detected among sporadic PA, whereas three of four familial cases were positive for a mutation (75%). Most of the SDHx-deficient PAs were either prolactinomas or somatotropinomas. Pituitaries of Sdhb+/− mice older than 12 months had an increased number mainly of prolactin-secreting cells and several ultrastructural abnormalities such as intranuclear inclusions, altered chromatin nuclear pattern, and abnormal mitochondria. Igf-1 levels of mutant mice tended to be higher across age groups, whereas Prl and Gh levels varied according to age and sex. Conclusion: The present study confirms the existence of a new association that we termed 3PAs. It is due mostly to germline SDHx defects, although sporadic cases of 3PAs without SDHx defects also exist. Using Sdhb+/− mice, we provide evidence that pituitary hyperplasia in SDHx-deficient cells may be the initial abnormality in the cascade of events leading to PA formation. PMID:25695889

  9. The human Bloom syndrome gene suppresses the DNA replication and repair defects of yeast dna2 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Osamu; Campbell, Judith L

    2003-07-08

    Bloom syndrome is a disorder of profound and early cancer predisposition in which cells become hypermutable, exhibit high frequency of sister chromatid exchanges, and show increased micronuclei. BLM, the gene mutated in Bloom syndrome, has been cloned previously, and the BLM protein is a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Many lines of evidence suggest that BLM is involved either directly in DNA replication or in surveillance during DNA replication, but its specific roles remain unknown. Here we show that hBLM can suppress both the temperature-sensitive growth defect and the DNA damage sensitivity of the yeast DNA replication mutant dna2-1. The dna2-1 mutant is defective in a helicase-nuclease that is required either to coordinate with the crucial Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sc) FEN1 nuclease in Okazaki fragment maturation or to compensate for scFEN1 when its activity is impaired. We show that human BLM interacts with both scDna2 and scFEN1 by using coimmunoprecipitation from yeast extracts, suggesting that human BLM participates in the same steps of DNA replication or repair as scFEN1 and scDna2.

  10. Combined use of Y-tube conduits with human umbilical cord stem cells for repairing nerve bifurcation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikeremujiang Muheremu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the anatomic complexity at the bifurcation point of a nerve trunk, enforced suturing between stumps can lead to misdirection of nerve axons, thereby resulting in adverse consequences. We assumed that Y-tube conduits injected with human umbilical cord stem cells could be an effective method to solve such problems, but studies focused on the best type of Y-tube conduit remain controversial. Therefore, the present study evaluated the applicability and efficacy of various types of Y-tube conduits containing human umbilical cord stem cells for treating rat femoral nerve defects on their bifurcation points. At 12 weeks after the bridging surgery that included treatment with different types of Y-tube conduits, there were no differences in quadriceps femoris muscle weight or femoral nerve ultrastructure. However, the Y-tube conduit group with longer branches and a short trunk resulted in a better outcome according to retrograde labeling and electrophysiological analysis. It can be concluded from the study that repairing a mixed nerve defect at its bifurcation point with Y-tube conduits, in particular those with long branches and a short trunk, is effective and results in good outcomes.

  11. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, A. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kramer, J. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Stiglbauer, R. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hajek, P.C. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    1993-04-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  12. Identification and characterization of novel rare mutations in the planar cell polarity gene PRICKLE1 in human neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosoi, Ciprian M; Capra, Valeria; Allache, Redouane; Trinh, Vincent Quoc-Huy; De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Drapeau, Pierre; Bassuk, Alexander G; Kibar, Zoha

    2011-12-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls the process of convergent extension (CE) during gastrulation and neural tube closure, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects (NTDs) in animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we analyzed the role of one core PCP gene PRICKLE1 in these malformations. We screened this gene in 810 unrelated NTD patients and identified seven rare missense heterozygous mutations that were absent in all controls analyzed and predicted to be functionally deleterious using bioinformatics. Functional validation of five PRICKLE1 variants in a zebrafish model demonstrated that one variant, p.Arg682Cys, antagonized the CE phenotype induced by the wild-type zebrafish prickle1a (zpk1a) in a dominant fashion. Our study demonstrates that PRICKLE1 could act as a predisposing factor to human NTDs and further expands our knowledge of the role of PCP genes in the pathogenesis of these malformations.

  13. Development of a novel ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay for human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Satoshi; Katakami, Hideki; Inoue, Shinobu; Sawada, Hirotake; Hashida, Seiichi

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel, ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay (immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay) for determination of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody concentrations in serum samples from patients with type 2 diabetes. We developed an immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and measured glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody from 22 patients with type 1 diabetes, 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 32 healthy controls. A conventional ELISA kit identified 10 patients with type 1 diabetes and one patient with type 2 diabetes as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive, whereas 15 patients with type 1 diabetes and six patients with type 2 diabetes were identified as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive using immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay. Immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay is a highly sensitive and specific assay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and might be clinically useful for diabetic onset prediction and early diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Modeling Pathogenic Mutations of Human Twinkle in Drosophila Suggests an Apoptosis Role in Response to Mitochondrial Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Calleja, Manuel; Peralta, Susana; Matsushima, Yuichi; Hernandez-Sierra, Rosana; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Kaguni, Laurie S.; Garesse, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    The human gene C10orf2 encodes the mitochondrial replicative DNA helicase Twinkle, mutations of which are responsible for a significant fraction of cases of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO), a human mitochondrial disease caused by defects in intergenomic communication. We report the analysis of orthologous mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) helicase gene, d-mtDNA helicase. Increased expression of wild type d-mtDNA helicase using the UAS-GAL4 system leads to an increase in mtDNA copy number throughout adult life without any noteworthy phenotype, whereas overexpression of d-mtDNA helicase containing the K388A mutation in the helicase active site results in a severe depletion of mtDNA and a lethal phenotype. Overexpression of two d-mtDNA helicase variants equivalent to two human adPEO mutations shows differential effects. The A442P mutation exhibits a dominant negative effect similar to that of the active site mutant. In contrast, overexpression of d-mtDNA helicase containing the W441C mutation results in a slight decrease in mtDNA copy number during the third instar larval stage, and a moderate decrease in life span in the adult population. Overexpression of d-mtDNA helicase containing either the K388A or A442P mutations causes a mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defect that significantly reduces cell proliferation. The mitochondrial impairment caused by these mutations promotes apoptosis, arguing that mitochondria regulate programmed cell death in Drosophila. Our study of d-mtDNA helicase overexpression provides a tractable Drosophila model for understanding the cellular and molecular effects of human adPEO mutations. PMID:22952820

  15. Sulfatases and a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) enzyme are key for mucosal foraging and fitness of the prominent human gut symbiont, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Martens, Eric C; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Berteau, Olivier

    2011-07-22

    The large-scale application of genomic and metagenomic sequencing technologies has yielded a number of insights about the metabolic potential of symbiotic human gut microbes. Nevertheless, the molecular basis of the interactions between commensal bacteria and their host remained to be investigated. Bacteria colonizing the mucosal layer that overlies the gut epithelium are exposed to highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucin and glycosaminoglycans). These polymers can serve as potential nutrient sources, but their high sulfate content usually prevents their degradation. Commensal bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron possess more predicted sulfatase genes than in the human genome, the physiological functions of which are largely unknown. To be active, sulfatases must undergo a critical post-translational modification catalyzed in anaerobic bacteria by the radical AdoMet enzyme anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME). In the present study, we have tested the role of this pathway in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron which, in addition to 28 predicted sulfatases, possesses a single predicted anSME. In vitro studies revealed that deletion of the gene encoding its anSME (BT0238) results in loss of sulfatase activity and impaired ability to use sulfated polysaccharides as carbon sources. Co-colonization of formerly germ-free mice with both isogenic strains (i.e. wild-type or ΔanSME), or invasion experiments involving introduction of one followed by the other strain established that anSME activity and the sulfatases activated via this pathway, are important fitness factors for B. thetaiotaomicron, especially when mice are fed a simple sugar diet that requires this saccharolytic bacterium to adaptively forage on host glycans as nutrients. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of wild-type and the anSME mutant in vivo revealed that loss of this enzyme alters expression of genes involved in mucin utilization and that this disrupted ability to access mucosal glycans

  16. Detecting gene-environment interactions in human birth defects: Study designs and statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Caroline G; Graff, Rebecca E; Liu, Jinghua; Passarelli, Michael N; Mefford, Joel A; Shaw, Gary M; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Witte, John S

    2015-08-01

    The National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) contains a wealth of information on affected and unaffected family triads, and thus provides numerous opportunities to study gene-environment interactions (G×E) in the etiology of birth defect outcomes. Depending on the research objective, several analytic options exist to estimate G×E effects that use varying combinations of individuals drawn from available triads. In this study, we discuss important considerations in the collection of genetic data and environmental exposures. We will also present several population- and family-based approaches that can be applied to data from the NBDPS including case-control, case-only, family-based trio, and maternal versus fetal effects. For each, we describe the data requirements, applicable statistical methods, advantages, and disadvantages. A range of approaches can be used to evaluate potentially important G×E effects in the NBDPS. Investigators should be aware of the limitations inherent to each approach when choosing a study design and interpreting results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Characterization of radioresistant variant from U251 human glioblastoma cell line and the role of antioxdant enzymes in its radioresistancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyung Chahn; Park, In Chul; Park, Myung Jin; Woo, Sang Hyeok; Rhee, Chang Hum; Hong, Seok-II [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the radioresistant mechanism in glioblastoma multiforme(GBM), we isolated the radioresistant clone (RRC) from U251 human glioblastoma cell line by exposing to repeated fractions of 3 Gy {gamma}-radiation for six months. RRC had higher radioresistance than the parent cell line as measured by clonogenic survival assay. FACS analysis showed that RRC had a delayed G2 arrest after radiation. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), were activated up to 5 folds in RRC after radiation. Erk 1/2 activation was higher in RRC than in the parent cell. Therefore, radioresistancy in RRC might be due to the delayed cell cycle, the coordinated high activation of antioxidant enzyme rather than a single enzyme alone,and higher activation of Erk 1/2.

  18. Reversible inhibition of three important human liver cytochrome p450 enzymes by tiliroside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dong-Xue; Lu, Jin-Cai; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Cao, Yun-Feng; Mao, Yu-Xi; Zhu, Liang-Liang; Yin, Jun; Yang, Ling

    2010-11-01

    Tiliroside, an active flavonoid extensively found in many medicinal plants including Helichrysum italicum, Geranium mexicanum and Helianthemum glomeratum, has been demonstrated to exert multiple biological effects including antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant and antitumor activities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play an important role in the Phase I oxidation metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics and inhibition of CYP isoforms might influence the elimination of drugs and induce serious adverse drug response. The inhibition of seven CYP isoforms (CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2C8 and CYP2E1) by tiliroside was investigated using in vitro human liver microsomal incubation assays. The results showed that tiliroside strongly inhibited the activity of CYP3A4 (IC(50) = 9.0 ± 1.7 μm), CYP2C8 (IC(50) = 12.1 ± 0.9 μm) and CYP2C9 (IC(50) = 10.2 ± 0.9 μm) with other CYP isoforms negligibly influenced. Further kinetic analysis showed that inhibition of these three CYP isoforms by tiliroside is best fit to a competitive way. The K(i) value was calculated to be 5.5 μm, 3.3 μm, 9.4 μm for CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and CYP2C8, respectively. The relatively low K(i) values suggested that tiliroside might induce drug-drug interactions with many clinically used drugs which are mainly metabolized by these three CYP isoforms. Therefore, attention should be given to the probable drug-drug interaction between tiliroside-containing herbs and substrates of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and CYP2C8.

  19. Healing of human intrabony defects following regenerative periodontal therapy with a bovine-derived xenograft and guided tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sculean, A; Stavropoulos, A; Windisch, P; Keglevich, T; Karring, T; Gera, I

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the healing of human intrabony defects following treatment with either a bovine-derived xenograft (BDX) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) [BDX + GTR] or a bovine-derived xenograft mixed with collagen (BDX Coll) and GTR [BDX Coll + GTR]. Eight patients with chronic periodontitis and each with one very deep intrabony defect around a tooth scheduled for extraction were treated with either a combination of BDX + GTR (five patients) or with BDX Coll + GTR (three patients). The postoperative healing was uneventful in all eight cases. After a healing period of 6 months, the teeth or roots were extracted together with some of their surrounding soft and hard tissues and subsequently fixed in 10% buffered formalin. Following decalcification in EDTA, the specimens were embedded in paraffin and 8-microm histological sections were cut in the mesio-distal direction, parallel to the long axes of the teeth. The sections were alternatively stained with hematoxylin and eosin, van Giesson's connective tissue stain or with the Ladevig's connective tissue staining method and examined under the light microscope. Generally, formation of new cementum with inserting collagen fibers was found in seven out of the eight treated cases, whereas in the remaining case (treated with BDX + GTR) the healing was characterized by formation of a long junctional epithelium along the debrided root surface and no formation of cementum or bone. In the specimens demonstrating periodontal regeneration the new cementum was always of a cellular type. In most cases, the graft particles were surrounded by bone. In some areas, the bone tissue around the graft particles was connected by perpendicularly inserting collagen fibers to the newly formed cementum on the root surface. The epithelium downgrowth stopped always at the most coronal part of the newly formed cementum. No remnants of the membrane material were observed in any of the biopsies

  20. Exome sequencing and CRISPR/Cas genome editing identify mutations of ZAK as a cause of limb defects in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spielmann, M.; Kakar, N.; Tayebi, N.; Leettola, C.; Nurnberg, G.; Sowada, N.; Lupianez, D.G.; Harabula, I.; Flottmann, R.; Horn, D.; Chan, W.L.; Wittler, L.; Yilmaz, R.; Altmuller, J.; Thiele, H.; Bokhoven, H. van; Schwartz, C.E.; Nurnberg, P.; Bowie, J.U.; Ahmad, J.; Kubisch, C.; Mundlos, S.; Borck, G.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology enables targeted genome editing and the rapid generation of transgenic animal models for the study of human genetic disorders. Here we describe an autosomal recessive human disease in two unrelated families characterized by a split-foot defect, nail abnormalities of the

  1. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor peptides derived from the endostatin-containing NC1 fragment of human collagen XVIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Shirley L; Sabatini, Regiane A; Sampaio, Tatiana C; Hirata, Izaura Y; Cezari, Maria Helena S; Juliano, Maria A; Sturrock, Edward D; Carmona, Adriana K; Juliano, Luiz

    2006-05-01

    Extracellular matrix and soluble plasma proteins generate peptides that regulate biological activities such as cell growth, differentiation and migration. Bradykinin, a peptide released from kininogen by kallikreins, stimulates vasodilatation and endothelial cell proliferation. Various classes of substances can potentiate these biological actions of bradykinin. Among them, the best studied are bradykinin potentiating peptides (BPPs) derived from snake venom, which can also strongly inhibit angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. We identified and synthesized sequences resembling BPPs in the vicinity of potential proteolytic cleavage sites in the collagen XVIII molecule, close to endostatin. These peptides were screened as inhibitors of human recombinant wild-type ACE containing two intact functional domains; two full-length ACE mutants containing only a functional C- or N-domain catalytic site; and human testicular ACE, a natural form of the enzyme that only contains the C-domain. The BPP-like peptides inhibited ACE in the micromolar range and interacted preferentially with the C-domain. The proteolytic activity involved in the release of BPP-like peptides was studied in human serum and human umbilical-vein endothelial cells. The presence of enzymes able to release these peptides in blood led us to speculate on a physiological mechanism for the control of ACE activities.

  2. Critical Amino Acid Residues for Nicotine 5' -Hydroxylation in Human CYP2A Enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyang He Xiaoyang He; Xu Xu; Jian Shen; Li Sun; Anthony Y. H. Lu; Clifford Weisel; Junyan Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We have continued previous work in which we demonstrated that #117 and #372 amino acids contrib-uted to the high activities of human CYP2A13 in catalyzing 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-hutanone(NNK) and aflatoxin B1(AFB1) carcinogenic activation. The present study was designed to identify other potential amino acid residues that contribute to the different catalytic characteristics of two CYP2A enzymes, CYP2A6 and CYP2A13, in nicotine metabolism and provide insights of the substrate and related amino acid residues interactions. Methods: A series of reciprocally substituted mutants of CYP2A6IIe'300→Phe, CYP2A6Gly'301Ala, CYP2A6Ser'369→Gly, CYP2A13Phe'300→Ile, CYP2A13AIa'301→Gly and CYP2A13Gly'369→Ser were generated by site-directed mutagenesis/baculovirus-Sf9 insect cells expression. Comparative kinetic analysis of nicotine 5'hydroxylatin by wild type and mutant CYP2A proteins was performed. Results:All amino acid residue substitutions at 300, 301 and 369 caused significant kinetic property changes in nicotine metabolism. While CYP2A6Ile'300→Phe and CYP2A6Gly'301→Ala mutations had notable catalytic efficiency increases compared to that for the wild type CYP2A6, CYP2A13Phe'300→Ile and CYP2A13Ala'301→Gly replacement introduced remarkable catalytic efficiency decreases. In addition, all these catalytic efficiency alterations were caused by V,maxvariations rather than K,m changes. Substi-tution of #369 residue significantly affected both K,m and V,max values. CYP2A6Ser'369→Gly increase the catalytic efficiency via a significant Km decrease versus V,max enhancement, while the opposite effects were seen with CYP2A13Gly'369→Ser. Conclusion:#300, #301 and #369 residues in human CYP2A6/13 play important roles in nicotine 5' -oxidation. Switching #300 or #301 residues did not affect the CYP2A protein affinities toward nicotine, although these amino acids are located in the active center. Seta69 to Gly substitution indirectly affected

  3. Effect of sprint cycle training on activities of antioxidant enzymes in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Apple, F. S.; Sjödin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of intermittent sprint cycle training on the level of muscle antioxidant enzyme protection was investigated. Resting muscle biopsies, obtained before and after 6 wk of training and 3, 24, and 72 h after the final session of an additional 1 wk of more frequent training, were analyzed...... for activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Activities of several muscle metabolic enzymes were determined to assess the effectiveness of the training. After the first 6-wk training period, no change in GPX, GR, or SOD...... the level of antioxidant protection in the muscle....

  4. Presence of a lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase-A, in the prelysosome-endosome compartments of human cultured fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B M; Yu, C Z; Chang, P L

    1989-02-01

    Although endosomes and lysosomes are associated with different subcellular functions, we present evidence that a lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase-A, is present in prelysosomal vesicles which constitute part of the endosomal compartment. When human cultured fibroblasts were subfractionated with Percoll gradients, arylsulfatase-A activity was enriched in three subcellular fractions: dense lysosomes, light lysosomes, and light membranous vesicles. Pulsing the cells for 1 to 10 min with the fluid-phase endocytic marker, horseradish peroxidase, showed that endosomes enriched with the marker were distributed partly in the light lysosome fraction but mainly in the light membranous fraction. By pulsing the fibroblasts for 10 min with horseradish peroxidase conjugated to colloidal gold and then staining the light membranous and light lysosomal fractions for arylsulfatase-A activity with a specific cytochemical technique, the endocytic marker was detected under the electron microscope in the same vesicles as the lysosomal enzyme. The origin of the lysosomal enzyme in this endosomal compartment was shown not to be acquired through mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated endocytosis of enzymes previously secreted from the cell. Together with our recent finding that the light membranous fraction contains prelysosomes distinct from bona fide lysosomes and was highly enriched with newly synthesized arylsulfatase-A molecules, these results demonstrate that prelysosomes also constitute part of the endosomal compartment to which intracellular lysosomal enzymes are targeted.

  5. Multifunctional human transcriptional coactivator protein PC4 is a substrate of Aurora kinases and activates the Aurora enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, Karthigeyan; Kumari, Sujata; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Shima, Hiroki; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Bachu, Mahesh; Ranga, Udaykumar; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-03-01

    Positive coactivator 4 (PC4), a human transcriptional coactivator, is involved in diverse processes like chromatin organization and transcription regulation. It is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis, with unknown significance. For the first time, we demonstrate the function of PC4 outside the nucleus upon nuclear envelope breakdown. A fraction of PC4 associates with Aurora A and Aurora B and undergoes phosphorylation, following which PC4 activates both Aurora A and B to sustain optimal kinase activity to maintain the phosphorylation gradient for the proper functioning of the mitotic machinery. This mitotic role is evident in PC4 knockdown cells where the defects are rescued only by the catalytically active Aurora kinases, but not the kinase-dead mutants. Similarly, the PC4 phosphodeficient mutant failed to rescue such defects. Hence, our observations establish a novel mitotic function of PC4 that might be dependent on Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylation.

  6. Thalidomide increases human hepatic cytochrome P450 3A enzymes by direct activation of the pregnane X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Norie; van Beuningen, Rinie; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Shibata, Norio; Yajima, Kanako; Utoh, Masahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Chesné, Christophe; Nakamura, Masato; Guengerich, F Peter; Houtman, René; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-17

    Heterotropic cooperativity of human cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4/3A5 by the teratogen thalidomide was recently demonstrated by H. Yamazaki et al. ( ( 2013 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 26 , 486 - 489 ) using the model substrate midazolam in various in vitro and in vivo models. Chimeric mice with humanized liver also displayed enhanced midazolam clearance upon pretreatment with orally administered thalidomide, presumably because of human P450 3A induction. In the current study, we further investigated the regulation of human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Thalidomide enhanced levels of P450 3A4 and 2B6 mRNA, protein expression, and/or oxidation activity in human hepatocytes, indirectly suggesting the activation of upstream transcription factors involved in detoxication, e.g., the nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). A key event after ligand binding is an alteration of nuclear receptor conformation and recruitment of coregulator proteins that alter chromatin accessibility of target genes. To investigate direct engagement and functional alteration of PXR and CAR by thalidomide, we utilized a peptide microarray with 154 coregulator-derived nuclear receptor-interaction motifs and coregulator and nuclear receptor boxes, which serves as a sensor for nuclear receptor conformation and activity status as a function of ligand. Thalidomide and its human proximate metabolite 5-hydroxythalidomide displayed significant modulation of coregulator interaction with PXR and CAR ligand-binding domains, similar to established agonists for these receptors. These results collectively suggest that thalidomide acts as a ligand for PXR and CAR and causes enzyme induction leading to increased P450 enzyme activity. The possibilities of drug interactions during thalidomide therapy in humans require further evaluation.

  7. Metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide by cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Yuuki; Usami, Atsushi; Rangsunvigit, Pramoch; Malakul, Pomthong; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide was investigated using human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes for the first time. Both isomers of rose oxide were incubated with human liver microsomes, and the formation of the respective 9-oxidized metabolite were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Of 11 different recombinant human P450 enzymes used, CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 were the primary enzymes catalysing the metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide. CYP1A2 also efficiently oxidized (-)-cis-rose oxide at the 9-position but not (-)-trans-rose oxide. α-Naphthoflavone (a selective CYP1A2 inhibitor), thioTEPA (a CYP2B6 inhibitor) and anti-CYP2B6 antibody inhibited (-)-cis-rose oxide 9-hydroxylation catalysed by human liver microsomes. On the other hand, the metabolism of (-)-trans-rose oxide was suppressed by thioTEPA and anti-CYP2B6 at a significant level in human liver microsomes. However, omeprazole (a CYP2C19 inhibitor) had no significant effects on the metabolism of both isomers of rose oxide. Using microsomal preparations from nine different human liver samples, (-)-9-hydroxy-cis- and (-)-9-hydroxy-trans-rose oxide formations correlated with (S)-mephenytoin N-demethylase activity (CYP2B6 marker activity). These results suggest that CYP2B6 plays important roles in the metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide in human liver microsomes.

  8. Functional defects in NOD2 signaling in experimental and human Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corridoni, Daniele; Arseneau, Kristen O; Cominelli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that a deficit in innate immunity may play a causative role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The most compelling support for this hypothesis comes from the genetic association of Crohn disease (CD) with carriage of polymorphisms within the NOD2 gene, which represent the most frequent genetic defect in CD. Our findings suggest that SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop CD-like ileitis in the absence of NOD2 genetic mutations, fail to respond to MDP administration by displaying decreased innate cytokine production and impaired bacterial clearance before the onset of disease. This provides evidence that dysregulated NOD2 signaling, genetic or functional in nature, predisposes to chronic intestinal inflammation, and supports a new paradigm that CD may occur from a deficit in innate immunity as opposed to an overly aggressive immune response. This new paradigm could lead to potential development of new preventative or therapeutic modalities for patients with CD.

  9. Defects in the IFT-B component IFT172 cause Jeune and Mainzer-Saldino syndromes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbritter, Jan; Bizet, Albane A; Schmidts, Miriam; Porath, Jonathan D; Braun, Daniela A; Gee, Heon Yung; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Krug, Pauline; Filhol, Emilie; Davis, Erica E; Airik, Rannar; Czarnecki, Peter G; Lehman, Anna M; Trnka, Peter; Nitschké, Patrick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Schueler, Markus; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Burtey, Stéphane; Szabó, Attila J; Tory, Kálmán; Leo, Paul J; Gardiner, Brooke; McKenzie, Fiona A; Zankl, Andreas; Brown, Matthew A; Hartley, Jane L; Maher, Eamonn R; Li, Chunmei; Leroux, Michel R; Scambler, Peter J; Zhan, Shing H; Jones, Steven J; Kayserili, Hülya; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Moorani, Khemchand N; Constantinescu, Alexandru; Krantz, Ian D; Kaplan, Bernard S; Shah, Jagesh V; Hurd, Toby W; Doherty, Dan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Duncan, Emma L; Otto, Edgar A; Beales, Philip L; Mitchison, Hannah M; Saunier, Sophie; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-11-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) depends on two evolutionarily conserved modules, subcomplexes A (IFT-A) and B (IFT-B), to drive ciliary assembly and maintenance. All six IFT-A components and their motor protein, DYNC2H1, have been linked to human skeletal ciliopathies, including asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD; also known as Jeune syndrome), Sensenbrenner syndrome, and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Conversely, the 14 subunits in the IFT-B module, with the exception of IFT80, have unknown roles in human disease. To identify additional IFT-B components defective in ciliopathies, we independently performed different mutation analyses: candidate-based sequencing of all IFT-B-encoding genes in 1,467 individuals with a nephronophthisis-related ciliopathy or whole-exome resequencing in 63 individuals with ATD. We thereby detected biallelic mutations in the IFT-B-encoding gene IFT172 in 12 families. All affected individuals displayed abnormalities of the thorax and/or long bones, as well as renal, hepatic, or retinal involvement, consistent with the diagnosis of ATD or MZSDS. Additionally, cerebellar aplasia or hypoplasia characteristic of Joubert syndrome was present in 2 out of 12 families. Fibroblasts from affected individuals showed disturbed ciliary composition, suggesting alteration of ciliary transport and signaling. Knockdown of ift172 in zebrafish recapitulated the human phenotype and demonstrated a genetic interaction between ift172 and ift80. In summary, we have identified defects in IFT172 as a cause of complex ATD and MZSDS. Our findings link the group of skeletal ciliopathies to an additional IFT-B component, IFT172, similar to what has been shown for IFT-A.

  10. Expression of the glutathione enzyme system of human colon mucosa by localisation, gender and age.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoensch, H.; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Kirch, W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glutathione S-transferases (GST) can metabolise endogenous and exogenous toxins and carcinogens by catalysing the conjugation of diverse electrophiles with reduced glutathione (GSH). Variations of GST enzyme activity could influence the susceptibility of developing cancers in certain

  11. Missing osteoconductive effect of a resorbable PEO/PBT copolymer in human bone defects: a clinically relevant pilot study with contrary results to previous animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, M; Wilke, A; Griss, P; Kienapfel, H

    2000-01-01

    PEO/PBT 70/30 (POLYACTIVE(R) 70/30), a degradable porous copolymer with elastic properties, was found to be osteoconductive in many animal studies. The aim of this study was to determine the osteoconductive effect in a human paired control iliac defect model. In seven patients undergoing anterior spinal interbody fusion surgery, two bicortical iliac defects for autograft harvesting were created. The defect size was identical for both defects measuring about 40 x 15 mm (group I). One defect was filled with the degradable implants, whereas the remaining one was left untreated as a control. The defect site for treatment was chosen randomly. In three further patients, only one defect measuring about 40 x 35 mm was created (group II). All patients were examined clinically and radiologically by spiral-CT after 1, 6, 12, 24, and 52 weeks. Three-dimensional reconstructions as well as CT-volumetric measurements using 1 mm sections were used as evaluation methods. In group I, a two-tailed paired t-test showed that the treated defects had significantly less formation of new bone than the untreated ones (p < 0.05 after 12 weeks, p < 0.01 after 52 weeks). Also, in group II, not much bone ingrowth could be observed. The histological evaluation of one patient in group I revealed no bone within the pores, and a fibrous layer between bone and implant was always present. Therefore, PEO/PBT 70/30 cannot be recommended as a bone substitute for clinical use. Differences in bone regeneration between humans and certain animal species as well as inapplicable defect models in previous animal studies are discussed as possible reasons for the failure.

  12. A therapeutic strategy for spinal cord defect: human dental follicle cells combined with aligned PCL/PLGA electrospun material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghan; Yang, Chao; Li, Lei; Xiong, Jie; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell implantation has been utilized for the repair of spinal cord injury; however, it shows unsatisfactory performance in repairing large scale lesion of an organ. We hypothesized that dental follicle cells (DFCs), which possess multipotential capability, could reconstruct spinal cord defect (SCD) in combination with biomaterials. In the present study, mesenchymal and neurogenic lineage characteristics of human DFCs (hDFCs) were identified. Aligned electrospun PCL/PLGA material (AEM) was fabricated and it would not lead to cytotoxic reaction; furthermore, hDFCs could stretch along the oriented fibers and proliferate efficiently on AEM. Subsequently, hDFCs seeded AEM was transplanted to restore the defect in rat spinal cord. Functional observation was performed but results showed no statistical significance. The following histologic analyses proved that AEM allowed nerve fibers to pass through, and implanted hDFCs could express oligodendrogenic lineage maker Olig2 in vivo which was able to contribute to remyelination. Therefore, we concluded that hDFCs can be a candidate resource in neural regeneration. Aligned electrospun fibers can support spinal cord structure and induce cell/tissue polarity. This strategy can be considered as alternative proposals for the SCD regeneration studies.

  13. Planar cell polarity gene mutations contribute to the etiology of human neural tube defects in our population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Piatelli, Gianluca; Cama, Armando; Kibar, Zoha; Capra, Valeria

    2014-08-01

    Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) are congenital malformations that involve failure of the neural tube closure during the early phases of development at any level of the rostro-caudal axis. The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is a highly conserved, noncanonical Wnt-Frizzled-Dishevelled signaling cascade, that was first identified in the fruit fly Drosophila. We are here reviewing the role of the PCP pathway genes in the etiology of human NTDs, updating the list of the rare and deleterious mutations identified so far. We report 50 rare nonsynonymous mutations of PCP genes in 54 patients having a pathogenic effect on the protein function. Thirteen mutations that have previously been reported as novel are now reported in public databases, although at very low frequencies. The mutations were private, mostly missense, and transmitted by a healthy parent. To date, no clear genotype-phenotype correlation has been possible to create. Even if PCP pathway genes are involved in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects, future studies will be necessary to better dissect the genetic causes underlying these complex malformations.

  14. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  15. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  16. Widespread Epigenetic Abnormalities Suggest a Broad DNA Methylation Erasure Defect in Abnormal Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Kimberly; Yang, Allen; Laird, Peter W.; Sokol, Rebecca Z.

    2007-01-01

    Background Male-factor infertility is a common condition, and etiology is unknown for a high proportion of cases. Abnormal epigenetic programming of the germline is proposed as a possible mechanism compromising spermatogenesis of some men currently diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. During germ cell maturation and gametogenesis, cells of the germ line undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This process involves widespread erasure of somatic-like patterns of DNA methylation followed by establishment of sex-specific patterns by de novo DNA methylation. Incomplete reprogramming of the male germ line could, in theory, result in both altered sperm DNA methylation and compromised spermatogenesis. Methodology/Principal Finding We determined concentration, motility and morphology of sperm in semen samples collected by male members of couples attending an infertility clinic. Using MethyLight and Illumina assays we measured methylation of DNA isolated from purified sperm from the same samples. Methylation at numerous sequences was elevated in DNA from poor quality sperm. Conclusions This is the first report of a broad epigenetic defect associated with abnormal semen parameters. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism for these epigenetic changes may be improper erasure of DNA methylation during epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ line. PMID:18074014

  17. Widespread epigenetic abnormalities suggest a broad DNA methylation erasure defect in abnormal human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Houshdaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Male-factor infertility is a common condition, and etiology is unknown for a high proportion of cases. Abnormal epigenetic programming of the germline is proposed as a possible mechanism compromising spermatogenesis of some men currently diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. During germ cell maturation and gametogenesis, cells of the germ line undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This process involves widespread erasure of somatic-like patterns of DNA methylation followed by establishment of sex-specific patterns by de novo DNA methylation. Incomplete reprogramming of the male germ line could, in theory, result in both altered sperm DNA methylation and compromised spermatogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We determined concentration, motility and morphology of sperm in semen samples collected by male members of couples attending an infertility clinic. Using MethyLight and Illumina assays we measured methylation of DNA isolated from purified sperm from the same samples. Methylation at numerous sequences was elevated in DNA from poor quality sperm. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of a broad epigenetic defect associated with abnormal semen parameters. Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism for these epigenetic changes may be improper erasure of DNA methylation during epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ line.

  18. GATA6 mutations cause human cardiac outflow tract defects by disrupting semaphorin-plexin signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodo, Kazuki; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Furutani, Michiko; Arai, Shoichi; Yamamura, Eiji; Joo, Kunitaka; Takahashi, Takao; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHD) occur in nearly 1% of all live births and are the major cause of infant mortality and morbidity. Although an improved understanding of the genetic causes of CHD would provide insight into the underlying pathobiology, the genetic etiology of most CHD remains unknown. Here we show that mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor GATA6 cause CHD characteristic of a severe form of cardiac outflow tract (OFT) defect, namely persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA). Two different GATA6 mutations were identified by systematic genetic analysis using DNA from patients with PTA. Genes encoding the neurovascular guiding molecule semaphorin 3C (SEMA3C) and its receptor plexin A2 (PLXNA2) appear to be regulated directly by GATA6, and both GATA6 mutant proteins failed to transactivate these genes. Transgenic analysis further suggests that, in the developing heart, the expression of SEMA3C in the OFT/subpulmonary myocardium and PLXNA2 in the cardiac neural crest contributing to the OFT is dependent on GATA transcription factors. Together, our data implicate mutations in GATA6 as genetic causes of CHD involving OFT development, as a result of the disruption of the direct regulation of semaphorin-plexin signaling. PMID:19666519

  19. HPV16 E7 protein and hTERT proteins defective for telomere maintenance cooperate to immortalize human keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Miller

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that wild-type human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT protein can functionally replace the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 E6 protein, which cooperates with the viral E7 protein in the immortalization of primary keratinocytes. In the current study, we made the surprising finding that catalytically inactive hTERT (hTERT-D868A, elongation-defective hTERT (hTERT-HA, and telomere recruitment-defective hTERT (hTERT N+T also cooperate with E7 in mediating bypass of the senescence blockade and effecting cell immortalization. This suggests that hTERT has activities independent of its telomere maintenance functions that mediate transit across this restriction point. Since hTERT has been shown to have a role in gene activation, we performed microarray studies and discovered that E6, hTERT and mutant hTERT proteins altered the expression of highly overlapping sets of cellular genes. Most important, the E6 and hTERT proteins induced mRNA and protein levels of Bmi1, the core subunit of the Polycomb Group (PcG complex 1. We show further that Bmi1 substitutes for E6 or hTERT in cell immortalization. Finally, tissue array studies demonstrated that expression of Bmi1 increased with the severity of cervical dysplasia, suggesting a potential role in the progression of cervical cancer. Together, these data demonstrate that hTERT has extra-telomeric activities that facilitate cell immortalization and that its induction of Bmi1 is one potential mechanism for mediating this activity.

  20. Mutations in the COPII vesicle component gene SEC24B are associated with human neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Yan; Zhou, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Qing Qing; Li, Hong; Chen, Ying; Lei, Yun-Ping; Ma, Xiao-Hang; Kong, Pan; Shi, Yan; Jin, Li; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Hong-Yan

    2013-08-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe birth malformations that affect one in 1,000 live births. Recently, mutations in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes had been implicated in the pathogenesis of NTDs in both the mouse model and in human cohorts. Mouse models indicate that the homozygous disruption of Sec24b, which mediates the ER-to-Golgi transportation of the core PCP gene Vangl2 as a component of the COPII vesicle, will result in craniorachischisis. In this study, we found four rare missense heterozygous SEC24B mutations (p.Phe227Ser, p.Phe682Leu, p.Arg1248Gln, and p.Ala1251Gly) in NTDs cases that were absent in all controls. Among them, p.Phe227Ser and p.Phe682Leu affected its protein stability and physical interaction with VANGL2. Three variants (p.Phe227Ser, p.Arg1248Gln, and p.Ala1251Gly) were demonstrated to affect VANGL2 subcellular localization in cultured cells. Further functional analysis in the zebrafish including overexpression and dosage-dependent rescue study suggested that these four mutations all displayed loss-of-function effects compared with wild-type SEC24B. Our study demonstrated that functional mutations in SEC24B might contribute to the etiology of a subset of human NTDs and further expanded our knowledge of the role of PCP pathway-related genes in the pathogenesis of human NTDs.

  1. AM-2201 Inhibits Multiple Cytochrome P450 and Uridine 5′-Diphospho-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

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    Ju-Hyun Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AM-2201 is a synthetic cannabinoid that acts as a potent agonist at cannabinoid receptors and its abuse has increased. However, there are no reports of the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on human cytochrome P450 (CYP or uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT enzymes. We evaluated the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on the activities of eight major human CYPs (1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and six major human UGTs (1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B7 enzymes in pooled human liver microsomes using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry to investigate drug interaction potentials of AM-2201. AM-2201 potently inhibited CYP2C9-catalyzed diclofenac 4′-hydroxylation, CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1′-hydroxylation, UGT1A3-catalyzed chenodeoxycholic acid 24-acyl-glucuronidation, and UGT2B7-catalyzed naloxone 3-glucuronidation with IC50 values of 3.9, 4.0, 4.3, and 10.0 μM, respectively, and showed mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8-catalyzed amodiaquine N-deethylation with a Ki value of 2.1 μM. It negligibly inhibited CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, and UGT1A9 activities at 50 μM in human liver microsomes. These in vitro results indicate that AM-2201 needs to be examined for potential pharmacokinetic drug interactions in vivo due to its potent inhibition of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and UGT2B7 enzyme activities.

  2. AM-2201 Inhibits Multiple Cytochrome P450 and Uridine 5'-Diphospho-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kwon, Soon-Sang; Kong, Tae Yeon; Cheong, Jae Chul; Kim, Hee Seung; In, Moon Kyo; Lee, Hye Suk

    2017-03-10

    AM-2201 is a synthetic cannabinoid that acts as a potent agonist at cannabinoid receptors and its abuse has increased. However, there are no reports of the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on human cytochrome P450 (CYP) or uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. We evaluated the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on the activities of eight major human CYPs (1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4) and six major human UGTs (1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B7) enzymes in pooled human liver microsomes using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to investigate drug interaction potentials of AM-2201. AM-2201 potently inhibited CYP2C9-catalyzed diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation, CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylation, UGT1A3-catalyzed chenodeoxycholic acid 24-acyl-glucuronidation, and UGT2B7-catalyzed naloxone 3-glucuronidation with IC50 values of 3.9, 4.0, 4.3, and 10.0 μM, respectively, and showed mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8-catalyzed amodiaquine N-deethylation with a Ki value of 2.1 μM. It negligibly inhibited CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, and UGT1A9 activities at 50 μM in human liver microsomes. These in vitro results indicate that AM-2201 needs to be examined for potential pharmacokinetic drug interactions in vivo due to its potent inhibition of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and UGT2B7 enzyme activities.

  3. Predicting Drug Extraction in the Human Gut Wall: Assessing Contributions from Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporter Proteins using Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Jones, Christopher R; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Hatley, Oliver J D

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal metabolism can limit oral bioavailability of drugs and increase the risk of drug interactions. It is therefore important to be able to predict and quantify it in drug discovery and early development. In recent years, a plethora of models-in vivo, in situ and in vitro-have been discussed in the literature. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge in the quantitative prediction of gut-wall metabolism. As well as discussing the successes of current models for intestinal metabolism, the challenges in the establishment of good preclinical models are highlighted, including species differences in the isoforms; regional abundances and activities of drug metabolizing enzymes; the interplay of enzyme-transporter proteins; and lack of knowledge on enzyme abundances and availability of empirical scaling factors. Due to its broad specificity and high abundance in the intestine, CYP3A is the enzyme that is frequently implicated in human gut metabolism and is therefore the major focus of this review. A strategy to assess the impact of gut wall metabolism on oral bioavailability during drug discovery and early development phases is presented. Current gaps in the mechanistic understanding and the prediction of gut metabolism are highlighted, with suggestions on how they can be overcome in the future.

  4. Measurement of deoxyribonuclease I activity in human tissues and body fluids by a single radial enzyme-diffusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadano, D; Yasuda, T; Kishi, K

    1993-03-01

    In the single radial enzyme-diffusion (SRED) method for assay of deoxyribonuclease I, a precisely measured volume of the enzyme solution is dispensed into a circular well in an agarose gel layer in which DNA and ethidium bromide are uniformly distributed. A circular dark zone is formed as the enzyme diffuses from the well radially into the gel and digests substrate DNA. The diameter of the dark circle of hydrolyzed DNA increases in size with time and correlates linearly with the amount of enzyme applied to the well. Thus, the SRED can be used for quantitation of deoxyribonuclease I with a limit of detection of 2 x 10(-6) unit. This corresponds to 1 pg of purified urine deoxyribonuclease I. We measured the deoxyribonuclease I activity of 17 different human tissues and body fluids from healthy donors. Urine samples showed the greatest activity, 6.0 +/- 2.2 kilo-units/g protein (mean +/- SD). Serum deoxyribonuclease I activity was 4.4 +/- 1.8 units/L.

  5. Deletion of the c-kit protooncogene in the human developmental defect piebald trait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischman, R.A.; Stastny, V.; Zneimer, S. (Univ. of Texas, Dallas (United States)); Saltman, D.L. (Genelabs, Inc., Redwood City, CA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The protooncogene c-kit is critical for development of hematopoietic stem cells, germ cells, and melanoblasts in the mouse. Homozygous mutations of this gene in the mouse cause anemia, infertility, and albinism, whereas heterozygous mutant mice usually exhibit only a white forehead blaze and depigmentation of the ventral body, tail, and feet. The heterozygous mouse phenotype is very similar to human piebald trait, which is characterized by a congenital white hair forelock and ventral and extremity depigmentation. To investigate the possibility that alterations in the human c-kit gene may be a cause of piebald trait, DNA from seven unrelated affected individuals was examined by Southern blot analysis. One subject, although cytogenetically normal, has a heterozygous deletion of the c-kit protooncogene. This deletion encompasses the entire coding region for c-kit and also involves the closely linked gene for platelet-derived growth factor receptor {alpha}. These findings provide molecular evidence mapping piebald trait to the c-kit locus on chromosome 4. Although the authors cannot exclude the involvement of other closely linked genes, the demonstration of a genomic c-kit deletion in one subject with piebald trait and the marked concordance of the human and mouse phenotypes provide strong evidence for the role of c-kit in the development of human melanocytes and in the pathogenesis of piebald trait.

  6. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-01-29

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases.

  7. Gene transfer of integration defective anti-HSV-1 meganuclease to human corneas ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawy, H M; Gailledrat, M; Desseaux, C; Salvalaio, G; Di Iorio, E; Ferrari, B; Bertolin, M; Barbaro, V; Parekh, M; Gayon, R; Munegato, D; Franchin, E; Calistri, A; Palù, G; Parolin, C; Ponzin, D; Ferrari, S

    2014-03-01

    Corneal graft rejection is a major problem in chronic herpetic keratitis (HK) patients with latent infection. A new class of antiviral agents targeting latent and active forms of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is importantly required. Meganucleases are sequence-specific homing endonucleases capable of inducing DNA double-strand breaks. A proof-of-concept experiment has shown that tailor-made meganucleases are efficient against HSV-1 in vitro. To take this work a step forward, we hypothesized that the pre-treatment of human corneas in eye banks using meganuclease-encoding vectors will allow HK patients to receive a medicated cornea to resist the recurrence of the infection and the common graft rejection problem. However, this strategy requires efficient gene delivery to human corneal endothelium. Using recombinant adeno-associated virus, serotype 2/1 (rAAV2/1), efficient gene delivery of a reporter gene was demonstrated in human corneas ex vivo. The optimum viral dose was 3.7 × 10(11) VG with an exposure time of 1 day, followed by 6 days incubation in de-swelling medium. In addition, 12 days incubation can result in transgene expression in excess of 70%. Using similar transduction conditions, meganuclease transgene expression was detected in 39.4% of the endothelial cells after 2 weeks in culture. Reduction of the total viral load in the media and the endothelial cells of corneas infected with HSV-1 was shown. Collectively, this work provides information about the optimum conditions to deliver genetic material to the cornea, and demonstrates for the first time the expression of meganuclease in human corneas ex vivo and its antiviral activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the treatment of human corneas in eye banks before transplantation is a new approach to address the unmet clinical needs in corneal diseases.

  8. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  9. Influence of acetyl-carnitine on some mitochondrial enzymic activities in the human cerebral tissue in conditions of acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Melis, A; Piga, M; Marchionni, A; Calvani, M

    1992-01-01

    Following previous research on human tissue in conditions of acute and massive hypoxia, in the present work the authors compared the cellular enzymic response to oxidative stress in normoxic (perifocal) and hypoxic (focal) areas in human brain affected by regional acute vasculopathies. Two homogeneous groups of patients were selected following strict clinical inclusion/exclusion criteria. The groups of patients were treated with a placebo or acetyl-carnitine at same doses and following randomized, double-blind procedures. The focal areas showed a significant functional damage in lactate, pyruvate and succinate dehydrogenases and in the cytochrome oxidase activity when compared with the enzymic capacities of perifocal areas (normoxic as controls). The pretreatment with acetyl-carnitine antagonized the above-mentioned enzymic damage by a protective action linked to the endocellular energy restoration. In accordance with these data, the therapeutic role played by acetyl-carnitine in the cerebral focal hypoxia appeared to be a determinant for the cell survival mainly in the reversible phase of oxidative damage.

  10. Coordination of gene expression of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid cascade enzymes during human brain development and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica H Ryan

    Full Text Available The polyunsaturated arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids (AA and DHA participate in cell membrane synthesis during neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity, and neurotransmission throughout life. Each is metabolized via coupled enzymatic reactions within separate but interacting metabolic cascades.AA and DHA pathway genes are coordinately expressed and underlie cascade interactions during human brain development and aging.The BrainCloud database for human non-pathological prefrontal cortex gene expression was used to quantify postnatal age changes in mRNA expression of 34 genes involved in AA and DHA metabolism.Expression patterns were split into Development (0 to 20 years and Aging (21 to 78 years intervals. Expression of genes for cytosolic phospholipases A2 (cPLA2, cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and -2, and other AA cascade enzymes, correlated closely with age during Development, less so during Aging. Expression of DHA cascade enzymes was less inter-correlated in each period, but often changed in the opposite direction to expression of AA cascade genes. Except for the PLA2G4A (cPLA2 IVA and PTGS2 (COX-2 genes at 1q25, highly inter-correlated genes were at distant chromosomal loci.Coordinated age-related gene expression during the brain Development and Aging intervals likely underlies coupled changes in enzymes of the AA and DHA cascades and largely occur through distant transcriptional regulation. Healthy brain aging does not show upregulation of PLA2G4 or PTGS2 expression, which was found in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. MOLECULAR MODELLING OF HUMAN ALDEHYDE OXIDASE AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE KEY INTERACTIONS IN THE ENZYME-SUBSTRATE COMPLEX

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    Siavoush Dastmalchi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1, a cytosolic enzyme containing FAD, molybdenum and iron-sulphur cluster, is a member of non-cytochrome P-450 enzymes called molybdenum hydroxylases which is involved in the metabolism of a wide range of endogenous compounds and many drug substances. Drug metabolism is one of the important characteristics which influences many aspects of a therapeutic agent such as routes of administration, drug interaction and toxicity and therefore, characterisation of the key interactions between enzymes and substrates is very important from drug development point of view. The aim of this study was to generate a three-dimensional model of human aldehyde oxidase (AO in order to assist us to identify the mode of interaction between enzyme and a set of phethalazine/quinazoline derivatives. Both sequence-based (BLAST and inverse protein fold recognition methods (THREADER were used to identify the crystal structure of bovine xanthine dehydrogenase (pdb code of 1FO4 as the suitable template for comparative modelling of human AO. Model structure was generated by aligning and then threading the sequence of human AO onto the template structure, incorporating the associated cofactors, and molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization using GROMACS program. Different criteria which were measured by the PROCHECK, QPACK, VERIFY-3D were indicative of a proper fold for the predicted structural model of human AO. For example, 97.9 percentages of phi and psi angles were in the favoured and most favoured regions in the ramachandran plot, and all residues in the model are assigned environmentally positive compatibility scores. Further evaluation on the model quality was performed by investigation of AO-mediated oxidation of a set of phthalazine/quinazoline derivatives to develop QSAR model capable of describing the extent of the oxidation. Substrates were aligned by docking onto the active site of the enzyme using GOLD technology and then

  12. [Inhibitory effect of imperatorin and isoimperatorin on activity of cytochrome P450 enzyme in human and rat liver microsomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Zhong, Yu-Huan; Yuan, Mei; Li, Hua; Zhao, Chun-Jie

    2013-04-01

    Imperatorin (IM) and isoimperatorin (ISOIM) are major active components of common herbal medicines from Umbelliferae plants, and widely used in clinic. This article studies the inhibitory effect of IM and ISOIM on the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme, and assesses their potential drug-drug interaction. IM and ISOIM were incubated separately with human or rat liver microsomes for 30 min, with phenacetin, bupropion, tolbutamide, S-mephenytoin, dextromethorphan and midazolam as probe substrates. Metabolites of the CYP probe substrates were determined by LC-MS/MS, and IC50 values were calculated to assess the inhibitory effect of the two drugs on human CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 enzymes, as well as on rat CYP1A2, 2B6, 2D2 and 3A1/2, and grade their inhibitory intensity. In human liver microsomes, IM and ISOIM showed different inhibitory effects on all of the six CYP isoenzymes. They were strong inhibitors for 1A2 and 2B6. The IC50 values were 0.05 and 0.20 micromol x L(-1) for 1A2, and 0.18 and 1.07 micromol x L(-1) for 2B6, respectively. They also showed moderate inhibitory effect on 2C19, and weak effect on 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4. In rat liver microsomes, IM and ISOIM were identified as moderate inhibitors for 1A2, with IC50 values of 1.95 and 2.98 micromol x L(-1). They were moderate and weak inhibitors for 2B6, with IC50 values of 6.22 and 21.71 micromol x L(-1), respectively. They also had weaker inhibitory effect on 2D2 and 3A1/2. The results indicated that IM and ISOIM had extensive inhibitory effects on human CYP enzymes. They are strong inhibitors of CYP1 A2 and 2B6 enzymes. However, it is worth noting the interaction arising from the inhibitory effect of CYP enzymes in clinic.

  13. Resorption of monetite granules in alveolar bone defects in human patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Bassett, David; Barralet, Jake; Cabarcos, Enrique L

    2010-04-01

    Bone grafting is often required to restore mandibular or maxillary bone volume prior to prosthetic tooth root implantation. Preclinical animal models are often used to study the in vivo properties of new bone graft products designed for human use. Although animal studies may offer valuable data regarding bioperformance, materials do not necessarily perform the same in human patients. In this study we implanted bovine hydroxyapatite (BH), a widely used porous apatite granule, and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (monetite) granules, bilaterally in human patients post extraction alveolar sockets. After six months, histomorphometrical analysis of the biopsies revealed that the amount of bone regenerated with monetite (59.5 +/- 13%) was significantly higher than that obtained with BH (33.1% +/- 4.9), while the amount of unresorbed graft was higher in the sockets treated with BH (37.8 +/- 6.1) than in those implanted with monetite (25.8 +/- 14.3). Resorption of calcium phosphate ceramics is discussed by applying the Hixon-Crowell dissolution model.

  14. Adenanthin, a new inhibitor of thiol-dependent antioxidant enzymes, impairs the effector functions of human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siernicka, Marta; Winiarska, Magdalena; Bajor, Malgorzata; Firczuk, Malgorzata; Muchowicz, Angelika; Bobrowicz, Malgorzata; Fauriat, Cyril; Golab, Jakub; Olive, Daniel; Zagozdzon, Radoslaw

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are considered critical components of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Deficiencies in NK cell activity are common, such as those that occur in cancer patients, and they can be responsible for dysfunctional immune surveillance. Persistent oxidative stress is intrinsic to many malignant tumours, and numerous studies have focused on the effects of reactive oxygen species on the anti-tumour activity of NK cells. Indeed, investigations in animal models have suggested that one of the most important thiol-dependent antioxidant enzymes, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), is essential for NK cell function. In this work, our analysis of the transcriptomic expression pattern of antioxidant enzymes in human NK cells has identified PRDX1 as the most prominently induced transcript out of the 18 transcripts evaluated in activated NK cells. The change in PRDX1 expression was followed by increased expression of two other enzymes from the PRDX-related antioxidant chain: thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. To study the role of thiol-dependent antioxidants in more detail, we applied a novel compound, adenanthin, to induce an abrupt dysfunction of the PRDX-related antioxidant chain in NK cells. In human primary NK cells, we observed profound alterations in spontaneous and antibody-dependent NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, impaired degranulation, and a decreased expression of activation markers under these conditions. Collectively, our study pinpoints the unique role for the antioxidant activity of the PRDX-related enzymatic chain in human NK cell functions. Further understanding this phenomenon will prospectively lead to fine-tuning of the novel NK-targeted therapeutic approaches to human disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Cloning of the Human Tumor Supressor Gene INGI: DNA Cloning into Plasmid Vector and DNA Analysis by Restriction Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA cloning is one of the most important techniques In the field of molecular biology, with a critical role in analyzing the structure and function of genes and their adjacent regulatory regions. DNA cloning is helpful in learning fundamental molecular biological techniques, since DNA cloning involves a series of them, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR, DNA ligation, bacterial transformation, bacterial culture, plasmid DNA extraction, DNA digestion with restriction enzymes and agarose gel electrophoresis. In this paper the cloning of the human tumor suppressor gene INGI has been used to illustrate the methodology. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned into a TA-cloning vectore, and restriction enzyme mapping was used to distinguish the sense INGI construct from the antisense INGI construct.

  16. Differential 3-bromopyruvate inhibition of cytosolic and mitochondrial human serine hydroxymethyltransferase isoforms, key enzymes in cancer metabolic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiardini, Alessandro; Tramonti, Angela; Schirch, Doug; Guiducci, Giulia; di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Fiascarelli, Alessio; Giorgi, Alessandra; Maras, Bruno; Cutruzzolà, Francesca; Contestabile, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    The cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT1 and SHMT2, respectively) are well-recognized targets of cancer research, since their activity is critical for purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis and because of their prominent role in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Here we show that 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a potent novel anti-tumour agent believed to function primarily by blocking energy metabolism, differentially inactivates human SHMT1 and SHMT2. SHMT1 is completely inhibited by 3BP, whereas SHMT2 retains a significant fraction of activity. Site directed mutagenesis experiments on SHMT1 demonstrate that selective inhibition relies on the presence of a cysteine residue at the active site of SHMT1 (Cys204) that is absent in SHMT2. Our results show that 3BP binds to SHMT1 active site, forming an enzyme-3BP complex, before reacting with Cys204. The physiological substrate l-serine is still able to bind at the active site of the inhibited enzyme, although catalysis does not occur. Modelling studies suggest that alkylation of Cys204 prevents a productive binding of l-serine, hampering interaction between substrate and Arg402. Conversely, the partial inactivation of SHMT2 takes place without the formation of a 3BP-enzyme complex. The introduction of a cysteine residue in the active site of SHMT2 by site directed mutagenesis (A206C mutation), at a location corresponding to that of Cys204 in SHMT1, yields an enzyme that forms a 3BP-enzyme complex and is completely inactivated. This work sets the basis for the development of selective SHMT1 inhibitors that target Cys204, starting from the structure and reactivity of 3BP.

  17. Fermented wheat aleurone induces enzymes involved in detoxification of carcinogens and in antioxidative defence in human colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Katrin; Borowicki, Anke; Scharlau, Daniel; Glei, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Dietary fibre is fermented by the human gut flora resulting mainly in the formation of SCFA, for example, acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFA, in particular butyrate, may be important for secondary cancer prevention by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell growth of cancer cells, thereby inhibiting the promotion and/or progression of cancer. Furthermore, SCFA could also act on primary cancer prevention by activation of detoxifying and antioxidative enzymes. We investigated the effects of fermented wheat aleurone on the expression of genes involved in stress response and toxicity, activity of drug-metabolising enzymes and anti-genotoxic potential. Aleurone was digested and fermented in vitro to obtain samples that reflect the content of the colon. HT29 cells and colon epithelial stripes were incubated with the resulting fermentation supernatant fractions (fs) and effects on mRNA expression of CAT, GSTP1 and SULT2B1 and enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) were measured. Fermented aleurone was also used to study the protection against H2O2-induced DNA damage in HT29 cells. The fs of aleurone significantly induced the mRNA expression of CAT, GSTP1 and SULT2B1 (HT29) and GSTP1 (epithelial stripes), respectively. The enzyme activities of GST (HT29) and CAT (HT29, epithelial stripes) were also unambiguously increased (1.4- to 3.7-fold) by the fs of aleurone. DNA damage induced by H2O2 was significantly reduced by the fs of aleurone after 48 h, whereupon no difference was observed compared with the faeces control. In conclusion, fermented aleurone is able to act on primary prevention by inducing mRNA expression and the activity of enzymes involved in detoxification of carcinogens and antioxidative defence.

  18. Expression of the vitamin D metabolizing enzyme CYP24A1 at the annulus of human spermatozoa may serve as a novel marker of semen quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Blomberg; Jørgensen, A; Nielsen, J E;

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D (VD) is important for male reproduction in mammals and the VD receptor (VDR) and VD-metabolizing enzymes are expressed in human spermatozoa. The VD-inactivating enzyme CYP24A1 titrates the cellular responsiveness to VD, is transcriptionally regulated by VD, and has a distinct expression...

  19. Integration-defective lentiviral vector mediates efficient gene editing through homology-directed repair in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yebo; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2016-11-28

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are used as platforms for disease study, drug screening and cell-based therapy. To facilitate these applications, it is frequently necessary to genetically manipulate the hESC genome. Gene editing with engineered nucleases enables site-specific genetic modification of the human genome through homology-directed repair (HDR). However, the frequency of HDR remains low in hESCs. We combined efficient expression of engineered nucleases and integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) transduction for donor template delivery to mediate HDR in hESC line WA09. This strategy led to highly efficient HDR with more than 80% of the selected WA09 clones harboring the transgene inserted at the targeted genomic locus. However, certain portions of the HDR clones contained the concatemeric IDLV genomic structure at the target site, probably resulted from recombination of the IDLV genomic input before HDR with the target. We found that the integrase protein of IDLV mediated the highly efficient HDR through the recruitment of a cellular protein, LEDGF/p75. This study demonstrates that IDLV-mediated HDR is a powerful and broadly applicable technology to carry out site-specific gene modification in hESCs.

  20. Genetic defects of GDF6 in the zebrafish out of sight mutant and in human eye developmental anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    den Hollander Anneke I

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The size of the vertebrate eye and the retina is likely to be controlled at several stages of embryogenesis by mechanisms that affect cell cycle length as well as cell survival. A mutation in the zebrafish out of sight (out locus results in a particularly severe reduction of eye size. The goal of this study is to characterize the outm233 mutant, and to determine whether mutations in the out gene cause microphthalmia in humans. Results In this study, we show that the severe reduction of eye size in the outm233 mutant is caused by a mutation in the zebrafish gdf6a gene. Despite the small eye size, the overall retinal architecture appears largely intact, and immunohistochemical studies confirm that all major cell types are present in outm233 retinae. Subtle cell fate and patterning changes are present predominantly in amacrine interneurons. Acridine orange and TUNEL staining reveal that the levels of apoptosis are abnormally high in outm233 mutant eyes during early neurogenesis. Mutation analysis of the GDF6 gene in 200 patients with microphthalmia revealed amino acid substitutions in four of them. In two patients additional skeletal defects were observed. Conclusions This study confirms the essential role of GDF6 in the regulation of vertebrate eye size. The reduced eye size in the zebrafish outm233 mutant is likely to be caused by a transient wave of apoptosis at the onset of neurogenesis. Amino acid substitutions in GDF6 were detected in 4 (2% of 200 patients with microphthalmia. In two patients different skeletal defects were also observed, suggesting pleitrophic effects of GDF6 variants. Parents carrying these variants are asymptomatic, suggesting that GDF6 sequence alterations are likely to contribute to the phenotype, but are not the sole cause of the disease. Variable expressivity and penetrance suggest a complex non-Mendelian inheritance pattern where other genetic factors may influence the outcome of the phenotype.

  1. Human mandible bone defect repair by the grafting of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells and collagen sponge biocomplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R d’Aquino

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we used a biocomplex constructed from dental pulp stem/progenitor cells (DPCs and a collagen sponge scaffold for oro-maxillo-facial (OMF bone tissue repair in patients requiring extraction of their third molars. The experiments were carried out according to our Internal Ethical Committee Guidelines and written informed consent was obtained from the patients. The patients presented with bilateral bone reabsorption of the alveolar ridge distal to the second molar secondary to impaction of the third molar on the cortical alveolar lamina, producing a defect without walls, of at least 1.5 cm in height. This clinical condition does not permit spontaneous bone repair after extraction of the third molar, and eventually leads to loss also of the adjacent second molar. Maxillary third molars were extracted first for DPC isolation and expansion. The cells were then seeded onto a collagen sponge scaffold and the obtained biocomplex was used to fill in the injury site left by extraction of the mandibular third molars. Three months after autologous DPC grafting, alveolar bone of patients had optimal vertical repair and complete restoration of periodontal tissue back to the second molars, as assessed by clinical probing and X-rays. Histological observations clearly demonstrated the complete regeneration of bone at the injury site. Optimal bone regeneration was evident one year after grafting. This clinical study demonstrates that a DPC/collagen sponge biocomplex can completely restore human mandible bone defects and indicates that this cell population could be used for the repair and/or regeneration of tissues and organs.

  2. Improved functional expression of human cardiac kv1.5 channels and trafficking-defective mutants by low temperature treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guang Ding

    Full Text Available We herein investigated the effect of low temperature exposure on the expression, degradation, localization and activity of human Kv1.5 (hKv1.5. In hKv1.5-expressing CHO cells, the currents were significantly increased when cultured at a reduced temperature (28°C compared to those observed at 37°C. Western blot analysis indicated that the protein levels (both immature and mature proteins of hKv1.5 were significantly elevated under the hypothermic condition. Treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, significantly increased the immature, but not the mature, hKv1.5 protein at 37°C, however, there were no changes in either the immature or mature hKv1.5 proteins at low temperature following MG132 exposure. These observations suggest that the enhancement of the mature hKv1.5 protein at reduced temperature may not result from the inhibition of proteolysis. Moreover, the hKv1.5 fluorescence signal in the cells increased significantly on the cell surface at 28°C versus those cultured at 37°C. Importantly, the low temperature treatment markedly shifted the subcellular distribution of the mature hKv1.5, which showed considerable overlap with the trans-Golgi component. Experiments using tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation, indicated that the N-glycosylation of hKv1.5 is more effective at 28°C than at 37°C. Finally, the hypothermic treatment also rescued the protein expression and currents of trafficking-defective hKv1.5 mutants. These results indicate that low temperature exposure stabilizes the protein in the cellular organelles or on the plasma membrane, and modulates its maturation and trafficking, thus enhancing the currents of hKv1.5 and its trafficking defect mutants.

  3. Birth Defects Among Children Born to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Women Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Protocols 219 and 219C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brogly, Susan B.; Abzug, Mark J.; Watts, D. Heather; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Williams, Paige L.; Oleske, James; Conway, Daniel; Sperling, Rhoda S.; Spiegel, Hans; Van Dyke, Russell B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Some studies have detected associations between in utero antiretroviral therapy (ARV) exposure and birth defects but evidence is inconclusive. Methods: A total of 2202 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-exposed children enrolled in the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group 219 and 219 C p

  4. Transfection of the cloned human excision repair gene ERCC-1 to UV-sensitive CHO mutants only corrects the repair defect in complementation group 2 mutants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J.H. Janssen; J. de Wit (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); L.H. Thompson; D. Bootsma (Dirk); A. Westerveld (Andries)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe human DNA-excision repair gene ERCC-1 is cloned by its ability to correct the excision-repair defect of the ultraviolet light- and mitomycin-C-sensitive CHO mutant cell line 43-3B. This mutant is assigned to complementation group 2 of the excision-repair-deficient CHO mutants. In ord

  5. Clinical and histologic evaluation of an enamel matrix protein derivative combined with a bioactive glass for the treatment of intrabony periodontal defects in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Windisch, P.; Keglevich, T.; Gera, I.

    2005-01-01

    The present study clinically and histologically evaluated healing of human intrabony defects following treatment with a combination of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) and bioactive glass (BG) or BG alone. Six patients displaying either combined one- and two-walled (five patients) or three-walled (one

  6. Lactate dehydrogenase is not a mitochondrial enzyme in human and mouse vastus lateralis muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans N; van Hall, Gerrit; Rasmussen, Ulla F

    2002-01-01

    procedure were assayed for marker enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The mitochondrial fraction contained no LDH activity (detection limit approximately 0.05 % of the tissue activity) and the distribution of LDH activity among the fractions paralleled that of pyruvate kinase, i.e. LDH was fractionated...... as a cytoplasmic enzyme. Respiratory experiments with the mitochondrial fraction also indicated the absence of LDH. Lactate did not cause respiration, nor did it affect the respiration of pyruvate + malate. The major part of the native cytochrome c was retained in the isolated mitochondria, which, furthermore......, showed high specific rates of state 3 respiration. This excluded artificial loss from the mitochondria of all activity of a possible LDH. It was concluded that skeletal muscle mitochondria are devoid of LDH and unable to metabolize lactate....

  7. Factors influencing the measurement of lysosomal enzymes activity in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Persichetti

    Full Text Available Measurements of the activities of lysosomal enzymes in cerebrospinal fluid have recently been proposed as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. To define the operating procedures useful for ensuring the reliability of these measurements, we analyzed several pre-analytical factors that may influence the activity of β-glucocerebrosidase, α-mannosidase, β-mannosidase, β-galactosidase, α-fucosidase, β-hexosaminidase, cathepsin D and cathepsin E in cerebrospinal fluid. Lysosomal enzyme activities were measured by well-established fluorimetric assays in a consecutive series of patients (n = 28 with different neurological conditions, including Parkinson's disease. The precision, pre-storage and storage conditions, and freeze/thaw cycles were evaluated. All of the assays showed within- and between-run variabilities below 10%. At -20°C, only cathepsin D was stable up to 40 weeks. At -80°C, the cathepsin D, cathepsin E, and β-mannosidase activities did not change significantly up to 40 weeks, while β-glucocerebrosidase activity was stable up to 32 weeks. The β-galactosidase and α-fucosidase activities significantly increased (+54.9±38.08% after 4 weeks and +88.94±36.19% after 16 weeks, respectively. Up to four freeze/thaw cycles did not significantly affect the activities of cathepsins D and E. The β-glucocerebrosidase activity showed a slight decrease (-14.6% after two freeze/thaw cycles. The measurement of lysosomal enzyme activities in cerebrospinal fluid is reliable and reproducible if pre-analytical factors are accurately taken into consideration. Therefore, the analytical recommendations that ensue from this study may contribute to the establishment of actual values for the activities of cerebrospinal fluid lysosomal enzymes as putative biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Human enzyme polymorphism in the Canary Islands. III. Tenerife Island population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, J M; Hernández, M; Larruga, J M; Cabrera, V M; González, A M

    1989-08-01

    We analyzed the genetic polymorphism of eight red cell enzymes in samples from different geographical areas of Tenerife and the Iberian peninsula. The gene frequency heterogeneity found within the Tenerife samples was at the same level as that of Tenerife-mainland comparisons. The presence of the Negroid G6PD A+ allele in the Tenerife samples is evidence of an African admixture with a mean estimation of 4.5%.

  9. Glycosaminoglycan-depolymerizing enzymes produced by anaerobic bacteria isolated from the human mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, L S; Embery, G

    1985-01-01

    A number of obligately anaerobic bacteria, some implicated in periodontal disease, were screened for their ability to produce enzymes capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate. Two screening methods were used following anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 7 days. One involved incorporating the respective substrates and bovine-serum albumin into agar plates and, after incubation, flooding the plates with 2 M acetic acid. Clear zones were produced around colonies which produced enzymes capable of depolymerizing the substrates. The second was a sensitive spectrophotometric procedure based on the ability of certain bacteria to produce eliminase enzymes, which degrade the substrates to unsaturated products having a characteristic u.v. absorption at 232 nm. Strains of Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides melaninogenicus degraded both substrates whereas Bacteroides asaccharolyticus degraded neither substrate by either method. Some bacteria gave negative results with the plate method whereas the more sensitive spectrophotometric assay proved positive. The number of anaerobic bacteria capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate in vitro may therefore have been underestimated in previous studies.

  10. Quantification of Sorafenib in Human Serum by Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Yuta; Noda, Satoshi; Shioya, Makoto; Hira, Daiki; Andoh, Akira; Morita, Shin-Ya; Terada, Tomohiro; Shin, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib has been used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Here we have demonstrated the production of the first specific antibody against sorafenib. Anti-sorafenib serum was obtained by immunizing mice with an antigen conjugated with bovine serum albumin and carboxylic modified 4-(4-aminophenoxy)-N-methyl-2-pyridinecarboxamide (AMPC) using the N-succinimidyl ester method. Enzyme labeling of sorafenib with horseradish peroxidase was similarly performed using carboxylic modified AMPC. A simple competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for sorafenib was developed using the principle of direct competition between sorafenib and the enzyme marker for anti-sorafenib antibody, which had been adsorbed by the plastic surface of a microtiter plate. Serum sorafenib concentrations lower than 0.04 µg/mL were reproducibly measurable using the ELISA. This ELISA was specific to sorafenib and showed very slight cross-reactivity (2.5%) with a major metabolite, sorafenib N-oxide. The values of serum sorafenib levels from 32 patients measured by this ELISA were comparable with those measured by HPLC, and there was a strong correlation between the values determined by the two methods (Y=1.016X-0.137, r=0.979). The specificity and sensitivity of the ELISA for sorafenib should provide a valuable new tool for use in therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic studies of sorafenib.

  11. Enzyme kinetic study of a new cardioprotective agent, KR-32570 using human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyojin; Seo, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Hyunmi; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Choong-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Gook; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon

    2007-04-01

    KR-32570 (5-(2-Methoxy-5-chlorophenyl)furan-2-ylcarbonyl)guanidine) is a new cardioprotective agent for preventing ischemia-reperfusion injury. Human liver microsomal incubation of KR-32570 in the presence of NADPH resulted in the formation of two metabolites, hydroxy-KR-32570 and O-desmethyl-KR-32570. In this study, a kinetic analysis of the metabolism of two metabolites from KR-32570 was performed in human liver microsomes, and recombinant CYP1A2, and CYP3A4. The metabolism for hydroxy- and O-desmethyl-KR-32570 formation from KR-32570 by human liver microsomes was best described by a Michaelis-Menten equation and a Hill equation, respectively. The Cl(int) values of hydroxy- and O-desmethyl-KR-32570 formation were similar to each other (0.03 vs 0.04 microL/min/pmol CYP, respectively). CYP3A4 mediated the formation of hydroxy-KR-32570 from KR-32570 with Cl(int) = 0.24 microL/min/pmol CYP3A4. The intrinsic clearance for O-desmethyl-KR-32570 formation by CYP1A2 was 0.83 AL/min/pmol CYP1A2. These findings suggest that CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 enzymes are major enzymes contributing to the metabolism of KR-32570.

  12. Xylan utilization in human gut commensal bacteria is orchestrated by unique modular organization of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Meiling

    2014-08-18

    Enzymes that degrade dietary and host-derived glycans represent the most abundant functional activities encoded by genes unique to the human gut microbiome. However, the biochemical activities of a vast majority of the glycan-degrading enzymes are poorly understood. Here, we use transcriptome sequencing to understand the diversity of genes expressed by the human gut bacteria Bacteroides intestinalis and Bacteroides ovatus grown in monoculture with the abundant dietary polysaccharide xylan. The most highly induced carbohydrate active genes encode a unique glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 endoxylanase (BiXyn10A or BACINT-04215 and BACOVA-04390) that is highly conserved in the Bacteroidetes xylan utilization system. The BiXyn10A modular architecture consists of a GH10 catalytic module disrupted by a 250 amino acid sequence of unknown function. Biochemical analysis of BiXyn10A demonstrated that such insertion sequences encode a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that binds to xy-lose- configured oligosaccharide/polysaccharide ligands, the substrate of the BiXyn10A enzymatic activity. The crystal structures of CBM1 from BiXyn10A (1.8 Å), a cocomplex of BiXyn10A CBM1 with xylohexaose (1.14 Å), and the CBM fromits homolog in the Prevotella bryantii B 14 Xyn10C (1.68 Å) reveal an unanticipated mode for ligand binding. Aminimal enzyme mix, composed of the gene products of four of the most highly up-regulated genes during growth on wheat arabinoxylan, depolymerizes the polysaccharide into its component sugars. The combined biochemical and biophysical studies presented here provide a framework for understanding fiber metabolism by an important group within the commensal bacterial population known to influence human health.

  13. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes from the CYP2C subfamily in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth Depaz, Iris M; Toselli, Francesca; Wilce, Peter A; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes from the CYP2C subfamily play a prominent role in the metabolic clearance of many drugs. CYP2C enzymes have also been implicated in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to vasoactive epoxyeicosatrienoic acids. CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 are expressed in the adult liver at significant levels; however, the expression of CYP2C enzymes in extrahepatic tissues such as the brain is less well characterized. Form-specific antibodies to CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 were prepared by affinity purification of antibodies raised to unique peptides. CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 were located in microsomal fractions of all five human brain regions examined, namely the frontal cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, amygdala, and cerebellum. Both CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 were detected predominantly within the neuronal soma but with expression extending down axons and dendrites in certain regions. Finally, a comparison of cortex samples from alcoholics and age-matched controls suggested that CYP2C9 expression was increased in alcoholics.

  14. Perforinopathy: a spectrum of human immune disease caused by defective perforin delivery or function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboinik, Ilia; Trapani, Joseph A

    2013-12-12

    Congenital perforin deficiency is considered a rare cause of human immunopathology and immune dysregulation, and classically presents as a fatal illness early in infancy. However, we propose that a group of related disorders in which killer lymphocytes deliver only partially active perforin or a reduced quantum of wild-type perforin to the immune synapse should be considered part of an extended syndrome with overlapping but more variable clinical features. Apart from the many rare mutations scattered over the coding sequences, up to 10% of Caucasians carry the severely hypomorphic PRF1 allele C272 > T (leading to A91V mutation) and the overall prevalence of the homozygous state for A91V is around 1 in 600 individuals. We therefore postulate that the partial loss of perforin function and its clinical consequences may be more common then currently suspected. An acute clinical presentation is infrequent in A91V heterozygous individuals, but we postulate that the partial loss of perforin function may potentially be manifested in childhood or early adulthood as "idiopathic" inflammatory disease, or through increased cancer susceptibility - either hematological malignancy or multiple, independent primary cancers. We suggest the new term "perforinopathy" to signify the common functional endpoints of all the known consequences of perforin deficiency and failure to deliver fully functional perforin.

  15. Perforinopathy: a spectrum of human immune disease caused by defective perforin delivery or function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Trapani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital perforin deficiency is considered a rare cause of human immunopathology and immune dysregulation, and classically presents as a fatal illness early in infancy. However, we propose that a group of related disorders in which killer lymphocytes deliver only partially active perforin or a reduced quantum of wild-type perforin to the immune synapse should be considered part of an extended syndrome with overlapping but more variable clinical features. Apart from the many rare mutations scattered over the coding sequences, up to 10% of Caucasians carry the severely hypomorphic PRF1 allele C272>T (leading to A91V mutation and the overall prevalence of the homozygous state for A91V is around 1 in 600 individuals. We therefore postulate that the partial loss of perforin function and its clinical consequences may be more common then currently suspected. An acute clinical presentation is infrequent in A91V heterozygous individuals, but we postulate that the partial loss of perforin function may potentially be manifested in childhood or early adulthood as ‘idiopathic’ inflammatory disease, or through increased cancer susceptibility – either hematological malignancy or multiple, independent primary cancers. We suggest the new term ‘perforinopathy’ to signify the common functional endpoints of all the known consequences of perforin-deficiency and failure to deliver fully functional perforin.

  16. Abnormal whole blood thrombi in humans with inherited platelet receptor defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis J Castellino

    Full Text Available To delineate the critical features of platelets required for formation and stability of thrombi, thromboelastography and platelet aggregation measurements were employed on whole blood of normal patients and of those with Bernard-Soulier Syndrome (BSS and Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia (GT. We found that separation of platelet activation, as assessed by platelet aggregation, from that needed to form viscoelastic stable whole blood thrombi, occurred. In normal human blood, ristocetin and collagen aggregated platelets, but did not induce strong viscoelastic thrombi. However, ADP, arachidonic acid, thrombin, and protease-activated-receptor-1 and -4 agonists, stimulated both processes. During this study, we identified the genetic basis of a very rare double heterozygous GP1b deficiency in a BSS patient, along with a new homozygous GP1b inactivating mutation in another BSS patient. In BSS whole blood, ADP responsiveness, as measured by thrombus strength, was diminished, while ADP-induced platelet aggregation was normal. Further, the platelets of 3 additional GT patients showed very weak whole blood platelet aggregation toward the above agonists and provided whole blood thrombi of very low viscoelastic strength. These results indicate that measurements of platelet counts and platelet aggregability do not necessarily correlate with generation of stable thrombi, a potentially significant feature in patient clinical outcomes.

  17. Abnormal whole blood thrombi in humans with inherited platelet receptor defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Francis J; Liang, Zhong; Davis, Patrick K; Balsara, Rashna D; Musunuru, Harsha; Donahue, Deborah L; Smith, Denise L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; Ploplis, Victoria A; Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    To delineate the critical features of platelets required for formation and stability of thrombi, thromboelastography and platelet aggregation measurements were employed on whole blood of normal patients and of those with Bernard-Soulier Syndrome (BSS) and Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia (GT). We found that separation of platelet activation, as assessed by platelet aggregation, from that needed to form viscoelastic stable whole blood thrombi, occurred. In normal human blood, ristocetin and collagen aggregated platelets, but did not induce strong viscoelastic thrombi. However, ADP, arachidonic acid, thrombin, and protease-activated-receptor-1 and -4 agonists, stimulated both processes. During this study, we identified the genetic basis of a very rare double heterozygous GP1b deficiency in a BSS patient, along with a new homozygous GP1b inactivating mutation in another BSS patient. In BSS whole blood, ADP responsiveness, as measured by thrombus strength, was diminished, while ADP-induced platelet aggregation was normal. Further, the platelets of 3 additional GT patients showed very weak whole blood platelet aggregation toward the above agonists and provided whole blood thrombi of very low viscoelastic strength. These results indicate that measurements of platelet counts and platelet aggregability do not necessarily correlate with generation of stable thrombi, a potentially significant feature in patient clinical outcomes.

  18. Enzyme immunoassay of oestrogen receptors in needle biopsies from human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Andersen, J; Poulsen, H S;

    1991-01-01

    For quantitative assessments of sex hormone receptors in liver tissue, ligand binding assays are inconvenient, as they require large biopsies (0.5-1.0 g). The present study shows that it is possible to measure oestrogen receptors (ER) quantitatively in needle biopsy specimens as small as 10 mg...... by modifications of a commercial enzyme immunoassay employing monoclonal antibodies. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and the dextran charcoal method served as reference methods. A consecutive series of needle biopsies from patients suspected of liver disease were investigated. The biopsies (n = 37) had a median...... is a convenient tool for further studies of ER in routine needle biopsies from the liver....

  19. Hydrogen peroxide induce modifications of human extracellular superoxide dismutase that results in enzyme inhibition

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    Randi H. Gottfredsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD controls the level of superoxide in the extracellular space by catalyzing the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In addition, the enzyme reacts with hydrogen peroxide in a peroxidase reaction which is known to disrupt enzymatic activity. Here, we show that the peroxidase reaction supports a site-specific bond cleavage. Analyses by peptide mapping and mass spectrometry shows that oxidation of Pro112 supports the cleavage of the Pro112–His113 peptide bond. Substitution of Ala for Pro112 did not inhibit fragmentation, indicating that the oxidative fragmentation at this position is dictated by spatial organization and not by side-chain specificity. The major part of EC-SOD inhibited by the peroxidase reaction was not fragmented but found to encompass oxidations of histidine residues involved in the coordination of copper (His98 and His163. These oxidations are likely to support the dissociation of copper from the active site and thus loss of enzymatic activity. Homologous modifications have also been described for the intracellular isozyme, Cu/Zn-SOD, reflecting the almost identical structures of the active site within these enzymes. We speculate that the inactivation of EC-SOD by peroxidase activity plays a role in regulating SOD activity in vivo, as even low levels of superoxide will allow for the peroxidase reaction to occur.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of the Influence of Human Salivary Enzymes on Odorant Concentration in Three Palm Wines

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    Ola Lasekan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of human salivary enzymes on palm wines’ odorant concentrations were investigated by the application of aroma extracts dilution analysis (AEDA and by the calculation of odour activity values (OAVs, respectively. The odorants were quantified by means of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA, and the degradation profiles of odorants by human saliva were also studied. Results revealed 46 odour-active compounds in the flavour dilution (FD factor range of 4-256, and all were subsequently identified. Of the 46 odorants, 41 were identified in the Elaeis guineensis wine, 36 in Raphia hookeri wine and 29 in Borassus flabellifer wine. Among the odorants, the highest FD-factors were obtained from acetoin, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine. Among the 13 potent odorants identified, five aroma compounds are reported here as important contributors to palm wine aroma, namely 3-isobutyl-2-methoxy-pyrazine, acetoin, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-methylbutylacetate and ethyl hexanoate. Meanwhile, salivary enzymic degradation of odorants was more pronounced among the aldehydes, esters and thiols.

  1. Enzymatically stable 5' mRNA cap analogs: synthesis and binding studies with human DcpS decapping enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalek, Marcin; Jemielity, Jacek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew M; Bojarska, Elzbieta; Stepinski, Janusz; Stolarski, Ryszard; Davis, Richard E; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2006-05-01

    Four novel 5' mRNA cap analogs have been synthesized with one of the pyrophosphate bridge oxygen atoms of the triphosphate linkage replaced with a methylene group. The analogs were prepared via reaction of nucleoside phosphor/phosphon-1-imidazolidates with nucleoside phosphate/phosphonate in the presence of ZnCl2. Three of the new cap analogs are completely resistant to degradation by human DcpS, the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of free cap resulting from 3' to 5' cellular mRNA decay. One of the new analogs has very high affinity for binding to human DcpS. Two of these analogs are Anti Reverse Cap Analogs which ensures that they are incorporated into mRNA chains exclusively in the correct orientation. These new cap analogs should be useful in a variety of biochemical studies, in the analysis of the cellular function of decapping enzymes, and as a basis for further development of modified cap analogs as potential anti-cancer and anti-parasite drugs.

  2. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  3. Evaluation of the osteogenesis and angiogenesis effects of erythropoietin and the efficacy of deproteinized bovine bone/recombinant human erythropoietin scaffold on bone defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donghai; Deng, Liqing; Xie, Xiaowei; Yang, Zhouyuan; Kang, Pengde

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) could promote the angiogenesis and may also play a role in bone regeneration. This study was conducted to evaluate the osteogenesis and angiogenesis effects of EPO and the efficacy of deproteinized bovine bone/recombinant human EPO scaffold on bone defect repair. Twenty-four healthy adult goats were chosen to build goat defects model and randomly divided into four groups. The goats were treated with DBB/rhEPO scaffolds (group A), porous DBB scaffolds (group B), autogenous cancellous bone graft (group C), and nothing (group D). Animals were evaluated with radiological and histological methods at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. The grey value of radiographs was used to evaluate the healing of the defects and the outcome revealed that the group A had a better outcome of defect healing compared with group B (P 0.05). The newly formed bone area was calculated from histological sections and the results demonstrated that the amount of new bone in group A increased significantly compared with that in group B (P 0.05) at 4, 8, 12 weeks respectively. In addition, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by immunohistochemical testing and real-time polymerase chain reaction at 12 weeks in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (P 0.05). Therefore, EPO has significant effects on bone formation and angiogenesis, and has capacity to promote the repair of bone defects. It is worthy of being recommended to further studies.

  4. Expression of two drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450-enzymes in human salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, C; Hansen, C; Torpet, L A

    2008-01-01

    : Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens from parotid (10), submandibular (7) and labial (10) salivary glands were examined immunohistochemically and by in situ hybridization for expression of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 protein and mRNA. RESULTS: CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 protein and mRNA were detected in ductal......OBJECTIVE: The oral cavity is constantly lubricated by saliva and even small amounts of xenobiotics and / or their metabolites in the saliva may affect the oral mucosa. Our aim was therefore to clarify if xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 are expressed in salivary glands. METHODS...... and seromucous / serous acinar cells in all gland types although to a varying degree and intensity. Mucous acinar cells were positive to a lesser extent. CONCLUSION: The results indicate a xenobiotic metabolizing capability of salivary glands. This may have implications for development of oral mucosal disease...

  5. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of UCHL5, a proteasome-associated human deubiquitinating enzyme, reveals an unproductive form of the enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Tushar K.; Permaul, Michelle; Boudreaux, David A.; Mahanic, Christina; Mauney, Sarah; Das, Chittaranjan (Purdue)

    2012-10-25

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L5 (UCHL5) is a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, which, along with RPN11 and USP14, is known to carry out deubiquitination on proteasome. As a member of the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) family, UCHL5 is unusual because, unlike UCHL1 and UCHL3, it can process polyubiquitin chain. However, it does so only when it is bound to the proteasome; in its free form, it is capable of releasing only relatively small leaving groups from the C-terminus of ubiquitin. Such a behavior might suggest at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, an apo form incapable of chain processing activity, and a proteasome-induced activated form capable of cleaving polyubiquitin chain. Through the crystal structure analysis of two truncated constructs representing the catalytic domain (UCH domain) of this enzyme, we were able to visualize a state of this enzyme that we interpret as its inactive form, because the catalytic cysteine appears to be in an unproductive orientation. While this work was in progress, the structure of a different construct representing the UCH domain was reported; however, in that work the structure reported was that of an inactive mutant [catalytic Cys to Ala; Nishio K et al. (2009) Biochem Biophys Res Commun390, 855-860], which precluded the observation that we are reporting here. Additionally, our structures reveal conformationally dynamic parts of the enzyme that may play a role in the structural transition to the more active form.

  6. Culture of human intestinal epithelial cell using the dissociating enzyme thermolysin and endothelin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium, a highly dynamic system, plays a key role in the homeostasis of the intestine. However, thus far a human intestinal epithelial cell line has not been established in many countries. Fetal tissue was selected to generate viable cell cultures for its sterile condition, effective generation, and differentiated character. The purpose of the present study was to culture human intestinal epithelial cells by a relatively simple method. Thermolysin was added to improve the yield of epithelial cells, while endothelin-3 was added to stimulate their growth. By adding endothelin-3, the achievement ratio (viable cell cultures/total cultures was enhanced to 60% of a total of 10 cultures (initiated from 8 distinct fetal small intestines, allowing the generation of viable epithelial cell cultures. Western blot, real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining showed that cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 had high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated markers such as sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV also showed high expression levels in human intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells, with the expression of surface markers (cytokeratins 8, 18 and mouse intestinal mucosa-1/39 and secretion of cytokines (sucrase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidylpeptidase IV, may be cultured by the thermolysin and endothelin-3 method and maintained for at least 20 passages. This is relatively simple, requiring no sophisticated techniques or instruments, and may have a number of varied applications.

  7. Restoration of a Critical Mandibular Bone Defect Using Human Alveolar Bone-Derived Stem Cells and Porous Nano-HA/Collagen/PLA Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Xing, Helin; Zhang, Guilan; Wu, Xia; Zou, Xuan; Feng, Lin; Wang, Dongsheng; Li, Meng; Zhao, Jing; Du, Jianwei; Lv, Yan; E, Lingling; Liu, Hongchen

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal bone defects occur in a wide variety of clinical situations. Adult stem cell- and biomaterial-based bone tissue regeneration are a promising alternative to natural bone grafts. Recent evidence has demonstrated that two populations of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) can be distinguished based on their embryonic origins. These BMSCs are not interchangeable, as bones preferentially heal using cells that share the same embryonic origin. However, the feasibility of tissue engineering using human craniofacial BMSCs was unclear. The goal of this study was to explore human craniofacial BMSC-based therapy for the treatment of localized mandibular defects using a standardized, minimally invasive procedure. The BMSCs' identity was confirmed. Scanning electron microscopy, a cell proliferation assay, and supernatant detection indicated that the nHAC/PLA provided a suitable environment for aBMSCs. Real-time PCR and electrochemiluminescence immunoassays demonstrated that osteogenic markers were upregulated by osteogenic preinduction. Moreover, in a rabbit critical-size mandibular bone defect model, total bone formation in the nHAC/PLA + aBMSCs group was significantly higher than in the nHAC/PLA group but significantly lower than in the nHAC/PLA + preinduced aBMSCs. These findings demonstrate that this engineered bone is a valid alternative for the correction of mandibular bone defects.

  8. Islet expression of the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanosine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1 in human type 2 diabetes

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    Yoon Kun-Ho

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly clear that β-cell failure plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Free-radical mediated β-cell damage has been intensively studied in type 1 diabetes, but not in human type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we studied the protein expression of the DNA repair enzyme Ogg1 in pancreases from type 2 diabetics. Ogg1 was studied because it is the major enzyme involved in repairing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine DNA adducts, a lesion previously observed in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, in a gene expression screen, Ogg1 was over-expressed in islets from a human type 2 diabetic. Methods Immunofluorescent staining of Ogg1 was performed on pancreatic specimens from healthy controls and patients with diabetes for 2–23 years. The intensity and islet area stained for Ogg1 was evaluated by semi-quantitative scoring. Results Both the intensity and the area of islet Ogg1 staining were significantly increased in islets from the type 2 diabetic subjects compared to the healthy controls. A correlation between increased Ogg1 fluorescent staining intensity and duration of diabetes was also found. Most of the staining observed was cytoplasmic, suggesting that mitochondrial Ogg1 accounts primarily for the increased Ogg1 expression. Conclusion We conclude that oxidative stress related DNA damage may be a novel important factor in the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes. An increase of Ogg1 in islet cell mitochondria is consistent with a model in which hyperglycemia and consequent increased β-cell oxidative metabolism lead to DNA damage and the induction of Ogg1 expression.

  9. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  10. Uncoupling of allosteric and oligomeric regulation in a functional hybrid enzyme constructed from Escherichia coli and human ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Long, Marcus J C; Rigney, Mike; Parvez, Saba; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2013-10-08

    An N-terminal-domain (NTD) and adjacent catalytic body (CB) make up subunit-α of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo dNTP biosynthesis. A strong linkage exists between ligand binding at the NTD and oligomerization-coupled RNR inhibition, inducible by both dATP and nucleotide chemotherapeutics. These observations have distinguished the NTD as an oligomeric regulation domain dictating the assembly of inactive RNR oligomers. Inactive states of RNR differ between eukaryotes and prokaryotes (α6 in human versus α4β4 in Escherichia coli , wherein β is RNR's other subunit); however, the NTD structurally interconnects individual α2 or α2 and β2 dimeric motifs within the respective α6 or α4β4 complexes. To elucidate the influence of NTD ligand binding on RNR allosteric and oligomeric regulation, we engineered a human- E. coli hybrid enzyme (HE) where human-NTD is fused to E. coli -CB. Both the NTD and the CB of the HE bind dATP. The HE specifically partners with E. coli -β to form an active holocomplex. However, although the NTD is the sole physical tether to support α2 and/or β2 associations in the dATP-bound α6 or α4β4 fully inhibited RNR complexes, the binding of dATP to the HE NTD only partially suppresses HE activity and fully precludes formation of higher-order HE oligomers. We postulate that oligomeric regulation is the ultimate mechanism for potent RNR inhibition, requiring species-specific NTD-CB interactions. Such interdomain cooperativity in RNR oligomerization is unexpected from structural studies alone or biochemical studies of point mutants.

  11. Enzyme activity of β-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae on simulated conditions of human gastrointestinal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bosso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An alternative to relieve the symptoms of lactose intolerance is the intake of the enzyme β-galactosidase in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The ability of β-galactosidase produced by Kluyveromyces lactis and Aspergillus oryzae to hydrolyze lactose in simulated conditions of the human gastrointestinal tract was investigated. The experiment was carried out in the optimum temperature for each enzyme activity, 40 and 55°C, respectively, and at the normal human body temperature (37°C at concentrations of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 g/L (enzyme from A. oryzae or mL/L (enzyme from K. lactis. Both enzymes were completely inactivated under simulated gastric conditions (pH 2. When the enzymes were subjected to simulated small intestine conditions (pH 7.4, lactose hydrolysis has occurred, but at 37°C the percentage was lower than that under the optimal temperatures. At concentrations of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mL/L the enzyme from K. lactis hydrolyzed 76.63%, 88.91% and 94.80% of lactose at 40°C, and 55.99%, 80.91% and 81.53% at 37°C, respectively. In contrast, the enzyme from A. oryzae hydrolyzed 7.11%, 16.18% and 21.29% at 55°C, and 8.4%, 11.85% and 16.43% at 37°C. It was observed that under simulated intestinal conditions, the enzyme from K. lactis was more effective on lactose hydrolysis as compared to the enzyme from A. oryzae. Considering the findings of this study, it is extremely necessary to use an enteric coating on β-galactosidase capsules so that this enzyme is released only in the small intestine, which is its site of action, thus not suffering the action of the stomach pH.Keywords: Lactase. Hydrolysis. Lactose intolerance. Gastrointestinal tract. RESUMOAtividade de β-galactosidase de Kluyveromyces lactis e Aspergillus oryzae, em condições simuladas do sistema gastrintestinal humanoUma das alternativas para amenizar os sintomas da intolerância à lactose é a ingestão de β-galactosidase em formas farmacêuticas. Neste trabalho avaliou-se a

  12. The diagnosis of human fascioliasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using recombinant cathepsin L protease.

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    Bibiana Gonzales Santana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fascioliasis is a worldwide parasitic disease of domestic animals caused by helminths of the genus Fasciola. In many parts of the world, particularly in poor rural areas where animal disease is endemic, the parasite also infects humans. Adult parasites reside in the bile ducts of the host and therefore diagnosis of human fascioliasis is usually achieved by coprological examinations that search for parasite eggs that are carried into the intestine with the bile juices. However, these methods are insensitive due to the fact that eggs are released sporadically and may be missed in low-level infections, and fasciola eggs may be misclassified as other parasites, leading to problems with specificity. Furthermore, acute clinical symptoms as a result of parasites migrating to the bile ducts appear before the parasite matures and begins egg laying. A human immune response to Fasciola antigens occurs early in infection. Therefore, an immunological method such as ELISA may be a more reliable, easy and cheap means to diagnose human fascioliasis than coprological analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a panel of serum from Fasciola hepatica-infected patients and from uninfected controls we have optimized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA which employs a recombinant form of the major F. hepatica cathepsin L1 as the antigen for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis. We examined the ability of the ELISA test to discern fascioliasis from various other helminth and non-helminth parasitic diseases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A sensitive and specific fascioliasis ELISA test has been developed. This test is rapid and easy to use and can discriminate fasciola-infected individuals from patients harbouring other parasites with at least 99.9% sensitivity and 99.9% specificity. This test will be a useful standardized method not only for testing individual samples but also in mass screening programs to assess the extent of human fascioliasis in

  13. METABOLISM OF MYCLOBUTANIL AND TRIADIMEFON BY HUMAN AND RAT CYTOCHROME P450 ENZYMES AND LIVER MICROSOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolism of two triazole-containing antifungal azoles was studied using expressed human and rat cytochrome P450s (CYP) and liver microsomes. Substrate depletion methods were used due to the complex array of metabolites produced from myclobutanil and triadimefon. Myclobutanil wa...

  14. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne;

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  15. Bile salt-stimulated lipase of human milk: characterization of the enzyme from preterm and term milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, L.M.; Hamosh, P.; Hamosh, M.

    1986-03-01

    The bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) of human milk is an important digestive enzyme in the newborn whose pancreatic function is immature. Milk from mothers delivering premature infants (preterm milk) has similar levels of BSSL activity to that of mothers of term infants (term milk). This study has determined whether the BSSL in preterm milk has the same characteristics as that in term milk. Milk samples were collected during the first 12 wk of lactation from seven mothers of infants born at 26-30 wk (very preterm, VPT), 31-37 wk (preterm, PT) and 37-42 wk (term, T) gestation. BSSL activity was measured using /sup 3/H-triolein emulsion as substrate. Time course, bile salt and enzyme concentration, pH and pH stability were studied, as well as inhibition of BSSL by eserine. The characteristics of BSSL from preterm and term milk were identical as were comparisons between colostrum and mature milk BSSL. BSSL from all milk sources had a neutral-to-alkaline pH optimum (pH 7.3-8.9), was stable at low pH for 60 min, and was 95-100% inhibited by eserine (greater than or equal to 0.6 mM). BSSL activity, regardless of enzyme source, was bile-salt dependent and was stimulated only by primary bile salts (taurocholate, glycocholate). The data indicate that the BSSL in milks of mothers delivering as early as 26 wk gestation is identical to that in term milk.

  16. Differential interfacial and substrate binding modes of mammalian pancreatic phospholipases A2: a comparison among human, bovine, and porcine enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitko, Y; Han, S K; Lee, B I; Cho, W

    1999-06-15

    To identify the residues essential for interfacial binding and substrate binding of human pancreatic phospholipase A2 (hpPLA2), several ionic residues in the putative interfacial binding surface (R6E, K7E, K10E, and K116E) and substrate binding site (D53K and K56E) were mutated. Interfacial affinity of these mutants was measured using anionic polymerized liposomes, and their enzymatic activity was measured using various substrates including phospholipid monomers, zwitterionic and anionic micelles, and anionic polymerized mixed liposomes. Similar mutations (R6E, K10E, K56E, and K116E) were made to porcine pancreatic phospholipase A2 (ppPLA2), and the properties of mutants were measured by the same methods. Results indicate that hpPLA2 and ppPLA2 have similar interfacial binding mechanisms in which cationic residues in the amino terminus and Lys-116 in the carboxy terminus are involved in binding to anionic lipid surfaces. Small but definite differences between the two enzymes were observed in overall interfacial affinity and activity and the effects of the mutations on interfacial enzyme activity. The interfacial binding of hpPLA2 and ppPLA2 is distinct from that of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A2 in that Lys-56 is involved in the interfacial binding of the latter enzyme. The unique phospholipid headgroup specificity of hpPLA2 derives from the presence of Asp-53 in the substrate binding site. This residue appears to participate in stabilizing electrostatic interactions with the cationic ethanolamine headgroup, hence the phosphatidylethanolamine preference of hpPLA2. Taken together, these studies reveal the similarities and the differences in the mechanisms by which mammalian pancreatic phospholipases A2 interact with lipid aggregates and perform interfacial catalysis.

  17. Effect of MUC2 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide on Cell Proliferation, Adhesion, and Proteolytic Enzyme in Human Gastric Carcinoma in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ya-ying; YI yong-fen; ZHANG Xiao-yan; XIAO Chun-wei; LIN Xiao; ZHOU Wen-wen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of MUC2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) on cell proliferation, adhesion and proteolytic enzyme in human gastric carcinoma cell line (SGC7901). Methods: Phosphorothioate MUC2 ASODN was synthesized and packaged by lipofectin, and then transfected to SGC7901 cells. The expression of MUC2 mRNA and protein after transfection was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical method respectively,and the effect of MUC2 ASODN on cell proliferation,adhesion and proteolytic enzyme was determined by flow cytometry(FCM), MTT method, Rose Bengal and immunohistochemical method. Results: Compared with the blank control group, ASODN efficiently downregulated the expression of MUC2 mRNA and protein in SGC7901 cells 48h after transfection(P<0.01). Various concentrations of ASODN could significantly inhibit the growth of SGC7901, and the inhibition peaked at the 48th hour after transfection(P<0.05). The apoptosis rate of the experimental group was about 4.38%, and the percentage of S-phase cells rose while G0/G1-phase cells fell because most of them were blocked at S-phase. In addition, cells treated with MUC2 ASODN showed lower adhesion ability with matrix and endothelial cells than control cells in vitro(P<0.01). By immunohistochemical method, the upregulation of E-cadherin proteins and the downregulation of MMP2 and cathepsinD proteins were also observed(P<0.05). Conclusion: MUC2 ASODN could efficiently inhibit SGC7901 cell proliferation, reduce cell adhesion ability and downregulate the expression levels of proteolytic enzyme in vitro.

  18. Xanthohumol induces phase II enzymes via Nrf2 in human hepatocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Paluszczak, Jarosław; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether xanthohumol may exert chemoprotective activity through the modulation of the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in immortalized normal THLE-2 hepatocytes and a hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. Cells were incubated in the presence of xanthohumol and the activation of Nrf2 and expression of genes controlled by this transcription factor were evaluated. Additionally, p53 level was assessed. Xanthohumol increased the expression and led to the activation of Nrf2 in both cell lines. However, in contrast to normal cells the expression of genes controlled by this transcription factor was not affected in HepG2 cells, except for GSTA and GSTP. Xanthohumol, beside the induction of GSTs and HO-1, significantly elevated NQO1 expression in concert with p53 level in normal hepatocytes. The activation of Nrf2 pathway and subsequently phase II enzymes in concert with p53 induction in normal hepatocytes may account for the molecular mechanism of the chemopreventive activity of xanthohumol. On the other hand its cytotoxicity towards HCC cells shown in this study indicates that it may also be considered as potentially chemotherapeutic.

  19. Insulin, catecholamines, glucose and antioxidant enzymes in oxidative damage during different loads in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, J; Blazícek, P; Marko, M; Grna, J D; Kvetnanský, R; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Exercise, insulin-induced hypoglycemia and oral glucose loads (50 g and 100 g) were used to compare the production of malondialdehyde and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in healthy subjects. Twenty male volunteers participated in the study. Exercise consisted of three consecutive work loads on a bicycle ergometer of graded intensity (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 W/kg, 6 min each). Hypoglycemia was induced by insulin (Actrapid MC Novo, 0.1 IU/kg, i.v.). Oral administration of 50 g and 100 g of glucose was given to elevate plasma glucose. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was determined in red blood cells, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was measured in whole blood. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) was determined by HPLC, catecholamines were assessed radioenzymatically and glucose was measured by the glucose-oxidase method. Exercise increased MDA concentrations, GSH-Px and SOD activities as well as plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Insulin hypoglycemia increased plasma adrenaline levels, but the concentrations of MDA and the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased. Hyperglycemia increased plasma MDA concentrations, but the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were significantly higher after a larger dose of glucose only. Plasma catecholamines were unchanged. These results indicate that the transient increase of plasma catecholamine and insulin concentrations did not induce oxidative damage, while glucose already in the low dose was an important triggering factor for oxidative stress.

  20. Enzyme adaptations of human skeletal muscle during bicycle short-sprint training and detraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linossier, M T; Dormois, D; Perier, C; Frey, J; Geyssant, A; Denis, C

    1997-12-01

    The effect of sprint training and detraining on supramaximal performances was studied in relation to muscle enzyme adaptations in eight students trained four times a week for 9 weeks on a cycle ergometer. The subjects were tested for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), maximal aerobic power (MAP) and maximal short-term power output (Wmax) before and after training and after 7 weeks of detraining. During these periods, biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis muscle for the determination of creatine kinase (CK), adenylate kinase (AK), glycogen phosphorylase (PHOS), hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and its isozymes, 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) and citrate synthase (CS) activities. Training induced large improvements in Wmax (28%) with slight increases (3%) in VO2peak (P power output as a result of a muscle glycogenolytic and glycolytic adaptation. A long interruption in training has negligible effects on short-sprint ability and muscle anaerobic potential. On the other hand, a persistent training stimulus is required to maintain high aerobic capacity and muscle oxidative potential. This may contribute to a rapid return to competitive fitness for sprinters and power athletes.

  1. Lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus patients impairs insulin action and induces defects in beta-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ulrik B; Friis-Møller, Nina; Storgaard, Heidi; Vølund, Aage; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Iversen, Johan; Madsbad, Sten

    2003-10-01

    The pathophysiology of insulin resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) is not fully clarified. We investigated 18 men with HALS and 18 HIV-positive males without lipodystrophy (control subjects). Duration and modality of antiretroviral therapy were similar between study groups. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp showed an impaired glucose disposal rate (GDR) in HALS patients (5.6 v 8.3 mg glucose/min. kg(FFM), P =.0006). As demonstrated by indirect calorimetry, HALS patients showed an impaired nonoxidative glucose metabolism (NOGM, 2.2 v 4.2, P =.006), whereas levels of basal and insulin-stimulated oxidative glucose metabolism (OGM) (2.4 v 2.3, P =.55, and 3.3 v 4.0, P =.064, respectively) were not significantly different between groups. Despite comparable total fat masses, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans showed that the percentage of limb fat (ie, peripheral-fat-mass/[peripheral-fat-mass + trunk-fat-mass]. 100%) was reduced in HALS patients (36% v 46%, P =.0002). Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that percentage of limb fat explained 53% of the variability of GDR and 45% of the variability of NOGM in HALS patients. In HALS patients, leg fat mass correlated positively with NOGM (r =.51, P <.05), whereas abdominal fat mass and NOGM did not correlate (P =.91). Analyzing the relationship between first phase insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, 6 HALS patients compared with none of the control subjects exhibited impaired insulin secretion (P <.05). Our data suggest that fat redistribution independently of antiretroviral therapy is highly related to insulin resistance in HALS patients. Furthermore, in HALS patients, impaired glucose metabolism most likely relates to decreased NOGM and to defects in beta-cell function.

  2. Simple and rapid human papillomavirus genotyping method by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis with two restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linghan; Watanabe, Ken; Haruyama, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2013-07-01

    Cervical cancer, the third most common cancer that affects women worldwide, is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and is treatable when detected at an early stage. To date, more than 100 different HPV types have been described, and the development of simple, low-cost, and accurate methods to distinguish HPV genotypes is highly warranted. In this study, an HPV genotyping assay based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was evaluated. This method involved the use of MY09/11 primers followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with the restriction enzymes HpyCH4V and NlaIII. Cervical specimens preserved using CytoRich Blue fluid were collected from 1,134 female volunteers for HPV detection, and 1,111 valid samples were amplified using PCR. The PCR method was sensitive enough to detect 25 copies of HPV18, and three copies of HPV16. Out of 202 PCR-positive samples, HPV genotypes were determined in 189 samples (93.6%) by this RFLP method. Results were then evaluated further by capillary sequencing method. Concordant results between the two tests were as high as 96.0%. Thirteen samples, which tested negative with RFLP, were verified as non-specific amplifications with PCR. In conclusion, this PCR-RFLP method using restriction enzymes HpyCH4V and NlaIII is simple, non-labor intensive, and is applicable for the inexpensive determination of HPV genotypes in clinical samples.

  3. Changes in the activities of some membrane-associated enzymes during in vivo ageing of the normal human erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlubowski, M; Agutter, P S

    1977-09-01

    Human erythrocytes from healthy male donors were fractionated with respect to in vivo age by simple centrifugation in order to characterize changes in the functional integrity of the membrane during the life-span of the cell. The three enzymes, Na/K-ATPase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADH-ferricyanide reductase, were found not to change with age, but significant age-dependent decreases were observed in the cases of acetylcholinesterase, phosphoglycerate kinase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, adenylate kinase, Mg-ATPase and alkaline phosphatase. The possibility that these changes were attributable to mechanisms other than age-related inactivation, such as reticulocyte contamination, differential resealing and crypticity, was investigated. Only the decrease in acetylcholinesterase could be explained wholly in terms of reticulocyte contamination. A decrease in membrane integrity on ageing was observed, which accounted for approximately half the change in alkaline phosphatase and may have contributed to the other enzyme activity changes. This membrane integrity effect masked a real decrease in the highly cryptic NADH-ferricyanide reductase, this decrease being apparent only after total disaggregation of the membrane with nonionic surfactant.

  4. Highly miniaturized formats for in vitro drug metabolism assays using vivid fluorescent substrates and recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Olga V; Gibson, Jasmin R; Marks, Bryan D

    2005-02-01

    Highly miniaturized P450 screening assays designed to enable facile analysis of P450 drug interactions in a 1536-well plate format with the principal human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 1A2) and Vivid fluorogenic substrates were developed. The detailed characterization of the assays included stability, homogeneity, and reproducibility of the recombinant P450 enzymes and the kinetic parameters of their reactions with Vivid fluorogenic substrates, with a focus on the specific characteristics of each component that enable screening in a low-volume 1536-well plate assay format. The screening assays were applied for the assessment of individual cytochrome P450 inhibition profiles with a panel of selected assay modifiers, including isozyme-specific substrates and inhibitors. IC(50) values obtained for the modifiers in 96- and 1536-well plate formats were similar and comparable with values obtained in assays with conventional substrates. An overall examination of the 1536-well assay statistics, such as signal-to-background ratio and Z' factor, demonstrated that these assays are a robust, successful, and reliable tool to screen for cytochrome P450 metabolism and inhibition in an ultra-high-throughput screening format.

  5. Human FAD synthase is a bi-functional enzyme with a FAD hydrolase activity in the molybdopterin binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Galluccio, Michele; Miccolis, Angelica; Leone, Piero; Eberini, Ivano; Iametti, Stefania; Indiveri, Cesare; Barile, Maria

    2015-09-25

    FAD synthase (FMN:ATP adenylyl transferase, FMNAT or FADS, EC 2.7.7.2) is involved in the biochemical pathway for converting riboflavin into FAD. Human FADS exists in different isoforms. Two of these have been characterized and are localized in different subcellular compartments. hFADS2 containing 490 amino acids shows a two domain organization: the 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase domain, that is the FAD-forming catalytic domain, and a resembling molybdopterin-binding (MPTb) domain. By a multialignment of hFADS2 with other MPTb containing proteins of various organisms from bacteria to plants, the critical residues for hydrolytic function were identified. A homology model of the MPTb domain of hFADS2 was built, using as template the solved structure of a T. acidophilum enzyme. The capacity of hFADS2 to catalyse FAD hydrolysis was revealed. The recombinant hFADS2 was able to hydrolyse added FAD in a Co(2+) and mersalyl dependent reaction. The recombinant PAPS reductase domain is not able to perform the same function. The mutant C440A catalyses the same hydrolytic function of WT with no essential requirement for mersalyl, thus indicating the involvement of C440 in the control of hydrolysis switch. The enzyme C440A is also able to catalyse hydrolysis of FAD bound to the PAPS reductase domain, which is quantitatively converted into FMN.

  6. Identification of RecQL1 as a Holliday junction processing enzyme in human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeRoy, Gary; Carroll, Robert; Kyin, Saw; Seki, Masayuki; Cole, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides an effective way to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is required for genetic recombination. During the process of homologous recombination, a heteroduplex DNA structure, or a ‘Holliday junction’ (HJ), is formed. The movement, or branch migration, of this junction is necessary for recombination to proceed correctly. In prokaryotes, the RecQ protein or the RuvA/RuvB protein complex can promote ATP-dependent branch migration of Holliday junctions. Much less is known about the processing of Holliday junctions in eukaryotes. Here, we identify RecQL1 as a predominant ATP-dependent, HJ branch migrator present in human nuclear extracts. A reduction in the level of RecQL1 induced by RNA interference in HeLa cells leads to an increase in sister chromatid exchange. We propose that RecQL1 is involved in the processing of Holliday junctions in human cells. PMID:16260474

  7. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-González, Carmen; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Villarroya, Magda; López-Pascual, Ernesto; Tuck, Simon; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2017-07-01

    Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs). Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively) exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the pathological phenotype

  8. Reconstruction of rat calvarial defects with human mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblast-like cells in poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Zong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can be used for xenogenic transplantation due to their low immunogenicity, high proliferation rate, and multi-differentiation potentials. Therefore, hMSCs are an ideal seeding source for tissue engineering. The present study evaluates the reconstruction effects of hMSCs and osteoblast-like cells differentiated from hMSCs in poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA scaffolds on the calvarial defect of rats. Two bilateral full-thickness defects (5mm in diameter were created in the calvarium of nonimmunosuppressed Sprague-Dawley rats. The defects were filled by PLGA scaffolds with hMSCs (hMSC Construct or with osteoblast-like cells differentiated from hMSCs (Osteoblast Construct. The defects without any graft (Blank Defect or filled with PLGA scaffold without any cells (Blank Scaffold were used as controls. Evaluation was performed using macroscopic view, histology and immunohistochemical analysis respectively at 10 and 20 weeks after transplantation. In addition, fluorescent carbocyanine CM-Dil was used to track the implanted cells in vivo during transplantation. The results showed that while both hMSC Construct and Osteoblast Construct led to an effective reconstruction of critical-size calvarial defects, the bone reconstruction potential of hMSC Construct was superior to that of Osteoblast Construct in non-autogenous applications. Our findings verify the feasibility of the use of xenogenic MSCs for tissue engineering and demonstrate that undifferentiated hMSCs are more suitable for bone reconstruction in xenotransplantation models.

  9. An evaluation of a resorbable (semirigid) GTR membrane in human periodontal intraosseous defects: A clinicoradiological re-entry study

    OpenAIRE

    Vinayak S Gowda; Vijay Chava; Ajeya E. G. Kumara

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a resorbable, semi rigid guided tissue regeneration (GTR) membrane in the treatment of periodontal intraosseous defects. Settings and Design: Randomized controlled clinicoradiological re-entry study. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with bilateral, identical intraosseous defects were selected. The sides for test and control group were randomly allocated to treat either with bioresorbable semi rigid membrane (test group) or open flap debridement (cont...

  10. Antiparasitic and antiproliferative effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme expression in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S L; Carlin, J M; Pyati, P; Dai, W; Pfefferkorn, E R; Murphy, M J

    1994-01-01

    Studies were carried out to evaluate the proposed role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (INDO) induction in the antimicrobial and antiproliferative effects of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in human fibroblasts. The INDO cDNA coding region was cloned in the pMEP4 expression vector, containing the metallothionein (MTII) promoter in the sense (+ve) or the antisense (-ve) orientation. Human fibroblasts (GM637) stably transfected with the sense construct expressed INDO activity after treatment with CdCl2 or ZnSO4, but cells transfected with the antisense construct did not. The growth of Chlamydia psittaci was strongly inhibited in INDO +ve cells but not in INDO -ve cells after treatment with Cd2+ or Zn2+. The inhibition correlated with the level of INDO activity induced and could be reversed by the addition of excess tryptophan to the medium. The growth of Toxoplasma gondii was also strongly inhibited in INDO +ve cells but not in INDO -ve cells after treatment with Cd2+. Expression of Cd(2+)-induced INDO activity also inhibited thymidine incorporation and led to cytotoxicity in INDO +ve cells but not in INDO -ve cells. Thus, the induction of INDO activity by IFN-gamma may be an important factor in the antimicrobial and antiproliferative effects of IFN-gamma in human fibroblasts. Images PMID:8188349

  11. Wnt11 plays an important role in the osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells in a PHA/FN/ALG composite scaffold: possible treatment for infected bone defect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hai; He, Xiao-Qing; Jin, Tao; Li, Yang; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Yi; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background Infected bone defect poses a great challenge for orthopedists because it is difficult to cure. Tissue-engineered bone based on the human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), has currently taken a promising treatment protocol in clinical practice. In a previous study, a porous hydroxyapatite/fibronectin/alginate (PHA/FN/ALG) composite scaffold displayed favorable biological properties as a novel scaffold, which was considered better than single-material scaffolds. In addition, Wnt11 has ...

  12. Evaluation of effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in combination with bioresorbable membrane (poly lactic acid-poly glycolic acid) for the treatment of infrabony defects in humans: A clinical and radiographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Bhumika Sehdev; Manohar Laxmanrao Bhongade; Kiran Kumar Ganji

    2016-01-01

    Background: The combination of biomaterials, bone graft substitutes along with guided tissue regeneration (GTR) has been shown to be an effective modality of periodontal regenerative therapy for infrabony defects. Therefore, the present randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA) in combination with bioresorbable membrane for the treatment of human infrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty four infrabony defects in 20 system...

  13. Specific, sensitive, and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human immunoglobulin G antibodies to anthrax toxin protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Conrad P; Semenova, Vera A; Elie, Cheryl M; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Greene, Carolyn; Li, Han; Stamey, Karen; Steward-Clark, Evelene; Schmidt, Daniel S; Mothershed, Elizabeth; Pruckler, Janet; Schwartz, Stephanie; Benson, Robert F; Helsel, Leta O; Holder, Patricia F; Johnson, Scott E; Kellum, Molly; Messmer, Trudy; Thacker, W Lanier; Besser, Lilah; Plikaytis, Brian D; Taylor, Thomas H; Freeman, Alison E; Wallace, Kelly J; Dull, Peter; Sejvar, Jim; Bruce, Erica; Moreno, Rosa; Schuchat, Anne; Lingappa, Jairam R; Martin, Sandra K; Walls, John; Bronsdon, Melinda; Carlone, George M; Bajani-Ari, Mary; Ashford, David A; Stephens, David S; Perkins, Bradley A

    2002-10-01

    The bioterrorism-associated human anthrax epidemic in the fall of 2001 highlighted the need for a sensitive, reproducible, and specific laboratory test for the confirmatory diagnosis of human anthrax. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed, optimized, and rapidly qualified an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) in human serum. The qualified ELISA had a minimum detection limit of 0.06 micro g/mL, a reliable lower limit of detection of 0.09 micro g/mL, and a lower limit of quantification in undiluted serum specimens of 3.0 micro g/mL anti-PA IgG. The diagnostic sensitivity of the assay was 97.8%, and the diagnostic specificity was 97.6%. A competitive inhibition anti-PA IgG ELISA was also developed to enhance diagnostic specificity to 100%. The anti-PA ELISAs proved valuable for the confirmation of cases of cutaneous and inhalational anthrax and evaluation of patients in whom the diagnosis of anthrax was being considered.

  14. Evaluation of the dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in comparison with standard ELISA for the immunodiagnosis of human toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roldán William

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA was standardized using excretory-secretory antigens of Toxocara canis for the rapid immunodiagnosis of human toxocariasis. Thirty patients with clinical signs of toxocariasis, 20 cases with other parasitic diseases, and 40 healthy subjects were tested. A total of 0.2 ng of antigen per dot, serum dilution of 1:160 and dilution conjugate of 1:1000 were found optimal. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 100 and 95%, respectively. Comparable sensitivity of dot-ELISA and the standard ELISA was obtained, but only 3 cross-reactions occurred in the dot-ELISA, compared with 6 in the standard ELISA. Dot-ELISA is simple to perform, rapid, and low cost. Large-scale screening studies should be done to evaluate its usefulness under field conditions.

  15. Effect the some heavy metals on carbonic anhydrase enzymes activities from non-tumour and tumour human stomach

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this study, in vitro effects of certain heavy metals on the human carbonic anhydrase enzyme were examined. Inhibitory effects of metal ions ( Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe2+,Cr2+, Al3+, Ni2+, Mn2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Mg2+) were observed in tumour and non-tumour tissue. IC50 values were calculated for metals. The Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and Mg2+ IC50 values of tumour tissue were calculated as 0.034mM, 0.426mM, 0.597mM, 0.878mM and 2.52mM respectively. The Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+ and Mg2+  IC50 values of non-tu...

  16. Comparison of murex single-use diagnostic system with traditional enzyme immunoassay for detection of exposure to human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christin A; Keren, David F

    2002-01-01

    Because a retrospective study detected 13 negative Western blots out of 38 single-use diagnostic system (SUDS)-positive cases over a 1-year period, we performed a prospective study to compare the performance of the SUDS test with that of enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Of 888 SUDS-tested sera, 875 (98.4%) were both SUDS and EIA negative and 5 (0.6%) were SUDS, EIA, and Western blot positive. The rate of SUDS-positive samples decreased from 3.16/month in the retrospective study to 1.33/month in the prospective study. The immunoassays had sensitivities and specificities of 100 and 99.7 (SUDS) and 100 and 99.4% (traditional EIA), respectively. In laboratories with experienced personnel, the SUDS test performs as well as the EIA as a screen for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus.

  17. Genetic reconstitution of the human Adenovirus type 2 temperature-sensitive 1 mutant defective in endosomal escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldelli Michele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Adenoviruses infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the urinary and digestive tracts, lymphoid systems and heart, and give rise to epidemic conjunctivitis. More than 51 human serotypes have been identified to-date, and classified into 6 species A-F. The species C Adenoviruses Ad2 and Ad5 (Ad2/5 cause upper and lower respiratory disease, but how viral structure relates to the selection of particular infectious uptake pathways is not known. An adenovirus mutant, Ad2-ts1 had been isolated upon chemical mutagenesis in the past, and shown to have unprocessed capsid proteins. Ad2-ts1 fails to package the viral protease L3/p23, and Ad2-ts1 virions do not efficiently escape from endosomes. It had been suggested that the C22187T point mutation leading to the substitution of the conserved proline 137 to leucine (P137L in the L3/p23 protease was at least in part responsible for this phenotype. To clarify if the C22187T mutation is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype, we sequenced the genes encoding the structural proteins of Ad2-ts1, and confirmed that the Ad2-ts1 DNA carries the point mutation C22187T. Introduction of C22187T to the wild-type Ad2 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (Ad2-BAC gave Ad2-BAC46 virions with the full Ad2-ts1 phenotype. Reversion of Ad2-BAC46 gave wild-type Ad2 particles indicating that P137L is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype. The kinetics of Ad2-ts1 uptake into cells were comparable to Ad2 suggesting similar endocytic uptake mechanisms. Surprisingly, infectious Ad2 or Ad5 but not Ad2-ts1 uptake required CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein, which controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis and membrane transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi-network. The data show that no other mutations than P137L in the viral protease are necessary to give rise to particles that are defective in capsid processing and endosomal escape. This provides a basis for

  18. Expression of xenobiotic and steroid hormone metabolizing enzymes in human breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Susanne; Pierl, Christiane; Harth, Volker; Pesch, Beate; Rabstein, Sylvia; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon; Hamann, Ute; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter

    2006-10-15

    The potential to metabolize endogenous and exogenous substances may influence breast cancer development and tumor growth. Therefore, the authors investigated the protein expression of Glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoforms and cytochrome P450 (CYP) known to be involved in the metabolism of steroid hormones and endogenous as well as exogenous carcinogens in breast cancer tissue to obtain new information on their possible role in tumor progression. Expression of GST pi, mu, alpha and CYP1A1/2, 1A2, 3A4/5, 1B1, 2E1 was assessed by immunohistochemistry for primary breast carcinomas of 393 patients from the German GENICA breast cancer collection. The percentages of positive tumors were 50.1 and 44.5% for GST mu and CYP2E1, and ranged from 13 to 24.7% for CYP1A2, GST pi, CYP1A1/2, CYP3A4/5, CYP1B1. GST alpha was expressed in 1.8% of tumors. The authors observed the following associations between strong protein expression and histopathological characteristics: GST expression was associated with a better tumor differentiation (GST mu, p = 0.018) and with reduced lymph node metastasis (GST pi, p = 0.02). In addition, GST mu expression was associated with a positive estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status (p CYP1B1 was associated with poor tumor differentiation (p = 0.049). Our results demonstrate that the majority of breast carcinomas expressed xenobiotic and drug metabolizing enzymes. They particularly suggest that GST mu and pi expression may indicate a better prognosis and that strong CYP3A4/5 and CYP1B1 expression may be key features of nonfavourable prognosis.

  19. Conformational states and recognition of amyloidogenic peptides of human insulin-degrading enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Lauren A; Liang, Wenguang G; Dowdell, Evan; Kalas, Vasilios; Hoey, Robert J; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2013-08-20

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) selectively degrades the monomer of amyloidogenic peptides and contributes to clearance of amyloid β (Aβ). Thus, IDE retards the progression of Alzheimer's disease. IDE possesses an enclosed catalytic chamber that engulfs and degrades its peptide substrates; however, the molecular mechanism of IDE function, including substrate access to the chamber and recognition, remains elusive. Here, we captured a unique IDE conformation by using a synthetic antibody fragment as a crystallization chaperone. An unexpected displacement of a door subdomain creates an ~18-Å opening to the chamber. This swinging-door mechanism permits the entry of short peptides into the catalytic chamber and disrupts the catalytic site within IDE door subdomain. Given the propensity of amyloidogenic peptides to convert into β-strands for their polymerization into amyloid fibrils, they also use such β-strands to stabilize the disrupted catalytic site resided at IDE door subdomain for their degradation by IDE. Thus, action of the swinging door allows IDE to recognize amyloidogenicity by substrate-induced stabilization of the IDE catalytic cleft. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis revealed that IDE exists as a mixture of closed and open states. These open states, which are distinct from the swinging door state, permit entry of larger substrates (e.g., Aβ, insulin) to the chamber and are preferred in solution. Mutational studies confirmed the critical roles of the door subdomain and hinge loop joining the N- and C-terminal halves of IDE for catalysis. Together, our data provide insights into the conformational changes of IDE that govern the selective destruction of amyloidogenic peptides.

  20. Soluble Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 in Human Heart Failure: Relation with Myocardial Function and Clinical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Slava; Shrestha, Kevin; Troughton, Richard W.; Francis, Gary S.; Sen, Subha; Klein, Allan L.; Tang, W .H. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an endogenous counter-regulator of the renin-angiotensin system. The relationship between soluble ACE2 (sACE2), myocardial function, and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic systolic heart failure is not well established. Methods We measured sACE2 activity in 113 patients with chronic systolic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≤ 35%, NYHA class II-IV). Comprehensive echocardiography was performed at the time of blood sampling. We prospectively examined adverse clinical events (death, cardiac transplant, and heart failure hospitalizations) over 34 ± 17 months. Results Patients who had higher sACE2 plasma activity were more likely to have a lower LVEF (Spearman’s r= −0.36, p <0.001), greater RV systolic dysfunction (r=0.33, p<0.001), higher estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r=0.35, p=0.002), larger LV end diastolic diameter (r=0.23, p=0.02), and higher plasma NT-proBNP levels (r=0.35, p<0.001). sACE2 was less associated with diastolic dysfunction (r=0.19, p=0.05), and was similar between patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. There was no relationship between sACE2 activity and markers of systemic inflammation. After adjusting for NT-proBNP and LVEF, sACE2 activity remained an independent predictor of adverse clinical events (HR=1.7 [95% CI: 1.1 – 2.6], p=0.018). Conclusions Elevated plasma sACE2 activity was associated with greater severity of myocardial dysfunction and was an independent predictor of adverse clinical events. PMID:19700132

  1. Human Deoxyhypusine Hydroxylase, an Enzyme Involved in Regulating Cell Growth, Activates O2 with a Nonheme Diiron Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, V.; Emerson, J; Martinho, M; Kim, Y; Munck, E; Park, M; Que, Jr., L

    2009-01-01

    Deoxyhypusine hydroxylase is the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of hypusine containing eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), which plays an essential role in the regulation of cell proliferation. Recombinant human deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (hDOHH) has been reported to have oxygen- and iron-dependent activity, an estimated iron/holoprotein stoichiometry of 2, and a visible band at 630 nm responsible for the blue color of the as-isolated protein. EPR, Moessbauer, and XAS spectroscopic results presented herein provide direct spectroscopic evidence that hDOHH has an antiferromagnetically coupled diiron center with histidines and carboxylates as likely ligands, as suggested by mutagenesis experiments. Resonance Raman experiments show that its blue chromophore arises from a (e-1,2-peroxo)diiron(III) center that forms in the reaction of the reduced enzyme with O2, so the peroxo form of hDOHH is unusually stable. Nevertheless we demonstrate that it can carry out the hydroxylation of the deoxyhypusine residue present in the elF5A substrate. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, hDOHH has a nonheme diiron active site that resembles both in structure and function those found in methane and toluene monooxygenases, bacterial and mammalian ribonucleotide reductases, and stearoyl acyl carrier protein ?9-desaturase from plants, suggesting that the oxygen-activating diiron motif is a solution arrived at by convergent evolution. Notably, hDOHH is the only example thus far of a human hydroxylase with such a diiron active site.

  2. Modulation of urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites by enzyme polymorphisms in workers of the German Human Bitumen Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihs, Hans-Peter; Spickenheuer, Anne; Heinze, Evelyn; Pesch, Beate; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Angerer, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Data concerning the influence of sequence variants of metabolizing enzymes on the effect modulation of current exposure to vapors and aerosols of bitumen in humans are limited. To assess the influence of 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genes coding for enzymes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and amine metabolism regarding their impact on urinary markers 1-hydroxpyrene (1-OHP) and the sum of 1-, 2+9-, 3-, 4-hydroxyphenanthrene (OHPHE). Based on personal ambient monitoring data for bitumen emissions, 218 German workers exposed to vapors and aerosols of bitumen during a shift and 96 German roadside construction workers without exposure to bitumen but with similar working tasks were studied. SNP determination based on DNA aliquots isolated from blood samples by real-time PCR or direct sequencing. The impact of sequence variants on the urinary levels of 1-OHP and sum of OHPHE was estimated with mixed linear models, adjusted for age, creatinine, exposure, smoking, SNP, and time of measurement. In the mixed linear model, an increasing metabolite level of OHPHE was only slightly modulated by the CC variant of the cytochrome P450 SNP CYP1A1 3801T>C (rs4646903; P = 0.051). In contrast, GSTM1 carriers showed a significant (P= 0.046) and double-mutated variants of three NAT2-specific SNP (NAT2*341CC, P = 0.06; NAT2*481TT, P = 0.06; NAT2*803GG, P = 0.042) displayed a decreasing influence on OHPHE levels. None of the SNP studied showed a significant effect on 1-OHP. The modulating SNP effects on OHPHE in the adjusted model were less pronounced when compared with the effects observed in a recent study with 170 workers occupationally exposed to PAH in German industries. This may be due to the much lower PAH exposure in the Human Bitumen Study.

  3. Generation of a 90 000 molecular weight fragment from human plasma angiotensin-I-converting enzyme by enzymatic or alkaline hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsumoto, H; Lanzillo, J J; Fanburg, B L

    1983-12-12

    A catalytically active Mr 90 000 fragment was generated from native Mr 140 000 human plasma angiotensin-I-converting enzyme after treatment with reagents that induced a perturbation of the native tertiary conformation. Treatment of converting enzyme with 6 M urea produced an aggregation of molecules that was susceptible to proteolysis by either trypsin, chymotrypsin or Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase to generate the Mr 90 000 converting enzyme. Also, 1 M ammonium hydroxide, pH 11.3, or 0.01 M sodium hydroxide, pH 11.3, cleaved converting enzyme to the Mr 90 000 fragment. Degradation was not an autocatalytic phenomenon, since it was not prevented by inhibition of converting enzyme with EDTA. The enzymatically mediated, but not the alkaline mediated, cleavage was inhibited by specific converting enzyme inhibitors captopril and Merck L-154,826. This suggests that captopril and Merck L-154,826 can prevent converting-enzyme degradation by preserving a conformation that does not have sites exposed to proteolytic enzymes. This conformation may mimic the native conformation which is quite resistant to serine proteinases.

  4. Enzyme catalysed production of sialylated human milk oligosaccharides and galactooligosaccharides by Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jesper; Larsen, Dorte Møller; Michalak, Malwina

    2014-01-01

    Bifidobacterium strains in single culture fermentations. The trans-sialidase also catalysed the transfer of sialic acid from CGMP to galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) and to the human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) backbone lacto-N-tetraose (LNT) to produce 3′-sialyl-GOS, including doubly sialylated GOS products, and 3....../acceptor ratio for the trans-sialidase catalysed 3′-sialyllactose production was found to be 1:4. Quantitative amounts of 3′-sialyllactose were produced from CGMP and lactose at a yield of 40mg/g CGMP. The 3′-sialyllactose obtained exerted a stimulatory effect on selected probiotic strains, including different...

  5. Studies of the V94M-substituted human UDPgalactose-4-epimerase enzyme associated with generalized epimerase-deficiency galactosaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlers, T M; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    2000-11-01

    Impairment of the human enzyme UDPgalactose 4-epimerase (hGALE) results in epimerase-deficiency galactosaemia, an inborn error of metabolism with variable biochemical presentation and clinical outcomes reported to range from benign to severe. Molecular studies of the hGALE loci from patients with epimerase deficiency reveal significant allelic heterogeneity, raising the possibility that variable genotypes may constitute at least one factor contributing to the biochemical and clinical heterogeneity observed. Previously we have identified a single substitution mutation, V94M, present in the homozygous state in all patients genotyped with the severe, generalized form of epimerase-deficiency galactosaemia. We report here further studies of the V94M-hGALE enzyme, overexpressed and purified from a null-background yeast expression system. Our results demonstrate that the mutant protein is impaired relative to the wild-type enzyme predominantly at the level of Vmax rather than of Km. Studies using UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine as a competitor of UDPgalactose further demonstrate that the Km values for these two substrates vary by less than a factor of 3 for both the wild-type and mutant proteins. Finally, we have explored the impact of the V94M substitution on susceptibility of yeast expressing human GALE to galactose toxicity, including changes in the levels of galactose 1-phosphate (gal-1-P) accumulated in these cells at different times following exposure to galactose. We have observed an inverse correlation between the level of GALE activity expressed in a given culture and the degree of galactose toxicity observed. We have further observed an inverse correlation between the level of GALE activity expressed in a culture and the concentration of gal-1-P accumulated in the cells. These data support the hypothesis that elevated levels of gal-1-P may underlie the observed toxicity. They further raise the intriguing possibility that yeast may provide a valuable model not only for

  6. The CD10 enzyme is a key player to identify and regulate human mammary stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard-Cascales, Elodie; Chapellier, Marion; Delay, Emmanuel; Pochon, Gaetan; Voeltzel, Thibault; Puisieux, Alain; Caron de Fromentel, Claude; Maguer-Satta, Véronique

    2010-06-01

    The major components of the mammary ductal tree are an inner layer of luminal cells, an outer layer of myoepithelial cells, and a basement membrane that separates the ducts from the underlying stroma. Cells in the outer layer express CD10, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that regulates the growth of the ductal tree during mammary gland development. To define the steps in the human mammary lineage at which CD10 acts, we have developed an in vitro assay for human mammary lineage progression. We show that sorting for CD10 and EpCAM cleanly separates progenitors from differentiated luminal cells and that the CD10-high EpCAM-low population is enriched for early common progenitor and mammosphere-forming cells. We also show that sorting for CD10 enriches sphere-forming cells from other tissue types, suggesting that it may provide a simple tool to identify stem or progenitor populations in tissues for which lineage studies are not currently possible. We demonstrate that the protease activity of CD10 and the adhesion function of beta1-integrin are required to prevent differentiation of mammary progenitors. Taken together, our data suggest that integrin-mediated contact with the basement membrane and cleavage of signaling factors by CD10 are key elements in the niche that maintains the progenitor and stem cell pools in the mammary lineage.

  7. Troglitazone thiol adduct formation in human liver microsomes: enzyme kinetics and reaction phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Qu, Qinling; He, Bing; Shyu, Wen C; Rodrigues, A David; He, Kan

    2008-08-01

    Troglitazone (TGZ) induced hepatotoxicity has been linked to cytochrome P450 (CYP)-catalyzed reactive metabolite formation. Therefore, the kinetics and CYP specificity of reactive metabolite formation were studied using dansyl glutathione (dGSH) as a trapping agent after incubation of TGZ with human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human CYP proteins. CYP2C8 exhibited the highest rate of TGZ adduct (TGZ-dGS) formation, followed by CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP2C19. The involvement of CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 was confirmed with CYP form-selective chemical inhibitors. The impact of TGZ concentration on the rate of TGZ-dGS formation was also evaluated. In this instance, two distinctly different profiles were observed with recombinant CYP3A4 and CYP2C8. It is concluded that both CYP3A4/5 and CYP2C8 play a major role in the formation of TGZ adduct in HLM. However, the contribution of these CYPs varies depending on their relative expression and the concentration of TGZ.

  8. Osteogenesis for postoperative temporal bone defects using human ear adipose-derived stromal cells and tissue engineering: an animal model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Ju; Park, Seung Gu; Shin, Beomyong; Kim, Jangho; Kim, Seung Won; Choo, Oak-Sung; Yin, Xiang Yun; Min, Byoung Hyun; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2017-09-05

    Mastoidectomy, the removal of infected mastoid bones, is a common surgical procedure for the treatment of chronic otitis media. Persistent and recurrent otorrhea and accumulation of keratin debris following open cavity mastoidectomy are still bothersome issues for both patients and otologists. In this study, we used human ear adipose-derived stromal cells (hEASCs) in combination with polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds and osteogenic differentiation medium (ODM) to regenerate temporal bone defects. The hEASCs showed stem cell phenotypes, and these characteristics were maintained up to passage 5. Mastoid bulla and cranial bone defects were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats using AgNO3 and burr hole drilling, respectively, and the rats were then divided into five groups: (1) control, (2) hEASCs, (3) hEASCs + ODM, (4) hEASCs + PCL scaffolds, and (5) hEASCs + PCL scaffolds + ODM. Osteogenesis was evaluated by micro-computed tomography and histology. Compared with the control group, the groups transplanted with hEASCs and PCL scaffolds had significantly higher bone formation along the periphery of the mastoid bulla area. Moreover, ODM synergistically enhanced bone formation in mastoid bulla defects. Our results suggest that combining hEASCs with PCL scaffolds represents a promising method for anatomical and functional reconstruction of postoperative temporal bone defects following mastoidectomy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Dvorak-Ewell

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS, an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS. Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rhGALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg and pure (>or=97% rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake = 2.5 nM, thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for

  10. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak-Ewell, Melita; Wendt, Dan; Hague, Chuck; Christianson, Terri; Koppaka, Vish; Crippen, Danielle; Kakkis, Emil; Vellard, Michel

    2010-08-16

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS), an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS). Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rh)GALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg) and pure (>or=97%) rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake) = 2.5 nM), thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA.

  11. Effect of Honokiol on Cytochrome P450 and UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yeon Cho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Honokiol is a bioactive component isolated from the medicinal herbs Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora that has antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, and antitumor activities. The inhibitory potentials of honokiol on eight major human cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4, and four UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs 1A1, 1A4, 1A9, and 2B7 in human liver microsomes were investigated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Honokiol strongly inhibited CYP1A2-mediated phenacetin O-deethylation, CYP2C8-mediated amodiaquine N-deethylation, CYP2C9-mediated diclofenac 4-hydroxylation, CYP2C19-mediated [S]-mephenytoin 4-hydroxylation, and UGT1A9-mediated propofol glucuronidation with Ki values of 1.2, 4.9, 0.54, 0.57, and 0.3 μM, respectively. Honokiol also moderately inhibited CYP2B6-mediated bupropion hydroxylation and CYP2D6-mediated bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation with Ki values of 17.5 and 12.0 μM, respectively. These in vitro results indicate that honokiol has the potential to cause pharmacokinetic drug interactions with other co-administered drugs metabolized by CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and UGT1A9.

  12. Immunohistochemical localization of the antioxidant enzymes biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 in human and pig gastric fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpaert, Erwin E; Timmermans, Jean Pierre; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2002-04-01

    The intrinsic antioxidant capacities of the bile pigments biliverdin and bilirubin are increasingly recognized since both heme degradation products can exert beneficial cytoprotective effects due to their scavenging of oxygen free radicals and interaction with antioxidant vitamins. Several studies have been published on the localization of the carbon monoxide producing enzyme heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2), which concomitantly generates biliverdin; histochemical data on the distribution of biliverdin reductase (BVR), converting biliverdin to bilirubin, are still very scarce in large mammals including humans. The present study revealed by means of immunohistochemistry the presence of BVR and HO-2 in mucosal epithelial cells and in the endothelium of intramural vessels of both human and porcine gastric fundus. In addition, co-labeling with the specific neural marker protein-gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) demonstrated that both BVR and HO-2 were present in all intrinsic nerve cell bodies of both submucous and myenteric plexuses, while double labeling with c-Kit antibody confirmed their presence in intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Our results substantiate the hypothesis that BVR, through the production of the potent antioxidant bilirubin, might be an essential component of normal physiologic gastrointestinal defense in man and pig.

  13. Autodisplay of Human Hyaluronidase Hyal-1 on Escherichia coli and Identification of Plant-Derived Enzyme Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya Orlando

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA is the main component of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Depending on its chain size, it is generally accepted to exert diverse effects. High molecular weight HA is anti-angiogenic, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory, while lower fragments are angiogenic and inflammatory. Human hyaluronidase Hyal-1 (Hyal-1 is one of the main enzymes in the metabolism of HA. This makes Hyal-1 an interesting target. Not only for functional and mechanistic studies, but also for drug development. In this work, Hyal-1 was expressed on the surface of E. coli, by applying Autodisplay, to overcome formation of inactive “inclusion bodies”. With the cells displaying Hyal-1 an activity assay was performed using “stains-all” dye. Subsequently, the inhibitory effects of four saponins and 14 plant extracts on the activity of surface displayed Hyal-1 were evaluated. The determined IC50 values were 177 µM for glycyrrhizic acid, 108 µM for gypsophila saponin 2, 371 µM for SA1657 and 296 µM for SA1641. Malvae sylvestris flos, Equiseti herba and Ononidis radix extracts showed IC50 values between 1.4 and 1.7 mg/mL. In summary, Autodisplay enabled the expression of functional human target protein Hyal-1 in E. coli and facilitated an accelerated testing of potential inhibitors.

  14. Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene is silenced by promoter hypermethylation in human lymphoma cell line DHL-9: another mechanism of enzyme deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Masaaki; Nakazawa, Keiko; Wada, Hideo; Nishioka, Junji; Nakatani, Kaname; Yamada, Yasuaki; Kamihira, Shimeru; Kusunoki, Masato; Nobori, Tsutomu

    2005-04-01

    Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) involved in the metabolism of purine and polyamine has been known to be deficient in a variety of tumors. Although this enzyme deficiency was reportedly caused by partial or total deletion of the MTAP gene, human MTAP-deficient lymphoma cell line DHL-9 has the intact MTAP gene. In order to determine the mechanism of MTAP deficiency in DHL-9, we carried out methylation-specific PCR analysis of sodium bisulfite-treated genomic DNA followed by DNA sequence analysis. Following incubation with various concentrations of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine, DHL-9 cells were subjected to RT-PCR and an immunoblot analysis for MTAP expression. MTAP promoter in DHL-9 cells was methylated at cytosine of all CpG dinucleotides analyzed. Moreover, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment induced DHL-9 cells to express MTAP mRNA and protein. Taken together, MTAP deficiency in DHL-9 was caused by transcriptional silencing due to promoter methylation. Promoter methylation of the MTAP gene was also found in DNA samples from adult T-cell leukemia patients. These results indicated that promoter hypermethylation is another mechanism of MTAP deficiency in human malignancy. Thus, immunological diagnostics will be needed for an accurate evaluation of MTAP expression at the protein level.

  15. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A New Path in Articular Cartilage Defect Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Philipp Stromps

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 6 million people undergo a variety of medical procedures for the repair of articular cartilage defects in the U.S. each year. Trauma, tumor, and age-related degeneration can cause major defects in articular cartilage, which has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. Therefore, there is substantial interest in the development of novel cartilage tissue engineering strategies to restore articular cartilage defects to a normal or prediseased state. Special attention has been paid to the expansion of chondrocytes, which produce and maintain the cartilaginous matrix in healthy cartilage. This review summarizes the current efforts to generate chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and provides an outlook on promising future strategies.

  16. The Establishment of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Human Thyrotropin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and specific ELISA for human thyrotropin(hTSH) is established with using two anti-hTSH monoclonal antibody. One of them is coated on the microtiter plate, the other is conjugate of biotin. The label is horseradish peroxidase(HRP) conjugate of streptavidin. TMB-H2O2 solution is used as the substrate of HRP. The sensitivity of the assay is 0.02 mIU/L. The intra-assay CVs and the intre-assay CVs of 3 samples are lower than 7.8% and 9.6%, respectively. The analytical recoveries are in the range from 93.3% to 107.8%. The assay is specific for hTSH and no cross reaction with other glyco-proteins, such as hLH , hHCG, hFSH. TSH concentrations range from 0.3 to 4,1 mlU/L in 142 normal subjects. As a reference IRMA(Multipact) method, the

  17. Catechol-Functionalized Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Enhance Angiogenesis and Osteogenesis of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Critical Tissue Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Kisuk; Lee, Changhyun; Yang, Hee Seok; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-06-13

    Over the last few decades, stem cell therapies have been highlighted for their potential to heal damaged tissue and aid in tissue reconstruction. However, materials used to deliver and support implanted cells often display limited efficacy, which has resulted in delaying translation of stem cell therapies into the clinic. In our previous work, we developed a mussel-inspired, catechol-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-CA) hydrogel that enabled effective cell transplantation due to its improved biocompatibility and strong tissue adhesiveness. The present study was performed to further expand the utility of HA-CA hydrogels for use in stem cell therapies to treat more clinically relevant tissue defect models. Specifically, we utilized HA-CA hydrogels to potentiate stem cell-mediated angiogenesis and osteogenesis in two tissue defect models: critical limb ischemia and critical-sized calvarial bone defect. HA-CA hydrogels were found to be less cytotoxic to human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in vitro compared to conventional photopolymerized HA hydrogels. HA-CA hydrogels also retained the angiogenic functionality of hADSCs and supported osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs. Because of their superior tissue adhesiveness, HA-CA hydrogels were able to mediate efficient engraftment of hADSCs into the defect regions. When compared to photopolymerized HA hydrogels, HA-CA hydrogels significantly enhanced hADSC-mediated therapeutic angiogenesis (promoted capillary/arteriole formation, improved vascular perfusion, attenuated ischemic muscle degeneration/fibrosis, and reduced limb amputation) and bone reconstruction (mineralized bone formation, enhanced osteogenic marker expression, and collagen deposition). This study proves the feasibility of using bioinspired HA-CA hydrogels as functional biomaterials for improved tissue regeneration in critical tissue defects.

  18. Changes of multiple biotransformation phase Ⅰ and phase Ⅱ enzyme activities in human fetal adrenals during fetal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui WANG; Jie PING; Ren-xiu PENG; Jiang YUE; Xue-yan XIA; Qi-xiong LI; Rui KONG; Jun-yan HONG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Fetal adrenal, which synthesizes steroid hormones, is critical to fetal growth and development. Our recent research showed that some xenobiotics could inter-fere with steroidogenesis and induce intrauterine growth retardation in rats. The study on the characteristics of biotransformation enzymes in fetal adrenals still seems to be important with respect to possible significance in xenobiotic-induced fetal development toxicity. In this study, the activities of several important xenobiotic-related phase Ⅰ and phase Ⅱ enzymes in human fetal adrenals were examined and compared with those in fetal livers. Methods: The activity and mRNA expression were determined by enzymatic analysis and RT-PCR. Results: The levels of cytochrome (CYP)2A6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A7 isozymes in fetal adrenals were 82%, 92%, and 33% of those in fetal livers, respectively. There was a good positive correlation between adrenal CYP2A6 activity and gestational time. The values of α glutathione S-transferase (GST), πGST, and μGST in adrenals were 0.5, 4.4, and 8.3-fold of those in the livers, respectively, and the activity of adrenal πGST was negatively correlated with gestational time. The uridine diphosphoglucuronyl transferase activities, which were measured using p-hydroxy-biphenyl and 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin as substrates, were 9% and 3%, respectively, of those in the fetal livers. Conclusion: Our investiga-tion suggested that adrenal could be an important xenobiotic-metabolizing or-gan in fetal development and may play a potential role in xenobiotic-induced fetal development toxicity.

  19. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate modulates antioxidant defense enzyme expression in murine submandibular and pancreatic exocrine gland cells and human HSG cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Douglas; DeRossi, Scott; Yu, Hongfang; Thomas, Cristina; Kragor, Chris; Paquin, Becky; Hahn, Emily; Ohno, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hsu, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) and type 1 diabetes are prevalent autoimmune diseases in the United States. We reported previously that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) prevented and delayed the onset of autoimmune disease in NOD mice, a model for both Sjogren’s syndrome (SS) and type 1 diabetes. EGCG also normalized the levels of proteins related to DNA repair and antioxidant activity in NOD.B10.Sn-H2 mice, a model for primary SS, prior to disease onset. The current study examined the effect of EGCG on the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the submandibular salivary gland and the pancreas of NOD mice and cultured human salivary gland acinar cells. NOD mice consuming 0.2% EGCG daily dissolved in water showed higher protein levels of peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6), a major antioxidant defense protein, and catalase, while the untreated NOD mice exhibited significantly lowered levels of PRDX6. Similarly, pancreas samples from water-fed NOD mice were depleted in PRDX6 and superoxide dismutase, while EGCG-fed mice showed high levels of these antioxidant enzymes. In cultured HSG cells EGCG increased PRDX6 levels significantly, and this was inhibited by p38 and JNK inhibitors, suggesting the EGCG-mediated increase in protective antioxidant capacity is regulated in part through MAPK pathway signaling. This mechanism may explain the higher levels of PRDX6 found in EGCG-fed NOD mice. These preclinical observations warrant future preclinical and clinical studies to determine whether EGCG or green tea polyphenols could be used in novel preventive and therapeutic approaches against autoimmune diseases and salivary dysfunction involving oxidative stress. PMID:24444391

  20. In situ osteogenesis: regeneration of 10-cm mandibular defect in porcine model using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and Helistat absorbable collagen sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Michael H; Chin, Martin; Li, X Jian

    2005-11-01

    Traditional bone grafting relies upon the incorporation of a bone-cell bearing structure into a recipient site. The graft serves as a scaffold that is eventually replaced and remodeled. This process is known as osteoconduction. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is commercially available as an acellular implant in which the protein is bound to an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS). The rhBMP-2/ACS implant converts undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts and promotes an intense local neovascular response. This process, known as osteoinduction, produces bone via membranous, chondroid, or endochondral ossification. The type of bone synthesis depends upon the mesenchymal substrate and the local cellular environment. Using this simple technique, bone defects can be resynthesized with good outcomes and a significant reduction in donor site morbidity. Repair of a critical-sized mandibular resection defect with ISO is described. Basic science concepts of rhBMP-2, relevant histopathologic findings, and clinical application are described.

  1. The effects of enamel matrix derivative and cyclic mechanical strain on human gingival fibroblasts in an in vitro defect healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jill E; Chuang, Augustine; Swiec, Gary D; Bisch, Fredrick C; Herold, Robert W; Buxton, Thomas B; McPherson, James C

    2011-01-01

    Gingival fibroblasts (GFs) play a considerable role in the maintenance of the gingival apparatus as well as in connective tissue repair. Mobility of a periodontal wound or soft tissue graft can impair connective tissue healing from the GFs. Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is an enamel matrix protein used clinically for periodontal regeneration of intrabony defects and furcations, as well as treatment of gingival margin recessions. The goal of this project was to compare the effects of varying concentrations of EMD, with and without cyclic mechanical strain, on cellular wound fill of human GFs using an in vitro defect healing model. GFs were seeded and cultured in six-well flexible-bottomed plates. A 3-mm wound was created in the central portion of each confluent well. Three wells were treated with each EMD concentration of 0 Μg/mL (control), 30 Μg/mL, 60 Μg/mL, or 120 Μg/mL. The plates were placed in an incubator containing a strain unit to subject test plates to cyclic strain. An identical set of control plates were not flexed. Cells were examined on days 4, 8, 12, and 16. Microphotographs were taken and wound fill measurements made using image analysis software. The percent wound fill was calculated. All nonflexed plates, regardless of EMD concentration, reached > 90% defect fill at similar rates by day 16. However, in the flexed plates, EMD had a significant negative effect on defect fill. The defect fill was 55.7% for 0 Μg/mL EMD, 48.2% for 30 Μg/mL EMD, 36.7% for 60 Μg/mL EMD, and 34.1% for 120 Μg/mL EMD on day 16 for the flexed GFs. EMD, in concentrations as high as 120 Μg/mL, did not significantly affect the amount of defect fill with nonflexed GFs. However, when the GFs were flexed, the addition of EMD had a significant negative effect on defect fill in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. [Experimental study on application recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2(rhBMP-2)/poly-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)/fibrin sealant(FS) on repair of rabbit radial bone defect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhongkai; Cao, Yang; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Mingchao; Lu, Wei; Tang, Lei; Yao, Qi; Lu, Gang

    2012-10-01

    This paper is aimed to investigate the repair of rabbit radial bone defect by the recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2/poly-lactideco-glycolic acid microsphere with fibrin sealant (rhBMP-2/PLGA/FS). The radial bone defect models were prepared using New Zealand white rabbits, which were randomly divided into 3 groups, experiment group which were injected with eMP-2/PLGA/FS at bone defect location, control group which were injected with FS at bone defect location, and blank control group without treatment. The ability of repairing bone defect was evaluated with X-ray radiograph. Bone mineral density in the defect regions was analysed using the level of ossification. The osteogenetic ability of repairing bone defect, the degradation of the material, the morphologic change and the bone formation were assessed by HE staining and Masson staining. The result showed that rhBMP-2/PLGA/FS had overwhelming superiority in the osteogenetic ability and quality of bone defect over the control group, and it could promote the repair of bone defect and could especially repair the radial bone defect of rabbit well. It may be a promising and efficient synthetic bone graft.

  3. The role of human cytochrome P450 enzymes in the formation of 2-hydroxymetronidazole: CYP2A6 is the high affinity (low Km) catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Robin E; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Sampson, Mario R; Kearns, Gregory L

    2013-09-01

    Despite metronidazole's widespread clinical use since the 1960s, the specific enzymes involved in its biotransformation have not been previously identified. Hence, in vitro studies were conducted to identify and characterize the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the formation of the major metabolite, 2-hydroxymetronidazole. Formation of 2-hydroxymetronidazole in human liver microsomes was consistent with biphasic, Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Although several cDNA-expressed P450 enzymes catalyzed 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation at a supratherapeutic concentration of metronidazole (2000 μM), at a "therapeutic concentration" of 100 μM only CYPs 2A6, 3A4, 3A5, and 3A7 catalyzed metronidazole 2-hydroxylation at rates substantially greater than control vector, and CYP2A6 catalyzed 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation at rates 6-fold higher than the next most active enzyme. Kinetic studies with these recombinant enzymes revealed that CYP2A6 has a Km = 289 μM which is comparable to the Km for the high-affinity (low-Km) enzyme in human liver microsomes, whereas the Km values for the CYP3A enzymes corresponded with the low-affinity (high-Km) component. The sample-to-sample variation in 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation correlated significantly with CYP2A6 activity (r ≥ 0.970, P concentrations of 100 and 300 μM. Selective chemical inhibitors of CYP2A6 inhibited metronidazole 2-hydroxylation in a concentration-dependent manner and inhibitory antibodies against CYP2A6 virtually eliminated metronidazole 2-hydroxylation (>99%). Chemical and antibody inhibitors of other P450 enzymes had little or no effect on metronidazole 2-hydroxylation. These results suggest that CYP2A6 is the primary catalyst responsible for the 2-hydroxylation of metronidazole, a reaction that may function as a marker of CYP2A6 activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Craniosynostosis and Multiple Skeletal Anomalies in Humans and Zebrafish Result from a Defect in the Localized Degradation of Retinoic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laue, Kathrin; Pogoda, Hans-Martin; Daniel, Philip B.; van Haeringen, Arie; Alanay, Yasemin; von Ameln, Simon; Rachwalski, Martin; Morgan, Tim; Gray, Mary J.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Sawyer, Gregory M.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.; Nikkels, Peter G.; Kubisch, Christian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Wollnik, Bernd; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Robertson, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Excess exogenous retinoic acid (RA) has been well documented to have teratogenic effects in the limb and craniofacial skeleton. Malformations that have been observed in this context include craniosynostosis, a common developmental defect of the skull that occurs in 1 in 2500 individuals and results

  5. Oxidative and nitrosative stress enzymes in relation to nitrotyrosine in Helicobacter pylori-infected humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anders; Elfvin; Anders; Edebo; Peter; Hallersund; Anna; Casselbrant; Lars; Fndriks

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare a possible relation between Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) and the oxygen- and nitrogen radical system in humans. METHODS: Mechanisms for H. pylori to interfere with the oxygen and nitrogen radical system is of great importance for understanding of the H. pylori persistence and pathogenesis. Biopsies were obtained from the gastric wall of 21 individuals. Ongoing infection with H. pylori was detected using direct analyze from the biopsies using campylobacter-like organism test(CLO-test) and/or by using 14C-urea breath test. The individuals were divided in a negative H. pylori and a positive H. pylori group. Expression in the gastric mucosa of induc-ible nitric oxide syntase(iNOS), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase(NADPH-oxidase) myeloperoxidase(MPO), and nitrotyrosine were assessed by Western blotting.RESULTS: The individuals who undervent gastroscopy were divided in a H. pylori neg. [n = 13, m/f = 7/6, age(mean) = 39] and a H. pylori pos. group [n = 8, m/f = 5/3, age(mean) = 53]. Using western blot analysis iNOS was detected as a 130 kDa band. The iNOS expression was upregulated in the antrum of H. pylori infected individuals in comparison to the controls, mean ± SD being 12.6 ± 2.4 vs 8.3 ± 3.1, P < 0.01. There was a markedly upregulated expression of MPO in the antrum of H. pylori infected individuals in comparison to the control group without infection. In several of noninfected controls it was not possible to detect any MPO expression at all, whereas the expression was high in all the infected subjects, mean ± SD being 5.1 ± 3.4 vs 2.1 ± 1.9, P < 0.05. The NADPH-oxidase expression was analysed by detecting the NADPH-oxidase subunit p47-phox expression. P47-phox was detected as a 47 kDa band using Western blot, and showed a significantly higher expression of p47-phox in the antrum of the H. pylori infected individuals compared to the controls, mean ± SD being 3.1 ± 2.2 vs 0.3 ± 0.2, P < 0.01. Regarding nitrotyrosine

  6. First human treatment with investigational rhGUS enzyme replacement therapy in an advanced stage MPS VII patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Joyce E; Volpe, Linda; Bullaro, Josephine; Kakkis, Emil D; Sly, William S

    2015-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII, Sly syndrome) is a very rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUS), which is required for the degradation of three glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): dermatan sulfate, heparan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate. Progressive accumulation of these GAGs in lysosomes leads to increasing dysfunction in numerous tissues and organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been used successfully for other MPS disorders, but there is no approved treatment for MPS VII. Here we describe the first human treatment with recombinant human GUS (rhGUS), an investigational therapy for MPS VII, in a 12-year old boy with advanced stage MPS VII. Despite a tracheostomy, nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure, and oxygen therapy, significant pulmonary restriction and obstruction led to oxygen dependence and end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) levels in the 60-80mmHg range, eventually approaching respiratory failure (ETCO2 of 100mmHg) and the need for full-time ventilation. Since no additional medical measures could improve his function, we implemented experimental ERT by infusing rhGUS at 2mg/kg over 4h every 2 weeks for 24 weeks. Safety was evaluated by standard assessments and observance for any infusion associated reactions (IARs). Urinary GAG (uGAG) levels, pulmonary function, oxygen dependence, CO2 levels, cardiac valve function, liver and spleen size, and growth velocity were assessed to evaluate response to therapy. rhGUS infusions were well tolerated. No serious adverse events (SAEs) or IARs were observed. After initiation of rhGUS infusions, the patient's uGAG excretion decreased by more than 50%. Liver and spleen size were reduced within 2 weeks of the first infusion and reached normal size by 24 weeks. Pulmonary function appeared to improve during the course of treatment based on reduced changes in ETCO2 after off-ventilator challenges and a reduced oxygen requirement. The patient regained the

  7. Toxicity of xanthene food dyes by inhibition of human drug-metabolizing enzymes in a noncompetitive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    The synthetic food dyes studied were rose bengal (RB), phroxine (PL), amaranth, erythrosine B (ET), allura red, new coccine, acid red (AR), tartrazine, sunset yellow FCF, brilliant blue FCF, and indigo carmine. First, data confirmed that these dyes were not substrates for CYP2A6, UGT1A6, and UGT2B7. ET inhibited UGT1A6 (glucuronidation of p-nitrophenol) and UGT2B7 (glucuronidation of androsterone). We showed the inhibitory effect of xanthene dye on human UGT1A6 activity. Basic ET, PL, and RB in those food dyes strongly inhibited UGT1A6 activity, with IC(50) values = 0.05, 0.04, and 0.015 mM, respectively. Meanwhile, AR of an acidic xanthene food dye showed no inhibition. Next, we studied the inhibition of CYP3A4 of a major phase I drug-metabolizing enzyme and P-glycoprotein of a major transporter by synthetic food dyes. Human CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were also inhibited by basic xanthene food dyes. The IC(50) values of these dyes to inhibit CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein were the same as the inhibition level of UGT1A6 by three halogenated xanthene food dyes (ET, PL, and RB) described above, except AR, like the results with UGT1A6 and UGT2B7. We also confirmed the noninhibition of CYP3A4 and P-gp by other synthetic food dyes. Part of this inhibition depended upon the reaction of (1)O(2) originating on xanthene dyes by light irradiation, because inhibition was prevented by (1)O(2) quenchers. We studied the influence of superoxide dismutase and catalase on this inhibition by dyes and we found prevention of inhibition by superoxide dismutase but not catalase. This result suggests that superoxide anions, originating on dyes by light irradiation, must attack drug-metabolizing enzymes. It is possible that red cosmetics containing phloxine, erythrosine, or rose bengal react with proteins on skin under lighting and may lead to rough skin.

  8. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  9. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  10. The revised human liver cytochrome P450 "Pie": absolute protein quantification of CYP4F and CYP3A enzymes using targeted quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Scott; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2014-08-01

    The CYP4F subfamily of enzymes has been identified recently to be involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds (arachidonic acid and leukotriene B4), nutrients (vitamins K1 and E), and xenobiotics (pafuramidine and fingolimod). CYP4F2 and CYP4F3B are reported to be expressed in the human liver. However, absolute concentrations of these enzymes in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and their interindividual variability have yet to be determined because of the lack of specific antibodies. Here, an liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted quantitative proteomic approach was employed to determine the absolute protein concentrations of CYP4F2 and CYP4F3B compared with CYP3A in two panels of HLMs (n = 31). As a result, the human hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) "pie" has been revised to include the contribution of CYP4F enzymes, which amounts to 15% of the total hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes. CYP4F3B displayed low interindividual variability (3.3-fold) in the HLM panels whereas CYP4F2 displayed large variability (21-fold). However, CYP4F2 variability decreased to 3.4-fold if the two donors with the lowest expression were excluded. In contrast, CYP3A exhibited 29-fold interindividual variability in the same HLM panels. The proposed marker reaction for CYP4F enzymes pafuramidine/DB289 M1 formation did not correlate with CYP4F protein content, suggesting alternate metabolic pathways for DB289 M1 formation in HLMs. In conclusion, CYP4F enzymes are highly expressed in the human liver and their physiologic and pharmacologic roles warrant further investigation.

  11. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  12. Paravaginal defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenholt, Louise T S; Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Glavind, Karin;

    2016-01-01

    , arcus tendineus fascia pelvis (ATFP), pubocervical fascia, and uterosacral/cardinal ligaments. Studies conclude that physical examination is inconsistent in detecting paravaginal defects. Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to describe patterns in the appearance...

  13. Human ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E1. Indication of potential nuclear and cytoplasmic subpopulations using epitope-tagged cDNA constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley-Gearhart, P M; Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1994-12-30

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 catalyzes the first step in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway. Previously, we have cloned and sequenced the cDNA for human E1. Expression of the E1 cDNA in the ts20 cell line, which harbors a thermolabile E1, abrogated the phenotypic defects associated with this line. However, little is known of the cell biology of the E1 protein or the nature of the E1 doublet. Thus, we constructed epitope-tagged E1 cDNAs in which the HA monoclonal antibody epitope tag sequence (from influenza hemagglutinin and recognized by the 12CA5 monoclonal antibody) was fused to the amino terminus of E1. Because the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of E1 is unknown, three constructs were made in which the HA tag was placed at each of the first three ATGs in the open reading frame (HA-1E1, HA-2E1, and HA-3E1). Western analysis of HeLa cells transfected with the constructs revealed that HA-1E1 closely comigrated with the upper band of the E1 doublet, and HA-2E1 comigrated with the lower band of the E1 doublet; HA-3E1 appeared smaller than either of the E1 bands. Metabolic labeling with 32P and immunoprecipitation with anti-HA antibody revealed that only the HA-1E1 protein product is phosphorylated; polyclonal anti-E1 antibody showed that only the upper band of the endogenous E1 doublet is phosphorylated. Each of the constructs was able to rescue the mutant phenotype of the ts20 cell line. Immunofluorescence studies showed that HA-2E1 and HA-3E1 were distributed in the cytoplasm with both negative and positive nuclei. This pattern of distribution has also been observed when immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody to E1 (1C5). However, the staining pattern associated with a polyclonal anti-E1 antibody (JJJ) is characterized by positive staining cytoplasm and nuclei in all cells. The HA-1E1 construct exhibited apparently exclusive nuclear distribution in HeLa cells. The difference between the staining patterns of the polyclonal and monoclonal anti-E1

  14. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranuch Nakchat

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat.

  15. An inhibition enzyme immunoassay, using a human monoclonal antibody (K14) reactive with gp41 of HIV-1, for the serology of HIV-1 infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.P. Teeuwsen; J.J. Schalken; G. van der Groen (Guido); R. van den Akker (Ruud); J. Goudsmit (Jaap); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractAn inhibition enzyme immunoassay (IEIA), using a human monoclonal antibody (K14) reactive with gp41 of HIV-1, was evaluated for its applicability to the serology of HIV-1 infections. Using panels of serum samples from seronegative and confirmed HIV-1-seropositive individuals, it was show

  16. Identification of the human P450 enzymes involved in the in vitro metabolism of the synthetic steroidal hormones Org 4060 and Org 30659

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, CHJ; Van Munster, TTM; Groothuis, GMM; Vos, RME; Rietjens, IMCM

    2002-01-01

    1. The type of human P450 enzymes involved in the in vitro metabolism of Org 4060 and Org 30659, two synthetic steroidal hormones currently under clinical development by NV Organon for use in oral contraceptive and hormone replacement therapy, was investigated. 2. Both steroids were mainly hydroxyla

  17. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent serum assays (ELISAs) for rat and human N-terminal pro-peptide of collagen type I (PINP) - Assessment of corresponding epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana Julie; Larsen, D.V.; Zhang, C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The present study describes two newly developed N-terminal pro-peptides of collagen type I (PINP) competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the assessment of corresponding PINP epitopes in the rat- and human species. Methods: Monoclonal antibodies were raised against...

  18. Microplate chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay for the quantitative evaluation of carbohydrate antigen 72-4 in human serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hui; WANG Xu; XIN TianBing; GAO Peng; LIN JinMing; LIANG ShuXuan

    2008-01-01

    A highly sensitive and specific microplate chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) was de-veloped for the quantitative evaluation of carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) in human serum, using luminol-H2O2 catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as the chemiluminescence system. The sim-ple and quick determination was accomplished through a sandwich reaction mode. Several physico-chemical parameters of the immunoreaction, including incubation conditions, antibody coating condi-tions, dilution ratio of anti-CA72-4-HRP conjugate, and chemiluminescence reaction time, were studied and optimized. The proposed method exhibited a linear range of 0-200 U/mL with correlation coeffi-cient and detection limit of 0.9995 and 0.18 U/mL, respectively. The inter-assay and intra-assay coeffi-cients of variation (CV) were both less than 10%. The average recovery of two clinical sera with low and high concentration CA72-4 was 99.3% and 98.7%, respectively. Normal tumor markers, including AFP, CEA, CA2.4-2, CA19-9 and CA15-3, did not cross-react with each other. The method's stability was evaluated by assessing its analytical performance after storing the immunoreagents at 4℃ and 37℃ for 7 days. Little difference was found, indicating satisfactory stability of the method. The present method has been successfully applied to the detection of CA72-4 human serum, and showed a good correlation with the commercially available ELISA kit (r2=0.9383). This method showed great potential in the fabrication of diagnostic kit for CA72-4, and could be well used in diagnosis of cancer in clinical practice.

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors attenuate propofol-induced pro-oxidative and antifibrinolytic effect in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz, Marzena; Gromotowicz-Poplawska, Anna; Kisiel, Wioleta; Konarzewska, Emilia; Szemraj, Janusz; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Chabielska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of plasma and tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) against propofol-induced endothelial dysfunction and to elucidate the involved mechanisms in vitro. We examined the effects of propofol (50 μM), quinaprilat and enalaprilat (10(-5) M) on fibrinolysis (t-PA, PAI-1, TAFI antigen levels), oxidative stress parameters (H2O2 and MDA antigen levels and SOD and NADPH oxidase mRNA levels) and nitric oxide bioavailability (NO2/NO3 concentration and NOS expression at the level of mRNA) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that both ACE-Is promoted similar endothelial fibrinolytic properties and decreased oxidative stress in vitro. Propofol alone increased the release of antifibrinolytic and pro-oxidative factors from the endothelium and increased mRNA iNOS expression. We also found that the incubation of HUVECs in the presence of propofol following ACE-Is pre-incubation caused weakness of the antifibrinolytic and pro-oxidative potential of propofol and this effect was similar after both ACE-Is. This observation suggests that the studied ACE-Is exerted protective effects against endothelial cell dysfunction caused by propofol, independently of hemodynamics.

  20. Characterization of the De Novo Biosynthetic Enzyme of Platelet Activating Factor, DDT-Insensitive Cholinephosphotransferase, of Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Alexandros Demopoulos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activating factor (PAF, a potent inflammatory mediator, is implicated in several proinflammatory/inflammatory diseases such as glomerulonephritis, glomerulosclerosis, atherosclerosis, cancer, allergy, and diabetes. PAF can be produced by several renal cells under appropriate stimuli and it is thought to be implicated in renal diseases. The aim of this study is the characterization of DTT-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase (PAF-CPT of human mesangial cell (HMC, the main regulatory enzyme of PAF de novo biosynthetic pathway. Microsomal fractions of mesangial cells were isolated and enzymatic activity and kinetic parameters were determined by TLC and in vitro biological test in rabbit washed platelets. The effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA, dithiothreitol (DTT, divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+, EDTA, and various chemicals on the activity of PAF-CPT of HMC was also studied. Moreover, preliminary in vitro tests have been performed with several anti-inflammatory factors such as drugs (simvastatin, IFNa, rupatadine, tinzaparin, and salicylic acid and bioactive compounds of Mediterranean diet (resveratrol and lipids of olive oil, olive pomace, sea bass “Dicentrarchus labrax,” and gilthead sea bream “Sparus aurata”. The results indicated that the above compounds can influence PAF-CPT activity of HMC.

  1. The effects by neuroleptics, antimycotics and antibiotics on disulfide reducing enzymes from the human pathogens Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondarza, Raúl N; Iturbe, Angélica; Hernández, Eva

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of two neuroleptic agents, chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine; three antimycotics, amphotericin B, ketoconazole and miconazole and four antibiotics, pentamidine, rifampicin, mepacrine and metronidazole on the NADPH-dependent disulfide reducing enzymes cystine reductase (CysR), glutathione reductase (GR) trypanothione reductase (TR) and a putative disulfide reductase for compound X in Acanthamoeba polyphaga from the human pathogens A. polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri. Against A. polyphaga, all nine drugs studied had the capacity to inhibit the putative disulfide reductase from the trophozoites at a concentration of 32microg/ml during a 24h incubation and they were: the neuroleptics trifluoperazine (100%) and chlorpromazine (96%), the antimycotics miconazole (89%) ketoconazole (81%) and amphotericin B, (53%) and the antibiotics pentamidine (89%), rifampicin (64%), mepacrine (57%) and metronidazole (14%). Only six of the nine drugs simultaneously inhibited CysR, GR and the putative disulfide reductase. In N. fowleri, the most potent inhibitors of trypanothione reductase were amphotericin B and miconazole which inhibited 100% at a concentration of 32microg/ml during the 24h incubation followed by the neuroleptics trifluoperazine (92%) and chlorpromazine (80%) and the antibiotic mepacrine (70%). All these also inhibited CysR and GR from the trophozoites other than mepacrine which inhibited only CysR and TR. Ketoconazole, rifampicin (which did not affect CysR), pentamidine and metronidazole had opposite effects since they did not inhibit but increased the amount of the three thiols.

  2. Human recombinant beta-secretase immobilized enzyme reactor for fast hits' selection and characterization from a virtual screening library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Angela; Mancini, Francesca; Cosconati, Sandro; Marinelli, Luciana; La Pietra, Valeria; Novellino, Ettore; Andrisano, Vincenza

    2013-01-25

    In the present work, a human recombinant BACE1 immobilized enzyme reactor (hrBACE1-IMER) has been applied for the sensitive fast screening of 38 compounds selected through a virtual screening approach. HrBACE1-IMER was inserted into a liquid chromatograph coupled with a fluorescent detector. A fluorogenic peptide substrate (M-2420), containing the β-secretase site of the Swedish mutation of APP, was injected and cleaved in the on-line HPLC-hrBACE1-IMER system, giving rise to the fluorescent product. The compounds of the library were tested for their ability to inhibit BACE1 in the immobilized format and to reduce the area related to the chromatographic peak of the fluorescent enzymatic product. The results were validated in solution by using two different FRET methods. Due to the efficient virtual screening methodology, more than fifty percent of the selected compounds showed a measurable inhibitory activity. One of the most active compound (a bis-indanone derivative) was characterized in terms of IC(50) and K(i) determination on the hrBACE1-IMER. Thus, the hrBACE1-IMER has been confirmed as a valid tool for the throughput screening of different chemical entities with potency lower than 30μM for the fast hits' selection and for mode of action determination.

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors attenuate propofol-induced pro-oxidative and antifibrinolytic effect in human endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of plasma and tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is against propofol-induced endothelial dysfunction and to elucidate the involved mechanisms in vitro. Materials and methods: We examined the effects of propofol (50 μM, quinaprilat and enalaprilat (10−5 M on fibrinolysis (t-PA, PAI-1, TAFI antigen levels, oxidative stress parameters (H2O2 and MDA antigen levels and SOD and NADPH oxidase mRNA levels and nitric oxide bioavailability (NO2/NO3 concentration and NOS expression at the level of mRNA in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Results: We found that both ACE-Is promoted similar endothelial fibrinolytic properties and decreased oxidative stress in vitro. Propofol alone increased the release of antifibrinolytic and pro-oxidative factors from the endothelium and increased mRNA iNOS expression. We also found that the incubation of HUVECs in the presence of propofol following ACE-Is pre-incubation caused weakness of the antifibrinolytic and pro-oxidative potential of propofol and this effect was similar after both ACE-Is. Conclusions: This observation suggests that the studied ACE-Is exerted protective effects against endothelial cell dysfunction caused by propofol, independently of hemodynamics.

  4. Inhibition of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1) by Finasteride and Structure of the Enzyme-Inhibitor Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.; Di Costanzo, L; Penning, T; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    The {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid functionality is present in nearly all steroid hormones apart from estrogens. The first step in functionalization of the A-ring is mediated in humans by steroid 5{alpha}- or 5{beta}-reductase. Finasteride is a mechanism-based inactivator of 5{alpha}-reductase type 2 with subnanomolar affinity and is widely used as a therapeutic for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is also used for androgen deprivation in hormone-dependent prostate carcinoma, and it has been examined as a chemopreventive agent in prostate cancer. The effect of finasteride on steroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1) has not been previously reported. We show that finasteride competitively inhibits AKR1D1 with low micromolar affinity but does not act as a mechanism-based inactivator. The structure of the AKR1D1 {center_dot} NADP{sup +} {center_dot} finasteride complex determined at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution shows that it is not possible for NADPH to reduce the {Delta}{sup 1-2}-ene of finasteride because the cofactor and steroid are not proximal to each other. The C3-ketone of finasteride accepts hydrogen bonds from the catalytic residues Tyr-58 and Glu-120 in the active site of AKR1D1, providing an explanation for the competitive inhibition observed. This is the first reported structure of finasteride bound to an enzyme involved in steroid hormone metabolism.

  5. Mutations in AAC2, equivalent to human adPEO-associated ANT1 mutations, lead to defective oxidative phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and affect mitochondrial DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanesi, Flavia; Palmieri, Luigi; Scarcia, Pasquale; Lodi, Tiziana; Donnini, Claudia; Limongelli, Anna; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo; Ferrero, Iliana; Viola, Anna Maria

    2004-05-01

    Autosomal dominant and recessive forms of progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO and arPEO) are mitochondrial disorders characterized by the presence of multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA in affected tissues. Four adPEO-associated missense mutations have been identified in the ANT1 gene. In order to investigate their functional consequences on cellular physiology, we introduced three of them at equivalent positions in AAC2, the yeast orthologue of human ANT1. We demonstrate here that expression of the equivalent mutations in aac2-defective haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in (a) a marked growth defect on non-fermentable carbon sources, and (b) a concurrent reduction of the amount of mitochondrial cytochromes, cytochrome c oxidase activity and cellular respiration. The efficiency of ATP and ADP transport was variably affected by the different AAC2 mutations. However, irrespective of the absolute level of activity, the AAC2 pathogenic mutants showed a significant defect in ADP versus ATP transport compared with wild-type AAC2. In order to study whether a dominant phenotype, as in humans, could be observed, the aac2 mutant alleles were also inserted in combination with the endogenous wild-type AAC2 gene. The heteroallelic strains behaved as recessive for oxidative growth and petite-negative phenotype. In contrast, reduction in cytochrome content and increased mtDNA instability appeared to behave as dominant traits in heteroallelic strains. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae is a suitable in vivo model to study the pathogenicity of the human ANT1 mutations and the pathophysiology leading to impairment of oxidative phosphorylation and damage of mtDNA integrity, as found in adPEO.

  6. Healing of a Large Long-Bone Defect through Serum-Free In Vitro Priming of Human Periosteum-Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Bolander

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical translation of cell-based strategies for regenerative medicine demands predictable in vivo performance where the use of sera during in vitro preparation inherently limits the efficacy and reproducibility. Here, we present a bioinspired approach by serum-free pre-conditioning of human periosteum-derived cells, followed by their assembly into microaggregates simultaneously primed with bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2. Pre-conditioning resulted in a more potent progenitor cell population, while aggregation induced osteochondrogenic differentiation, further enhanced by BMP-2 stimulation. Ectopic implantation displayed a cascade of events that closely resembled the natural endochondral process resulting in bone ossicle formation. Assessment in a critical size long-bone defect in immunodeficient mice demonstrated successful bridging of the defect within 4 weeks, with active contribution of the implanted cells. In short, the presented serum-free process represents a biomimetic strategy, resulting in a cartilage tissue intermediate that, upon implantation, robustly leads to the healing of a large long-bone defect.

  7. Repair of Osteochondral Defects Using Human Umbilical Cord Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cell (WJMSC is a new-found mesenchymal stem cell in recent years with multiple lineage potential. Due to its abundant resources, no damage procurement, and lower immunogenicity than other adult MSCs, WJMSC promises to be a good xenogenous cell candidate for tissue engineering. This in vivo pilot study explored the use of human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs containing a tissue engineering construct xenotransplant in rabbits to repair full-thickness cartilage defects in the femoral patellar groove. We observed orderly spatial-temporal remodeling of hWJMSCs into cartilage tissues during repair over 16 months, with characteristic architectural features, including a hyaline-like neocartilage layer with good surface regularity, complete integration with adjacent host cartilage, and regenerated subchondral bone. No immune rejection was detected when xenograft hWJMSCs were implanted into rabbit cartilage defects. The repair results using hWJMSCs were superior to those of chondrogenically induced hWJMSCs after assessing gross appearance and histological grading scores. These preliminary results suggest that using novel undifferentiated hWJMSCs as seed cells might be a better approach than using transforming growth factor-β-induced differentiated hWJMSCs for in vivo tissue engineering treatment of cartilage defects. hWJMSC allografts may be promising for clinical applications.

  8. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxallyl glycine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on repair of critical-sized bone defects in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ding, Zhen-Yu; Cao, Jia-Qing; Huang, Jing-Huan; Zhang, Jie-Yuan; Jia, Wei-Tao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Lin

    2017-02-01

    In bone remodeling, osteogenesis is closely coupled to angiogenesis. Bone tissue engineering using multifunctional bioactive materials is a promising technique which has the ability to simultaneously stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis for repair of bone defects. We developed mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG)-doped poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) composite scaffolds as delivery vehicle. Two bioactive molecules, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a small-molecule angiogenic drug, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive growth factor, were co-incorporated into the scaffold. The synergistic effects of DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the composite scaffolds on osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Moreover, in vivo studies were conducted to observe bone regeneration and vascular formation of critical-sized bone defects in rats using micro-computed tomography, histological analyses, Microfil® perfusion, fluorescence labeling, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the MBG-PHBHHx scaffolds did exert synergistic effects on the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Moreover, DMOG and rhBMP-2 produced significant increases in newly-formed bone and neovascularization of calvarial bone defects in rats. It is concluded that the co-delivery strategy of both rhBMP-2 and DMOG can significantly improve the critical-sized bone regeneration.

  9. Synergistic effects of dimethyloxallyl glycine and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 on repair of critical-sized bone defects in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Yang; Ding, Zhen-yu; Cao, Jia-qing; Huang, Jing-huan; Zhang, Jie-yuan; Jia, Wei-tao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang-sheng; Li, Xiao-lin

    2017-01-01

    In bone remodeling, osteogenesis is closely coupled to angiogenesis. Bone tissue engineering using multifunctional bioactive materials is a promising technique which has the ability to simultaneously stimulate osteogenesis and angiogenesis for repair of bone defects. We developed mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG)-doped poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) composite scaffolds as delivery vehicle. Two bioactive molecules, dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a small-molecule angiogenic drug, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), an osteoinductive growth factor, were co-incorporated into the scaffold. The synergistic effects of DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the composite scaffolds on osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs were investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Moreover, in vivo studies were conducted to observe bone regeneration and vascular formation of critical-sized bone defects in rats using micro-computed tomography, histological analyses, Microfil® perfusion, fluorescence labeling, and immunohistochemical analysis. The results showed that DMOG and rhBMP-2 released in the MBG-PHBHHx scaffolds did exert synergistic effects on the osteogenic and angiogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Moreover, DMOG and rhBMP-2 produced significant increases in newly-formed bone and neovascularization of calvarial bone defects in rats. It is concluded that the co-delivery strategy of both rhBMP-2 and DMOG can significantly improve the critical-sized bone regeneration. PMID:28230059

  10. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  11. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Navarro-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs. Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the

  12. Genotype-phenotype relationships in human red/green color-vision defects: Molecular and psychophysical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeb, S.S.; Motulsky, A.G.; Lindsey, D.T.; Hibiya, Y.; Sanocki, E.; Winderickx, J.; Teller, D.Y. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    The relationship between the molecular structure of the X-linked red and green visual pigment genes and color-vision phenotype as ascertained by anomaloscopy was studied in 64 color-defective males. The great majority of red-green defects were associated with either the deletion of the green-pigment gene or the formation of 5[prime] red-green hybrid genes or 5[prime] green-red hybrid genes. A rapid PCR-based method allowed detection of hybrid genes, including those undetectable by Southern blot analysis, as well as more precise localization of the fusion points in hybrid genes. Protan color-vision defects appeared always associated with 5[prime] red-green hybrid genes. Carriers of single red-green hybrid genes with fusion in introns 1-4 were protanopes. However, carriers of hybrid genes with red-green fusions in introns 2, 3, or 4 in the presence of additional normal green genes manifested as either protanopes or protanomalous trichromats, with the majority being protanomalous. Deutan defects were associated with green-pigment gene deletions, with 5[prime] green-red hybrid genes, or, rarely, with 5[prime] green-red-green hybrid genes. Complete green-pigment gene deletions or green-red fusions in intron 1 were usually associated with deuteranopia, although the authors unexpectedly found three carriers of a single red-pigment gene without any green-pigment genes to be deuteranomalous trichromats. All but one of the other deuteranomalous subjects had green-red hybrid genes with intron 1, 2, 3, or 4 fusions, as well as several normal green-pigment genes. The one exception had a grossly normal gene array, presumably with a more subtle mutation. Amino acid differences in exon 5 largely determine whether a hybrid gene will be more redlike or more greenlike in phenotype. Various discrepancies as to severity (dichromacy or trichromacy) remain unexplained but may arise because of variability of expression, postreceptoral variation, or both.

  13. Rescue of a trafficking defective human pacemaker channel via a novel mechanism: roles of Src, Fyn, and Yes tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Huang, Jianying; Kan, Hong; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Yu, Han-Gang

    2009-10-30

    Therapeutic strategies such as using channel blockers and reducing culture temperature have been used to rescue some long QT-associated voltage-gated potassium Kv trafficking defective mutant channels. A hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated HCN4 pacemaker channel mutant (D553N) has been recently found in a patient associated with cardiac arrhythmias including long QT. D553N showed the defective trafficking to the cell surface, leading to little ionic current expression (loss-of-function). We show in this report that enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation mediated by Src, Fyn, and Yes kinases was able to restore the surface expression of D553N for normal current expression. Src or Yes, but not Fyn, significantly increased the current density and surface expression of D553N. Fyn accelerated the activation kinetics of the rescued D553N. Co-expression of D553N with Yes exhibited the slowest activation kinetics of D553N. Src, Fyn, and Yes significantly enhanced the tyrosine phosphorylation of D553N. A combination of Src, Fyn, and Yes rescued the current expression and the gating of D553N comparable with those of wild-type HCN4. In conclusion, we demonstrate a novel mechanism using three endogenous Src kinases to rescue a trafficking defective HCN4 mutant channel (D553N) by enhancing the tyrosine phosphorylation of the mutant channel protein.

  14. The Arabidopsis male-sterile mutant dde2-2 is defective in the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene encoding one of the key enzymes of the jasmonic acid biosynthesis pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Malek, Bernadette; van der Graaff, Eric; Schneitz, Kay

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. mutant delayed-dehiscence2-2 (dde2-2) was identified in an En1/Spm1 transposon-induced mutant population screened for plants showing defects in fertility. The dde2-2 mutant allele is defective in the anther dehiscence process and filament elongation and thus...

  15. Expression and sub-cellular localization of leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains are related to antioxidant enzymes in human ependymoma and oligodendroglioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yi; Lin Liu; Okechi Humphrey; Qianxue Chen; Shulan Huang

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated correlations between the expression of leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domain 1 (LRIG1) and antioxidant enzymes and related proteins, including manganese superoxide dismutase, glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic or regulatory subunit, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, in both human ependymoma and oligodendroglioma. Results revealed that the cytoplasmic expression of LRIG1 was associated with expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit in the human ependymoma, while the nuclear expression of LRIG1 was associated with expression of thioredoxin reductase. In human oligodendroglioma, the cytoplasmic expression of LRIG1 was associated with expression of the glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit. Both the nuclear and perinuclear expressions of LRIG1 were associated with expression of glutamate cysteine ligase regulatory subunit. These results indicated that several antioxidant enzymes and related proteins contributed to LRIG1 expression, and that these may participate in the antioxidation of the cells.

  16. Polymorphic human (CTAT)n microsatellite provides a conserved linkage marker for mouse mutants causing cleft palate, vestibular defects, obesity and ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D. [Univ. of MIchigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Twirler mutation (Tw) causing cleft palate {plus_minus} cleft lip, vestibular defects and obesity is located within 0.5 cM of an ataxia locus (ax) on mouse chromosome 18. We identified a transgene-induced insertional mutation with vestibular and craniofacial defects that appears to be a new allele of Twirler. Mouse DNA flanking the transgene insertion site was isolated from a cosmid library. An evolutionarily conserved, zoo blot positive cosmid subclone was used to probe a human {lambda} genomic library. From the sequence of a highly homologous human {lambda} clone, we designed STS primers and screened a human P1 library. DNA from two positive P1 clones was hybridized with simple sequence probes, and a (CTAT){sub 12} repeat was detected. Analysis of 62 CEPH parents with primers flanking the repeat identified six alleles containing 9 to 14 copies of the repeat, at frequencies of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.07, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was 49/62 with a calculated PIC value of 0.76. This polymorphic microsatellite marker, designated Umi3, was mapped to the predicted conserved human linkage group by analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels. The anticipated short distance between Umi3 and the disease genes will facilitate detection of linkage in small families. We would like to type appropriate human pedigrees with Umi3 in order to identify patients with inherited disorders homologous to the mouse mutations Twirler and ataxia.

  17. Dentin sialophosphoprotein knockout mouse teeth display widened predentin zone and develop defective dentin mineralization similar to human dentinogenesis imperfecta type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenath, Taduru; Thyagarajan, Tamizchelvi; Hall, Bradford; Longenecker, Glenn; D'Souza, Rena; Hong, Sung; Wright, J Tim; MacDougall, Mary; Sauk, John; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2003-07-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) is mainly expressed in teeth by the odontoblasts and preameloblasts. The Dspp mRNA is translated into a single protein, Dspp, and cleaved into two peptides, dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein, that are localized within the dentin matrix. Recently, mutations in this gene were identified in human dentinogenesis imperfecta II (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) accession number 125490) and in dentin dysplasia II (OMIM accession number 125420) syndromes. Herein, we report the generation of Dspp-null mice that develop tooth defects similar to human dentinogenesis imperfecta III with enlarged pulp chambers, increased width of predentin zone, hypomineralization, and pulp exposure. Electron microscopy revealed an irregular mineralization front and a lack of calcospherites coalescence in the dentin. Interestingly, the levels of biglycan and decorin, small leucine-rich proteoglycans, were increased in the widened predentin zone and in void spaces among the calcospherites in the dentin of null teeth. These enhanced levels correlate well with the defective regions in mineralization and further indicate that these molecules may adversely affect the dentin mineralization process by interfering with coalescence of calcospherites. Overall, our results identify a crucial role for Dspp in orchestrating the events essential during dentin mineralization, including potential regulation of proteoglycan levels.

  18. Analytical characterization and clinical evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measurement of afamin in human plasma☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieplinger, Benjamin; Egger, Margot; Gabriel, Christian; Poelz, Werner; Morandell, Elisabeth; Seeber, Beata; Kronenberg, Florian; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Mueller, Thomas; Dieplinger, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparative proteomics has recently identified afamin, the newest member of the albumin gene family, as a potential biomarker for ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was the analytical and clinical evaluation of a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of afamin in human plasma. Methods We evaluated precision, linearity, and detection limit of the assay, analyte stability and biological variability, determined reference values and quantified afamin concentrations in various diseases. Results Within-run and total coefficients of variation were < 10%. The method was linear across the tested measurement range. Detection limit was 7 mg/L for the assay. The analyte was stable for 24 h at room temperature, for 48 h at 4 °C, and for at least one year at − 20 °C and − 80 °C. The reference change value for healthy individuals was 24%. Age- and sex-independent reference values in healthy blood donors were 45–99 mg/L (median 68 mg/L). In the clinical assay evaluation afamin plasma concentrations were modestly decreased in patients with heart failure. Patients with pneumonia or sepsis exhibited markedly decreased afamin plasma concentrations. However, patients with chronic renal disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease showed no difference in afamin plasma concentrations as compared to healthy individuals. Correlation analyses revealed an inverse association between afamin and inflammatory biomarkers. Conclusions The afamin assay meets quality specifications for laboratory medicine. The results of the clinical assay evaluation revealed novel insights with respect to afamin as a potential negative acute phase protein and should encourage further studies. PMID:23981841

  19. Effects of microinjected photoreactivating enzyme on thymine dimer removal and DNA repair synthesis in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roza, L.; Vermeulen, W.; Bergen Henegouwen, J.B.; Eker, A.P.; Jaspers, N.G.; Lohman, P.H.; Hoeijmakers, J.H. (TNO Medical Biological Laboratory, Rijswijk (Netherlands))

    1990-03-15

    UV-induced thymine dimers (10 J/m2 of UV-C) were assayed in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts with a monoclonal antibody against these dimers and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. In repair-proficient cells dimer-specific immunofluorescence gradually decreased with time, reaching about 25% of the initial fluorescence after 27 h. Rapid disappearance of dimers was observed in cells which had been microinjected with yeast photoreactivating enzyme prior to UV irradiation. This photoreactivation (PHR) was light dependent and (virtually) complete within 15 min of PHR illumination. In general, PHR of dimers strongly reduces UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS). However, when PHR was applied immediately after UV irradiation, UDS remained unchanged initially; the decrease set in only after 30 min. When PHR was performed 2 h after UV exposure, UDS dropped without delay. An explanation for this difference is preferential removal of some type(s) of nondimer lesions, which is responsible for the PHR-resistant UDS immediately following UV irradiation. After the rapid removal of these photoproducts, the bulk of UDS is due to dimer repair. From the rapid effect of dimer removal by PHR on UDS it can be deduced that the excision of dimers up to the repair synthesis step takes considerably less than 30 min. Also in XP fibroblasts of various complementation groups the effect of PHR was investigated. The immunochemical dimer assay showed rapid PHR-dependent removal comparable to that in normal cells. However, the decrease of (residual) UDS due to PHR was absent (in XP-D) or much delayed (in XP-A and -E) compared to normal cells. This supports the idea that in these XP cells preferential repair of nondimer lesions does occur, but at a much lower rate.

  20. Protective role of Cys-178 against the inactivation and oligomerization of human insulin-degrading enzyme by oxidation and nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralat, Luis A; Ren, Min; Schilling, Alexander B; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a 110-kDa metalloendopeptidase, hydrolyzes several physiologically relevant peptides, including insulin and amyloid-beta (Abeta). Human IDE has 13 cysteines and is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), donors of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, respectively. Here, we report that the oxidative burst of BV-2 microglial cells leads to oxidation or nitrosylation of secreted IDE, leading to the reduced activity. Hydrogen peroxide and GSNO treatment of IDE reduces the V(max) for Abeta degradation, increases IDE oligomerization, and decreases IDE thermostability. Additionally, this inhibitory response of IDE is substrate-dependent, biphasic for Abeta degradation but monophasic for a shorter bradykinin-mimetic substrate. Our mutational analysis of IDE and peptide mass fingerprinting of GSNO-treated IDE using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer reveal a surprising interplay of Cys-178 with Cys-110 and Cys-819 for catalytic activity and with Cys-789 and Cys-966 for oligomerization. Cys-110 is near the zinc-binding catalytic center and is normally buried. The oxidation and nitrosylation of Cys-819 allow Cys-110 to be oxidized or nitrosylated, leading to complete inactivation of IDE. Cys-789 is spatially adjacent to Cys-966, and their nitrosylation and oxidation together trigger the oligomerization and inhibition of IDE. Interestingly, the Cys-178 modification buffers the inhibition caused by Cys-819 modification and prevents the oxidation or nitrosylation of Cys-110. The Cys-178 modification can also prevent the oligomerization-mediated inhibition. Thus, IDE can be intricately regulated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The structure of IDE reveals the molecular basis for the long distance interactions of these cysteines and how they regulate IDE function.

  1. Structural and functional characterization of pathogenic non- synonymous genetic mutations of human insulin-degrading enzyme by in silico methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor A; Kaleemuddin, Mohammed; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Khan, Fazal; Shaik, Nazia S; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a key protease involved in degrading insulin and amyloid peptides in human body. Several non-synonymous genetic mutations of IDE gene have been recently associated with susceptibility to both diabetes and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the consequence of these mutations on the structure of IDE protein and its substrate binding characteristics is not well elucidated. The computational investigation of genetic mutation consequences on structural level of protein is recently found to be an effective alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. Hence, by using a combination of empirical rule and support vector machine based in silico algorithms, this study was able to identify that the pathogenic nonsynonymous genetic mutations corresponding to p.I54F, p.P122T, p.T533R, p.P581A and p.Y609A have more potential role in structural and functional deviations of IDE activity. Moreover, molecular modeling and secondary structure analysis have also confirmed their impact on the stability and secondary properties of IDE protein. The molecular docking analysis of IDE with combinational substrates has revealed that peptide inhibitors compared to small non-peptide inhibitor molecules possess good inhibitory activity towards mutant IDE. This finding may pave a way to design novel potential small peptide inhibitors for mutant IDE. Additionally by un-translated region (UTR) scanning analysis, two regulatory pathogenic genetic mutations i.e., rs5786997 (3' UTR) and rs4646954 (5' UTR), which can influence the translation pattern of IDE gene through sequence alteration of upstream-Open Reading Frame and Internal Ribosome Entry Site elements were identified. Our findings are expected to help in narrowing down the number of IDE genetic variants to be screened for disease association studies and also to select better competitive inhibitors for IDE related diseases.

  2. Inhibitory effects of seven components of danshen extract on catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 enzyme in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Furong; Zhang, Rong; Sun, Jianguo; Jiye, A; Hao, Haiping; Peng, Ying; Ai, Hua; Wang, Guangji

    2008-07-01

    The potential for herb-drug interactions has recently received greater attention worldwide, considering the fact that the use of herbal products becomes more and more widespread. The goal of this work was to examine the potential for the metabolism-based drug interaction arising from seven active components (danshensu, protocatechuic aldehyde, protocatechuic acid, salvianolic acid B, tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, and cryptotanshinone) of danshen extract. Probe substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes were incubated in human liver microsomes (HLMs) with or without each component of danshen extract. IC(50) and K(i) values were estimated, and the types of inhibition were determined. Among the seven components of danshen extract, tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA, and cryptotanshinone were potent competitive inhibitors of CYP1A2 (K(i) = 0.48, 1.0, and 0.45 microM, respectively); danshensu was a competitive inhibitor of CYP2C9 (K(i) = 35 microM), and cryptotanshinone was a moderate mixed-type inhibitor of CYP2C9 (K(i) = 8 microM); cryptotanshinone inhibited weakly and in mixed mode against CYP2D6 activity (K(i) = 68 microM), and tanshinone I was a weak inhibitor of CYP2D6 (IC(50) = 120 microM); and protocatechuic aldehyde was a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4 (IC(50) = 130 and 160 microM for midazolam and testosterone, respectively). These findings provided some useful information for safe and effective use of danshen preparations in clinical practice. Our data indicated that it was necessary to study the in vivo interactions between drugs and pharmaceuticals with danshen extract.

  3. Phenotyping studies to assess the effects of phytopharmaceuticals on in vivo activity of main human cytochrome p450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadoyan, Gregor; Fuhr, Uwe

    2012-09-01

    The extensive use of herbal drugs and their multiple components and modes of action suggests that they may also cause drug interactions by changing the activity of human cytochrome P450 enzymes. The purpose of the present review is to present the available data for the top 14 herbal drug sales in the U. S. Studies describing the effects of herbal drugs on phenotyping substrates for individual CYPs were identified by a comprehensive MEDLINE search. Drugs included Allium sativum (Liliaceae), Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae), Serenoa repens (Arecaceae), Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae), Vaccinium macrocarpon (Ericaceae), Glycine max (Fabaceae), Panax ginseng (Araliaceae), Actea racemosa (Ranunculaceae), Hypericum perforatum (Hypericaceae), Silybum marianum (Asteraceae), Camellia sinensis (Theaceae), Valeriana officinalis (Valerianaceae), Piper methysticum (Piperaceae), and Hydrastis canadensis (Ranunculaceae) preparations. We identified 70 clinical studies in 69 publications. The majority of the herbal drugs appeared to have no clear effects on most of the CYPs examined. If there was an effect, there was mild inhibition in almost all cases, as seen with garlic or kava effects on CYP2E1 and with soybean components on CYP1A2. The most pronounced effects were induction of CYP3A and other CYPs by St. John's wort and the inhibitory effect of goldenseal on CYP3A and CYP2D6, both being borderline between mild and moderate in magnitude. With the exceptions of St.John's wort and goldenseal, the information currently available suggests that concomitant intake of the herbal drugs addressed here is not a major risk for drugs that are metabolized by CYPs.

  4. Inhibition of Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes by Allergen Removed Rhus verniciflua Stoke Standardized Extract and Constituents

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    Hyunsik Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Potential interactions between herbal extracts and the cytochrome P450 (CYP system lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. Rhus verniciflua stoke (RVS and its constituents have been reported to have various pharmacological properties. We evaluated the inhibitory potential of RVS and its constituents on the major CYP isoforms. Methods. The effects of allergen removed RVS (aRVS standardized extract and major components, fustin and fisetin isolated from aRVS, were evaluated on CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 isoenzyme activity by a luminescent CYP recombinant human enzyme assay. Results. The aRVS extract showed relative potent inhibitory effects on the CYP2C9 (IC50, <0.001 μg/mL, CYP2C19 (IC50, 9.68 μg/mL, and CYP1A2 (IC50, 10.0 μg/mL. However, it showed weak inhibition on CYP3A4 and CYP2D6. Fustin showed moderate inhibitory effects on the CYP2C19 (IC50, 64.3 μg/mL and weak inhibition of the other CYP isoforms similar to aRVS. Fisetin showed potent inhibitory effects on CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP1A2. Fisetin showed moderate inhibition of CYP2D6 and weak inhibition of CYP3A4. Conclusions. These results indicate that aRVS, a clinically available herbal medicine, could contribute to herb-drug interactions when orally coadministered with drugs metabolized by CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP1A2.

  5. Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Catalytic Mechanism of Human AMSH-LP Domain Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenyou; Liu, Yongjun; Ling, Baoping

    2015-08-25

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) catalyze the cleavage of the isopeptide bond in polyubiquitin chains to control and regulate the deubiquitination process in all known eukaryotic cells. The human AMSH-LP DUB domain specifically cleaves the isopeptide bonds in the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of AMSH-LP has been studied using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. Two possible hydrolysis processes (Path 1 and Path 2) have been considered. Our calculation results reveal that the activation of Zn(2+)-coordinated water molecule is the essential step for the hydrolysis of isopeptide bond. In Path 1, the generated hydroxyl first attacks the carbonyl group of Gly76, and then the amino group of Lys63 is protonated, which is calculated to be the rate limiting step with an energy barrier of 13.1 kcal/mol. The energy barrier of the rate limiting step and the structures of intermediate and product are in agreement with the experimental results. In Path 2, the protonation of amino group of Lys63 is prior to the nucleophilic attack of activated hydroxyl. The two proton transfer processes in Path 2 correspond to comparable overall barriers (33.4 and 36.1 kcal/mol), which are very high for an enzymatic reaction. Thus, Path 2 can be ruled out. During the reaction, Glu292 acts as a proton transfer mediator, and Ser357 mainly plays a role in stabilizing the negative charge of Gly76. Besides acting as a Lewis acid, Zn(2+) also influences the reaction by coordinating to the reaction substrates (W1 and Gly76).

  6. Differential role of human choline kinase alpha and beta enzymes in lipid metabolism: implications in cancer onset and treatment.

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    David Gallego-Ortega

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Kennedy pathway generates phosphocoline and phosphoethanolamine through its two branches. Choline Kinase (ChoK is the first enzyme of the Kennedy branch of synthesis of phosphocholine, the major component of the plasma membrane. ChoK family of proteins is composed by ChoKalpha and ChoKbeta isoforms, the first one with two different variants of splicing. Recently ChoKalpha has been implicated in the carcinogenic process, since it is over-expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, no evidence for a role of ChoKbeta in carcinogenesis has been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we compare the in vitro and in vivo properties of ChoKalpha1 and ChoKbeta in lipid metabolism, and their potential role in carcinogenesis. Both ChoKalpha1 and ChoKbeta showed choline and ethanolamine kinase activities when assayed in cell extracts, though with different affinity for their substrates. However, they behave differentially when overexpressed in whole cells. Whereas ChoKbeta display an ethanolamine kinase role, ChoKalpha1 present a dual choline/ethanolamine kinase role, suggesting the involvement of each ChoK isoform in distinct biochemical pathways under in vivo conditions. In addition, while overexpression of ChoKalpha1 is oncogenic when overexpressed in HEK293T or MDCK cells, ChoKbeta overexpression is not sufficient to induce in vitro cell transformation nor in vivo tumor growth. Furthermore, a significant upregulation of ChoKalpha1 mRNA levels in a panel of breast and lung cancer cell lines was found, but no changes in ChoKbeta mRNA levels were observed. Finally, MN58b, a previously described potent inhibitor of ChoK with in vivo antitumoral activity, shows more than 20-fold higher efficiency towards ChoKalpha1 than ChoKbeta. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study represents the first evidence of the distinct metabolic role of ChoKalpha and ChoKbeta isoforms, suggesting different physiological roles and implications in human

  7. Food and feed enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraatz, Marco Alexander; Rühl, Martin; Zorn, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Humans have benefited from the unique catalytic properties of enzymes, in particular for food production, for thousands of years. Prominent examples include the production of fermented alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine, as well as bakery and dairy products. The chapter reviews the historic background of the development of modern enzyme technology and provides an overview of the industrial food and feed enzymes currently available on the world market. The chapter highlights enzyme applications for the improvement of resource efficiency, the biopreservation of food, and the treatment of food intolerances. Further topics address the improvement of food safety and food quality.

  8. A sensitive enzyme immunoassay for human epidermal growth factor. Determination of hEGF in human serum and urine and pharmacokinetics in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Hashimoto, K; Sakamoto, S

    1989-07-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay for human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) is described. The anti-hEGF antibody was prepared by immunizing rabbits with hEGF, which was synthesized by Escherichia coli using the genetic engineering technique. The present assay system was based on the sandwiching of an antigen between anti-hEGF F(ab')2 precoated on a 96-well polystyrene plate and beta-D-galactosidase-labeled anti-hEGF Fab'. The range of measurable hEGF by this assay was 0.1-100 pg/well. Recoveries of hEGF added to serum and urine ranged between 94 and 108%. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were less than 6 and 8%, respectively. The results obtained by this assay method correlated well with those obtained by the radioimmunoassay method. By using this assay, the time course of serum hEGF levels in mice after the various administrations were also examined.

  9. Influence of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on myocardial enzymes, serum cardiac function indexes and oxygen metabolism of patients with open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Tian Song; Ming Yang; Kun-Peng Li; Juan Xu; Chuan-Ming Bai; Ji-Wu Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate and analyze the influence of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on myocardial enzymes, serum cardiac function indexes and oxygen metabolism of patients with open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods:A total of 42 patients with open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass during the period of June 2014 to January 2016 were randomly divided into the control group of 21 cases and the observation group of 21 cases. The control group was treated with routine postoperative treatment, and the observation group was treated with recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on the basic treatment of control group, then the myocardial enzymes, serum cardiac function indexes and oxygen metabolism indexes of the two groups before the surgery and at 2 h, 12 h and 24 h after the surgery were respectively detected and compared.Results: There were no significant difference in myocardial enzymes, serum cardiac function indexes and oxygen metabolism indexes between two groups before the surgery (allP>0.05), while the myocardial enzymes and serum cardiac function indexes of the observation group at 2 h ,12 h and 24 h after the surgery were all significantly lower than those of control group, the oxygen metabolism indexes were significantly better than the levels of control group (allP<0.05).Conclusions:The recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide can effectively improve the myocardial enzymes, serum cardiac function indexes and oxygen metabolism state of patients with open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, and it has application value for the patients with the surgery is higher.

  10. Metabolism of novel anti-HIV agent 3-cyanomethyl-4-methyl-DCK by human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-mei ZHUANG; Jing-ting DENG; Hua LI; Wei-li KONG; Jin-xiu RUAN; Lan XIE

    2011-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the metabolism of 3-cyanomethyl-4-methyl-DCK (CMDCK),a novel anti-HIV agent,by human liver microsomes (HLMs) and recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs).Methods:CMDCK was incubated with HLMs or a panel of recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes including CYP1A2,2B6,2C8,2C9,2C19,2D6,3A4,and 3A5.LC-ion trap mass spectrometry was used to separate and identify CMDCK metabolites.In the experiments with recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes,specific chemical inhibitors combined with CYP antibodies were used to identify the CYP isoforms involved in CMDCK metabolism.Results:CMDCK was rapidly and extensively metabolized by HLMs.Its intrinsic hepatic clearance estimated from the in vitro data was 19.4 mL.min-1·kg-1,which was comparable to the mean human hepatic blood flow rate (20.7 mL·min-1·kg-1).The major metabolic pathway of CMDCK was oxidation,and a total of 14 metabolites were detected.CYP3A4 and 3A5 were found to be the principal CYP enzymes responsible for CMDCK metabolism.Conclusion:CMDCK was metabolized rapidly and extensively in human hepatic microsomes to form a number of oxidative metabolites.CYP3A4 and 3A5 were the predominant enzymes responsible for the oxidation of CMDCK.

  11. Biotransformation of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) by human liver microsomes: identification of cytochrome P450 2B6 as the major enzyme involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erratico, Claudio A; Szeitz, András; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2013-05-20

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were widely used flame retardants that have become persistent environmental pollutants. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro oxidative metabolism of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), a major PBDE detected in human tissue and environmental samples. Biotransformation of BDE-47 by pooled and individual human liver microsomes and by human recombinant cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes was assessed using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-based method. Of the nine hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 produced by human liver microsomes, seven metabolites were identified using authentic standards. A monohydroxy-tetrabrominated and a dihydroxy-tetrabrominated metabolite remain unidentified. Kinetic analysis of the rates of metabolite formation revealed that the major metabolites were 5-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (5-OH-BDE-47), 6-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (6-OH-BDE-47), and possibly the unidentified monohydroxy-tetrabrominated metabolite. Among the human recombinant P450 enzymes tested, P450 2B6 was the most active enzyme in the formation of the hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47. Moreover, the formation of all metabolites of BDE-47 by pooled human liver microsomes was inhibited by a P450 2B6-specific antibody and was highly correlated with P450 2B6-mediated activity in single donor liver microsomes indicating that P450 2B6 was the major P450 responsible for the biotransformation of BDE-47. Additional experiments involving the incubation of liver microsomes with individual monohydroxy-tetrabrominated metabolites in place of BDE-47 demonstrated that 2,4-dibromophenol was a product of BDE-47 and several primary metabolites, but the dihydroxy-tetrabrominated metabolite was not formed by sequential hydroxylation of any of the monohydroxy-tetrabrominated metabolites tested. The present study provides a comprehensive characterization of the oxidative metabolism of BDE-47 by

  12. Human HPRT1 gene and the Lesch-Nyhan disease: Substitution of alanine for glycine and inversely in the HGprt enzyme protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khue Vu; Naviaux, Robert K; Nyhan, William L

    2017-02-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a rare X-linked inherited neurogenetic disorder of purine metabolism in which the enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt) is defective. The authors report three novel independent mutations in the coding region of the HPRT1 gene from genomic DNA of (a) a carrier sister of two male patients with LND: c.569G>C, p.G190A in exon 8; and (b) two LND affected male patients unrelated to her who had two mutations: c.648delC, p.Y216X, and c.653C>G, p.A218G in exon 9. Molecular analysis reveals the heterogeneity of genetic mutation of the HPRT1 gene responsible for the HGprt deficiency. It allows fast, accurate detection of carriers and genetic counseling.

  13. Characterization of splice variants of the genes encoding human mitochondrial HMG-CoA lyase and HMG-CoA synthase, the main enzymes of the ketogenesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisac, Beatriz; Ramos, Mónica; Arnedo, María; Menao, Sebastián; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Pié, Angeles; de Karam, Juan Carlos; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Giménez, Ignacio; Ramos, Feliciano J; Casals, Nuria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Pié, Juan

    2012-04-01

    The genes HMGCS2 and HMGCL encode the two main enzymes for ketone-body synthesis, mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA lyase. Here, we identify and describe possible splice variants of these genes in human tissues. We detected an alternative transcript of HMGCS2 carrying a deletion of exon 4, and two alternative transcripts of HMGCL with deletions of exons 5 and 6, and exons 5, 6 and 7, respectively. All splice variants maintained the reading frame. However, Western blot studies and overexpression measurements in eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell models did not reveal HL or mHS protein variants. Both genes showed a similar distribution of the inactive variants in different tissues. Surprisingly, the highest percentages were found in tissues where almost no ketone bodies are synthesized: heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Our results suggest that alternative splicing might coordinately block the two main enzymes of ketogenesis in specific human tissues.

  14. Targeting of a human iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme, nifs, to different subcellular compartments is regulated through alternative AUG utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, T; Rouault, T A

    1998-12-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters are prosthetic groups that are required for the function of numerous enzymes in the cell, including enzymes important in respiration, photosynthesis, and nitrogen fixation. Here we report cloning of the human homolog of NifS, a cysteine desulfurase that is proposed to supply the inorganic sulfur in iron-sulfur clusters. In human cells, different forms of NifS that localize either to mitochondria or to the cytosol and nucleus are synthesized from a single transcript through initiation at alternative inframe AUGs, and initiation site selection varies according to the pH of the medium or cytosol. Thus, a novel form of translational regulation permits rapid redistribution of NifS proteins into different compartments of the cell in response to changes in metabolic status.

  15. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Oranuch Nakchat; Nonthaneth Nalinratana; Duangdeun Meksuriyen; Sunanta Pongsamart

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role and mechanism of tamarind seed coat extract (TSCE) on normal human skin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells under normal and oxidative stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods: Tamarind seed coats were extracted with boiling water and then partitioned with ethyl acetate before the cell analysis. Effect of TSCE on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glut...

  16. Molecular, physiological, and motor performance defects in DMSXL mice carrying >1,000 CTG repeats from the human DM1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Huguet

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro-RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice. After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice. Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing, were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances. We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic

  17. Molecular, physiological, and motor performance defects in DMSXL mice carrying >1,000 CTG repeats from the human DM1 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Aline; Medja, Fadia; Nicole, Annie; Vignaud, Alban; Guiraud-Dogan, Céline; Ferry, Arnaud; Decostre, Valérie; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Baraibar, Martin; Gomes-Pereira, Mário; Puymirat, Jack; Bassez, Guillaume; Furling, Denis; Munnich, Arnold; Gourdon, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an unstable CTG repeat expansion in the 3'UTR of the DM protein kinase (DMPK) gene. DMPK transcripts carrying CUG expansions form nuclear foci and affect splicing regulation of various RNA transcripts. Furthermore, bidirectional transcription over the DMPK gene and non-conventional RNA translation of repeated transcripts have been described in DM1. It is clear now that this disease may involve multiple pathogenic pathways including changes in gene expression, RNA stability and splicing regulation, protein translation, and micro-RNA metabolism. We previously generated transgenic mice with 45-kb of the DM1 locus and >300 CTG repeats (DM300 mice). After successive breeding and a high level of CTG repeat instability, we obtained transgenic mice carrying >1,000 CTG (DMSXL mice). Here we described for the first time the expression pattern of the DMPK sense transcripts in DMSXL and human tissues. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that DMPK antisense transcripts are expressed in various DMSXL and human tissues, and that both sense and antisense transcripts accumulate in independent nuclear foci that do not co-localize together. Molecular features of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in DMSXL mice (such as foci accumulation and mild missplicing), were associated with high mortality, growth retardation, and muscle defects (abnormal histopathology, reduced muscle strength, and lower motor performances). We have found that lower levels of IGFBP-3 may contribute to DMSXL growth retardation, while increased proteasome activity may affect muscle function. These data demonstrate that the human DM1 locus carrying very large expansions induced a variety of molecular and physiological defects in transgenic mice, reflecting DM1 to a certain extent. As a result, DMSXL mice provide an animal tool to decipher various aspects of the disease mechanisms. In addition, these mice can be used to test the preclinical impact of systemic therapeutic

  18. Characterization of the enzymatic and structural properties of human D-aspartate oxidase and comparison with those of the rat and mouse enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katane, Masumi; Kawata, Tomonori; Nakayama, Kazuki; Saitoh, Yuki; Kaneko, Yuusuke; Matsuda, Satsuki; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Miyamoto, Tetsuya; Sekine, Masae; Homma, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    D-Aspartate (D-Asp), a free D-amino acid found in mammals, plays crucial roles in the neuroendocrine, endocrine, and central nervous systems. Recent studies have implicated D-Asp in the pathophysiology of infertility and N-methyl-D-Asp receptor-related diseases. D-Asp oxidase (DDO), a degradative enzyme that is stereospecific for acidic D-amino acids, is the sole catabolic enzyme acting on D-Asp in mammals. Human DDO is considered an attractive therapeutic target, and DDO inhibitors may be potential lead compounds for the development of new drugs against the aforementioned diseases. However, human DDO has not been characterized in detail and, although preclinical studies using experimental rodents are prerequisites for evaluating the in vivo effects of potential inhibitors, the existence of species-specific differences in the properties of human and rodent DDOs is still unclear. Here, the enzymatic activity and characteristics of purified recombinant human DDO were analyzed in detail. The kinetic and inhibitor-binding properties of this enzyme were also compared with those of purified recombinant rat and mouse DDOs. In addition, structural models of human, rat, and mouse DDOs were generated and compared. It was found that the differences among these DDO proteins occur in regions that appear involved in migration of the substrate/product in and out of the active site. In summary, detailed characterization of human DDO was performed and provides useful insights into the use of rats and mice as experimental models for evaluating the in vivo effects of DDO inhibitors.

  19. Study of in vitro metabolism of m-nisoldipine in human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lin; Jia, Peipei; Sun, Yupeng; Zhao, Chengcheng; Zhi, Xuran; Sheng, Ning; Zhang, Lantong

    2014-08-01

    This is a report about the investigation of the metabolic fate of m-nisoldipine in human liver microsomes and the recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes by using LC-MS/MS. A sensitive and reliable LC-MS/MS method was developed to obtain a rapid and complete characterization of new metabolites and the metabolism pathways. The analytes were separated on a reversed phase C18 column with acetonitrile and 0.1% aqueous formic acid as the mobile phase. Tandem mass spectrometry with positive electrospray ionization was used to enable the structural characterization of the metabolites. A total of 10 metabolites were characterized with proposed structures in the incubation of human liver microsomes by comparing their retention times and spectral patterns with those of the parent drug. Dehydrogenation of the dihydropyridine core and reactions of side chains such as hydroxylation and hydrolysis of ester bonds were the major metabolic pathways. The specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes responsible for m-nisoldipine metabolites were identified using chemical inhibition and cDNA expressed CYP enzymes. The results indicated that CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 might play major roles in the metabolism of m-nisoldipine in human liver microsomes.

  20. Fabrication of an on-line enzyme micro-reactor coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the digestion of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Hsiao Ching; Smith, Norman W; Stanley, Shawn M R

    2015-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a fast and efficient on-line method using micro-reactors for the digestion and deglycosylation of recombinant human erythropoietin extracted from equine plasma. The trypsin digestion micro reactors were fabricated using fused silica capillaries with either a dextran-modified coating or a porous monolith that was able to immobilise the enzyme. These were both found to be reasonably robust and durable, with the trypsin immobilised on dextran-modified fused silica capillaries offering better reproducibility than the micro-reactor based upon covalent attachment of this enzyme to the polymer. It is also evident that the enzyme attached micro reactors produced some tryptic peptides in a greater yield than in-solution digestion. A peptide-N-glycosidase F reactor was also fabricated and, when coupled with the trypsin reactor, the deaminated peptides T5 DAM and T9 DAM from recombinant human erythropoietin could also be detected by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These results were better than those achieved using off-line digestion plus deglycosylation reactions and the analysis required far less time and effort to complete. The use of this on-line approach improved the sensitivity, efficiency and speed of our confirmation methodology that is based upon detecting the unique peptide segments of recombinant human erythropoietin that has been affinity extracted from positive equine plasma samples.

  1. A clinical and radiological evaluation of the relative efficacy of demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft versus anorganic bovine bone xenograft in the treatment of human infrabony periodontal defects: A 6 months follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Blaggana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy entails regeneration of the periodontal tissues lost as a consequence of periodontitis. Predictable correction of vertical osseous defects has however posed as a constant therapeutic challenge. The aim of our present study is to evaluate the relative efficacy of demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA vs anorganic bovine bone xenograft (ABBX in the treatment of human infrabony periodontal defects. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with 30 bilaterally symmetrical defect sites in either of the arches, in the age group of 25-50 years were selected as part of split-mouth study design. Defect-A (right side was grafted with DFDBA while Defect-B (left side was grafted with ABBX. Various clinical and radiographic parameters viz. probing depth(PD, clinical attachment level(CAL and linear bone fill were recorded preoperatively, 12- & 24-weeks postoperatively. Results: Both defect-A & defect-B sites exhibited a highly significant reduction in probing depth, and gain in clinical attachment level and linear bone fill at 12-weeks & at the end of 24-weeks. Comparative evaluation between the study groups revealed a statistically non-significant reduction in probing depth (P<0.1 and mean gain in linear bone fill (P<0.1. However, there was a statistically significant gain in clinical attachment level (P <0.05 in Defect-A (CD=0.356 as compared to Defect-B (CD=0.346. Conclusions: Within the limits of this study, both the materials viz. ABBX and DFDBA are beneficial for the treatment of periodontal infrabony defects. Both the materials were found to be equally effective in all respects except the gain in attachment level, which was found to be more with DFDBA. Long-term studies are suggested to evaluate further the relative efficacy of the two grafts.

  2. Continuous activation of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes leads to arsenite-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Wang, Dapeng; Ma, Yuan; Xu, Xiguo; Zhu, Zhen; Wang, Xiaojuan; Deng, Hanyi; Li, Chunchun; Chen, Min; Tong, Jian; Yamanaka, Kenzo; An, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Long-term exposure to arsenite leads to human lung cancer, but the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain obscure. The transcription factor of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 p45-related factor (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant response represents a critical cellular defense mechanism and protection against various diseases. Paradoxically, emerging data suggest that the constitutive activation of Nrf2 is associated with cancer development, progression and chemotherapy resistance. However, the role of Nrf2 in the occurrence of cancer induced by long-term arsenite exposure remains to be fully understood. By establishing transformed human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells via chronic low-dose arsenite treatment, we showed that, in acquiring this malignant phenotype, continuous low level of ROS and sustained enhancement of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzyme levels were observed in the later-stage of arsenite-induced cell transformation. The downregulation of Keap1 level may be responsible for the over-activation of Nrf2 and its target enzymes. To validate these observations, Nrf2 was knocked down in arsenite-transformed HBE cells by SiRNA transfection, and the levels of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes, ROS, cell proliferation, migration, and colony formation were determined following these treatments. Results showed that blocked Nrf2 expression significantly reduced Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzyme levels, restored ROS levels, and eventually suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and colony formation of the transformed cells. In summary, the results of the study strongly suggested that the continuous activation of Nrf2 and its target antioxidant enzymes led to the over-depletion of intracellular ROS levels, which contributed to arsenite-induced HBE cell transformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Very low-dose (femtomolar) 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) disrupts steroidogenic enzyme mRNAs and steroid secretion by human luteinizing granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, M G; Marks, G T; Rawlins, R G; Hutz, R J

    2015-04-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the most toxic congener of the polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which causes anatomical abnormalities and developmental defects, impairs ovulation and reduces fertility. TCDD's endocrine-disrupting effects are, in part, caused by a direct action at the ovary. Herein we investigated the in-vitro effects of environmentally relevant doses of TCDD on estradiol-17β (E2) production by human luteinizing granulosa cells (hLGC) obtained from women stimulated for in-vitro fertilization (IVF). TCDD at all concentrations tested (3.1fM, 3.1pM and 3.1nM) significantly decreased E2 secretion when assayed for by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Herein we confirm that TCDD alters E2 secretion by hLGC in a time-, not dose-dependent fashion and are the first to show decreases in E2 secretion with fM concentrations of TCDD. Using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), the decreased E2 secretion correlates with a decrease in the mRNA expression levels two enzymes in the estrogen biosynthesis pathway: CYP11A1 and CYP19A1.

  4. Effects of Escherichia Coli-derived Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Loaded Porous Hydroxyaptite-based Ceramics on Calvarial Defect in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Young; Lee, Youngkyun; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background Recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) have been widely used in regenerative therapies to promote bone formation. The production of rhBMPs using bacterial systems such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) is estimated to facilitate clinical applications by lowering the cost without compromising biological activity. In clinical practice, rhBMP-2 and osteoconductive carriers (e.g., hydroxyapatite [HA] and bovine bone xenograft) are used together. This study examined the effect of E. coli-derived rhBMP-2 combined with porous HA-based ceramics on calvarial defect in rabbits. Methods Six adult male New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. The experimental groups were divided into the following 4 groups: untreated (NC), bovine bone graft (BO), porous HA (HA) and porous HA with rhBMP-2 (HA-BMP). Four transosseous defects of 8 mm in diameter were prepared using stainless steel trephine bur in the frontal and parietal bones. Histological and histomorphometric analyses at 4 weeks after surgery revealed significant new bone formation by porous HA alone. Results HA-BMP showed significantly higher degree of bone formation compared with BO and HA group (Pceramics can promote new bone formation. PMID:28326298

  5. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Minjuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM. The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration.

  6. Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in the Treatment of Mouse Full-Thickness Skin Defects Using Composite Human Acellular Amniotic Membrane and Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minjuan, Wu; Jun, Xiong; Shiyun, Shao; Sha, Xu; Haitao, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Early repair of skin injury and maximal restoration of the function and appearance have become important targets of clinical treatment. In the present study, we observed the healing process of skin defects in nude mice and structural characteristics of the new skin after transplantation of isolated and cultured adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) onto the human acellular amniotic membrane (AAM). The result showed that ADMSCs were closely attached to the surface of AAM and grew well 24 h after seeding. Comparison of the wound healing rate at days 7, 14, and 28 after transplantation showed that ADMSCs seeded on AAM facilitated the healing of full-thickness skin wounds more effectively as compared with either hAM or AAM alone, indicating that ADMSCs participated in skin regeneration. More importantly, we noticed a phenomenon of hair follicle development during the process of skin repair. Composite ADMSCs and AAM not only promoted the healing of the mouse full-thickness defects but also facilitated generation of the appendages of the affected skin, thus promoting restoration of the skin function. Our results provide a new possible therapy idea for the treatment of skin wounds with respect to both anatomical regeneration and functional restoration. PMID:27597871

  7. Application of Human Amniotic Membrane in Canine Penile Tunica Albuginea Defect: First Step toward an Innovating New Method for Treatment of Peyronie?s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salehipour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purposes To evaluate the efficacy of human amniotic membrane (AM grafting in the canine penile tunica albuginea defect; we developed an animal model as the first step toward an innovating new method for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease, penile cancers, and congenital deformities of the penis. Material and Methods From August to September 2011, ten healthy male dogs were selected. A rhomboid incision about 3x2cm over the tunica albuginea and its overlying squamous epithelium was made and then excised. The amniotic membrane was folded twice on itself and grafted on the defect. After 8 weeks, artificial erection was made for 5 dogs and for the other 5 dogs after 12 weeks. After artificial erection, partial penectomy was done and histopathological evaluation was performed on the grafts. Results Artificial erection performed successfully in all of the dogs. No infection or any other complication was seen. Histopathological examination showed complete re-epithelialization with squamous epithelium and collagen fiber deposition. Also, no dysplasia was seen. Conclusions The amniotic membrane can be used as a suitable substitution for tunica albuginea. It is safe, inexpensive, biodegradable, and available and may be used for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease, penile cancers, congenital penile deformities, and penile reconstructive surgery.

  8. Functional expression of a fragment of human dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by means of the baculovirus expression vector system, and kinetic investigation of the purified recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, W; Bergjohann, U; Gonski, S; Kirschbaum, B; Löffler, M

    1996-08-15

    Human mitochondrial dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (the fourth enzyme of pyrimidine de novo synthesis) has been overproduced by means of a recombinant baculovirus that contained the human cDNA fragment for this protein. After virus infection and protein expression in Trichoplusia ni cells (BTI-Tn-5B1-4), the subcellular distribution of the recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was determined by two distinct enzyme-activity assays and by Western blot analysis with anti-(dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) Ig. The targeting of the recombinant protein to the mitochondria of the insect cells was verified. The activity of the recombinant enzyme in the mitochondria of infected cells was about 740-fold above the level of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase in human liver mitochondria. In a three-step procedure, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase was purified to a specific activity of greater than 50 U/mg. Size-exclusion chromatography showed a molecular mass of 42 kDa and confirmed the existence of the fully active enzyme as a monomeric species. Fluorimetric cofactor analysis revealed the presence of FMN in recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase. By kinetics analysis, Km values for dihydroorotate and ubiquinone-50 were found to be 4 microM and 9.9 microM, respectively, while Km values for dihydroorotate and decylubiquinone were 9.4 microM and 13.7 microM, respectively. The applied expression system will allow preparation of large quantities of the enzyme for structure and function studies. Purified recombinant human dihytdroorotate dehydrogenase was tested for its sensitivity to a reported inhibitor A77 1726 (2-hydroxyethyliden-cyanoacetic acid 4-trifluoromethyl anilide), which is the active metabolite of the isoxazole derivative leflunomide [5-methyl-N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-4-isoxazole carboximide]. An IC50 value of 1 microM was determined for A77 1726. Detailed kinetics experiments revealed uncompetitive inhibition with respect to dihydroorotate (Kiu = 0.94 microM) and non

  9. An ultra-sensitive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosobent assay for dibutyl phthalate in human urinary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lifang [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lei, Yajing [Hangzhou EPIE Bio-detection Technology Limited, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Zhang, Dai; Ahmed, Shabbir [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Shuqing, E-mail: chenshuqing@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-01-15

    tool to detect DBP in urinary samples. - Highlights: • DBP complete antigens (DBP–BSA and DBP–OVA) were designed and synthesized novelty. • The development of DBP monoclonal antibody with no cross-reactivity, low LOD (0.06 ng mL{sup −1}) and IC{sub 50} (7.34 ng mL{sup −1}) • Optimization and evaluation of indirect complete competitive enzyme immunoassay • Application of the method in detecting DBP of internal exposure among Chinese human urinary • Subjects were randomly recruited and system classified by ages, genders and educations.

  10. Cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolic pathway of the histamine 2 (H2)-receptor antagonist roxatidine acetate by human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M; Nakayama, M; Numazawa, S; Oguro, T; Honma, S; Iwamura, S; Tsukamoto, K; Yoshida, T

    2001-01-01

    Roxatidine acetate hydrochloride (ROX, 2-acetoxy-N-[3-[m-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy]propyl]acetamide hydrochloride, CAS 78273-80-0), a histamine 2 (H2)-receptor antagonist, has been clinically applied for the treatment of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers. There is no report on the identification of the metabolic enzyme of M-1 (2-hydroxy-N-[3-[m-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy]propyl]acetamide), the pharmacologically active metabolite, in humans. In this study, the Cytochrome P450 (CYP or P450) enzymes which participate in the metabolism of ROX were identified using human liver microsomes and S9 fractions. M-1 was converted to M-4 (3-[m-(1-piperidinyl-methyl)phenoxy]propylamine) by the enzyme reaction with the S9 but not with microsomes. M-4 was further metabolized to M-5 (3-[m-(1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy]propanol) by microsomes. The metabolism was inhibited by coumarin and anti-CYP2A1 serum. (3-[m-(1-piperidinylmethyl)-phenoxy]propionic acid) and M-3 (m-(1-piperidinylmethyl) phenol) formation from M-5 were inhibited by quinidine and anti-CYP2D6 serum. Moreover, M-5 was converted to M-2 and M-3 by cDNA-expressed CYP2D6. In conclusion, this study shows that microsomal enzymes do not participate in the clearance of the active metabolite M-1, CYP2A6 primarily catalyzes M-5 formation from M-4, and CYP2D6 primarily catalyzes M-2 and M-3 formation from M-5 in humans.

  11. Digital subtraction radiographic analysis of the combination of bioabsorbable membrane and bovine morphogenetic protein pool in human periodontal infrabony defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Machado Guimarães

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the bone density gain and its relationship with the periodontal clinical parameters in a case series of a regenerative therapy procedure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Using a split-mouth study design, 10 pairs of infrabony defects from 15 patients were treated with a pool of bovine bone morphogenetic proteins associated with collagen membrane (test sites or collagen membrane only (control sites. The periodontal healing was clinically and radiographically monitored for six months. Standardized pre-surgical and 6-month postoperative radiographs were digitized for digital subtraction analysis, which showed relative bone density gain in both groups of 0.034 ± 0.423 and 0.105 ± 0.423 in the test and control group, respectively (p>0.05. RESULTS: As regards the area size of bone density change, the influence of the therapy was detected in 2.5 mm² in the test group and 2 mm² in the control group (p>0.05. Additionally, no correlation was observed between the favorable clinical results and the bone density gain measured by digital subtraction radiography (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study suggest that the clinical benefit of the regenerative therapy observed did not come with significant bone density gains. Long-term evaluation may lead to a different conclusions.

  12. Genome-wide association mapping in dogs enables identification of the homeobox gene, NKX2-8, as a genetic component of neural tube defects in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Safra

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs is a general term for central nervous system malformations secondary to a failure of closure or development of the neural tube. The resulting pathologies may involve the brain, spinal cord and/or vertebral column, in addition to associated structures such as soft tissue or skin. The condition is reported among the more common birth defects in humans, leading to significant infant morbidity and mortality. The etiology remains poorly understood but genetic, nutritional, environmental factors, or a combination of these, are known to play a role in the development of NTDs. The variable conditions associated with NTDs occur naturally in dogs, and have been previously reported in the Weimaraner breed. Taking advantage of the strong linkage-disequilibrium within dog breeds we performed genome-wide association analysis and mapped a genomic region for spinal dysraphism, a presumed NTD, using 4 affected and 96 unaffected Weimaraners. The associated region on canine chromosome 8 (pgenome  =3.0 × 10(-5, after 100,000 permutations, encodes 18 genes, including NKX2-8, a homeobox gene which is expressed in the developing neural tube. Sequencing NKX2-8 in affected Weimaraners revealed a G to AA frameshift mutation within exon 2 of the gene, resulting in a premature stop codon that is predicted to produce a truncated protein. The exons of NKX2-8 were sequenced in human patients with spina bifida and rare variants (rs61755040 and rs10135525 were found to be significantly over-represented (p=0.036. This is the first documentation of a potential role for NKX2-8 in the etiology of NTDs, made possible by investigating the molecular basis of naturally occurring mutations in dogs.

  13. Cloning and characterization of a putative human holocytochrome c-type synthetase gene (HCCS) isolated from the critical region for microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, L.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) is an X-linked male-lethal disorder associated with X chromosomal rearrangements resulting in monosomy from Xpter to Xp22. Features include microphthalmia, sclerocornea, linear skin defects, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Using a cross-species conservation strategy, an expressed sequence from the 450- to the 550-kb MLS critical region on Xp22 was identified by screening a human embryo cDNA library. Northern analysis revealed a transcript of {approx}2.6 kb in all tissues examined, with weaker expression of {approx}1.2- and {approx}5.2-kb transcripts. The strongest expression was observed in heart and skeletal muscle. Sequence analysis of a 3-kb cDNA contig revealed an 807-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 268-amino-acid-protein. Comparison of the sequence with sequences in the databases revealed homology with holocytochrome c-type synthetases, which catalyze the covalent addition of a heme group onto c-type cytochromes in the mitochondria. The c-type cytochromes are required for proper functioning of the electron transport pathway. The human gene (HGMW-approved symbol HCCS) and the corresponding murine gene characterized in this paper are the first mammalian holocytochrome c-type synthetases to be described in the literature. Because of the lack of a neuromuscular phenotype in MLS, it is uncertain whether the deletion of a mitochondrial holocytochrome synthetase would contribute to the phenotype seen in MLS. The expression pattern of this gene and knowledge about the function of holocytochrome synthetases, however, suggest that it is a good candidate for X-linked encephalomyopathies typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Altered DNA methylation patterns of the H19 differentially methylated region and the DAZL gene promoter are associated with defective human sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    Full Text Available DNA methylation disturbance is associated with defective human sperm. However, oligozoospermia (OZ and asthenozoospermia (AZ usually present together, and the relationship between the single-phenotype defects in human sperm and DNA methylation is poorly understood. In this study, 20 infertile OZ patients and 20 infertile AZ patients were compared with 20 fertile normozoospermic men. Bisulfate-specific PCR was used to analyze DNA methylation of the H19-DMR and the DAZL promoter in these subjects. A similar DNA methylation pattern of the H19-DMR was detected in AZ and NZ(control, with only complete methylation and mild hypomethylation(0.05. However, the methylation pattern of severe hypomethylation (>50% unmethylated CpGs and complete unmethylation was only detected in 5 OZ patients, and the occurrence of these two methylation patterns was 8.54±10.86% and 9±6.06%, respectively. Loss of DNA methylation of the H19-DMR in the OZ patients was found to mainly occur in CTCF-binding site 6, with occurrence of 18.15±14.71%, which was much higher than that in patients with NZ (0.84±2.05% and AZ (0.58±1.77% (P20% methylated clones in the DAZL promoter only in infertile patients, there was no significant difference between the AZ and OZ patients in the proportion of moderately-to-severely hypermethylated clones (p>0.05. In all cases, global sperm genome methylation analyses, using LINE1 transposon as the indicator, showed that dysregulation of DNA methylation is specifically associated with the H19-DMR and DAZL promoter. Therefore, abnormal DNA methylation status of H19-DMR, especially at the CTCF-binding site 6, is closely associated with OZ. Abnormal DNA methylation of the DAZL promoter might represent an epigenetic marker of male infertility.

  15. Evaluation of effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in combination with bioresorbable membrane (poly lactic acid-poly glycolic acid for the treatment of infrabony defects in humans: A clinical and radiographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Sehdev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The combination of biomaterials, bone graft substitutes along with guided tissue regeneration (GTR has been shown to be an effective modality of periodontal regenerative therapy for infrabony defects. Therefore, the present randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid (HA in combination with bioresorbable membrane for the treatment of human infrabony defects. Materials and Methods: Twenty four infrabony defects in 20 systemically healthy patients were randomly assigned to test (HA in combination with bioresorbable membrane and control (bioresorbable membrane alone treatment groups. Probing pocket depth (PPD, relative attachment level, and relative gingival margin level were measured with a computerized Florida disc probe at baseline and at 6 months follow-up. Radiographic measurements were also evaluated at baseline and at 6 months of postsurgery. Results: At 6 months, the mean reduction in PPD in test group and control group was 4.52 mm and 2.97 mm, respectively. Significantly higher clinical attachment level with a gain of 2.20 mm was found in the test group as compared to control group. In addition, statistically significant greater reduction of radiographic defect depth was observed in the test group. Conclusion: Regenerative approach using hyaloss in combination with GTR for the treatment of human infrabony defects resulted in a significant added benefit in terms of CAL gains, PPD reductions and radiographic defect fill, as well as LBG, compared to the GTR alone.

  16. Regulation of oxidative enzyme activity and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 in human skeletal muscle: influence of gender and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Schjerling, P.; Vistisen, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gender-related differences in the responses of oxidative enzymes and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2) to exercise. METHODS: The influence of exercise (90 min, 60%VO(2peak)) on citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity and mRNA content, to...

  17. RLEdb: a database of rate-limiting enzymes and their regulation in human, rat, mouse, yeast and E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhao; Xin Chen; Ge Gao; Louis Tao; Liping Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Rate-limiting enzymes, because of their relatively low rates of catalysis, are essential for flux control in metabolic pathways [1, 2]. They themselves are often extensively regulated, such as by transcription factors and post-translational modifications, and thus play the important role of linking metabolic pathways to gene expression regulatory networks and signal transduction networks.

  18. Endurance exercise induces mRNA expression of oxidative enzymes in human skeletal muscle late in recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Plomgaard, Peter S.; Grønløkke, L.

    2010-01-01

    exercise. To test the hypothesis that mRNA expression of many oxidative enzymes is up-regulated late in recovery (10-24 h) after exercise, male subjects (n=8) performed a 90-min cycling exercise (70% VO(2-max)), with muscle biopsies obtained before exercise (pre), and after 10, 18 and 24 h of recovery...

  19. The deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene is related to phenotypic differences in human arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, H; Pinto, YM; Rooks, G; Grandjean, JG; Schunkert, H; vanGilst, WH

    We hypothesized that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion polymorphism may be related to arterial phenotypic differences that could explain the adverse effects of deletion polymorphism. Accordingly, contractile responses to angiotensin I and II (0.1 nmol.l(-1)-1 mu mol.l(-1)),

  20. Lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus patients impairs insulin action and induces defects in beta-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ulrik B;

    2003-01-01

    The pathophysiology of insulin resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) is not fully clarified. We investigated 18 men with HALS and 18 HIV-positive males without lipodystrophy (control subjects). Duration and modality of antiretroviral therapy were...

  1. Contractile Defect Caused by Mutation in MYBPC3 Revealed under Conditions Optimized for Human PSC-Cardiomyocyte Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Birket (Matthew J.); M.C. Ribeiro (Marcelo C.); G. Kosmidis (Georgios); D. Ward (Dorien); A.R. Leitoguinho (Ana Rita); V. van de Pol (Vera); C. Dambrot (Cheryl); H.D. Devalla (Harsha D.); R.P. Davis (Richard P.); P.G. Mastroberardino (Pier); D.E. Atsma (Douwe); R. Passier (Robert); C.L. Mummery (Christine)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMaximizing baseline function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) is essential for their effective application in models of cardiac toxicity and disease. Here, we aimed to identify factors that would promote an adequate level of function to permit robust singl

  2. Lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus patients impairs insulin action and induces defects in beta-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ulrik B

    2003-01-01

    The pathophysiology of insulin resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) is not fully clarified. We investigated 18 men with HALS and 18 HIV-positive males without lipodystrophy (control subjects). Duration and modality of antiretroviral therapy were...

  3. Excessive production and extreme editing of human metapneumovirus defective interfering RNA is associated with type I IFN induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); S. van Boheemen (Sander); J.C.W.M. de Rijck (Jonneke); S. van Nieuwkoop (Stefan); D.J. Smith (Derek James); B.M. Laksono (Brigitta); A.P. Gultyaev (Alexander); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractType I IFN production is one of the hallmarks of host innate immune responses upon virus infection. Whilst most respiratory viruses carry IFN antagonists, reports on human metapneumovirus (HMPV) have been conflicting. Using deep sequencing, we have demonstrated that HMPV particles accumu

  4. Identification of key functional residues in the active site of human {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase 7: a major enzyme in the glycosaminoglycan synthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Bui, Catherine; Oriol, Rafael; Mulliert, Guillermo; Gulberti, Sandrine; Netter, Patrick; Coughtrie, Michael W H; Ouzzine, Mohamed; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2010-11-26

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play a central role in many pathophysiological events, and exogenous xyloside substrates of β1,4-galactosyltransferase 7 (β4GalT7), a major enzyme of GAG biosynthesis, have interesting biomedical applications. To predict functional peptide regions important for substrate binding and activity of human β4GalT7, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of the β1,4-galactosyltransferase family and generated a molecular model using the x-ray structure of Drosophila β4GalT7-UDP as template. Two evolutionary conserved motifs, (163)DVD(165) and (221)FWGWGREDDE(230), are central in the organization of the enzyme active site. This model was challenged by systematic engineering of point mutations, combined with in vitro and ex vivo functional assays. Investigation of the kinetic properties of purified recombinant wild-type β4GalT7 and selected mutants identified Trp(224) as a key residue governing both donor and acceptor substrate binding. Our results also suggested the involvement of the canonical carboxylate residue Asp(228) acting as general base in the reaction catalyzed by human β4GalT7. Importantly, ex vivo functional tests demonstrated that regulation of GAG synthesis is highly responsive to modification of these key active site amino acids. Interestingly, engineering mutants at position 224 allowed us to modify the affinity and to modulate the specificity of human β4GalT7 toward UDP-sugars and xyloside acceptors. Furthermore, the W224H mutant was able to sustain decorin GAG chain substitution but not GAG synthesis from exogenously added xyloside. Altogether, this study provides novel insight into human β4GalT7 active site functional domains, allowing manipulation of this enzyme critical for the regulation of GAG synthesis. A better understanding of the mechanism underlying GAG assembly paves the way toward GAG-based therapeutics.

  5. DNA Adduct Formation from Metabolic 5'-Hydroxylation of the Tobacco-Specific Carcinogen N'-Nitrosonornicotine in Human Enzyme Systems and in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarth, Adam T; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Yang, Jing; Hecht, Stephen S

    2016-03-21

    N'-Nitrosonornicotine (NNN) is carcinogenic in multiple animal models and has been evaluated as a human carcinogen. NNN can be metabolized by cytochrome P450s through two activation pathways: 2'-hydroxylation and 5'-hydroxylation. While most previous studies have focused on 2'-hydroxylation in target tissues of rats, available evidence suggests that 5'-hydroxylation is a major activation pathway in human enzyme systems, in nonhuman primates, and in target tissues of some other rodent carcinogenicity models. In the study reported here, we investigated DNA damage resulting from NNN 5'-hydroxylation by quantifying the adduct 2-(2-(3-pyridyl)-N-pyrrolidinyl)-2'-deoxyinosine (py-py-dI). In rats treated with NNN in the drinking water (7-500 ppm), py-py-dI was the major DNA adduct resulting from 5'-hydroxylation of NNN in vivo. Levels of py-py-dI in the lung and nasal cavity were the highest, consistent with the tissue distribution of CYP2A3. In rats treated with (S)-NNN or (R)-NNN, the ratios of formation of (R)-py-py-dI to (S)-py-py-dI were not the expected mirror image, suggesting that there may be a carrier for one of the unstable intermediates formed upon 5'-hydroxylation of NNN. Rat hepatocytes treated with (S)- or (R)-NNN or (2'S)- or (2'R)-5'-acetoxyNNN exhibited a pattern of adduct formation similar to that of live rats. In vitro studies with human liver S9 fraction or human hepatocytes incubated with NNN (2-500 μM) demonstrated that py-py-dI formation was greater than the formation of pyridyloxobutyl-DNA adducts resulting from 2'-hydroxylation of NNN. (S)-NNN formed more total py-py-dI adducts than (R)-NNN in human liver enzyme systems, which is consistent with the critical role of CYP2A6 in the 5'-hydroxylation of NNN in human liver. The results of this study demonstrate that the major DNA adduct resulting from NNN metabolism by human enzymes is py-py-dI and provide potentially important new insights into the metabolic activation of NNN in rodents and humans.

  6. In silico enhanced restriction enzyme based methylation analysis of the human glioblastoma genome using Agilent 244K CpG Island microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Tran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide methylation profiling of gliomas is likely to provide important clues to improving treatment outcomes. Restriction enzyme based approaches have been widely utilized for methylation profiling of cancer genomes and will continue to have importance in combination with higher density microarrays. With the availability of the human genome sequence and microarray probe sequences, these approaches can be readily characterized and optimized via in silico modeling. We adapted the previously described HpaII/MspI based Methylation Sensitive Restriction Enzyme (MSRE assay for use with two-color Agilent 244K CpG island microarrays. In this assay, fragmented genomic DNA is digested in separate reactions with isoschizomeric HpaII (methylation-sensitive and MspI (methylation-insensitive restriction enzymes. Using in silico hybridization, we found that genomic fragmentation with BfaI was superior to MseI, providing a maximum effective coverage of 22,362 CpG islands in the human genome. In addition, we confirmed the presence of an internal control group of fragments lacking HpaII/MspI sites which enable separation of methylated and unmethylated fragments. We used this method on genomic DNA isolated from normal brain, U87MG cells, and a glioblastoma patient tumor sample and confirmed selected differentially methylated CpG islands using bisulfite sequencing. Along with additional validation points, we performed a receiver operating characteristics (ROC analysis to determine the optimal threshold (p ≤ 0.001. Based on this threshold, we identified ~2400 CpG islands common to all three samples and 145 CpG islands unique to glioblastoma. These data provide more general guidance to individuals seeking to maximize effective coverage using restriction enzyme based methylation profiling approaches.

  7. Serial deletion reveals structural basis and stability for the core enzyme activity of human glutaminase 1 isoforms: relevance to excitotoxic neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuju; Peer, Justin; Zhao, Runze; Xu, Yinghua; Wu, Beiqing; Wang, Yi; Tian, Changhai; Huang, Yunlong; Zheng, Jialin

    2017-01-01

    Glutaminase 1 is a phosphate-activated metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the first step of glutaminolysis, which converts glutamine into glutamate. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter of excitatory synapses, executing important physiological functions in the central nervous system. There are two isoforms of glutaminase 1, KGA and GAC, both of which are generated through alternative splicing from the same gene. KGA and GAC both transcribe 1-14 exons in the N-terminal, but each has its unique C-terminal in the coding sequence. We have previously identified that KGA and GAC are differentially regulated during inflammatory stimulation and HIV infection. Furthermore, glutaminase 1 has been linked to brain diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and hepatic encephalopathy. Core enzyme structure of KGA and GAC has been published recently. However, how other coding sequences affect their functional enzyme activity remains unclear. We cloned and performed serial deletions of human full-length KGA and GAC from the N-terminal and the C-terminal at an interval of approximately 100 amino acids (AAs). Prokaryotic expressions of the mutant glutaminase 1 protein and a glutaminase enzyme activity assay were used to determine if KGA and GAC have similar efficiency and efficacy to convert glutamine into glutamate. When 110 AAs or 218 AAs were deleted from the N-terminal or when the unique portions of KGA and GAC that are beyond the 550 AA were deleted from the C-terminal, KGA and GAC retained enzyme activity comparable to the full length proteins. In contrast, deletion of 310 AAs or more from N-terminal or deletion of 450 AAs or more from C-terminal resulted in complete loss of enzyme activity for KGA/GAC. Consistently, when both N- and C-terminal of the KGA and GAC were removed, creating a truncated protein that expressed the central 219 AA - 550 AA, the protein retained enzyme activity. Furthermore, expression of the core 219 AA - 550 AA coding

  8. Brain morphological defects in prolidase deficient mice: first report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insolia, V; Piccolini, V M

    2014-09-17

    Prolidase gene (PEPD) encodes prolidase enzyme, which is responsible for hydrolysis of dipeptides containing proline or hydroxyproline at their C-terminal end. Mutations in PEPD gene cause, in human, prolidase deficiency (PD), a rare autosomal recessive disorder. PD patients show reduced or absent prolidase activity and a broad spectrum of phenotypic traits including various degrees of mental retardation. This is the first report correlating PD and brain damages using as a model system prolidase deficient mice, the so called dark-like (dal) mutant mice. We focused our attention on dal postnatal brain development, revealing a panel of different morphological defects in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, such as undulations of the cerebral cortex, cell rarefaction, defects in cerebellar cortex lobulation, and blood vessels overgrowth. These anomalies might be ascribed to altered angiogenic process and loss of pial basement membrane integrity. Further studies will be directed to find a correlation between neuroarchitecture alterations and functional consequences.

  9. Brain morphological defects in prolidase deficient mice: first report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Insolia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolidase gene (PEPD encodes prolidase enzyme, which is responsible for hydrolysis of dipeptides containing proline or hydroxyproline at their C-terminal end. Mutations in PEPD gene cause, in human, prolidase deficiency (PD, a rare autosomal recessive disorder. PD patients show reduced or absent prolidase activity and a broad spectrum of phenotypic traits including various degrees of mental retardation. This is the first report correlating PD and brain damages using as a model system prolidase deficient mice, the so called dark-like (dal mutant mice. We focused our attention on dal postnatal brain development, revealing a panel of different morphological defects in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, such as undulations of the cerebral cortex, cell rarefaction, defects in cerebellar cortex lobulation, and blood vessels overgrowth. These anomalies might be ascribed to altered angiogenic process and loss of pial basement membrane integrity. Further studies will be directed to find a correlation between neuroarchitecture alterations and functional consequences.

  10. Absence of p53 enhances growth defects and etoposide sensitivity of human cells lacking the Bloom syndrome helicase BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Sairei; Adachi, Noritaka; Koyama, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    The Bloom syndrome helicase BLM and the tumor-suppressor protein p53 play important roles in preserving genome integrity. Here, we knock out the genes for BLM and p53 in a human pre-B-cell line, Nalm-6. We show that p53 plays an important role in cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, when BLM is absent. Intriguingly, despite the apoptotic function of p53, BLM(/)TP53(/) cells were more sensitive than either single mutant to etoposide, an anticancer agent that poisons DNA topoisomerase II. Our results suggest a direct, BLM-independent role for p53 in etoposide-induced, topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in human cells.

  11. Human acellular dermal matrix for repair of abdominal wall defects: review of clinical experience and experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Luther H; Kim, Daniel; Silverman, Ronald P; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Singh, Navin; Goldberg, Nelson H

    2005-01-01

    The use of prosthetic mesh for the tension-free repair of incisional hernias has been shown to be more effective than primary suture repair. Unfortunately, prosthetic materials can be a suboptimal choice in a variety of clinical scenarios. In general, prosthetic materials should not be implanted into sites with known contamination or infection because they lack an endogenous vascular network and are thus incapable of clearing bacteria. This is of particular relevance to the repair of recurrent hernias, which are often refractory to repair because of indolent bacterial colonization that weakens the site and retards appropriate healing. Although fascia lata grafts and muscle flaps can be employed for tension-free hernia repairs, they carry the potential for significant donor site morbidity. Recently, a growing number of clinicians have used human acellular dermal matrix as a graft material for the tension-free repair of ventral hernias. This material has been shown to become revascularized in both animal and human subjects. Once repopulated with a vascular network, this graft material is theoretically capable of clearing bacteria, a property not found in prosthetic graft materials. Unlike autologous materials such as fascial grafts and muscle flaps, acellular dermal matrix can be used without subjecting the patient to additional morbidity in the form of donor site complications. This article presents a thorough review of the current literature, describing the properties of human acellular dermal matrix and discussing both animal and human studies of its clinical performance. In addition to the review of previously published clinical experiences, we discuss our own preliminary results with the use of acellular dermal matrix for ventral hernia repair in 46 patients.

  12. The Choice of Enzyme for Human Pancreas Digestion Is a Critical Factor for Increasing the Success of Islet Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Meirigeng; Valiente, Luis; McFadden, Brian; Omori, Keiko; Bilbao, Shiela; Juan, Jemily; Rawson, Jeffrey; Scott, Stephen; Ferreri, Kevin; Mullen, Yoko; El-Shahawy, Mohamed; Dafoe, Donald; Kandeel, Fouad; Al-Abdullah, Ismail H.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated 3 commercially available enzymes for pancreatic digestion by comparing key parameters during the islet isolation process, as well as islet quality after isolation. Methods Retrospectively compared and analyzed islet isolations from pancreata using 3 different enzyme groups: liberase HI (n = 63), collagenase NB1/neutral protease (NP) (n = 43), and liberase mammalian tissue-free collagenase/thermolysin (MTF C/T) (n = 115). A standardized islet isolation and purification method was used. Islet quality assessment was carried out using islet count, viability, in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), glucose-stimulated oxygen consumption rate, and in vivo transplantation model in mice. Results Donor characteristics were not significantly different among the 3 enzyme groups used in terms of age, sex, hospital stay duration, cause of death, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c, cold ischemia time, and pancreas weight. Digestion efficacy (percentage of digested tissue by weight) was significantly higher in the liberase MTF C/T group (73.5 ± 1.5 %) when compared to the liberase HI group (63.6 ± 2.3 %) (P < 0.001) and the collagenase NB1/NP group (61.7 ± 2.9%) (P < 0.001). The stimulation index for GSIS was significantly higher in the liberase MTF C/T group (5.3 ± 0.5) as compared to the liberase HI (2.9 ± 0.2) (P < 0.0001) and the collagenase NB1/NP (3.6 ± 2.9) (P = 0.012) groups. Furthermore, the liberase MTF C/T enzymes showed the highest success rate of transplantation in diabetic non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice (65%), which was significantly higher than the liberase HI (42%, P = 0.001) and the collagenase NB1/NP enzymes (41%, P < 0.001). Conclusions Liberase MTF C/T is superior to liberase HI and collagenase NB1/NP in terms of digestion efficacy and GSIS in vitro. Moreover, liberase MTF C/T had a significantly higher success rate of transplantation in diabetic NOD Scid mice compared to liberase HI and

  13. Contractile Defect Caused by Mutation in MYBPC3 Revealed under Conditions Optimized for Human PSC-Cardiomyocyte Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birket, Matthew J; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; Kosmidis, Georgios; Ward, Dorien; Leitoguinho, Ana Rita; van de Pol, Vera; Dambrot, Cheryl; Devalla, Harsha D; Davis, Richard P; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Atsma, Douwe E; Passier, Robert; Mummery, Christine L

    2015-10-27

    Maximizing baseline function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) is essential for their effective application in models of cardiac toxicity and disease. Here, we aimed to identify factors that would promote an adequate level of function to permit robust single-cell contractility measurements in a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). A simple screen revealed the collaborative effects of thyroid hormone, IGF-1 and the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone on the electrophysiology, bioenergetics, and contractile force generation of hPSC-CMs. In this optimized condition, hiPSC-CMs with mutations in MYBPC3, a gene encoding myosin-binding protein C, which, when mutated, causes HCM, showed significantly lower contractile force generation than controls. This was recapitulated by direct knockdown of MYBPC3 in control hPSC-CMs, supporting a mechanism of haploinsufficiency. Modeling this disease in vitro using human cells is an important step toward identifying therapeutic interventions for HCM.

  14. Contractile Defect Caused by Mutation in MYBPC3 Revealed under Conditions Optimized for Human PSC-Cardiomyocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Birket

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Maximizing baseline function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs is essential for their effective application in models of cardiac toxicity and disease. Here, we aimed to identify factors that would promote an adequate level of function to permit robust single-cell contractility measurements in a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. A simple screen revealed the collaborative effects of thyroid hormone, IGF-1 and the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone on the electrophysiology, bioenergetics, and contractile force generation of hPSC-CMs. In this optimized condition, hiPSC-CMs with mutations in MYBPC3, a gene encoding myosin-binding protein C, which, when mutated, causes HCM, showed significantly lower contractile force generation than controls. This was recapitulated by direct knockdown of MYBPC3 in control hPSC-CMs, supporting a mechanism of haploinsufficiency. Modeling this disease in vitro using human cells is an important step toward identifying therapeutic interventions for HCM.

  15. Fusarium ramigenum, a novel human opportunist in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency and cellular immune defects: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroti, Ruxandra V; Gheorghita, Valeriu; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meis, Jacques F; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-02-15

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous environmental fungi that occasionally provoke serious invasive infections in immunocompromised hosts. Among Fusarium species, Fusarium ramigenum, belonging to the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex, has thus far never been found to cause human infections. Here we describe the first case of invasive fusariosis caused by Fusarium ramigenum in a human and also identify immunological deficiencies that most likely contributed to invasiveness. A 32-year-old Caucasian male with a seemingly insignificant medical history of mild respiratory illness during the preceding two years, developed invasive pulmonary fusariosis. Detailed immunological assessment revealed the presence of common variable immunodeficiency, complicated by a severe impairment of the capacity of T-cells to produce both gamma-interferon and interleukin-17. In-depth microbiological assessment identified the novel human opportunistic pathogen Fusarium ramigenum as cause of the infection. This report demonstrated that an opportunistic invasive fungal infection may indicate an underlying cellular immune impairment of the host. The unexpected invasive infection with Fusarium ramigenum in this case unmasked a complex combined humoral and cellular immunological deficiency.

  16. Disruption of the folate pathway in zebrafish causes developmental defects

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    Lee Marina S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects and congenital heart defects. The biological mechanisms through which folate prevents birth defects are not well understood. We explore the use of zebrafish as a model system to investigate the role of folate metabolism during development. Results We first identified zebrafish orthologs of 12 human folate metabolic genes. RT-PCR and in situ analysis indicated maternal transcripts supply the embryo with mRNA so that the embryo has an intact folate pathway. To perturb folate metabolism we exposed zebrafish embryos to methotrexate (MTX, a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase (Dhfr an essential enzyme in the folate metabolic pathway. Embryos exposed to high doses of MTX exhibited developmental arrest prior to early segmentation. Lower doses of MTX resulted in embryos with a shortened anterior-posterior axis and cardiac defects: linear heart tubes or incomplete cardiac looping. Inhibition of dhfr mRNA with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides resulted in embryonic lethality. One function of the folate pathway is to provide essential one-carbon units for dTMP synthesis, a rate-limiting step of DNA synthesis. After 24 hours of exposure to high levels of MTX, mutant embryos continue to incorporate the thymidine analog BrdU. However, additional experiments indicate that these embryos have fewer mitotic cells, as assayed with phospho-histone H3 antibodies, and that treated embryos have perturbed cell cycles. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that human and zebrafish utilize similar one-carbon pathways. Our data indicate that folate metabolism is essential for early zebrafish development. Zebrafish studies of the folate pathway and its deficiencies could provide insight into the underlying etiology of human birth defects and the natural role of folate in development.

  17. Intrauterine Infections and Birth Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO-YING ZHENG; XIN-MING SONG; LI-HUA PANG; YING JI; HONG-MEI SUN; LEI ZHANG; JU-FEN LIU; YAN-LING GUO; YAN ZHANG; TING ZHANG; YI-FEI WANG; CHEN XU; GONG CHEN; RUOLEI XIN; JIA-PENG CHEN; XU-MEI HU; QING YANG

    2004-01-01

    Intrauterine infection is an important cause of some birth defects worldwide. The most common pathogens include rubella virus, cytomegaloviurs, ureaplasma urealyticum, toxoplasma, etc. General information about these pathogens in epidemiology, consequence of birth defects, and the possible mechanisms in the progress of birth defects, and the interventions to prevent or treat these pathogens' infections are described. The infections caused by rubella virus, cytomegaloviurs, ureaplasma urealyticum, toxoplasma, etc. are common, yet they are proved to be fatal during the pregnant period, especially during the first trimester. These infections may cause sterility, abortion, stillbirth, low birth weight, and affect multiple organs that may induce loss of hearing and vision, even fetal deformity and the long-term effects. These pathogens' infections may influence the microenvironment of placenta, including levels of enzymes and cytokines, and affect chondriosome that may induce the progress of birth defect. Early diagnosis of infections during pregnancy should be strengthened. There are still many things to be settled, such as the molecular mechanisms of birth defects, the effective vaccines to certain pathogens. Birth defect researches in terms of etiology and the development of applicable and sensitive pathogen detection technology and methods are imperative.

  18. Ex Vivo Measurement of Enzyme Stability in Human Plasma: A Potential Screening Method for In Vivo Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    INTRODUCTION Catalytic enzymes offer the potential to protect against organophosphate poisoning by detoxifying these compounds in the blood stream, before...phosphotriesterase for the hydrolysis of  organophosphate  nerve agents,  Biochemistry published online, August 2012.  2 Bigley, A.N., C. Xu, T.J. Henderson

  19. Assessing PreCR™ repair enzymes for restoration of STR profiles from artificially degraded DNA for human identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James M; Dineen, Shauna M; Scott, Kristina A; Lucyshyn, Jonathan; Saeed, Maria; Murphy, Devonie L; Schweighardt, Andrew J; Meiklejohn, Kelly A

    2014-09-01

    Forensic scientists have used several approaches to obtain short tandem repeat (STR) profiles from compromised DNA samples, including supplementing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with enhancers and using procedures yielding reduced-length amplicons. For degraded DNA, the peak intensities of the alleles separated by electrophoresis generally decrease as the length of the allele increases. When the intensities of the alleles decrease below an established threshold, they are described as drop-outs, thus contributing to a partial STR profile. This work assesses the use of repair enzymes to improve the STR profiles from artificially degraded DNA. The commercial PreCR™ repair kit of DNA repair enzymes was tested on both purified DNA and native DNA in body fluids exposed to oxidizing agents, hydrolytic conditions, ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, and desiccation. The strategy was to restrict the level of DNA damage to that which yields partial STR profiles in order to test for allele restoration as opposed to simple allele enhancement. Two protocols were investigated for allele restoration: a sequential protocol using the manufacturer's repair procedure and a modified protocol reportedly designed for optimal STR analysis of forensic samples. Allele restoration was obtained with both protocols, but the peak height appeared to be higher for the modified protocol (determined by Mann-Kendall Trend Test). The success of the approach using the PreCR™ repair enzymes was sporadic; it led to allele restoration as well as allele drop-out. Additionally, allele restoration with the PreCR™ enzymes was compared with restoration by alternative, but commonly implemented approaches using Restorase™, PCRBoost™, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the Minifiler™ STR system. The alternative methods were also successful in improving the STR profile, but their success also depended on the quality of the template encountered. Our results indicate the PreCR™ repair kit may

  20. Effects of methoxychlor and 2,2-bis ( p -hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane on cytochrome P450 enzyme activities in human and rat livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingbing; Pan, Peipei; Wang, Li; Chen, Menchun; Dong, Yaoyao; Ge, Ren-Shan; Hu, Guo-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Human and rat liver microsomes were used to investigate the inhibitory effects of methoxychlor (MXC) and its metabolite 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE) on the activities of corresponding human and rat CYPs. Probe drugs were used to test the inhibitory effects of MXC and HPTE on human and rat CYPs. The results showed that MXC and HPTE inhibited both human CYP2C9 and rat liver CYP2C11 activity, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 15.47 ± 0.36 (MXC) and 8.87 ± 0.53 μmol/l (HPTE) for human CYP2C9, and of 22.45 ± 1.48 (MXC) and 24.63 ± 1.35 μmol/l (HPTE) for rat CYP2C11. MXC and HPTE had no effects on human CYP2C19 activity but inhibited rat CYP2C6 activity with IC50 values of 14.84 ± 0.04 (MXC) and 8.72 ± 0.25 μmol/l (HPTE). With regard to human CYP2D6 and rat CYP2D2 activity, only HPTE potently inhibited human CYP2D6 activity, with an IC50 value of 16.56 ± 0.69 μmol/l. Both chemicals had no effect on human CYP3A4 and rat CYP3A1 activity. In summary, MXC and HPTE are potent inhibitors of some human and rat CYPs.

  1. Tuning intracellular homeostasis of human uroporphyrinogen III synthase by enzyme engineering at a single hotspot of congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ben Bdira, Fredj; González, Esperanza; Pluta, Paula; Laín, Ana; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Falcon-Perez, Juan Manuel; Millet, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) results from a deficiency in uroporphyrinogen III synthase enzyme (UROIIIS) activity that ultimately stems from deleterious mutations in the uroS gene. C73 is a hotspot for these mutations and a C73R substitution, which drastically reduces the enzyme activity and stability, is found in almost one-third of all reported CEP cases. Here, we have studied the structural basis, by which mutations in this hotspot lead to UROIIIS destabilization. First, a strong interdependency is observed between the volume of the side chain at position 73 and the folded protein. Moreover, there is a correlation between the in vitro half-life of the mutated proteins and their expression levels in eukaryotic cell lines. Molecular modelling was used to rationalize the results, showing that the mutation site is coupled to the hinge region separating the two domains. Namely, mutations at position 73 modulate the inter-domain closure and ultimately affect protein stability. By incorporating residues capable of interacting with R73 to stabilize the hinge region, catalytic activity was fully restored and a moderate increase in the kinetic stability of the enzyme was observed. These results provide an unprecedented rationale for a destabilizing missense mutation and pave the way for the effective design of molecular chaperones as a therapy against CEP.

  2. Effects of black grape extract on activities of DNA turn-over enzymes in cancerous and non cancerous human colon tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Ilker; Cetin, Recep; Devrim, Erdinç; Ergüder, Imge B

    2005-05-06

    Effects of extract of dried whole black grape including seed on adenosine deaminase (ADA), 5' nucleotidase (5'NT) and xanthine oxidase (XO) enzymes were investigated in cancerous and non-cancerous human colon tissues. Enzyme activities were measured in 20 colon tissues, 10 from cancerous region and 10 from non cancerous region with and without pre incubation with black grape extract. ADA and 5'NT activities were found increased and that of the XO decreased in the cancerous tissues relative to non cancerous ones. After incubation period with black grape extract for 12 h, ADA and 5'NT activities were found to be significantly lowered but that of XO unchanged in both cancerous and non cancerous tissues. Results suggest that ADA and 5'NT activities increase but XO activity decreases in cancerous human colon tissues, which may provide advantage to the cancerous tissues in obtaining new nucleotides for rapid DNA synthesis through accelerated salvage pathway activity. Black grape extract makes significant inhibition on the ADA and 5'NT activities of cancerous and non cancerous colon tissues, thereby eliminating this advantage of cancer cells, which might be the basis for the beneficial effect of black grape in some kinds of human cancers.

  3. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived.

  4. Optical isomers of dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers display enantiospecific effects on the expression and enzyme activities of human xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánková, Martina; Krasulová, Kristýna; Dořičáková, Aneta; Kurka, Ondřej; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-11-16

    Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are used as anti-hypertensives and in the treatment of angina pectoris. Structurally, CCBs have at least one chiral center in the molecule, thereby existing in two or more different enantiomers. In the current paper we examined effects of benidipine, felodipine and isradipine enantiomers on the expression and enzyme activities of human xenobiotics-metabolizing cytochromes P450. All CCBs dose-dependently activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR), as revealed by gene reporter assays. Activation of AhR, but not PXR, was enantiospecific. Consistently, CCBs induced CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs, but not protein, in human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells, with following pattern: benidipine (-)>(+), isradipine (-)>(+) and felodipine (+)>(-). All CCBs induced CYP2A6, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in human hepatocytes, and there were not differences between the enantiomers. All CCBs transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form, as revealed by electromobility shift assay. Tested CCBs inhibited enzyme activities of CYP3A4 (benidipine (+)>(-); felodipine (-)>(+); isradipine (-)-(+)) and CYP2C9 (benidipine (-)>(+); felodipine (+)>(-); isradipine (-)>(+)). The data presented here might be of toxicological and clinical importance.

  5. Transport of dibasic amino acids, cystine, and tryptophan by cultured human fibroblasts: absence of a defect in cystinuria and Hartnup disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, U; Rosenberg, L E

    1972-08-01

    Transport of lysine, arginine, cystine, and tryptophan was studied in cultured skin fibroblasts from normal controls and from patients with cystinuria and Hartnup disease. Each of these amino acids was accumulated against concentration gradients by energy-dependent, saturable mechanisms. Lysine and arginine were each transported by two distinct processes which they shared with each other and with ornithine. In contrast, cystine was taken up by a different transport system with no demonstrable affinity for the dibasic amino acids. The time course and Michaelis-Menten kinetics of lysine and cystine uptake by cells from three cystinuric patients differed in no way from those found in control cells. Similarly, the characteristics of tryptophan uptake by cells from a child with Hartnup disease were identical to those noted in control cells. These findings indicate that the specific transport defects observed in gut and kidney in cystinuria and Hartnup disease are not expressed in cultured human fibroblasts, thus providing additional evidence of the important role that cellular differentiation plays in the regulation of expression of the human genome.

  6. Differential effects of human L1CAM mutations on complementing guidance and synaptic defects in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Sirisha Kudumala

    Full Text Available A large number of different pathological L1CAM mutations have been identified that result in a broad spectrum of neurological and non-neurological phenotypes. While many of these mutations have been characterized for their effects on homophilic and heterophilic interactions, as well as expression levels in vitro, there are only few studies on their biological consequences in vivo. The single L1-type CAM gene in Drosophila, neuroglian (nrg, has distinct functions during axon guidance and synapse formation and the phenotypes of nrg mutants can be rescued by the expression of human L1CAM. We previously showed that the highly conserved intracellular FIGQY Ankyrin-binding motif is required for L1CAM-mediated synapse formation, but not for neurite outgrowth or axon guidance of the Drosophila giant fiber (GF neuron. Here, we use the GF as a model neuron to characterize the pathogenic L120V, Y1070C, C264Y, H210Q, E309K and R184Q extracellular L1CAM missense mutations and a L1CAM protein with a disrupted ezrin-moesin-radixin (ERM binding site to investigate the signaling requirements for neuronal development. We report that different L1CAM mutations have distinct effects on axon guidance and synapse formation. Furthermore, L1CAM homophilic binding and signaling via the ERM motif is essential for axon guidance in Drosophila. In addition, the human pathological H210Q, R184Q and Y1070C, but not the E309K and L120V L1CAM mutations affect outside-in signaling via the FIGQY Ankyrin binding domain which is required for synapse formation. Thus, the pathological phenotypes observed in humans are likely to be caused by the disruption of signaling required for both, guidance and synaptogenesis.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein 1 impairs G2 checkpoint in human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells through defective Chk1 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Deng

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common cancer in Southeast Asia, particularly in southern regions of China. EBV infection is closely associated with NPC and has long been postulated to play an etiological role in the development of NPC. However, the role of EBV in malignant transformation of nasopharyngeal epithelial cells remains enigmatic. The current hypothesis of NPC development is that premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelial cells harboring genetic alterations support EBV infection and expression of EBV genes induces further genomic instability to facilitate the development of NPC. The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 is a well-documented EBV-encoded oncogene. The involvement of LMP1 in human epithelial malignancies has been implicated, but the mechanisms of oncogenic actions of LMP1, particularly in nasopharyngeal cells, are unclear. Here we observed that LMP1 expression in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells impaired G2 checkpoint, leading to formation of unrepaired chromatid breaks in metaphases after γ-ray irradiation. We further found that defective Chk1 activation was involved in the induction of G2 checkpoint defect in LMP1-expressing nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Impairment of G2 checkpoint could result in loss of the acentrically broken chromatids and propagation of broken centric chromatids in daughter cells exiting mitosis, which facilitates chromosome instability. Our findings suggest that LMP1 expression facilitates genomic instability in cells under genotoxic stress. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved in LMP1-induced genomic instability in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells will shed lights on the understanding of role of EBV infection in NPC development.

  8. N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.

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    Dagmar Zweytick

    Full Text Available Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill

  9. N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweytick, Dagmar; Japelj, Bostjan; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Zorko, Mateja; Dowhan, William; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Riedl, Sabrina; Jerala, Roman; Lohner, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill bacteria by

  10. Lipodystrophy in human immunodeficiency virus patients impairs insulin action and induces defects in beta-cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ulrik B

    2003-01-01

    The pathophysiology of insulin resistance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) is not fully clarified. We investigated 18 men with HALS and 18 HIV-positive males without lipodystrophy (control subjects). Duration and modality of antiretroviral therapy wer...... =.006), whereas levels of basal and insulin-stimulated oxidative glucose metabolism (OGM) (2.4 v 2.3, P =.55, and 3.3 v 4.0, P =.064, respectively) were not significantly different between groups. Despite comparable total fat masses, dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans showed...

  11. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-05-02

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD.

  12. The glucuronidation of R- and S-lorazepam: human liver microsomal kinetics, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzyme selectivity, and inhibition by drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchaipichat, Verawan; Suthisisang, Chuthamanee; Miners, John O

    2013-06-01

    The widely used hypnosedative-anxiolytic agent R,S-lorazepam is cleared predominantly by conjugation with glucuronic acid in humans, but the enantioselective glucuronidation of lorazepam has received little attention. The present study characterized the kinetics of the separate R and S enantiomers of lorazepam by human liver microsomes (HLMs) and by a panel of recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. Respective mean K(m) and V(max) values for R- and S-lorazepam glucuronidation by HLM were 29 ± 8.9 and 36 ± 10 µM, and 7.4 ± 1.9 and 10 ± 3.8 pmol/min ⋅ mg. Microsomal intrinsic clearances were not significantly different, suggesting the in vivo clearances of R- and S-lorazepam are likely to be similar. Both R- and S-lorazepam were glucuronidated by UGT2B4, 2B7, and 2B15, whereas R-lorazepam was additionally metabolized by the extrahepatic enzymes UGT1A7 and 1A10. Based on in vitro clearances and consideration of available in vivo and in vitro data, UGT2B15 is likely to play an important role in the glucuronidation of R- and S-lorazepam. However, the possible contribution of other enzymes and the low activities observed in vitro indicate that the lorazepam enantiomers are of limited use as substrate probes for UGT2B15. To identify potential drug-drug interactions, codeine, fluconazole, ketamine, ketoconazole, methadone, morphine, valproic acid, and zidovudine were screened as inhibitors of R- and S-lorazepam glucuronidation by HLM. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation suggested that, of these drugs, only ketoconazole had the potential to inhibit lorazepam clearance to a clinically significant extent.

  13. Differential expression of human cytochrome P450 enzymes from the CYP3A subfamily in the brains of alcoholic subjects and drug-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth Depaz, Iris M; Toselli, Francesca; Wilce, Peter A; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2013-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are responsible for the metabolism of most commonly used drugs. Among these enzymes, CYP3A forms mediate the clearance of around 40-50% of drugs and may also play roles in the biotransformation of endogenous compounds. CYP3A forms are expressed both in the liver and extrahepatically. However, little is known about the expression of CYP3A proteins in specific regions of the human brain. In this study, form-selective antibodies raised to CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 were used to characterize the expression of these forms in the human brain. Both CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 immunoreactivity were found to varying extents in the microsomal fractions of cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, amygdala, and cerebellum. However, only CYP3A4 expression was observed in the mitochondrial fractions of these brain regions. N-terminal sequencing confirmed the principal antigen detected by the anti-CYP3A4 antibody in cortical microsomes to be CYP3A4. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 expression was primarily localized in the soma and axonal hillock of neurons and varied according to cell type and cell layer within brain regions. Finally, analysis of the frontal cortex of chronic alcohol abusers revealed elevated expression of CYP3A4 in microsomal but not mitochondrial fractions; CYP3A5 expression was unchanged. The site-specific expression of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in the human brain may have implications for the role of these enzymes in both normal brain physiology and the response to drugs.

  14. Loss of MAFB Function in Humans and Mice Causes Duane Syndrome, Aberrant Extraocular Muscle Innervation, and Inner-Ear Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong G; Tischfield, Max A; Nugent, Alicia A; Cheng, Long; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Chan, Wai-Man; Maconachie, Gail; Bosley, Thomas M; Summers, C Gail; Hunter, David G; Robson, Caroline D; Gottlob, Irene; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2016-06-02

    Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) is a congenital eye-movement disorder defined by limited outward gaze and retraction of the eye on attempted inward gaze. Here, we report on three heterozygous loss-of-function MAFB mutations causing DRS and a dominant-negative MAFB mutation causing DRS and deafness. Using genotype-phenotype correlations in humans and Mafb-knockout mice, we propose a threshold model for variable loss of MAFB function. Postmortem studies of DRS have reported abducens nerve hypoplasia and aberrant innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by the oculomotor nerve. Our studies in mice now confirm this human DRS pathology. Moreover, we demonstrate that selectively disrupting abducens nerve development is sufficient to cause secondary innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by aberrant oculomotor nerve branches, which form at developmental decision regions close to target extraocular muscles. Thus, we present evidence that the primary cause of DRS is failure of the abducens nerve to fully innervate the lateral rectus muscle in early development.

  15. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

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    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  16. The human neonatal small intestine has the potential for arginine synthesis; developmental changes in the expression of arginine-synthesizing and -catabolizing enzymes

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    Ruijter Jan M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milk contains too little arginine for normal growth, but its precursors proline and glutamine are abundant; the small intestine of rodents and piglets produces arginine from proline during the suckling period; and parenterally fed premature human neonates frequently suffer from hypoargininemia. These findings raise the question whether the neonatal human small intestine also expresses the enzymes that enable the synthesis of arginine from proline and/or glutamine. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS, arginase-1 (ARG1, arginase-2 (ARG2, and nitric-oxide synthase (NOS were visualized by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry in 89 small-intestinal specimens. Results Between 23 weeks of gestation and 3 years after birth, CPS- and ASS-protein content in enterocytes was high and then declined to reach adult levels at 5 years. OAT levels declined more gradually, whereas ARG-1 was not expressed. ARG-2 expression increased neonatally to adult levels. Neurons in the enteric plexus strongly expressed ASS, OAT, NOS1 and ARG2, while varicose nerve fibers in the circular layer of the muscularis propria stained for ASS and NOS1 only. The endothelium of small arterioles expressed ASS and NOS3, while their smooth-muscle layer expressed OAT and ARG2. Conclusion The human small intestine acquires the potential to produce arginine well before fetuses become viable outside the uterus. The perinatal human intestine therefore resembles that of rodents and pigs. Enteral ASS behaves as a typical suckling enzyme because its expression all but disappears in the putative weaning period of human infants.

  17. Comparative effect of Piper betle, Chlorella vulgaris and tocotrienol-rich fraction on antioxidant enzymes activity in cellular ageing of human diploid fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makpol, Suzana; Yeoh, Thong Wei; Ruslam, Farah Adilah Che; Arifin, Khaizurin Tajul; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2013-08-16

    Human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) undergo a limited number of cellular divisions in culture and progressively reach a state of irreversible growth arrest, a process termed cellular ageing. Even though beneficial effects of Piper betle, Chlorella vulgaris and tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) have been reported, ongoing studies in relation to ageing is of interest to determine possible protective effects that may reverse the effect of ageing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. betle, C. vulgaris and TRF in preventing cellular ageing of HDFs by determining the activity of antioxidant enzymes viz.; catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase. Different passages of HDFs were treated with P. betle, C. vulgaris and TRF for 24 h prior to enzymes activity determination. Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA β-gal) expression was assayed to validate cellular ageing. In cellular ageing of HDFs, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were reduced, but SOD activity was heightened during pre-senescence. P. betle exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity by reducing SA β-gal expression, catalase activities in all age groups, and SOD activity. TRF exhibited a strong antioxidant activity by reducing SA β-gal expression, and SOD activity in senescent HDFs. C. vulgaris extract managed to reduce SOD activity in senescent HDFs. P. betle, C. vulgaris, and TRF have the potential as anti-ageing entities which compensated the role of antioxidant enzymes in cellular ageing of HDFs.

  18. Differences in the glucuronidation of bisphenols F and S between two homologous human UGT enzymes, 1A9 and 1A10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramec Skledar, Darja; Troberg, Johanna; Lavdas, Jason; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija; Finel, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    1. Bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) are bisphenol A (BPA) analogues commonly used in the manufacturing of industrial and consumer products. 2. Bisphenols are often detoxified through conjugation with glucuronic acid or sulfate. In this work, we have examined the glucuronidation of BPS and BPF by recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes. In addition, we have reexamined BPA glucuronidation, using extra-hepatic UGTs that were not tested previously. 3. The results revealed that UGT1A9, primarily a hepatic enzyme, is mainly responsible for BPS glucuronidation, whereas UGT1A10, an intestine enzyme that is highly homologous to UGT1A9 at the protein level, is by far the most active UGT in BPF glucuronidation. In contrast to the latter two UGTs that display significant specificity in the glucuronidation of BPS and BPF, UGT2A1 that is mainly expressed in the airways, exhibited high activity toward all the tested bisphenols, BPS, BPF and BPA. UGT1A10 exhibited somewhat higher BPA glucuronidation activity than UGT1A9, but it was lower than UGT2A1 and UGT2B15. 4. The new findings demonstrate interesting differences in the glucuronidation patterns of bisphenols and provide new insights into the role of extra-hepatic tissues in their detoxification.

  19. Pan-pathway based interaction profiling of FDA-approved nucleoside and nucleobase analogs with enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism.

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    Louise Egeblad

    Full Text Available To identify interactions a nucleoside analog library (NAL consisting of 45 FDA-approved nucleoside analogs was screened against 23 enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism using a thermal shift assay. The method was validated with deoxycytidine kinase; eight interactions known from the literature were detected and five additional interactions were revealed after the addition of ATP, the second substrate. The NAL screening gave relatively few significant hits, supporting a low rate of "off target effects." However, unexpected ligands were identified for two catabolic enzymes guanine deaminase (GDA and uridine phosphorylase 1 (UPP1. An acyclic guanosine prodrug analog, valaciclovir, was shown to stabilize GDA to the same degree as the natural substrate, guanine, with a ΔT(agg around 7°C. Aciclovir, penciclovir, ganciclovir, thioguanine and mercaptopurine were also identified as ligands for GDA. The crystal structure of GDA with valaciclovir bound in the active site was determined, revealing the binding of the long unbranched chain of valaciclovir in the active site of the enzyme. Several ligands were identified for UPP1: vidarabine, an antiviral nucleoside analog, as well as trifluridine, idoxuridine, floxuridine, zidovudine, telbivudine, fluorouracil and thioguanine caused concentration-dependent stabilization of UPP1. A kinetic study of UPP1 with vidarabine revealed that vidarabine was a mixed-type competitive inhibitor with the natural substrate uridine. The unexpected ligands identified for UPP1 and GDA imply further metabolic consequences for these nucleoside analogs, which could also serve as a starting point for future drug design.

  20. Mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 coding microsatellites in human cells with defective DNA mismatch repair.

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    Heekyung Chung

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability promotes colonic tumorigenesis through generating frameshift mutations at coding microsatellites of tumor suppressor genes, such as TGFBR2 and ACVR2. As a consequence, signaling through these TGFbeta family receptors is abrogated in DNA Mismatch repair (MMR-deficient tumors. How these mutations occur in real time and mutational rates of these human coding sequences have not previously been studied. We utilized cell lines with different MMR deficiencies (hMLH1-/-, hMSH6-/-, hMSH3-/-, and MMR-proficient to determine mutation rates. Plasmids were constructed in which exon 3 of TGFBR2 and exon 10 of ACVR2 were cloned +1 bp out of frame, immediately after the translation initiation codon of an enhanced GFP (EGFP gene, allowing a -1 bp frameshift mutation to drive EGFP expression. Mutation-resistant plasmids were constructed by interrupting the coding microsatellite sequences, preventing frameshift mutation. Stable cell lines were established containing portions of TGFBR2 and ACVR2, and nonfluorescent cells were sorted, cultured for 7-35 days, and harvested for flow cytometric mutation detection and DNA sequencing at specific time points. DNA sequencing revealed a -1 bp frameshift mutation (A9 in TGFBR2 and A7 in ACVR2 in the fluorescent cells. Two distinct fluorescent populations, M1 (dim, representing heteroduplexes and M2 (bright, representing full mutants were identified, with the M2 fraction accumulating over time. hMLH1 deficiency revealed 11 (5.91 x 10(-4 and 15 (2.18 x 10(-4 times higher mutation rates for the TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellites compared to hMSH6 deficiency, respectively. The mutation rate of the TGFBR2 microsatellite was approximately 3 times higher in both hMLH1 and hMSH6 deficiencies than the ACVR2 microsatellite. The -1 bp frameshift mutation rates of TGFBR2 and ACVR2 microsatellite sequences are dependent upon the human MMR background.

  1. Use of the Falcon assay screening test--enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (FAST-ELISA) and the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) to determine the prevalence of human fascioliasis in the Bolivian Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, G V; Soler de Galanes, M; Rodriguez-Perez, J; Bjorland, J; Silva de Lagrava, M; Ramirez Guzman, S; Bryan, R T

    1992-05-01

    A collaborative study between the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control, the Bolivian Ministry of Health, and private voluntary organizations (Foster Parents Plan International and Danchurchaid) working in Bolivia has identified a region in the northwestern Altiplano of Bolivia near Lake Titicaca as harboring the highest prevalence of human fascioliasis in the world reported to date. Two serologic techniques (the Falcon assay screening test-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [FAST-ELISA] and the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot [EITB]) were used in the determination of its prevalence. One hundred serum samples and 73 stool samples were obtained from Aymara Indians from Corapata, Bolivia. Antibody absorbance levels to Fasciola hepatica excretion-secretion antigens were compared with EITB banding patterns using the same antigen preparation. A positive FAST-ELISA result was defined as an absorbance value greater than the mean plus three standard deviations of two sets of normal negative controls (Puerto Rican and Bolivian). Using this criterion, 53 of 100 sera tested were found positive by this technique. Within this group, 19 (95%) of 20 individuals who were parasite positive were also positive by FAST-ELISA. An additional 24 individuals who were negative for F. hepatica eggs and 10 individuals for whom no specimens were received were also positive by FAST-ELISA. Among the 53 individuals negative for F. hepatica eggs, 29 were also negative by FAST-ELISA. The EITB analysis of the sera from confirmed infected individuals revealed at least three F. hepatica (Fh) bands with molecular weights of 12, 17, and 63 kD, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The hepatitis B virus ribonuclease H is sensitive to inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus ribonuclease H and integrase enzymes.

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    John E Tavis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleos(tide analog therapy blocks DNA synthesis by the hepatitis B virus (HBV reverse transcriptase and can control the infection, but treatment is life-long and has high costs and unpredictable long-term side effects. The profound suppression of HBV by the nucleos(tide analogs and their ability to cure some patients indicates that they can push HBV to the brink of extinction. Consequently, more patients could be cured by suppressing HBV replication further using a new drug in combination with the nucleos(tide analogs. The HBV ribonuclease H (RNAseH is a logical drug target because it is the second of only two viral enzymes that are essential for viral replication, but it has not been exploited, primarily because it is very difficult to produce active enzyme. To address this difficulty, we expressed HBV genotype D and H RNAseHs in E. coli and enriched the enzymes by nickel-affinity chromatography. HBV RNAseH activity in the enriched lysates was characterized in preparation for drug screening. Twenty-one candidate HBV RNAseH inhibitors were identified using chemical structure-activity analyses based on inhibitors of the HIV RNAseH and integrase. Twelve anti-RNAseH and anti-integrase compounds inhibited the HBV RNAseH at 10 µM, the best compounds had low micromolar IC(50 values against the RNAseH, and one compound inhibited HBV replication in tissue culture at 10 µM. Recombinant HBV genotype D RNAseH was more sensitive to inhibition than genotype H. This study demonstrates that recombinant HBV RNAseH suitable for low-throughput antiviral drug screening has been produced. The high percentage of compounds developed against the HIV RNAseH and integrase that were active against the HBV RNAseH indicates that the extensive drug design efforts against these HIV enzymes can guide anti-HBV RNAseH drug discovery. Finally, differential inhibition of HBV genotype D and H RNAseHs indicates that viral genetic variability will be a factor during drug

  3. Angiotensin-converting enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P G; Rømer, F K; Cortes, D

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical or radiolog......In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical...

  4. Evaluation of Cyclosporine A with β-TCP in the Treatment of Human Infra bony Defects – A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishnajaneya; Avula, Haritha; Mishra, Ashank; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Pandey, Ruchi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Cyclosporine A (CsA), an immunosuppressant, is considered a life saver drug in organ transplant cases. It has also been tested in animal and human studies for periodontal applications as it selectively inhibits T lymphocyte proliferation, Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokine production, without any effect on T suppressor cells, thereby suppressing the cell mediated immunity and suppressing the inflammation. Inflammatory and immunological responses have been found to be decreased and bone formation is found to be increased in immunosuppressed animals. CsA is also supposed to potentiate osseous regeneration due to increase in the bone alkaline phosphatase levels and a direct activating effect on osteoblasts. Aim The present study was aimed at evaluating locally administered low dose of CsA which is potent immunosuppressant along with β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in comparison with β TCP alone, in the treatment of human infrabony defects, over a period of six months. Materials and Methods Thirty two systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients with infrabony defects were included in the randomized, controlled, parallel arm study and were allocated into either Group A (n =16), patients treated with β-TCP + CsA (2 mg) or Group B (n =16), patients treated with β-TCP. Clinical parameters [Relative Attachment Level (RAL), Probing Depth (PD), Gingival Recession (GR)] and radiographic parameters were measured at baseline and six months postoperatively. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16 software. Student’s paired and independent t-test were used for intra and inter-group analysis. Results Both Group A and Group B showed statistically significant improvements in clinical and radiographic parameters from base line to six months post-operatively. The Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) gain, Linear Bone Growth (LBG) and Percentage Bone Fill (% BF) were 2.38±1.12 mm, 1.90±1.48 mm and 49.83±29.23 mm in Group A and 2.57±1

  5. Glycine cleavage enzyme complex: molecular cloning and expression of the H-protein cDNA from cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zay, Agnes; Choy, Francis Y M; Patrick, Chelsea; Sinclair, Graham

    2011-06-01

    The human H-protein is one of four essential components (H-, L-, P-, and T-proteins) of the mammalian glycine cleavage enzyme complex and its function is involved in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of glycine encephalopathy. A transcript corresponding to the glycine cleavage H-protein functional gene was isolated from cultured human skin fibroblasts along with a transcript for a putative proces