WorldWideScience

Sample records for human enterotoxigenic escherichia

  1. Ultrastructural study of adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to erythrocytes and human intestinal epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Knutton, S; Lloyd, D R; Candy, D C; McNeish, A S

    1984-01-01

    The adhesion to erythrocytes and human intestinal epithelial cells of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains H10407, B2C, and H10407P, expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and type 1 fimbriae, respectively, was examined by electron microscopy. CFA and type 1 fimbriae were visualized by negative staining in thin sections after en bloc staining with ruthenium red and by immune labeling with antisera raised against purified fimbriae. By negative and ruthenium red staining,...

  2. ANIMAL ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Isaacson, Richard E.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of E. coli diarrhea in farm animals. ETEC are characterized by the ability to produce two types of virulence factors; adhesins that promote binding to specific enterocyte receptors for intestinal colonization and enterotoxins responsible for fluid secretion. The best-characterized adhesins are expressed in the context of fimbriae, such as the F4 (also designated K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), F17 and F18 fimbriae. Once established in the animal small intestine, ETEC produces enterotoxin(s) that lead to diarrhea. The enterotoxins belong to two major classes; heat-labile toxin that consist of one active and five binding subunits (LT), and heat-stable toxins that are small polypeptides (STa, STb, and EAST1). This chapter describes the disease and pathogenesis of animal ETEC, the corresponding virulence genes and protein products of these bacteria, their regulation and targets in animal hosts, as well as mechanisms of action. Furthermore, vaccines, inhibitors, probiotics and the identification of potential new targets identified by genomics are presented in the context of animal ETEC. PMID:27735786

  3. CfaE tip mutations in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I fimbriae define critical human intestinal binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K K; Levine, M M; Morison, J; Phillips, A; Barry, E M

    2009-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) use colonization factors to attach to the human intestinal mucosa, followed by enterotoxin expression that induces net secretion and diarrhoeal illness. ETEC strain H10407 expresses CFA/I fimbriae, which are composed of multiple CfaB structural subunits and a CfaE tip subunit. Currently, the contribution of these individual fimbrial subunits in intestinal binding remains incompletely defined. To identify the role of CfaE in attachment in the native ETEC background, an R181A single-amino-acid substitution was introduced by recombination into the H10407 genome. The substitution of R181A eliminated haemagglutination and binding of intestinal mucosa biopsies in in vitro organ culture assays, without loss of CFA/I fimbriae expression. Wild-type in trans plasmid-expressed cfaE restored the binding phenotype. In contrast, in trans expression of cfaE containing amino acid 181 substitutions with similar amino acids, lysine, methionine and glutamine did not restore the binding phenotype, indicating that the loss of the binding phenotype was due to localized areas of epitope disruption. R181 appears to have an irreplaceable role in the formation of a receptor-binding feature on CFA/I fimbriae. The results specifically indicate that the CfaE tip protein is a required binding factor in CFA/I-mediated ETEC colonization, making it a potentially important vaccine antigen. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. First characterization of bioactive components in soybean tempe that protect human and animal intestinal cells against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Schols, H.A.; Nout, M.J.R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Gruppen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Tempe extracts can inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to intestinal cells and thereby can play a role in controlling ETEC-induced diarrhea. The component responsible for this adhesion inhibition activity is still unknown. This research describes the purification and

  5. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Multilocus Sequence Types in Guatemala and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences. PMID:20031063

  6. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli multilocus sequence types in Guatemala and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklasson, Matilda; Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann Mari; Sjoling, Asa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences.

  7. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Multilocus Sequence Types in Guatemala and Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Nicklasson, Matilda; Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sj?ling, ?sa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences.

  8. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of CofB, the minor pilin subunit of CFA/III from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Oki, Hiroya; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Motooka, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Tooru; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Shota; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2015-06-01

    Colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III) is one of the virulence factors of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that forms the long, thin, proteinaceous fibres of type IV pili through assembly of its major and minor subunits CofA and CofB, respectively. The crystal structure of CofA has recently been reported; however, the lack of structural information for CofB, the largest among the known type IV pilin subunits, hampers a comprehensive understanding of CFA/III pili. In this study, constructs of wild-type CofB with an N-terminal truncation and the corresponding SeMet derivative were cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 103.97, c = 364.57 Å for the wild-type construct and a = b = 103.47, c = 362.08 Å for the SeMet-derivatized form. Although the diffraction quality of these crystals was initially very poor, dehydration of the crystals substantially improved the resolution limit from ∼ 4.0 to ∼ 2.0 Å. The initial phase was solved by the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method using a dehydrated SeMet CofB crystal, which resulted in an interpretable electron-density map.

  9. Simple method for purification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Brittany; Grassel, Christen; Laufer, Rachel S; Sears, Khandra T; Pasetti, Marcela F; Barry, Eileen M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are endemic pathogens in the developing world. They frequently cause illness in travelers, and are among the most prevalent causes of diarrheal disease in children. Pathogenic ETEC strains employ fimbriae as adhesion factors to bind the luminal surface of the intestinal epithelium and establish infection. Accordingly, there is marked interest in immunoprophylactic strategies targeting fimbriae to protect against ETEC infections. Multiple strategies have been reported for purification of ETEC fimbriae, however none is ideal. Purification has typically involved the use of highly virulent wild-type strains. We report here a simple and improved method to purify ETEC fimbriae, which was applied to obtain two different Class 5 fimbriae types of clinical relevance (CFA/I and CS4) expressed recombinantly in E. coli production strains. Following removal from cells by shearing, fimbriae proteins were purified by orthogonal purification steps employing ultracentrifugation, precipitation, and ion-exchange membrane chromatography. Purified fimbriae demonstrated the anticipated size and morphology by electron microscopy analysis, contained negligible levels of residual host cell proteins, nucleic acid, and endotoxin, and were recognized by convalescent human anti-sera. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of CD4+ T Cell Responses on Clinical Outcome following Oral Administration of Wild-Type Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica A McArthur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is a non-invasive enteric pathogen of considerable public health importance, being one of the most common attributable causes of diarrheal illness in infants and young children in developing countries and the most common cause of traveler's diarrhea. To enhance study-to-study consistency of our experimental challenge model of ETEC in volunteers, and to allow concomitant multi-site trials to evaluate anti-ETEC immunoprophylactic products, hundreds of vials, each containing a standardized inoculum of virulent wild-type (wt ETEC strain H10407 (serotype O78:H11 expressing colonization factor antigen I and heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins, were prepared under current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP and frozen. Following thawing, the contents of each vial can be used (diluted as necessary to prepare consistent challenge inoculum, even at different study sites. A preliminary human experimental challenge study using this cGMP inoculum was conducted on a research isolation ward and the clinical and cell-mediated immune responses evaluated. Of the 6 healthy adult volunteers challenged 83% (5/6 developed diarrhea and 50% developed moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD. Moderate and severe diarrhea were defined as passage of ≥ 1 liter or ≥ 3 liters of diarrheal stool respectively. We compared the CD4+ T cell responses of volunteers who developed MSD against those who did not and identified significant differences in ETEC-specific cytokine production and gut homing potential. We furthermore demonstrated that increased expression of the gut-homing molecule integrin α4β7 by peripheral T follicular helper cells (pTfh correlated with decreased stool volume and increased ETEC-specific IgA B memory cell (BM development. Collectively, despite small numbers of volunteers, our results indicate a potential role for CD4+ T cells, in particular pTfh, in modulating disease outcome following exposure to wt ETEC in a

  11. Homo-trimeric Structure of the Type IVb Minor Pilin CofB Suggests Mechanism of CFA/III Pilus Assembly in Human Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Oki, Hiroya; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Takuya; Imai, Tomoya; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Motooka, Daisuke; Iida, Tetsuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Nakamura, Shota

    2016-03-27

    In gram-negative bacteria, the assembly of type IV pilus (T4P) and the evolutionally related pseudopilus of type II secretion system involves specialized structural proteins called pilins and pseudopilins, respectively, and is dynamically regulated to promote bacterial pathogenesis. Previous studies have suggested that a structural "tip"-like hetero-complex formed through the interaction of at least three minor (pseudo) pilins plays an important role in this process, while some members of the pathogenic type IVb subfamily are known to have only one such minor pilin subunit whose function is still unknown. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the type IVb minor pilin CofB of colonization factor antigen/III from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli at 1.88-Å resolution. The crystal structure, in conjunction with physicochemical analysis in solution, reveals a symmetrical homo-trimeric arrangement distinct from the hetero-complexes of minor (pseudo) pilins observed in other T4P and type II secretion systems. Each CofB monomer adopts a unique three-domain architecture, in which the C-terminal β-sheet-rich lectin domain can effectively initiate trimer association of its pilin-like N-terminal domain through extensive hydrophobic interactions followed by domain swapping at the central hinge-like domain. Deletion of cofB produces a phenotype with no detectable pili formation on the cell surface, while molecular modeling indicates that the characteristic homo-trimeric structure of CofB is well situated at the pilus tip of colonization factor antigen/III formed by the major pilin CofA, suggesting a role for the minor pilin in the efficient initiation of T4P assembly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    piotective antigens for the development of vaccines to protect by active immunization . I’ DD I Fr 1473 EDITION OF NOV 65IS 0O’.OL ET K ( / / SECURITY...enterotoxin immunity presented by the existence of non-antigenic heat-stable types of enterotoxin. Preliminary efforts to protect by oral vaccination...SUMHARY -. Pregnant gilts were vaccinated orally with Escherichia coli that S- produce pilus antigens K99 or 987P. The vaccines were live or dead

  13. First characterization of bioactive components in soybean tempe that protect human and animal intestinal cells against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, Petra J; Schols, Henk A; Nout, M J Rob; Zwietering, Marcel H; Gruppen, Harry

    2010-07-14

    Tempe extracts can inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to intestinal cells and thereby can play a role in controlling ETEC-induced diarrhea. The component responsible for this adhesion inhibition activity is still unknown. This research describes the purification and partial characterization of this bioactive component of tempe. After heating, defatting, and protease treatment, the extracts were found to remain active. However, after treatment with polysaccharide-degrading enzyme mixtures the bioactivity was lost. Ultrafiltration revealed the active component to be >30 kDa. Further purification of the bioactive tempe extracts yielded an active fraction with an increased carbohydrate content of higher arabinose content than the nonactive fractions. In conclusion, the bioactive component contains arabinose and originates from the arabinan or arabinogalactan side chain of the pectic cell wall polysaccharides of the soybeans, which is probably released or formed during fermentation by enzymatic modifications.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain E24377A, Obtained from a Tribal Drinking Water Source in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, Ashok J; Nerkar, Sandeep S; Khadake, Prashant P; Akolkar, Dadasaheb B; Apurwa, Sachin R; Deshpande, Uday; Khedkar, Smita U; Stålsby-Lundborg, Cecilia

    2015-04-02

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Its dissemination can occur through water sources contaminated by it. Here, we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain E24377A, obtained from a tribal drinking water source in India. Copyright © 2015 Tamhankar et al.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain E24377A, Obtained from a Tribal Drinking Water Source in India

    OpenAIRE

    Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Nerkar, Sandeep S.; Khadake, Prashant P.; Akolkar, Dadasaheb B.; Apurwa, Sachin R.; Deshpande, Uday; Khedkar, Smita U.; St?lsby-Lundborg, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease in humans and animals. Its dissemination can occur through water sources contaminated by it. Here, we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of ETEC strain E24377A, obtained from a tribal drinking water source in India.

  16. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection induces intestinal epithelial cell autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2014-06-25

    The morbidity and mortality in piglets caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in large economic losses to the swine industry, but the precise pathogenesis of ETEC-associated diseases remains unknown. Intestinal epithelial cell autophagy serves as a host defense against pathogens. We found that ETEC induced autophagy, as measured by both the increased punctae distribution of GFP-LC3 and the enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Inhibiting autophagy resulted in decreased survival of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. ETEC triggered autophagy in IPEC-1 cells through a pathway involving the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of CfaA, a molecular chaperone essential for the assembly of CFA/I fimbriae of human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Poole, Steven; McVeigh, Annette; Chen, Yu Xing; Savarino, Stephen J; Xia, Di

    2014-02-01

    Understanding of pilus bioassembly in Gram-negative bacteria stems mainly from studies of P pili and type 1 fimbriae of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, which are mediated by the classic chaperone-usher pathway (CUP). However, CFA/I fimbriae, a class 5 fimbria and intestinal colonization factor for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), are proposed to assemble via the alternate chaperone pathway (ACP). Both CUP and ACP fimbrial bioassembly pathways require the function of a periplasmic chaperone, but their corresponding proteins share very low similarity in primary sequence. Here, the crystallization of the CFA/I periplasmic chaperone CfaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected from a native CfaA crystal to 2 Å resolution and to 1.8 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively, from a lead and a platinum derivative. These crystals displayed the symmetry of space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.6, b = 28.68, c = 90.60 Å, β = 119.7°. Initial phases were derived from multiple isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments using the data from the platinum and lead derivatives. This resulted in an interpretable electron-density map showing one CfaA molecule in an asymmetric unit. Sequence assignments were aided by anomalous signals from the heavy-atom derivatives. Refinement of the atomic model of CfaA is ongoing, which is expected to further understanding of the essential aspects and allowable variations in tertiary structure of the greater family of chaperones involved in chaperone-usher mediated bioassembly.

  18. Pathogenicity of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Hemolysin (hlyA) Mutant in Gnotobiotic Piglets†

    OpenAIRE

    Moxley, Rodney A.; Berberov, Emil M.; Francis, David H.; Xing, Jun; Moayeri, Mahtab; Welch, Rodney A.; Baker, Diane R.; Barletta, Raúl G.

    1998-01-01

    Pigs infected with hemolytic F4+ strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli often develop septicemia secondary to intestinal infection. We tested the hypothesis that inactivation of hemolysin would reduce the ability of F4+ enterotoxigenic E. coli to cause septicemia in swine following oral inoculation. Inactivation of the hemolysin structural gene (hlyA) did not decrease the incidence of septicemia in the gnotobiotic piglet model.

  19. Structure of CFA/I fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong-Fu; Poole, Steven; Nishio, Kazuya; Jang, Ken; Rasulova, Fatima; McVeigh, Annette; Savarino, Stephen J.; Xia, Di; Bullitt, Esther; (BU-M); (NIH); (NMRC)

    2009-10-21

    Adhesion pili (fimbriae) play a critical role in initiating the events that lead to intestinal colonization and diarrheal disease by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), an E. coli pathotype that inflicts an enormous global disease burden. We elucidate atomic structures of an ETEC major pilin subunit, CfaB, from colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae. These data are used to construct models for 2 morphological forms of CFA/I fimbriae that are both observed in vivo: the helical filament into which it is typically assembled, and an extended, unwound conformation. Modeling and corroborative mutational data indicate that proline isomerization is involved in the conversion between these helical and extended forms. Our findings affirm the strong structural similarities seen between class 5 fimbriae (from bacteria primarily causing gastrointestinal disease) and class 1 pili (from bacteria that cause urinary, respiratory, and other infections) in the absence of significant primary sequence similarity. They also suggest that morphological and biochemical differences between fimbrial types, regardless of class, provide structural specialization that facilitates survival of each bacterial pathotype in its preferred host microenvironment. Last, we present structural evidence for bacterial use of antigenic variation to evade host immune responses, in that residues occupying the predicted surface-exposed face of CfaB and related class 5 pilins show much higher genetic sequence variability than the remainder of the pilin protein.

  20. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S. (Univ. of Pavia (Italy))

    1990-02-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides (alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4) were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure.

  1. Weapons of mass destruction: virulence factors of the global killer enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Susan M; Scott-Tucker, Anthony; Cooper, Lisa M; Henderson, Ian R

    2006-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of food and water-borne E. coli-mediated human diarrhoea worldwide. The incidence in developing countries is estimated at 650 million cases per year, resulting in 800 000 deaths, primarily in children under the age of five. ETEC is also the most common cause of diarrhoea among travellers, including the military, from industrialized nations to less developed countries. In addition, ETEC is a major pathogen of animals, being responsible for scours in cattle and neonatal and postweaning diarrhoea in pigs and resulting in significant financial losses. Studies on the pathogenesis of ETEC infections have concentrated on the plasmid-encoded heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxins and on the plasmid-encoded antigenically variable colonization factors. Relatively little work has been carried out on chromosomally encoded virulence factors. Here, we review the known virulence factors of ETEC and highlight the future for combating this major disease.

  2. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P.J.; Nout, M.J.R.; Beumer, R.R.; Meulen, van der J.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and

  3. Inhibition of adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 by soya bean tempe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.; Nout, M.J.R.; Rombouts, F.M.; Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Meulen, van der J.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Tempe is a traditional fungal fermented food made from soaked and cooked soya beans. It has been associated with antidiarrhoeal characteristics. This study investigated potential inhibitory effects of tempe on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88. Methods and Results: Soya beans were

  4. Immunization of suckling pigs against enteric enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection by vaccinating dams with purified pili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, B; Moon, H W; Isaacson, R E; To, C C; Brinton, C C

    1978-01-01

    Pregnant swine (gilts) were vaccinated parenterally with a suspension of purified pili from the porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain 987 (09:K103::NM). Gilts injected with placebo served as controls. Suckling pigs born to gilts in both groups were challenged intragastrically with virulent strain 987. The percentage of deaths, incidence and duration of diarrhea, numbers of E. coli in the ilea, and E. coli attachment to the villous epithelia were significantly less in suckling pigs of vaccinated gilts than in those of controls. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that pili of some enterotoxigenic E. coli facilitate adhesion to intestinal epithelia. Vaccination of dams with pili appears to be a means of immunizing against diarrheal disease caused by enterotoxigenic E. coli in suckling neonates. This work confirms the role of somatic pili as colonization and virulence factors and provides another example of safe and effective purified pilus vaccines. Images PMID:361566

  5. Genotypic Characterization of Egypt Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates Expressing Coli Surface Antigen 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    USA Abstract Introduction: One approach to control enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections has been to develop vaccines focused on...results show a lack of clonality among Egypt CS6 E. coli isolates and supports the use and the further research on vaccines targeting this cell surface...organisms must colonize the mucosal epithelium; this process utilizes fimbrial and non-fimbrial colonization factors, also referred to as coli surface

  6. Bromelain protects piglets from diarrhoea caused by oral challenge with K88 positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Chandler, D; Mynott, T

    1998-01-01

    Background—K88 positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88+ ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhoea in young piglets. K88+ ETEC pathogenesis relies on attachment to specific glycoprotein receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. Proteolytic treatment of these receptors in vitro and in vivo prevents attachment of K88+ ETEC to piglet small intestines and may be of clinical use to prevent K88+ ETEC pathogenesis. 
Aims—To determine whether bromelain, a proteolytic ex...

  7. Fermented soya bean (tempe) extracts reduce adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Nout, M J R; Beumer, R R; van der Meulen, J; Zwietering, M H

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of processed soya bean, during the successive stages of tempe fermentation and different fermentation times, on adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 to intestinal brush border cells as well as Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells; and to clarify the mechanism of action. Tempe was prepared at controlled laboratory scale using Rhizopus microsporus var. microsporus as the inoculum. Extracts of raw, soaked and cooked soya beans reduced ETEC adhesion to brush border cells by 40%. Tempe extracts reduced adhesion by 80% or more. ETEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells reduced by 50% in the presence of tempe extracts. ETEC K88 bacteria were found to interact with soya bean extracts, and this may contribute to the observed decrease of ETEC adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells. Fermented soya beans (tempe) reduce the adhesion of ETEC to intestinal epithelial cells of pig and human origin. This reduced adhesion is caused by an interaction between ETEC K88 bacteria and soya bean compounds. The results strengthen previous observations on the anti-diarrhoeal effect of tempe. This effect indicates that soya-derived compounds may reduce adhesion of ETEC to intestinal cells in pigs as well as in humans and prevent against diarrhoeal diseases.

  8. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection alters intestinal immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiangwu; Xiao, Zhiming; Liu, Fen; Chen, Shuai; Tang, Wuliang; Zhang, Decai; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in humans and piglets. However, research regarding alterations of intestinal immunity following ETEC infection remains limited and the results controversial. The present study investigated the effects of ETEC on the expression levels of pro‑inflammatory cytokines and innate immune regulators from plasma cells, goblet cells and Paneth cells, and the activation of toll‑like receptor 4-nuclear factor (NF)‑κB and mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, in a mouse model infected with a porcine isolated ETEC strain. ETEC infection significantly reduced the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines in the mouse jejunum (Pinfection significantly affected the expression of immune regulators of plasma cells, goblet cells and Paneth cells in the mouse intestine (Pintestinal immunity via the NF‑κB and MAPK signaling pathways. In conclusion, ETEC colonization affects intestinal immunity as observed in a mouse model. This study provides a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in animals and humans.

  9. Sulfatide recognition by colonization factor antigen CS6 from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Jansson

    Full Text Available The first step in the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC infections is adhesion of the bacterium to the small intestinal epithelium. Adhesion of ETEC is mediated by a number of antigenically distinct colonization factors, and among these, one of the most commonly detected is the non-fimbrial adhesin coli surface antigen 6 (CS6. The potential carbohydrate recognition by CS6 was investigated by binding of recombinant CS6-expressing E. coli and purified CS6 protein to a large number of variant glycosphingolipids separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Thereby, a highly specific binding of the CS6-expressing E. coli, and the purified CS6 protein, to sulfatide (SO(3-3Galbeta1Cer was obtained. The binding of the CS6 protein and CS6-expressing bacteria to sulfatide was inhibited by dextran sulfate, but not by dextran, heparin, galactose 4-sulfate or galactose 6-sulfate. When using recombinantly expressed and purified CssA and CssB subunits of the CS6 complex, sulfatide binding was obtained with the CssB subunit, demonstrating that the glycosphingolipid binding capacity of CS6 resides within this subunit. CS6-binding sulfatide was present in the small intestine of species susceptible to CS6-mediated infection, e.g. humans and rabbits, but lacking in species not affected by CS6 ETEC, e.g. mice. The ability of CS6-expressing ETEC to adhere to sulfatide in target small intestinal epithelium may thus contribute to virulence.

  10. Immunologic Control of Diarrheal Disease Due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Classical Enteropathogenic (Serotyped) Escherichia coli Strains of Proven Pathogenicity. Infect. Immun. 38:798-801, 1982. 8. Levine, M.M. Vacunas Contra...Microbiol., 18:808-815, 1983. 8 15. Levine, M.M., Lanata, C. Progresos en Vacunas Contra Diarrea Bacteriana. Adelantos Microbiol. Enferm. Inf., 2:67-117

  11. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection and intestinal thiamin uptake: studies with intestinal epithelial Caco-2 monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Chatterjee, Nabendu S; Chou, Tristan; Said, Hamid M

    2013-12-01

    Infections with enteric pathogens like enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major health issue worldwide and while diarrhea is the major problem, prolonged, severe, and dual infections with multiple pathogens may also compromise the nutritional status of the infected individuals. There is almost nothing currently known about the effect of ETEC infection on intestinal absorptions of water-soluble vitamins including thiamin. We examined the effect of ETEC infection on intestinal uptake of the thiamin using as a model the human-derived intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The results showed that infecting confluent Caco-2 monolayers with live ETEC (but not with boiled/killed ETEC or nonpathogenic E. coli) or treatment with bacterial culture supernatant led to a significant inhibition in thiamin uptake. This inhibition appears to be caused by a heat-labile and -secreted ETEC component and is mediated via activation of the epithelial adenylate cyclase system. The inhibition in thiamin uptake by ETEC was associated with a significant reduction in expression of human thiamin transporter-1 and -2 (hTHTR1 and hTHTR2) at the protein and mRNA levels as well as in the activity of the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters. Dual infection of Caco-2 cells with ETEC and EPEC (enteropathogenic E. coli) led to compounded inhibition in intestinal thiamin uptake. These results show for the first time that infection of human intestinal epithelial cells with ETEC causes a significant inhibition in intestinal thiamin uptake. This inhibition is mediated by a secreted heat-labile toxin and is associated with a decrease in the expression of intestinal thiamin transporters.

  12. Intestinal Colonization by EnterotoxigenicEscherichia Coli’

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    here were: i. to adopt or develop an in vitro system for the study of the adhesive abilities of porcine ETEC strains which lack K88 antigen, and ii. to...Rutter. 1972. Role of the K88 antigen in the pathogenesis of neonatal diarrhea caused by Escherichia coli in piglets . Infect. Immun. 6:918-927. 10. Jones...particular regard to those produced by atypical piglet strains and by calf and lamb strains: The transmissible nature of these enterotoxins and of a K

  13. Environmental reservoirs for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in south Asian Gangetic riverine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gulshan; Vajpayee, Poornima; Ram, Siya; Shanker, Rishi

    2010-08-15

    Forecasting diarrheagenic E. coli contamination of aquatic resources to prevent outbreaks largely depends on rapid and accurate diagnostic testing in a few hours. Real-time PCR is widely used for quick culture-free quantitative enumeration of pathogenic bacteria in environmental samples. In this study, real-time PCR in molecular beacon format was used for detection and culture-free quantitative enumeration of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) harboring LT1 gene in a sewage-impacted south Asian Gangetic riverine system. The quantitative budget for ETEC in surface water was observed to vary significantly (DMRT, p Pontederia cordata, Najas indica and strands of Spirogyra spp.) collected between sites 1 and 9 exhibited significant high levels of ETEC in comparison to their representatives collected from pristine area. The level of ETEC harboring LT1 gene observed in leafy vegetables cultivated along the banks was in the following order: mint leaves > coriander > spinach > methi leaves. The study suggests that the aquatic flora and cultivated leafy vegetables in the south Asian Gangetic riverine system are environmental reservoirs for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

  14. Response of weaned piglets to a challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) when fed diets with pea or pea fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, A.J.M.; Wagenaars, C.M.F.; Meulen, van der J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of using pea and various fractions of pea on the consequences of an oral challenge with an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) were evaluated in post weaning piglets. The experiment comprised six treatment groups each consisting of 12 individually housed weaned piglets. Each group

  15. Detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in stool samples by using nonradioactively labeled oligonucleotide DNA probes and PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultsz, C.; Pool, G. J.; van Ketel, R.; de Wever, B.; Speelman, P.; Dankert, J.

    1994-01-01

    The detection of heat-labile enterotoxin LT-A and heat-stable enterotoxin ST Ia and ST Ib genes from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) by using oligonucleotide DNA probes and the PCR was evaluated in reconstruction experiments and by testing stool specimens from 29 healthy subjects and from 50

  16. Effect of processed and fermented soyabeans on net absorption in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-infected piglet small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.; Nout, M.J.R.; Rombouts, F.M.; Andel, van E.E.; Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Meulen, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    Infectious diarrhoea is a major problem in both children and piglets. Infection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in fluid secretion and electrolyte losses in the small intestine. In the present study the effect of processed and fermented soyabean products on net absorption during

  17. Methionine deficiency reduces autophagy and accelerates death in intestinal epithelial cells infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Li, Fengna; Ren, Wenkai; Kong, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Wei; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2015-10-01

    Infections by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) result in large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Dietary supplementation with amino acids has been considered as a potential mechanism to improve host defenses against infection. The goal of this study was to determine whether methionine deprivation alters ETEC interactions with porcine intestinal epithelial cells. IPEC-1 cells were cultured in media with or without L-methionine. Methionine deprivation resulted in enhanced ETEC adhesion and increased both the cytotoxicity and apoptotic responses of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. Methionine deprivation inhibited IPEC-1 cell autophagic responses, suggesting that the increased cytotoxicity of ETEC to methionine-deprived IPEC-1 cells might be due to defects in autophagy.

  18. Serologic responses to somatic O and colonization-factor antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deetz, T R; Evans, D J; Evans, D G; DuPont, H L

    1979-07-01

    To improve the retrospective diagnoses of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) as a cause of travelers' diarrhea, as well as to determine the presence of colonization-factor antigens in these infections, a study of serologic responses to antigens of ETEC was done. Paired sera from 60 United States students in Cholula, Puebla, Mexico, were analyzed for rises in titer of antibody to heat-labile toxin, eight somatic antigen O serogroups associated with ETEC, and two colonization-factor antigens, CFA/I and CFA/II. Only 9% had a response to O antigens, while 20% had responses to the colonization-factor antigens. Response to the colonization-factor antigens correlated significantly with response to the heat-labile toxin and with culture evidence of ETEC infection. Serologic studies confirmed that colonization-factor antigen has a role in naturally acquired cases of travelers' diarrhea and that it can be used as an additional determinant of infection with ETEC.

  19. Structure and function of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbriae from differing assembly pathways

    CERN Document Server

    Mortezaei, Narges; Shao, Paul P; Shirdel, Mariam; Singh, Bhupender; McVeigh, Annette; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Andersson, Magnus; Bullitt, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the major bacterial cause of diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers, causing significant mortality in children. Adhesive fimbriae are a prime virulence factor for ETEC, initiating colonization of the small intestinal epithelium. Similar to other Gram-negative bacteria, ETEC express one or more diverse fimbriae, some assembled by the chaperone-usher pathway and others by the alternate chaperone pathway. Here we elucidate structural and biophysical aspects and adaptations of each fimbrial type to its respective host niche. CS20 fimbriae are compared to CFA/I fimbriae, which are two ETEC fimbriae assembled via different pathways, and to Pfimbriae from uropathogenic E. coli. Many fimbriae unwind from their native helical filament to an extended linear conformation under force, thereby sustaining adhesion by reducing load at the point of contact between the bacterium and the target cell. CFA/I fimbriae require the least force to un...

  20. Prevention of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in pigs by dairy-based nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Jensen, Bent Borg; Jensen, Karin Hjelholt

    2015-01-01

    Postweaning diarrhoea (PWD) is a significant enteric disease causing considerable economic losses for the pig industry. Among several aetiological risk factors, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is considered to be a major cause. After being routinely used for several decades to control...... bacterial disease outbreaks in piglets, the use of antibiotics at subtherapeutic concentrations has been banned in the European Union because of the increasing prevalence of resistance to antibiotics in pigs. The removal of in-feed antibiotics from piglet diets has negative economic consequences...... of such strategies. It is apparent that colostrum, milk and milk fractions such as whey and casein contain several biologically active compounds with anti-microbial and immunomodulatory properties. Recently, these dairy products and their isolated compounds such as lactoferrin and oligosaccharides have been employed...

  1. Bromelain protects piglets from diarrhoea caused by oral challenge with K88 positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, D; Mynott, T

    1998-01-01

    Background—K88 positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88+ ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhoea in young piglets. K88+ ETEC pathogenesis relies on attachment to specific glycoprotein receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. Proteolytic treatment of these receptors in vitro and in vivo prevents attachment of K88+ ETEC to piglet small intestines and may be of clinical use to prevent K88+ ETEC pathogenesis. 
Aims—To determine whether bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, would protect piglets against K88+ ETEC diarrhoea and to confirm and extend earlier findings on the effects of bromelain on K88+ ETEC receptors in vivo. 
Methods—Bromelain (0, 12.5, or 125 mg) was orally administered to just weaned piglets for 10 days. One day following commencement of bromelain treatment, piglets were challenged with K88+ ETEC (5 × 1010 K88ac:0149) for seven days. Intestinal contents from unchallenged piglets were obtained via an intestinal fistula, and tested for their ability to bind K88+ ETEC before and after bromelain treatment. 
Results—Both doses of bromelain were successful in reducing the incidence of K88+ ETEC diarrhoea and protected piglets from life threatening disease. Bromelain treated pigs also had significantly increased weight gain compared with untreated pigs. Bromelain only temporarily inhibited K88+ ETEC receptor activity, with receptor activity being regenerated 30 hours following treatment, consistent with the regeneration of new enterocytes. 
Conclusion—Results show that bromelain can temporarily inactivate ETEC receptors in vivo and protect against ETEC induced diarrhoea. Bromelain may therefore be an effective prophylaxis against ETEC infection. 

 Keywords: enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli; K88 ETEC; ETEC receptors; diarrhoea; bromelain PMID:10189844

  2. Structure of the CFA/III major pilin subunit CofA from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli determined at 0.90 Å resolution by sulfur-SAD phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Kawahara, Kazuki; Nakamura, Shota; Iwashita, Takaki; Baba, Seiki; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Tooru; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2012-10-01

    CofA, a major pilin subunit of colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III), forms pili that mediate small-intestinal colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). In this study, the crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated version of CofA was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing using five sulfurs in the protein. Given the counterbalance between anomalous signal strength and the undesired X-ray absorption of the solvent, diffraction data were collected at 1.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. These data were sufficient to elucidate the sulfur substructure at 1.38 Å resolution. The low solvent content (29%) of the crystal necessitated that density modification be performed with an additional 0.9 Å resolution data set to reduce the phase error caused by the small sulfur anomalous signal. The CofA structure showed the αβ-fold typical of type IVb pilins and showed high structural homology to that of TcpA for toxin-coregulated pili of Vibrio cholerae, including spatial distribution of key residues critical for pilin self-assembly. A pilus-filament model of CofA was built by computational docking and molecular-dynamics simulation using the previously reported filament model of TcpA as a structural template. This model revealed that the CofA filament surface was highly negatively charged and that a 23-residue-long loop between the α1 and α2 helices filled the gap between the pilin subunits. These characteristics could provide a unique binding epitope for the CFA/III pili of ETEC compared with other type IVb pili.

  3. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics of Escherichia coli isolates carrying virulence factors of both enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Tracy H; Michalski, Jane; Luo, Qingwei; Shetty, Amol C; Daugherty, Sean C; Fleckenstein, James M; Rasko, David A

    2017-06-14

    Escherichia coli that are capable of causing human disease are often classified into pathogenic variants (pathovars) based on their virulence gene content. However, disease-associated hybrid E. coli, containing unique combinations of multiple canonical virulence factors have also been described. Such was the case of the E. coli O104:H4 outbreak in 2011, which caused significant morbidity and mortality. Among the pathovars of diarrheagenic E. coli that cause significant human disease are the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). In the current study we use comparative genomics, transcriptomics, and functional studies to characterize isolates that contain virulence factors of both EPEC and ETEC. Based on phylogenomic analysis, these hybrid isolates are more genomically-related to EPEC, but appear to have acquired ETEC virulence genes. Global transcriptional analysis using RNA sequencing, demonstrated that the EPEC and ETEC virulence genes of these hybrid isolates were differentially-expressed under virulence-inducing laboratory conditions, similar to reference isolates. Immunoblot assays further verified that the virulence gene products were produced and that the T3SS effector EspB of EPEC, and heat-labile toxin of ETEC were secreted. These findings document the existence and virulence potential of an E. coli pathovar hybrid that blurs the distinction between E. coli pathovars.

  4. Black tea reduces diarrhoea prevalence but decreases growth performance in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-infected post-weaning piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, M J; Vente-Spreeuwenberg, M A M; Smits, C H; Frenken, L G J

    2011-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a main cause of diarrhoea in humans and piglets. In vitro, black tea extract (BTE) has anti-pathogenic properties. Anti-diarrhoeal properties of BTE were assessed in a pig model of gastrointestinal infection. At weaning (day 0), piglets (n = 96) were randomly assigned to a diet containing 0% (control), 0.4% or 0.8% (wt/wt) BTE during 27 days. Piglets were orally infected with 6.4 × 10(6) cfu of ETEC on day 6. Faecal consistency, feed intake and body weight were measured. In a sub-study (n = 30 piglets), the effect of BTE palatability on feed intake was assessed. Additionally, the effect of BTE on ETEC growth in the presence or absence of iron was studied in vitro. The 0.8% BTE diet reduced diarrhoea prevalence by 20% but also decreased feed intake by 16% and feed efficiency by 12% over the total period. The 0.4% BTE diet decreased feed efficiency and weight gain from day 13 onwards. The palatability study demonstrated that piglets preferred the control to the BTE diets. In vitro, BTE delayed ETEC exponential growth, which was reversed by iron addition. Although BTE had anti-diarrhoeal properties, this effect was accompanied by impaired performance. The absence of a correlation between diarrhoea prevalence and feed intake suggests that reduced diarrhoea directly results from BTE rather than from reduced feed intake caused by BTE astringency. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  6. Multi-drug-resistant enterotoxigenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolated from children with diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, Habib; Haghi, Fakhri; Hajiahmadi, Fahimeh; Kashefiyeh, Mehdi; Memariani, Mojtaba

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug-resistant (MDR) diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) has rapidly spread worldwide and represents the most serious threat to the management of diarrhea in developing countries. During the period from March 2011 to January 2012, a total of 450 stool samples of diarrheal children aged 0-60 months were studied. In order to detect enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) simultaneously, a mixture of four primer pairs specific for eltB, estA, vt1, and vt2 genes was used in a multiplex PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed as the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. A total of 140 (31·1%) DEC were isolated from 450 stool samples. Diarrheagenic E. coli exhibited high-level resistance to aztreonam (80·7%), amoxicillin (74·4%), and tetracycline (69·3%). Also, 86·4% of E. coli isolates were resistant to at least three different classes of antimicrobial agents and considered as MDR. The frequency of ETEC and EHEC pathotypes was 46·4 and 12·1%, respectively and all of these isolates were MDR. In conclusion, MDR ETEC continues to be an important agent associated with diarrhea in children from Tabriz, Iran.

  7. Persistence and spread of gastro-intestinal infections: the case of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldin, Barbara

    2008-10-01

    Several gastro-intestinal infections in animal husbandry not only greatly reduce the well-being of animals, but also have the potential to cause large economical damage. Understanding of the dynamics of such diseases is thus of great importance. In this paper, we focus on within-host dynamics and present a model describing the dynamics of pathogens in the intestine of a single host. Our motivation to study the problem stems from the case of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in newly weaned piglets, but the models we present offer an acceptable description of within-host dynamics of several other gastro-intestinal infections. We begin by studying the case where infection is a one-time event and derive an explicit expression for the distribution of pathogens inside the intestine at an arbitrary time after the infection took place. Since farm animals often come into contact with faeces, we furthermore investigate the reinfection case, in which a fraction of the shed pathogens is reintroduced into the intestine. We find the condition that guarantees persistence of colonization in the reinfection case and determine when the microbial distribution in the intestine obeys the so called asynchronous exponential growth. We outline possibilities for infection control and point out some challenges for further research on the subject.

  8. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during EnterotoxigenicEscherichia coliInfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis . Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA-mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases.

  9. An assessment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella vaccine candidates for infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard I

    2015-02-18

    Despite improvements to water quality, sanitation, and the implementation of current prevention and treatment interventions, diarrhea remains a major cause of illness and death, especially among children less than five years of age in the developing world. Rotavirus vaccines have already begun making a real impact on diarrhea, but several more enteric vaccines will be necessary to achieve broader reductions of illness and death. Among the many causes of diarrheal disease, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shigella are the two most important bacterial pathogens for which there are no currently licensed vaccines. Vaccines against these two pathogens could greatly reduce the impact of disease caused by these infections. This review describes the approaches to ETEC and Shigella vaccines that are currently under development, including a range of both cellular and subunit approaches for each pathogen. In addition, the review discusses strategies for maximizing the potential benefit of these vaccines, which includes the feasibility of co-administration, consolidation, and combination of vaccine candidates, as well as issues related to effective administration of enteric vaccines to infants. Recent impact studies indicate that ETEC and Shigella vaccines could significantly benefit global public health. Either vaccine, particularly if they could be combined together or with another enteric vaccine, would be an extremely valuable tool for saving lives and promoting the health of infants and children in the developing world, as well as potentially providing protection to travelers and military personnel visiting endemic areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution of Enteroinvasive and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli across Space and Time in Northwestern Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Darlene; de los Ángeles Bayas, Rosa; Lopez, Velma K.; Zhang, Lixin; Trueba, Gabriel; Foxman, Betsy; Marrs, Carl; Cevallos, William; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). At its peak, the regional prevalence of EIEC was 8.3 infections/100 persons but this decreased to 1 infection/1,000 persons. The regional prevalence of ETEC ranged from 8 infections/1,000 persons to 3.7 infections/100 persons. The prevalence pattern of EIEC resembled that of a large epidemic whereas the prevalence of ETEC was more stable over time. Here, we provide community-based evidence for temporal shifts in the dominant E. coli pathotype from EIEC to ETEC over a multi-year time period. Furthermore, genotype analysis suggests that a given strain of EIEC and ETEC can persist in this region for long periods, up to 24 and 55 months, respectively. PMID:26643532

  11. Cloned polynucleotide and synthetic oligonucleotide probes used in colony hybridization are equally efficient in the identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerfelt, H.; Kalland, K.H.; Raj, P.; Moseley, S.L.; Bhan, M.K.; Bjorvatn, B.

    1988-11-01

    Restriction endonuclease-generated polynucleotide and synthetically produced oligonucleotide gene probes used in colony hybridization assays proved to be efficient for the detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. To compare their relative efficiencies, these two sets of probes were radiolabeled with /sup 32/P and were applied to 74 strains of E. coli with known enterotoxin profiles and to 156 previously unexamined E. coli isolates. The enterotoxigenic bacteria Vibrio cholerae O1, Vibrio cholerae non-O1 (NAG), Yersinia enterocolitica, and E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were examined for further evaluation of probe specificity. The two classes of probes showed a perfect concordance in their specific detection and differentiation of enterotoxigenic E. coli. In the analysis of six strains, the signal strength on autoradiography after hybridization with oligonucleotides was weaker than that obtained after hybridization with polynucleotide probes. The probes did not hybridize with DNA from V. cholerae O1, V. cholerae non-O1 (NAG), or Y. enterocolitica. The strains of E. coli harboring the plasmid vectors of the polynucleotide gene probes were, likewise, negative in the hybridization assays.

  12. Preliminary Characterization of the Transcriptional Response of the Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2 to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli, and E. coli Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa M. Geens

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available IPEC-J2, a promising in vitro model system, is not well characterized especially on the transcriptional level, in contrast to human counterparts. The aim of this study was to characterize the gene expression in IPEC-J2 cells when coincubated with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, nonpathogenic E. coli, and E. coli endotoxin. Apical infection of polarized IPEC-J2 monolayers caused a time-dependent decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER. Microarray analysis showed up-regulation of interleukins when IPEC-J2 were cocultured with E. coli strains this has so far never been measured in this cell line. Highest IL8 expression was found with the ETEC strain possessing the F4 fimbrium, suggesting IPEC-J2 cells to be F4 receptor positive, confirmed in a brush border membrane adhesion assay. It is concluded that the innate immune responses to pathogens and LPS makes the IPEC-J2 cell line a suitable model for research on intestinal host pathogen interaction.

  13. Exopolysaccharides Synthesized by Lactobacillus reuteri Protect against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Yan; Woodward, Adrienne; Zijlstra, Ruurd T.

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in piglets; ETEC cells colonize the intestinal mucosa with adhesins and deliver toxins that cause fluid loss. This study determined the antiadhesive properties of bacterial exopolysaccharides (reuteran and levan) and related glycans (dextran and inulin) in a small intestinal segment perfusion (SISP) model. The SISP model used 10 jejunal segments from 5-week-old piglets. Five segments were infected with ETEC expressing K88 fimbriae (ETEC K88), while five segments were treated with saline. Every two segments (ETEC and non-ETEC infected) were infused with 65 ml of 10 g liter−1 of glycans or saline (control) for 8 h. High-resolution melting-curve (HRM) quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that E. coli is the dominant bacterium in infected segments, while other bacteria were predominant in noninfected segments. Infection by ETEC K88 was also verified by qPCR; gene copy numbers of K88 fimbriae and the heat-labile toxin (LT) in mucosal scrapings and outflow fluid of infected segments were significantly higher than those in noninfected segments. Genes coding for K88 fimbriae and LT were also detected in noninfected segments. LT amplicons from infected and noninfected segments were 99% identical over 481 bp, demonstrating the presence of autochthonous ETEC K88. All glycans reduced fluid loss caused by ETEC K88 infection. Reuteran tended (P = 0.06) to decrease ETEC K88 levels in mucosal scraping sample, as judged by qPCR. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that reuteran significantly (P = 0.012) decreased levels of adherent ETEC K88. Overall, reuteran may prevent piglet diarrhea by reducing adhesion of ETEC K88. PMID:25015886

  14. Immunogenicity of a prototype enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adhesin vaccine in mice and nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincock, Stephanie A; Hall, Eric R; Woods, Colleen M; O'Dowd, Aisling; Poole, Steven T; McVeigh, Annette L; Nunez, Gladys; Espinoza, Nereyda; Miller, Milagros; Savarino, Stephen J

    2016-01-04

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in young children in developing countries and in travelers. Efforts to develop an ETEC vaccine have intensified in the past decade, and intestinal colonization factors (CFs) are somatic components of most investigational vaccines. CFA/I and related Class 5 fimbrial CFs feature a major stalk-forming subunit and a minor, antigenically conserved tip adhesin. We hypothesized that the tip adhesin is critical for stimulating antibodies that specifically inhibit ETEC attachment to the small intestine. To address this, we compared the capacity of donor strand complemented CfaE (dscCfaE), a stabilized form of the CFA/I fimbrial tip adhesin, and CFA/I fimbriae to elicit anti-adhesive antibodies in mice, using hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) as proxy for neutralization of intestinal adhesion. When given with genetically attenuated heat-labile enterotoxin LTR192G as adjuvant by intranasal (IN) or orogastric (OG) vaccination, dscCfaE exceeded CFA/I fimbriae in eliciting serum HAI titers and anti-CfaE antibody titers. Based on these findings, we vaccinated Aotus nancymaae nonhuman primates (NHP) with dscCfaE alone or admixed with one of two adjuvants, LTR192G and cholera toxin B-subunit, by IN and OG administration. Only IN vaccination with dscCfaE with either adjuvant elicited substantial serum HAI titers and IgA and IgG anti-adhesin responses, with the latter detectable a year after vaccination. In conclusion, we have shown that dscCfaE elicits robust HAI and anti-adhesin antibody responses in both mice and NHPs when given with adjuvant by IN vaccination, encouraging further evaluation of an ETEC adhesin-based vaccine approach. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Intestinal challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in pigs, and nutritional intervention to prevent postweaning diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawang Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gut health of nursery pigs immediately after weaning is tightly associated with their growth performance and economic values. Postweaning diarrhea (PWD is one of the major concerns related to gut health of nursery pigs which often is caused by infections of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, mainly including F4 (K88+ and F18+ E. coli. The main virulence factors of ETEC are adhesins (fimbriae or pili and enterotoxins. The common types of fimbriae on ETEC from PWD pigs are F18+ and F4+. Typically, PWD in pigs is associated with both F18+ and F4+ ETEC infections whereas pre-weaning diarrhea in pigs is associated with F4+ ETEC infection. Enterotoxins including heat-labile enterotoxins (LT and heat-stable peptide toxins (ST are associated with causing diarrhea in pigs. At least 109 to 1010 ETEC are required to induce diarrhea in nursery pigs typically lasting 1 to 5 days after ETEC infection. Antibiotics used to be the most effective way to prevent PWD, however, with the increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics, alternatives to the use of antibiotics are urgently needed to prevent PWD. Immunopropylaxis and nutritional intervention of antimicrobial minerals (such as zinc oxide and copper sulfate, organic acids, functional feedstuffs (such as blood plasma and egg yolk antibodies, direct fed microbials, phytobiotics, and bacteriophage can potentially prevent PWD associated with ETEC. Some other feed additives such as nucleotides, feed enzymes, prebiotic oligosaccharides, and clay minerals can enhance intestinal health and thus indirectly help with preventing PWD. Numerous papers show that nutritional intervention using selected feed additives can effectively prevent PWD.

  16. Structural characterization of CFA/III and Longus type IVb pili from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Roos, Justin; Yuen, Alex S W; Pierce, Owen M; Craig, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    The type IV pili are helical filaments found on many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, with multiple diverse roles in pathogenesis, including microcolony formation, adhesion, and twitching motility. Many pathogenic enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates express one of two type IV pili belonging to the type IVb subclass: CFA/III or Longus. Here we show a direct correlation between CFA/III expression and ETEC aggregation, suggesting that these pili, like the Vibrio cholerae toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), mediate microcolony formation. We report a 1.26-Å resolution crystal structure of CofA, the major pilin subunit from CFA/III. CofA is very similar in structure to V. cholerae TcpA but possesses a 10-amino-acid insertion that replaces part of the α2-helix with an irregular loop containing a 3(10)-helix. Homology modeling suggests a very similar structure for the Longus LngA pilin. A model for the CFA/III pilus filament was generated using the TCP electron microscopy reconstruction as a template. The unique 3(10)-helix insert fits perfectly within the gap between CofA globular domains. This insert, together with differences in surface-exposed residues, produces a filament that is smoother and more negatively charged than TCP. To explore the specificity of the type IV pilus assembly apparatus, CofA was expressed heterologously in V. cholerae by replacing the tcpA gene with that of cofA within the tcp operon. Although CofA was synthesized and processed by V. cholerae, no CFA/III filaments were detected, suggesting that the components of the type IVb pilus assembly system are highly specific to their pilin substrates.

  17. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of enterotoxigenic and entero-aggregative Escherichia coli isolated from raw milk and unpasteurized cheeses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Bonyadian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains and antibiotic resistance of the isolates in raw milk and unpasteurized cheese. Out of 200 samples of raw milk and 50 samples of unpasteurized cheeses, 96 and 24 strains of E. coli were isolated, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to detect the genes encoding heat-stable enterotoxin a (STa, heat-stable enterotoxin b (STb, heat labile toxin (LT and enteroaggregative heat-stable toxin1 (EAST1. Twelve out of 120 (10.00% isolates harbored the gene for EAST1, 2(1.66% isolates were detected as producing STb and LT toxins and 12 (10.00% strains contained STb and EAST1 genes. None of the strains contain the STa gene. All of the strains were tested for antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion method. Disks included: ciprofloxacin (CFN, trimetoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TSX, oxytetracycline (OTC, gentamicin (GMN, cephalexin (CPN, nalidixic acid (NDA and nitrofurantoin (NFN, ampicillin (AMP, neomycin (NEO and streptomycin (STM. Among 120 isolated strains of E. coli, the resistance to each antibiotics were as follows: OTC100%, CPN 86.00%, NDA 56.00%, NFN 42.00%, GMN 30.00%, TSX 28.00%, CFN 20%, AM 23.40% and STM 4.25%. None of the isolates were resistant to NEO. The present data indicate that different resistant E. coli pathogens may be found in raw milk and unpasteurized cheese. It poses an infection risk for human and transferring the resistant factors to microflora of the consumers gut.

  18. Allele Variants of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin Are Globally Transmitted and Associated with Colonization Factors

    KAUST Repository

    Joffré, Enrique

    2015-01-15

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. ETEC-mediated diarrhea is orchestrated by heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins (STp and STh), acting in concert with a repertoire of more than 25 colonization factors (CFs). LT, the major virulence factor, induces fluid secretion after delivery of a monomeric ADP-ribosylase (LTA) and its pentameric carrier B subunit (LTB). A study of ETEC isolates from humans in Brazil reported the existence of natural LT variants. In the present study, analysis of predicted amino acid sequences showed that the LT amino acid polymorphisms are associated with a geographically and temporally diverse set of 192 clinical ETEC strains and identified 12 novel LT variants. Twenty distinct LT amino acid variants were observed in the globally distributed strains, and phylogenetic analysis showed these to be associated with different CF profiles. Notably, the most prevalent LT1 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS1 + CS3 or CS2 + CS3, and the most prevalent LT2 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS5 + CS6 or CFA/I. LTB allele variants generally exhibited more-stringent amino acid sequence conservation (2 substitutions identified) than LTA allele variants (22 substitutions identified). The functional impact of LT1 and LT2 polymorphisms on virulence was investigated by measuring total-toxin production, secretion, and stability using GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (GM1-ELISA) and in silico protein modeling. Our data show that LT2 strains produce 5-fold more toxin than LT1 strains (P < 0.001), which may suggest greater virulence potential for this genetic variant. Our data suggest that functionally distinct LT-CF variants with increased fitness have persisted during the evolution of ETEC and have spread globally.

  19. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Claudia; Lu, Yan; Higa, Naomi; Nakasone, Noboru; Chinen, Isabel; Baschkier, Ariela; Rivas, Marta; Iwanaga, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  20. Young Pigs Consuming Lysozyme Transgenic Goat Milk Are Protected from Clinical Symptoms of EnterotoxigenicEscherichia coliInfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas, Lydia C; Cooper, Caitlin A; Dawson, Matthew W; Wang, Jane-Ling; Murray, James D; Maga, Elizabeth A

    2017-11-01

    Background: Diarrheal diseases in infancy and childhood are responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality in developing nations. Lysozyme, an antimicrobial component of human milk, is thought to play a role in establishing a healthy intestinal microbiota and immune system. Consumption of breast milk has been shown to prevent intestinal infections and is a recommended treatment for infants with diarrhea. Objective: This study aimed to examine the ability of lysozyme-rich goat milk to prevent intestinal infection. Methods: Six-week-old Hampshire-Yorkshire pigs were assigned to treatment groups balanced for weight, sex, and litter and were fed milk from nontransgenic control goats (GM group) or human lysozyme transgenic goats (hLZM group) for 2 wk before they were challenged with porcine-specific enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Fecal consistency, complete blood counts, intestinal histology, and microbial populations were evaluated. Results: Pigs in the hLZM group had less severe diarrhea than did GM pigs at 24 and 48 h after ETEC infection ( P = 0.01 and 0.05, respectively), indicating a less severe clinical disease state. Relative to baseline, postmilk hLZM pigs had 19.9% and 137% enrichment in fecal Bacteroidetes ( P = 0.028) and Paraprevotellaceae ( P = 0.003), respectively, and a 93.8% reduction in Enterobacteriaceae ( P = 0.007), whereas GM pigs had a 60.9% decrease in Lactobacillales ( P = 0.003) and an 83.3% enrichment in Burkholderiales ( P = 0.010). After ETEC infection, hLZM pigs tended to have lower amounts (68.7% less) of fecal Enterobacteriaceae than did GM pigs ( P = 0.058). There were 83.1% fewer bacteria translocated into the mesenteric lymph nodes of hLZM pigs than into those of GM pigs ( P = 0.039), and hLZM pigs had 34% lower mucin 1 and 61% higher tumor necrosis factor-α expression in the ileum than did GM pigs ( P = 0.046 and 0.034, respectively). Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that human lysozyme milk consumption

  1. Avian extraintestinal Escherichia coli exhibits enterotoxigenic-like activity in the in vivo rabbit ligated ileal loop assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluta, Renato Pariz; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Silveira, Flávio; Houle, Sébastien; Kobayashi, Renata Katsuko Takayama; Dozois, Charles M; Dias da Silveira, Wanderley

    2014-06-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains harbor a number of virulence genes and cause extraintestinal diseases, such as septicemia, swollen-head syndrome, salpingitis, and omphalitis in poultry. APEC strains are not known to cause intestinal diseases. Herein, for the first time, it is reported that APEC strains were able to induce an enterotoxigenic-like effect in rabbit ligated ileal loops. Strain SEPT362 caused cell detachment of the intestinal villi, which also showed a flattened and wilted appearance, but the integrity of the tight junctions was maintained. Additionally, this strain did not adhere to enterocytes in vivo, although adhesin encoding genes ( fimH, csgA, lpfA2-3, and ECP) were present while other lpfA types, sfa, afa, papC, and ral genes were not. This enterotoxigenic-like activity was conserved after thermal treatment of the supernatant at 65°C but not at 100°C. Moreover, experiments based on filtering with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) pore sizes demonstrated that the component associated with the observed biological effect has a molecular weight >100 kDa. Blast search and polymerase chain reaction assays for known E. coli virulence factors showed that strain SEPT362 harbors the gene encoding for the toxin EAST-1 and the serine protease autotransporter (SPATE) Tsh, but is negative for genes encoding for the toxins LT-I, STh, STp, Stx1, Stx2, CNF-1, CNF-2, CDT and the SPATEs Sat, Pic, Vat, SigA, SepA, EatA, EspP, or EspC. A cloned copy of the tsh gene in E. coli K-12 was also tested and was shown to have an enterotoxic effect. These results suggest that APEC might induce fluid accumulation in the rabbit gut. The Tsh autotransporter seems to be one of the factors associated with this phenotype.

  2. Production, characterization, and application of antibodies against heat-labile type-I toxin for detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A Menezes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC are responsible for significant rates of morbidity and mortality among children, particularly in developing countries. The majority of clinical and public health laboratories are capable of isolating and identifying Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 from stool samples, but ETEC cannot be identified by routine methods. The method most often used to identify ETEC is polymerase chain reaction for heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxin genes, and subsequent serotyping, but most clinical and public health laboratories do not have the capacity or resources to perform these tests. In this study, polyclonal rabbit and monoclonal mouse IgG2b antibodies against ETEC heat-labile toxin-I (LT were characterized and the potential applicability of a capture assay was analyzed. IgG-enriched fractions from rabbit polyclonal and the IgG2b monoclonal antibodies recognized LT in a conformational shape and they were excellent tools for detection of LT-producing strains. These findings indicate that the capture immunoassay could be used as a diagnostic assay of ETEC LT-producing strains in routine diagnosis and in epidemiological studies of diarrhea in developing countries as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay techniques remain as effective and economical choice for the detection of specific pathogen antigens in cultures.

  3. Enterotoxigenicity and frequency of Campylobacter jejuni, C. coli and C. laridis in human and animal stool isolates from different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, G B; Johny, M; Khalil, K; Mazhar, K; Ruiz-Palacios, G M; Kaijser, B

    1990-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli strains were collected during three different years from adult patients with enterocolitis in Sweden (n = 372) from 49 patients in Kuwait, and Campylobacter strains from hens from Mexico, Pakistan and Sweden (n = 107) and Swedish pigs (n = 47). C. jejuni was the predominant species in human and hen isolates, and C. coli in pigs C. coli was significantly more common in human isolates from Sweden, and more common in hen isolates from Pakistan, than in hens from Sweden and Mexico. C. laridis was only isolated from pigs (17%) and was in no case enterotoxigenic. Both in human and hen isolates, C. jejuni strains were more enterotoxigenic than C. coli strains. C. jejuni strains from Swedish hens were less enterotoxigenic than those from Pakistan and Mexico (P less than 0.001), and strains from pigs were less enterotoxigenic than those from hens (P less than 0.001). We conclude that C. jejuni are more often enterotoxigenic and possibly more virulent than c. coli and C. laridis. The relative frequency of C. jejuni and C. coli in humans and animals differs from one country to another.

  4. Expression of colonization factor CS5 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is enhanced in vivo and by the bile component Na glycocholate hydrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilda Nicklasson

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is an important cause of acute watery diarrhoea in developing countries. Colonization factors (CFs on the bacterial surface mediate adhesion to the small intestinal epithelium. Two of the most common CFs worldwide are coli surface antigens 5 and 6 (CS5, CS6. In this study we investigated the expression of CS5 and CS6 in vivo, and the effects of bile and sodium bicarbonate, present in the human gut, on the expression of CS5. Five CS5+CS6 ETEC isolates from adult Bangladeshi patients with acute diarrhoea were studied. The level of transcription from the CS5 operon was approximately 100-fold higher than from the CS6 operon in ETEC bacteria recovered directly from diarrhoeal stool without sub-culturing (in vivo. The glyco-conjugated primary bile salt sodium glycocholate hydrate (NaGCH induced phenotypic expression of CS5 in a dose-dependent manner and caused a 100-fold up-regulation of CS5 mRNA levels; this is the first description of NaGCH as an enteropathogenic virulence inducer. The relative transcription levels from the CS5 and CS6 operons in the presence of bile or NaGCH in vitro were similar to those in vivo. Another bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC, previously reported to induce enteropathogenic virulence, also induced expression of CS5, whereas sodium bicarbonate did not.

  5. Expression of colonization factor CS5 of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is enhanced in vivo and by the bile component Na glycocholate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklasson, Matilda; Sjöling, Åsa; von Mentzer, Astrid; Qadri, Firdausi; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of acute watery diarrhoea in developing countries. Colonization factors (CFs) on the bacterial surface mediate adhesion to the small intestinal epithelium. Two of the most common CFs worldwide are coli surface antigens 5 and 6 (CS5, CS6). In this study we investigated the expression of CS5 and CS6 in vivo, and the effects of bile and sodium bicarbonate, present in the human gut, on the expression of CS5. Five CS5+CS6 ETEC isolates from adult Bangladeshi patients with acute diarrhoea were studied. The level of transcription from the CS5 operon was approximately 100-fold higher than from the CS6 operon in ETEC bacteria recovered directly from diarrhoeal stool without sub-culturing (in vivo). The glyco-conjugated primary bile salt sodium glycocholate hydrate (NaGCH) induced phenotypic expression of CS5 in a dose-dependent manner and caused a 100-fold up-regulation of CS5 mRNA levels; this is the first description of NaGCH as an enteropathogenic virulence inducer. The relative transcription levels from the CS5 and CS6 operons in the presence of bile or NaGCH in vitro were similar to those in vivo. Another bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), previously reported to induce enteropathogenic virulence, also induced expression of CS5, whereas sodium bicarbonate did not.

  6. Construction and immunogenic properties of a chimeric protein comprising CfaE, CfaB and LTB against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheibi Hayat, Seyed-Mohammad; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed-Latif; Nazarian, Shahram

    2016-11-01

    ETEC (Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli) is a major cause of diarrhea in developing countries and children. ETEC has two virulence factors including colonization factors antigen (CFA) and labile enterotoxins (LTs). CFA/I consists the major pilin subunit CfaB and a minor adhesive subunit, CfaE. In this study a tripartite fusion protein containing CfaB, CfaE and LTB was designed. In silico analysis of the tertiary structure of the chimeric protein showed a protein with three main domains linked together with linkers. Linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were identified. A chimera consisting cfaB, cfaE and ltB(BET)was then synthesized with E. coli codon bias in pUC57 and sub cloned into pET32 vector. Recombinant protein was expressed and purified by affinity chromatography and confirmed by western blotting. Mice were immunized with recombinant protein and the antibody titer and specificity of the sera were analyzed by ELISA. The efficiency of the immune sera against ETEC was evaluated by binding assay and GM1-ELISA. VaxiJen analysis of the protein showed high antigenicity. Post-immune sera contained high titers of anti-BET IgG. Pretreatment of ETEC cells with sera from immunized mice decreased their ability to adhere to cells of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A foodborne outbreak of gastrointestinal illness caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli serotype O169:H41 in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tetsuya; Itoh, Kaoru; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Hirai, Yuji; Kanki, Masashi; Kawatsu, Kentaro; Seto, Kazuko; Taguchi, Masumi; Kumeda, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    We describe our laboratory investigation of a massive foodborne outbreak of gastrointestinal illness caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) serotype O169:H41 that occurred during a 2-day traditional festival held in September 2012 in Osaka Prefecture, Japan. Of 126 customers who patronized a particular Japanese restaurant during the event, 102 developed symptoms of gastrointestinal disease. We isolated strains of ETEC serotype O169:H41 from 1 food sample and from fecal samples collected from 19 of 34 patients and 2 of 4 food handlers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of these isolates suggested that the foodborne pathogen that caused the diarrheal outbreak was a specific clone of ETEC serotype O169:H41. Based on these findings and our interviews with the restaurant owner and employees, we concluded that a likely cause of the outbreak was an overwhelmed capacity of the restaurant kitchen in terms of preservation of sanitary procedures during the festival and the inability of the restaurant staff to handle the relatively large quantity of food to ensure a lack of contamination with ETEC. Thus, we reconfirm that ETEC strains of serotype O169:H41 remain important causes of domestic foodborne outbreaks in developed countries, including Japan.

  8. Outbreak of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O169 enteritis in schoolchildren associated with consumption of kimchi, Republic of Korea, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S H; Kim, J; Oh, K-H; Hu, J K; Seo, J; Oh, S S; Hur, M J; Choi, Y-H; Youn, S K; Chung, G T; Choe, Y J

    2014-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is now recognized as a common cause of foodborne outbreaks. This study aimed to describe the first ETEC O169 outbreak identified in Korea. In this outbreak, we identified 1642 cases from seven schools. Retrospective cohort studies were performed in two schools; and case-control studies were conducted in five schools. In two schools, radish kimchi was associated with illness; and in five other schools, radish or cabbage kimchi was found to have a higher risk among food items. Adjusted relative risk of kimchi was 5·87-7·21 in schools that underwent cohort studies; and adjusted odds ratio was 4·52-12·37 in schools that underwent case-control studies. ETEC O169 was isolated from 230 affected students, and was indistinguishable from the isolates detected from the kimchi product distributed by company X, a food company that produced and distributed kimchi to all seven schools. In this outbreak, we found that the risk of a kimchi-borne outbreak of ETEC O169 infection is present in Korea. We recommend continued monitoring regarding food safety in Korea, and strengthening surveillance regarding ETEC O169 infection through implementation of active laboratory surveillance to confirm its infection.

  9. Consecutive Outbreaks of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O6 in Schools in South Korea Caused by Contamination of Fermented Vegetable Kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaeseung; Yoon, Ki-Bok; Jeon, Doo-Young; Oh, Sung-Suk; Oh, Kyung-Hwan; Chung, Gyung Tae; Kim, Seung Woo; Cho, Seung-Hak

    2016-10-01

    Two outbreaks of gastroenteritis occurred in South Korea, affecting a middle school in the Jeollanam-do province in 2013 (Outbreak 1) and 10 schools in the Incheon province in 2014 (Outbreak 2). We investigated the outbreaks to identify the pathogen and mode of transmission. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Outbreak 1; and case-control studies were performed for the Outbreak 2. Samples from students, environments, and preserved food items were collected and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was conducted to identify strains of pathogen. We identified 167 and 1022 students who met the case definition (≥3 loose stools in any 24-h period) in the Outbreaks 1 and 2, respectively. The consumption of cabbage kimchi and young radish kimchi were significantly associated with the illness. Adjusted odds ratios of kimchi were 2.62-11.74. In the Outbreak 1, cabbage kimchi was made and consumed in the school restaurant and in the Outbreak 2, young radish kimchi was supplied by food company X and distributed to all the 10 schools in the Incheon province. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) O6 was isolated from fecal samples in 375 cases (33.9%) and from kimchi samples. PFGE patterns of the outbreak strains isolated from cases and food were indistinguishable in each outbreak. The suspected food vehicle in these two consecutive outbreaks was kimchi contaminated with ETEC O6. We recommend continued monitoring and stricter sanitation requirements for the food supply process in Korea, especially in relation to kimchi.

  10. Mechanism of cold-induced increase in susceptibility to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea of the newborn pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmiento Mendoza, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    These experiments studied the susceptibility to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in piglets kept at 25/sup 0/C (cold) or 35/sup 0/C (warm) from birth and infected at 18 h of age. When infected with ETEC strain M431 cold piglets had greater incidence and severity of diarrhea, fluid secretion, dehydration and intestinal colonization than warm littermates. In contrast, when piglets were challenged with ETEC strain O926-B-9C, which lacks the pilus antigens K99, K88, 987P but is able to produce heat stable enterotoxin (ST), increases influidity of feces and colonic and fecal contents in cold piglets were not consistent and there was no significant difference in bacterial counts between temperature groups. Cold piglets given /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol had the bulk of radiolabelled contents in the cranial small intestinal segments indicating prolonged retention or decreased propulsion in comparison to warm littermates. No difference, however, was found in xylose absorption between temperature groups. It was investigated if insulin administration reduces the net propulsion of contents in newborn piglets as cold stress does. The segments containing the greater percentages of radioactivity were always more cranial in insulin injected piglets than in control piglets. There was, however, no differences in severity of disease or bacterial numbers between insulin injected and control piglets infected with M431 ETEC.

  11. L-Glutamine and L-arginine protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection via intestinal innate immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Ren, Wenkai; Fang, Jun; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Guan, Guiping; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yin, Jie; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Chen, Shuai; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) or arginine (Arg) supplementation is beneficial for intestinal health; however, whether Gln or Arg may confer protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is not known. To address this, we used an ETEC-infected murine model to investigate the protective effects of Gln and Arg. Experimentally, we pre-treated mice with designed diet of Gln or Arg supplementation prior to the oral ETEC infection and then assessed mouse mortality and intestinal bacterial burden. We also determined the markers of intestinal innate immunity in treated mice, including secretory IgA response (SIgA), mucins from goblet cells, as well as antimicrobial peptides from Paneth cells. ETEC colonized in mouse small intestine, including duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and inhibited the mRNA expression of intestinal immune factors, such as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), cryptdin-related sequence 1C (CRS1C), and Reg3γ. We found that dietary Gln or Arg supplementation decreased bacterial colonization and promoted the activation of innate immunity (e.g., the mRNA expression of pIgR, CRS1C, and Reg3γ) in the intestine of ETEC-infected mice. Our results suggest that dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation may inhibit intestinal ETEC infection through intestinal innate immunity.

  12. Improving genome annotation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TW10598 by a label-free quantitative MS/MS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Veronika Kuchařová; Steinsland, Hans; Wiker, Harald G

    2015-11-01

    The most commonly used genome annotation processes are to a great extent based on computational methods. However, those can only predict genes that have been described earlier or that have sequence signatures indicative of a gene function. Here, we report a synonymous proteogenomic approach for experimentally improving microbial genome annotation based on label-free quantitative MS/MS. The approach is exemplified by analysis of cell extracts from in vitro cultured enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain TW10598, as part of an effort to create a new reference ETEC genome sequence. The proteomic analysis yielded identification of 2060 proteins, out of which 312 proteins were originally described as hypothetical. For 84% of the identified proteins we have provided description of their relative quantitative levels, among others, for 20 abundantly expressed ETEC virulence factors. Proteogenomic mapping supported the existence of four protein-coding genes that had not been annotated, and led to correction of translation start positions of another nine. The addition of the proteomic analysis into TW10598 genome re-annotation project improved quality of the annotation, and provided experimental evidence for a significant portion of ETEC expressed proteome. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002473 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002473). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from two paediatric cohort studies in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Anicia M; Rivera, Fulton P; Pons, Maria J; Riveros, Maribel; Gomes, Cláudia; Bernal, María; Meza, Rina; Maves, Ryan C; Huicho, Luis; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Lanata, Claudio F; Gil, Ana I; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, being of special concern in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of resistance in 205 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates from two cohort studies in children Peru. ETEC were identified by an in-house multiplex real-time PCR. Susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents was tested by disk diffusion; mechanisms of resistance were evaluated by PCR. ETEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin (64%), cotrimoxazole (52%), tetracycline (37%); 39% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant. Heat-stable toxin producing (ETEC-st) (48%) and heat-labile toxin producing ETEC (ETEC-lt) (40%) had higher rates of multidrug resistance than isolates producing both toxins (ETEC-lt-st) (21%), pPeru. However, further development of resistance should be closely monitored. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Contamination of potable water by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: qPCR based culture-free detection and quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, C B; Vajpayee, P; Singh, G; Upadhyay, R S; Shanker, R

    2011-11-01

    Tourists visiting to endemic zones may acquire Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection resulting into diarrhea due to consumption of contaminated potable waters. In this study, a qPCR assay (SYBR Green), targeting LT1 and ST1 genes was designed to quantify ETEC in potable waters derived from civic water supply. The assay could detect lowest 1CFU/PCR targeting LT1/ST1 gene from ten-fold diluted culture of the reference strain (E. coli MTCC 723) and is ten-fold more sensitive than the conventional PCR. The quantification of the ETEC in potable waters collected from civic supply of a major city of the northern India exhibiting high flow of tourists reveals that all the sites that ran along sewage line were contaminated by the ETEC. Contamination was due to percolation of sewage. The assay could be used for the regular monitoring of potable water in places exhibiting heavy flow of tourists to prevent ETEC induced diarrhea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Disruption the Outer Membrane of Enteropathogenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli using Proanthocyanidins

    Science.gov (United States)

    American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins (PACs) have been reported as a natural antibacterial agent to suppress the growth of pathogenic Escherichia coli. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins on destabilizing the outer...

  16. Use of specific antibody to demonstrate glycocalyx, K99 pili, and the spatial relationships of K99+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the ileum of colostrum-fed calves.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, R.; Acres, S. D.; Costerton, J W

    1982-01-01

    The attachment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain B44 (O9:K30:K99:F41:H-) to the ileal epithelium of newborn colostrum-fed calves was studied by electron microscopy. Stabilization of the bacterial glycocalyx (K30) and pili (K99) by fixation of tissue sections in specific antibody and staining with ruthenium red were used so that the bacterial surface structures could be clearly visualized and their spatial relationship to the intestinal brush border defined. When sections of il...

  17. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CS21 pilus contributes to adhesion to intestinal cells and to pathogenesis under in vivo conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, C. P.; Luiz, W. B.; Sierra, A.; Cruz, C.; Qadri, F.; Kaushik, R. S.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Colonization surface antigens (CSs) represent key virulence-associated factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains. They are required for gut colonization, the first step of the diarrhoeal disease process induced by these bacteria. One of the most prevalent CSs is CS21, or longus, a type IV pili associated with bacterial self-aggregation, protection against environmental stresses, biofilm formation and adherence to epithelial cell lines. The objectives of this study were to assess the role of CS21 in adherence to primary intestinal epithelial cells and to determine if CS21 contributes to the pathogenesis of ETEC infection in vivo. We evaluated adherence of a CS21-expressing wild-type ETEC strain and an isogenic CS21-mutant strain to pig-derived intestinal cell lines. To determine the role of CS21 in pathogenesis we used the above ETEC strains in a neonatal mice challenge infection model to assess mortality. Quantitative adherence assays confirmed that ETEC adheres to primary intestinal epithelial cells lines in a CS21-dependent manner. In addition, the CS21-mediated ETEC adherence to cells was specific as purified LngA protein, the CS21 major subunit, competed for binding with the CS21-expressing ETEC while specific anti-LngA antibodies blocked adhesion to intestinal cells. Neonatal DBA/2 mice died after intra-stomach administration of CS21-expressing strains while lack of CS21 expression drastically reduced the virulence of the wild-type ETEC strain in this animal model. Collectively these results further support the role of CS21 during ETEC infection and add new evidence on its in vivo relevance in pathogenesis. PMID:23760820

  18. The effect of preparation of cebiche on the survival of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Andrés; Espinosa, Benjamin J; Nuñez, Gladys; Espinoza, Nereyda; Maves, Ryan C; Martin, Gregory J

    2010-01-01

    Cebiche is a common dish in Latin America, prepared using raw fish mixed with vegetables and marinated with lime juice. The acidity of the lime juice is commonly believed to destroy bacteria and render cebiche as safe to eat. Little data exist concerning rates of cebiche-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks, although these may be high given the popularity of the dish. We inoculated raw fish with Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to determine the effect of the cebiche preparation process on bacterial viability. Raw fish were exposed to a suspension of 1.0 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFUs) of each organism in a 50-mL solution, prior to the addition of cebiche ingredients. A typical Peruvian cebiche recipe was used combining limes, onions, sweet potatoes, cilantro, and hot peppers marinated together for 30 minutes. A homogenized mixture of the dish was then evaluated for pH and bacterial counts at 0, 10, and 30 minutes. As much as 100 µL of inocula were streaked onto tryptic soy agar (TSA) agar plates and incubated for 24 hours. The initial average pH of the fish was 6.4 prior to adding cebiche ingredients and 5.0 immediately afterwards. The pH at 10- and 30-minute periods was 5.4 and 5.2, respectively. Little reduction in bacterial counts was observed at either the 10- or 30-minute time periods, with counts increasing at 30 minutes. The putative bactericidal role of lime juice in the preparation process is not sufficient to reduce the microbial population present in cebiche. Pathogens may remain viable after exposure to acidic conditions. The increasing popularity of Peruvian cuisine may also lead to cebiche-associated illness outside of Latin America. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Reflection of serum immunoglobulin isotypes in the egg yolk of laying hens immunized with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Nath Barman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the seroconversion and development of egg yolk immunoglobulins in adult laying White Leghorn hens immunized against an isolate of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC bearing K91 and K88ac antigens, obtained from diarrheic piglet. Materials and Methods: Adult laying White Leghorn hens were immunized with inactivated enterotoxic E. coli strain isolated originally from a case of piglet diarrhea following recommended schedule. The development of whole antibodies and isotype-specific antibodies in serum and egg yolk were measured using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Piglets suffering from diarrhea with fecal samples positive for ETEC were fed with egg yolk and compared with diarrheic control group. Results: The serum and egg yolk ELISA antibody titer against E. coli strain used in the present study was as high as 2666.66±307.92 and 933.33±203.67 respectively on 50 day-post-vaccination (DPV. The immunoglobulin Y (IgY was the predominant isotype in serum and egg yolk, which reached the peak titer of 2200±519.61 in serum on 40 DPV and 800±244.94 in egg yolk on 50 DPV. IgM titer in serum and egg yolk was found to be meager, and no IgA could be detected. Diarrheic piglets fed with the egg yolk suspension from immunized hens showed a promising result in controlling diarrhea. Conclusion: Egg yolk antibodies are considered a suitable immunotherapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy. High titer of egg yolk antibodies raised in the immunized hen against an isolate of ETEC holds the potential to be used for passive protection of diarrheic piglets during their most susceptible period of infection.

  20. Tight conformational coupling between the domains of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin CfaE regulates binding state transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J

    2013-04-05

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE.

  1. Glucose significantly enhances enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adherence to intestinal epithelial cells through its effects on heat-labile enterotoxin production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prageeth Wijemanne

    Full Text Available The present study tested whether exposure of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC to glucose at different concentrations in the media results in increased bacterial adherence to host cells through increased heat-labile enterotoxin (LT production, thereby suggesting the effects are physiological. Porcine-origin ETEC strains grown in Casamino acid yeast extract medium containing different concentrations of glucose were washed and inoculated onto IPEC-J2 porcine intestinal epithelial cells to test for effects on adherence and host cell cAMP concentrations. Consistent with previous studies, all LT+ strains had higher ETEC adherence to IPEC-J2 cells than did LT- strains. Adherence of the LT- but not the LT+ strains was increased by pre-incubating the IPEC-J2 cells with LT and decreased by co-incubation with GM1 ganglioside in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05. To determine whether the glucose concentration of the cell culture media has an effect on adherence, IPEC-J2 cells were inoculated with LT+ or LT- strains in cell culture media containing a final glucose concentration of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0%, and incubated for 4 h. Only media containing 0.25% glucose resulted in increased adherence and cAMP levels, and this was limited to IPEC-J2 cells inoculated with LT+ strains. This study supports the hypothesis that glucose, at a concentration optimal for LT expression, enhances bacterial adherence through the promotion of LT production. Hence, these results establish the physiological relevance of the effects of glucose on LT production and provide a basis for how glucose intake may influence the severity of ETEC infection.

  2. LeoA, B and C from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Are Bacterial Dynamins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michie, Katharine A; Boysen, Anders; Low, Harry H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 contains a GTPase virulence factor, LeoA, which is encoded on a pathogenicity island and has been shown to enhance toxin release, potentially through vesicle secretion. By sequence comparisons and X-ray structure determination we now identify LeoA as a bacter......Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 contains a GTPase virulence factor, LeoA, which is encoded on a pathogenicity island and has been shown to enhance toxin release, potentially through vesicle secretion. By sequence comparisons and X-ray structure determination we now identify Leo......A as a bacterial dynamin-like protein (DLP). Proteins of the dynamin family remodel membranes and were once thought to be restricted to eukaryotes. In ETEC H10407 LeoA localises to the periplasm where it forms a punctate localisation pattern. Bioinformatic analyses of leoA and the two upstream genes leoB and leo...... membrane vesicle associated toxin secretion....

  3. Lactobacillus zeae Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Caused Death by Inhibiting Enterotoxin Gene Expression of the Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mengzhou; Yu, Hai; Yin, Xianhua; Sabour, Parviz M.; Chen, Wei; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become increasingly used for screening antimicrobials and probiotics for pathogen control. It also provides a useful tool for studying microbe-host interactions. This study has established a C. elegans life-span assay to preselect probiotic bacteria for controlling K88+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a pathogen causing pig diarrhea, and has determined a potential mechanism underlying the protection provided by Lactobacillus. Methodology/Principal Findings Life-span of C. elegans was used to measure the response of worms to ETEC infection and protection provided by lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB). Among 13 LAB isolates that varied in their ability to protect C. elegans from death induced by ETEC strain JG280, Lactobacillus zeae LB1 offered the highest level of protection (86%). The treatment with Lactobacillus did not reduce ETEC JG280 colonization in the nematode intestine. Feeding E. coli strain JFF4 (K88+ but lacking enterotoxin genes of estA, estB, and elt) did not cause death of worms. There was a significant increase in gene expression of estA, estB, and elt during ETEC JG280 infection, which was remarkably inhibited by isolate LB1. The clone with either estA or estB expressed in E. coli DH5α was as effective as ETEC JG280 in killing the nematode. However, the elt clone killed only approximately 40% of worms. The killing by the clones could also be prevented by isolate LB1. The same isolate only partially inhibited the gene expression of enterotoxins in both ETEC JG280 and E. coli DH5α in-vitro. Conclusions/Significance The established life-span assay can be used for studies of probiotics to control ETEC (for effective selection and mechanistic studies). Heat-stable enterotoxins appeared to be the main factors responsible for the death of C. elegans. Inhibition of ETEC enterotoxin production, rather than interference of its intestinal colonization, appears to be the mechanism of protection

  4. Susceptibility towards enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ac diarrhea is governed by the MUC13 gene in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ren

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC F4ac is a major determinant of diarrhea and mortality in neonatal and young pigs. Susceptibility to ETEC F4ac is governed by the intestinal receptor specific for the bacterium and is inherited as a monogenic dominant trait. To identify the receptor gene (F4acR, we first mapped the locus to a 7.8-cM region on pig chromosome 13 using a genome scan with 194 microsatellite markers. A further scan with high density markers on chromosome 13 refined the locus to a 5.7-cM interval. Recombination breakpoint analysis defined the locus within a 2.3-Mb region. Further genome-wide mapping using 39,720 informative SNPs revealed that the most significant markers were proximal to the MUC13 gene in the 2.3-Mb region. Association studies in a collection of diverse outbred populations strongly supported that MUC13 is the most likely responsible gene. We characterized the porcine MUC13 gene that encodes two transcripts: MUC13A and MUC13B. Both transcripts have the characteristic PTS regions of mucins that are enriched in distinct tandem repeats. MUC13B is predicated to be heavily O-glycosylated, forming the binding site of the bacterium; while MUC13A does not have the O-glycosylation binding site. Concordantly, 127 independent pigs homozygous for MUC13A across diverse breeds are all resistant to ETEC F4ac, and all 718 susceptible animals from the broad breed panel carry at least one MUC13B allele. Altogether, we conclude that susceptibility towards ETEC F4ac is governed by the MUC13 gene in pigs. The finding has an immediate translation into breeding practice, as it allows us to establish an efficient and accurate diagnostic test for selecting against susceptible animals. Moreover, the finding improves our understanding of mucins that play crucial roles in defense against enteric pathogens. It revealed, for the first time, the direct interaction between MUC13 and enteric bacteria, which is poorly understood in mammals.

  5. New surface-associated heat-labile colonization factor antigen (CFA/II) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli of serogroups O6 and O8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J

    1978-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) belonging to serogroups O6 and O8 do not possess the H-10407-type colonization factor antigen (CFA/I). However, these frequently isolated ETEC were found to possess a second and distinct heat-labile surface-associated colonization factor antigen, termed CFA/II. Whereas CFA/I mediates mannose-resistant hemagglutination of human group A erythrocytes, CFA/II does not. CFA/II mediates mannose-resistant hemagglutination of bovine erythrocytes, and mannose-resistant hemagglutination is rapid only at reduced temperature (4 degrees C). Because CFA/II, like CFA/I, is spontaneously lost by many ETEC isolates in the laboratory, it was possible to produce specific anti-CFA/II serum by preparing antiserum against living cells of a prototype strain (PB-176) and adsorbing this serum with living and heat-treated cells of its CFA/II-negative derivative strain PB-176-P. This serum, which neutralized the colonization factor activity of CFA/II-positive strains in infant rabbits, was employed to confirm the presence of CFA/II on ETEC which exhibited mannose-resistant hemagglutination of bovine but not human erythrocytes. CFA/II, like CFA/I, mediates adherence of the bacteria to the mucosal surface of the small intestine, as demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. CFA/II appears to be an important virulence factor for humans since CFA/II-positive ETEC are frequently isolated from diarrhea cases, particularly travelers' diarrhea, in Mexico; these ETEC were not uncommon in a collection of isolates from Bangladesh. The O6:H16 strain of ETEC responsible for an outbreak of diarrhea in the United States was also shown to be CFA/II positive. CFA/I and CFA/II were never found on the same serotypes of ETEC, but 98% of the heat-stable and heat-labile enterotoxin-producing ETEC belonging to the frequently isolated serogroups O6, O8, O15, O25, O63, and O78 were positive for either CFA/I or CFA/II.

  6. Toxins and virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli associated with strains isolated from indigenous children and international visitors to a rural community in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O R; González, W; Lemus, O; Pratdesaba, R A; Matute, J A; Wiklund, G; Sack, D A; Bourgeois, A L; Svennerholm, A-M

    2015-06-01

    Diarrhoea remains a common cause of illness in Guatemala, with children suffering most frequently from the disease. This study directly compared the frequency, enterotoxin, and colonization factor (CF) profiles of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains isolated from children living in a rural community in Guatemala and from Western visitors to the same location during the same seasons, using similar detection methodologies. We found that ETEC accounted for 26% of severe cases of diarrhoea in children requiring hospitalization, 15% of diarrhoea in the community, and 29% of travellers' diarrhoea in visitors staying ⩾2 weeks. The toxin and CF patterns of the ETEC strains isolated from both groups differed significantly (P < 0·0005) as determined by χ 2 = 60·39 for CFs and χ 2 = 35 for toxins, while ETEC phenotypes found in Guatemalan children were comparable to those found in children from other areas of the world.

  7. An outbreak of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection in Norway, 2012: a reminder to consider uncommon pathogens in outbreaks involving imported products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, E; Møller, K E; Wester, A L; Dahle, U R; Hermansen, N O; Jenum, P A; Thoresen, L; Vold, L

    2015-02-01

    We investigated an outbreak of gastroenteritis following a Christmas buffet served on 4-9 December 2012 to ~1300 hotel guests. More than 300 people were reported ill in initial interviews with hotel guests. To identify possible sources of infection we conducted a cohort investigation through which we identified 214 probable cases. Illness was associated with consumption of scrambled eggs (odds ratio 9·07, 95% confidence interval 5·20-15·84). Imported chives added fresh to the scrambled eggs were the suspected source of the outbreak but were unavailable for testing. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was eventually confirmed in 40 hotel guests. This outbreak reinforces that ETEC should be considered in non-endemic countries when the clinical picture is consistent and common gastrointestinal pathogens are not found. Following this outbreak, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority recommended that imported fresh herbs should be heat-treated before use in commercial kitchens.

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a single-dose live non-pathogenic Escherichia coli oral vaccine against F4-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli challenge in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, John Morris; Nadeau, Éric; Bélanger, Louise; Tremblay, Cindy-Love; Tremblay, Danielle; Brunelle, Mélanie; Wolf, Regina; Hellmann, Klaus; Hidalgo, Álvaro

    2017-01-05

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains expressing F4 (K88) fimbriae (F4-ETEC) are one of the most important causes of post-weaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs. F4, a major antigen, plays an important role in the early steps of the infection. Herein, the efficacy of a live oral vaccine consisting of a non-pathogenic E. coli strain expressing F4 for protection of pigs against PWD was evaluated. Three blinded, placebo-controlled, block design, parallel-group confirmatory experiments were conducted, using an F4-ETEC PWD challenge model, each with a different vaccination-challenge interval (3, 7, and 21days). The pigs were vaccinated via the drinking water with a single dose of the Coliprotec® F4 vaccine one day post-weaning. Efficacy was assessed by evaluating diarrhea, clinical observations, intestinal fluid accumulation, weight gain, intestinal colonization and fecal shedding of F4-ETEC. The immune response was evaluated by measuring serum and intestinal F4-specific antibodies. The administration of the vaccine resulted in a significant reduction of the incidence of moderate to severe diarrhea, ileal colonization by F4-ETEC, and fecal shedding of F4-ETEC after the heterologous challenge at 7 and 21days post-vaccination. The 7-day onset of protection was associated with an increase of serum anti-F4 IgM whereas the 21-day duration of protection was associated with an increase of both serum anti-F4 IgM and IgA. Significant correlations between levels of serum and intestinal secretory anti-F4 antibodies were detected. Maternally derived F4-specific serum antibodies did not interfere with the vaccine efficacy. The evaluation of protection following a challenge three days after vaccination showed a reduction of the severity and the duration of diarrhea and of fecal shedding of F4-ETEC. The 7-day onset and the 21-day duration of protection induced by Coliprotec® F4 vaccine administered once in drinking water to pigs of at least 18days of age were confirmed by protection

  9. A Selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Promotes EGFR-Independent Akt Activation in an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88-Infected IPEC-J2 Cell Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC are important intestinal pathogens that cause diarrhea in humans and animals. Although probiotic bacteria may protect against ETEC-induced enteric infections, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, porcine intestinal epithelial J2 cells (IPEC-J2 were pre-incubated with and without Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and then exposed to F4+ ETEC. Increases in TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA expression were observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge, but these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus treatment. Expression of TLR2 and NOD1 mRNA was up-regulated in cells pre-treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus counteracted F4+ ETEC-induced increases in TNF-α concentration. Increased PGE2. concentrations were observed in cells infected with F4+ ETEC and in cells treated with L. rhamnosus only. A decrease in phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR was observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge in cells treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus enhanced Akt phosphorylation and increased ZO-1 and occludin protein expression. Our findings suggest that L. rhamnosus protects intestinal epithelial cells from F4+ ETEC-induced damage, partly through the anti-inflammatory response involving synergism between TLR2 and NOD1. In addition, L. rhamnosus promotes EGFR-independent Akt activation, which may activate intestinal epithelial cells in response to bacterial infection, in turn increasing tight junction integrity and thus enhancing the barrier function and restricting pathogen invasion. Pre-incubation with L. rhamnosus was superior to co-incubation in reducing the adhesion of F4+ ETEC to IPEC-J2 cells and subsequently attenuating F4+ ETEC-induced mucin layer destruction and suppressing apoptosis. Our data indicate that a selected L. rhamnosus strain interacts with porcine intestinal epithelial cells to maintain the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal epithelial

  10. A Selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Promotes EGFR-Independent Akt Activation in an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88-Infected IPEC-J2 Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Yao-Hong; Yang, Jin-Cai; Yang, Gui-Yan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are important intestinal pathogens that cause diarrhea in humans and animals. Although probiotic bacteria may protect against ETEC-induced enteric infections, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, porcine intestinal epithelial J2 cells (IPEC-J2) were pre-incubated with and without Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 and then exposed to F4+ ETEC. Increases in TLR4 and NOD2 mRNA expression were observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge, but these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus treatment. Expression of TLR2 and NOD1 mRNA was up-regulated in cells pre-treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus counteracted F4+ ETEC-induced increases in TNF-α concentration. Increased PGE2. concentrations were observed in cells infected with F4+ ETEC and in cells treated with L. rhamnosus only. A decrease in phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was observed at 3 h after F4+ ETEC challenge in cells treated with L. rhamnosus. Pre-treatment with L. rhamnosus enhanced Akt phosphorylation and increased ZO-1 and occludin protein expression. Our findings suggest that L. rhamnosus protects intestinal epithelial cells from F4+ ETEC-induced damage, partly through the anti-inflammatory response involving synergism between TLR2 and NOD1. In addition, L. rhamnosus promotes EGFR-independent Akt activation, which may activate intestinal epithelial cells in response to bacterial infection, in turn increasing tight junction integrity and thus enhancing the barrier function and restricting pathogen invasion. Pre-incubation with L. rhamnosus was superior to co-incubation in reducing the adhesion of F4+ ETEC to IPEC-J2 cells and subsequently attenuating F4+ ETEC-induced mucin layer destruction and suppressing apoptosis. Our data indicate that a selected L. rhamnosus strain interacts with porcine intestinal epithelial cells to maintain the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal epithelial cell activation in

  11. Crystal Structure of the Minor Pilin CofB, the Initiator of CFA/III Pilus Assembly in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolappan, Subramania; Ng, Dixon; Yang, Guixiang; Harn, Tony; Craig, Lisa

    2015-10-23

    Type IV pili are extracellular polymers of the major pilin subunit. These subunits are held together in the pilus filament by hydrophobic interactions among their N-terminal α-helices, which also anchor the pilin subunits in the inner membrane prior to pilus assembly. Type IV pilus assembly involves a conserved group of proteins that span the envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Among these is a set of minor pilins, so named because they share their hydrophobic N-terminal polymerization/membrane anchor segment with the major pilins but are much less abundant. Minor pilins influence pilus assembly and retraction, but their precise functions are not well defined. The Type IV pilus systems of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae are among the simplest of Type IV pilus systems and possess only a single minor pilin. Here we show that the enterotoxigenic E. coli minor pilins CofB and LngB are required for assembly of their respective Type IV pili, CFA/III and Longus. Low levels of the minor pilins are optimal for pilus assembly, and CofB can be detected in the pilus fraction. We solved the 2.0 Å crystal structure of N-terminally truncated CofB, revealing a pilin-like protein with an extended C-terminal region composed of two discrete domains connected by flexible linkers. The C-terminal region is required for CofB to initiate pilus assembly. We propose a model for CofB-initiated pilus assembly with implications for understanding filament growth in more complex Type IV pilus systems as well as the related Type II secretion system. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Binding of CFA/I Pili of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to Asialo-GM1 Is Mediated by the Minor Pilin CfaE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Riches, James D; Scanlon, Martin J; Ulett, Glen C; Sakellaris, Harry

    2016-05-01

    CFA/I pili are representatives of a large family of related pili that mediate the adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells. They are assembled via the alternate chaperone-usher pathway and consist of two subunits, CfaB, which makes up the pilus shaft and a single pilus tip-associated subunit, CfaE. The current model of pilus-mediated adherence proposes that CFA/I has two distinct binding activities; the CfaE subunit is responsible for binding to receptors of unknown structure on erythrocyte and intestinal epithelial cell surfaces, while CfaB binds to various glycosphingolipids, including asialo-GM1. In this report, we present two independent lines of evidence that, contrary to the existing model, CfaB does not bind to asialo-GM1 independently of CfaE. Neither purified CfaB subunits nor CfaB assembled into pili bind to asialo-GM1. Instead, we demonstrate that binding activity toward asialo-GM1 resides in CfaE and this is essential for pilus binding to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that the binding activities of CFA/I pili for asialo-GM1, erythrocytes, and intestinal cells are inseparable, require the same amino acid residues in CfaE, and therefore depend on the same or very similar binding mechanisms. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Effect of chicken egg anti-F4 antibodies on performance and diarrhea incidences in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88+-challenged piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolawole Aluko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of spay-dried whole egg containing anti-F4 antibodies (SDWE against recombinantly produced F4 antigens in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88+ (ETEC-challenged piglets. Twenty-seven 21-d-old and individually housed piglets were randomly allotted to 3 treatments consisting of a wheat-soybean meal basal diet containing either 0 (control egg powder; CEP, 0.1% (SDWE1 or 0.4% (SDWE2 SDWE. After a 7-d adaptation period, blood samples were collected from all pigs, and pigs were weighed and orally challenged with an ETEC inoculum. Blood was sampled at 24 and 48 h post-challenge, and diarrhea incidences and scores were recorded. On d 14, all pigs were weighed and then euthanized to obtain intestinal tissue samples for histomorphology measurement. During the pre-challenge period, pigs fed the SDWE showed a linear improvement (P < 0.05 in average daily gain (ADG and gain to feed ratio (G:F, but there were no differences among treatments in growth performance during the post-challenge period. Diarrhea incidences and scores, fecal shedding of ETEC, plasma urea nitrogen content and intestinal histomorphology were similar among treatments. The results show that 0.4% SDWE supported greater piglet performance before challenge although such benefits were not evident during the post-challenge period at either 0.1% or 0.4% supplementation.

  14. Immunization against the colonization factor antigen I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli by administration of a bivalent Salmonella typhimurium aroA strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.C.R. Guillobel

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available An expression plasmid (pCFA-1 carrying the cfaB gene that codes for the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC fimbrial adhesin colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I subunit was constructed and used to transform a derivative of the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium aroA vaccine strain SL3261 carrying an F'lacIq. Treatment of the transformed strain with isopropyl-ß-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG resulted in elevated in vitro expression of the CFA/I subunit. Although flagellar function and lipopolysaccharide (LPS synthesis were similar in both the parental and the recombinant strains, spleen colonization was reduced in the recombinant strain. All BALB/c mice parenterally inoculated with the recombinant strain developed significant anti-CFA/I and anti-LPS serum antibody titers (P0.05 while 4/5 of the same mice developed anti-LPS IgA (P<0.05. The results indicate that the vaccine strain elicited an antibody response against the bacterial host both after oral and intravenous immunization while the response against the CFA/I antigen was significant only after inoculation by the intravenous route

  15. Construction and expression of immunogenic hybrid enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli CFA/I and CS2 colonization fimbriae for use in vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joshua; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Holmgren, Jan; Lebens, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are an important cause of diarrheal morbidity in developing countries, especially in children and also of traveler's diarrhea. Colonization factors (CFs) of ETEC, like CFA/I and CS2 which are genetically and structurally related, play a substantial role in pathogenicity, and since intestinal-mucosal immune responses against CFs appear to be protective, much effort has focused on the development of a CF-based ETEC vaccine. We have constructed hybrid operons in which the major CS2 subunit-encoding cotA gene was inserted into the CFA/I operon, either replacing (hybrid I) or being added to the major CFA/I subunit-encoding cfaB gene (hybrid II). Using specific monoclonal antibodies against the major subunits of CFA/I and CS2, high levels of surface expression of both fimbrial subunits were shown in E. coli carrying the hybrid II operon. Oral immunization of mice with formalin-killed bacteria expressing hybrid II fimbriae induced strong CFA/I- and CS2-specific serum IgG + IgM and fecal IgA antibody responses, which were higher than those achieved by similar immunization with the reference strains. Bacteria expressing hybrid fimbriae are potential candidate strains in an oral-killed CF-ETEC vaccine, and the approach represents an attractive and novel means of producing a broad-spectrum ETEC vaccine.

  16. Different Assay Conditions for Detecting the Production and Release of Heat-Labile and Heat-Stable Toxins in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia B. Rocha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC produce heat-labile (LT and/or heat-stable enterotoxins (ST. Despite that, the mechanism of action of both toxins are well known, there is great controversy in the literature concerning the in vitro production and release of LT and, for ST, no major concerns have been discussed. Furthermore, the majority of published papers describe the use of only one or a few ETEC isolates to define the production and release of these toxins, which hinders the detection of ETEC by phenotypic approaches. Thus, the present study was undertaken to obtain a better understanding of ST and LT toxin production and release under laboratory conditions. Accordingly, a collection of 90 LT-, ST-, and ST/LT-producing ETEC isolates was used to determine a protocol for toxin production and release aimed at ETEC detection. For this, we used previously raised anti-LT antibodies and the anti-ST monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies described herein. The presence of bile salts and the use of certain antibiotics improved ETEC toxin production/release. Triton X-100, as chemical treatment, proved to be an alternative method for toxin release. Consequently, a common protocol that can increase the production and release of LT and ST toxins could facilitate and enhance the sensitivity of diagnostic tests for ETEC using the raised and described antibodies in the present work.

  17. A Chimeric protein of CFA/I, CS6 subunits and LTB/STa toxoid protects immunized mice against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinalzadeh, Narges; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Goujani, Goli; Amani, Jafar; Ahangari, Ghasem; Akhavian, Asal; Jafari, Mahyat

    2017-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli (ETEC) strains are the commonest bacteria causing diarrhea in children in developing countries and travelers to these areas. Colonization factors (CFs) and enterotoxins are the main virulence determinants in ETEC pathogenesis. Heterogeneity of CFs is commonly considered the bottleneck to developing an effective vaccine. It is believed that broad spectrum protection against ETEC would be achieved by induced anti-CF and anti-enterotoxin immunity simultaneously. Here, a fusion antigen strategy was used to construct a quadrivalent recombinant protein called 3CL and composed of CfaB, a structural subunit of CFA/I, and CS6 structural subunits, LTB and STa toxoid of ETEC. Its anti-CF and antitoxin immunogenicity was then assessed. To achieve high-level expression, the 3CL gene was synthesized using E. coli codon bias. Female BALB/C mice were immunized with purified recombinant 3CL. Immunized mice developed antibodies that were capable of detecting each recombinant subunit in addition to native CS6 protein and also protected the mice against ETEC challenge. Moreover, sera from immunized mice also neutralized STa toxin in a suckling mouse assay. These results indicate that 3CL can induce anti-CF and neutralizing antitoxin antibodies along with introducing CFA/I as a platform for epitope insertion. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Binding of CFA/I Pili of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to Asialo-GM1 Is Mediated by the Minor Pilin CfaE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, T. P. Vipin; Riches, James D.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    CFA/I pili are representatives of a large family of related pili that mediate the adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli to intestinal epithelial cells. They are assembled via the alternate chaperone-usher pathway and consist of two subunits, CfaB, which makes up the pilus shaft and a single pilus tip-associated subunit, CfaE. The current model of pilus-mediated adherence proposes that CFA/I has two distinct binding activities; the CfaE subunit is responsible for binding to receptors of unknown structure on erythrocyte and intestinal epithelial cell surfaces, while CfaB binds to various glycosphingolipids, including asialo-GM1. In this report, we present two independent lines of evidence that, contrary to the existing model, CfaB does not bind to asialo-GM1 independently of CfaE. Neither purified CfaB subunits nor CfaB assembled into pili bind to asialo-GM1. Instead, we demonstrate that binding activity toward asialo-GM1 resides in CfaE and this is essential for pilus binding to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. We conclude that the binding activities of CFA/I pili for asialo-GM1, erythrocytes, and intestinal cells are inseparable, require the same amino acid residues in CfaE, and therefore depend on the same or very similar binding mechanisms. PMID:26975993

  19. Association of vitamin D status with incidence of enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli diarrhoea in children of urban Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A M S; Soares Magalhaes, R J; Long, K Z; Ahmed, T; Alam, Md A; Hossain, Md I; Islam, Md M; Mahfuz, M; Mondal, D; Haque, R; Mamun, A A

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the association between vitamin D status and diarrhoeal episodes by enterotoxigenic (ETEC), enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli in underweight and normal-weight children aged 6-24 months in urban Bangladesh. Cohorts of 446 normal-weight and 466 underweight children were tested separately for ETEC, EPEC and EAEC from diarrhoeal stool samples collected during 5 months of follow-up while considering vitamin D status at enrolment as the exposure. Cox proportional hazards models with unordered failure events of the same type were used to determine diarrhoeal risk factors after adjusting for sociodemographic and concurrent micronutrient status. Vitamin D status was not independently associated with the risk of incidence of ETEC, EPEC and EAEC diarrhoea in underweight children, but moderate-to-severe retinol deficiency was associated with reduced risk for EPEC diarrhoea upon adjustment. Among normal-weight children, insufficient vitamin D status and moderate-to-severe retinol deficiency were independently associated with 44% and 38% reduced risk of incidence of EAEC diarrhoea, respectively. These children were at higher risk of ETEC diarrhoea with vitamin D deficiency status when adjusted for micronutrient status only. This study demonstrates for the first time that normal-weight children with insufficient vitamin D status have a reduced risk of EAEC diarrhoea than children with sufficient status. Moderate-to-severe deficiency of serum retinol is associated with reduced risk of EPEC and EAEC diarrhoea in underweight and normal-weight children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Adherence, enterotoxigenicity, invasiveness and serogroups in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains from adult humans with acute enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, G B; Cervantes, L E; Sjögren, E; Kaijser, B; Ruiz-Palacios, G M

    1990-02-01

    Two hundred Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains from the same number of adult Swedish patients with acute enterocolitis were tested regarding adherence to and invasiveness in HEp-2 cells and for enterotoxigenicity by the CHO-cell assay. The serogroup characteristics, heat-stable and heat-labile, for each strain were also investigated. Eighty-four percent of the strains were classified as C. jejuni and 16 percent as C. coli. All of the strains were adherent to HEp-2 cells, 39% were invasive and 31.5% enterotoxigenic. We found significantly more invasive strains in the non-enterotoxigenic group than in the enterotoxigenic one. There would seem to be no correlation between enterotoxigenicity or invasiveness and serogroup. The results of this study suggest the existence of multiple mechanisms for C. jejuni- and C. coli-induced diarrhoea and that the mechanisms may differ from one strain to another.

  1. Effect of bovine colostrum feeding in comparison with milk replacer and natural feeding on the immune responses and colonisation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the intestinal tissue of piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Poulsen, Ann-Sofie Riis; Canibe, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of feeding bovine colostrum (BC) to piglets in comparison with feeding a milk replacer (MR) and conventional rearing by the sow on the intestinal immune system and number of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) colonising the intestinal tissue. Piglets......-fed and Sow-Milk groups. The expression level of IL-2 was higher (P≤ 0·051) in piglets from the MR-fed group than in those from the other treatment groups. In conclusion, feeding BC rather than MR to the piglets reduced the colonisation of intestine by ETEC and modulated the intestinal immune system, whereas...

  2. Oral administration of synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 improves growth performance and cecal microbial flora and down-regulates the expression of intestinal toll-like receptor-4 and inflammatory cytokines in weaned piglets challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiru; Xu, Ling; Shi, Baoshi; Deng, Huang; Lai, Xin; Liu, Jingyan; Sun, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic porcine beta-defensin-2 (pBD-2) was tested as an alternative to antimicrobial growth-promoters in pig production. Thirty 21-day weaned piglets were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, and orally dosed with either sterile water (CON), pBD-2 (BD) or neomycin sulphate (NS) twice daily for 21 days. pBD-2 and NS led to higher growth performance, jejunum villus height and increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-I compared with the CON group (P intestinal morphological indices in the same way as probiotics. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Biofilm formation and binding specificities of CFA/I, CFA/II and CS2 adhesions of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Cfae-R181A mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Iram; Sakellaris, Harry

    2012-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are leading causes of childhood diarrhea in developing countries. Adhesion is the first step in pathogenesis of ETEC infections and ETEC pili designated colonization factor antigens (CFAs) are believed to be important in the biofim formation, colonization and host cell adhesions. As a first step, we have determined the biofilm capability of ETEC expressing various types of pili (CFA/I, CfaE-R181A mutant/CfaE tip mutant, CFA/II and CS2). Further, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay were developed to compare the binding specificity of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1 - CS3) and CS2 of ETEC, using extracted pili and piliated bacteria. CFA/II strain (E24377a) as well as extracted pili exhibited significantly higher binding both in biofilm and ELISA assays compared to non piliated wild type E24377a, CFA/I and CS2 strains. This indicates that co-expression of two or more CS2 in same strain is more efficient in increasing adherence. Significant decrease in binding specificity of DH5αF'lacI (q)/∆cotD (CS2) strain and MC4100/pEU2124 (CfaE-R181A) mutant strain indicated the important contribution of tip proteins in adherence assays. However, CS2 tip mutant strain (DH5αF'lacI (q)/pEU5881) showed that this specific residue may not be important as adhesions in these strains. In summary, our data suggest that pili, their minor subunits are important for biofilm formation and adherence mechanisms. Overall, the functional reactivity of strains co expressing various antigens, particularly minor subunit antigen observed in this study suggest that fewer antibodies may be required to elicit immunity to ETEC expressing a wider array of related pili.

  4. Prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli on coriander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Segovia-Cruz, Jesús A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Salas-Rangel, Laura P; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence and behavior of multidrug-resistant diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes on coriander was determined. One hundred coriander samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli were determined using the most probable number procedure. Diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes (DEPs) were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to sixteen antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEPs strains by standard test. The behavior of multidrug-resistant DEPs isolated from coriander was determined on coriander leaves and chopped coriander at 25°± 2 °C and 3°± 2 °C. Generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 43 and 7% of samples. Nine DEPs strains were isolated from positive coriander samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC, 4%) enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC, 2%) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC, 1%). All isolated DEPs strains exhibited multi-resistance to antibiotics. On inoculated coriander leaves stored at 25°± 2 °C or 3°± 2 °C, no growth was observed for multidrug-resistant DEPs strains. However, multidrug-resistant DEPs strains grew in chopped coriander: after 24 h at 25° ± 2 °C, DEPs strains had grown to approximately 3 log CFU/g. However, at 3°± 2 °C the bacterial growth was inhibited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence and behavior of multidrug-resistant STEC, ETEC and EPEC on coriander and chopped coriander. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Murine immunization with CS21 pili or LngA major subunit of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) elicits systemic and mucosal immune responses and inhibits ETEC gut colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengxian; Iqbal, Junaid; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2017-04-01

    CS21 pili of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the most prevalent ETEC colonization factors. CS21 major subunit, LngA, mediates ETEC adherence to intestinal cells, and contributes to ETEC pathogenesis in a neonatal mouse infection model. The objectives of this work were to evaluate LngA major subunit purified protein and CS21 purified pili on immunogenicity and protection against ETEC colonization of mice intestine. Recombinant LngA purified protein or purified CS21 pili from E9034A ETEC strain were evaluated for immunogenicity after immunization of C57BL/6 mice. Specific anti-LngA antibodies were detected from mice serum, feces, and intestine fluid samples by ELISA assays. Protection against gut colonization was evaluated on immunized mice orally challenged with wild type E9034A ETEC strain and by subsequent quantification of bacterial colony forming units (CFU) recovered from feces. Recombinant LngA protein and CS21 pili induced specific humoral and mucosal anti-LngA antibodies in the mouse model. CS21 combined with CT delivered intranasally as well as LngA combined with incomplete Freund adjuvant delivered intraperitoneally inhibited ETEC gut colonization in a mouse model. In conclusion, both LngA purified protein and CS21 pili from ETEC are highly immunogenic and may inhibit ETEC intestinal shedding. Our data on immunogenicity and immunoprotection indicates that CS21 is a suitable vaccine candidate for a future multivalent vaccine against ETEC diarrhea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Combination of Egg Yolk IgY and Phosvitin Inhibits the Growth of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 and K99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujral, Naiyana; Yoo, Heejoo; Bamdad, Fatemeh; Lee, Kwang Y; Suh, Joo-Won; Sunwoo, Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the main cause of fatal diarrhea in piglets during the first week of life and over the time of weaning. Pathogenesis of ETEC-causing diarrhea involves intestinal colonization mediated by fimbriae. Although, both IgY and egg yolk phosvitin (PV) possess antimicrobial activity, their combined activity has not been explored. A combination of IgY specific for ETEC and metal-chelating PV may show synergistic effect in reducing the growth of ETEC by inhibiting bacterial proliferation and stipulating protection against ETEC infection. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of anti-ETEC IgY and PV on in vitro growth inhibition of ETEC strains possessing K88 and K99 fimbriae prevalent in the porcine population. Anti-K88 and -K99 IgY antibodies were obtained from egg yolks of 23-week-old Single- Comb White Leghorn hens immunized with K88 and K99 fimbriae of ETEC, respectively, with high titres sustained over 6 to 8 weeks of the immunization period. Specific IgY, PV, and PV-hydrolysate from alcalase-hydrolysis under high hydrostatic pressure (PVH-Alc-HHP) alone or in combination, were used to treat ETEC K88 and K99 cultures at optimal concentrations of 100 μg/mL, 1 mg/mL, and 1 mg/mL, respectively, for 24 h. PVH-Alc-HHP demonstrated the highest degree of hydrolysis, 38.9%. Combined use of IgY and PVH-Alc-HHP showed the highest bactericidal effect resulting in ETEC K88 and K99 growth inhibition of 2.8 and 2.67 log CFU/mL, respectively. Combined IgY-PVH effectively control ETEC, therefore holds a great potential for microbial control in veterinary pharmaceutical industry. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Biofilm formation and binding specificities of CFA/I, CFA/II and CS2 adhesions of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Cfae-R181A mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaqat, Iram; Sakellaris, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are leading causes of childhood diarrhea in developing countries. Adhesion is the first step in pathogenesis of ETEC infections and ETEC pili designated colonization factor antigens (CFAs) are believed to be important in the biofim formation, colonization and host cell adhesions. As a first step, we have determined the biofilm capability of ETEC expressing various types of pili (CFA/I, CfaE-R181A mutant/CfaE tip mutant, CFA/II and CS2). Further, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay were developed to compare the binding specificity of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1 - CS3) and CS2 of ETEC, using extracted pili and piliated bacteria. CFA/II strain (E24377a) as well as extracted pili exhibited significantly higher binding both in biofilm and ELISA assays compared to non piliated wild type E24377a, CFA/I and CS2 strains. This indicates that co-expression of two or more CS2 in same strain is more efficient in increasing adherence. Significant decrease in binding specificity of DH5αF’lacIq/∆cotD (CS2) strain and MC4100/pEU2124 (CfaE-R181A) mutant strain indicated the important contribution of tip proteins in adherence assays. However, CS2 tip mutant strain (DH5αF’lacIq/pEU5881) showed that this specific residue may not be important as adhesions in these strains. In summary, our data suggest that pili, their minor subunits are important for biofilm formation and adherence mechanisms. Overall, the functional reactivity of strains co expressing various antigens, particularly minor subunit antigen observed in this study suggest that fewer antibodies may be required to elicit immunity to ETEC expressing a wider array of related pili. PMID:24031915

  8. Clonal relatedness of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains expressing LT and CS17 isolated from children with diarrhoea in La Paz, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas, Claudia; Klena, John D; Nicklasson, Matilda; Iniguez, Volga; Sjöling, Asa

    2011-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of traveller's and infantile diarrhoea in the developing world. ETEC produces two toxins, a heat-stable toxin (known as ST) and a heat-labile toxin (LT) and colonization factors that help the bacteria to attach to epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized a subset of ETEC clinical isolates recovered from Bolivian children under 5 years of age using a combination of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, virulence typing, serotyping and antimicrobial resistance test patterns in order to determine the genetic background of ETEC strains circulating in Bolivia. We found that strains expressing the heat-labile (LT) enterotoxin and colonization factor CS17 were common and belonged to several MLST sequence types but mainly to sequence type-423 and sequence type-443 (Achtman scheme). To further study the LT/CS17 strains we analysed the nucleotide sequence of the CS17 operon and compared the structure to LT/CS17 ETEC isolates from Bangladesh. Sequence analysis confirmed that all sequence type-423 strains from Bolivia had a single nucleotide polymorphism; SNP(bol) in the CS17 operon that was also found in some other MLST sequence types from Bolivia but not in strains recovered from Bangladeshi children. The dominant ETEC clone in Bolivia (sequence type-423/SNP(bol)) was found to persist over multiple years and was associated with severe diarrhoea but these strains were variable with respect to antimicrobial resistance patterns. The results showed that although the LT/CS17 phenotype is common among ETEC strains in Bolivia, multiple clones, as determined by unique MLST sequence types, populate this phenotype. Our data also appear to suggest that acquisition and loss of antimicrobial resistance in LT-expressing CS17 ETEC clones is more dynamic than acquisition or loss of virulence factors.

  9. The 987P gene cluster in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli contains an STpa transposon that activates 987P expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, P; Woodward, M J; van Zijderveld, F G; de Graaf, F K

    1990-03-01

    The genetic determinant for the production of 987P fimbriae has been cloned into pBR322. Analysis of frequently occurring deletions in the resultant recombinant plasmid, pPK180, revealed that the 987P gene cluster contains a transposon that encodes the synthesis of heat-stable enterotoxin STpa and is flanked by inverted repeats of IS1. Hybridization experiments with STpa- and 987P-specific probes demonstrated that a variety of STpa+ 987P+ wild-type Escherichia coli strains contained contiguous STpa-987P DNA, most likely on their chromosome. Transcription of the 987P gene cluster appeared to be activated by the adjacent IS1 element.

  10. Clostridium perfringens: Comparative effects of heat and osmotic stress on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbona, Cinthia Carolina; Stagnitta, Patricia Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens isolates associated with food poisoning carries a chromosomal cpe gene, while non-foodborne human gastrointestinal disease isolates carry a plasmid cpe gene. The enterotoxigenic strains tested produced vegetative cells and spores with significantly higher resistance than non-enterotoxigenic strains. These results suggest that the vegetative cells and spores have a competitive advantage over non-enterotoxigenic strains. However, no explanation has been provided for the significant associations between chromosomal cpe genotypes with the high resistance, which could explain the strong relationship between chromosomal cpe isolates and C. perfringens type A food poisoning. Here, we analyse the action of physical and chemical agent on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic regional strains. And this study tested the relationship between the sensitivities of spores and their levels SASPs (small acid soluble proteins) production in the same strains examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of lng mutations on LngA expression, processing and CS21 assembly in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli E9034A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeus Saldaña-Ahuactzi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is a major cause of morbidity in children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries and a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea worldwide. The ability of ETEC to colonize the intestinal epithelium is mediated by fimbrial adhesins, such as CS21 (Longus. This adhesin is a type IVb pilus involved in adherence to intestinal cells in vitro and bacterial self-aggregation. Fourteen open reading frames have been proposed to be involved in CS21 assembly, hitherto only the lngA and lngB genes, coding for the major (LngA and minor (LngB structural subunit, have been characterized. In this study, we investigated the role of the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins in the assembly of CS21 in ETEC strain E9034A. The deletion of the lngA, lngB, lngC, lngD, lngH, or lngP genes, abolished CS21 assembly in ETEC strain E9034A and adherence to HT-29 cells was reduced 90%, compared to wild-type strain. Subcellular localization prediction of CS21 proteins was similar to other well-known type IV pili homologues. We showed that LngP is the prepilin peptidase of LngA, and that ETEC strain E9034A has another peptidase capable of processing LngA, although with less efficiency. Additionally, we present immuno-electron microscopy imagens to show that the LngB protein could be localized at the tip of CS21, and probably helps to control CS21 length. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the LngA, LngB, LngC, LngD, LngH, and LngP proteins are essential for CS21 assembly, as well as for bacterial aggregation and adherence to HT-29 cells.

  12. Combined effects of chitosan and microencapsulated Enterococcus faecalis CG1.0007 probiotic supplementation on performance and diarrhea incidences in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88+ challenged piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolawole Aluko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the combined effects of chitosan oligosaccharide (COS and a microencapsulated Enterococcus faecalis CG1.0007 probiotic (PRO on growth performance and diarrhea incidences in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC K88+ challenged piglets in a 14-d study. Thirty piglets, 7.19 ± 0.52 kg initial BW weaned at 21 ± 1 d, were allotted to 5 treatment groups (n = 6 consisting of a corn–soybean meal diet with no additive (negative control, NC, NC + 0.25% chlortetracycline (positive control, PC, NC + 400 mg/kg COS (COS, NC + 100 mg/kg PRO (PRO and NC + a combination of COS and PRO (CPRO. Pigs were individually housed in cages, acclimated to treatments for a 7-d period and had ad libitum access to feed and water throughout the study. On d 8, pigs were weighed, blood samples were collected, and then orally challenged with 6 mL (1 × 1011 cfu/mL of freshly grown ETEC inoculum. During post-challenge period, blood was sampled at 24 and 48 h to determine plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, and diarrhea incidences and fecal consistency scores were recorded from d 9 to 12. On d 14, all pigs were weighed and then euthanized to obtain intestinal tissue samples for histomorphometric measurements. Growth performance responses were similar among treatments during the pre- and post-challenge periods. There were no significant differences in PUN content, incidences of diarrhea, and fecal consistency scores among treatments. The intestinal histomorphology results did not differ significantly among treatments except for PC with increased (P = 0.0001 villus:crypt ratio compared with the NC. Under the conditions of the present study, it can be concluded that supplementation of piglet diets with 400 mg/kg COS, 100 mg/kg microencapsulated PRO or their combination did not significantly improve piglet growth performance both during the pre- and post-ETEC K88+ oral inoculation. Also, there were no significant reduction

  13. Persistent Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Infection Enhances Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88 Adhesion by Promoting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Dai, Lei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2017-11-01

    Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a coronavirus characterized by diarrhea and high morbidity rates, and the mortality rate is 100% in piglets less than 2 weeks old. Pigs infected with TGEV often suffer secondary infection by other pathogens, which aggravates the severity of diarrhea, but the mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that persistent TGEV infection stimulates the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) can more easily adhere to generating cells. Intestinal epithelial cells are the primary targets of TGEV and ETEC infections. We found that TGEV can persistently infect porcine intestinal columnar epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and cause EMT, consistent with multiple changes in key cell characteristics. Infected cells display fibroblast-like shapes; exhibit increases in levels of mesenchymal markers with a corresponding loss of epithelial markers; have enhanced expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNAs; and demonstrate increases in migratory and invasive behaviors. Additional experiments showed that the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways via TGF-β is critical for the TGEV-mediated EMT process. Cellular uptake is also modified in cells that have undergone EMT. TGEV-infected cells have higher levels of integrin α5 and fibronectin and exhibit enhanced ETEC K88 adhesion. Reversal of EMT reduces ETEC K88 adhesion and inhibits the expression of integrin α5 and fibronectin. Overall, these results suggest that TGEV infection induces EMT in IPEC-J2 cells, increasing the adhesion of ETEC K88 in the intestine and facilitating dual infection. IMPORTANCE Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) causes pig diarrhea and is often followed by secondary infection by other pathogens. In this study, we showed

  14. Modulatory effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on intestinal mucosal immunity and microbial community of weaned piglets challenged by an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunlan; Wang, Youming; Sun, Rui; Qiao, Xiangjin; Shang, Xiaoya; Niu, Weining

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial pathogens and trigger immune response, but their regulation by neuropeptide-vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in weaned piglets infected by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) K88 remains unexplored. Therefore, the study was conducted to investigate its role using a model of early weaned piglets infected by ETEC K88. Male Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire piglets (n = 24) were randomly divided into control, ETEC K88, VIP, and ETEC K88+VIP groups. On the first three days, ETEC K88 and ETEC K88+VIP groups were orally administrated with ETEC K88, other two groups were given sterile medium. Then each piglet from VIP and ETEC K88+VIP group received 10 nmol VIP intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily, on day four and six. On the seventh day, the piglets were sacrificed. The results indicated that administration of VIP improved the growth performance, reduced diarrhea incidence of ETEC K88 challenged pigs, and mitigated the histopathological changes of intestine. Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-γ and TNF-α in the ETEC K88+ VIP group were significantly reduced compared with those in the ETEC group. VIP significantly increased IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β and S-IgA production compared with the ETEC K88 group. Besides, VIP could inhibit the expression of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, NF-κB p65 and the phosphorylation of IκB-α, p-ERK, p-JNK, and p-38 induced by ETEC K88. Moreover, VIP could upregulate the expression of occludin in the ileum mucosa compared with the ETEC K88 group. Colon and caecum content bacterial richness and diversity were lower for pigs in the ETEC group than the unchallenged groups. These results demonstrate that VIP is beneficial for the maturation of the intestinal mucosal immune system and elicited local immunomodulatory activities. The TLR2/4-MyD88 mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway may be critical to the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect of VIP on intestinal mucosal immune function and

  15. Modulatory effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on intestinal mucosal immunity and microbial community of weaned piglets challenged by an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlan Xu

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs recognize microbial pathogens and trigger immune response, but their regulation by neuropeptide-vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP in weaned piglets infected by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC K88 remains unexplored. Therefore, the study was conducted to investigate its role using a model of early weaned piglets infected by ETEC K88. Male Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire piglets (n = 24 were randomly divided into control, ETEC K88, VIP, and ETEC K88+VIP groups. On the first three days, ETEC K88 and ETEC K88+VIP groups were orally administrated with ETEC K88, other two groups were given sterile medium. Then each piglet from VIP and ETEC K88+VIP group received 10 nmol VIP intraperitoneally (i.p. once daily, on day four and six. On the seventh day, the piglets were sacrificed. The results indicated that administration of VIP improved the growth performance, reduced diarrhea incidence of ETEC K88 challenged pigs, and mitigated the histopathological changes of intestine. Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-γ and TNF-α in the ETEC K88+ VIP group were significantly reduced compared with those in the ETEC group. VIP significantly increased IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β and S-IgA production compared with the ETEC K88 group. Besides, VIP could inhibit the expression of TLR2, TLR4, MyD88, NF-κB p65 and the phosphorylation of IκB-α, p-ERK, p-JNK, and p-38 induced by ETEC K88. Moreover, VIP could upregulate the expression of occludin in the ileum mucosa compared with the ETEC K88 group. Colon and caecum content bacterial richness and diversity were lower for pigs in the ETEC group than the unchallenged groups. These results demonstrate that VIP is beneficial for the maturation of the intestinal mucosal immune system and elicited local immunomodulatory activities. The TLR2/4-MyD88 mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway may be critical to the mechanism underlying the modulatory effect of VIP on intestinal mucosal immune

  16. Active oral immunization of suckling piglets to prevent colonization after weaning by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with fimbriae F18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschinger, H U; Nief, V; Tschäpe, H

    2000-02-01

    Immunoprophylaxis of porcine oedema disease and post-weaning diarrhoea caused by strains of Escherichia coli expressing fimbriae F18 is an unsolved problem. The study was designed to examine whether vaccination with a live F18ac vaccine of unweaned pigs born to sows with F18ac antibody in the colostrum requires preformed fimbriae in the vaccine, and whether protection against the heterologous fimbrial variant F18ab is induced as well. Genetically susceptible pigs were vaccinated orally on three consecutive days, beginning 10 days before weaning with 10(11) CFU of an F18ac culture. Challenge with a dose of 10(7) CFU of E. coli F18 on three consecutive days was initiated 9 or 11 days after weaning. Eighteen pigs given the fimbriated F18ac vaccine and challenged with a strain of the homologous fimbrial variant were protected against colonization; mean faecal viable counts of the challenge strain were >3 log10 lower than those from the 17 non-vaccinated control pigs. The vaccinated pigs developed a significant rise of F18ac IgA serum antibodies. The 23 pigs which had received the non-fimbriated vaccine showed no significant protection and exhibited much lower serum F18ac IgA ELISA reactivities. Eighteen pigs vaccinated with the fimbriated F18ac and challenged with an F18ab strain had faecal viable counts nearly as high as those from 16 non-vaccinated control pigs. It is concluded that only oral vaccines having preformed fimbriae induce protection limited to the homologous fimbrial variant.

  17. New vaccine strategies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: II: Enhanced systemic and secreted antibody responses against the CFA/I fimbriae by priming with DNA and boosting with a live recombinant Salmonella vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Lásaro

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The induction of systemic (IgG and mucosal (IgA antibody responses against the colonization factor I antigen (CFA/I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC was evaluated in mice primed with an intramuscularly delivered CFA/I-encoding DNA vaccine followed by two oral immunizations with a live recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain expressing the ETEC antigen. The booster effect induced by the oral immunization was detected two weeks and one year after the administration of the DNA vaccine. The DNA-primed/Salmonella-boosted vaccination regime showed a synergistic effect on the induced CFA/I-specific systemic and secreted antibody levels which could not be attained by either immunization strategy alone. These results suggest that the combined use of DNA vaccines and recombinant Salmonella vaccine strains can be a useful immunization strategy against enteric pathogens.

  18. Effects of dietary administering chitosan on growth performance, jejunal morphology, jejunal mucosal sIgA, occludin, claudin-1 and TLR4 expression in weaned piglets challenged by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dingfu; Tang, Zhiru; Yin, Yulong; Zhang, Bin; Hu, Xionggui; Feng, Zemeng; Wang, Jinquan

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how chitosan (COS) affects intestinal mucosal barrier function and to further explain mechanisms of COS on growth performance. Thirty piglets, weaned at 21 days of age, were challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli during preliminary trial period. Three groups of Piglets in individual pens were fed a corn-soybean meal diet containing no addition, 50 mg/kg chlortetracycline, or 300 mg/kg COS for 21 days. Jejunal morphology and histology were analyzed under light microscope. The concentrations of occludin proteins were determined by western blot. Immunohistochemistry assays were used to determine secretory immunoglobulin (sIgA) level. Real-time PCR was used to detect Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Claudin-1 in jejunal mucosa. Feeding COS or chlortetracycline reduced (Ppiglet growth and reducing intestinal inflammation, but different effects on intestinal mucosal barrier function. This indicates that chitosan can replace chlortetracycline as a feed additive for piglets. © 2013.

  19. Determination of the optimum standardised ileal digestible sulphur amino acids to lysine ratio in weaned pigs challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capozzalo, M. M.; Resink, J. W.; Htoo, J. K.

    2017-01-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that pigs challenged with an enterotoxigenic strain of E. coli (ETEC) would require a higher sulphur amino acids (SAA) to Lys ratio (SAA:Lys). Pigs (n = 120) weighing 7.4 ± 0.52 kg (mean ± SD) and weaned at 27 d (Pietrain genotype, mixed sex) were stratified...

  20. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen

    2016-01-01

    -spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues...... previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass...

  1. Genetic Fusions of Heat-Labile Toxoid (LT) and Heat-Stable Toxin b (STb) of Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Elicit Protective Anti-LT and Anti-STb Antibodies ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-associated diarrhea causes a substantial economic loss to swine producers worldwide. The majority of ETEC strains causing porcine diarrhea, especially postweaning diarrhea (PWD), produce heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin b (STb). LT is commonly used in vaccine development, but STb has not been included because of its poor immunogenicity. As a virulence factor in porcine diarrhea, STb needs to be included as an antigen for development of broad-spectrum vaccines. In this study, we used an LT toxoid (LTR192G [hereafter, LT192]) derived from porcine ETEC to carry a mature STb peptide for LT192-STb fusions to enhance STb immunogenicity for potential vaccine application. Anti-LT and anti-STb antibodies were detected in immunized rabbits and pigs. In addition, when challenged with an STb-positive ETEC strain, all 10 suckling piglets borne by immunized gilts remained healthy, whereas 7 out 9 piglets borne by unimmunized gilts developed moderate diarrhea. This study indicates that the LT192-STb fusion enhanced anti-STb immunogenicity and suggests the LT192-STb fusion antigen can be used in future vaccine development against porcine ETEC diarrhea. PMID:20505006

  2. An increased ratio of dietary tryptophan to lysine improves feed efficiency and elevates plasma tryptophan and kynurenine in the absence of antimicrobials and regardless of infection with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzalo, M M; Kim, J C; Htoo, J K; de Lange, C F M; Mullan, B P; Hansen, C F; Resink, J W; Stumbles, P A; Hampson, D J; Pluske, J R

    2012-12-01

    This experiment examined if a higher ratio of dietary Trp:Lys in the absence of antimicrobials improves production indices and modulates diarrhea in weaned pigs infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). Effects of the Trp:Lys ratio on plasma levels of Trp and its metabolite kynurenine (Kyn) were also examined. Individually housed mixed-sex pigs (n = 72) weaned at 21 d of age (Landrace × Large White; initial BW of 6.3 ± 0.32 kg) were stratified into 1 of 6 treatments (n = 12) according to a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of (i) infection or without infection with ETEC and (ii) 3 dietary standardized ileal digestible (SID) Trp:Lys ratios of 0.17, 0.21, or 0.26 in a randomized complete block design. Pigs were fed diets (10.4 MJ NE; 1.24% SID Lys; 19.5% CP) ad libitum for 3 wk after weaning. Pigs were infected with ETEC (O149:K98:K88) at 72, 96, and 120 h after weaning and then bled on day 11. A Trp:Lys ratio of 0.26 improved (P = 0.021) G:F over the study period compared to other ratios, without an infection effect (P > 0.05). Treatments did not affect ADG or ADFI (P > 0.05). Infection increased (P = 0.039) the diarrhea index and increased fecal consistency scores (P = 0.010). Plasma Trp and Kyn were lower (P ratios of 0.21 and 0.26 and were not affected (P > 0.05) by infection. In conclusion, in the absence of antimicrobials, increasing the dietary Trp:Lys ratio to 0.26 improved G:F after weaning and increased plasma levels of Trp and Kyn.

  3. Passive antibodies derived from intramuscularly immunized toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT protect against STa+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) diarrhea in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Rahul M; Duan, Qiangde; Wang, Yin; Zhang, Weiping

    2017-01-23

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of children's diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea. Developing effective vaccines against ETEC associated diarrhea becomes a top priority. ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin (STa) toxoid fusion 3xSTa N12S -dmLT was demonstrated recently to induce neutralizing antitoxin antibodies in intraperitoneally or subcutaneously immunized mice. However, whether antibodies derived from this toxoid fusion are protective against ETEC diarrhea has not been examined. In this study, we intramuscularly immunized pregnant gilts with toxoid fusion 3xSTa N12S -dmLT, challenged suckling piglets with a STa-positive ETEC strain, and assessed protective efficacy of passive acquire antitoxin antibodies against ETEC diarrhea. Data showed all three immunized gilts developed anti-STa IgG and IgA antibodies, and piglets born to the immunized dams acquired anti-STa and anti-LT antibodies. When challenged with a STa+ ETEC strain, none of the piglets born to the immunized dams developed watery diarrhea, with 20 piglets remained normal and the other 8 piglets developed mild diarrhea indicated with stained butt. In contrast, the control dams and born piglets had no anti-STa or anti-LT antibodies detected, and 26 out 32 piglets developed watery diarrhea after challenge of the STa+ ETEC strain. These results indicated that passive acquired anti-STa antibodies are protective against ETEC diarrhea, and suggested potential application of toxoid fusion 3xSTa N12S -dmLT in ETEC vaccine development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Presence of Multidrug-Resistant Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, Enteropathogenic E. coli and Enterotoxigenic E. coli, on Raw Nopalitos (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) and in Nopalitos Salads from Local Retail Markets in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Cerna-Cortes, Jorge F; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Torres-Vitela, Mdel Refugio; Villarruel-López, Angelica; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Eduardo J; Castro-Rosas, Javier

    2016-05-01

    The presence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria in food is a significant public health concern. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEPs) are foodborne bacteria. In Mexico, DEPs have been associated with diarrheal illness. There is no information about the presence of multidrug-resistant DEPs on fresh vegetables and in cooked vegetable salads in Mexico. "Nopalitos" (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) is a Cactacea extensively used as a fresh green vegetable throughout Mexico. The presence of generic E. coli and multidrug-resistant DEPs on raw whole and cut nopalitos and in nopalitos salad samples was determined. One hundred raw whole nopalitos (without prickles) samples, 100 raw nopalitos cut into small square samples, and 100 cooked nopalitos salad samples were collected from markets. Generic E. coli was determined using the most probable number procedures. DEPs were identified using two multiplex polymerase chain reaction procedures. Susceptibility to 16 antibiotics was tested for the isolated DEP strains by standard test. Of the 100 whole nopalitos samples, 100 cut nopalitos samples, and 100 nopalitos salad samples, generic E. coli and DEPs were identified, respectively, in 80% and 10%, 74% and 10%, and 64% and 8%. Eighty-two DEP strains were isolated from positive nopalitos samples. The identified DEPs included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). All isolated strains exhibited resistance to at least six antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of multidrug-resistant and antibiotic resistance profiles of STEC, ETEC, and EPEC on raw nopalitos and in nopalitos salads in Mexico.

  5. Clinical trial to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of an oral inactivated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli prototype vaccine containing CFA/I overexpressing bacteria and recombinantly produced LTB/CTB hybrid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, A; Leach, S; Tobias, J; Carlin, N; Gustafsson, B; Jertborn, M; Bourgeois, L; Walker, R; Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-02-06

    We have developed a new oral vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) diarrhea containing killed recombinant E. coli bacteria expressing increased levels of ETEC colonization factors (CFs) and a recombinant protein (LCTBA), i.e. a hybrid between the binding subunits of E. coli heat labile toxin (LTB) and cholera toxin (CTB). We describe a randomized, comparator controlled, double-blind phase I trial in 60 adult Swedish volunteers of a prototype of this vaccine. The safety and immunogenicity of the prototype vaccine, containing LCTBA and an E. coli strain overexpressing the colonization factor CFA/I, was compared to a previously developed oral ETEC vaccine, consisting of CTB and inactivated wild type ETEC bacteria expressing CFA/I (reference vaccine). Groups of volunteers were given two oral doses of either the prototype or the reference vaccine; the prototype vaccine was administered at the same or a fourfold higher dosage than the reference vaccine. The prototype vaccine was found to be safe and equally well-tolerated as the reference vaccine at either dosage tested. The prototype vaccine induced mucosal IgA (fecal secretory IgA and intestine-derived IgA antibody secreting cell) responses to both LTB and CFA/I, as well as serum IgA and IgG antibody responses to LTB. Immunization with LCTBA resulted in about twofold higher mucosal and systemic IgA responses against LTB than a comparable dose of CTB. The higher dose of the prototype vaccine induced significantly higher fecal and systemic IgA responses to LTB and fecal IgA responses to CFA/I than the reference vaccine. These results demonstrate that CF over-expression and inclusion of the LCTBA hybrid protein in an oral inactivated ETEC vaccine does not change the safety profile when compared to a previous generation of such a vaccine and that the prototype vaccine induces significant dose dependent mucosal immune responses against CFA/I and LTB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [The relationship of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni enterotoxigenicity and the increase of cAMP and electrolyte changes in the rat intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, H; Toro, J

    1998-08-01

    Small intestine alterations produced by the enterotoxigenic capacity of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni are similar to the hydric, electrolytic and pathological changes caused by choleraic and thermolabile Escherichia coli toxins. To study the enterotoxigenic capacity of 4 strains of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni using the intestinal loop model. Rat intestinal loops were inoculated with culture filtrates of the four strains. Enterotoxigenicity was assessed by fluid accumulation, the increase in Na+ and Cl- in the loop fluid, and cAMP increase in loop tissues. An enterotoxigenic Escherichia coil strain and sterile Brucella both were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The filtrates of two strains produced fluid accumulation in the loops, significantly increased Na+ and Cl- secretion to the intestinal lumen and increased tissue cAMP levels. Some strains of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni are able to show enterotoxigenicity in vivo, increasing cAMP levels in the intestinal cells and altering electrolyte exchange mechanisms.

  7. Genetic fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) and a toxoid fusion of heat-stable toxin (STa) and heat-labile toxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) retain broad anti-CFA and antitoxin antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  8. Genetic fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen and a toxoid fusion of heat-stable toxin (STa and heat-labile toxin (LT of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC retain broad anti-CFA and antitoxin antigenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosai Ruan

    Full Text Available Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2:243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3, CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5:1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in

  9. Genetic Fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (Multiepitope Fusion Antigen) and a Toxoid Fusion of Heat-Stable Toxin (STa) and Heat-Labile Toxin (LT) of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) Retain Broad Anti-CFA and Antitoxin Antigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A.; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  10. Genetic Relatedness Among Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from Food Products for Human Consumption in Cartagena, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amézquita-Montes, Zorangel; Tamborski, Maria; Kopsombut, Usa G; Zhang, Chengxian; Arzuza, Octavio S; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne pathogens are a leading cause of mild-to-severe gastrointestinal illnesses worldwide. Escherichia coli pathotypes have been known to cause gastrointestinal illnesses in children less than 5 years old in Colombia. However, insufficient information is available on the prevalence of E. coli contamination of food products and the kind of E. coli food product reservoirs. The two objectives of this study were designed to address this issue. The first objective was to ascertain coliform, E. coli, and pathogenic E. coli contamination of food products readily available for human consumption in Cartagena, Colombia. The second objective was to evaluate the relationship between pathogenic E. coli isolated from food products and those isolated from cases of diarrhea in children. Food product samples consisting of pasteurized milk, unpasteurized fruit juice, ground beef, cheese, and vegetables were obtained at four retail stores. The food samples were cultured in liquid media and tested for the presence of coliforms and E. coli. E. coli isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of pathogenic E. coli. Coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathotypes contamination were detected in 88.4%, 53%, and 2.1% of food product samples, respectively. Ground beef and cheese were the only food samples contaminated with E. coli intestinal pathotypes including enteropathogenic (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing (STEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Closed multilocus sequencing typing relationships between diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from food products and from individuals with diarrhea suggest that food products readily available at public markets in Cartagena can transmit ETEC and possibly EPEC and STEC. We demonstrated that a high proportion of food products for human consumption available at public markets in Cartagena are contaminated with coliforms, E. coli, and E. coli intestinal pathogens. Furthermore, food products containing E. coli intestinal

  11. An Evidenced-Based Scale of Disease Severity following Human Challenge with Enteroxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad K Porter

    Full Text Available Experimental human challenge models have played a major role in enhancing our understanding of infectious diseases. Primary outcomes have typically utilized overly simplistic outcomes that fail to entirely account for complex illness syndromes. We sought to characterize clinical outcomes associated with experimental infection with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC and to develop a disease score.Data were obtained from prior controlled human ETEC infection studies. Correlation and univariate regression across sign and symptom severity was performed. A multiple correspondence analysis was conducted. A 3-parameter disease score with construct validity was developed in an iterative fashion, compared to standard outcome definitions and applied to prior vaccine challenge trials.Data on 264 subjects receiving seven ETEC strains at doses from 1x105 to 1x1010 cfu were used to construct a standardized dataset. The strongest observed correlation was between vomiting and nausea (r = 0.65; however, stool output was poorly correlated with subjective activity-impacting outcomes. Multiple correspondence analyses showed covariability in multiple signs and symptoms, with severity being the strongest factor corresponding across outcomes. The developed disease score performed well compared to standard outcome definitions and differentiated disease in vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects.Frequency and volumetric definitions of diarrhea severity poorly characterize ETEC disease. These data support a disease severity score accounting for stool output and other clinical signs and symptoms. Such a score could serve as the basis for better field trial outcomes and gives an additional outcome measure to help select future vaccines that warrant expanded testing in pivotal pre-licensure trials.

  12. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesin-toxoid MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) CFA/I/II/IV-3xSTaN12S-mnLTG192G/L211A derived antibodies inhibit adherence of seven adhesins (CFA/I, CFA/II & CFA/IV), neutralize enterotoxicity of both toxins (LT & STa), and protect piglets against diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Rahul; Ruan, Xiaosai; Lu, Ti; Duan, Qiangde; Sack, David; Zhang, Weiping

    2017-12-20

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a leading cause of children's diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea. Vaccines inducing antibodies to broadly inhibit bacterial adherence and to neutralize toxin enterotoxicity are expected effective against ETEC-associated diarrhea. 6xHis-tagged adhesin-toxoid fusion proteins were shown to induce neutralizing antibodies to several adhesins and LT and STa toxins (X. Ruan, DA Sack, W. Zhang, PLoS ONE, 10:e0121623, 2015). However, antibodies derived from his-tagged CFA/I/II/IV-2xSTaA14Q-dmLT or CFA/I/II/IV-2xSTaN12S-dmLT protein were less effective in neutralizing STa enterotoxicity and were not evaluated in vivo for efficacy against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, his-tagged proteins are considered less desirable for human vaccines. In this study, we produced a tag-less adhesin-toxoid MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) protein, enhanced anti-STa immunogenicity by including a third copy of STa toxoid STaN12S, and examined antigen immunogenicity in a murine model. Moreover, we immunized pregnant pigs with the tag-less adhesin-toxoid MEFA protein and evaluated passive antibody protection against STa+ or LT+ ETEC infection in a pig challenge model. Results showed that tag-less adhesin-toxoid MEFA CFA/I/II/IV-3xSTaN12S-mnLTR192G/L211A induced broad anti-adhesin and antitoxin antibody responses in the intraperitoneally immunized mice and the intramuscularly immunized pigs. Mouse and pig serum antibodies significantly inhibited adherence of seven CFA adhesins (CFA/I, CS1 to CS6) and effectively neutralized both toxins. More importantly, suckling piglets born to the immunized mothers acquired antibodies and were protected against STa+ ETEC and LT+ ETEC diarrhea. These results indicated tag-less CFA/I/II/IV-3xSTaN12S-mnLTR192G/L211A induced broadly protective anti-adhesin and antitoxin antibodies and suggested this adhesin-toxoid MEFA a potential antigen for developing broadly protective ETEC vaccines. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  13. Isolation of Enterotoxigenic E. coli from Food-Handlers in Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 3866 stool samples from food-handlers from tourist hotels in Nairobi were screened for the presence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). This was done using the “salting out” (hydrophobicity) technique. Results showed an ETEC carriage of 3.4% among the tested hotel food-handlers. This is significant in ...

  14. Pigs experimentally infected with an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli have improved feed efficiency and indicators of inflammation with dietary supplementation of tryptophan and methionine in the immediate post-weaning period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capozzalo, Meeka M; Kim, Jae Cheol; Htoo, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that pigs challenged with an enterotoxigenic strain of E. coli (ETEC) will improve performance by dietary supplementation of sulfur amino acids (SAA) and tryptophan (Trp) above the current recommended levels in the immediate post-weaning period. Male pigs (n ...... of inflammation and SAA supplementation decreased the pro-inflammatory interferon-gamma response and improved protein utilisation, as measured by PU, whereas supplementation with both Trp and SAA improved feed conversion ratio....... interferon-gamma regardless of dietary Trp or day of sampling (P = 0.043). Increasing dietary SAA decreased plasma urea (PU) levels on Days 5, 8 and 14 (P

  15. Enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens: Detection and Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the genetics of enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens, including whole genome sequencing of a chromosomal cpe strain and sequencing of several cpe-carrying large plasmids, have led to the development of molecular approaches to more precisely investigate isolates involved in human gastrointestinal diseases and isolates present in the environment. Sequence-based PCR genotyping of the cpe locus (cpe genotyping PCR assays) has provided new information about cpe-positive type A C. perfringens including: 1) Foodborne C. perfringens outbreaks can be caused not only by chromosomal cpe type A strains with extremely heat-resistant spores, but also less commonly by less heat-resistant spore-forming plasmid cpe type A strains; 2) Both chromosomal cpe and plasmid cpe C. perfringens type A strains can be found in retail foods, healthy human feces and the environment, such as in sewage; 3) Most environmental cpe-positive C. perfringens type A strains carry their cpe gene on plasmids. Moreover, recent studies indicated that the cpe loci of type C, D, and E strains differ from the cpe loci of type A strains and from the cpe loci of each other, indicating that the cpe loci of C. perfringens have remarkable diversity. Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) indicated that the chromosomal cpe strains responsible for most food poisoning cases have distinct genetic characteristics that provide unique biological properties, such as the formation of highly heat-resistant spores. These and future advances should help elucidate the epidemiology of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens and also contribute to the prevention of C. perfringens food poisoning outbreaks and other CPE-associated human diseases. PMID:22504431

  16. Pigs experimentally infected with an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli have improved feed efficiency and indicators of inflammation with dietary supplementation of tryptophan and methionine in the immediate post-weaning period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capozzalo, Meeka M; Kim, Jae Cheol; Htoo, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    dietary SAA reduced plasma levels of interferon-gamma regardless of dietary Trp or day of sampling (P = 0.043). Increasing dietary SAA decreased plasma urea (PU) levels on Days 5, 8 and 14 (P indicate that Trp supplementation reduced the intensity......This experiment tested the hypothesis that pigs challenged with an enterotoxigenic strain of E. coli (ETEC) will improve performance by dietary supplementation of sulfur amino acids (SAA) and tryptophan (Trp) above the current recommended levels in the immediate post-weaning period. Male pigs (n...... conversion ratio, and combined supplementation of SAA and Trp further improved FCR than individual supplementation of either SAA or Trp (P = 0.092). Dietary treatments had no impact on the incidence of post-weaning diarrhoea (P > 0.05). Increasing SAA increased shedding of ETEC on Days 12 and 14 after...

  17. Specific binding of lactoferrin to Escherichia coli isolated from human intestinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S.S.; Erdei, J.; Forsgren, A.; Naidu, A.S. (Departments of Medical Microbiology, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden)); Czirok, E.; Gado, I. (National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest (Hungary)); Kalfas, S. (School of Dentistry, University of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden)); Thoren, A. (Infectious Diseases, Malmoe General Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    The degrees of human lactoferrin (HLf) and bovine lactoferrin (BLf) binding in 169 Escherichia coli strains isolated from human intestinal infections, and in an additional 68 strains isolated from healthy individuals, were examined in a {sup 125}I-labelled protein binding assay. The binding was expressed as a percentage calculated from the total labelled ligand added to bacteria. The HLf and BLf binding to E. coli was in the range 3.7 to 73.4% and 4.8 to 61.6%, respectively. Enterotoxigenic strains demonstrated a significantly higher HLf binding (median = 19%) than enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, enterohaemorrhagic strains or normal intestinal E. coli isolates (medians 6 to 9). Enteropathogenic strains belonging to serotypes O44 and O127 demonstrated significantly higher HLf binding compared to O26, O55, O111, O119 and O126. No significant differences in the degree of HLf or BLf binding were found between aerobactin-producing and non-producing strains. The interaction was further characterized in a high Lf-binging EPEC strain, E34663 (serotype O127). The binding was stable in the pH range 4.0 to 7.5, did not dissociate in the presence of 2M NaCl or 2M urea, and reached saturation within two h. Unlabelled HLf and BLf displaced the {sup 125}I-HLf binding to E34663 in a dose-dependent manner. Apo- and iron-saturated forms of Lf demonstrated similar binding to E34663. Among various unlabelled subephithelial matrix proteins and carbohydrates tested (in 10{sup 4}-fold excess) only fibronectin and fibrinogen caused a moderate inhibition of {sup 125}I-HLf binding. According to Scatchard plot analysis, 5,400 HLf-binding sites/cell, with an affinity constant (K{sub a}) of 1.4 x 10{sup -7} M, were estimated in strain E34663. These data establish the presence of a specific Lf-binding mechanism in E. coli. (au).

  18. Enterotoxigenic and non-enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis from fecal microbiota of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF is an important part of the human and animal intestinal microbiota and is commonly associated with diarrhea. ETBF strains produce an enterotoxin encoded by the bft gene located in the B. fragilispathogenicity island (BfPAI. Non-enterotoxigenic B. fragilis(NTBF strains lack the BfPAI and usually show two different genetic patterns, II and III, based on the absence or presence of a BfPAI-flanking region, respectively. The incidence of ETBF and NTBF strains in fecal samples isolated from children without acute diarrhea or any other intestinal disorders was determined. All 84 fecal samples evaluated were B. fragilis-positive by PCR, four of them harbored the bft gene, 27 contained the NTBF pattern III DNA sequence, and 52 were considered to be NTBF pattern II samples. One sample was positive for both ETBF and NTBF pattern III DNA sequences. All 19 B. fragilis strains isolated by the culture method were bft-negative, 9 belonged to pattern III and 10 to pattern II. We present an updated overview of the ETBF and NTBF incidence in the fecal microbiota of children from Sao Paulo City, Brazil.

  19. Antibodies derived from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) adhesin tip MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) against adherence of nine ETEC adhesins: CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandre, Rahul M; Ruan, Xiaosai; Duan, Qiangde; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-06-30

    Diarrhea continues to be a leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years in developing countries. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading bacterial cause of children's diarrhea and travelers' diarrhea. ETEC bacteria initiate diarrheal disease by attaching to host receptors at epithelial cells and colonizing in small intestine. Therefore, preventing ETEC attachment has been considered the first line of defense against ETEC diarrhea. However, developing vaccines effectively against ETEC bacterial attachment encounters challenge because ETEC strains produce over 23 immunologically heterogeneous adhesins. In this study, we applied MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) approach to integrate epitopes from adhesin tips or adhesive subunits of CFA/I, CS1, CS2, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, CS21 and EtpA adhesins and to construct an adhesin tip MEFA peptide. We then examined immunogenicity of this tip MEFA in mouse immunization, and assessed potential application of this tip MEFA for ETEC vaccine development. Data showed that mice intraperitoneally immunized with this adhesin tip MEFA developed IgG antibody responses to all nine ETEC adhesins. Moreover, ETEC and E. coli bacteria expressing these nine adhesins, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, exhibited significant reduction in attachment to Caco-2 cells. These results indicated that anti-adhesin antibodies induced by this adhesin tip MEFA blocked adherence of the most important ETEC adhesins, suggesting this multivalent tip MEFA may be useful for developing a broadly protective anti-adhesin vaccine against ETEC diarrhea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of bacterial contamination with antibiotic-resistant and enterotoxigenic fecal coliforms in treated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S P; Gopal, K

    2008-01-01

    Pollution indicator bacteria such as coliforms, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci were enumerated using a multiple-tube fermentation method in 100 treated drinking-water samples from 20 locations in residential, commercial, and industrial areas of a tropical city during summer. Thirty-four percent of the samples were bacteriologically nonpotable. Maximum coliform-contaminated (27%) samples were derived from industrial areas, while samples contaminated with fecal coliform (23%) and fecal streptococci (20%) originated from commercial areas. Coliforms identified as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Enterobacter sp., and Citrobacter sp. were present in 29%, 26%, 24%, and 15% of samples, respectively. Fecal coliforms were examined for antibiotic susceptibility with disc diffusion method. All test isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) for kanamycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and trimethoprim. Escherichia coli isolates were examined for enterotoxigenicity using the suckling mice bioassay and 60% of the isolates displayed enterotoxigenicity. Data indicate that drinking water contaminated with antibiotic-resistant enterotoxigenic fecal bacteria may be responsible for presence of waterborne diarrheal diseases attributed to therapeutic agents used by urban populations in the tropics.

  1. Isolation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus from pet dogs and cats: a public health implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-moein, Khaled A; Samir, Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a globally distributed bacterium causing wide variety of illnesses in humans, which attributed to its ability to produce wide array of virulence factors, including enterotoxins that are responsible for staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. The current study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs and cats and its public health implication. For this purpose, nasal, oral, and wound swabs were collected from 70 dogs and 47 cats, whereas nasal swabs were collected from 26 human contacts. All samples were examined for the presence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus by isolation of S. aureus in culture media and then tested by specific ELISA kits to detect the produced toxins in bacterial cultures. The prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus was 10% and 2.1% for pet dogs and cats, respectively, whereas the nasal carriage rate in human contacts was 7.7%. The majority of animal isolates were obtained from mouth of the apparently healthy animals. All types of staphylococcal enterotoxins were detected in both animal and human isolates. High prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs highlights the possibility of zoonotic transmission to human contacts leading to nasal and/or hand carriage of such strains; thus, pet animals may be incriminated in the epidemiology of household staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks.

  2. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology of pathogenic Escherichia coli of calves and the role of calves as reservoirs for human pathogenic E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał eKolenda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli bacteria are the most common causes of diarrhea and septicemia in calves. Moreover, calves form a major reservoir for transmission of pathogenic E. coli to humans. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of publications on Escherichia coli as calf pathogens and the role of calves as reservoir have not been done so far. We reviewed studies between 1951 and 2013 reporting the presence of virulence associated factors (VAFs in calf E. coli and extracted the following information: year(s and country of sampling, animal number, health status, isolate number, VAF prevalence, serotypes, diagnostic methods and biological assays. The prevalence of VAFs or E. coli pathotypes was compared between healthy and diarrheic animals and was analysed for time courses. Together, 106 papers with 25982 E. coli isolates from 27 countries tested for VAFs were included. F5, F17 and F41 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin (ST – VAFs of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC were significantly associated with calf diarrhea. On the contrary, ETEC VAF F4 fimbriae and heat-labile enterotoxin as well as enteropathogenic (EPEC, Shiga toxin-producing (STEC, and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC were not associated with diarrhea. The prevalence increased overtime for ST-positive isolates, but decreased for F5- and STEC-positive isolates. Our study provides useful information about the history of scientific investigations performed in this domain so far, and helps to define etiological agents of calf disease, and to evaluate calves as reservoir hosts for human pathogenic E. coli.

  3. Response of early-weaned pigs to an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88) challenge when fed diets containing spray-dried porcine plasma or pea protein isolate plus egg yolk antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Asiedu, A; Nyachoti, C M; Baidoo, S K; Marquardt, R R; Yang, X

    2003-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) infection and resulting scours is a major problem for young pigs, especially when purified plant proteins are fed rather than spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP). The effect of supplementing a pea protein isolate (PPI)-based diet with egg yolk antibodies (EYA) from laying hens immunized with ETEC K88 antigen on piglet performance, incidence of scours, and gut histology was studied in a 14-d trial. Ninety-six 10-d-old weaned pigs were assigned to five dietary treatments in a completely randomized design to give six replicate pens per treatment. The treatments were PPI without EYA (PPI-EYA), PPI with EYA (PPI+EYA), SDPP without EYA (SDPP-EYA), SDPP with EYA (SDPP+EYA), or a combination of PPI and SDPP (PPI+SDPP). Diets were formulated to similar nutrient levels and provided for ad libitum intake. Blood from all pigs was taken on d 0, 7, and 14 for determining plasma urea N (PUN). On d 7, pigs were orally challenged with 6 mL of 10(10) cfu/ mL ETEC K88. Piglets were weighed on d 7 and 14. On d 7, 8, and 14, four pigs per treatment were sacrificed to study the histology of the small intestine. Weekly feed intake, BW changes, and gain:feed were determined. Fecal swabs from 10 pigs per treatment were taken for a PCR test to detect K88 E. coli. Feed efficiency over the 14-d period was not affected (P > 0.78) by dietary treatment. Mean ADFI on an as-fed basis was lower (P piglets fed PPI-EYA (64.3 g/d) compared with PPI+EYA (94.8 g/d) or SDPP (102 g/d) during wk 1. Piglets fed PPI-EYA tend to have a lower (P piglets fed EYA- or SDPP-containing diets recovered 10 to 72 h postchallenge, whereas those fed PPI-EYA continued to have severe diarrhea, resulting in 33% mortality. The PCR results showed that a greater (P piglets fed PPI-EYA compared with those fed SDPP- or EYA-containing diets continued to shed ETEC K88 at the end of the 14-d study. Piglets fed PPI-EYA had shorter villi (P < 0.01), higher intestinal pH (P < 0.013), and higher PUN (P < 0

  4. Curli fimbria: an Escherichia coli adhesin associated with human cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; Werle, Catierine Hirsch; Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of human cystitis. In this study, a preliminary molecular analysis carried out by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that 100% of 31 E. coli strains isolated from patients with recurrent UTIs (urinary tract infections) showed the presence of the curli fimbria gene (csgA). Curli fimbria is known to be associated with bacterial biofilm formation but not with the adhesion of human cystitis-associated E. coli. Therefore, this work aimed to study how curli fimbria is associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) as an adhesion factor. For this purpose, the csgA gene was deleted from strain UPEC-4, which carries three adhesion factor genes (csgA, fimH and ompA). The wild-type UPEC-4 strain and its mutant (ΔcsgA) were analyzed for their adhesion ability over HTB-9 (human bladder carcinoma), Vero (kidney cells of African green monkey) and HUVEC (human umbilical vein) cells in the presence of α-d-mannose. All the wild-type UPEC strains tested (100%) were able to adhere to all three cell types, while the UPEC-4 ΔcsgA mutant lost its adherence to HTB-9 but continued to adhere to the HUVEC and Vero cells. The results suggest that curli fimbria has an important role in the adhesion processes associated with human UPEC-induced cystitis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reserv...

  6. Escherichia coli expression, refolding and characterization of human laforin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Pedro; Moreira, Susana; Gama, Miguel; Faro, Carlos

    2010-06-01

    Laforin is a unique human dual-specificity phosphatase as it contains an amino terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM). Laforin gene mutations lead to Lafora disease, a progressive myoclonus epilepsy with an early fatal issue. Previous attempts to produce recombinant laforin faced various difficulties, namely the appearance of protein inclusion bodies, the contamination with bacterial proteins and a high tendency of the protein to aggregate, despite the use of fusion tags to improve solubility and ease the purification process. In this work, we have expressed human laforin in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies devoid of any fusion tags. After a rapid dilution refolding step, the protein was purified by two chromatographic steps, yielding 5-7mg of purified protein per liter of bacterial culture. The purified protein was shown to have the kinetic characteristics of a dual-specificity phosphatase, and a functional carbohydrate binding module. With this protocol, we were able for the first time, to produce and purify laforin without fusion tags in the amounts traditionally needed for the crystallographic structural studies paving the way to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of laforin activity and to the development of novel therapies for Lafora disease.

  7. Immunogenicity of recombinant Lactobacillus casei-expressing F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG in conjunction with a heat-labile enterotoxin A (LTAK63) and heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli as an oral adjuvant in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M; Qi, R; Chen, C; Yin, J; Ma, S; Shi, W; Wu, Y; Ge, J; Jiang, Y; Tang, L; Xu, Y; Li, Y

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to develop an effective oral vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection and to design new and more versatile mucosal adjuvants. Genetically engineered Lactobacillus casei strains expressing F4 (K88) fimbrial adhesin FaeG (rLpPG-2-FaeG) and either co-expressing heat-labile enterotoxin A (LTA) subunit with an amino acid mutation associated with reduced virulence (LTAK63) and a heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) subunit of E. coli (rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB) or fused-expressing LTAK63 and LTB (rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB) were constructed. The immunogenicity of rLpPG-2-FaeG in conjunction with rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB or rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB as an orally administered mucosal adjuvant in mice was evaluated. Results showed that the levels of FaeG-specific serum IgG and mucosal sIgA, as well as the proliferation of lymphocytes, were significantly higher in mice orally co-administered rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB compared with those administered rLpPG-2-FaeG alone, and were lower than those co-administered rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB. Moreover, effective protection was observed after challenge with F4+ ETEC strain CVCC 230 in mice co-administered rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-co-LTB or rLpPG-2-FaeG and rLpPG-2-LTAK63-fu-LTB group compared with those that received rLpPG-2-FaeG alone. rLpPG-2-FaeG showed greater immunogenicity in combination with LTAK63 and LTB as molecular adjuvants. Recombinant Lactobacillus provides a promising platform for the development of vaccines against F4+ ETEC infection. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Recombinant production of human interleukin 6 in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Nausch

    Full Text Available In this study, we compared basic expression approaches for the efficient expression of bioactive recombinant human interleukin-6 (IL6, as an example for a difficult-to-express protein. We tested these approaches in a laboratory scale in order to pioneer the commercial production of this protein in Escherichia coli (E. coli. Among the various strategies, which were tested under Research and Development (R&D conditions, aggregation-prone IL6 was solubilized most effectively by co-expressing cytoplasmic chaperones. Expression of a Glutathion-S-Transferase (GST fusion protein was not efficient to increase IL6 solubility. Alteration of the cultivation temperature significantly increased the solubility in both cases, whereas reduced concentrations of IPTG to induce expression of the T7lac-promotor only had a positive effect on chaperone-assisted expression. The biological activity was comparable to that of commercial IL6. Targeting the expressed protein to an oxidizing environment was not effective in the generation of soluble IL6. Taken together, the presence of chaperones and a lowered cultivation temperature seem effective to isolate large quantities of soluble IL6. This approach led to in vivo soluble, functional protein fractions and reduces purification and refolding requirements caused by downstream purification procedures. The final yield of soluble recombinant protein averaged approximately 2.6 mg IL6/liter of cell culture. These findings might be beneficial for the development of the large-scale production of IL6 under the conditions of current good manufacturing practice (cGMP.

  9. Passive immunity in cattle against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: serologic evaluation of a bacterin containing K99 and F41 fimbriae in colostrum of vaccinated females and calf serum Imunidade passiva contra Escherichia coli enterotoxigênica: avaliação sorológica de uma bacterina contendo as fímbrias K99 e F41 no colostro de fêmeas vacinadas e no soro de bezerros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.C.P. Figueiredo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A bacterin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, containing fimbriae K99 and F41, was produced and its capacity to induce anti-K99 and anti-F41 antibodies in colostrum of vaccinated cows and in calf serum, and the persistence of these antibodies in neonates were determined. Three experiments were performed on two commercial farms. In all experiments animals were allotted randomly to the blocks, each block consisting of two pregnant females (a vaccinated one and a control one and their respective calves. In experiment A (farm 1, comprised of 18 blocks, the animals received a vaccine dose 30 days before delivery. In experiment B (farm 1, consisted of 26 blocks, the animals received two vaccine doses (60 and 30 days before delivery. In experiment C (farm 2, consisted of 22 blocks, the animals received two vaccine doses (60 and 30 days before delivery. In experiments A and B pregnant cows and heifers were used and colostrum and serum from 24- to 36-hour-old calves were collected. In experiment C, pregnant embryo-recipient heifers were used and colostrum and sera from calves at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days of age were collected. Anti-K99 and anti-F41 antibodies were detected by ELISA using purified K99 and F41 fimbrial antigens. In experiment A no difference between treated and control groups was observed for the concentration of anti-K99 and anti-F41 antibodies in colostrum and calf serum. In experiment B a difference (PProduziu-se uma bacterina de Escherichia coli enterotoxigênica (ETEC contendo as fímbrias K99 e F41 e avaliaram-se a capacidade de indução de anticorpos anti-K99 e anti F-41 no colostro de vacas vacinadas e no soro de bezerros e a persistência dos anticorpos nos neonatos. Três experimentos foram realizados em duas fazendas comerciais. Os animais foram aleatoriamente alocados em blocos, de duas fêmeas prenhes (uma vacinada e outra controle e seus respectivos bezerros. No experimento A (fazenda 1, com 18 blocos, os animais

  10. Heterologously expressed bacterial and human multidrug resistance proteins confer cadmium resistance to Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achard-Joris, M; van Saparoea, HBV; Driessen, AJM; Bourdineaud, JP; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The human MDR1 gene is induced by cadmium exposure although no resistance to this metal is observed in human cells overexpressing hMDR1. To access the role of MDR proteins in cadmium resistance, human MDR1, Lactococcus lactis lmrA, and Oenococcus oeni omrA were expressed in an Escherichia coli tolC

  11. Highly conserved type 1 pili promote enterotoxigenic E. coli pathogen-host interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaullah Sheikh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, defined by their elaboration of heat-labile (LT and/or heat-stable (ST enterotoxins, are a common cause of diarrheal illness in developing countries. Efficient delivery of these toxins requires ETEC to engage target host enterocytes. This engagement is accomplished using a variety of pathovar-specific and conserved E. coli adhesin molecules as well as plasmid encoded colonization factors. Some of these adhesins undergo significant transcriptional modulation as ETEC encounter intestinal epithelia, perhaps suggesting that they cooperatively facilitate interaction with the host. Among genes significantly upregulated on cell contact are those encoding type 1 pili. We therefore investigated the role played by these pili in facilitating ETEC adhesion, and toxin delivery to model intestinal epithelia. We demonstrate that type 1 pili, encoded in the E. coli core genome, play an essential role in ETEC virulence, acting in concert with plasmid-encoded pathovar specific colonization factor (CF fimbriae to promote optimal bacterial adhesion to cultured intestinal epithelium (CIE and to epithelial monolayers differentiated from human small intestinal stem cells. Type 1 pili are tipped with the FimH adhesin which recognizes mannose with stereochemical specificity. Thus, enhanced production of highly mannosylated proteins on intestinal epithelia promoted FimH-mediated ETEC adhesion, while conversely, interruption of FimH lectin-epithelial interactions with soluble mannose, anti-FimH antibodies or mutagenesis of fimH effectively blocked ETEC adhesion. Moreover, fimH mutants were significantly impaired in delivery of both heat-stable and heat-labile toxins to the target epithelial cells in vitro, and these mutants were substantially less virulent in rabbit ileal loop assays, a classical model of ETEC pathogenesis. Collectively, our data suggest that these highly conserved pili play an essential role in virulence of these

  12. Characterization of Escherichia coli isolated from migratory water fowls in Hakaluki Haor, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdaus Mohd. Altaf Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 135 fecal samples were collected to characterize the Escherichia coli isolates from the migratory waterfowls (whistling Swan harbored in the Hakaluki Haor of Bangladesh in the year of 2008 and 2009. Out of 135 fecal samples, 100 samples were distinguished as positive for isolates of Escherichia coli following cultural, biochemical and motility test. Amongst the recovered isolates only 38% were found upbeat to enterotoxin production propensity on mice inoculation test. Finally, out of 38 % enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC positive isolates no any isolates found to be positive for the aptitude of heat stable (ST toxin yield. So, the presence of ETEC in migratory waterfowls indicating the possibilities of them to act as vector and reservoir of E. coli to spread further infection to animals and humans. This work indicates the first time ETEC characterization from the migratory birds of Bangladesh.

  13. Characterization of Escherichia coli isolated from migratory water fowls in Hakaluki Haor, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdaus MohdAltaf Hossain

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 135 fecal samples were collected to characterize the Escherichia coli isolates from the migratory waterfowls (whistling Swan harbored in the Hakaluki Haor of Bangladesh in the year of 2008 and 2009. Out of 135 fecal samples, 100 samples were distinguished as positive for isolates of Escherichia coli following cultural, biochemical and motility test. Amongst the recovered isolates only 38% were found upbeat to enterotoxin production propensity on mice inoculation test. Finally, out of 38 % enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC positive isolates no any isolates found to be positive for the aptitude of heat stable (ST toxin yield. So, the presence of ETEC in migratory waterfowls indicating the possibilities of them to act as vector and reservoir of E. coli to spread further infection to animals and humans. This work indicates the first time ETEC characterization from the migratory birds of Bangladesh.

  14. Modification of human beta-globin locus PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Patrinos (George); M. de Krom (Mariken); S. Bottardi; R.J. Janssens; E. Katsantoni (Eleni); A.W. Wai; D.J. Sherratt; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); A.M.A. Imam (Ali)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe report here modifications of human beta-globin PAC clones by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli DH10B, utilising a plasmid temperature sensitive for replication, the recA gene and a wild-type copy of the rpsL gene which allows for an efficient selection for

  15. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Ana R; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R; Bezerra, Camila N A; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF-preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144-7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa-decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting human

  16. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eGonzalez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysines in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen, a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to plasminogen, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp-plasminogen interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound plasminogen to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds plasminogen via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that plasminogen bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding plasminogen are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria.

  17. Bactericidal Effect of Selected Antidiarrhoeal Medicinal Plants on Intracellular Heat-Stable Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Birdi, Tannaz J.; Brijesh, S.; Poonam G. Daswani

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli continue to be a cause of global concern. Medicinal plants have been gaining popularity as promising antidiarrhoeal agents. In the present study, four antidiarrhoeal plants, viz. Aegle marmelos, Cyperus rotundus, Psidium guajava and Zingiber officinale were screened against a heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain. Decoctions of these plants were studied for their effect on intracellular killing of the bacterial s...

  18. Resistance to drugs and heavy metals, colicin production, and biochemical characteristics of selected bovine and porcine Escherichia coli strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Harnett, N M; Gyles, C L

    1984-01-01

    A study was made of resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics, biochemical characteristics, and colicinogeny in selected strains of Escherichia coli of O serogroups 8, 9, 20, 64, 101, and X46. Of 42 strains that were investigated, 26 were porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), 8 were porcine non-enterotoxigenic E. coli (NETEC), and 8 were bovine ETEC. Multiple resistance to antimicrobial agents was common among the strains, and resistance to chloramphenicol and kanamycin was less common tha...

  19. The impact of infant feeding patterns on infection and diarrheal disease due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli El impacto de las modalidades de alimentación infantil en la infección y en las enfermedades diarreicas por Escherichia coli enterotoxigénica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Long

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE. Determine the impact of dietary risk factors on patterns of infection by heat labile toxin-producing Escherichia coli (LT-ETEC. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Ninety-eight infants were followed from birth for one year in Guadalajara, Mexico, beginning in august of 1986. Stool and breast milk samples were collected weekly from infants and their mothers, respectively. Mothers were also interviewed on a weekly basis regarding the health of the infants. Parametric hazard models were fit to durations of different LTETEC disease states determined through the analysis of stools. The child's consumption of supplemental foods and liquids as well as specific levels of LT-ETEC-specific breast milk antibodies were included in each model as time-varying covariates. RESULTS. The hazard of LTETEC asymptomatic infection increased 400 percent among children who received oats gruel (hazard rate= 4.01; 95% CI 2.77-5.24. The duration of infection was reduced if the child had had a previous LT-ETEC diarrheal episode (2.12; 95% CI 1.74-2.49 but was prolonged if the child consumed herbal teas (0.53; 95% CI 0.27-0.7. Herbal teas and high LTETEC-specific breast milk antibody levels each reduced the hazard of symptomatic infection by ninety percent. Symptomatic episodes became asymptomatic more rapidly if a child was given rice water. CONCLUSIONS. Specific weaning foods increase the risk of infection. Breastmilk antibodies and liquid infusions reduce diarrheal disease and infection duration.OBJETIVOS. Determinar el impacto de los factores dietéticos sobre patrones de infección por Escherichia coli enterotoxigénica productora de la toxina lábil (ECET-TL. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se reclutaron 98 infantes al nacer, en agosto de 1986; se hizo seguimiento durante un año. En visitas semanales se recolectaron muestras de heces de los niños y una muestra de leche de las madres; éstas fueron entrevistadas sobre la morbilidad del niño. Se ajustaron modelos de hazard a la

  20. Inhibition of enterotoxin from Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae by gangliosides from human milk.

    OpenAIRE

    Otnaess, A B; Laegreid, A; Ertresvåg, K

    1983-01-01

    Inhibitory activity of enterotoxin from Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae was associated with the ganglioside fraction of human milk. Both the milk fat and skim milk contained gangliosides that inhibited the toxins. The most purified milk fraction contained three glycolipid components, of which two migrated close to ganglioside GM1 on thin-layer chromatography plates. A component with a slightly different mobility from GM1 appeared to be associated with the inhibitory activity. Milk gangli...

  1. Expression of human β-defensin-1 in recombinant Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was transformed with a pHCD1 plasmid harboring the human β-defensin-1 (hBD1) gene fused in frame behind a disulfide bond isomerase (DsbC), a His-tag, and an enterokinase cleavage site. After induction, the DsbC-hBD1 was expressed as a ~36 kDa soluble fusion protein in recombinant E.

  2. Determination of phylogenetic groups and antibiotic resistance pattern of Enterotoxigenic Escherishia coli isolates from diarrheoic cases in Bam City by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Alizade

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Purposes of this study were to determine the phylogenetic groups, prevalence of enterotoxigenic pathotype and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates from diarrheic cases in Bam city. Materials and Methods: In this study 155 E. coli were isolated from diarrheic samples in Bam city. Phylogenetic groups of isolates and enterotoxigenic pathotype were determined by detection of chuA, yjaA, TspE4C2 and ST, LT genes respectively. Results: One hundred fifty five examined isolates were distributed in phylogenetic groups: A (71.60%, B1 (3.22%, B2 (9.67% and D (15.48%. The genes for enterotoxigenic pathotype were detected in 52 isolates (33.54%, which ST gene were found in 29 isolates, LT in 16 isolates and LT, ST genes in 7 isolates. Twenty nine ST gene positive isolates were distributed in three phylogenetic groups A (48.28%, D (41.38% and B2 (10.34%. According to the antibiotic susceptibility tests maximum and minimum antibiotic resistance rate was against to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (74.19% and ciprofloxacin and gentamycin (9.67%. Fifteen multiple antibiotic resistance patterns were detected in four phylogenetic groups. Conclusions: Escherichia coli isolates from enterotoxigenic pathotype have a considerable antibiotic resistance rate in Bam city and were distributed in different phylogenetic groups. Since a considerable number of isolates were negative for LT and ST genes, it is necessary to study the other virulence genes and their phylogenetic background in E. coli isolates from diarrheic cases in Bam city.

  3. Global gene expression profiling of asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli during biofilm growth in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2007-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an important health problem worldwide, with many millions of cases each year, and Escherichia coli is the most common organism causing UTI in humans. Also, E. coli is responsible for most infections in patients with chronic indwelling bladder catheter. The two...... asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) E. coli strains 83972 and VR50 are significantly better biofilm formers in their natural growth medium, human urine, than the two uropathogenic E. coli isolates CFT073 and 536. We used DNA microarrays to monitor the expression profile during biofilm growth in urine of the two ABU...

  4. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-09-09

    Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an outbreak of E. coli O104:H4 in Europe in 2011. We assessed the opportunities for E. coli carrying the aggR and stx genes to emerge in 'backyard' farms in south-east Asia. Faecal samples collected from 204 chicken farms; 204 farmers and 306 age- and gender-matched individuals not exposed to poultry farming were plated on MacConkey agar plates with and without antimicrobials being supplemented. Sweep samples obtained from MacConkey agar plates without supplemented antimicrobials were screened by multiplex PCR for the detection of the stx1, stx2 and aggR genes. One chicken farm sample each (0.5 %) contained the stx1 and the aggR gene. Eleven (2.4 %) human faecal samples contained the stx1 gene, 2 samples (0.4 %) contained stx2 gene, and 31 (6.8 %) contained the aggR gene. From 46 PCR-positive samples, 205 E. coli isolates were tested for the presence of stx1, stx2, aggR, wzx O104 and fliC H4 genes. None of the isolates simultaneously contained the four genetic markers associated with E. coli O104:H4 epidemic strain (aggR, stx2, wzx O104 and fliC H4 ). Of 34 EAEC, 64.7 % were resistant to 3(rd)-generation cephalosporins. These results indicate that in southern Vietnam, the human population is a more likely reservoir of aggR and stx gene carrying E. coli than the chicken population. However, conditions for transmission of isolates and/or genes between human and animal reservoirs resulting in the emergence of highly virulent E. coli strains are still favorable, given the nature of'backyard' farms in Vietnam.

  5. Biofilm-Forming Abilities of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates Associated with Human Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeleer, Philippe; Tremblay, Yannick D. N.; Jubelin, Grégory; Jacques, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Forming biofilms may be a survival strategy of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to enable it to persist in the environment and the food industry. Here, we evaluate and characterize the biofilm-forming ability of 39 isolates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates recovered from human infection and belonging to seropathotypes A, B, or C. The presence and/or production of biofilm factors such as curli, cellulose, autotransporter, and fimbriae were investigated. The polymeric matrix of these biofilms was analyzed by confocal microscopy and by enzymatic digestion. Cell viability and matrix integrity were examined after sanitizer treatments. Isolates of the seropathotype A (O157:H7 and O157:NM), which have the highest relative incidence of human infection, had a greater ability to form biofilms than isolates of seropathotype B or C. Seropathotype A isolates were unique in their ability to produce cellulose and poly-N-acetylglucosamine. The integrity of the biofilms was dependent on proteins. Two autotransporter genes, ehaB and espP, and two fimbrial genes, z1538 and lpf2, were identified as potential genetic determinants for biofilm formation. Interestingly, the ability of several isolates from seropathotype A to form biofilms was associated with their ability to agglutinate yeast in a mannose-independent manner. We consider this an unidentified biofilm-associated factor produced by those isolates. Treatment with sanitizers reduced the viability of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli but did not completely remove the biofilm matrix. Overall, our data indicate that biofilm formation could contribute to the persistence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and specifically seropathotype A isolates in the environment. PMID:26712549

  6. Prevalence of enterotoxigenic Bacillus Cereus and Its enterotoxins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) and enterotoxins in milk and milk products. Design: A random sampling of milk products was carried out. Setting: Market milk and milk products were collected from retail shops in Nairobi and analysed for contamination with ...

  7. enterotoxigenicity and drug sensitivity of staphylococci from children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-12-12

    Dec 12, 2003 ... enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), Campylobacter jejuni and Salmonella and Shigella species have been ... including penicillin (10 units), chloramphenicol 30µ g, colistin. 10µ g, kanamycin 30µ g, ampicillin 10µ g, ... penicillin, and erythromycin was determined for S. aureus which showed resistance to them.

  8. Recurrent diarrhea associated with enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens in 2 dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Weese, J. S.; Greenwood, S J; Staempfli, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    Two dogs were diagnosed with enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens-associated diarrhea. Diarrhea was responsive to antimicrobial therapy, but recurred after treatment was ceased. Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin was present in feces during diarrheic episodes but not when feces were normal. Both dogs responded to a prolonged course of oral cephalexin and dietary modification.

  9. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co......Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems......-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side...

  10. Screening for enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Aitchison, Alan; Purcell, Rachel V; Greenlees, Rosie; Pearson, John F; Frizelle, Frank A

    2016-08-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most humans, however enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains (ETBF) have been associated with diarrhoea and colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to establish a method of screening for the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft) gene in stool samples, as a means of determining if carriage of ETBF is detected more often in CRC patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Stool samples from 71 patients recently diagnosed with CRC, and 71 age-matched controls, were screened by standard and quantitative PCR using primers specific for the detection of the bft gene. Bacterial template DNA from stool samples was prepared by two methods: a sweep, where all colonies growing on Bacteroides Bile Esculin agar following stool culture for 48 h at 37 °C in an anaerobic environment were swept into sterile water and heat treated; and a direct DNA extraction from each stool sample. The bft gene was detected more frequently from DNA isolated from bacterial sweeps than from matched direct DNA extractions. qPCR was found to be more sensitive than standard PCR in detecting bft. The cumulative total of positive qPCR assays from both sample types revealed that 19 of the CRC patients had evidence of the toxin gene in their stool sample (27%), compared to seven of the age-matched controls (10%). This difference was significant (P = 0.016). Overall, ETBF carriage was detected more often in CRC patient stool samples compared to controls, but disparate findings from the different DNA preparations and testing methods suggests that poor sensitivity may limit molecular detection of ETBF in stool samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA reveals clonal relationships among enteropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from non-human primates and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Carvalho

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC strains are important agents of infantile diarrhea all over the world, gaining even greater importance in developing countries. EPEC have also been isolated from various animal species, but most isolates belong to serotypes that differ from those recovered from humans. However, it has been demonstrated that several isolates from non-human primates belong to the serogroups and/or serotypes related to those implicated in human disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic differences between thirteen strains isolated from non-human primates and the same number of strains isolated from human infections. Human isolates belonged to the same serogroup/serotype as the monkey strains and the evaluation was done by analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA. Dendrogram analysis showed that there was no clustering between human and monkey strains. Human and non-human isolates of the EPEC serotypes O127:H40 and O128:H2 shared 90 and 87% of their bands, respectively, indicating strong genomic similarity between the strains, leading to the speculation that they may have arisen from the same pathogenic clone. To our knowledge, this study is the first one comparing genomic similarity between human and non-human primate strains and the results provide further evidence that monkey EPEC strains correlate with human EPEC, as suggested in a previous investigation.

  12. Genetic Structure and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli and Cryptic Clades in Birds with Diverse Human Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Michaela D J; Pi, Hongfei; Vangchhia, Belinda; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J; Johnson, James R; Gordon, David M

    2015-08-01

    The manner and extent to which birds associate with humans may influence the genetic attributes and antimicrobial resistance of their commensal Escherichia communities through strain transmission and altered selection pressures. In this study, we determined whether the distribution of the different Escherichia coli phylogenetic groups and cryptic clades, the occurrence of 49 virulence associated genes, and/or the prevalence of resistance to 12 antimicrobials differed between four groups of birds from Australia with contrasting types of human association. We found that birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas had similar Escherichia communities. The Escherichia communities of backyard domestic poultry were phylogenetically distinct from the Escherichia communities sourced from all other birds, with a large proportion (46%) of poultry strains belonging to phylogenetic group A and a significant minority (17%) belonging to the cryptic clades. Wild birds sampled from veterinary and wildlife rehabilitation centers (in-care birds) carried Escherichia isolates that possessed particular virulence-associated genes more often than Escherichia isolates from birds sampled in suburban and wilderness areas. The Escherichia isolates from both the backyard poultry and in-care birds were more likely to be multidrug resistant than the Escherichia isolates from wild birds. We also detected a multidrug-resistant E. coli strain circulating in a wildlife rehabilitation center, reinforcing the importance of adequate hygiene practices when handling and caring for wildlife. We suggest that the relatively high frequency of antimicrobial resistance in the in-care birds and backyard poultry is due primarily to the use of antimicrobials in these animals, and we recommend that the treatment protocols used for these birds be reviewed. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an outbreak of E.

  14. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Minh, Van Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  15. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  16. Human Health Hazards from Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli of Animal Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, A. M.; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2009-01-01

    Because of the intensive use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production, meat is frequently contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli. Humans can be colonized with E. coli of animal origin, and because of resistance to commonly used antimicrobial agents, these bacteria may...... cause infections for which limited therapeutic options are available. This may lead to treatment failure and can have serious consequences for the patient. Furthermore, E. coli of animal origin may act as a donor of antimicrobial resistance genes for other pathogenic E. coli. Thus, the intensive use...

  17. Seroprevalence of Escherichia coli in traditional cheeses manufactured in Maragheh rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mahdavi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Coliforms and Escherichia coli are major microbial indicators in the accessing the quality of foodstuffs. The presence of these bacteria in foods is considered as an indication of fecal contamination. E. coli O157:H7 is the most pathogenic strain that is transmitted to human through animal-foods. This study was performed on 100 traditional cheese samples manufactured in Maragheh rural to determine the seroprevalence of E. coli. The samples were analyzed with standard microbiological methods followed by biochemical confirmatory tests. Afterwards, the isolates were assayed for the detection of O-serotypes using direct agglutination method. Among the 100 cheese samples, E. coli O157serotypewas not detected in any sample. However, other E. coli serotypes including 32 isolates of non-O157 serotypes were detected. Among the isolates, enteropathogenic, enterotoxigenic and enterohaemorhhagic serogruops was also detected.

  18. Inhibition of enterotoxin from Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae by gangliosides from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otnaess, A B; Laegreid, A; Ertresvåg, K

    1983-05-01

    Inhibitory activity of enterotoxin from Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae was associated with the ganglioside fraction of human milk. Both the milk fat and skim milk contained gangliosides that inhibited the toxins. The most purified milk fraction contained three glycolipid components, of which two migrated close to ganglioside GM1 on thin-layer chromatography plates. A component with a slightly different mobility from GM1 appeared to be associated with the inhibitory activity. Milk ganglioside fraction, derived from 2 ml of human milk, contained 1 to 4 micrograms of lipid-bound sialic acid and completely inhibited 0.1 micrograms of cholera toxin in rabbit intestinal loop experiments. It is suggested that human milk gangliosides, although present only in trace amounts, may be important in protecting infants against enterotoxin-induced diarrhea.

  19. Genetic identity of aminoglycoside-resistance genes in Escherichia coli isolates from human and animal sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Wong, River C; Lo, Stephanie W; Chow, Kin-Hung; Wong, Samson S; Que, Tak-Lun

    2010-06-01

    A bacterial collection (n=249) obtained in Hong Kong from 2002 to 2004 was used to investigate the molecular epidemiology of aminoglycoside resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from humans and food-producing animals. Of these, 89 isolates were gentamicin-sensitive (human n=60, animal n=29) and 160 isolates were gentamicin-resistant (human n=107, animal n=53). Overall, 84.1% (90/107) and 75.5% (40/53) of the gentamicin-resistant isolates from human and animal sources, respectively, were found to possess the aacC2 gene. The aacC2 gene for 20 isolates (10 each for human and animal isolates) was sequenced. Two alleles were found that were equally distributed in human and animal isolates. PFGE showed that the gentamicin-resistant isolates exhibited diverse patterns with little clonality. In some isolates, the aacC2 gene was encoded on large transferable plasmids of multiple incompatibility groups (IncF, IncI1 and IncN). An IncFII plasmid of 140 kb in size was shared by one human and three animal isolates. In summary, this study showed that human and animal isolates share the same pool of resistance genes.

  20. Dissemination of Cephalosporin Resistance Genes between Escherichia coli Strains from Farm Animals and Humans by Specific Plasmid Lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Been, Mark; Lanza, Val F.; de Toro, María; Scharringa, Jelle; Dohmen, Wietske|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/333690451; Du, Yu; Hu, Juan; Lei, Ying; Li, Ning; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Heederik, Dick J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072910542; Fluit, Ad C.; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; de la Cruz, Fernando; van Schaik, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Third-generation cephalosporins are a class of β-lactam antibiotics that are often used for the treatment of human infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli. Worryingly, the incidence of human infections caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli is

  1. High rates of Escherichia coli transmission between livestock and humans in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwego, Innocent B; Gillespie, Thomas R; Isabirye-Basuta, Gilbert; Goldberg, Tony L

    2008-10-01

    Escherichia coli is a zoonotic bacterium that is important to both public health and livestock economics. To date, most studies of zoonotic E. coli transmission have been conducted in developed nations with industrialized agricultural economies. In this study, E. coli bacteria were collected from people and livestock in two communities in rural western Uganda in order to investigate patterns of interspecific bacterial transmission in a developing rural economy characterized by very close human-livestock associations. Six hundred seventy-two E. coli isolates were genotyped using repetitive element-PCR (Rep-PCR) fingerprinting, and genetic distances between populations of bacteria from different hosts and locations were calculated. Genetic distances between human and livestock bacteria were generally very low, indicating high rates of bacterial gene flow among host species. Bacteria from humans and livestock in the same communities were virtually indistinguishable genetically. Data from surveys administered at the time of sample collection showed that people who did not regularly wash their hands before eating harbored bacteria approximately twice as similar genetically to bacteria of their livestock as did people who regularly washed their hands before eating. These results suggest that both rates of human-livestock interactions and patterns of human hygiene affect human-livestock bacterial transmission in this setting. This conclusion has implications not only for human and livestock health in subsistence-based agricultural economies but also for the emergence of zoonotic diseases out of such areas as a result of increasing globalization.

  2. The asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 outcompetes uropathogenic E. coli strains in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.; Schembri, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract....... The prototype ABU E. coli strain 83972 was originally isolated from a girl who had carried it asymptomatically for 3 years. Deliberate colonization of UTI-susceptible individuals with E. coli 83972 has been used successfully as an alternative approach for the treatment of patients who are refractory...... to conventional therapy. Colonization with strain 83972 appears to prevent infection with UPEC strains in such patients despite the fact that this strain is unable to express the primary adhesins involved in UTI, viz. P and type 1 fimbriae. Here we investigated the growth characteristics of E. coli 83972 in human...

  3. Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Enteric Infections Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Roberto; Vidal, Maricel; Lagos, Rossana; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex PCR for detection of three categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. With this method, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli were identified in fecal samples from patients with hemorrhagic colitis, watery diarrhea, or hemolytic-uremic syndrome and from food-borne outbreaks. PMID:15071051

  4. Metabolic Modeling of Common Escherichia coli Strains in Human Gut Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Dong Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent high-throughput sequencing has enabled the composition of Escherichia coli strains in the human microbial community to be profiled en masse. However, there are two challenges to address: (1 exploring the genetic differences between E. coli strains in human gut and (2 dynamic responses of E. coli to diverse stress conditions. As a result, we investigated the E. coli strains in human gut microbiome using deep sequencing data and reconstructed genome-wide metabolic networks for the three most common E. coli strains, including E. coli HS, UTI89, and CFT073. The metabolic models show obvious strain-specific characteristics, both in network contents and in behaviors. We predicted optimal biomass production for three models on four different carbon sources (acetate, ethanol, glucose, and succinate and found that these stress-associated genes were involved in host-microbial interactions and increased in human obesity. Besides, it shows that the growth rates are similar among the models, but the flux distributions are different, even in E. coli core reactions. The correlations between human diabetes-associated metabolic reactions in the E. coli models were also predicted. The study provides a systems perspective on E. coli strains in human gut microbiome and will be helpful in integrating diverse data sources in the following study.

  5. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Wilson, William A; Pierce, Andrew J

    2012-10-30

    Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  6. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killen Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  7. Host-specific induction of Escherichia coli fitness genes during human urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Hazen, Tracy H; Brumbaugh, Ariel R; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Smith, Sara N; Ernst, Robert D; Rasko, David A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2014-12-23

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the predominant etiological agent of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI), manifested by inflammation of the urinary bladder, in humans and is a major global public health concern. Molecular pathogenesis of UPEC has been primarily examined using murine models of UTI. Translational research to develop novel therapeutics against this major pathogen, which is becoming increasingly antibiotic resistant, requires a thorough understanding of mechanisms involved in pathogenesis during human UTIs. Total RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and comparative transcriptional analysis of UTI samples to the UPEC isolates cultured in human urine and laboratory medium were used to identify novel fitness genes that were specifically expressed during human infection. Evidence for UPEC genes involved in ion transport, including copper efflux, nickel and potassium import systems, as key fitness factors in uropathogenesis were generated using an experimental model of UTI. Translational application of this study was investigated by targeting Cus, a bacterial copper efflux system. Copper supplementation in drinking water reduces E. coli colonization in the urinary bladder of mice. Additionally, our results suggest that anaerobic processes in UPEC are involved in promoting fitness during UTI in humans. In summary, RNA-seq was used to establish the transcriptional signature in UPEC during naturally occurring, community acquired UTI in women and multiple novel fitness genes used by UPEC during human infection were identified. The repertoire of UPEC genes involved in UTI presented here will facilitate further translational studies to develop innovative strategies against UTI caused by UPEC.

  8. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an outbreak of E. coli O104:H4 in Europe in 2011. We assessed the opportunities for E. coli carrying the aggR and stx genes to emerge in ?backyard? farms in south-east Asia. Results Faecal samples collected...

  9. Pathogenic Potential to Humans of Bovine Escherichia coli O26, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Tracy; Allison, Lesley J.; Courcier, Emily; Evans, Judith; McKendrick, Iain J.; Pearce, Michael C.; Handel, Ian; Caprioli, Alfredo; Karch, Helge; Hanson, Mary F.; Pollock, Kevin G.J.; Locking, Mary E.; Woolhouse, Mark E.J.; Matthews, Louise; Low, J. Chris; Gally, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O26 and O157 have similar overall prevalences in cattle in Scotland, but in humans, Shiga toxin–producing E. coli O26 infections are fewer and clinically less severe than E. coli O157 infections. To investigate this discrepancy, we genotyped E. coli O26 isolates from cattle and humans in Scotland and continental Europe. The genetic background of some strains from Scotland was closely related to that of strains causing severe infections in Europe. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling found an association between hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and multilocus sequence type 21 strains and confirmed the role of stx2 in severe human disease. Although the prevalences of E. coli O26 and O157 on cattle farms in Scotland are equivalent, prevalence of more virulent strains is low, reducing human infection risk. However, new data on E. coli O26–associated HUS in humans highlight the need for surveillance of non-O157 enterohemorrhagic E. coli and for understanding stx2 phage acquisition. PMID:22377426

  10. Human Intestinal Cells Modulate Conjugational Transfer of Multidrug Resistance Plasmids between Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut. PMID:24955767

  11. Human intestinal cells modulate conjugational transfer of multidrug resistance plasmids between clinical Escherichia coli isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Manuel Dantas Machado

    Full Text Available Bacterial conjugation in the human gut microbiota is believed to play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and virulence plasmids. However, the modulation of bacterial conjugation by the human host remains poorly understood and there is a need for controlled systems to study this process. We established an in vitro co-culture system to study the interaction between human intestinal cells and bacteria. We show that the conjugation efficiency of a plasmid encoding an extended spectrum beta-lactamase is reduced when clinical isolates of Escherichia coli are co-cultured with human intestinal cells. We show that filtered media from co-cultures contain a factor that reduces conjugation efficiency. Protease treatment of the filtered media eliminates this inhibition of conjugation. This data suggests that a peptide or protein based factor is secreted on the apical side of the intestinal cells exposed to bacteria leading to a two-fold reduction in conjugation efficiency. These results show that human gut epithelial cells can modulate bacterial conjugation and may have relevance to gene exchange in the gut.

  12. Cd(II) and As(III) bioaccumulation by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing oligomeric human metallothioneins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Lin, Jianqun; Zhang, Chengjia; Ren, Yilin; Lin, Jianqiang

    2011-01-30

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of metal binding proteins. Recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the human MT (hMT-1A) gene was constructed for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. In order to increase protein stability, the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene was fused with the hMT-1A gene and coexpressed. In order to increase MT expression efficiency and metal binding capacity, two, three or four hMT-1A genes were integrated in series and overexpressed in E. coli. The recombinant E. coli expressing the GST fused trimeric hMT-1A protein exhibited the highest Cd(II) and As(III) bioaccumulation ability, 6.36 mg Cd/g dry cells and 7.59 mg As/g dry cells, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Intestinal organoids model human responses to infection by commensal and Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Sayali S; Pradhan, Suman; Ward, Doyle V; Weiss, Alison A

    2017-01-01

    Infection with Shiga toxin (Stx) producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 can cause the potentially fatal complication hemolytic uremic syndrome, and currently only supportive therapy is available. Lack of suitable animal models has hindered study of this disease. Induced human intestinal organoids (iHIOs), generated by in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, represent differentiated human intestinal tissue. We show that iHIOs with addition of human neutrophils can model E. coli intestinal infection and innate cellular responses. Commensal and O157:H7 introduced into the iHIO lumen replicated rapidly achieving high numbers. Commensal E. coli did not cause damage, and were completely contained within the lumen, suggesting defenses, such as mucus production, can constrain non-pathogenic strains. Some O157:H7 initially co-localized with cellular actin. Loss of actin and epithelial integrity was observed after 4 hours. O157:H7 grew as filaments, consistent with activation of the bacterial SOS stress response. SOS is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and O157:H7 infection increased ROS production. Transcriptional profiling (RNAseq) demonstrated that both commensal and O157:H7 upregulated genes associated with gastrointestinal maturation, while infection with O157:H7 upregulated inflammatory responses, including interleukin 8 (IL-8). IL-8 is associated with neutrophil recruitment, and infection with O157:H7 resulted in recruitment of human neutrophils into the iHIO tissue.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from humans and foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benevides Melo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance has increased in recent years, raising the concern of public health authorities. We conducted a study of Escherichia coli isolates obtained from human and food samples to assess the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and to determine the genotype and clonal relationship of 84 E. coli isolates (48 from humans and 36 from foods. An antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using the disk diffusion method. Virulence factors were evaluated by multiplex PCR, and the clonal relationship among the resistant isolates was studied by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. All isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone. Overall, 26%, 20.2%, 15.4% and 6% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline, ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and cephalotin, respectively. Twenty two percent of the isolates exhibited resistance to more than one antimicrobial agent. Multiple-drug resistance was mostly observed in the human isolates and involved the antibiotics ampicillin and tetracycline. None of the six virulence genes were identified among the isolates. Analysis of genetic diversity by PFGE of 31 resistant isolates, revealed 29 distinct restriction patterns. In conclusion, E. coli from humans and foods are resistant to commonly used antibiotics and are highly genetically diverse. In this setting, inappropriate use of antibiotics may be a cause of high resistance rate instead of clonal spread.

  15. Draft genome sequence analysis of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated in 2013 from humans and chickens in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of nine multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n=6) and chicken carcass (n=3) from Lagos, Nigeria in 2013. Multiple extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes were identified in these isolates. ...

  16. Comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance and phylogenetic group patterns in human and porcine urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Krag, L.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infectious diseases in humans and domestic animals such as pigs. The most frequent infectious agent in such infections is Escherichia coli. Virulence characteristics of E. coli UTI strains range from highly virulent pyelonephritis strains...

  17. High-yield extraction of Escherichia coli RNA from human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecke, Johannes; Kraut, Simone; Zwadlo, Klara; Gandi, Senthil Kumar; Pritchard, David; Templeton, Kate; Bachmann, Till

    2017-03-01

    Studies of bacterial transcriptomics during bloodstream infections are limited to-date because unbiased extraction of bacterial mRNA from whole blood in sufficient quantity and quality has proved challenging. Problems include the high excess of human cells, the presence of PCR inhibitors and the short intrinsic half-life of bacterial mRNA. This study aims to provide a framework for the choice of the most suitable sample preparation method. Escherichia coli cells were spiked into human whole blood and the bacterial gene expression was stabilized with RNAprotect either immediately or after lysis of the red blood cells with Triton X-100, saponin, ammonium chloride or the commercial MolYsis buffer CM. RNA yield, purity and integrity were assessed by absorbance measurements at 260 and 280 nm, real-time PCR and capillary electrophoresis. For low cell numbers, the best mRNA yields were obtained by adding the commercial RNAprotect reagent directly to the sample without prior lyses of the human blood cells. Using this protocol, significant amounts of human RNA were co-purified, however, this had a beneficial impact on the yields of bacterial mRNA. Among the tested lysis agents, Triton X-100 was the most effective and reduced the human RNA background by three to four orders of magnitude. For most applications, lysis of the human blood cells is not required. However, co-purified human RNA may interfere with some downstream processes such as RNA sequencing. In this case, blood cell lysis with Triton X-100 is desirable.

  18. Epidemiological importance of humans and domestic animals as reservoirs of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Srđan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A "new" pathogenic agent, verocytotoxin - producing Escherichia coli (VTEC emerged in the last 20 years, causing an increased number of sporadic cases, as well as of outbreaks of diarrhoeal diseases. Humans and animals can be infected with VTEC, but their epidemiological importance as a reservoir of this agent is not quite clear, especially in the Balkan region. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of isolation of VTEC from the intestinal tract of humans and animals and to determine the serogroups of the isolated strains. Methods. A total of, 3 401 stool samples from humans and 2 660 samples from five different species of domestic animals were tested for the presence of this pathogen. Results. VTEC was isolated from 20 (0.6% humans stools and from 431 (16.2% animal fecal samples (p < 0.001. Only 15 (3.3% VTEC strains belonged to human infection-associated serogroups (O26, O55, O111, O128 and O 157, designated as enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC. The most known serogroup- O157 was identified in 6 (1.3% of the isolated VTEC strains; of them, 1 (5% was of human origin and 5 (1.2% were animal strains. Conclusion. This study revealed that domestic animals were a more important reservoir of VTEC than humans, and that the isolated VTEC strains rarely belonged to O157, as well as to other EHEC serogroups that might explain rare sporadic cases and the absence of epidemic occurrence of diarrhoeal diseases caused by VTEC in this geographic region.

  19. Human milk glycosaminoglycans inhibit in vitro the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Salmonella fyris to human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Giovanni V; Facinelli, Bruna; Magi, Gloria; Marini, Emanuela; Zampini, Lucia; Mantovani, Veronica; Galeazzi, Tiziana; Padella, Lucia; Marchesiello, Rita L; Santoro, Lucia; Coscia, Alessandra; Peila, Chiara; Volpi, Nicola; Gabrielli, Orazio

    2016-04-01

    Breast-fed infants have a lower incidence of acute gastroenteritis due to the presence of several anti-infective factors in human milk. The aim of this work is to study the capacity of human milk glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) to inhibit the adhesion of some common pathogenic bacteria. GAGs were isolated from a pool of milk samples collected from different mothers during the first month of lactation. Experiments were carried out to study the ability of GAGs to inhibit the adhesion of two intestinal micro-organisms (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotype 0119 and Salmonella fyris) to Caco-2 and Int-407 cell lines. The study showed that the GAGs had an anti-adhesive effect on the two pathogenic strains studied with different degrees of inhibition. In particular, in the presence of human milk GAGs, the adhesion of S. fyris to Caco-2 cells and to Int-407 cells of both tested strains was significantly reduced. Our results demonstrated that GAGs in human milk can be one of the important defensive factors against acute diarrheal infections in breast-fed infants.

  20. Microarray based comparative genotyping of gentamicin resistant Escherichia coli strains from food animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmolka, Ama; Anjum, Muna F; La Ragione, Roberto M; Kaszanyitzky, Eva J; Nagy, Béla

    2012-04-23

    Recent data from the European and Hungarian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Systems have indicated that the routine use of gentamicin in human and veterinary medicine frequently leads to the selection of gentamicin resistance in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to provide molecular characterization of gentamicin resistance in clinical and commensal E. coli strains representing humans and food producing animals by genotyping for antimicrobial resistance and virulence using a miniaturized microarray. All 50 strains tested proved to be multidrug resistant defined as resistance to three or more antimicrobial classes. Antimicrobial resistances genes such as aadA1-like, strB, bla(TEM), sul1 and tet(A) or tet(B), and corresponding phenotypes (streptomycin-, ampicillin-, sulfamethoxazole- and tetracycline resistance) were detected in >50% of isolates regardless of the host or clinical background. However, certain genes encoding gentamicin resistance such as aac(6')-Ib and ant(2″)-Ia as well as catB3-like genes for phenicol resistance were only detected in human isolates. Among virulence genes, the increased serum survival gene iss was predominant in all host groups. Although the majority of gentamicin resistant E. coli strains were characterized by diverse antimicrobial resistance, and virulence gene patterns, accentuated links between catB3-like, aac(6')-Ib, bla(CTX-M-1) and sat genes could be detected in human strains. Further resistance/virulence gene associations (tet(A) with iroN and iss) were detected in poultry strains. In conclusion, the simultaneous characterization of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genotypes of representative clinical and commensal strains of E. coli should be useful for the identification of emerging genotypes with human and or animal health implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Human exposure assessment to antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli through drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, E; Borrego, C M; Balcázar, J L; Cummins, E

    2018-03-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) are a potential threat to human health through drinking water with strong evidence of ARB presence in post treated tap water around the world. This study examines potential human exposure to antibiotic-resistant (AR) Escherichia coli (E. coli) through drinking water, the effect of different drinking water treatments on AR E. coli and the concentration of AR E. coli required in the source water for the EU Drinking Water Directive (DWD) (Council Directive 98/83/EC, 0CFU/100ml of E. coli in drinking water) to be exceeded. A number of scenarios were evaluated to examine different water treatment combinations and to reflect site specific conditions at a study site in Europe. A literature search was carried out to collate data on the effect of environmental conditions on AR E. coli, the effect of different water treatments on AR E. coli and typical human consumption levels of tap water. A human exposure assessment model was developed with probability distributions used to characterise uncertainty and variability in the input data. Overall results show the mean adult human exposure to AR E. coli from tap water consumption ranged between 3.44×10 -7 and 2.95×10 -1 cfu/day for the scenarios tested and varied depending on the water treatments used. The level of AR E. coli required in the source water pre-treatment to exceed the DWD varied between 1 and 5logcfu/ml, depending on the water treatments used. This can be used to set possible monitoring criteria in pre-treated water for potential ARB exposure in drinking water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. FREQUENCY AND DISTRIBUTION OF DIARRHOEAGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH DIARRHOEA IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    OpenAIRE

    Dedeić-Ljubović, AmeLa; Hukić, Mirsada; Bekić, DaRia; Zvizdić, AmrA

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease is a major cause of illness and death among infants and young children worldwide. Among the Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intestinal diseases, there are six well-described categories: enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), entero-pathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC).

  3. A high molecular weight soluble fraction of tempeh protects against fluid losses in Escherichia coli-infected piglet small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.; Nout, M.J.R.; Rombouts, F.M.; Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Meulen, van der J.

    2007-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhoea in children and piglets. Infection of ETEC results in fluid secretion and electrolyte losses in the small intestine. In this study the effects of tempeh, a traditional fungal fermented soyabean product, on fluid losses

  4. Human Milk Oligosaccharides Protect Bladder Epithelial Cells Against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Invasion and Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ann E.; Autran, Chloe A.; Espanola, Sophia D.; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants. PMID:23990566

  5. High-yield Escherichia coli-based cell-free expression of human proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Erich; Wuethrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Production of sufficient amounts of human proteins is a frequent bottleneck in structural biology. Here we describe an Escherichia coli-based cell-free system which yields mg-quantities of human proteins in N-terminal fusion constructs with the GB1 domain, which show significantly increased translation efficiency. A newly generated E. coli BL21 (DE3) RIPL-Star strain was used, which contains a variant RNase E with reduced activity and an excess of rare-codon tRNAs, and is devoid of lon and ompT protease activity. In the implementation of the expression system we used freshly in-house prepared cell extract. Batch-mode cell-free expression with this setup was up to twofold more economical than continuous-exchange expression, with yields of 0.2-0.9 mg of purified protein per mL of reaction mixture. Native folding of the proteins thus obtained is documented with 2D [{sup 15}N,{sup 1}H]-HSQC NMR.

  6. Effect of sterilized human fecal extract on the sensitivity of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 to enrofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngbeom; Sung, Kidon; Rafii, Fatemeh; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2012-04-01

    The ingestion of antimicrobial residues in foods of animal origin has the potential risk of exposing colonic bacteria to small concentrations of antibiotics and inducing resistance in the colonic bacteria. To investigate whether human intestinal contents would influence resistance development in bacteria, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (MIC of enrofloxacin sterilized human fecal extract. In the first passage, only the medium containing sterilized fecal extract supported the growth of E. coli at an enrofloxacin concentration equal to the MIC. In the second and third passages following exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of the drug, the bacteria in media containing sterilized fecal extract grew at 0.1 μg ml(-1) of enrofloxacin. The efflux pump inhibitors, reserpine and carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), increased the sensitivity of bacteria to 0.1 μg ml(-1) of enrofloxacin in the medium containing sucrose, but their effect was not observed in the medium supplemented with 2.5% sterilized fecal extract. The proportions of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in E. coli grown in the medium with 2.5% sterilized fecal extract differed from those grown in the medium alone. Fecal extract may contain unknown factors that augment the ability of E. coli to grow in concentrations of enrofloxacin higher than MIC, both in the presence and absence of efflux pump inhibitors. This is the first study showing that fecal extract affects the level of sensitivity of E. coli to antimicrobial agents.

  7. Simplified Method to Produce Human Bioactive Leukemia Inhibitory Factor in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Kahroba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Human leukemia inhibitory factor (hLIF is a poly functional cytokine with numerous regulatory effects on different cells. Main application of hLIF is maintaining pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. hLIF indicated effective work in implantation rate of fertilized eggs and multiple sclerosis (MS treatment. Low production of hLIF in eukaryotic cells and prokaryotic host’s problems for human protein production convinced us to develop a simple way to reach high amount of this widely used clinical and research factor. Objectives In this study we want to purify recombinant human leukemia inhibitory factor in single simple method. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study, gene expression: human LIF gene was codon optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and attached his-tag tail to make it extractable. After construction and transformation of vector to E. coli, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG used for induction. Single step immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC used for purification confirmed by Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE and western blotting. Bioactivity of the hLIF were tested by MTT assay with TF-1 cells and CISH gene stimulation in monocyte and TF-1 by real-time PCR. Induction by 0.4 mM of IPTG in 25°C for 3 hours indicated best result for soluble expression. SPSS indicated P ˂ 0.05 that is significant for our work. Results Cloning, expression, and extraction of bio active rhLIF was successfully achieved according MTT assay and real time PCR after treatment of TF-1 and monocyte cell lines. Conclusions We developed an effective single step purification method to produce bioactive recombinant hLIF in E. coli. For the first time we used CISH gene stimulating for bioactivity test for qualifying of recombinant hLIF for application.

  8. Virulence genes in bla(CTX-M) Escherichia coli isolates from chickens and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Luke; Wu, Guanghui; Phillips, Neil; Coldham, Nick; Mevius, Dik; Teale, Chris

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the presence of virulence genes in isolates of CTX-M Escherichia coli from diseased chickens, from healthy chickens and from urinary tract infections in people. Three CTX-M E. coli strains from three different instances of disease in poultry (two of which were E. coli related) were tested for bla(CTX-M) sequence type and replicon type. Additionally, they were tested for the presence of 56 virulence genes (encoding fimbriae, adhesins, toxins, microcins and iron acquisition genes) using a micro-array. Results were compared to the virulence genes present in isolates from 26 healthy chickens and from 10 people with urinary tract infections. All genes found in isolates from diseased birds, including the astA (heat stable toxin) and tsh (temperature sensitive haemagglutinin) genes which have previously been associated with colibacillosis in chickens, were also present in isolates from healthy birds. However, 6/10 of the virulence genes found were exclusive to isolates from humans. Genes exclusive to chicken isolates included ireA (sidephore receptor), lpfA (long polar fimbriae), mchF (microcin transporter protein) and tsh whilst genes exclusive to human isolates included ctdB (cytolethal distending toxin), nfaE (non-fimbrial adhesion), senB (plasmid encoded enterotoxin) and toxB (toxin B). The results support previous findings that CTX-M E. coli strains in chickens are generally different from those causing disease in humans, but genes such as astA and tsh in isolates from diseased birds with colisepticaemia were also present in isolates from healthy birds. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Paul D

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial usage is considered the most important factor promoting the emergence, selection and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in both veterinary and human medicine. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic basis of tetracycline resistance in faecal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy broiler chickens and compare these data with isolates obtained from hospitalized patients in Jamaica. Results Eighty-two E. coli strains isolated from faecal samples of broiler chickens and urine and wound specimens of hospitalized patients were analyzed by agar disc diffusion to determine their susceptibility patterns to 11 antimicrobial agents. Tetracycline resistance determinants were investigated by plasmid profiling, transformations, and amplification of plasmid-borne resistance genes. Tetracycline resistance occurred at a frequency of 82.4% in avian isolates compared to 43.8% in human isolates. In addition, among avian isolates there was a trend towards higher resistance frequencies to kanamycin and nalidixic acid (p E. coli. Tetracycline resistance was mediated by efflux genes tetB and/or tetD. Conclusion The present study highlights the prevalence of multiple drug resistant E. coli among healthy broiler chickens in Jamaica, possibly associated with expression of tetracycline resistance. While there did not appear to be a common source for multiple drug resistance in the strains from avian or human origin, the genes encoding resistance are similar. These results suggest that genes are disseminated in the environment and warrant further investigation of the possibility for avian sources acting as reservoirs for tetracycline resistance.

  10. Key features of mcr-1-bearing plasmids from Escherichia coli isolated from humans and food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Zurfluh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mcr-1-harboring Enterobacteriaceae are reported worldwide since their first discovery in 2015. However, a limited number of studies are available that compared full-length plasmid sequences of human and animal origins. Methods In this study, mcr-1-bearing plasmids from seven Escherichia coli isolates recovered from patients (n = 3, poultry meat (n = 2 and turkey meat (n = 2 in Switzerland were further analyzed and compared. Isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The mcr-1-bearing plasmids were transferred by transformation into reference strain E. coli DH5α and MCR-1-producing transformants were selected on LB-agar supplemented with 2 mg/L colistin. Purified plasmids were then sequenced and compared. Results MLST revealed six distinct STs, illustrating the high clonal diversity among mcr-1-positive E. coli isolates of different origins. Two different mcr-1-positive plasmids were identified from a single E. coli ST48 human isolate. All other isolates possessed a single mcr-1 harboring plasmid. Transferable IncI2 (size ca. 60–61 kb and IncX4 (size ca. 33–35 kb type plasmids each bearing mcr-1 were found associated with human and food isolates. None of the mcr-1-positive IncI2 and IncX4 plasmids possessed any additional resistance determinants. Surprisingly, all but one of the sequenced mcr-1-positive plasmids lacked the ISApl1 element, which is a key element mediating acquisition of mcr-1 into various plasmid backbones. Conclusions There is strong evidence that the food chain may be an important transmission route for mcr-1-bearing plasmids. Our data suggest that some “epidemic” plasmids rather than specific E. coli clones might be responsible for the spread of the mcr-1 gene along the food chain.

  11. Human and avian extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli: infections, zoonotic risks, and antibiotic resistance trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellata, Melha

    2013-11-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) constitutes ongoing health concerns for women, newborns, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals due to increased numbers of urinary tract infections (UTIs), newborn meningitis, abdominal sepsis, and septicemia. E. coli remains the leading cause of UTIs, with recent investigations reporting the emergence of E. coli as the predominant cause of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections. This shift from the traditional Gram-positive bacterial causes of nosocomial and neonatal sepsis infections could be attributed to the use of intrapartum chemoprophylaxis against Gram-positive bacteria and the appearance of antibiotic (ATB) resistance in E. coli. While ExPEC strains cause significant healthcare concerns, these bacteria also infect chickens and cause the poultry industry economic losses due to costs of containment, mortality, and disposal of carcasses. To circumvent ExPEC-related costs, ATBs are commonly used in the poultry industry to prevent/treat microbial infections and promote growth and performance. In an unfortunate linkage, chicken products are suspected to be a source of foodborne ExPEC infections and ATB resistance in humans. Therefore, the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) (resistance to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents) among avian E. coli has created major economic and health concerns, affecting both human healthcare and poultry industries. Increased numbers of immunocompromised individuals, including the elderly, coupled with MDR among ExPEC strains, will continue to challenge the treatment of ExPEC infections and likely lead to increased treatment costs. With ongoing complications due to emerging ATB resistance, novel treatment strategies are necessary to control ExPEC infections. Recognizing and treating the zoonotic risk posed by ExPEC would greatly enhance food safety and positively impact human health.

  12. Global gene expression profiling of the asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 in the human urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are an important health problem worldwide, with many million cases each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism causing UTIs in humans. The asymptomatic bacteriuria E. coli strain 83972 is an excellent colonizer of the human urinary tract, where it causes...... long-term bladder colonization. The strain has been used for prophylactic purposes in patients prone to more severe and recurrent UTIs. For this study, we used DNA microarrays to monitor the expression profile of strain 83972 in the human urinary tract. Significant differences in expression levels were...

  13. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer between human and animal commensal Escherichia coli strains identified by microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, Elena; François, Patrice; Gutacker, Michaela; Gettler, Brian; Benagli, Cinzia; Convert, Maruska; Boerlin, Patrick; Schrenzel, Jacques; Piffaretti, Jean-Claude

    2008-08-01

    Bacteria exchange genetic material by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). To evaluate the impact of HGT on Escherichia coli genome plasticity, 19 commensal strains collected from the intestinal floras of humans and animals were analyzed by microarrays. Strains were hybridized against an oligoarray containing 2700 E. coli K12 chromosomal genes. A core (genes shared among compared genomes) and a flexible gene pool (genes unique for each genome) have been identified. Analysis of hybridization signals evidenced 1015 divergent genes among the 19 strains and each strain showed a specific genomic variability pattern. Four hundred and fifty-eight genes were characterized by higher rates of interstrain variation and were considered hyperdivergent. These genes are not randomly distributed onto the chromosome but are clustered in precise regions. Hyperdivergent genes belong to the flexible gene pool and show a specific GC content, differing from that of the chromosome, indicating acquisition by HGT. Among these genes, those involved in defense mechanisms and cell motility as well as intracellular trafficking and secretion were far more represented than others. The observed genome plasticity contributes to the maintenance of genetic diversity and may therefore be a source of evolutionary adaptation and survival.

  14. Functional expression of a human GDP-L-fucose transporter in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster-Fromme, Karin; Schneider, Sarah; Sprenger, Georg A; Albermann, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the translocation of nucleotide-activated sugars from the cytosol across a membrane into the endoplasmatic reticulum or the Golgi apparatus which is an important step in the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids in eukaryotes. The heterologous expression of the recombinant and codon-adapted human GDP-L-fucose antiporter gene SLC35C1 (encoding an N-terminal OmpA-signal sequence) led to a functional transporter protein located in the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. The in vitro transport was investigated using inverted membrane vesicles. SLC35C1 is an antiporter specific for GDP-L-fucose and depending on the concomitant reverse transport of GMP. The recombinant transporter FucT1 exhibited an activity for the transport of 3 H-GDP-L-fucose with a V max of 8 pmol/min mg with a K m of 4 µM. The functional expression of SLC35C1 in GDP-L-fucose overproducing E. coli led to the export of GDP-L-fucose to the culture supernatant. The export of GDP-L-fucose by E. coli provides the opportunity for the engineering of a periplasmatic fucosylation reaction in recombinant bacterial cells.

  15. High Efficient Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Native Human Epidermal Growth Factor in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF is a small, mitotic growth polypeptide that promotes the proliferation of various cells and is widely applied in clinical practices. However, high efficient expression of native hEGF in Escherichia coli has not been successful, since three disulfide bonds in monomer hEGF made it unable to fold into correct 3D structure using in vivo system. To tackle this problem, we fused Mxe GyrA intein (Mxe at the C-terminal of hEGF followed by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO and 10x His-tag to construct a chimeric protein hEGF-Mxe-SUMO-H10. The fusion protein was highly expressed at the concentration of 281 mg/L and up to 59.5% of the total cellular soluble proteins. The fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and 29.4 mg/L of native hEGF can be released by thiol induced N-terminal cleavage without any proteases. The mitotic activity in Balb/c 3T3 cells is proliferated by commercial and recombinant hEGF measured with methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay which indicated that recombinant hEGF protein stimulates the cell proliferation similar to commercial protein. This study significantly improved the yield and reduced the cost of hEGF in the recombinant E. coli system and could be a better strategy to produce native hEGF for pharmaceutical development.

  16. Influence of the Escherichia coli capsule on complement fixation and on phagocytosis and killing by human phagocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Horwitz, M A; Silverstein, S C

    1980-01-01

    To define mechanisms by which polysaccharide capsules confer enhanced virulence on gram-negative bacteria, we examined the effect of the Escherichia coli capsule on complement fixation to the bacterial surface and on phagocytosis and killing of these bacteria by mouse macrophages and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and monocytes. When E. coli were attached to mouse macrophages with concanavalin A, the macrophages readily phagocytosed unencapsulated but not encapsulated bacteria even ...

  17. Single Multiplex PCR Assay To Identify Simultaneously the Six Categories of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Associated with Enteric Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Maricel; Kruger, Eileen; Durán, Claudia; Lagos, Rosanna; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria; Toro, Cecilia; Vidal, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We designed a multiplex PCR for the detection of all categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. This method proved to be specific and rapid in detecting virulence genes from Shiga toxin-producing (stx1, stx2, and eae), enteropathogenic (eae and bfp), enterotoxigenic (stII and lt), enteroinvasive (virF and ipaH), enteroaggregative (aafII), and diffuse adherent (daaE) Escherichia coli in stool samples. PMID:16208019

  18. Longitudinal Characterization of Escherichia coli in Healthy Captive Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Jonathan B.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Trent, Ava M.; Murphy, Tami; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of non-human primates (NHPs) are well known to harbor Escherichia coli, a known commensal of human beings and animals. While E. coli is a normal inhabitant of the mammalian gut, it also exists in a number of pathogenic forms or pathotypes, including those with predisposition for the GI tract as well as the urogenital tract. Diarrhea in captive NHPs has long been a problem in both zoo settings and research colonies, including the Como Zoo. It is an animal welfare concern, as well as a public health concern. E. coli has not been extensively studied; therefore, a study was performed during the summer of 2009 in collaboration with a zoo in Saint Paul, MN, which was previously experiencing an increased incidence and severity of diarrhea among their NHP collection. Fresh fecal samples were collected weekly from each member of the primate collection, between June and August of 2009, and E. coli were isolated. A total of 33 individuals were included in the study, representing eight species. E. coli isolates were examined for their genetic relatedness, phylogenetic relationships, plasmid replicon types, virulence gene profiles, and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. A number of isolates were identified containing virulence genes commonly found in several different E. coli pathotypes, and there was evidence of clonal transmission of isolates between animals and over time. Overall, the manifestation of chronic diarrhea in the Como Zoo primate collection is a complex problem whose solution will require regular screening for microbial agents and consideration of environmental causes. This study provides some insight toward the sharing of enteric bacteria between such animals. PMID:26664923

  19. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Anshu; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Chakraborti, Anuradha; Ghosh, Sujata

    2017-03-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging enteric pathogen causing diarrhoeal diseases in multiple epidemiological and clinical settings. However, understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease caused by this organism is still suboptimal. Studies have indicated that enteric bacteria induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in host intestinal epithelial cells might play a vital role in the pathogenesis caused by these organisms. In this study an attempt was made to assess EAEC-induced apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in human intestinal epithelial cell lines. INT-407 and HCT-15 cells were infected with EAEC-T8 (clinical isolate) as well as plasmid cured variant of EAEC-T8 (EAEC-pT8). Propidium iodide staining was done to select the time of infection and the incubation period of the infected culture. Apoptosis was further assessed in EAEC infected both the cell lines by annexin-V-FLUOS & propidium iodide, cell death detection ELISA, DNA strand breaks and microscopic analysis. Further, the DNA content of the EAEC-infected cells at different phases of cell cycle was also monitored. We have found that EAEC could induce apoptosis in human small intestinal as well as colonic epithelial cell lines, which was assessed by the expression of phosphatidylserine on host cell surface, internucleosomal cleavage of host cell DNA and microscopic analysis of the characteristic apoptotic features of these cells. EAEC was also found to arrest cells at S phase and G2-M phase of the cell cycle. EAEC-T8 could induce maximum apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. Further, we have observed that the plasmid of this organism had maximum contribution to these processes. The outcome of this study has undoubtedly led to a better understanding of the basic mechanism of pathogenesis caused by EAEC.

  20. Expression of active human sialyltransferase ST6GalNAcI in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Marc F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of terminal, surface-exposed sialic acid moieties can greatly enhance the in vivo half-life of glycosylated biopharmaceuticals and improve their therapeutic efficacy. Complete and homogeneous sialylation of glycoproteins can be efficiently performed enzymically in vitro but this process requires large amounts of catalytically active sialyltransferases. Furthermore, standard microbial hosts used for large-scale production of recombinant enzymes can only produce small quantities of glycosyltransferases of animal origin, which lack catalytic activity. Results and conclusion In this work, we have expressed the human sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc I (ST6, an enzyme that sialylates O-linked glycoproteins, in Escherichia coli cells. We observed that wild-type bacterial cells are able to produce only very small amounts of soluble ST6 enzyme. We have found, however, that engineered bacterial strains which possess certain types of oxidative cytoplasm or which co-express the molecular chaperones/co-chaperones trigger factor, DnaK/DnaJ, GroEL/GroES, and Skp, can produce greatly enhanced amounts of soluble ST6. Furthermore, we have developed a novel high-throughput assay for the detection of sialyltransferase activity and used it to demonstrate that the bacterially expressed ST6 enzyme is active and able to transfer sialic acid onto a desialylated O-glycoprotein, bovine submaxillary mucin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of expression of active human sialyltransferase in bacteria. This system may be used as a starting point for the evolution of sialyltransferases with better expression characteristics or altered donor/acceptor specificities.

  1. Second human protein with homology to the Escherichia coli abasic endonuclease exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, M Z; Wilson, D M

    2000-01-01

    There are two major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease/3'-diesterase families designated after the Escherichia coli proteins exonuclease III (ExoIII) and endonuclease IV (EndoIV). These repair proteins function to excise mutagenic and cytotoxic AP sites or 3'-phosphate/phosphoglycolate groups from DNA. In mammals, the predominant repair endonuclease is Ape1, a homolog of ExoIII, whereas a mammalian homolog to EndoIV has not been identified to date. We have identified a human protein termed Ape2 that represents a subclass of the ExoIII family (exhibiting highest similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ETH1/APN2 gene product) and maintains many of the essential functional residues of the ExoIII-like proteins. The human protein is 518 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.3 kDa and a pI of 8.65. Unlike Ape1, this protein exhibited only weak ability to complement the repair defects of AP endonuclease/3'-repair-defective bacteria and yeast. Similarly, a weak, but specific, DNA-binding and incision activity for abasic site-containing substrates was observed with partially purified Ape2 protein. APE2 is located on the X chromosome at position p11.21 and consists of six exons. The transcript for APE2 is ubiquitously expressed, suggesting an important function for the encoded protein. An Ape2 green fluorescent fusion protein localized predominantly to the nucleus of HeLa cells, indicating a nuclear function; this localization was dependent on the C-terminal domain. We discuss our results in the context of the evolutionary conservation of the AP endonuclease families and their divergent activities and biological contributions.

  2. Escherichia coli O157:H7: Animal Reservoir and Sources of Human Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferens, Witold A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This review surveys the literature on carriage and transmission of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 in the context of virulence factors and sampling/culture technique. EHEC of the O157:H7 serotype are worldwide zoonotic pathogens responsible for the majority of severe cases of human EHEC disease. EHEC O157:H7 strains are carried primarily by healthy cattle and other ruminants, but most of the bovine strains are not transmitted to people, and do not exhibit virulence factors associated with human disease. Prevalence of EHEC O157:H7 is probably underestimated. Carriage of EHEC O157:H7 by individual animals is typically short-lived, but pen and farm prevalence of specific isolates may extend for months or years and some carriers, designated as supershedders, may harbor high intestinal numbers of the pathogen for extended periods. The prevalence of EHEC O157:H7 in cattle peaks in the summer and is higher in postweaned calves and heifers than in younger and older animals. Virulent strains of EHEC O157:H7 are rarely harbored by pigs or chickens, but are found in turkeys. The bacteria rarely occur in wildlife with the exception of deer and are only sporadically carried by domestic animals and synanthropic rodents and birds. EHEC O157:H7 occur in amphibian, fish, and invertebrate carriers, and can colonize plant surfaces and tissues via attachment mechanisms different from those mediating intestinal attachment. Strains of EHEC O157:H7 exhibit high genetic variability but typically a small number of genetic types predominate in groups of cattle and a farm environment. Transmission to people occurs primarily via ingestion of inadequately processed contaminated food or water and less frequently through contact with manure, animals, or infected people. PMID:21117940

  3. Replicative bypass of abasic site in Escherichia coli and human cells: similarities and differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savithri Weerasooriya

    Full Text Available Abasic [apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP] sites are the most common DNA damages, opposite which dAMP is frequently inserted ('A-rule' in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide insertion opposite the AP-site in eukaryotic cells depends on the assay system and the type of cells. Accordingly, a 'C-rule', 'A-rule', or the lack of specificity has been reported. DNA sequence context also modulates nucleotide insertion opposite AP-site. Herein, we have compared replication of tetrahydrofuran (Z, a stable analog of AP-site, in E. coli and human embryonic kidney 293T cells in two different sequences. The efficiency of translesion synthesis or viability of the AP-site construct in E. coli was less than 1%, but it was 7- to 8-fold higher in the GZGTC sequence than in the GTGZC sequence. The difference in viability increased even more in pol V-deficient strains. Targeted one-base deletions occurred in 63% frequency in the GZG and 68% frequency in GZC sequence, which dropped to 49% and 21%, respectively, upon induction of SOS. The full-length products with SOS primarily involved dAMP insertion opposite the AP-site, which occurred in 49% and 71% frequency, respectively, in the GZG and GZC sequence. dAMP insertion, largely carried out by pol V, was more efficient when the AP-site was a stronger replication block. In contrast to these results in E. coli, viability was 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher in human cells, and the 'A-rule' was more rigidly followed. The AP-site in the GZG and GZC sequences gave 76% and 89%, respectively, Z → T substitutions. In human cells, targeted one-base deletion was undetectable, and dTMP>dCMP were the next preferred nucleotides inserted opposite Z. siRNA knockdown of Rev1 or pol ζ established that both these polymerases are vital for AP-site bypass, as demonstrated by 36-67% reduction in bypass efficiency. However, neither polymerase was indispensable, suggesting roles of additional DNA polymerases in AP-site bypass in human cells.

  4. Current pathogenic Escherichia coli foodborne outbreak cases and therapy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Chun; Lin, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Fang, Jia-You

    2017-08-01

    Food contamination by pathogenic microorganisms has been a serious public health problem and a cause of huge economic losses worldwide. Foodborne pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) contamination, such as that with E. coli O157 and O104, is very common, even in developed countries. Bacterial contamination may occur during any of the steps in the farm-to-table continuum from environmental, animal, or human sources and cause foodborne illness. To understand the causes of the foodborne outbreaks by E. coli and food-contamination prevention measures, we collected and investigated the past 10 years' worldwide reports of foodborne E. coli contamination cases. In the first half of this review article, we introduce the infection and symptoms of five major foodborne diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli (STEC/EHEC), Shigella/enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). In the second half of this review article, we introduce the foodborne outbreak cases caused by E. coli in natural foods and food products. Finally, we discuss current developments that can be applied to control and prevent bacterial food contamination.

  5. Genetic features of human and bovine Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianciola, L; D'Astek, B A; Mazzeo, M; Chinen, I; Masana, M; Rivas, M

    2016-02-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are important food-borne pathogens associated with human diseases. In Argentina, O157:H7 is the dominant serotype in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases. Previously, we have described the almost exclusive circulation of human E. coli O157 strains belonging to the hypervirulent clade 8 in Neuquén Province. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by a broad molecular characterization, if this particular distribution of E. coli O157 clades in Neuquén is similar to the situation in other regions of the country and if it may be originated in a similar profile in cattle, its main reservoir. Two-hundred and eighty O157 strains (54 bovine and 226 human) isolated between 2006 and 2008 in different regions of Argentina were studied. All strains harbored rfbO157, fliCH7, eae, and ehxA genes. The predominant genotype was stx2a/stx2c in human (76.1%) and bovine (55.5%) strains. All human isolates tested by Lineage-Specific Polymorphism Assay (LSPA-6), were lineage I/II; among bovine strains, 94.1% belonged to lineage I/II and 5.9% to lineage I. No LSPA-6 lineage II isolates were detected. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis has revealed the existence of nine clade phylogenetic groups. In our clinical strains collection, 87.6% belonged to the hypervirulent clade 8, and 12.4% were classified as clade 4/5. In bovine isolates, 59.3% strains were clade 8, 33.3% clade 4/5 and 7.4% clade 3. More than 80% of human strains showed the presence of 6 of the 7 virulence determinants described in the TW14359 O157 strain associated with the raw spinach outbreak in the U.S. in 2006. More than 80% of bovine strains showed the presence of 3 of these factors. The q933 allele, which has been related to high toxin production, was present in 98.2% of clinical strains and 75.9% of the bovine isolates. The molecular characterization of human STEC O157 strains allows us to conclude that the particular situation previously described

  6. A novel expression system of domain I of human beta2 glycoprotein I in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Laurence H

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, characterised by recurrent miscarriage and thrombosis, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Domain I (DI of human beta 2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI is thought to contain crucial antibody binding epitopes for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, which are critical to the pathogenesis of APS. Expressing this protein in bacteria could facilitate studies investigating how this molecule interacts with aPL. Methods Using a computer programme called Juniper, sequentially overlapping primers were designed to be used in a recursive polymerase chain reaction (PCR to produce a synthetic DI gene. Specifically Juniper incorporates 'major' codons preferred by bacteria altering 41 codons out of 61. This was cloned into the expression plasmid pET(26b and expressed in BL21(DE3 Escherichia coli (E. coli. By virtue of a pelB leader sequence, periplasmic localisation of DI aided disulphide bond formation and toxicity was addressed by tightly regulating expression through the high stringency T7lac promoter. Results Purified, soluble his-tagged DI in yields of 750 μg/L bacterial culture was obtained and confirmed on Western blot. Expression using the native human cDNA sequence of DI in the same construct under identical conditions yielded significantly less DI compared to the recombinant optimised sequence. This constitutes the first description of prokaryotic expression of soluble DI of β2GPI. Binding to murine monoclonal antibodies that recognise conformationally restricted epitopes on the surface of DI and pathogenic human monoclonal IgG aPL was confirmed by direct and indirect immunoassay. Recombinant DI also bound a series of 21 polyclonal IgG samples derived from patients with APS. Conclusion By producing a synthetic gene globally optimised for expression in E. coli, tightly regulating expression and utilising periplasmic product translocation, efficient, soluble E. coli expression of the

  7. Synthetic genes for human muscle-type adenylate kinase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H J; Nishikawa, S; Tanaka, T; Uesugi, S; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gene coding for the human muscle-type cytosolic adenylate kinase (hAK1) was chemically synthesized and directly expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of trp promoter. The DNA duplex of 596 bp was designed and constructed from 40 oligonucleotide fragments of typically 30 nucleotides in length. Twelve unique restriction sites were fairly evenly spaced in the synthetic gene to facilitate site-specific mutagenesis at any part of this recombinant protein. The genes for mutant hAK1 (Tyr 95----Phe 95, Y95F hAK1; Arg 97----Ala 97, R97A hAK1) were constructed by cassette mutagenesis and utilized restriction sites incorporated in the hAK1 gene. The recombinant hAK1 was purified to homogeneity by a two-step chromatographic procedure with a good yield, and showed the same adenylate kinase activity as that of authentic hAK1. Preliminary kinetic studies show that the enzymatic activity (Vmax app,cor/Et) of Y95F hAK1 was slightly greater than that of recombinant hAK1, whereas R97A hAK1 still possessed approximately 4% of recombinant hAK1 activity. These results suggest that the Arg-97 residue is important but not essential for catalytic activity, and that Tyr-95 can be replaced by phenylalanine without substantial effects on the enzymatic activity. Moreover, preliminary estimates of the apparent kinetic parameters suggest that these residues are not required for MgATP binding, and therefore they do not appear to be part of the MgATP binding site.

  8. Minimizing human infection from Escherichia coli O157:H7 using GUMBOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Marsha R; Li, Min; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh; El-Zahab, Bilal; Hayes, Daniel; Hobden, Jeffery A; Janes, Marlene E; Warner, Isiah M

    2013-06-01

    Reduction in faecal shedding of Shiga toxin-producing enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in food-producing animals is a viable strategy to minimize human disease initiated by exposure to these microorganisms. To this end, an intervention strategy involving the electrostatic hybridization of two commonly used anti-infective agents for veterinary practice (i.e. chlorhexidine and ampicillin) was evaluated to curtail EHEC-transmitted disease from ruminant sources. Chlorhexidine di-ampicillin is a novel group of uniform material based on organic salts (GUMBOS) with inherent in vitro antibacterial activity that comes from its parent antimicrobial ions, chlorhexidine and ampicillin. Antibacterial activities for chlorhexidine diacetate, sodium ampicillin, chlorhexidine di-ampicillin and stoichiometrically equivalent 1 : 2 chlorhexidine diacetate : sodium ampicillin were assessed using the serial 2-fold dilution method and time-kill studies against seven isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one non-pathogenic E. coli 25922. Further studies to investigate synergistic interactions of reacted and stoichiometrically equivalent unreacted antimicrobial agents at MICs and possible mechanisms were also investigated. Synergism and in vitro antibacterial activities against EHEC were observed in this study, which suggests chlorhexidine di-ampicillin could be a useful reagent in reducing EHEC transmission and minimizing EHEC-associated infections. Likewise, chlorhexidine di-ampicillin reduced HeLa cell toxicity as compared with chlorhexidine diacetate or the stoichiometric combination of antimicrobial agents. Further results suggest that the mechanisms of action of chlorhexidine di-ampicillin and chlorhexidine diacetate against E. coli O157:H7 are similar. Reacting antimicrobial GUMBOS as indicated in this study may enhance the approach to current combination drug therapeutic strategies for EHEC disease control and prevention.

  9. Characteristics of Romanian fluoroquinolone-resistant human clinical Escherichia coli isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usein, Codruţa-Romaniţa; Tatu-Chiţoiu, Dorina; Nica, Maria; Ciontea, Simona Adriana; Palade, Andi-Marian; Condei, Maria; Damian, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Alarming progressive increase in the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli has been documented worldwide. Previous studies have suggested that many E. coli clinical isolates are actually low-virulence opportunists whose success derives more from antibiotic resistance than from pathogenic capability. The co-existence of ESBL production and fluoroquinolone resistance was reported as a major therapeutic challenge for E. coli infections. Considering the sparse information regarding the genetic background of virulence and antibiotic resistance of local isolates, a collection of ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates from human extraintestinal specimens was analyzed using PCR, PCR-sequencing, and PFGE, in order to clarify some aspects regarding their mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, phylogenetic origin, the content of virulence-encoding determinants, and clonal relatedness. The tested fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli (FQREC) isolates, which displayed genetic heterogeneity, carried double mutations in the QRDR of gyrA previously described, which could explain their high resistance to ciprofloxacin. More than half of them (69%) possessed group 1 blaCTX. like genes, and with one exception, all these isolates were ESBL producers. The FQREC isolates belonging to non B2 phylogenetic groups outnumbered the isolates derived from B2 group (60 versus 27 isolates), and their overall content of virulence-encoding genes (fim, pap, sfa/foc, afa, hly, cnf and aer) was reduced. Regardless of the phylogenetic origin, the most prevalent virulence-associated genes possessed by the FQREC isolates were aer and fim determinants, while none of these isolates carried hly and cnf genes. In the case of weakened patients, the E. coli isolates do not need a robust virulence repertoire in order to overcome the host defense systems. The co-resistance of many FQREC isolates to extended-spectrum cephalosporins may provide a substantial advantage to their survival and

  10. Bactericidal Effect of Selected Antidiarrhoeal Medicinal Plants on Intracellular Heat-Stable Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdi, Tannaz J; Brijesh, S; Daswani, Poonam G

    2014-05-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli continue to be a cause of global concern. Medicinal plants have been gaining popularity as promising antidiarrhoeal agents. In the present study, four antidiarrhoeal plants, viz. Aegle marmelos, Cyperus rotundus, Psidium guajava and Zingiber officinale were screened against a heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain. Decoctions of these plants were studied for their effect on intracellular killing of the bacterial strain using murine monocytic cell line, J774. [(3)H] thymidine release assay was used to evaluate the apoptotic/necrotic effect. All plants at concentrations plants could control diarrhoea caused by heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli through their immunomodulatory effect.

  11. Diversity and enterotoxigenicity of Staphylococcus spp. associated with domiati cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharoud, Walid M; Spano, Giuseppe

    2008-12-01

    A total of 87 samples of fresh and stored Domiati cheese (an Egyptian soft cheese) were examined for the presence of Staphylococcus spp. Fifteen Staphylococcus isolates identified as S. aureus (2 isolates), S. xylosus (4), S. caprae (4), and S. chromogenes (5) were recovered from 15 cheese samples. The S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin, and one isolate was also resistant to tetracycline. S. aureus isolates harbored classical staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes (sea and seb) and recently characterized SE-like genes (selg, seli, selm, and selo). One S. aureus isolate contained a single SE gene (sea), whereas another isolate contained five SE genes (seb, selg, seli, selm, and selo). These results suggest that Domiati cheese is a source for various Staphylococcus species, including S. aureus strains that could be enterotoxigenic.

  12. Escherichia coli F4 fimbriae specific lama single-domain antibody fragments effectively inhibit bacterial adhesion in vitro but poorly protect against diarrhea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, M.M.; Solt, van C.B.; Hoogendoorn, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Niewold, T.A.; Meulen, van der J.

    2005-01-01

    Oral administration of polyclonal antibodies directed against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) F4 fimbriae is used to protect against piglet post-weaning diarrhoea. For cost reasons, we aim to replace these polyclonal antibodies by recombinant llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs)

  13. The first 30 years of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in cattle production: Incidence, pre-harvest ecology, and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of the 700 serotypes of Escherichia coli, most are commensal; however, some range from mildly to highly pathogenic and can cause death. The disease-causing enterovirulent E. coli are classified as: Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and ...

  14. Refined localization of the Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac receptor locus on pig chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joller, D.; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Bertschinger, H.U.

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoea in newborn and weaned pigs caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing F4 fimbriae leads to considerable losses in pig production. In this study, we refined the mapping of the receptor locus for ETEC F4ab/F4ac adhesion (F4bcR) by joint analysis of Nordic and Swiss data....

  15. Occurrence of toxigenic Escherichia coli in raw milk cheese in Brazil Ocorrência de Escherichia coli toxigênica em queijo-de-minas frescal no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Paneto, B.R. [UNESP; Schocken-Iturrino, R.P.; Macedo,C.; Santo, E.; J.M. Marin

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of toxigenic Escherichia coli in raw milk cheese was surveyed in Middle Western Brazil. Fifty samples of cheese from different supermarkets were analyzed for E.coli. The isolates were serotyped and screened for the presence of verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The susceptibility to thirteen antimicrobial agents was evaluated by the disk diffusion method. E.coli were recovered from 48 (96.0%) of the samples. The s...

  16. Revisiting Escherichia coli as microbial factory for enhanced production of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashima; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2017-10-05

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-one of the most demanded therapeutic proteins with immense biotechnological applications-is a large multidomain protein containing 17 disulfide bonds. The current source of HSA is human blood plasma which is a limited and unsafe source. Thus, there exists an indispensable need to promote non-animal derived recombinant HSA (rHSA) production. Escherichia coli is one of the most convenient hosts which had contributed to the production of more than 30% of the FDA approved recombinant pharmaceuticals. It grows rapidly and reaches high cell density using inexpensive and simple subst-rates. E. coli derived recombinant products have more economic potential as fermentation processes are cheaper compared to the other expression hosts. The major bottleneck in exploiting E. coli as a host for a disulfide-rich multidomain protein is the formation of aggregates of overexpressed protein. The majority of the expressed HSA forms inclusion bodies (more than 90% of the total expressed rHSA) in the E. coli cytosol. Recovery of functional rHSA from inclusion bodies is not preferred because it is difficult to obtain a large multidomain disulfide bond rich protein like rHSA in its functional native form. Purification is tedious, time-consuming, laborious and expensive. Because of such limitations, the E. coli host system was neglected for rHSA production for the past few decades despite its numerous advantages. In the present work, we have exploited the capabilities of E. coli as a host for the enhanced functional production of rHSA (~ 60% of the total expressed rHSA in the soluble fraction). Parameters like intracellular environment, temperature, induction type, duration of induction, cell lysis conditions etc. which play an important role in enhancing the level of production of the desired protein in its native form in vivo have been optimized. We have studied the effect of assistance of different types of exogenously employed chaperone systems on the

  17. F4+ Escherichia coli in piglets: effect of host characteristics on population dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Geenen, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    Post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD) is a multifactorial disease of newly-weaned piglets that occurs in the first two weeks after weaning. PWD causes growth retardation and increased mortality, resulting in reduced animal welfare and economical damage. The main causative agent of PWD is enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli expressing F4 fimbriae (F4+ E. coli ).Intervention measures for F4+ E. coli can be aimed at preventing diarrhoea or at preventing transmission and should be evaluated in challenge or t...

  18. The F4 fimbrial antigen of Escherichia coli and its receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Broeck, W; Cox, E; Oudega, B.; Goddeeris, B

    2000-01-01

    F4 or K88 fimbriae are long filamentous polymeric surface proteins of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), consisting of so-called major (FaeG) and minor (FaeF, FaeH, FaeC, and probably FaeI) subunits. Several serotypes of F4 have been described, namely F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad. The F4 fimbriae

  19. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Markers and Phenotypes among Fecal E. coli Isolates Collected from Nicaraguan Infants ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, Daniel; Vilchez, Samuel; Paniagua, Margarita; Colque-Navarro, Patricia; Weintraub, Andrej; Möllby, Roland; Kühn, Inger

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) markers and common phenotypes in 2,164 E. coli isolates from 282 DEC-positive samples. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) were very diverse and were not correlated with diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) estA and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) belonged to a few phenotypes and were significantly correlated with diarrhea.

  20. Enterotoxigenic strain of Staphylococcus aureus causing food-borne outbreak in a private context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Manila Bianchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last European Food Safety Authority (EFSA report on zoonoses a total of 5262 food- borne outbreaks (FBOs have been reported in Europe in 2010. Staphylococcal FBOs are caused by consuming food contaminated with one or more preformed enterotoxins and are characterised by rapid onset of symptoms. In May 2012, an Italian family made up of five people was involved in a FBO: food sample of arancini (fried rice balls were analysed and resulted positive for coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS (>100,000 cfu/g and for staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE (types A and C. Laboratory analyses also led to the isolation of Staphylococcus aureus strain carrying the gene encoding for enterotoxin type A and belonging to the human biotype. The FBO described in this paper should be included in the next official FBO report as a strong evidence case: food and toxins responsible for symptoms and enterotoxigenic S. aureus strain were identified and the clinical symptoms matched with the final diagnosis.

  1. Serotypes, virulence genes, and intimin types of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from mastitic milk relevant to human health in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Kamelia M; Mustafa, Ashgan M; Aly, Magdy A K; AbdElhamed, Ghada S

    2012-04-01

    Some foodborne pathogens can cause mastitis, in which the organism is directly excreted into milk. Therefore, we undertook the steps to determine the prevalence and molecular characteristics of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolates from bovine mastitic milk in Egypt. Forty milk samples from dairy cattle showing mastitis were collected and examined for the presence of E. coli. Following enrichment and plating on selective agar, confirmation of the isolates was based on biochemical tests and the isolates were determined at the species level using cytochrome oxidase, triple sugar iron agar, urea, and indole tests as putatively E. coli. About 77.4% of the isolates belonged to four different O serogroups (O26, O86, O111, and O127). The multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) found that the seven isolates revealed positive amplification of the Eagg gene from the extracted DNA of the E. coli isolates in an incidence of 100%. Also, the selected isolates were subjected to a simple PCR for the detection of 12 of the most important E. coli genes associated with virulence. Those genes detected were stx1, stx2, hylA, Flic(h7), stb, F41, K99, sta, F17, LT-I, LT-II, and eaeA. A total of seven E. coli isolates that were non-O157 isolates were investigated. Among the seven isolates, none was stx positive, and all seven lacked F41, K99, LT-I, LT-II, and Flic(h7). Of these seven isolates, three (42.85%) were enterohemorrhagic E. coli hlyA positive and two (28.57%) were eaeA positive. STEC isolates were not found in bovine mastitic milk in Egypt. Isolates from mastitic milk were potentially pathogenic for human in that they belonged to serogroups associated with diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and some of them were hylA, stb, sta, F17, and eaeA positive.

  2. Characterization and biofilm forming ability of diarrhoeagenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli isolates recovered from human infants and young animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Deepthi; Dhaka, Pankaj; Vergis, Jess; Negi, Mamta; Mohan, Vysakh; Kumar, Manesh; Doijad, Swapnil; Poharkar, Krupali; Kumar, Ashok; Malik, Satyaveer Singh; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo Baliram; Rawool, Deepak B

    2015-02-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an important pathotype that causes infection in humans and animals. EAEC isolates (n=86) recovered from diarrhoeal cases in human infants (37) and young animals (49) were characterized as 'typical' and/or 'atypical' EAEC strains employing PCR for virulence associated genes (cvd432, aaiA, astA, pilS, irp2, ecp, pic, aggR, aafA, aggA, and agg3A). Besides, biofilm formation ability of human and animal EAEC isolates was assessed using microtiter plate assay. In addition, the transcriptional profile of biofilm associated genes (fis and ecp) was also evaluated and correlated with biofilm formation assay for few selected EAEC isolates of human and animal origins. Overall, a diverse virulence gene profile was observed for the EAEC isolates of human and animal origins as none of the EAEC isolates revealed the presence of all the genes that were targeted. Nine 'typical' EAEC isolates were identified (6 from humans and 3 from animals) while, the majority of the isolates were 'atypical' EAEC strains. Isolation and identification of three 'typical' EAEC isolates from animals (canines) appears to be the first report globally. Further, based on the observations of the biofilm formation assay, the study suggested that human EAEC isolates in particular were comparatively more biofilm producers than that of the animal EAEC isolates. The fis gene was highly expressed in majority of 'typical' EAEC isolates and the ecp gene in 'atypical' EAEC isolates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shuyu, Wu; Dalsgaard, A.; Hammerum, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids...... isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids...... involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli...

  4. Molecular screening of virulence genes in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from human blood culture in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Vanessa L; Tomazetto, Geizecler; Cyoia, Paula S; Neves, Meiriele S; Vidotto, Marilda C; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K T

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is one of the main etiological agents of bloodstream infections caused by Gram-negative bacilli. In the present study, 20 E. coli isolates from human hemocultures were characterized to identify genetic features associated with virulence (pathogenicity islands markers, phylogenetic group, virulence genes, plasmid profiles, and conjugative plasmids) and these results were compared with commensal isolates. The most prevalent pathogenicity island, in strains from hemoculture, were PAI IV536, described by many researchers as a stable island in enterobacteria. Among virulence genes, iutA gene was found more frequently and this gene enconding the aerobactin siderophore receptor. According to the phylogenetic classification, group B2 was the most commonly found. Additionally, through plasmid analysis, 14 isolates showed plasmids and 3 of these were shown to be conjugative. Although in stool samples of healthy people the presence of commensal strains is common, human intestinal tract may serve as a reservoir for ExPEC.

  5. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, O. L.; Hellerud, B. C.; Christiansen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant...... and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had......-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Adhesion of human and animal escherichia coli strains in association with their virulence-associated genes and phylogenetic origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fr̈mmel, Ulrike; R̈diger, Stefan; B̈hm, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    VAGs) infection. Moreover, initial evidence indicates that inVAGs and exVAGs support intestinal colonization. We developed new screening tools to genotypically and phenotypically characterize E. coli isolates originating in humans, domestic pigs, and 17 wild mammal and avian species. We analyzed 317 isolates......Intestinal colonization is influenced by the ability of the bacterium to inhabit a niche, which is based on the expression of colonization factors. Escherichia coli carries a broad range of virulence-associated genes (VAGs) which contribute to intestinal (inVAGs) and extraintestinal (ex......) and the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus). The prevalence of exVAGs depended on isolation from a specific host. Human uropathogenic E. coli isolates carried exVAGs with the highest prevalence, followed by badger (Meles meles) and roe deer isolates. Adhesion was found to be very diverse. Adhesion was specific...

  7. Oral rice-based vaccine induces passive and active immunity against enterotoxigenic E. coli-mediated diarrhea in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Oroku, Kazuki; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Kodama, Toshiaki; Nagai, Shinya; Ueda, Susumu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-09-22

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes severe diarrhea in both neonatal and weaned pigs. Because the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) has a high level of amino acid identity to the ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) B-subunit (LTB), we selected MucoRice-CTB as a vaccine candidate against ETEC-induced pig diarrhea. When pregnant sows were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, increased amounts of antigen-specific IgG and IgA were produced in their sera. CTB-specific IgG was secreted in the colostrum and transferred passively to the sera of suckling piglets. IgA antibodies in the colostrum and milk remained high with a booster dose after farrowing. Additionally, when weaned minipigs were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, production of CTB-specific intestinal SIgA, as well as systemic IgG and IgA, was induced. To evaluate the cross-protective effect of MucoRice-CTB against ETEC diarrhea, intestinal loop assay with ETEC was conducted. The fluid volume accumulated in the loops of minipigs immunized with MucoRice-CTB was significantly lower than that in control minipigs, indicating that MucoRice-CTB-induced cross-reactive immunity could protect weaned pigs from diarrhea caused by ETEC. MucoRice-CTB could be a candidate oral vaccine for inducing both passive and active immunity to protect both suckling and weaned piglets from ETEC diarrhea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Peruvian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Research Center, Silver Spring, Mary/and5; lnsrituto Nacional de Salud del Nino, Lima, Pern6; and Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Aplicadas, Lima, Pern 7...Center Detachment (NMRCD). Lima, Peru. Before the isolates were tested, one loop of bacteria from the frozen stock cultures was spread onto a

  9. Immunologic Control by Oral Vaccines of Diarrheal Disease Due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-30

    causing diarrhea among neonatal and infant herd animals, including calves and piglets . The causative strains are of different O:H serotypes from those...Newborn piglets and calves suckled on immunized mothers were significantly protected against challenge with otherwise lethal doses of ETEC strains...vaccine for travelers diarrhea: susceptibility to proteolytic digestion . Gastroenterology :1575, 1985. 49. Levine MM, Black RE, Clements ML, Lanata C

  10. Phenotypic Profiles of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Associated With Early Childhood Diarrhea in Rural Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    excretion of ETEC, either alone (n 729 [78%]) or with one or more copathogens (n 204 [22%]), including Shigella, Salmonella, Campylobacter, rotavirus ...vaccine strategies, in which a primary reliance on LT- based antitoxic immunity is disadvantaged wherever there is a preponderance of ST-only ETEC...among mil- itary personnel deployed to Egypt or Saudi Arabia from 1989 to 1991 (42). This correlation clearly implies that within Egypt and the Middle

  11. A Commensal Gone Bad: Complete Genome Sequence of the Prototypical Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain H10407

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Vivienne Mahon,5 Carl Brinkley,6 Jon L. Hobman,7 Stephen J. Savarino,8 Susan M. Tumer ,4 Mark J. Pallen,9 Charles W. Penn,9 Julian Parkhill,1 A. Keith... Tumer ,1 Timothy J. Johnson,10 Nicholas R. Thomson,1 Stephen G. J. Smith,5 and Ian R. Henderson4* The We/lcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus

  12. Detection of Escherichia coli Shiga toxin-producing in viscera of animals bovine and chicken intended for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zotta, Claudio Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli producing-Shiga toxin (STEC is associated with foodborne illness (ETA. It can cause bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The aim of the study was to detect the presence of STEC in samples of organs (offal of bovine animals and chicken intended for human consumption. Between 2008-2009, 76 samples bovine entrails and 22 chicken viscera samples, were processed and underwent, as screening technique, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of multiple genes coding for the factors virulence: Shiga toxin (stx1, stx2 and rfbO157 gene coding for capsular O157 lipopolysaccharide LPS. Samples from bovine offal development showed 84.2% for coliform bacteria. These isolates showed no virulence factor that characterized as STEC or Escherichia coli O157. The chicken offal samples showed 95.5% of development for coliform bacteria, being negative for the presence of genes encoding the Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (stx1, stx2 and rfbO157 gene. While this work does not STEC was detected, the presence of coliform bacteria in the samples studied makes these foods should be considered as potentially hazardous to consume undercooked with the consequent possibility of filing ETA.

  13. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-14

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women's bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the "interactive metabolome", which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI.

  14. Longitudinal Study of Antimicrobial Resistance among Escherichia coli Isolates from Integrated Multisite Cohorts of Humans and Swine▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, W. Q.; Scott, H. M.; Harvey, R. B.; Norby, B.; Lawhorn, D. B.; Pillai, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    In a 3-year longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between the seasonal prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant (AR) Escherichia coli isolates from human wastewater and swine fecal samples and the following risk factors: the host species, the production type (swine), the vocation (human swine workers, non-swine workers, and slaughter plant workers), and the season, in a multisite, vertically integrated swine and human population representative of a closed agri-food system. Human and swine E. coli (n = 4,048 and 3,429, respectively) isolates from wastewater and fecal samples were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, using the Sensititre broth microdilution system. There were significant (P vocation cohorts, in which swine worker cohort isolates exhibited lower sulfisoxazole and cefoxitin prevalence than the non-swine worker cohorts, while the slaughter plant worker cohort isolates exhibited elevated cefoxitin prevalence compared to that of non-swine workers. While a high variability was observed among seasonal samples over the 3-year period, no significant temporal trends were apparent. There were significant differences in the prevalence levels of multidrug-resistant isolates between host species, with swine at a higher risk of carrying multidrug-resistant strains than humans. Considering vocation, slaughter plant workers were at higher risk of exhibiting multidrug-resistant E. coli than non-swine workers. PMID:18424541

  15. Role of urinary cathelicidin LL-37 and human β-defensin 1 in uncomplicated Escherichia coli urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L; Dynesen, Pia; Larsen, Preben

    2014-01-01

    Cathelicidin (LL-37) and human β-defensin 1 (hBD-1) are important components of the innate defense in the urinary tract. The aim of this study was to characterize whether these peptides are important for developing uncomplicated Escherichia coli urinary tract infections (UTIs...... indicate that the concentration of LL-37 in the urinary tract and low susceptibility to LL-37 may increase the likelihood of UTI in a complex interplay between host and pathogen attributes.......). This was investigated by comparing urinary peptide levels of UTI patients during and after infection to those of controls, as well as characterizing the fecal flora of participants with respect to susceptibility to LL-37 and in vivo virulence. Forty-seven UTI patients and 50 controls who had never had a UTI were...

  16. Effect of probenecid on phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by human monocytes and granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisman, H P; Buys, L F; Langermans, J A; van den Broek, P J; van Furth, R

    1991-01-01

    The present study concerns the effects of probenecid on the phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by human monocytes and granulocytes. In both monocytes and granulocytes the inhibitory effect on phagocytosis was very small. Inhibition of intracellular killing of S. aureus by monocytes and granulocytes by probenecid was concentration dependent, being half-maximal at about 2 mM probenecid, and near-maximal at about 5 mM probenecid. The intracellular killing could also be inhibited when probenecid was added when this process was already started. Probenecid also inhibited the intracellular killing of E. coli by granulocytes, but not by monocytes. In the concentration range used, probenecid had no toxic effect on phagocytes or bacteria during the 2 hr of the experiments. PMID:1748482

  17. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33...... DCE-induced changes were overall more similar to those of B. lactis 420 than to L. acidophilus NCFM™, which is consistent with previously observed in vivo immunomodulation properties. In the gene ontology and pathway analyses both specific and unspecific changes were observed. Common to all...... was the regulation of apoptosis and adipogenesis, and lipid-metabolism related regulation by the probiotics. Specific changes such as regulation of cell-cell adhesion by B. lactis 420, superoxide metabolism by L. salivarius Ls-33, and regulation of MAPK pathway by L. acidophilus NCFM™ were noted. Furthermore...

  18. [A new method for the detection of coliforms and Escherichia coli in water intended for human consumption.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Lucia; Cataldo, Claudia; Chiaretti, Gianluca; Coccia, Annamaria; Semproni, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The ISO reference method, defined by the European Drinking Water Directive for the enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in water intended for human consumption, has various limitations, especially related to discrepancies observed with the new taxonomic classification of the coliform group. A study was therefore performed to compare the above reference method with another rapid method, the DST/Colilert, and to evaluate the phenotypical characteristics of isolated microrganisms. The ISO reference method failed to detect a significant proportion of coliforms and E. coli in water and furthermore, it enumerated microrganisms belonging to other groups. The DST/Colilert method was found instead to be a suitable alternative method for the detection of bacterial indicators.

  19. Virulence potential for extraintestinal infections among commensal Escherichia coli isolated from healthy humans--the Trojan horse within our gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starčič Erjavec, Marjanca; Žgur-Bertok, Darja

    2015-03-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that the reservoir of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains is the intestinal microbiota. Nevertheless, studies focused on the prevalence of potential ExPEC strains among the bowel microbiota in healthy human individuals practically do not exist and a strong bias towards pathogenic strains among the E. coli data set is obvious. To assess the prevalence of potential ExPEC strains among E. coli from the intestinal microbiota of healthy humans, we performed a search for data on the prevalence of virulence-associated genes and pathogenicity islands among fecal E. coli found in published studies, including studies comparing isolates from patients suffering from extraintestinal E. coli infections with E. coli from feces of healthy humans. An extensive literature search, including more than 500 published papers, revealed 24 papers with data on prevalences of ≥ 5 virulence-associated genes among 21 E. coli collections including ≥ 20 fecal/rectal strains obtained from healthy individuals and 4 papers with prevalences of pathogenicity islands among E. coli collections from healthy humans. The gathered data are presented in this minireview and clearly show that potential ExPEC strains are present among fecal isolates with a prevalence of around ≥ 10%. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Emergence of Escherichia coli encoding Shiga toxin 2f in human Shiga toxin-producing E-coli (STEC) infections in the Netherlands, January 2008 to December 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesema, I.; van der Zwaluw, K.; Schuurman, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; Franz, E.; van Duynhoven, Y.; van Pelt, W.

    2014-01-01

    The Shiga toxins of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can be divided into Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1) and Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) with several sub-variants. Variant Stx(2f) is one of the latest described, but has been rarely associated with symptomatic human infections. In the enhanced STEC

  1. G-Protein Sensitivity of Ligand Binding to Human Dopamine D2 and D3 Receptors Expressed in Escherichia coli : Clues for a Constrained D3 Receptor Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhauwe, Jurgen F.M.; Josson, Katty; Luyten, Walter H.M.L.; Driessen, Arnold J.; Leysen, Josée E.

    2000-01-01

    Human dopamine D2 and D3 receptors were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and Escherichia coli cells to compare their ligand binding properties in the presence or absence of G-proteins and to analyze their ability to interact with Gi/o-proteins. Binding affinities of agonists (dopamine,

  2. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various extended-spectrum

  3. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; Essen-Zandbergen, Van Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various

  4. Fate of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli from Faecal Sources in Surface Water and Probability of Human Exposure through Swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Jack F; Blaak, Hetty; Schets, Franciska M; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the fate of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) emitted from faecal sources in surface water, and the probability of human exposure through swimming. Concentrations of ESBL-EC were measured in recreational waters and in source waters, being water in

  5. Expression of recombinant human colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Resende Gomes

    2010-01-01

    O Fator estimulador de colônias de granulócitos humano recombinante (rhG-CSF) produzido em Escherichia coli é uma proteína não glicosilada com 175 aminoácidos, de grande importância clínica para o tratamento de neutropenias. O presente trabalho propõe a construção de dois sistemas de expressão em E. coli, um sistema para obtenção do rhG-CSF no citoplasma e outro para secreção da proteína recombinante no meio de cultura utilizando a sequência sinal da L-asparaginase II. Os dois sistemas de exp...

  6. High frequency of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with and without diarrhea in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Coralith; Chincha, Omayra; Leon, Mey; Iglesias, David; Barletta, Francesca; Mercado, Erik; Ochoa, Theresa

    2010-06-01

    Diarrhea is still a prevalent health issue in HIV patients. Our objective was to characterize the different diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) groups in stools from adult HIV patients. Cross sectional study: We enrolled HIV-positive and -negative patients with and without diarrhea from a tertiary-care center of Lima, Peru. Clinical data was recorded and a stool sample per patient was cultured. Multiplex PCR was used to detect different DECs. One hundred eighty-four participants were enrolled. The frequency of having at least one DEC was more common in HIV-positive than HIV-negative patients with diarrhea (42% versus 20%, P < 0.05). The enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) was the most common DEC in patients with diarrhea, 13% in HIV patients. The diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) was only present in HIV positive patients with diarrhea (10.1%). Different types of DEC are frequent in stools from HIV-positive patients.

  7. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrine Fladeby

    Full Text Available Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV, encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV, many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  8. Antibacterial and Antidiarrheal Activities of Plant Products against Enterotoxinogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Daniel Dubreuil

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC produces two types of enterotoxins: heat-labile (LT and heat-stable (STa and STb. These molecules are involved in the induction of secretory diarrhea in animals including humans. This condition is currently treated using a fluid replacement therapy and antibiotics. This treatment is often not available to people in developing countries, and several die from the condition provoke by ETEC. Over the years, plants and plant extracts have been use as traditional medicine to treat various gastrointestinal ailments including diarrhea. Many of these plant products have been claimed to be active against diarrhea, however few have been extensively studied. The main objective of this review was to gather the scattered information on the antidiarrheal activities reported for various plant products on ETEC. This includes two major effects: (1 The inhibitory effect on bacterial growth or viability and (2 The interference with ETEC enterotoxins activity upon the intestinal epithelium. We will focus on plant products and extracts for which we have major indications of their biological activity against ETEC and their enterotoxins. Because Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT is structurally, antigenically and mechanistically related to LT, it will also be discussed in this review.

  9. Dissemination of cephalosporin resistance genes between Escherichia coli strains from farm animals and humans by specific plasmid lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark de Been

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Third-generation cephalosporins are a class of β-lactam antibiotics that are often used for the treatment of human infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria, especially Escherichia coli. Worryingly, the incidence of human infections caused by third-generation cephalosporin-resistant E. coli is increasing worldwide. Recent studies have suggested that these E. coli strains, and their antibiotic resistance genes, can spread from food-producing animals, via the food-chain, to humans. However, these studies used traditional typing methods, which may not have provided sufficient resolution to reliably assess the relatedness of these strains. We therefore used whole-genome sequencing (WGS to study the relatedness of cephalosporin-resistant E. coli from humans, chicken meat, poultry and pigs. One strain collection included pairs of human and poultry-associated strains that had previously been considered to be identical based on Multi-Locus Sequence Typing, plasmid typing and antibiotic resistance gene sequencing. The second collection included isolates from farmers and their pigs. WGS analysis revealed considerable heterogeneity between human and poultry-associated isolates. The most closely related pairs of strains from both sources carried 1263 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs per Mbp core genome. In contrast, epidemiologically linked strains from humans and pigs differed by only 1.8 SNPs per Mbp core genome. WGS-based plasmid reconstructions revealed three distinct plasmid lineages (IncI1- and IncK-type that carried cephalosporin resistance genes of the Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL- and AmpC-types. The plasmid backbones within each lineage were virtually identical and were shared by genetically unrelated human and animal isolates. Plasmid reconstructions from short-read sequencing data were validated by long-read DNA sequencing for two strains. Our findings failed to demonstrate evidence for recent clonal transmission of

  10. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Reduces Mucus and Intermicrovillar Bridges in Human Stem Cell-Derived ColonoidsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie In

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC causes over 70,000 episodes of foodborne diarrhea annually in the United States. The early sequence of events that precede life-threatening hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome is not fully understood due to the initial asymptomatic phase of the disease and the lack of a suitable animal model. We determined the initial molecular events in the interaction between EHEC and human colonic epithelium. Methods: Human colonoids derived from adult proximal colonic stem cells were developed into monolayers to study EHEC-epithelial interactions. Monolayer confluency and differentiation were monitored by transepithelial electrical resistance measurements. The monolayers were apically infected with EHEC, and the progression of epithelial damage over time was assessed using biochemical and imaging approaches. Results: Human colonoid cultures recapitulate the differential protein expression patterns characteristic of the crypt and surface colonocytes. Mucus-producing differentiated colonoid monolayers are preferentially colonized by EHEC. Upon colonization, EHEC forms characteristic attaching and effacing lesions on the apical surface of colonoid monolayers. Mucin 2, a main component of colonic mucus, and protocadherin 24 (PCDH24, a microvillar resident protein, are targeted by EHEC at early stages of infection. The EHEC-secreted serine protease EspP initiates brush border damage through PCDH24 reduction. Conclusions: Human colonoid monolayers are a relevant pathophysiologic model that allow the study of early molecular events during enteric infections. Colonoid monolayers provide access to both apical and basolateral surfaces, thus providing an advantage over three-dimensional cultures to study host–pathogen interactions in a controllable and tractable manner. EHEC reduces colonic mucus and affects the brush border cytoskeleton in the absence of commensal bacteria. Keywords

  11. Translational Efficacy of Humanized Exposures of Cefepime, Ertapenem, and Levofloxacin against Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in a Murine Model of Complicated Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monogue, Marguerite L; Nicolau, David P

    2017-11-01

    Validated animal models are required as bridging tools to assess the utility of novel therapies and potential microbiologic outcomes. Herein, we utilized uropathogenic extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in the neutropenic murine complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) model with humanized exposures of cefepime, ertapenem, and levofloxacin to assess its translational value to human outcomes. Our data support the translational utility of this murine model to cUTI in humans as humanized exposures produced microbiologic outcomes consistent with the phenotypic profiles of the organisms. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Purification of human transcription factors Nanog and Sox2, each in complex with Skp, an Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung Chul; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Jeong, Jin Hee; Huh, Jin Hoe; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2009-10-01

    Nanog and Sox2 are key transcriptional factors involved in self-renewal and pluripotency of stem cells in human and other mammals. Nanog and Sox2 contain homeodomain (HD) and high-mobility group (HMG) DNA-binding domain, respectively, for targeting them to their regulatory regions and the other regions with transactivation function by providing sites for recruiting other transcriptional regulators. To gain insights in the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of the other regions of Nanog and Sox2, we have tried to overproduce and purify full length wild-type human Nanog and Sox2 expressed in Escherichia coli. Interestingly, we found that Nanog and Sox2 were individually stabilized by tight interaction with Skp, an E. coli periplasmic chaperone, thereby enabling stable over-expression and purification of Nanog and Sox2, each in complex with Skp. Purified Skp complexes of Nanog and Sox maintained DNA-binding activity toward its cognate DNA sequence. A similar approach may be applicable for some other mammalian proteins that are unstable or difficult to over-express in E. coli.

  13. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  14. Refolding and purification of recombinant human (Pro)renin receptor from Escherichia coli by ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Guo, Jinjin; Bai, Quan; Wang, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Purification of the recombinant human renin receptor (rhRnR) is a major aspect of its biological or biophysical analysis, as well as structural research. A simple and efficient method for the refolding and purification of rhRnR expressed in Escherichia coli with weak anion-exchange chromatography (WAX) was presented in this work. The solution containing denatured rhRnR in 8.0 mol/L urea extracted from the inclusion bodies was directly injected into the WAX column. The aggregation was prevented and the soluble form of renatured rhRnR in aqueous solution was obtained after desorption from the column. Effects of the extracting solutions, the pH values and urea concentrations in the mobile phase, as well as the sample size on the refolding and purification of rhRnR were investigated, indicating that the above mentioned factors had remarkable influences on the efficiency of refolding, purification and mass recovery of rhRnR. Under the optimal conditions, rhRnR was successfully refolded and purified simultaneously by WAX in one step within only 30 min. The result was satisfactory with mass recovery of 71.8% and purity of 94.8%, which was further tested by western blotting. The specific binding of the purified rhRnR to recombinant human renin was also determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The association constant of rhRnR to recombinant human renin was calculated to be 3.25 × 10(8) L/mol, which demonstrated that rhRnR was already renatured and simultaneously purified in one step using WAX. All of the above demonstrate that protein folding liquid chromatography (PFLC) should be a powerful tool for the purification and renaturation of rhRnR. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  15. Overexpression of functional human oxidosqualene cyclase in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kürten, Charlotte; Uhlén, Mathias; Syrén, Per-Olof

    2015-01-01

    The generation of multicyclic scaffolds from linear oxidosqualene by enzymatic polycyclization catalysis constitutes a cornerstone in biology for the generation of bioactive compounds. Human oxidosqualene cyclase (hOSC) is a membrane-bound triterpene cyclase that catalyzes the formation of the te......The generation of multicyclic scaffolds from linear oxidosqualene by enzymatic polycyclization catalysis constitutes a cornerstone in biology for the generation of bioactive compounds. Human oxidosqualene cyclase (hOSC) is a membrane-bound triterpene cyclase that catalyzes the formation...

  16. Flagellin Induces β-Defensin 2 in Human Colonic Ex vivo Infection with Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Steven B; Prior, Alison; Ellis, Samuel J; Cook, Vivienne; Chan, Simon S M; Gelson, William; Schüller, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E.coli (EHEC) is an important foodborne pathogen in the developed world and can cause life-threatening disease particularly in children. EHEC persists in the human gut by adhering intimately to colonic epithelium and forming characteristic attaching/effacing lesions. In this study, we investigated the innate immune response to EHEC infection with particular focus on antimicrobial peptide and protein expression by colonic epithelium. Using a novel human colonic biopsy model and polarized T84 colon carcinoma cells, we found that EHEC infection induced expression of human β-defensin 2 (hBD2), whereas hBD1, hBD3, LL-37, and lysozyme remained unchanged. Infection with specific EHEC deletion mutants demonstrated that this was dependent on flagellin, and apical exposure to purified flagellin was sufficient to stimulate hBD2 and also interleukin (IL)-8 expression ex vivo and in vitro. Flagellin-mediated hBD2 induction was significantly reduced by inhibitors of NF-κB, MAP kinase p38 and JNK but not ERK1/2. Interestingly, IL-8 secretion by polarized T84 cells was vectorial depending on the side of stimulation, and apical exposure to EHEC or flagellin resulted in apical IL-8 release. Our results demonstrate that EHEC only induces a modest immune response in human colonic epithelium characterized by flagellin-dependent induction of hBD2 and low levels of IL-8.

  17. Induction of Human β-Defensin 2 by the Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Is Mediated through Flagellin▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Miriam; Wehkamp, Jan; Altenhoefer, Artur; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A.; Stange, Eduard F.; Fellermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Human β-defensin 2 (hBD-2) is an inducible antimicrobial peptide synthesized by the epithelium to counteract bacterial adherence and invasion. Proinflammatory cytokines, as well as certain bacterial strains, have been identified as potent endogenous inducers. Recently, we have found that hBD-2 induction by probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 was mediated through NF-κB- and AP-1-dependent pathways. The aim of the present study was to identify the responsible bacterial factor. E. coli Nissle 1917 culture supernatant was found to be more potent than the pellet, indicating a soluble or shed factor. Chemical analysis demonstrated the factor to be heat resistant and proteinase digestible. Several E. coli Nissle 1917 deletion mutants were constructed and tested for their ability to induce hBD-2 expression in Caco-2 cells. Deletion mutants for flagellin specifically exhibited an impaired immunostimulatory capacity. Reinsertion of the flagellin gene restored the induction capacity to normal levels. Isolated flagellin from E. coli Nissle 1917 and from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis induced hBD-2 mRNA significantly in contrast to the flagellin of the apathogenic E. coli strain ATCC 25922. H1 flagellin antiserum abrogated hBD-2 expression induced by flagellin as well as E. coli Nissle 1917 supernatant, confirming that flagellin is the major stimulatory factor of E. coli Nissle 1917. PMID:17283097

  18. N-chlorotaurine, a long-lived oxidant produced by human leukocytes, inactivates Shiga toxin of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eitzinger

    Full Text Available N-chlorotaurine (NCT, the main representative of long-lived oxidants produced by granulocytes and monocytes, is known to exert broad-spectrum microbicidal activity. Here we show that NCT directly inactivates Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2, used as a model toxin secreted by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC. Bacterial growth and Stx2 production were both inhibited by 2 mM NCT. The cytotoxic effect of Stx2 on Vero cells was removed by ≥5.5 mM NCT. Confocal microscopy and FACS analyses showed that the binding of Stx2 to human kidney glomerular endothelial cells was inhibited, and no NCT-treated Stx2 entered the cytosol. Mass spectrometry displayed oxidation of thio groups and aromatic amino acids of Stx2 by NCT. Therefore, long-lived oxidants may act as powerful tools of innate immunity against soluble virulence factors of pathogens. Moreover, inactivation of virulence factors may contribute to therapeutic success of NCT and novel analogs, which are in development as topical antiinfectives.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance genes in marine bacteria and human uropathogenic Escherichia coli from a region of intensive aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova, Alexandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Rioseco, Maria Luisa; Kalsi, Rajinder K; Godfrey, Henry P; Cabello, Felipe C

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobials are heavily used in Chilean salmon aquaculture. We previously found significant differences in antimicrobial-resistant bacteria between sediments from an aquaculture and a non-aquaculture site. We now show that levels of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARG) are significantly higher in antimicrobial-selected marine bacteria than in unselected bacteria from these sites. While ARG in tetracycline- and florfenicol-selected bacteria from aquaculture and non-aquaculture sites were equally frequent, there were significantly more plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes per bacterium and significantly higher numbers of qnrB genes in quinolone-selected bacteria from the aquaculture site. Quinolone-resistant urinary Escherichia coli from patients in the Chilean aquacultural region were significantly enriched for qnrB (including a novel qnrB gene), qnrS, qnrA and aac(6')-1b, compared with isolates from New York City. Sequences of qnrA1, qnrB1 and qnrS1 in quinolone-resistant Chilean E. coli and Chilean marine bacteria were identical, suggesting horizontal gene transfer between antimicrobial-resistant marine bacteria and human pathogens. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Involvement of toll-like receptor 4 and Fc receptors gamma in human neutrophil priming by endotoxins from escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, D S; Prokhorenko, I R

    2013-02-01

    By using the fMLP-induced respiratory burst approach, the involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in human neutrophil priming by S- or Re-glycoforms of endotoxin from Escherichia coli has been elucidated. The priming effect of Re-glycoform is more pronounced than that of the S-glycoform. Unexpectedly, fMLP-triggered generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by endotoxin primed neutrophils was amplified by preincubation of the cells with anti-TLR4 (HTA125) antibodies or with isotype-matched immunoglobulin IgG2a. The most significant finding of our study is that neutrophils exposed to anti-TLR4 antibodies retain their ability to distinguish between S- or Re-glycoforms being primed, respectively. Moreover, differentiated effect of HTA125 antibodies on functional responses of neutrophils during their priming and fMLP stimulation was revealed. Taking these results into consideration, it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution of Fcγ receptors to fMLP-induced ROS generation by neutrophils preincubated with HTA125 or IgG2a and primed by endotoxins.

  1. Escherichia coli "TatExpress" strains super-secrete human growth hormone into the bacterial periplasm by the Tat pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Douglas F; Richards, Kirsty L; Peswani, Amber R; Roobol, Jo; Busby, Stephen J W; Robinson, Colin

    2017-12-01

    Numerous high-value proteins are secreted into the Escherichia coli periplasm by the General Secretory (Sec) pathway, but Sec-based production chassis cannot handle many potential target proteins. The Tat pathway offers a promising alternative because it transports fully folded proteins; however, yields have been too low for commercial use. To facilitate Tat export, we have engineered the TatExpress series of super-secreting strains by introducing the strong inducible bacterial promoter, ptac, upstream of the chromosomal tatABCD operon, to drive its expression in E. coli strains commonly used by industry (e.g., W3110 and BL21). This modification significantly improves the Tat-dependent secretion of human growth hormone (hGH) into the bacterial periplasm, to the extent that secreted hGH is the dominant periplasmic protein after only 1 hr induction. TatExpress strains accumulate in excess of 30 mg L-1 periplasmic recombinant hGH, even in shake flask cultures. A second target protein, an scFv, is also shown to be exported at much higher rates in TatExpress strains. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Sensitivity of K1-Encapsulated Escherichia coli to Killing by the Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein of Rabbit and Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Jerrold; Victor, Michael; Cross, Alan S; Elsbach, Peter

    1982-01-01

    The presence of K1 capsular polysaccharides increases the resistance of Escherichia coli to killing by serum and phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). To determine whether K1 capsule impedes the action of intracellular bactericidal systems of PMNs, we compared the sensitivity of several K1-encapsulated and non-encapsulated strains of E. coli to killing by the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) isolated from rabbit and human PMNs. BPI appears to be the principal ...

  3. Apramycin treatment affects selection and spread of a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain able to colonize the human gut in the intestinal microbiota of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Hansen, Monica Hegstad

    2016-01-01

    The effect of apramycin treatment on transfer and selection of an Escherichia coli strain (E. coli 912) in the intestine of pigs was analyzed through an in vivo experiment. The strain was sequenced and assigned to the sequence type ST101 and serotype O11. It carried resistance genes to apramycin/......-resistant E. coli. Since gentamicin is a first-choice drug for human bacteremia, this is of concern....

  4. Virulence and extended-spectrum β-lactamase encoding genes in Escherichia coli recovered from chicken meat intended for hospitalized human consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Younis, Gamal A.; Elkenany, Rasha M.; Fouda, Mohamed A.; Mostafa, Noura F.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study describes the prevalence of Escherichia coli in frozen chicken meat intended for human consumption with emphasis on their virulence determinants through detection of the virulence genes and recognition of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) encoding genes (bla OXA and bla TEM genes). Materials and Methods: A total of 120 frozen chicken meat samples were investigated for isolation of E. coli. All isolates were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Eight serotypes...

  5. High diversity of plasmids harbouring blaCMY-2 among clinical Escherichia coli isolates from humans and companion animals in the upper Midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Hansen, Katrine Hartung; Nielsen, Christine

    2014-01-01

    To determine the population structure and genetic relatedness of plasmids encoding CMY-2 β-lactamase in clinical Escherichia coli from humans and companion animals within a defined geographical area....

  6. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Biofilm Formation by Human Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates of Different Pathotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Juliane; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Weinreich, Jörg; Ali, Aamir; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter

    2017-12-15

    Bacterial biofilm formation is a widespread phenomenon and a complex process requiring a set of genes facilitating the initial adhesion, maturation, and production of the extracellular polymeric matrix and subsequent dispersal of bacteria. Most studies on Escherichia coli biofilm formation have investigated nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strains. Due to the extensive focus on laboratory strains in most studies, there is poor information regarding biofilm formation by pathogenic E. coli isolates. In this study, we genotypically and phenotypically characterized 187 human clinical E. coli isolates representing various pathotypes (e.g., uropathogenic, enteropathogenic, and enteroaggregative E. coli ). We investigated the presence of biofilm-associated genes ("genotype") and phenotypically analyzed the isolates for motility and curli and cellulose production ("phenotype"). We developed a new screening method to examine the in vitro biofilm formation ability. In summary, we found a high prevalence of biofilm-associated genes. However, we could not detect a biofilm-associated gene or specific phenotype correlating with the biofilm formation ability. In contrast, we did identify an association of increased biofilm formation with a specific E. coli pathotype. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) was found to exhibit the highest capacity for biofilm formation. Using our image-based technology for the screening of biofilm formation, we demonstrated the characteristic biofilm formation pattern of EAEC, consisting of thick bacterial aggregates. In summary, our results highlight the fact that biofilm-promoting factors shown to be critical for biofilm formation in nonpathogenic strains do not reflect their impact in clinical isolates and that the ability of biofilm formation is a defined characteristic of EAEC. IMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and consist of sessile bacterial cells surrounded by a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. They cause chronic and device

  7. Evaluation of Escherichia coli isolates from healthy chickens to determine their potential risk to poultry and human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary R Stromberg

    Full Text Available Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC strains are important pathogens that cause diverse diseases in humans and poultry. Some E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated virulence genes, so appear potentially pathogenic; they conceivably could be transmitted to humans through handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat. However, the actual extraintestinal virulence potential of chicken-source fecal E. coli is poorly understood. Here, we assessed whether fecal E. coli isolates from healthy production chickens could cause diseases in a chicken model of avian colibacillosis and three rodent models of ExPEC-associated human infections. From 304 E. coli isolates from chicken fecal samples, 175 E. coli isolates were screened by PCR for virulence genes associated with human-source ExPEC or avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, an ExPEC subset that causes extraintestinal infections in poultry. Selected isolates genetically identified as ExPEC and non-ExPEC isolates were assessed in vitro for virulence-associated phenotypes, and in vivo for disease-causing ability in animal models of colibacillosis, sepsis, meningitis, and urinary tract infection. Among the study isolates, 13% (40/304 were identified as ExPEC; the majority of these were classified as APEC and uropathogenic E. coli, but none as neonatal meningitis E. coli. Multiple chicken-source fecal ExPEC isolates resembled avian and human clinical ExPEC isolates in causing one or more ExPEC-associated illnesses in experimental animal infection models. Additionally, some isolates that were classified as non-ExPEC were able to cause ExPEC-associated illnesses in animal models, and thus future studies are needed to elucidate their mechanisms of virulence. These findings show that E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated genes, exhibit ExPEC-associated in vitro phenotypes, and can cause ExPEC-associated infections in animal models, and thus may pose a

  8. Evaluation of Escherichia coli isolates from healthy chickens to determine their potential risk to poultry and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Zachary R; Johnson, James R; Fairbrother, John M; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Van Goor, Angelica; Curtiss, Roy; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains are important pathogens that cause diverse diseases in humans and poultry. Some E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated virulence genes, so appear potentially pathogenic; they conceivably could be transmitted to humans through handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat. However, the actual extraintestinal virulence potential of chicken-source fecal E. coli is poorly understood. Here, we assessed whether fecal E. coli isolates from healthy production chickens could cause diseases in a chicken model of avian colibacillosis and three rodent models of ExPEC-associated human infections. From 304 E. coli isolates from chicken fecal samples, 175 E. coli isolates were screened by PCR for virulence genes associated with human-source ExPEC or avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), an ExPEC subset that causes extraintestinal infections in poultry. Selected isolates genetically identified as ExPEC and non-ExPEC isolates were assessed in vitro for virulence-associated phenotypes, and in vivo for disease-causing ability in animal models of colibacillosis, sepsis, meningitis, and urinary tract infection. Among the study isolates, 13% (40/304) were identified as ExPEC; the majority of these were classified as APEC and uropathogenic E. coli, but none as neonatal meningitis E. coli. Multiple chicken-source fecal ExPEC isolates resembled avian and human clinical ExPEC isolates in causing one or more ExPEC-associated illnesses in experimental animal infection models. Additionally, some isolates that were classified as non-ExPEC were able to cause ExPEC-associated illnesses in animal models, and thus future studies are needed to elucidate their mechanisms of virulence. These findings show that E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated genes, exhibit ExPEC-associated in vitro phenotypes, and can cause ExPEC-associated infections in animal models, and thus may pose a health threat to

  9. Characterization of oqxAB in Escherichia coli Isolates from Animals, Retail Meat, and Human Patients in Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and genetic elements of oqxAB among Escherichia coli isolates from animals, retail meat, and humans (patients with infection or colonization in Guangzhou, China. A total of 1,354 E. coli isolates were screened for oqxAB by PCR. Fifty oqxAB-positive isolates were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, multilocus sequence typing (MLST, S1-PFGE, genetic environment analysis, plasmid replicon typing, and plasmid sequencing. oqxAB was detected in 172 (33.79%, 60 (17.34%, and 90 (18.07% E. coli isolates from animal, food, and human, respectively. High clonal diversity was observed among oqxAB-positive isolates. In 21 oqxAB-containing transformants, oqxAB was flanked by two IS26 elements in the same orientation, formed a composite transposon Tn6010 in 19 transformants, and was located on plasmids (33.3~500 kb belonging to IncN1-F33:A-:B- (n = 3, IncHI2/ST3 (n = 3, F-:A18:B- (n = 2, F-:A-:B54 (n = 2, or others. Additionally, oqxAB was co-located with multiple resistance genes on the same plasmid, such as aac(6′-Ib-cr and/or qnrS, which were identified in two F-:A18:B- plasmids from pigs, and blaCTX−M−55, rmtB, fosA3, and floR, which were detected in two N1-F33:A-:B- plasmids from patients. The two IncHI2/ST3 oqxAB-bearing plasmids, pHNLDF400 and pHNYJC8, which were isolated from human patient and chicken meat, respectively, contained a typical IncHI2-type backbone, and were similar to each other with 2-bp difference, and also showed 99% identity to the Salmonella Typhimurium oqxAB-carrying plasmids pHXY0908 (chicken and pHK0653 (human patient. Horizontal transfer mediated by mobile elements may be the primary mechanism underlying oqxAB spread in E. coli isolates obtained from various sources in Guangzhou, China. The transmission of identical oqxAB-carrying IncHI2 plasmids between food products and humans might pose a serious threat to public health.

  10. Evaluation of Escherichia coli isolates from healthy chickens to determine their potential risk to poultry and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James R.; Fairbrother, John M.; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn; Van Goor, Angelica; Curtiss, Roy; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains are important pathogens that cause diverse diseases in humans and poultry. Some E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated virulence genes, so appear potentially pathogenic; they conceivably could be transmitted to humans through handling and/or consumption of contaminated meat. However, the actual extraintestinal virulence potential of chicken-source fecal E. coli is poorly understood. Here, we assessed whether fecal E. coli isolates from healthy production chickens could cause diseases in a chicken model of avian colibacillosis and three rodent models of ExPEC-associated human infections. From 304 E. coli isolates from chicken fecal samples, 175 E. coli isolates were screened by PCR for virulence genes associated with human-source ExPEC or avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), an ExPEC subset that causes extraintestinal infections in poultry. Selected isolates genetically identified as ExPEC and non-ExPEC isolates were assessed in vitro for virulence-associated phenotypes, and in vivo for disease-causing ability in animal models of colibacillosis, sepsis, meningitis, and urinary tract infection. Among the study isolates, 13% (40/304) were identified as ExPEC; the majority of these were classified as APEC and uropathogenic E. coli, but none as neonatal meningitis E. coli. Multiple chicken-source fecal ExPEC isolates resembled avian and human clinical ExPEC isolates in causing one or more ExPEC-associated illnesses in experimental animal infection models. Additionally, some isolates that were classified as non-ExPEC were able to cause ExPEC-associated illnesses in animal models, and thus future studies are needed to elucidate their mechanisms of virulence. These findings show that E. coli isolates from chicken feces contain ExPEC-associated genes, exhibit ExPEC-associated in vitro phenotypes, and can cause ExPEC-associated infections in animal models, and thus may pose a health threat to

  11. Adhesion of Human and Animal Escherichia coli Strains in Association with Their Virulence-Associated Genes and Phylogenetic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frömmel, Ulrike; Lehmann, Werner; Rödiger, Stefan; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Weinreich, Jörg; Groß, Julia; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Zinke, Olaf; Ansorge, Hermann; Vogel, Steffen; Klemm, Per; Wex, Thomas; Schröder, Christian; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal colonization is influenced by the ability of the bacterium to inhabit a niche, which is based on the expression of colonization factors. Escherichia coli carries a broad range of virulence-associated genes (VAGs) which contribute to intestinal (inVAGs) and extraintestinal (exVAGs) infection. Moreover, initial evidence indicates that inVAGs and exVAGs support intestinal colonization. We developed new screening tools to genotypically and phenotypically characterize E. coli isolates originating in humans, domestic pigs, and 17 wild mammal and avian species. We analyzed 317 isolates for the occurrence of 44 VAGs using a novel multiplex PCR microbead assay (MPMA) and for adhesion to four epithelial cell lines using a new adhesion assay. We correlated data for the definition of new adhesion genes. inVAGs were identified only sporadically, particularly in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and the European hedgehog ( Erinaceus europaeus). The prevalence of exVAGs depended on isolation from a specific host. Human uropathogenic E. coli isolates carried exVAGs with the highest prevalence, followed by badger (Meles meles) and roe deer isolates. Adhesion was found to be very diverse. Adhesion was specific to cells, host, and tissue, though it was also unspecific. Occurrence of the following VAGs was associated with a higher rate of adhesion to one or more cell lines: afa-dra, daaD, tsh, vat, ibeA, fyuA, mat, sfa-foc, malX, pic, irp2, and papC. In summary, we established new screening methods which enabled us to characterize large numbers of E. coli isolates. We defined reservoirs for potential pathogenic E. coli. We also identified a very broad range of colonization strategies and defined potential new adhesion genes. PMID:23872574

  12. Expression of Functional Human Sialyltransferases ST3Gal1 and ST6Gal1 in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Ortiz-Soto

    Full Text Available Sialyltransferases (STs are disulfide-containing, type II transmembrane glycoproteins that catalyze the transfer of sialic acid to proteins and lipids and participate in the synthesis of the core structure oligosaccharides of human milk. Sialic acids are found at the outermost position of glycostructures, playing a key role in health and disease. Sialylation is also essential for the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins (RTPs. Despite their importance, availability of sialyltransferases is limited due to the low levels of stable, soluble and active protein produced in bacterial expression systems, which hampers biochemical and structural studies on these enzymes and restricts biotechnological applications. We report the successful expression of active human sialyltransferases ST3Gal1 and ST6Gal1 in commercial Escherichia coli strains designed for production of disulfide-containing proteins. Fusion of hST3Gal1 with different solubility enhancers and substitution of exposed hydrophobic amino acids by negatively charged residues (supercharging-like approach were performed to promote solubility and folding. Co-expression of sialyltransferases with the chaperon/foldases sulfhydryl oxidase, protein disulfide isomerase and disulfide isomerase C was explored to improve the formation of native disulfide bonds. Active sialyltransferases fused with maltose binding protein (MBP were obtained in sufficient amounts for biochemical and structural studies when expressed under oxidative conditions and co-expression of folding factors increased the yields of active and properly folded sialyltransferases by 20%. Mutation of exposed hydrophobic amino acids increased recovery of active enzyme by 2.5-fold, yielding about 7 mg of purified protein per liter culture. Functionality of recombinant enzymes was evaluated in the synthesis of sialosides from the β-d-galactoside substrates lactose, N-acetyllactosamine and benzyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-(β-d-galactopyranosyl-α-d-galactopyranoside.

  13. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Conceição

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%. In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 x 10(7 CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  14. Adhesion of human and animal Escherichia coli strains in association with their virulence-associated genes and phylogenetic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frömmel, Ulrike; Lehmann, Werner; Rödiger, Stefan; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Weinreich, Jörg; Groß, Julia; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Zinke, Olaf; Ansorge, Hermann; Vogel, Steffen; Klemm, Per; Wex, Thomas; Schröder, Christian; Wieler, Lothar H; Schierack, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Intestinal colonization is influenced by the ability of the bacterium to inhabit a niche, which is based on the expression of colonization factors. Escherichia coli carries a broad range of virulence-associated genes (VAGs) which contribute to intestinal (inVAGs) and extraintestinal (exVAGs) infection. Moreover, initial evidence indicates that inVAGs and exVAGs support intestinal colonization. We developed new screening tools to genotypically and phenotypically characterize E. coli isolates originating in humans, domestic pigs, and 17 wild mammal and avian species. We analyzed 317 isolates for the occurrence of 44 VAGs using a novel multiplex PCR microbead assay (MPMA) and for adhesion to four epithelial cell lines using a new adhesion assay. We correlated data for the definition of new adhesion genes. inVAGs were identified only sporadically, particularly in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and the European hedgehog ( Erinaceus europaeus). The prevalence of exVAGs depended on isolation from a specific host. Human uropathogenic E. coli isolates carried exVAGs with the highest prevalence, followed by badger (Meles meles) and roe deer isolates. Adhesion was found to be very diverse. Adhesion was specific to cells, host, and tissue, though it was also unspecific. Occurrence of the following VAGs was associated with a higher rate of adhesion to one or more cell lines: afa-dra, daaD, tsh, vat, ibeA, fyuA, mat, sfa-foc, malX, pic, irp2, and papC. In summary, we established new screening methods which enabled us to characterize large numbers of E. coli isolates. We defined reservoirs for potential pathogenic E. coli. We also identified a very broad range of colonization strategies and defined potential new adhesion genes.

  15. Preparative isolation by high performance liquid chromatography of human insulin B chain produced in escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, N.; Antonio, S.; De Anda, R.; Gosset, G.; Bolivar, F. (Centro de Investigacion sobre Ingenieria Genetica y Biotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 510-3 Cuernavaca, Mor. 62271 (MX))

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple method developed for the analytical and preparative purification of human insulin B chain from recombinant origin. Three solvent systems: acetonitrile, isopropanol and methanol, were studied to determine their capacity to resolve the insulin B chain from a mixture of cyanogen bromide generated bacterial peptides. Using a {mu}Bondapak C18 column, it was possible to resolve the insulin B chain in all three systems. On a preparative scale, using a PrePak 500 C18 column with the isopropanol system, it was possible to purify insulin B chain and to obtain a 95% protein recovery.

  16. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuyu; Dalsgaard, Anders; Hammerum, Anette M; Porsbo, Lone J; Jensen, Lars B

    2010-07-30

    Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3) in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans) were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc) groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%), while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively). Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes. Sul genes were distributed widely in E. coli isolated

  17. Prevalence and characterization of plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes among Escherichia coli from pigs, pig carcasses and human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammerum Anette M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfonamide resistance is very common in Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize plasmids carrying sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3 in E. coli isolated from pigs and humans with a specific objective to assess the genetic diversity of plasmids involved in the mobility of sul genes. Methods A total of 501 E. coli isolates from pig feces, pig carcasses and human stools were tested for their susceptibility to selected antimicrobial. Multiplex PCR was conducted to detect the presence of three sul genes among the sulfonamide-resistant E. coli isolates. Fifty-seven sulfonamide-resistant E. coli were selected based on presence of sul resistance genes and subjected to conjugation and/or transformation experiments. S1 nuclease digestion followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to visualize and determine the size of plasmids. Plasmids carrying sul genes were characterized by PCR-based replicon typing to allow a comparison of the types of sul genes, the reservoir and plasmid present. Results A total of 109/501 isolates exhibited sulfonamide resistance. The relative prevalences of sul genes from the three reservoirs (pigs, pig carcasses and humans were 65%, 45% and 12% for sul2, sul1, and sul3, respectively. Transfer of resistance through conjugation was observed in 42/57 isolates. Resistances to streptomycin, ampicillin and trimethoprim were co-transferred in most strains. Class 1 integrons were present in 80% of sul1-carrying plasmids and 100% of sul3-carrying plasmids, but only in 5% of sul2-carrying plasmids. The sul plasmids ranged from 33 to 160-kb in size and belonged to nine different incompatibility (Inc groups: FII, FIB, I1, FIA, B/O, FIC, N, HI1 and X1. IncFII was the dominant type in sul2-carrying plasmids (52%, while IncI1 was the most common type in sul1 and sul3-carrying plasmids (33% and 45%, respectively. Multireplicons were found associated with all three sul genes

  18. [Cytotoxic effect in human colon of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolated from calves with bloody diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone Creydt, V; Venzano, A; Vilte, D A; Mercado, E C; Ibarra, C

    2005-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) is one of the most important emergent pathogen in foods, being its main reservoir bovine cattle. STEC can cause diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The present work have studied the cytotoxic action in human colon of cultures of two STEC strains isolated from faeces of calves with bloody diarrhea. Colonic mucosa was mounted as a diaphragm in a Ussing chamber and incubated with the cultures of pathogenic strains. Net water flow (Jw) decreased and the short-circuit current (Isc) increased significantly (p < 0.01) compared to negative control. Tissues showed an erosion of the mucose, epithelial exfoliation, and presence of pseudo-membranes in the lumen. Mild circulatory lesions were observed in the lamina propia. A moderate neutrophils infiltration was observed in the lumen and into the epithelial cells. Colonic crypts were not disrupted. Both experimental strains caused a similar lesion on colon tissues. This is the first study that shows that cultures of STEC strains isolated from bovine cattle produce cytotoxic effects in vitro in human colon.

  19. Regulation and expression of human Fabs under the control of the Escherichia coli arabinose promoter, PBAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M A; Hammond, F R; Papaioannou, A; Hawkins, N J; Ward, R L

    1997-10-01

    The L-arabinose operon from E. coli contains an inducible promoter PBAD which has been extensively studied for the control of gene expression. PBAD has a number of potential advantages over Plac, and has been used successfully to promote high level expression of recombinant proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate PBAD as an alternative system to Plac for the bacterial expression of recombinant Fabs. The promoter PBAD from the E. coli arabinose operon araBAD and the gene encoding the regulator of this promoter, were cloned into the phagemid expression vector MCO1. Expression of human recombinant tetanus toxoid (TT) and c-erbB2 Fabs under the control of PBAD was compared at two induction temperatures with the same Fabs produced under the control of Plac. Expression of TT and c-erbB2 Fabs under the control of PBAD was comparable to Fab expression from Plac. However, highly expressed TT Fab under the control of PBAD was localised to the soluble periplasmic fraction whereas under the control of Plac, there was greater leakage of Fab into the culture supernatant. In addition, Fab expression from PBAD could be more tightly repressed than from Plac. PBAD is a useful and cheaply inducible alternative to the more commonly used Plac for the rapid expression of soluble recombinant human antibody fragments.

  20. Lactobacillus reuteri Inhibition of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Adherence to Human Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair eWalsham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC is a major cause of diarrheal infant death in developing countries, and probiotic bacteria have been shown to provide health benefits in gastrointestinal infections. In this study, we have investigated the influence of the gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri on EPEC adherence to the human intestinal epithelium. Different host cell model systems including non-mucus-producing HT-29 and mucus-producing LS174T intestinal epithelial cell lines as well as human small intestinal biopsies were used. Adherence of L. reuteri to HT-29 cells was strain-specific, and the mucus-binding proteins CmbA and MUB increased binding to both HT-29 and LS174T cells. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 significantly inhibited EPEC binding to HT-29 but not LS174T cells. While pre-incubation of LS174T cells with ATCC PTA 6475 did not affect EPEC A/E lesion formation, it increased the size of EPEC microcolonies. ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 binding to the mucus layer resulted in decreased EPEC adherence to small intestinal biopsy epithelium. Our findings show that L. reuteri reduction of EPEC adhesion is strain-specific and has the potential to target either the epithelium or the mucus layer, providing further rationale for the selection of probiotic strains.

  1. Prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli virulence genes in the feces of slaughtered cattle, chickens, and pigs in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagambèga, Assèta; Martikainen, Outi; Siitonen, Anja; Traoré, Alfred S; Barro, Nicolas; Haukka, Kaisa

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the prevalence of the virulence genes specific for five major pathogroups of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in primary cultures from feces of animals slaughtered for human consumption in Burkina Faso. For the study, 704 feces samples were collected from cattle (n = 304), chickens (n = 350), and pigs (n = 50) during carcass processing. The presence of the virulence-associated genes in the mixed bacterial cultures was assessed using 16-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Virulence genes indicating presence of DEC were detected in 48% of the cattle, 48% of the chicken, and 68% of the pig feces samples. Virulence genes specific for different DECs were detected in the following percentages of the cattle, chicken, and pig feces samples: Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) in 37%, 6%, and 30%; enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) in 8%, 37%, and 32%; enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) in 4%, 5%, and 18%; and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) in 7%, 6%, and 32%. Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) virulence genes were detected in 1% of chicken feces samples only. The study was the first of its kind in Burkina Faso and revealed the common occurrence of the diarrheal virulence genes in feces of food animals. This indicates that food animals are reservoirs of DEC that may contaminate meat because of the defective slaughter and storage conditions and pose a health risk to the consumers in Burkina Faso.

  2. 1,2-Fucosyllactose Does Not Improve Intestinal Function or Prevent Escherichia coli F18 Diarrhea in Newborn Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted; Sangild, Per Torp; Jensen, Michael Ladegaard

    2017-01-01

     = 24) without (control) or with inoculation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F18 (7.5 × 1010/day for 8 days) fed either no (F18) or 10 g/L 2′-FL (2FL-F18). Results: In vitro studies revealed decreased pathogen adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells with 2′-FL (5 g/L; P ... of mucosa and activities of some brush border enzymes in the proximal small intestine. In situ abundance of α-1,2-fucose and E coli was similar between groups, whereas sequencing showed higher abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in F18, Enterococcus in control and Lachnospiraceae in 2FL-F18 pigs. Conclusions: 2...... in the intestine and may in part explain the protective effects of human milk. We hypothesized that 2′-FL prevents diarrhea via competitive inhibition of pathogen adhesion in a pig model for sensitive newborn infants. Methods: Intestinal cell studies were coupled with studies on cesarean-delivered newborn pigs (n...

  3. Prevalence and Antibiogram Profiling of Escherichia coli Pathotypes Isolated from the Kat River and the Fort Beaufort Abstraction Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolonwabo Nontongana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a widespread bacterium encompassing a variety of strains, ranging from highly pathogenic strains, causing worldwide outbreaks of severe diseases to avirulent, well characterized safe laboratory strains. This study evaluated the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of E. coli pathotypes isolated from the Kat River and Fort Beaufort abstraction water. A total of 171 out of 278 confirmed E. coli isolates were positive for at least one pathogenic determinant and these included enteropathogenic E. coli (6%, enterotoxigenic E. coli (47%, uropathogenic E. coli (2%, neonatal meningitis E. coli (5%, diffusely adherent E. coli (1% and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (1%. Interestingly, enteroinvasive and enteroaggregative E. coli were not detected. The phenotypic antibiogram profiles of the isolates revealed that all were resistant to penicillin G, while 98% and 38% of the pathotypes were resistant to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, respectively. About 8% of the isolates were resistant to streptomycin. More than half of the isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance with 44% being resistant to three antibiotics and 8% resistant to four antibiotics. We conclude that the Kat River is a reservoir of potentially virulent antibiotic resistant E. coli strains that can cause serious health risks to humans who drink raw water from this river, or in the case that consumption of treated drinking water coincides with failed drinking water processes.

  4. Lability of the pAA Virulence Plasmid in Escherichia coli O104:H4: Implications for Virulence in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlan Zhang

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O104:H4 that caused the large German outbreak in 2011 is a highly virulent hybrid of enterohemorrhagic (EHEC and enteroaggregative (EAEC E. coli. The strain displays "stacked-brick" aggregative adherence to human intestinal epithelial cells mediated by aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I encoded on the pAA plasmid. The AAF/I-mediated augmented intestinal adherence might facilitate systemic absorption of Shiga toxin, the major virulence factor of EHEC, presumably enhancing virulence of the outbreak strain. However, the stability of pAA in the outbreak strain is unknown. We therefore tested outbreak isolates for pAA, monitored pAA loss during infection, and determined the impact of pAA loss on adherence and clinical outcome of infection.E. coli O104:H4 outbreak isolates from 170 patients (128 with hemolytic uremic syndrome [HUS] and 42 with diarrhea without HUS were tested for pAA using polymerase chain reaction and plasmid profiling. pAA-harboring bacteria in stool samples were quantified using colony blot hybridization, and adherence to HCT-8 cells was determined. Isolates from 12 (7.1% patients lacked pAA. Analyses of sequential stool samples demonstrated that the percentages of pAA-positive populations in the initial stools were significantly higher than those in the follow-up stools collected two to eight days later in disease (P≤0.01. This indicates a rapid loss of pAA during infections of humans. The pAA loss was associated with loss of the aggregative adherence phenotype and significantly reduced correlation with HUS (P  = 0.001.The pAA plasmid can be lost by E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain in the human gut in the course of disease. pAA loss might attenuate virulence and diminish the ability to cause HUS. The pAA instability has clinical, diagnostic, epidemiologic, and evolutionary implications.

  5. Human extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strains differ in prevalence of virulence factors, phylogroups, and bacteriocin determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micenková, Lenka; Bosák, Juraj; Vrba, Martin; Ševčíková, Alena; Šmajs, David

    2016-09-20

    The study used a set of 407 human extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains (ExPEC) isolated from (1) skin and soft tissue infections, (2) respiratory infections, (3) intra-abdominal infections, and (4) genital smears. The set was tested for bacteriocin production, for prevalence of bacteriocin and virulence determinants, and for phylogenetic typing. Results obtained from the group of ExPEC strains were compared to data from our previously published analyses of 1283 fecal commensal E. coli strains. The frequency of bacteriocinogeny was significantly higher in the set of ExPEC strains (63.1 %), compared to fecal E. coli (54.2 %; p production of microcin M and lower production of microcin B17, colicin Ib, and Js was detected in the set of ExPEC strains. ExPEC strains had a significantly higher prevalence of phylogenetic group B2 (52.6 %) compared to fecal E. coli strains (38.3 %; p bacteriocin production, prevalence of several bacteriocin and virulence determinants, and prevalence of phylogenetic groups. Differences in these parameters were also identified within subgroups of ExPEC strains of diverse origin. While some microcin determinants (mM, mH47) were associated with virulent strains, other bacteriocin types (mB17, Ib, and Js) were associated with fecal flora.

  6. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections.

  7. Effects of Escherichia coli subtilase cytotoxin and Shiga toxin 2 on primary cultures of human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Laura B; Velázquez, Natalia; Repetto, Horacio A; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Ibarra, Cristina; Silberstein, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause post-diarrhea Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in many parts of the world. Several non-O157 STEC strains also produce Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was to examine the cytotoxic effects of SubAB on primary cultures of human cortical renal tubular epithelial cells (HRTEC) and compare its effects with those produced by Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2), in order to evaluate their contribution to renal injury in HUS. For this purpose, cell viability, proliferation rate, and apoptosis were assayed on HRTEC incubated with SubAB and/or Stx2 toxins. SubAB significantly reduced cell viability and cell proliferation rate, as well as stimulating cell apoptosis in HRTEC cultures in a time dependent manner. However, HRTEC cultures were significantly more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of Stx2 than those produced by SubAB. No synergism was observed when HRTEC were co-incubated with both SubAB and Stx2. When HRTEC were incubated with the inactive SubAA272B toxin, results were similar to those in untreated control cells. Similar stimulation of apoptosis was observed in Vero cells incubated with SubAB or/and Stx2, compared to HRTEC. In conclusion, primary cultures of HRTEC are significantly sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of SubAB, although, in a lesser extent compared to Stx2.

  8. Effects of Escherichia coli subtilase cytotoxin and Shiga toxin 2 on primary cultures of human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Márquez

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC cause post-diarrhea Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS, which is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children in many parts of the world. Several non-O157 STEC strains also produce Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was to examine the cytotoxic effects of SubAB on primary cultures of human cortical renal tubular epithelial cells (HRTEC and compare its effects with those produced by Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2, in order to evaluate their contribution to renal injury in HUS. For this purpose, cell viability, proliferation rate, and apoptosis were assayed on HRTEC incubated with SubAB and/or Stx2 toxins. SubAB significantly reduced cell viability and cell proliferation rate, as well as stimulating cell apoptosis in HRTEC cultures in a time dependent manner. However, HRTEC cultures were significantly more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of Stx2 than those produced by SubAB. No synergism was observed when HRTEC were co-incubated with both SubAB and Stx2. When HRTEC were incubated with the inactive SubAA272B toxin, results were similar to those in untreated control cells. Similar stimulation of apoptosis was observed in Vero cells incubated with SubAB or/and Stx2, compared to HRTEC. In conclusion, primary cultures of HRTEC are significantly sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of SubAB, although, in a lesser extent compared to Stx2.

  9. A Comparative Study on the Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Human Adiponectin in Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin A. Rothan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is one of the most bioactive substances secreted by adipose tissue and is involved in the protection against metabolic syndrome, artherosclerosis and type II diabetes. Research into the use of adiponectin as a promising drug for metabolic syndromes requires production of this hormone in high quantities considering its molecular isoforms. The objective of this study is to produce recombinant human adiponectin by Pichia pastoris (P-ADP as a cheap and convenient eukaryotic expression system for potential application in pharmaceutical therapy. For comparison, adiponectin was also expressed using the Escherichia coli (E-ADP expression system. Adiponectin was constructed by overlap-extension PCR, and cloned in standard cloning vector and hosts. Recombinant expression vectors were cloned in the P. pastoris and E. coli host strains, respectively. SDS-PAGE and western blotting were used to detect and analyse expressed recombinant protein in both systems. Adiponectin was purified by affinity chromatography and quantified using the Bradford Assay. The results of this study indicated that P-ADP quantity (0.111 mg/mL was higher than that of E-ADP (0.04 mg/mL and both were produced in soluble form. However, P-ADP was able to form high molecular weights of adiponectin molecules, whilst E-ADP was not able to form isoforms higher than trimer. In addition, P-ADP was more active in lowering blood glucose compared with E-ADP. The two types of proteins were equally efficient and significantly decreased blood triglyceride and increased high density lipoprotein. We conclude that P. pastoris is able to produce high quantity of bioactive adiponectin for potential use in treatment of metabolic syndromes.

  10. Common and specific genomic sequences of avian and human extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli as determined by genomic subtractive hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan Lisa K

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH strategy was used with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (EXPEC that cause avian colibacillosis (avian pathogenic E. coli or APEC and human urinary tract infections (uropathogenic E. coli or UPEC to determine if they possessed genes that were host and/or niche specific. Both APEC and UPEC isolates were used as tester and driver strains in 4 different SSHs in order to obtain APEC- and UPEC-specific subtraction fragments (SFs. Results These procedures yielded a total of 136 tester-specific SFs of which 85 were APEC-derived and 51 were UPEC-derived. Most of the APEC-derived SFs were associated with plasmids; whereas, the majority of UPEC-derived sequences matched to the bacterial chromosome. We further determined the distribution of these tester-derived sequences in a collection of UPEC and APEC isolates using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Plasmid-borne, APEC-derived sequences (tsh, cvaB, traR, traC and sopB were predominantly present in APEC, as compared to UPEC. Of the UPEC-derived SFs, those encoding hemolysin D and F1C major and minor fimbrial subunits were present only in UPEC. However, two UPEC-derived SFs that showed strong similarity to the uropathgenic-specific protein gene (usp occurred in APEC, demonstrating that usp is not specific to UPEC. Conclusion This study provides evidence of the genetic variability of ExPEC as well as genomic similarities between UPEC and APEC; it did not identify any single marker that would dictate host and/or niche specificity in APEC or UPEC. However, further studies on the genes that encode putative or hypothetical proteins might offer important insight into the pathogenesis of disease, as caused by these two ExPEC.

  11. Escherichia coli pathotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli strains are important commensals of the intestinal tract of humans and animals; however, pathogenic strains, including diarrhea-inducing E. coli and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Intestinal E. coli pathotypes may cause a dehydrating watery diarrhea, or more severe diseases su...

  12. Characteristics of Quinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Humans, Animals, and the Environment in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röderova, Magdalena; Halova, Dana; Papousek, Ivo; Dolejska, Monika; Masarikova, Martina; Hanulik, Vojtech; Pudova, Vendula; Broz, Petr; Htoutou-Sedlakova, Miroslava; Sauer, Pavel; Bardon, Jan; Cizek, Alois; Kolar, Milan; Literak, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a common commensal bacterial species of humans and animals that may become a troublesome pathogen causing serious diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance phenotypes and genotypes in E. coli isolates of different origin from one area of the Czech Republic. E. coli isolates were obtained from hospitalized patients and outpatients, chicken farms, retailed turkeys, rooks wintering in the area, and wastewaters. Susceptibility of the isolates grown on the MacConkey agar with ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg/L) to 23 antimicrobial agents was determined. The presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and ESBL genes was tested by PCR and sequencing. Specific mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE were also examined. Multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were performed to assess the clonal relationship. In total, 1050 E. coli isolates were obtained, including 303 isolates from humans, 156 from chickens, 105 from turkeys, 114 from the rooks, and 372 from wastewater samples. PMQR genes were detected in 262 (25%) isolates. The highest occurrence was observed in isolates from retailed turkey (49% of the isolates were positive) and inpatients (32%). The qnrS1 gene was the most common PMQR determinant identified in 146 (56%) followed by aac(6′)-Ib-cr in 77 (29%), qnrB19 in 41 (16%), and qnrB1 in 9 (3%) isolates. All isolates with high level of ciprofloxacin resistance (>32 mg/L) carried double or triple mutations in gyrA combined with single or double mutations in parC. The most frequently identified substitutions were Ser(83)Leu; Asp(87)Asn in GyrA, together with Ser(80)Ile, or Glu(84)Val in ParC. Majority of these isolates showed resistance to beta-lactams and multiresistance phenotype was found in 95% isolates. Forty-eight different sequence types among 144 isolates analyzed were found, including five major clones ST131 (26), ST355 (19), ST48 (13), ST95 (10), and ST10 (5). No isolates

  13. Computational Analysis of Host–Pathogen Protein Interactions between Humans and Different Strains of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tungadri; Venkatesh, K. V.; Mande, Sharmila S.

    2017-01-01

    Serotype O157:H7, an enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), is known to cause gastrointestinal and systemic illnesses ranging from diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis to potentially fatal hemolytic uremic syndrome. Specific genetic factors like ompA, nsrR, and LEE genes are known to play roles in EHEC pathogenesis. However, these factors are not specific to EHEC and their presence in several non-pathogenic strains indicates that additional factors are involved in pathogenicity. We propose a comprehensive effort to screen for such potential genetic elements, through investigation of biomolecular interactions between E. coli and their host. In this work, an in silico investigation of the protein–protein interactions (PPIs) between human cells and four EHEC strains (viz., EDL933, Sakai, EC4115, and TW14359) was performed in order to understand the virulence and host-colonization strategies of these strains. Potential host–pathogen interactions (HPIs) between human cells and the “non-pathogenic” E. coli strain MG1655 were also probed to evaluate whether and how the variations in the genomes could translate into altered virulence and host-colonization capabilities of the studied bacterial strains. Results indicate that a small subset of HPIs are unique to the studied pathogens and can be implicated in virulence. This subset of interactions involved E. coli proteins like YhdW, ChuT, EivG, and HlyA. These proteins have previously been reported to be involved in bacterial virulence. In addition, clear differences in lineage and clade-specific HPI profiles could be identified. Furthermore, available gene expression profiles of the HPI-proteins were utilized to estimate the proportion of proteins which may be involved in interactions. We hypothesized that a cumulative score of the ratios of bound:unbound proteins (involved in HPIs) would indicate the extent of colonization. Thus, we designed the Host Colonization Index (HCI) measure to determine the host

  14. Computational Analysis of Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions between Humans and Different Strains of EnterohemorrhagicEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Tungadri; Venkatesh, K V; Mande, Sharmila S

    2017-01-01

    Serotype O157:H7, an enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), is known to cause gastrointestinal and systemic illnesses ranging from diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis to potentially fatal hemolytic uremic syndrome. Specific genetic factors like ompA, nsrR , and LEE genes are known to play roles in EHEC pathogenesis. However, these factors are not specific to EHEC and their presence in several non-pathogenic strains indicates that additional factors are involved in pathogenicity. We propose a comprehensive effort to screen for such potential genetic elements, through investigation of biomolecular interactions between E. coli and their host. In this work, an in silico investigation of the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between human cells and four EHEC strains (viz., EDL933, Sakai, EC4115, and TW14359) was performed in order to understand the virulence and host-colonization strategies of these strains. Potential host-pathogen interactions (HPIs) between human cells and the "non-pathogenic" E. coli strain MG1655 were also probed to evaluate whether and how the variations in the genomes could translate into altered virulence and host-colonization capabilities of the studied bacterial strains. Results indicate that a small subset of HPIs are unique to the studied pathogens and can be implicated in virulence. This subset of interactions involved E. coli proteins like YhdW, ChuT, EivG, and HlyA. These proteins have previously been reported to be involved in bacterial virulence. In addition, clear differences in lineage and clade-specific HPI profiles could be identified. Furthermore, available gene expression profiles of the HPI-proteins were utilized to estimate the proportion of proteins which may be involved in interactions. We hypothesized that a cumulative score of the ratios of bound:unbound proteins (involved in HPIs) would indicate the extent of colonization. Thus, we designed the Host Colonization Index (HCI) measure to determine the host colonization

  15. Comparative Analysis of Phylogenetic Assignment of Human and Avian ExPEC and Fecal Commensal Escherichia coli Using the (Previous and Revised) Clermont Phylogenetic Typing Methods and its Impact on Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Catherine M; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Nicholson, Bryon A; Doetkott, Curt; Barbieri, Nicolle L; Nolan, Lisa K

    2017-01-01

    The Clermont scheme has been used for subtyping of Escherichia coli since it was initially described in early 2000. Since then, researchers have used the scheme to type and sub-type commensal E. coli and pathogenic E. coli, such as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), and compare their phylogenetic assignment by pathogenicity, serogroup, distribution among ExPEC of different host species and complement of virulence and resistance traits. Here, we compare assignments of human and avian ExPEC and commensal E. coli using the old and revised Clermont schemes to determine if the new scheme provides a refined snapshot of isolate classification. 1,996 E. coli from human hosts and poultry, including 84 human neonatal meningitis E. coli isolates, 88 human vaginal E. coli, 696 human uropathogenic E. coli, 197 healthy human fecal E. coli, 452 avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), 200 retail poultry E. coli, 80 crop and gizzard E. coli from healthy poultry at slaughter and 199 fecal E. coli from healthy birds at slaughter. All isolates were subject to phylogenetic analysis using the Clermont et al. (2000, 2013) schemes and compared to determine the effect of the new classification on strain designation. Most of the isolates' strain designation remained where they were originally assigned. Greatest designation change occurred in APEC where 53.8% of isolates were reclassified; while classification rates among human strains ranged from 8 to 14%. However, some significant changes were observed for UPEC associated strains with significant (P APEC significant designation changes were observed from A to C and D to E and F. These studies suggest that the new scheme provides a tighter and more meaningful definition of some ExPEC; while the new typing scheme has a significant impact on APEC classification. A comparison of phylogenetic group assignment by content of virulence, resistance, replicon and pathogenicity island genes in APEC suggests that insertion of pathogenicity islands

  16. Distribution of the urease gene cluster among and urease activities of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 isolates from humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Alexander W; Köck, Robin; Bielaszewska, Martina; Zhang, Wenlan; Karch, Helge; Mathys, Werner

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157 strains belong to two closely related major groups, which are differentiated by their sorbitol fermentation phenotypes. Here we studied the conservation of urease genes and their expression in sorbitol-fermenting (SF) and non-SF EHEC O157 isolates. PCR

  17. Detection of mcr-1 encoding plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from human bloodstream infection and imported chicken meat, Denmark 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasman, Henrik; Hammerum, Anette M; Hansen, Frank; Hendriksen, Rene S; Olesen, Bente; Agersø, Yvonne; Zankari, Ea; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Stegger, Marc; Kaas, Rolf S; Cavaco, Lina M; Hansen, Dennis S; Aarestrup, Frank M; Skov, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat. One isolate from chicken meat belonged to the epidemic spreading sequence type ST131. In addition to IncI2, an incX4 replicon was found to be linked to mcr-1. This report follows a recent detection of mcr-1 in E. coli from animals, food and humans in China.

  18. Detection of mcr-1 encoding plasmid-mediated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from human bloodstream infection and imported chicken meat, Denmark 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, H.; Hammerum, A. M.; Hansen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene, mcr-1, was detected in an Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection and in five E. coli isolates from imported chicken meat. One isolate from chicken meat belonged to the epidemic spreading sequence type ST131. In addi....... In addition to IncI2*, an incX4 replicon was found to be linked to mcr-1. This report follows a recent detection of mcr-1 in E. coli from animals, food and humans in China....

  19. Determination of enterotoxigenic and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gücükoğlu, Ali; Çadirci, Özgür; Terzi, Göknur; Kevenk, T Onur; Alişarli, Mustafa

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enterotoxigenic and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ice creams. After culture-based identification of isolates, the presence of 16S rRNA and nuc was confirmed by mPCR. S. aureus was identified in 18 of 56 fruity (32.1%), 4 of 32 vanilla (12.5%), and 1 of 12 chocolate (8.3%) ice creams. S. aureus was identified as 38 isolates in 23 ice cream samples by culture-based techniques, but only 35 isolates were confirmed by PCR as S. aureus. To determine the enterotoxigenic properties of PCR-confirmed S. aureus isolates, a toxin detection kit was used (SET RPLA®). Of the 12 enterotoxigenic S. aureus isolates, 9 SEB (75%), 1 SED (8.3%), 1 SEB+SED (8.3%), and 1 SEA+SEB+SED (8.3%) expressing isolates were found. The presence of enterotoxin genes (sea, seb, sed) was identified in 13 (37.1%) out of 35 isolates by the mPCR technique. In the ice cream isolates, the sea, seb, and sed genes were detected: 1 sea (7.6%), 9 seb (69.2%), 1 sed (7.6%), 1 seb+sed (7.6%), and 1 sea+seb+sed (7.6%), respectively. The sec gene was not detected in any of these isolates. One of the 35 (2.8%) S. aureus strain was mecA positive. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Transmission of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli between cattle, humans and the environment in peri-urban livestock keeping communities in Morogoro, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lupindu, Athumani M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Msoffe, Peter L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Urban and peri-urban livestock farming is expanding world-widely because of increased urbanization and demands for food of animal origin. Such farming practices pose a public health risk as livestock are reservoirs of several zoonotic pathogens. In an attempt to determine the fecal transmission...... infrastructures (Odd Ratio=11.2, 95% CI=1.1-119.3) were associated with E. coli showing identical PFGE types within and between clusters. There is a need to improve animal husbandry and manure management practices to reduce risks of transmission of enteropathogens between livestock and humans in urban and peri-urban...... between livestock and people, 100 household clusters keeping cattle in close proximity of humans were selected in urban and peri-urban areas of Morogoro in Tanzania. One hundred eighteen ampicillin and tetracycline resistant Escherichia coli (40 from human stool, 50 from cattle feces, 21 from soil...

  1. Escherichia coli O157: Insights into the adaptive stress physiology and the influence of stressors on epidemiology and ecology of this human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidovic, Sinisa; Korber, Darren R

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157, a foodborne pathogen of major concern for public health, has been associated with numerous outbreaks of haemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome worldwide. Human infection with E. coli O157 has been primarily associated with the food-chain transmission route. This transmission route commonly elicits a multi-faceted adaptive stress response of E. coli O157 for an extended period of time prior to human infection. Several recent research articles have indicated that E. coli O157:H7 has evolved unique survival characteristics which can affect the epidemiology and ecology of this zoonotic pathogen. This review article summarizes the recent knowledge of the molecular responses of E. coli O157 to the most common stressors found within the human food chain, and further emphasizes the influence of these stressors on the epidemiology and ecology of E. coli O157.

  2. Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Induces Broadly Protective Antibodies That Prevent Adherence of Escherichia coli Strains Expressing Colonization Factor Antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Wollenberg, Katie M.; Sack, David A.; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block a...

  3. Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Swedish cattle; isolates from prevalence studies versus strains linked to human infections - A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Erik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cases of human infection caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC O157:H7 in Sweden have been connected with cattle farm visits. Between 1996 and 2002, 18 farms were classified as the source of human cases with isolation of EHEC (Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli after VTEC O157:H7 had been isolated from cattle on those farms. Results Characterization by phage typing and molecular methods of the strains isolated from these 18 farms, including PCR for virulence genes (vtx1, vtx2 and variants thereof, eaeA and EHEC-hlyA and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE, demonstrated a cluster of very similar strains from 16 farms. All were of phage type 4, carried the genes encoding the verotoxins VT2 and VT2c, intimin, EHEC-haemolysin and flagellin H7 as shown by PCR, and had identical or very similar PFGE patterns. When analysing strains in a prevalence study of VTEC O157:H7 from cattle at slaughter as well as from an on-farm prevalence study of dairy cattle, using the same typing methods, a rather wide variation was observed among the isolated VTEC O157:H7 strains. Conclusions In Sweden, a limited group of genetically similar and highly pathogenic VTEC O157:H7 strains seem to predominate in direct or indirect transmission from cattle to man.

  4. Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  5. Enterotoxigenic Genes in strains of Staphylococcus spp., isolated from cheese made in Pamplona-Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Herrera A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the incidence of coagulase-positive strains of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus in doble crema (double cream cheese samples produced in Pamplona. Materials and methods. Bacterial isolation was performed following the routine method for coagulase positive Staphylococcus provided by the Colombian Technical Standard 4779, by using Baird Parker medium with confirmation of typical colonies by performing the coagulase test. Detection of genes for principal enterotoxins was done by PCR. Results. The prevalence of coagulase positive Staphylococcus in cheese samples was 31%, with 27% of the samples failing to meet the requirements of the NTC 750. In 24.6% of the studied isolates, genes for enterotoxin production were detected. The presence, in the isolated strains, of genes for SEB, SEA and SED was 18.5%, 4.6% and 3.0%, respectively. Conclusions. The significant presence of enterotoxigenic genes found in the isolates obtained from samples of double cream cheese made in Pamplona, suggests an important hazard to the health of consumers.

  6. Dynamics of co-existing Escherichia colilineages in situ of the infant gut and multiplex phenotypic targeted recovery of previously uncultivated bacteria from the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumpert, Heidi

    in antibiotic susceptibility. In one case, the transfer occurred in the absenceof antibiotic treatment and the transconjugant remained amongst the gut microbiota for months, providing evidence to the hypothesis that resistance genes are stably maintained once acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first...... of these micro-evolutionary events was facilitated throughthe isolation of strains, yielding a high-resolution view into the strain heterogeneity of the human gut. Also included in this thesis is work highlighting that a large proportion of the gutmicrobiota can indeed be cultivated using carefully designed......The work in this thesis explores the dynamic nature of Escherichia coli lineages co-existing in the human intestinal tract. The work is supported via full genomesequencing of co-existing E. coli strains isolated from infants enrolled in the ALLERGYFLORA study. Both sets of isolates examined here...

  7. Escherichia coli Isolates from Broiler Chicken Meat, Broiler Chickens, Pork, and Pigs Share Phylogroups and Antimicrobial Resistance with Community-Dwelling Humans and Patients with Urinary Tract Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L.; Kurbasic, A.; Skjot-Rasmussen, L.

    2010-01-01

    , and their possible associations in E. coli isolates from patients with UTI, community-dwelling humans, broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork, and pigs in Denmark. A total of 964 geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from UTI patients (n = 102), community-dwelling humans (n = 109), Danish (n......Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Phylogroup B2 and D isolates are associated with UTI. It has been proposed that E. coli causing UTI could have an animal origin. The objective of this study was to investigate the phylogroups and antimicrobial resistance......, these sources could still pose a risk for acquiring uropathogenic E. coli. Further, E. coli from animals and meat were very similar to UTI isolates with respect to their antimicrobial resistance phenotype. Thus, our study provides support for the hypothesis that a food animal and meat reservoir might exist...

  8. Comparison of multilocus sequence analysis and virulence genotyping of Escherichia coli from live birds, retail poultry meat, and human extraintestinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzeisen, Jessica L; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Nolan, Lisa K; Johnson, Timothy J

    2013-03-01

    To examine the correlations between virulence genotyping and multilocus sequence analysis of Escherichia coli from poultry and humans, 88 isolates were examined. The isolates were selected from a population of over 1000 based on their assignment to nine different virulence genotyping clusters. Clustering based on multilocus sequence analysis mostly correlated with virulence genotyping, although multilocus sequence analysis demonstrated higher discriminatory ability and greater reliability related to inferred phylogenetic relationships. No distinct patterns in host source were observed using inferred phylogeny through multilocus sequence analysis, indicating that human, avian, and retail meat isolates are diverse, and some belong to multiple shared clonal complexes. Clonal complexes with host source overlap included ST95 and ST23 and additional novel groups, underscoring the diversity of avian pathogenic E. coli and the potential importance of these novel groups as avian and zoonotic pathogens.

  9. Genetic characterization of type A enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agi Deguchi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type A, is both a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and a major cause of human gastrointestinal disease, which usually involves strains producing C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE. The gene (cpe encoding this toxin can be carried on the chromosome or a large plasmid. Interestingly, strains carrying cpe on the chromosome and strains carrying cpe on a plasmid often exhibit different biological characteristics, such as resistance properties against heat. In this study, we investigated the genetic properties of C. perfringens by PCR-surveying 21 housekeeping genes and genes on representative plasmids and then confirmed those results by Southern blot assay (SB of five genes. Furthermore, sequencing analysis of eight housekeeping genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST analysis were also performed. Fifty-eight C. perfringens strains were examined, including isolates from: food poisoning cases, human gastrointestinal disease cases, foods in Japan or the USA, or feces of healthy humans. In the PCR survey, eight of eleven housekeeping genes amplified positive reactions in all strains tested. However, by PCR survey and SB assay, one representative virulence gene, pfoA, was not detected in any strains carrying cpe on the chromosome. Genes involved in conjugative transfer of the cpe plasmid were also absent from almost all chromosomal cpe strains. MLST showed that, regardless of their geographic origin, date of isolation, or isolation source, chromosomal cpe isolates, i assemble into one definitive cluster ii lack pfoA and iii lack a plasmid related to the cpe plasmid. Similarly, independent of their origin, strains carrying a cpe plasmid also appear to be related, but are more variable than chromosomal cpe strains, possibly because of the instability of cpe-borne plasmid(s and/or the conjugative transfer of cpe-plasmid(s into unrelated C. perfringens strains.

  10. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) of human and avian origin belonging to sequence type complex 95 (STC95) portray indistinguishable virulence features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandanwar, Nishant; Janssen, Traute; Kühl, Michael; Ahmed, Niyaz; Ewers, Christa; Wieler, Lothar H

    2014-10-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains of certain genetic lineages are frequently implicated in a wide range of diseases in humans and birds. ExPEC strains belonging to the phylogenetic lineage/sequence type complex 95 (STC95) are one such prominent lineage that is commonly isolated from extraintestinal infections such as systemic disease in poultry and urinary tract infections (UTIs), neonatal meningitis and sepsis in humans. Several epidemiological studies have indicated that ST95 strains obtained from such infections may share similar virulence genes and other genomic features. However, data on their ability to establish infections in vivo as deduced from the manifestation of similar virulence phenotypes remain elusive. In the present study, 116 STC95 ExPEC isolates comprising 55 human and 61 avian strains, possessing similar virulence gene patterns, were characterized in vitro using adhesion, invasion, biofilm formation and serum bactericidal assays. Overall, STC95 strains from both groups, namely human and birds, were equally capable of adhering to and invading the two mammalian kidney cell lines. Similarly, these strains were able to form strong biofilms in M63 medium. Furthermore, they were equally resistant to the bactericidal activity of human and avian serum. Our cumulative data reinforce the understanding that ST95 strains from poultry present a potential zoonotic risk and therefore need a One Health strategy for a successfull intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. A combination of PhP typing and β-d-glucuronidase gene sequence variation analysis for differentiation of Escherichia coli from humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, N; Christie, M; Katouli, M; Stratton, H

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the usefulness of the β-d-glucuronidase gene variance in Escherichia coli as a microbial source tracking tool using a novel algorithm for comparison of sequences from a prescreened set of host-specific isolates using a high-resolution PhP typing method. A total of 65 common biochemical phenotypes belonging to 318 E. coli strains isolated from humans and domestic and wild animals were analysed for nucleotide variations at 10 loci along a 518 bp fragment of the 1812 bp β-d-glucuronidase gene. Neighbour-joining analysis of loci variations revealed 86 (76.8%) human isolates and 91.2% of animal isolates were correctly identified. Pairwise hierarchical clustering improved assignment; where 92 (82.1%) human and 204 (99%) animal strains were assigned to their respective cluster. Our data show that initial typing of isolates and selection of common types from different hosts prior to analysis of the β-d-glucuronidase gene sequence improves source identification. We also concluded that numerical profiling of the nucleotide variations can be used as a valuable approach to differentiate human from animal E. coli. This study signifies the usefulness of the β-d-glucuronidase gene as a marker for differentiating human faecal pollution from animal sources.

  12. Efecto citotóxico en colon humano de Escherichia coli enterohemorrágico aislado de terneros con diarrea sanguinolenta Cytotoxic effect in human colon of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolated from calves with bloody diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pistone Creydt

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli productor de toxina Shiga (STEC es el patógeno emergente en alimentos de mayor impacto, siendo su principal reservorio el ganado bovino. STEC puede causar diarrea, colitis hemorrágica y síndrome urémico hemolítico. El presente trabajo estudió la acción citotóxica de dos cepas de STEC aisladas de heces de terneros diarreicos en colon humano in vitro. Los fragmentos se montaron como un diafragma en una cámara de Ussing y se incubaron con las cepas patógenas. El flujo neto absortivo de agua (Jw disminuyó y la corriente de cortocircuito (Isc aumentó significativamente (P Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC is one of the most important emergent pathogen in foods, being its main reservoir bovine cattle. STEC can cause diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The present work have studied the cytotoxic action in human colon of cultures of two STEC strains isolated from faeces of calves with bloody diarrhea. Colonic mucosa was mounted as a diaphragm in a Ussing chamber and incubated with the cultures of pathogenic strains. Net water flow (Jw decreased and the short-circuit current (Isc increased significantly (p < 0,01 compared to negative control. Tissues showed an erosion of the mucose, epithelial exfoliation, and presence of pseudo-membranes in the lumen. Mild circulatory lesions were observed in the lamina propia. A moderate neutrophils infiltration was observed in the lumen and into the epithelial cells. Colonic crypts were not disrupted. Both experimental strains caused a similar lesion on colon tissues. This is the first study that shows that cultures of STEC strains isolated from bovine cattle produce cytotoxic effects in vitro in human colon.

  13. Characterization of FapR, a positive regulator of expression of the 987P operon in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, P; de Graaf, F K

    1990-10-01

    Expression of the 987P gene cluster is activated by the adjacent IS1 element of an STpa transposon. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 987P-DNA region contiguous with this IS1 element revealed the presence of an open reading frame designated fapR, encoding a basic protein of 260 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 30,349 Daltons. The gene product, FapR, possesses similarity to a number of positive regulators of gene expression: VirF, Rns, AppY and EnvY. Moreover, a 43-amino-acid residue sequence in the C-terminal part of FapR is similar to the C-terminal domain of AraC, RhaR, and RhaS. Expression of fapR is dependent on the adjacent IS1 element. The FapR protein appears to be required for activation of the silent promoter of the fimbrial subunit gene, fapC.

  14. The ferric yersiniabactin uptake receptor FyuA is required for efficient biofilm formation by urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ferrieres, Lionel; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    tract and there is fierce competition between the host and infectious bacteria for this essential metal. Urinary tract infectious E coli have highly efficient mechanisms of iron acquisition, one of which is the yersiniabactin system. The fyuA gene, encoding the yersiniabactin receptor, is one......Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in patients with indwelling urinary catheters, and bacterial biofilm formation is a major problem in this type of infection. Escherichia coli is responsible for the large majority of UTIs. Free iron is strictly limited in the human urinary...... showed a 92% reduction in biofilm formation in urine flow-cell chambers compared with the wild-type. The FyuA/yersiniabactin system is known to be important for virulence. Here we demonstrate a direct link between FyuA and biofilm formation in iron-poor environments. We also show that the availability...

  15. Transmission of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli between cattle, humans and the environment in peri-urban livestock keeping communities in Morogoro, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupindu, Athumani M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Msoffe, Peter L M; Ngowi, Helena A; Mtambo, Madundo M; Olsen, John E

    2015-03-01

    Urban and peri-urban livestock farming is expanding world-widely because of increased urbanization and demands for food of animal origin. Such farming practices pose a public health risk as livestock are reservoirs of several zoonotic pathogens. In an attempt to determine the fecal transmission between livestock and people, 100 household clusters keeping cattle in close proximity of humans were selected in urban and peri-urban areas of Morogoro in Tanzania. One hundred eighteen ampicillin and tetracycline resistant Escherichia coli (40 from human stool, 50 from cattle feces, 21 from soil and seven from water samples) were isolated from 44 different clusters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of XbaI digested chromosomal DNA was used to compare the genetic relatedness of the ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates. Indistinguishable PFGE band patterns of the ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates were found in samples from 23 (52%) clusters. This suggests that transfer of fecal microorganisms between cattle, humans, water and soils within the farms and from livestock farms to the neighborhood occurred commonly. Logistic regression showed that animal housing infrastructures (Odd Ratio=11.2, 95% CI=1.1-119.3) were associated with E. coli showing identical PFGE types within and between clusters. There is a need to improve animal husbandry and manure management practices to reduce risks of transmission of enteropathogens between livestock and humans in urban and peri-urban farming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic characterization of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from ewes' milk, sheep farm environments, and humans by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Verónica; Rodríguez-Calleja, José-María; Otero, Andrés; García-López, María-Luisa; Santos, Jesús A

    2013-10-01

    A collection of 81 isolates of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) was obtained from samples of bulk tank sheep milk (62 isolates), ovine feces (4 isolates), sheep farm environment (water, 4 isolates; air, 1 isolate), and human stool samples (9 isolates). The strains were considered atypical EPEC organisms, carrying the eae gene without harboring the pEAF plasmid. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was carried out with seven housekeeping genes and 19 sequence types (ST) were detected, with none of them having been previously reported for atypical EPEC. The most frequent ST included 41 strains isolated from milk and human stool samples. Genetic typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) resulted in 57 patterns which grouped in 24 clusters. Comparison of strains isolated from the different samples showed phylogenetic relationships between milk and human isolates and also between milk and water isolates. The results obtained show a possible risk for humans due to the presence of atypical EPEC in ewes' milk and suggest a transmission route for this emerging pathogen through contaminated water.

  17. More than a marine propeller--the flagellum of the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 is the major adhesin mediating binding to human mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troge, Anja; Scheppach, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Bjoern O; Rund, Stefan A; Heuner, Klaus; Wehkamp, Jan; Stange, Eduard F; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A

    2012-12-01

    The flagellum of the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) is not just responsible for motility, but also for EcN's ability to induce the production of human β-defensin 2. Here, we report a third function of this EcN organell. In this study we investigated the role of the EcN flagellum in adhesion to different host tissues by ex vivo and in vitro studies. Ex vivo studies with cryosections of human gut biopsies revealed that the flagellum of EcN is most likely important for efficient adhesion to the human intestinal tract. These results and in vitro studies with different epithelial cells indicated that the presence of mucus is important for efficient mediation of adhesion by the flagellum of EcN. We observed direct interaction between isolated flagella from EcN wild type and porcine mucin 2 as well as human mucus. However, we could not observe any interaction of the flagella with murine mucus. For the first time, we identified the mucus component gluconate as one receptor for the binding of flagella from EcN and were able to exclude the flagellin domain D3 as a responsible interaction partner. We propose that the flagellum of EcN is its major adhesin in vivo, which enables this probiotic strain to compete efficiently for binding sites on host tissue with several bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Escherichia coli MTC, a human NADPH P450 reductase competent mutagenicity tester strain for the expression of human cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A1, 1A2, 2A6, 3A4, or 3A5: catalytic activities and mutagenicity studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranendonk, M.; Carreira, F.; Theisen, P.; Laires, A.; Fischer, C.W.; Rueff, J.; Estabrook, R.W.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Roda, R.

    1999-01-01

    We report here on the genetic engineering of four new Escherichia coli tester bacteria, coexpressing human CYP1A1, CYP2A6, CYP3A4 or CYP3A5 with human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (RED) by a biplasmid coexpression system, recently developed to express human CYP1A2 in the tester strain MTC. The

  19. Escherichia coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and eggs cause sepsis, meningitis and urinary tract infection in rodent models of human infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellata, M; Johnson, J R; Curtiss, R

    2018-02-01

    The zoonotic potential of Escherichia coli from chicken-source food products is important to define for public health purposes. Previously, genotypic and phenotypic screening of E. coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and shell eggs identified some E. coli strains that by molecular criteria resembled human-source extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Here, to clarify the zoonotic risk of such chicken-source E. coli, we compared selected E. coli isolates from chicken meat and eggs, stratified by molecularly defined ExPEC status, to human-source ExPEC and to laboratory E. coli for virulence in rodent models of sepsis, meningitis and UTI, and evaluated whether specific bacterial characteristics predict experimental virulence. Multiple chicken-source E. coli resembled human-source ExPEC in their ability to cause one or multiple different ExPEC-associated infections. Swimming ability corresponded with urovirulence, K1 capsule corresponded with ability to cause neonatal meningitis, and biofilm formation in urine corresponded with ability to cause sepsis. In contrast, molecularly defined ExPEC status and individual genotypic traits were uncorrelated with ability to cause sepsis, and neither complement sensitivity nor growth in human urine corresponded with virulence in any infection model. These findings establish that chicken-derived food products contain E. coli strains that, in rodent models of multiple human-associated ExPEC infections, are able to cause disease comparably to human-source E. coli clinical isolates, which suggests that they may pose a significant food safety threat. Further study is needed to define the level of risk they pose to human health, which if appreciable would justify efforts to monitor for and reduce or eliminate them. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. First study on characterization of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes in verotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic E. coli isolated from raw milk and unpasteurized traditional cheeses in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaran, Alexandra; Mihaiu, Marian; Tăbăran, Flaviu; Colobatiu, Liora; Reget, Oana; Borzan, Mihai Marian; Dan, Sorin Daniel

    2017-03-01

    The study focused on the incidence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) in raw milk and traditional dairy cheeses marketed in Romania, characterizing the virulence and antibiotic resistance genes of these isolates. One hundred and twenty samples of raw milk and 80 samples of unpasteurized telemy cheese were collected and cultured according to the international standard protocol. All the characteristic E. coli cultures were analyzed for the presence of STa, STb, LT, stx1, and stx2 toxicity genes. The ETEC/VTEC strains were tested for the presence of antibiotic resistance genes, such as aadA1, tetA, tetB, tetC, tetG, dfrA1, qnrA, aaC, sul1, bla SHV , bla CMY , bla TEM , and ere(A), using PCR. The results showed that 27 samples (18.62%) were positive for one of the virulence genes investigated. 48.1% (n = 13) tested positive at the genes encoding for tetracycline resistance, tetA being the most prevalent one (61.5%; n = 8). A high percent (33.3%; n = 9) revealed the beta-lactamase (bla TEM ) resistance gene, and none of the samples tested positive for bla CMY and bla SHV genes. The genes responsible for resistance to sulfonamides (sul1) and trimethoprim (dfrA1) were detected in rates of 14.8% (n = 4) and 7.4% (n = 2), respectively. E. coli is highly prevalent in raw milk and unpasteurized cheeses marketed in Romania. These strains might represent an important reservoir of resistance genes which can easily spread into other European countries, given the unique market.

  1. Growth of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in povi masima, a traditional Pacific island food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T L; Whyte, R J; Graham, C G; Saunders, D; Schumacher, J; Hudson, J A

    2004-01-01

    To obtain preliminary data on the microbiology and hurdles to pathogen growth in the traditional Pacific Island food, povi masima, which is essentially beef brisket cured in brine. Six containers of povi masima were prepared and two were inoculated with five enterotoxigenic strains of Staphyloccocus aureus. The povi masima were divided into two lots each containing two uninoculated control and an inoculated container. Lot 1 was incubated at room temperature (20 degrees C) and lot 2 under refrigeration (4-5 degrees C) for up to 98 days. During storage, samples were removed and tested for aerobic plate count, coagulase-producing Staphylococci, Clostridium perfringens, staphylococcal enterotoxin and various chemical parameters of the food. Coagulase-producing Staphylococci and aerobic plate counts grew to high levels in both the inoculated and uninoculated lots stored at room temperature, but enterotoxin was only detected at one time point in these lots and this may represent a false positive result. The concentration of NaCl in the meat increased with time as concentrations equilibrated, and nitrite was rapidly lost in those lots stored at room temperature. Storage at 4-5 degrees C prevented proliferation of coagulase-producing Staphylococci. For safe curing and storage, this food should be kept under refrigeration as this prevented growth of staphylococci. Optimum storage would also be achieved with improved attempts to ensure equal distribution of NaCl prior to storage. Under conditions traditionally used to cure and store this food, enterotoxigenic staphylococci can grow to numbers where toxigenesis might occur, especially during the early stages of curing where the salt has not diffused from the brine into the meat.

  2. Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans and swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hasman, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) were investigated in 124 Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n = 85) and swine (n = 39) in Denmark. The collection included 59 high-level CIP-resistant...... isolates (MIC >= 4) from human (n = 51) and pig origin (n = 8) and 65 low-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >= 0.125) from human (n = 34) and pig origin (n = 31). Resistance by target modification was screened by PCR amplification and sequencing, of the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs......) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. QRDR mutations occurred in all except two isolates (98%). All high-level CIP-resistant E. coli had one or two mutations in gyrA in combination with mutations in parC or parE. Mutations in parC and parE were only found in combination with gyrA mutations, and no mutations...

  3. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection has donor-dependent effect on human gut microbiota and may be antagonized by probiotic yeast during interaction with Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, J; Cordonnier, C; Rougeron, A; Le Goff, O; Nguyen, H T T; Denis, S; Alric, M; Livrelli, V; Blanquet-Diot, S

    2015-11-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are major food-borne pathogens responsible for serious infections ranging from mild diarrhea to hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening complications. Shiga toxins (Stxs) are the main virulence factor of EHEC. The antagonistic effect of a prophylactic treatment with the probiotic strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae against EHEC O157:H7 was investigated using complementary in vitro human colonic model and in vivo murine ileal loop assays. In vitro, the probiotic treatment had no effect on O157:H7 survival but favorably influenced gut microbiota activity through modulation of short-chain fatty acid production, increasing acetate production and decreasing that of butyrate. Both pathogen and probiotic strains had individual-dependent effects on human gut microbiota. For the first time, stx expression was followed in human colonic environment: at 9 and 12 h post EHEC infection, probiotic treatment significantly decreased stx mRNA levels. Besides, in murine ileal loops, the probiotic yeast specifically exerted a trophic effect on intestinal mucosa and inhibited O157:H7 interactions with Peyer's patches and subsequent hemorrhagic lesions. Taken together, the results suggest that S. cerevisiae may be useful in the fight against EHEC infection and that host associated factors such as microbiota could influence clinical evolution of EHEC infection and the effectiveness of probiotics.

  4. Detection and characterization of pCT-like plasmid vectors for blaCTX-M-14 in Escherichia coli isolates from humans, turkeys and cattle in England and Wales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokes, M.O.; Cottel, J.L.; Piddock, L.J.; Wu, G.; Wootton, M.; Mevius, D.J.; Randall, L.P.; Teale, C.J.; Fielder, M.D.; Coldham, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives - To detect and characterize Escherichia coli strains and pCT-like plasmids implicated in the dissemination of the CTX-M-14 gene in animals and humans, in England and Wales. Methods UK CTX-M-14-producing E. coli (n¿=¿70) from cattle (n¿=¿33), turkeys (n¿=¿9), sheep (n¿=¿2) and humans

  5. Detection of clonal group A Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chickens, broiler chicken meat, community-dwelling humans, and urinary tract infection (UTI) patients and their virulence in a mouse UTI model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Hammerum, Anette M; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2010-12-01

    Escherichia coli clonal group A isolates cause infections in people. We investigated 158 phylogroup D E. coli isolates from animals, meat, and humans. Twenty-five of these isolates were of clonal group A, and 15 isolates were shown to cause infection in a mouse urinary tract infection (UTI) model. We conclude that clonal group A isolates are found in both broiler chickens and broiler chicken meat and may cause UTI in humans.

  6. Genetic Relatedness Among Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolated Along the Animal Food Supply Chain and in Gastroenteritis Cases in Qatar Using Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Srikanth; Chang, YuChen; Scaria, Joy; Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; Peters, Kenlyn E; Doiphode, Sanjay H; Sultan, Ali; Mohammed, Hussni O

    2017-06-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli has been listed among the most important bacteria associated with foodborne illnesses around the world. We investigated the genetic relatedness among Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) isolated along the animal food supply chain and from humans diagnosed with gastroenteritis in Qatar. Samples were collected from different sources along the food supply chain and from patients admitted to the hospital with complaints of gastroenteritis. All samples were screened for the presence of E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC using a combination of bacterial enrichment and molecular detection techniques. A proportional sampling approach was used to select positive samples from each source for further multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. Seven housekeeping genes described for STEC were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and analyzed by MLST. Isolates were characterized by allele composition, sequence type (ST) and assessed for epidemiologic relationship within and among different sources. Nei's genetic distance was calculated at the allele level between sample pools in each site downstream. E. coli O157:H7 occurred at a higher rate in slaughterhouse and retail samples than at the farm or in humans in our sampling. The ST171, an ST common to enterotoxigenic E. coli and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli, was the most common ST (15%) in the food supply chain. None of the genetic distances among the different sources was statistically significant. Enterohemorrhagic E. coli pathogenic strains are present along the supply chain at different levels and with varying relatedness. Clinical isolates were the most diverse, as expected, considering the polyclonal diversity in the human microbiota. The high occurrence of these food adulterants among the farm products suggests that implementation of sanitary measures at that level might reduce the risk of human exposure.

  7. Evaluation of in vitro Probiotic Potential of Pediococcus pentosaceus OZF Isolated from Human Breast Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanagaoglu, Ozlem; Kiran, Fadime; Ataoglu, Haluk

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the probiotic properties of Pediococcus pentosaceus OZF isolated from human breast milk. The results obtained so far suggest that the strain is resistant to low pH, bile salt, pepsin and pancreatin, so it could survive while passing through the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract and reveal its potential probiotic action on host organism. The strain was non-pathogenic (γ-hemolytic), produced anti-Listerial bacteriocin, exhibited a strong autoaggregating phenotype (85.71%) and demonstrated 6.26 and 12.99% coaggregation with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium SL 1344 and Escherichia coli LMG 3083 (ETEC), respectively. The degree of adhesion of Ped. pentosaceus OZF to the human Caco-2 cell line was investigated and when compared to the adhesion of pathogenic strains tested, it was shown to inhibit the growth of human enterotoxigenic E. coli LMG 3083 (ETEC) and of Salm. Typhimurium SL 1344. Ped. pentosaceus OZF seems to adhere to human intestinal cells via mechanisms that involve different combinations of carbohydrate and lipid factors on the bacteria and eukaryotic cell surface. The percentage of adhesion to n-hexadecane was 34% showing that the surface was rather hydrophilic. Higher affinity displayed by Ped. pentosaceus OZF for chloroform demonstrates the basic property of a cell, which may be due to the presence of carboxylic groups on the cell surface.

  8. Comparison by multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis and antimicrobial resistance among atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from food samples and human and animal faecal specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Nakamura, H; Kage-Nakadai, E; Hara-Kudo, Y; Nishikawa, Y

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed whether multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing discriminated diarrhoeagenic atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) from aEPEC indigenous to domestic animals or healthy people. MLVA genotyping of 142 aEPEC strains isolated from foods and faecal samples of domestic animals and humans revealed 126 distinct MLVA profiles that distributed to four clusters, yielding a Simpson's index of diversity (D) of 99·8%. Cluster 2 included 87% of cattle isolates and 67% of patient isolates. The plurality (15/34, 44%) of strains from healthy humans mapped to Cluster 1, while half (18/41, 44%) of the swine strains belonged to Cluster 4. Testing for antimicrobial susceptibility revealed that 52 strains (37%) of aEPEC were resistant to one or more agents; only 10 strains (7%) exhibited resistance to more than three agents. Strains isolated from swine or food exhibited a wider variety of resistance phenotypes than bovine or human strains. MLVA assigned the aEPEC isolates from cattle and patients to Cluster 2, distinct from aEPEC from other sources. Hog yards may be a larger source of drug-resistant strains than are cattle ranches. MLVA suggests that human diarrhoeagenic aEPEC are derived from cattle and are distinct from strains carried by healthy people and other animals. Cattle appear to be reservoirs of human diarrhoeagenic aEPEC. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Human bladder uroepithelial cells synergize with monocytes to promote IL-10 synthesis and other cytokine responses to uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L Duell

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are a major source of morbidity for women and the elderly, with Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC being the most prevalent causative pathogen. Studies in recent years have defined a key anti-inflammatory role for Interleukin-10 (IL-10 in urinary tract infection mediated by UPEC and other uropathogens. We investigated the nature of the IL-10-producing interactions between UPEC and host cells by utilising a novel co-culture model that incorporated lymphocytes, mononuclear and uroepithelial cells in histotypic proportions. This co-culture model demonstrated synergistic IL-10 production effects between monocytes and uroepithelial cells following infection with UPEC. Membrane inserts were used to separate the monocyte and uroepithelial cell types during infection and revealed two synergistic IL-10 production effects based on contact-dependent and soluble interactions. Analysis of a comprehensive set of immunologically relevant biomarkers in monocyte-uroepithelial cell co-cultures highlighted that multiple cytokine, chemokine and signalling factors were also produced in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. These results demonstrate that IL-10 responses to UPEC occur via multiple interactions between several cells types, implying a complex role for infection-related IL-10 during UTI. Development and application of the co-culture model described in this study is thus useful to define the degree of contact dependency of biomarker production to UPEC, and highlights the relevance of histotypic co-cultures in studying complex host-pathogen interactions.

  10. Human Bladder Uroepithelial Cells Synergize with Monocytes to Promote IL-10 Synthesis and Other Cytokine Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duell, Benjamin L.; Carey, Alison J.; Dando, Samantha J.; Schembri, Mark A.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are a major source of morbidity for women and the elderly, with Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) being the most prevalent causative pathogen. Studies in recent years have defined a key anti-inflammatory role for Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in urinary tract infection mediated by UPEC and other uropathogens. We investigated the nature of the IL-10-producing interactions between UPEC and host cells by utilising a novel co-culture model that incorporated lymphocytes, mononuclear and uroepithelial cells in histotypic proportions. This co-culture model demonstrated synergistic IL-10 production effects between monocytes and uroepithelial cells following infection with UPEC. Membrane inserts were used to separate the monocyte and uroepithelial cell types during infection and revealed two synergistic IL-10 production effects based on contact-dependent and soluble interactions. Analysis of a comprehensive set of immunologically relevant biomarkers in monocyte-uroepithelial cell co-cultures highlighted that multiple cytokine, chemokine and signalling factors were also produced in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. These results demonstrate that IL-10 responses to UPEC occur via multiple interactions between several cells types, implying a complex role for infection-related IL-10 during UTI. Development and application of the co-culture model described in this study is thus useful to define the degree of contact dependency of biomarker production to UPEC, and highlights the relevance of histotypic co-cultures in studying complex host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24155979

  11. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxigenic strains in bovine raw milk by reversed passive latex agglutination and multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Samy Mansour

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This review gives an outline of the assessment of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus tainting levels in raw milk from different sources in Egypt and characterization of enterotoxigenic strains utilizing a technique in light of PCR to identify genes coding for the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE. The obtained data were compared with results from the application of the reversed passive latex. Materials and Methods: Multiplex PCR and reversed passive latex agglutination (RPLA were used. A total of 141 samples of raw milk (cow's milk=33, buffalo's milk=58, and bulk tank milk=50 were investigated for S. aureus contamination and tested for enterotoxin genes presence and toxin production. Results: S. aureus was detected in 23 (16.3% samples phenotypically and genotypically by amplification of nuc gene. The S. aureus isolates were investigated for SEs genes (sea to see by multiplex PCR and the toxin production by these isolates was screened by RPLA. SEs genes were detected in six isolates (26.1% molecularly; see was the most observed gene where detected in all isolates, two isolates harbored seb, and two isolates harbored sec. According to RPLA, three isolates produced SEB and SEC. Conclusion: The study revealed the widespread of S. aureus strains caring genes coding for toxins. The real significance of the presence of these strains or its toxins in raw milk and their possible impact a potential hazard for staphylococcal food poisoning by raw milk consumption. Therefore, detection of enterotoxigenic S. aureus strains in raw milk is necessary for consumer safety.

  12. Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizade, Hesam

    2018-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most prominent cause of infectious diseases that span from the gastrointestinal tract to extra-intestinal sites such as urinary tract infection, septicaemia, and neonatal meningitis. The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in E. coli is an increasing public health concern across the world. Rising resistance in E. coli isolates is also observed in Iran. This review summarizes the status of antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates in Iran from 2007 to 2016. The data of the prevalence of E. coli antibiotic resistance were collected from databases such as Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and Scientific Information Database. Antibiotic resistance in E. coli is on the rise. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance of E. coli varies from region to region in Iran.

  13. Longitudinal study of antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli isolated from integrated multi-site cohorts of humans and swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the relationship between the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant (AR) E. coli isolated from human wastewater and swine fecal samples and the risk factors: (host species, production type (swine), vocation (human swine workers, non-workers, and slaughter-plant workers), and season) in a ...

  14. Effects of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Extract on Killing Activity of Human Neutrophils and Membrane Integrity of Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmoteh, Jutharat; Syed Musthafa, Khadar; Pomwised, Rattanaruji; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2016-05-27

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 is one of the most virulent causative agents of foodborne disease. Use of antibiotics for the treatment against E. coli O157:H7 infection leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The present study evaluated the potential of ethanolic leaf extract of a medicinal plant, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa in enhancing the killing activity of human neutrophils against E. coli O157:H7. In addition, the effects of the extract on membrane permeability of the organisms were studied. In the killing assay, percentage survival of the bacterial cells after being exposed to human neutrophils in the presence of various concentrations of the extract were determined. At 45 min, percentage survival of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 after treated with neutrophils in the presence of the extract at 125-250 µg/mL was 58.48%-50.28% and 69.13%-35.35%, respectively. Furthermore, upon treatment with R. tomentosa at 250 µg/mL uptake of crystal violet by E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25922 was increased to 40.07% and 36.16%, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that the extract exhibited dual effects as immunostimulant and membrane permeabilizing agent perhaps resulted in enhancing the killing activity of neutrophils against the organisms.

  15. Comparative analysis of the susceptibility to biocides and heavy metals of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates of human and avian origin, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deus, Daniela; Krischek, Carsten; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Sharifi, Ahmad Reza; Fiegen, Ulrike; Reich, Felix; Klein, Guenter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2017-05-01

    A total of 174 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates collected from humans (n=140) and healthy broiler chickens (n = 34) was included in the study. The MIC values of alkyl diaminoethyl glycin hydrochloride, benzethonium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, acriflavine, copper sulfate, silver nitrate and zinc chloride were determined by the broth microdilution method. Significant differences in MIC distributions were found between human and avian isolates and between CTX-M-, SHV- and TEM-type ESBL E. coli for chlorhexidine, silver nitrate, zinc chloride and copper sulfate by statistical analysis. Isolates with reduced susceptibility were investigated for the presence and localization of tolerance-mediating genes by PCR analysis and Southern blotting. The genes emrE, mdfA, sugE(c), cueO, copA, zntA and zitB were commonly present in isolates with elevated MICs, while the genes qacE∆1, qacF, qacH, sugE(p), cusC and pcoA, were less prevalent. In several isolates, a plasmid localization of the genes qacE∆1, qacF, qacH and sugE(p) on large plasmids >20 kb was detected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli in diarrhoeic calves and comparative genomics of O5 bovine and human STEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, I; Thiry, D; Duprez, J-N; Saulmont, M; Iguchi, A; Piérard, D; Jouant, L; Daube, G; Ogura, Y; Hayashi, T; Taminiau, B; Mainil, J G

    2017-04-01

    Escherichia coli producing Shiga toxins (Stx) and the attaching-effacing (AE) lesion (AE-STEC) are responsible for (bloody) diarrhoea in humans and calves while the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) producing the AE lesion only cause non-bloody diarrhoea in all mammals. The purpose of this study was (i) to identify the pathotypes of enterohaemolysin-producing E. coli isolated between 2009 and 2013 on EHLY agar from less than 2 month-old diarrhoeic calves with a triplex PCR targeting the stx1, stx2, eae virulence genes; (ii) to serotype the positive isolates with PCR targeting the genes coding for ten most frequent and pathogenic human and calf STEC O serogroups; and (iii) to compare the MLSTypes and virulotypes of calf and human O5 AE-STEC after Whole Genome Sequencing using two server databases (www.genomicepidemiology.org). Of 233 isolates, 206 were triplex PCR-positive: 119 AE-STEC (58%), 78 EPEC (38%) and 9 STEC (4%); and the stx1+eae+ AE-STEC (49.5%) were the most frequent. Of them, 120 isolates (84% of AE-STEC, 23% of EPEC, 22% of STEC) tested positive with one O serogroup PCR: 57 for O26 (47.5%), 36 for O111 (30%), 10 for O103 (8%) and 8 for O5 (7%) serogroups. The analysis of the draft sequences of 15 O5 AE-STEC could not identify any difference correlated to the host. As a conclusion, (i) the AE-STEC associated with diarrhoea in young calves still belong to the same serogroups as previously (O5, O26, O111) but the O103 serogroup may be emerging, (ii) the O5 AE-STEC from calves and humans are genetically similar. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Immunologic Control of Diarrheal Disease Due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Reactogenicity, Immunogenicity, and Efficacy Studies of Purified Escherichia coli (H10407 and B7A) Pili Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    U.S. Army Medical and Research Development Command, we demonstrated that clinical diarrheal infection due to ETEC stimulated homologous immunity to re...challenge. We hypothesized that the mechanism of immunity was operative at the intestinal mucosal surface and involved prevention of adherence of ETEC...to proximal, small intestinal mucosa. We suggested a role for vaccines consisting of purified adhesion pili. Vaccination of pregnant gilts with

  18. Genetic diversity, phylogroup distribution and virulence gene profile of pks positive Escherichia coli colonizing human intestinal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarshar, Meysam; Scribano, Daniela; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Aprea, Maria Rita; Aleandri, Marta; Pronio, Annamaria; Longhi, Catia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Conte, Maria Pia

    2017-11-01

    Some Escherichia coli strains of phylogroup B2 harbor a (pks) pathogenicity island that encodes a polyketide-peptide genotoxin called colibactin. It causes DNA double-strand breaks and megalocytosis in eukaryotic cells and it may contribute to cancer development. Study of bacterial community that colonizes the adenomatous polyp lesion, defined as precancerous lesions, could be helpful to assess if such pathogenic bacteria possess a role in the polyp progression to cancer. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1500 E. coli isolates were obtained from biopsies of patients presenting adenomatous colon polyps, the normal tissues adjacent to the polyp lesion and patients presenting normal mucosa. pks island frequency, phylogenetic grouping, fingerprint genotyping, and virulence gene features of pks positive (pks + ) E. coli isolates were performed. We found pks + E. coli strongly colonize two patients presenting polypoid lesions and none were identified in patients presenting normal mucosa. Predominant phylogroups among pks + E. coli isolates were B2, followed by D. Clustering based on fragment profiles of composite analysis, typed the pks + isolates into 5 major clusters (I-V) and 17 sub-clusters, demonstrating a high level of genetic diversity among them. The most prevalent virulence genes were fimH and fyuA (100%), followed by vat (92%), hra and papA (69%), ibeA (28%), and hlyA (25%). Our results revealed that pks + E. coli can colonize the precancerous lesions, with a high distribution in both the polyp lesions and in normal tissues adjacent to the lesion. The high differences in fingerprinting patterns obtained indicate that pks + E. coli strains were genetically diverse, possibly allowing them to more easily adapt to environmental variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Global Incidence of Human Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli Infections and Deaths: A Systematic Review and Knowledge Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majowicz, Shannon E.; Scallan, Elaine; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Sargeant, Jan M.; Stapleton, Jackie; Angulo, Frederick J.; Yeung, Derrick H.; Kirk, Martyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are an important cause of foodborne disease, yet global estimates of disease burden do not exist. Our objective was to estimate the global annual number of illnesses due to pathogenic STEC, and resultant hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and death. Materials We searched Medline, Scopus, SIGLE/OpenGrey, and CABI and World Health Organization (WHO) databases for studies of STEC incidence in the general population, published between January 1, 1990 and April 30, 2012, in all languages. We searched health institution websites for notifiable disease data and reports, cross-referenced citations, and consulted international knowledge experts. We employed an a priori hierarchical study selection process and synthesized results using a stochastic simulation model to account for uncertainty inherent in the data. Results We identified 16 articles and databases from 21 countries, from 10 of the 14 WHO Sub-Regions. We estimated that STEC causes 2,801,000 acute illnesses annually (95% Credible Interval [Cr.I.]: 1,710,000; 5,227,000), and leads to 3890 cases of HUS (95% Cr.I.: 2400; 6700), 270 cases of ESRD (95% Cr.I.: 20; 800), and 230 deaths (95% Cr.I.: 130; 420). Sensitivity analyses indicated these estimates are likely conservative. Conclusions These are the first estimates of the global incidence of STEC-related illnesses, which have not been explicitly included in previous global burden of disease estimations. Compared to other pathogens with a foodborne transmission component, STEC appears to cause more cases than alveolar echinococcosis each year, but less than typhoid fever, foodborne trematodes, and nontyphoidal salmonellosis. Applications Given the persistence of STEC globally, efforts aimed at reducing the burden of foodborne disease should consider the relative contribution of STEC in the target population. PMID:24750096

  20. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Kilic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of humans and warm-blooded animals. Most strains of E. coli are harmless for human. E. coli O157:H7 is the most common member of a group of pathogenic E. coli strains known variously as enterohaemorrhagic, verocytotoxin-producing, or Shiga-toxin-producing organisms. EHEC bacterium is the major cause of haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The reservoir of this pathogen appears to be mainly cattle and other ruminants such as camels. It is transmitted to humans primarily through consumption of contaminated foods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 387-388

  1. Comparative Analysis of ESBL-Positive Escherichia coli Isolates from Animals and Humans from the UK, The Netherlands and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guanghui; Day, Michaela J.; Mafura, Muriel T.; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Fenner, Jackie J.; Sharma, Meenaxi; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Rodríguez, Irene; Dierikx, Cindy; Kadlec, Kristina; Schink, Anne-Kathrin; Wain, John; Helmuth, Reiner; Guerra, Beatriz; Schwarz, Stefan; Threlfall, John; Woodward, Martin J.; Woodford, Neil; Coldham, Nick; Mevius, Dik

    2013-01-01

    The putative virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene contents of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive E. coli (n=629) isolated between 2005 and 2009 from humans, animals and animal food products in Germany, The Netherlands and the UK were compared using a microarray approach to test the suitability of this approach with regard to determining their similarities. A selection of isolates (n=313) were also analysed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Isolates harbouring blaCTX-M-group-1 dominated (66%, n=418) and originated from both animals and cases of human infections in all three countries; 23% (n=144) of all isolates contained both blaCTX-M-group-1 and blaOXA-1-like genes, predominantly from humans (n=127) and UK cattle (n=15). The antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles of this collection of isolates were highly diverse. A substantial number of human isolates (32%, n=87) did not share more than 40% similarity (based on the Jaccard coefficient) with animal isolates. A further 43% of human isolates from the three countries (n=117) were at least 40% similar to each other and to five isolates from UK cattle and one each from Dutch chicken meat and a German dog; the members of this group usually harboured genes such as mph(A), mrx, aac(6’)-Ib, catB3, blaOXA-1-like and blaCTX-M-group-1. forty-four per cent of the MLST-typed isolates in this group belonged to ST131 (n=18) and 22% to ST405 (n=9), all from humans. Among animal isolates subjected to MLST (n=258), only 1.2% (n=3) were more than 70% similar to human isolates in gene profiles and shared the same MLST clonal complex with the corresponding human isolates. The results suggest that minimising human-to-human transmission is essential to control the spread of ESBL-positive E. coli in humans. PMID:24086522

  2. Attribution of human infections with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) to livestock sources and identification of source-specific risk factors, The Netherlands (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, L; van Pelt, W; van der Voort, M; Heck, M; Friesema, I; Franz, E

    2018-02-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a zoonotic pathogen of public health concern whose sources and transmission routes are difficult to trace. Using a combined source attribution and case-control analysis, we determined the relative contributions of four putative livestock sources (cattle, small ruminants, pigs, poultry) to human STEC infections and their associated dietary, animal contact, temporal and socio-econo-demographic risk factors in the Netherlands in 2010/2011-2014. Dutch source data were supplemented with those from other European countries with similar STEC epidemiology. Human STEC infections were attributed to sources using both the modified Dutch model (mDM) and the modified Hald model (mHM) supplied with the same O-serotyping data. Cattle accounted for 48.6% (mDM) and 53.1% (mHM) of the 1,183 human cases attributed, followed by small ruminants (mDM: 23.5%; mHM: 25.4%), pigs (mDM: 12.5%; mHM: 5.7%) and poultry (mDM: 2.7%; mHM: 3.1%), whereas the sources of the remaining 12.8% of cases could not be attributed. Of the top five O-serotypes infecting humans, O157, O26, O91 and O103 were mainly attributed to cattle (61%-75%) and O146 to small ruminants (71%-77%). Significant risk factors for human STEC infection as a whole were the consumption of beef, raw/undercooked meat or cured meat/cold cuts. For cattle-attributed STEC infections, specific risk factors were consuming raw meat spreads and beef. Consuming raw/undercooked or minced meat were risk factors for STEC infections attributed to small ruminants. For STEC infections attributed to pigs, only consuming raw/undercooked meat was significant. Consuming minced meat, raw/undercooked meat or cured meat/cold cuts were associated with poultry-attributed STEC infections. Consuming raw vegetables was protective for all STEC infections. We concluded that domestic ruminants account for approximately three-quarters of reported human STEC infections, whereas pigs and poultry play a minor role and

  3. Inhibition of water absorption and selective damage to human colonic mucosa induced by Shiga toxin-2 are enhanced by Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Adriana; Gerhardt, Elizabeth; García, Hugo; Amigo, Natalia; Cataldi, Angel; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for a variety of clinical syndromes including bloody and non-bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although multiple serotypes of STEC have been isolated from hemorrhagic colitis cases, E. coli O157:H7 is by far the most prevalent serotype associated with HUS. Shiga toxin is the major virulence factor of E. coli O157:H7 and is responsible for the more severe symptoms of the infection. However, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diarrhea mediated by Stx2 are not well known. In this study, we have determined the effects of E. coli O157:H7 strain 125/99 wild type (wt) on the human colonic mucosa mounted in an Ussing chamber. In response to 125/99wt, an inhibition of water absorption across human colonic mucosa was observed. Histological sections showed severe necrosis with detachment of the surface epithelium, mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and loss of goblet cells after 1h of incubation with 125/99wt. These alterations were not observed with the isogenic mutant strain lacking stx2 or with the filter-sterilized culture supernatant from the 125/99wt strain. These results indicate that the cell damages in human colon are induced by Stx2, and that Stx2 production is increased by the interaction with bacterial cells. Identification of host cell-derived factors responsible for increasing Stx2 can lead to new strategies for modulating STEC infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia Strains from Human, Animal, and Food Samples in San Luis, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Isabel Favier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia species was investigated in humans, animals, and foods in San Luis, Argentina. A total of 453 samples were analyzed by culture and PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all the strains was studied, the genomic relationships among isolates of the same species were determined by PFGE, and the potencial virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains was analyzed. Yersinia species showed higher prevalence (9/453, 2.0%, 95% CI, 0.7–3.3% than STEC (4/453, 0.9%, 95% CI, 0–1.8% and Salmonella spp. (3/453, 0.7%, 95% CI, 0–1.5%. Y. enterocolitica and Y. intermedia were isolated from chicken carcasses (6/80, 7.5%, 95% CI, 1.5–13.5% and porcine skin and bones (3/10, 30%, 95% CI, 0–65%. One STEC strain was recovered from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2% and STEC stx1/stx2 genes were detected in bovine stools (3/129, 2.3%, 95% CI, 0–5.0%. S. Typhimurium was isolated from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2% while one S. Newport and two S. Gaminara strains were recovered from one wild boar (1/3, 33%, 95% CI, 0–99%. The knowledge of prevalence and characteristics of these enteropathogens in our region would allow public health services to take adequate preventive measures.

  5. Refined candidate region specified by haplotype sharing for Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac susceptibility alleles in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Kracht, S S; Esteso, G

    2010-01-01

    Infection of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4ab/ac is a major welfare problem and financial burden for the pig industry. Natural resistance to this infection is inherited as a Mendelian recessive trait, and a polymorphism in the MUC4 gene segregating for susceptibility....../resistance is presently used in a selection programme by the Danish pig breeding industry. To elucidate the genetic background involved in E. coli F4ab/ac susceptibility in pigs, a detailed haplotype map of the porcine candidate region was established. This region covers approximately 3.7 Mb. The material used...

  6. The mechanisms of activation of normal human serum complement by Escherichia coli strains with K1 surface antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugla-Płoskońska, G; Cisowska, A; Karpińska, K; Jankowski, S; Doroszkiewicz, W

    2006-01-01

    Ten E. coli K1 strains isolated from the urine of children with urinary tract infections were sensitive to the bactericidal action of normal human serum (NHS). The role of the particular mechanisms of complement activation was determined in the process of killing these strains, showing variable sensitivity to the bactericidal action of NHS; three mechanisms of activation of human complement were observed. Important role of alternative pathway activation in the bactericidal action of NHS against E. coli K1 strains independent of the classical and lectin pathways was not established.

  7. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokil, Nilesh J.; Totsika, Makrina; Carey, Alison J.

    2011-01-01

    or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1+ vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data......Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular...

  8. Comparative analysis of ESBL-positive Escherichia coli isolates from animals and humans from the UK, The Netherlands and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, G.; Day, M.J.; Mafura, T.; Nunez-Garcia, J.; Fenner, J.J.; Sharma, M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Rodriguez, I.; Dierikx, C.M.; Mevius, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    The putative virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene contents of extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-positive E. coli (n=629) isolated between 2005 and 2009 from humans, animals and animal food products in Germany, The Netherlands and the UK were compared using a microarray approach to test the

  9. Role of the lysozyme inhibitor Ivy in growth or survival of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in hen egg white and in human saliva and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Daphne; Vanlint, Dietrich; Callewaert, Lien; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2008-07-01

    Ivy is a lysozyme inhibitor that protects Escherichia coli against lysozyme-mediated cell wall hydrolysis when the outer membrane is permeabilized by mutation or by chemical or physical stress. In the current work, we have investigated whether Ivy is necessary for the survival or growth of E. coli MG1655 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in hen egg white and in human saliva and breast milk, which are naturally rich in lysozyme and in membrane-permeabilizing components. Wild-type E. coli was able to grow in saliva and breast milk but showed partial inactivation in egg white. The knockout of Ivy did not affect growth in breast milk but slightly increased sensitivity to egg white and caused hypersensitivity to saliva, resulting in the complete inactivation of 10(4) CFU ml(-1) of bacteria within less than 5 hours. The depletion of lysozyme from saliva completely restored the ability of the ivy mutant to grow like the parental strain. P. aeruginosa, in contrast, showed growth in all three substrates, which was not affected by the knockout of Ivy production. These results indicate that lysozyme inhibitors like Ivy promote bacterial survival or growth in particular lysozyme-rich secretions and suggest that they may promote the bacterial colonization of specific niches in the animal host.

  10. Effects of acetic acid and its assimilation in fed-batch cultures of recombinant Escherichia coli containing human-like collagen cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenjiao; Fan, Daidi; Shang, Longan; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Xiaoli; Yu, Yuanyuan

    2010-03-01

    The primary processing problem in recombinant Escherichia coli fermentation is the production of acetic acid, which can inhibit both cell growth and recombinant protein production. The ability of E. coli to assimilate acetate permits it to solve this problem in a rather creative manner. In this study, the effects of acetic acid assimilation through a glucose starvation period at different cell growth phases were investigated in fed-batch cultures of recombinant E. coli. Experimental results showed that the human-like collagen (HLC) production could be improved by introducing glucose starvation at the end of batch culture and pre-induction phase, while the glucose starvation at the induction phase resulted in a poor HLC productivity. The acetic acid assimilation was observed during all the glucose starvation periods. In addition, a systematic study for evaluating the effects of acetic acid was carried out by adding acetate into culture media at different cell growth phases and then employing a glucose starvation after several hours. It was found that obvious acetate inhibition on cell growth occurred in the batch culture phases while its inhibitory effect on HLC expression occurred only in the post-induction phase. The longer the elevated acetic acid concentration maintained, the stronger the inhibitory effects were. These results are of significance for optimizing and scaling-up fermentation processes. Copyright 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of fermentation conditions for the production of human soluble catechol-O-methyltransferase by Escherichia coli using artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R; Ferreira, S; Bonifácio, M J; Dias, J M L; Queiroz, J A; Passarinha, L A

    2012-08-31

    The aim of this work was to optimize the temperature, pH and stirring rate of the production of human soluble catechol-O-methyltransferase (hSCOMT) in a batch Escherichia coli culture process. A central composite design (CCD) was firstly employed to design the experimental assays used in the evaluation of these operational parameters on the hSCOMT activity for a semi-defined and complex medium. Predictive artificial neural network (ANN) models of the hSCOMT activity as function of the combined effects of these variables was proposed based on this exploratory experiments performed for the two culture media. The regression coefficients (R(2)) for the final models were 0.980 and 0.983 for the semi-defined and complex medium, respectively. The ANN models predicted a maximum hSCOMT activity of 183.73 nmol/h, at 40 °C, pH 6.5 and stirring rate of 351 rpm, and 132.90 nmol/h, at 35 °C, pH 6.2 and stirring rate of 351 rpm, for semi-defined and complex medium, respectively. These results represent a 4-fold increase in total hSCOMT activity by comparison to the standard operational conditions used for this bioprocess at slight scale. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Production of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-2A by high density culture of Escherichia coli with stationary dissolved oxygen fed-batch condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Chen, C; Pu, Q; Chen, S

    1998-01-01

    The optimization of cultivation condition in 500 ml shake flasks was carried out to produce recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2A (BMP-2A) in recombinant Escherichia coli YK537/pDH-B2m, followed by a 5L fermenter batch and condition-controlled fed-batch culture to obtain BMP-2A. The comparison of these two methods indicated that cultivation by keeping dissolved oxygen at 30%-40% and limiting glucose concentration could obtain BMP-2A 2.78 g/L broth, the final cell density was OD600 53 (dry cell weight 21.2 g/L), and expressed BMP-2A was 25% of the total amount of protein in E.coli. The critical fermentation conditions included: (1) keeping appropriate dissolved oxygen concentration in the process; (2) limiting glucose concentration; (3) taking heat induction at the middle-log phase and maintaining 42 degrees C for 4 hours; (4) controlling specific growth rate around 0.3 h-1 in the duration of growth.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from handmade sweets: Biofilm formation, enterotoxigenicity and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroning, Isabela Schneid; Iglesias, Mariana Almeida; Sehn, Carla Pohl; Valente Gandra, Tatiane Kuka; Mata, Marcia Magalhães; da Silva, Wladimir Padilha

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the second most important pathogen involved in foodborne outbreaks in Brazil. Because of their widespread distribution and biofilm forming ability, handmade sweets are easily contaminated with S. aureus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) from handmade sweets produced in Pelotas City/Brazil. The virulence potential was checked by evaluating the presence of the staphylococcal enterotoxin genes, icaA and icaD genes, the biofilm forming potential and antimicrobial resistance of the isolates. It was find just S. aureus among the CPS isolates. All the S. aureus isolates had biofilm forming ability on stainless steel and more than half of them on polystyrene surfaces. The majority of the isolates carried the icaA (66.6%) and icaD (58.4%) genes and some of them had the genes encoding enterotoxins A (33.4%) and B (16.6%). Furthermore, the majority of the isolates (83%) were resistant to at least one of the tested antimicrobials and multidrug resistance was observed in 8.4% of the isolates. The isolates had virulence potential, and half of them were enterotoxigenic. In addition, the ability of all the isolates to produce biofilms highlights the danger posed by these potentially virulent microorganisms persisting in food manufacturing environments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. PREVALENCE OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS STRAINS IN RAW SHEEP MILK CHEESE AND ENTEROTOXIGENIC PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Spanu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of S. aureus in raw sheep milk cheese and to assess the enterotoxigenic profile of the isolated strains. N.16 raw milk sheep cheese, collected from 8 artisan dairies, were analyzed to detect the presence of Coagulase Positive Staphylococci (CPS. In the frame of Regulation (EC No 2073/2005 cheese samples were tested for the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs when a CPS count >105 cfu/g was detected. CPS isolates identified as S. aureus were analyzed using multiplex PCR for the detection of classical (sea-see and enterotoxins-like (seh, sek, sel, sem, seo, sep genes. S. aureus was recovered in all cheese samples and in 50% with levels >105 cfu/g. 14 strains carried at least one of the genes coding for enterotoxins. In none of the cheese samples SEs were detected. Although a correct acidification (pH 5.1-5.4 at 6 hours was observed in dairies using natural starter culture, in cheese samples obtained from these dairies, CPS counts were greater (P<0.05 as compared with those where starter culture were not used. This result might be related to the main role of microbial competition on the control of S. aureus in early stage of cheesemaking. Further research is needed to better understand the effect of lactic acid bacteria competition on the growth of S. aureus.

  15. Prevalence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus and Shigella spp. in some raw street vended Indian foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moushumi; Wahi, Sidhi; Kumar, Mukesh; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2007-04-01

    In India, the street food trade is a growing sector with its expansion linked with urbanisation and the need of urban populations for both employment and food. However, the microbiological status of popularly consumed raw street foods, general hygienic and vending practices are not known. We visited 75 vendors (50 having fixed stalls and 25 with mobile stalls) operating in three major locations: mandi (open market place), bus terminus and railway station in New Delhi and Patiala City. A total of 150 samples each of coriander sauce, of ready-to-eat salads and coconut slices collected were analysed for Staphylococcus aureus and Shigella spp. Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus were detected in 91 (60%) samples of coriander sauce, 87 (58%) samples of coconut slices and 129 (86%) samples of ready-to-eat salads. Twenty-three (15%) samples of coconut slices contained Shigella (18 Sh. dysenteraie type 1 and 5 Sh. flexneri 2a), 13 (8%) samples of ready-to-eat salads and 10 (6%) samples of coriander sauce contained Sh. flexneri 2a. Street vendors lacked access to potable water, toilet facilities and operated under poor hygiene conditions. The results of our study suggest that street vended coconut slices, coriander sauce and ready-to-eat salads could be important potential vehicles for food-borne diseases.

  16. Integron, Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli from Humans and Food Included in the Norwegian Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring Programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sunde

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli (n=331 isolates from humans with bloodstream infections were investigated for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. The integron cassettes arrays were characterized and the findings were compared with data from similar investigations on resistant E. coli from meat and meat products (n=241 produced during the same time period. All isolates were obtained from the Norwegian monitoring programs for antimicrobial resistance in human pathogens and in the veterinary sector. Methods used included PCR, sequencing, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing and subtyping, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis and serotyping. Integrons of class 1 and 2 occurred significantly more frequently among human isolates; 45.4% (95% CI: 39.9-50.9 than among isolates from meat; 18% (95% CI: 13.2 -23.3, (p<0.01, Chi-square test. Identical cassette arrays including dfrA1-aadA1, aadA1, dfrA12-orfF-aadA2, oxa-30-aadA1 (class 1 integrons and dfrA1-sat1-aadA1 (class 2 integrons were detected from both humans and meat. However, the most prevalent cassette array in human isolates, dfrA17-aadA5, did not occur in isolates from meat, suggesting a possible linkage between this class 1 integron and a subpopulation of E. coli adapted to a human host. The drfA1-aadA1 and aadA1 class 1 integrons were found frequently in both human and meat isolates. These isolates were subjected to further studies to investigate similarities with regard to transferability, plasmid and host strain characteristics. We detected incF plasmids with pMLST profile F24:A-:B1 carrying drfA1-aadA1 integrons in isolates from pork and in a more distantly related E. coli strain from a human with septicaemia. Furthermore, we showed that most of the class 1 integrons with aadA1 were located on incF plasmids with pMLST profile F51:A-:B10 in human isolates. The plasmid was present in unrelated as well as closely related host strains, demonstrating that dissemination

  17. Differences in the antibiotic susceptibility of human Escherichia coli with poultry-associated and non-poultry-associated extended-spectrum beta-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platteel, T N; Leverstein-Van Hall, M A; Cohen Stuart, J W; Voets, G M; van den Munckhof, M P; Scharringa, J; van de Sande, N; Fluit, A C; Bonten, M J M

    2013-08-01

    The concurrent presence of bla CTX-M-1 and bla TEM-52 genes on similar plasmids of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, chicken meat and humans supports the occurrence of food-borne transmission of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes. ESBL-producing E. coli (ESBL-E. coli) are most frequently detected in hospitalised patients and are known to spread in healthcare settings. We hypothesised that poultry-associated (PA) ESBL genes are predominant in the community, where acquisition is fuelled by food contamination, whereas non-PA ESBL genes are predominant in hospitals, with acquisition fuelled by cross-transmission. Then, differences in antimicrobial selective pressure in hospitals and poultry would create differences in co-resistance between PA and non-PA ESBL-E. coli. We, therefore, determined the prevalence and co-resistance of PA and non-PA ESBL-E. coli in community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections in humans and bla CTX-M-1 and bla TEM-52 isolates from poultry. A total of 134 human ESBL-E. coli urine isolates were included in this study. Isolates containing bla CTX-M-1 or bla TEM-52 were considered to be PA, with the remainder being non-PA. Also, 72 poultry ESBL-E. coli were included. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by broth microdilution. The prevalence of PA ESBL genes in isolates obtained in general practice and hospitals was 28 % versus 30 % (n.s.). Human PA ESBL-E. coli were more frequently susceptible to ciprofloxacin (51 % vs. 25 %; p = 0.0056), gentamicin (86 % vs. 63 %; p = .0.0082), tobramycin (91 % vs. 34 %; p = 0.0001) and amikacin (98 % vs. 67 %; p = 0.0001) compared to human non-PA ESBL-E. coli. PA ESBL-E. coli are not more prevalent in community acquired than nosocomial urine samples, but are more often susceptible to ciprofloxacin and aminoglycosides than non-PA ESBL-E. coli. This does not support the existence of different reservoirs of ESBL genes.

  18. Occurrence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamases producing Escherichia coli in foods of animal origin and human clinical samples in Chhattisgarh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoomika

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL (blaTEM, blaSHV, and blaCTX-M genes in Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat, chevon meat, raw milk, and human urine and stool samples collected from tribal districts of Chhattisgarh, viz., Jagdalpur, Dantewada, Kondagaon, and Kanker. Materials and Methods: A total of 330 samples, comprising 98 chicken meat, 82 chevon meat, 90 raw milk, and 60 human urine and stool samples, were processed for isolation of E. coli. Isolates were confirmed biochemically and further tested against commonly used antibiotics to know their resistant pattern. The resistant isolates were tested for ESBL production by phenotypic method followed by characterization with molecular method using multiplex-polymerase chain reaction technique. Results: Overall 57.87% (191/330 samples were found positive for E. coli, which include 66.32% (65/98 chicken meat, 46.34% (38/82 chevon meat, 81.11% (73/90 raw milk, and 25% (15/60 human urine and stool samples. Isolates showed the highest resistance against cefotaxime (41.36% followed by oxytetracycline (34.03%, ampicillin (29.31%, cephalexin (24.60%, cefixime (16.75%, and ceftazidime (13.08%. Phenotypic method detected 10.99% (21/191 isolates as presumptive ESBL producers, however, molecular method detected 3.66% (7/191, 2.09% (4/191, and 0.00% (0/191 prevalence of blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV, respectively. Conclusion: The present study indicates a high prevalence of E. coli in raw chicken meat, chevon meat, and milk due to poor hygienic practices. The antibiotic susceptibility test detected the presence of the resistance pattern against ESBL in E. coli isolated from raw chicken meat, chevon meat, milk, and also in human clinical samples is of great concern. The appearance of E. coli in the human food chain is alarming and requires adaptation of hygienic practices and stipulate use of antibiotics.

  19. Escherichia coli isolates from broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork, and pigs share phylogroups and antimicrobial resistance with community-dwelling humans and patients with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Kurbasic, Azra; Skjøt-Rasmussen, Line; Ejrnaes, Karen; Porsbo, Lone J; Pedersen, Karl; Jensen, Lars B; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Agersø, Yvonne; Olsen, Katharina E P; Aarestrup, Frank M; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hammerum, Anette M

    2010-05-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). Phylogroup B2 and D isolates are associated with UTI. It has been proposed that E. coli causing UTI could have an animal origin. The objective of this study was to investigate the phylogroups and antimicrobial resistance, and their possible associations in E. coli isolates from patients with UTI, community-dwelling humans, broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork, and pigs in Denmark. A total of 964 geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from UTI patients (n = 102), community-dwelling humans (n = 109), Danish (n = 197) and imported broiler chicken meat (n = 86), Danish broiler chickens (n = 138), Danish (n = 177) and imported pork (n = 10), and Danish pigs (n = 145) were tested for phylogroups (A, B1, B2, D, and nontypeable [NT] isolates) and antimicrobial susceptibility. Phylogroup A, B1, B2, D, and NT isolates were detected among all groups of isolates except for imported pork isolates. Antimicrobial resistance to three (for B2 isolates) or five antimicrobial agents (for A, B1, D, and NT isolates) was shared among isolates regardless of origin. Using cluster analysis to investigate antimicrobial resistance data, we found that UTI isolates always grouped with isolates from meat and/or animals. We detected B2 and D isolates, that are associated to UTI, among isolates from broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork, and pigs. Although B2 isolates were found in low prevalences in animals and meat, these sources could still pose a risk for acquiring uropathogenic E. coli. Further, E. coli from animals and meat were very similar to UTI isolates with respect to their antimicrobial resistance phenotype. Thus, our study provides support for the hypothesis that a food animal and meat reservoir might exist for UTI-causing E. coli.

  20. Virulence and extended-spectrum β-lactamase encoding genes in Escherichia coli recovered from chicken meat intended for hospitalized human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Gamal A; Elkenany, Rasha M; Fouda, Mohamed A; Mostafa, Noura F

    2017-10-01

    This study describes the prevalence of Escherichia coli in frozen chicken meat intended for human consumption with emphasis on their virulence determinants through detection of the virulence genes and recognition of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) encoding genes (blaOXA and blaTEM genes). A total of 120 frozen chicken meat samples were investigated for isolation of E. coli. All isolates were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Eight serotypes isolated from samples were analyzed for the presence of various virulence genes (stx1, stx2, and eae A genes) using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Moreover, the strains were evaluated for the ESBL encoding genes (blaTEM and blaOXA). Overall, 11.66% (14/120) chicken meat samples carried E. coli according to cultural and biochemical properties. The most predominant serotypes were O78 and O128: H2 (21.5%, each), followed by O121: H7 and O44: H18. Molecular method detected that 2 strains (25%) harbored stx1, 3 strains (37.5%) stx2, and 3 strains (37.5%) both stx1 and stx2, while 1 (12.5%) strain carried eae A gene. Particularly, only O26 serotype had all tested virulence genes (stx1, stx2, and eae A). The results revealed that all examined 8 serotypes were Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). The ESBL encoding genes (blaTEM and blaOXA) of STEC were detected in 4 (50%) isolates by multiplex PCR. The overall incidence of blaTEM and blaOXA genes was 3 (37.5%) and 2 (25%) isolates. The present study indicates the prevalence of virulent and ESBL-producing E. coli in frozen chicken meat intended for hospitalized human consumption due to poor hygienic measures and irregular use of antibiotics. Therefore, the basic instructions regarding good hygienic measures should be adapted to limit public health hazard.

  1. Real-time toxicity and metabolic activity tracking of human cells exposed to Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a mixed consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Marr, Enolia; Lam, Haylie; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary; Close, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a significant human pathogen that is continually responsible for sickness, and even death, on a worldwide scale. While the pathology of E. coli O157:H7 infection has been well studied, the effect of it's multiple resulting cytotoxic mechanisms on host metabolic activity has not been well characterized. To develop a more thorough understanding of these effects, several bioluminescence assays were evaluated for their ability to track both toxicity and host metabolic activity levels in real-time. The use of continuously autobioluminescent human cells was determined to be the most favorable method for tracking these metrics, as its self-sufficient autobioluminescent phenotype was unaffected by the presence of the infecting bacteria and its signal could be measured without cellular destruction. Using this approach, it was determined that infection with as few as 10 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 could elicit cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the initial infective dose, an impact on metabolic expression was not observed until bacterial populations reached levels between 5 × 10(5) and 1 × 10(6) (R(2) = 0.933), indicating that a critical bacterial infection level must be reached prior to the onset of cytotoxic effects. Supporting this hypothesis, it was found that cells displaying infection-mediated metabolic activity reductions could recover to wild type metabolic activity levels if the infecting bacteria were removed prior to cell death. These results indicate that rapid treatment of E. coli O157:H7 infection could serve to limit host metabolic impact and reduce overall host cell death.

  2. HIV-1 infection of human intestinal lamina propria CD4+ T cells in vitro is enhanced by exposure to commensal Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Stephanie M; Manuzak, Jennifer A; Leone, Amanda K; Lee, Eric J; Rogers, Lisa M; McCarter, Martin D; Wilson, Cara C

    2012-07-15

    Microbial translocation has been linked to systemic immune activation in HIV-1 disease, yet mechanisms by which microbes may contribute to HIV-associated intestinal pathogenesis are poorly understood. Importantly, our understanding of the impact of translocating commensal intestinal bacteria on mucosal-associated T cell responses in the context of ongoing viral replication that occurs early in HIV-1 infection is limited. We previously identified commensal Escherichia coli-reactive Th1 and Th17 cells in normal human intestinal lamina propria (LP). In this article, we established an ex vivo assay to investigate the interactions between Th cell subsets in primary human LP mononuclear cells (LPMCs), commensal E. coli, and CCR5-tropic HIV-1(Bal). Addition of heat-killed E. coli to HIV-1-exposed LPMCs resulted in increases in HIV-1 replication, CD4 T cell activation and infection, and IL-17 and IFN-γ production. Conversely, purified LPS derived from commensal E. coli did not enhance CD4 T cell infection. E. coli exposure induced greater proliferation of LPMC Th17 than Th1 cells. Th17 cells were more permissive to infection than Th1 cells in HIV-1-exposed LPMC cultures, and Th17 cell infection frequencies significantly increased in the presence of E. coli. The E. coli-associated enhancement of infection was dependent on the presence of CD11c(+) LP dendritic cells and, in part, on MHC class II-restricted Ag presentation. These results highlight a potential role for translocating microbes in impacting mucosal HIV-1 pathogenesis during early infection by increasing HIV-1 replication and infection of intestinal Th1 and Th17 cells.

  3. Escherichia coli and enterococci are sensitive and reliable indicators for human, livestock and wildlife faecal pollution in alpine mountainous water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnleitner, A.H.; Ryzinska-Paier, G.; Reischer, G.H.; Burtscher, M.M.; Knetsch, S.; Kirschner, A.K.T.; Dirnböck, T.; Kuschnig, G.; Mach, R.L.; Sommer, R.

    2011-01-01

    Aims This study evaluated the applicability of standard faecal indicator bacteria (SFIB) for alpine mountainous water resources monitoring. Methods and Results Escherichia coli, enterococci (ENTC) and Clostridium perfringens were investigated by standard or frequently applied methods in a broad range of animal and human faecal sources in a large alpine mountainous area. C. perfringens occurred only in human, livestock and carnivorous source groups in relevant average concentrations (log 4.7-7.0 CFU per g) but not in herbivorous wildlife sources. E. coli proved to be distributed in all faecal source groups with remarkably balanced average concentrations (log 7.0 - 8.4 CFU per g). Except for single faecal samples from the cattle source group, prevalence rates for ENTC source groups were generally > 90% with average concentrations of log 5.3 - 7.7 CFU per g. In order to test the faecal indication capacity in the environment, faecal prevalence data were comparatively analysed with results from the concurrently performed multi-parametric microbial source tracking effort on karst spring water quality from the investigated alpine mountainous catchment (Reischer et al. 2008; Environ. Microbiol. 10:2598-2608). Conclusion E. coli and enterococci are reliable faecal indicators for alpine mountainous water resources monitoring, although E. coli is the more sensitive one. C. perfringens did not prove an indicator of general faecal pollution but is suggested a conservative microbial source tracking marker for anthropogenic faecal influence. Significance and Impact of Study Applicability of SFIB is currently hotly debated. This is the first study providing comprehensive information on the applicability of SFIB at alpine mountainous habitats. PMID:20629798

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 8 Is a Major Sensor of Group B Streptococcus But Not Escherichia coli in Human Primary Monocytes and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrnström, Birgitta; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Yurchenko, Mariia; Moen, Siv Helen; Kojen, June Frengen; Lentini, Germana; Teti, Giuseppe; Damås, Jan Kristian; Espevik, Terje; Stenvik, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    TLR8 is the major endosomal sensor of degraded RNA in human monocytes and macrophages. It has been implicated in the sensing of viruses and more recently also bacteria. We previously identified a TLR8-IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) signaling pathway that mediates IFNβ and interleukin-12 (IL-12) induction by Staphylococcus aureus and is antagonized by TLR2. The relative importance of TLR8 for the sensing of various bacterial species is however still unclear. We here compared the role of TLR8 and IRF5 for the sensing of Group B Streptococcus (GBS), S. aureus, and Escherichia coli in human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). GBS induced stronger IFNβ and TNF production as well as IRF5 nuclear translocation compared to S. aureus grown to the stationary phase, while S. aureus in exponential growth appeared similarly potent to GBS. Cytokine induction in primary human monocytes by GBS was not dependent on hemolysins, and induction of IFNβ and IL-12 as well as IRF5 activation were reduced with TLR2 ligand costimulation. Heat inactivation of GBS reduced IRF5 and NF-kB translocation, while only the viable E. coli activated IRF5. The attenuated stimulation correlated with loss of bacterial RNA integrity. The E. coli-induced IRF5 translocation was not inhibited by TLR2 costimulation, suggesting that IRF5 was activated via a TLR8-independent mechanism. Gene silencing of MDM using siRNA revealed that GBS-induced IFNβ, IL-12-p35, and TNF production was dependent on TLR8 and IRF5. In contrast, cytokine induction by E. coli was TLR8 independent but still partly dependent on IRF5. We conclude that TLR8-IRF5 signaling is more important for the sensing of GBS than for stationary grown S. aureus in human primary monocytes and MDM, likely due to reduced resistance of GBS to phagosomal degradation and to a lower production of TLR2 activating lipoproteins. TLR8 does not sense viable E. coli, while IRF5 still contributes to E. coli-induced cytokine production

  5. Overlapped sequence types (STs) and serogroups of avian pathogenic (APEC) and human extra-intestinal pathogenic (ExPEC) Escherichia coli isolated in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluta, Renato Pariz; Logue, Catherine Mary; Casas, Monique Ribeiro Tiba; Meng, Ting; Guastalli, Elisabete Aparecida Lopes; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Montelli, Augusto Cezar; Sadatsune, Teruê; de Carvalho Ramos, Marcelo; Nolan, Lisa Kay; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias

    2014-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains belong to a category that is associated with colibacillosis, a serious illness in the poultry industry worldwide. Additionally, some APEC groups have recently been described as potential zoonotic agents. In this work, we compared APEC strains with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains isolated from clinical cases of humans with extra-intestinal diseases such as urinary tract infections (UTI) and bacteremia. PCR results showed that genes usually found in the ColV plasmid (tsh, iucA, iss, and hlyF) were associated with APEC strains while fyuA, irp-2, fepC sitDchrom, fimH, crl, csgA, afa, iha, sat, hlyA, hra, cnf1, kpsMTII, clpVSakai and malX were associated with human ExPEC. Both categories shared nine serogroups (O2, O6, O7, O8, O11, O19, O25, O73 and O153) and seven sequence types (ST10, ST88, ST93, ST117, ST131, ST155, ST359, ST648 and ST1011). Interestingly, ST95, which is associated with the zoonotic potential of APEC and is spread in avian E. coli of North America and Europe, was not detected among 76 APEC strains. When the strains were clustered based on the presence of virulence genes, most ExPEC strains (71.7%) were contained in one cluster while most APEC strains (63.2%) segregated to another. In general, the strains showed distinct genetic and fingerprint patterns, but avian and human strains of ST359, or ST23 clonal complex (CC), presented more than 70% of similarity by PFGE. The results demonstrate that some "zoonotic-related" STs (ST117, ST131, ST10CC, ST23CC) are present in Brazil. Also, the presence of moderate fingerprint similarities between ST359 E. coli of avian and human origin indicates that strains of this ST are candidates for having zoonotic potential.

  6. Principales características y diagnóstico de los grupos patógenos de Escherichia coli Diagnosis and main characteristics of Escherichia coli pathogenic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Rodríguez-Angeles

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli coloniza el intestino del hombre pocas horas después del nacimiento y se considera de flora normal, pero hay descritos seis grupos de E. coli productora de diarrea: enterotoxigénica (ETEC, enterohemorrágica (EHEC, enteroinvasiva (EIEC, enteropatógena (EPEC, enteroagregativa (EAEC y de adherencia difusa (DAEC. La bacteria se puede aislar e identificar tradicionalmente con base en sus características bioquímicas o serológicas, pero también se pueden estudiar sus mecanismos de patogenicidad mediante ensayos en cultivos celulares o modelos animales y, más recientemente, empleando técnicas de biología molecular que evidencian la presencia de genes involucrados en dichos mecanismos. La intención del presente trabajo es resaltar la importancia del estudio y diagnóstico de E. coli como patógeno capaz de causar casos aislados o brotes de diarrea, síndrome urémico hemolítico, colitis hemorrágica y cuadros de disentería, principalmente en niños; por esto es necesario conocer mejor a la bacteria y mantener la vigilancia epidemiológica.Escherichia coli colonizes the human intestinal tract within hours of birth and is considered a non-pathogenic member of the normal intestinal flora. However, there are six pathogenic groups that may produce diarrhea: enterotoxigenic (ETEC, enterohemorrhagic (EHEC, enteroinvasive (EIEC, enteropathogenic (EPEC, enteroaggregative (EAEC and diffusely adherent (DAEC groups. E. coli can be isolated and classified using traditional methods, by identifying its biochemical or serum characteristics. The pathogenic mechanisms may be studied in cell cultures and animal model assays, as well as more up to date molecular biology methods for study and diagnosis. The latter have proven that genes are involved in pathogenesis. The objective of the present work is to draw attention to the importance of E. coli as a pathogenic organism. This microorganism is an etiologic agent of sporadic cases of diarrhea

  7. Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Cunzhong; Hou, Jiafa

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether Escherichia coli virulence affects the roles of sex hormone receptors in female dogs with simulated pyometra. A total of 33 healthy, nulliparous, crossbred female dogs were divided into four groups, with 10 dogs in each of the three experimental groups and 3 dogs in the control group. Estradiol was administrated to female dogs in group 1 continuously at 0.6-4.8 mg/kg twice daily for 12 days (the dose doubled every three days), followed by intramuscular injection of 0.2-1.8 mg/kg progesterone. The progesterone was administrated with an initial dose of 0.2 µg/kg and increased 0.2 mg/kg every three days, twice daily until the maximum of 1.8 mg/kg for 24 days and maintained at 1.8 mg/kg for 19 days. Progesterone only was administrated at 1.8 mg/kg in group 2 (twice daily) for 55 continuous days and only estradiol was administered with an initial dose of 0.6 µg/kg (dose doubled every 3 days for 12 days) in group 3 twice daily and maintained at 4.8 mg/kg for the following 43 days. A strongly virulent E. coli strain, nau-b, and a weakly virulent strain, nau-i, were screened. On the 12th day of diestrus, 5 female dogs in each of the experimental groups were inoculated with E. coli nau-i strain, while the other five in each group were inoculated with nau-b strain. Histopathological changes of uterine tissues were microscopically observed 50 days after E. coli inoculation and hormone receptor expression levels were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Simulated pyometra was observed in dogs administrated with progesterone alone or progesterone combined with estradiol. The clinical symptoms and histopathological observation demonstrated that inoculation with strongly virulent E. coli strain, nau-b, caused earlier onset of pyometra symptoms and more severe pyometra symptoms compared with the weakly virulent E. coli strain, nau-i. Furthermore, estrogen and progesterone receptor levels in dogs with pyometra

  8. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral(®)), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed.

  9. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral®), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  10. Intramacrophage survival of uropathogenic Escherichia coli: Differences between diverse clinical isolates and between mouse and human macrophages

    KAUST Repository

    Bokil, Nilesh J.

    2011-11-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that UPEC can invade and replicate within epithelial cells, suggesting that this bacterial pathogen may occupy an intracellular niche within the host. Given that many intracellular pathogens target macrophages, we assessed the interactions between UPEC and macrophages. Colonization of the mouse bladder by UPEC strain CFT073 resulted in increased expression of myeloid-restricted genes, consistent with the recruitment of inflammatory macrophages to the site of infection. In in vitro assays, CFT073 was able to survive within primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) up to 24h post-infection. Three additional well-characterized clinical UPEC isolates associated with distinct UTI symptomatologies displayed variable long-term survival within BMM. UPEC strains UTI89 and VR50, originally isolated from patients with cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria respectively, showed elevated bacterial loads in BMM at 24h post-infection as compared to CFT073 and the asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972. These differences did not correlate with differential effects on macrophage survival or initial uptake of bacteria. E. coli UTI89 localized to a Lamp1 + vesicular compartment within BMM. In contrast to survival within mouse BMM, intracellular bacterial loads of VR50 were low in both human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and in human T24 bladder epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that some UPEC isolates may subvert macrophage anti-microbial pathways, and that host species differences may impact on intracellular UPEC survival. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  11. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Viljoen

    Full Text Available Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a the presence and b the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5. We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05, age (FDR = 0.03 or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01. Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  12. Histomorphometric evaluation of intestinal cellular immune responses in pigs immunized with live oral F4ac+ non-enterotoxigenic E. coli vaccine against postweaning colibacillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovsca Janjatović, A; Lacković, G; Bozić, F; Kezić, D; Popović, M; Valpotić, H; Harapin, I; Pavicić, Z; Njari, B; Valpotić, I

    2010-02-11

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is the most common type of porcine postweaning colibacillosis (PWC). Among fimbriae of porcine ETEC strains the best studied family of fimbriae are the members of F4 adhesins, existing in at least three variants: ab, ac, ad. Active immunization against porcine PWC is difficult due to: i) ETEC strains are only one of the essential predisposing factors, ii) the success of vaccinal antigen uptake depends on the presence of enterocyte receptors for F4 adhesins, iii) the intestinal immune system may react with tolerance or hypersensitivity to the same antigens depending on the dose and form of the vaccinal immunogen, and iv) kinetics of the specific immune responses may be different in the case of F4 (earlier) and the other ETEC adhesins, particularly F18 (later). The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a live attenuated F4ac+ non-ETEC vaccine against porcine PWC by analyzing quantitative differences in the small intestinal lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets of immunized (with or without levamisole given as an adjuvant) vs control non-immunized pigs. Four week-old pigs were intragastrically immunized with a vaccine candidate F4ac+ non-ETEC strain 2407 at day 0, challenged 7 days later with a virulent F4ac+ strain ETEC 11-800/1/94, euthanatized at day 13 and sampled for immunohistology. Non-immunized pigs received saline at day 0 and were processed as the principals. Immuno-phenotypes of lymphoid and myeloid cell subsets were demonstrated within jejunal and ileal mucosa by immunohistochemical avidin-biotin complex method and corresponding morphometric data were analyzed using software program Lucia G for digital image analyses. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with surface molecules on porcine immune cells such as CD3, CD45RA, CD45RC, CD21 and SWC3 enabled clear insight into distribution patterns and amount of these cells within the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) examined. The numbers of jejunal and

  13. Antibacterial potential and genetic profile of Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from human normal flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimaei, Samira; Sadeghi, Javad; Asadian, Mahla; Esghaei, Maryam; Pourshafie, Mohammad Reza; Talebi, Malihe

    2016-07-01

    Enterococci have a widespread attendance in the circumference and belongs to the enteric commensal microbiota. Most of them produce the antimicrobial compounds and have an inhibition effect on pathogenic microorganisms. The objective of this study was to characterize the enterococcal strains isolated from human normal flora and assess their antibacterial activity. Enterococcal isolates were obtained from the feces of eighteen healthy humans. All enterococcal species were identified by biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isolates were investigated further to examine their ability to inhibit growth of Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri and Escherichia coli by well diffusion assay. Furthermore, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed and genetic relatedness of all isolates was evaluated by Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). In all, 432 isolates were obtained from fecal samples. All of the isolates identified as Enterococcus faecium by biochemical and molecular (PCR) methods. Using repetitive element palindromic (REP)-PCR method 54 patterns have been obtained and were selected for further evaluation. The results indicated that 66%, 38% and 24% of our isolates had antimicrobial effect against S. typhi, S flexneri and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), respectively. On the other hand, there was no significant inhibition effect against enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, ampicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. On the other hand, the resistance rates for erythromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were 20%, 22%, and 1.8% respectively. In addition, the analysis of PFGE showed forty patterns with eight (40.7%) common types (CT) and thirty two (59.2%) single types (ST). Among eight common types, only one common type (CT5) had similar antimicrobial effect. These results suggested that enterococcal isolates obtained from

  14. Genetically similar strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolated from sheep, cattle and human patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderlund Robert

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparatively little is known about the prevalence or the molecular characteristics of the zoonotic pathogen E. coli O157:H7 in the sheep reservoir. To investigate this and determine the host specificity of subclones of the bacterium, we have conducted a slaughterhouse prevalence study in sheep and compared the collected isolates to O157:H7 previously isolated from cattle and human patients. Results Verotoxin-producing O157:H7 was found in 11/597 (1.8% of samples from sheep in Swedish slaughterhouses, 9/492 faecal (1.8% and 2/105 ear samples (1.9%. All positive sheep were eaeA, hlyA, cdtV-B, vtx1, and partial sequencing of vtx2. The observed profiles were similar to those of cattle strains investigated previously. Conclusions The same pathogenic subtypes of VTEC O157:H7, including the highly virulent clade 8, appear to be present in both sheep and cattle in Sweden, suggesting strains can circulate freely between ruminant reservoirs.

  15. Experimental infection with Escherichia coli 0149 : F4ac in weaned piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gerda M.; Frydendahl, Kai; Svendsen, Ove

    2006-01-01

    The outcome of experimental intestinal infections with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is dependent on several factors. An important factor is adhesion of the challenge strain to the intestinal mucosa. The test for susceptibility towards ETEC adhesion has so far been made by an intestinal...... adhesion test made after slaughter of piglets. However, in an experimental infection study with the purpose to obtain diarrhoeic piglets, it would be an advantage to test for susceptibility prior to experimentation. The Mucin 4 gene on porcine chromosome 13 has been proposed as a candidate gene......-gastric intubated with 10(9) CFU of ETEC O149:F4ac and 23 age-matched piglets, both susceptible and resistant, were used as non-infected controls. Of susceptible piglets, challenged with ETEC 0149:F4ac, 74% had ETEC O149:F4ac-associated diarrhoea first day after first challenge, which were significantly higher...

  16. The Need and New Tools for Surveillance of Escherichia coli Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asalapuram R. Pavankumar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Among foodborne pathogens, diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli is of major concern because of its commensal status, abundance in the natural environment, and ability to acquire virulence determinants by horizontal gene transfer from other microbes. From enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC strains to the more virulent enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, the mechanisms of pathogenicity within this species are intriguing. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics are providing novel tools for improved rapid detection and quantification of this and other pathogenic bacteria from clinical, food, and environmental specimens. These include simple and inexpensive colorimetric and immunological methods to more elaborate nucleic acid-based assays that combine extreme specificity to unparalleled sensitivity and high sample throughput. This review summarizes the current state of E. coli pathogenesis with emphasis on the need for incorporating detection and surveillance tools as part of pre- and post-harvest food safety ideals.

  17. Prevalence of ESBLs and PMQR genes in fecal Escherichia coli isolated from the non-human primates in six zoos in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; He, Tao; Han, Jing; Wang, Juan; Foley, Steven L; Yang, Guangyou; Wan, Shuangxiu; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Congming

    2012-09-14

    The aim of this study is to characterize the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in Escherichia coli from captive non-human primates. A total of 206 E. coli isolates were collected from primates in six zoos in China in 2009 and their susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials were tested by broth microdilution. The susceptibility patterns of E. coli strains varied greatly among different zoos reflecting different backgrounds of antimicrobial usage. Both the ESBL-encoding genes and the PMQR genes were detected by PCR. Of the 206 strains, 65 (32%) were confirmed as phenotypic ESBL producers with bla(CTX-M) (27%, bla(CTX-M-15), n=31, bla(CTX-M-3), n=23 and bla(CTX-M-14), n=2) mainly mediating the ESBL phenotype. qnrS1 (18%, n=36) and oqxAB (15%, n=31) were the predominant PMQR genes and the prevalence of PMQR genes was much higher among phenotypic ESBL producers than that among phenotypic non-ESBL producers from any zoo. Notably, the PMQR genes qnrS1 and oqxAB and β-lactamase genes bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M-3) were found together in 23 E. coli isolates in two zoos in Shanghai. PFGE analysis of these 23 isolates demonstrated nearly identical PFGE profiles (similarity matrix >97%) indicating this specific E. coli genotype was prevalent in these two zoos. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of these four genes coexisting in an E. coli genotype and the first report of antimicrobial resistance profiles in E. coli isolated from primates in China. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Escherichia coli O26:H11 Strains Isolated in France between 2010 and 2013 and Carrying the stx2d Gene Only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Sabine; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Bonacorsi, Stephane; Liguori, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli O26:H11 that were positive for stx2 alone (n = 23), which were not epidemiologically related or part of an outbreak, were isolated from pediatric patients in France between 2010 and 2013. We were interested in comparing these strains with the new highly virulent stx2a-positive E. coli O26 clone sequence type 29 (ST29) that has emerged recently in Europe, and we tested them by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), stx2 subtyping, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) sequencing, and plasmid (ehxA, katP, espP, and etpD) and chromosomal (Z2098, espK, and espV) virulence gene profiling. We showed that 16 of the 23 strains appeared to correspond to this new clone, but the characteristics of 12 strains differed significantly from the previously described characteristics, with negative results for both plasmid and chromosomal genetic markers. These 12 strains exhibited a ST29 genotype and related CRISPR arrays (CRISPR2a alleles 67 or 71), suggesting that they evolved in a common environment. This finding was corroborated by the presence of stx2d in 7 of the 12 ST29 strains. This is the first time that E. coli O26:H11 carrying stx2d has been isolated from humans. This is additional evidence of the continuing evolution of virulent Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O26 strains. A new O26:H11 CRISPR PCR assay, SP_O26_E, has been developed for detection of these 12 particular ST29 strains of E. coli O26:H11. This test is useful to better characterize the stx2-positive O26:H11 clinical isolates, which are associated with severe clinical outcomes such as bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:25428148

  19. Characterization of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids harboring ambler class A and C genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica from animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hilde; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Wu, Guanghui; Woodford, Neil; Schwarz, Stefan; Guerra, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Irene; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Brouwer, Michael; Mevius, Dik

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the plasmid-encoded factors contributing to the emergence and spread of epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids obtained from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica isolates from animal and human reservoirs. For this, 251 IncI1-Iγ plasmids carrying various extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) or AmpC β-lactamase genes were compared using plasmid multilocus sequence typing (pMLST). Thirty-two of these plasmids belonging to different pMLST types were sequenced using Roche 454 and Illumina platforms. Epidemic IncI1-Iγ plasmids could be assigned to various dominant clades, whereas rarely detected plasmids clustered together as a distinct clade. Similar phylogenetic trees were obtained using only the plasmid backbone sequences, showing that the differences observed between the plasmids belonging to distinct clades resulted mainly from differences between their backbone sequences. Plasmids belonging to the various clades differed particularly in the presence/absence of genes encoding partitioning and addiction systems, which contribute to stable inheritance during cell division and plasmid maintenance. Despite this, plasmids belonging to the various phylogenetic clades also showed marked resistance gene associations, indicating the circulation of successful plasmid-gene combinations. The variation in traY and excA genes found in IncI1-Iγ plasmids is conserved within pMLST sequence types and plays a role in incompatibility, although functional study is needed to elucidate the role of these genes in plasmid epidemiology. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Influence of human urine to antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli producing β-lactamase of different types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ž. Žagar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the influence of human urine on the antibiotic susceptibilities of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli strains producing different types of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL. The study was performed on 26 ESBL negative strains of K. pneumoniae, 80 K. pneumoniae strains producing SHV-ESBLs (52-SHV-5, 31- SHV-2 and 7- SHV-12, 94 E. coli strains harbouring TEM- ESBLs and 14 E. coli strains possessing CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of amoxycillin alone and combined with clavulanate (co-amoxilcav, cephalexin, cefuroxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were performed in parallel in Mueller-Hinton broth and urine by broth microdilution method. With ESBL negative strains, urine increased MIC90 of amoxycillin alone and combined with clavulanate, cephalexin, cefuroxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Against SHV-5 producers, an increase in MIC90 was observed with cefotaxime, cefepime and ciprofloxacin when the test was performed in urine. SHV-2 producers showed elevated MIC90 of ceftazidime, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone and cefepime in the presence of urine, in contrast to SHV-12 producers which displayed elevated MIC90 only for cefotaxime. Urine increased MIC90 of amoxycillin/clavulanate, ceftazidime and cefepime against CTX-M producers, and of amoxycillin/clavulanate, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime and ciprofloxacin for TEM producers. According to our results the activity of antibiotics used for the treatment of urinary tract infection could be overestimated by a standard in vitro testing. However, most of antibiotics used for the treatment of urinary tract infection achieve very high concentration in urine and that could abrogate the reduction of antimicrobial activity by biological fluid.

  1. Broiler chickens, broiler chicken meat, pigs and pork as sources of ExPEC related virulence genes and resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from community-dwelling humans and UTI patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, L; Spangholm, D. J.; Pedersen, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections. UTI is primarily caused by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) from the patients' own fecal flora. The ExPEC often belong to phylogroups B2 and D, the groups which include potent human ExPEC isolates...... causing UTI, bacteremia, and meningitis. The external sources of these ExPEC in the human intestine are unknown. The food supply may transmit ExPEC to humans. However, evidence of this hypothesis is limited. To assess this hypothesis, the objective of our study was to investigate the presence of Ex......PEC related virulence genes in E. coli isolates from UTI patients, community-dwelling humans, meat, and production animals. Accordingly, we included 964 geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from UTI patients (n=102), community-dwelling humans (n=109), fresh Danish (n=197) and imported...

  2. New amino acid germinants for spores of the enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udompijitkul, Pathima; Alnoman, Maryam; Banawas, Saeed; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens spore germination plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens-associated food poisoning (FP) and non-food-borne (NFB) gastrointestinal diseases. Germination is initiated when bacterial spores sense specific nutrient germinants (such as amino acids) through germinant receptors (GRs). In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize amino acid germinants for spores of enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A. The polar, uncharged amino acids at pH 6.0 efficiently induced germination of C. perfringens spores; L-asparagine, L-cysteine, L-serine, and L-threonine triggered germination of spores of most FP and NFB isolates; whereas, L-glutamine was a unique germinant for FP spores. For cysteine- or glutamine-induced germination, gerKC spores (spores of a gerKC mutant derivative of FP strain SM101) germinated to a significantly lower extent and released less DPA than wild type spores; however, a less defective germination phenotype was observed in gerAA or gerKB spores. The germination defects in gerKC spores were partially restored by complementing the gerKC mutant with a recombinant plasmid carrying wild-type gerKA-KC, indicating that GerKC is an essential GR protein. The gerKA, gerKC, and gerKB spores germinated significantly slower with L-serine and L-threonine than their parental strain, suggesting the requirement for these GR proteins for normal germination of C. perfringens spores. In summary, these results indicate that the polar, uncharged amino acids at pH 6.0 are effective germinants for spores of C. perfringens type A and that GerKC is the main GR protein for germination of spores of FP strain SM101 with L-cysteine, L-glutamine, and L-asparagine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enterotoxigenicity and Antimicrobial Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Retail Food in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of zoonotic agent in the world, which are attributable to the contamination of food with enterotoxins. In this study, a total of 1,150 S. aureus isolates were cultured from 27,000 retail foods items from 203 cities of 24 provinces in China in 2015 and were test for antimicrobial susceptibility. Additionally, the role of the genes responsible for the staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA to SEE, methicillin resistance (mecA and the toxigenic capabilities were also assessed. The results showed that 4.3% retail foods were contaminated with S. aureus, and 7.9% retail foods isolates were mecA positive. Some 97.6% of S. aureus isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial compound, and 57.5% of these were multi drug resistant (MDR. Resistance to penicillin (83.7%, 963/1,150, was common, followed by linezolid (67.7%, 778/1,150 and erythromycin (52.1%, 599/1,150. The isolates cultured from raw meats showed high levels of resistant to tetracycline (42.8%, ciprofloxacin (17.4%, and chloramphenicol (12.0% and expressed a MDR phenotype (62.4%. A total of 29.7% S. aureus isolates harbored the classical SEs genes (sea, seb, sec, and sed. The sea and seb genes were the most frequent SEs genes detected. Of note, 22% of the SEs genes positive S. aureus harbored two or three SEs genes, and 16 isolates were confirmed with the capacity to simultaneously produce two or three enterotoxin types. Moreover, nearly 50% of the MRSA isolates were positive for at least one SE gene in this study. Therefore, it is important to monitor the antimicrobial susceptibility and enterotoxigenicity of MDR S. aureus and MRSA in the food chain and to use these data to develop food safety measures, designed to reduce the contamination and transmission of this bacterium.

  4. Enterotoxigenic coagulase positive Staphylococcus in milk and milk products, lben and jben, in northern Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendahou, Abdrezzak; Abid, Mohammed; Bouteldoun, Nadine; Catelejine, Dierick; Lebbadi, Mariam

    2009-04-30

    The aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of enterotoxin genes (sea-seo) in Coagulase Positive Staphylococcus (CPS) isolated from unpasteurized milk and milk products. These results were compared with the results obtained by using the detection kit SET-RPLA for the specific detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA-SED). Eighty-one samples of milk and milk products were analyzed for the presence of Staphylococcus strains. Forty-six coagulase positive Staphylococcus isolates were tested for the production of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEA-SED) by using the reversed passive latex agglutination method. The strains were also tested for the presence of se genes (sea-seo) by polymerase chain reaction. One or more classical enterotoxin products (SEA-SED) were observed in 39% of the strains tested, while se genes were detected in 56.5%. SEA and sea were most commonly detected. For newly discovered se genes among CPS isolates tested in this study, except the seh gene which was revealed in four isolates (8.7 %), none of the strains harbored any of the other se genes (see, seg, sei, sej, sek, sel, sem, seo and sen). The finding of a pathogen such as staphylococci-producing SEs and containing se genes in milk and milk products in northern Morocco may indicate a problem for public health in this region. The presence of enterotoxigenic strains in food does not always necessarily mean that the toxin will be produced. For that reason, the combination of both methods (RPLA and PCR) is a guarantee for success in diagnostic analysis tests.

  5. Prevalence of Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus Isolated From Chicken Nugget in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madahi, Hajar; Rostami, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus is considered as one of the most important cause of food poisoning that manifests with gastroenteritis, diarrhea, and vomiting. Its complications usually occur when bacterial virulence genes are produced. The most important virulence factors are cell-associated components, exoenzymes, exotoxins, enterotoxins, and enterotoxin-like toxins. Objectives: The present study aimed to study the presence of S. aureus and its virulence factors in chicken nuggets in Iran. Materials and Methods: Totally, 420 chicken nuggets from five brands were collected from Isfahan and Chaharmahal-va-Bakhtiari provinces, Iran. Samples were cultured and the positive results were studied using ELISA and PCR for detection of classical staphylococcal enterotoxins and sea-sej virulence genes, respectively. Results: Results showed that 27 (6.42%) of 420 samples were contaminated with S. aureus with bacteria concentration between 6.1 × 103 to 8.4 × 101/mL. Totally, 33.33% of isolates produced SEA, 4.16% SEB, 12.50% SEC, 8.33% SED, 12.50% SEA + SEC, and 12.50% SEA + SED. The most commonly detected genes were sea (25%), sea + seg (8.33%), sec (12.50%), sea + sed (12.50%), and sea + sec + sej (12.50%). Conclusions: S. aureus can easily contaminate the chicken nugget and this contamination is usually associated with significant presences of virulence genes. Consumption of these nuggets certainly is associated with gastrointestinal diseases. Therefore, some food safety and quality standards should be applied and performed in most of the Iranian food units to control growth of S. aureus and its virulence factors. PMID:25485044

  6. Escherichia coli Contamination across Multiple Environmental Compartments (Soil, Hands, Drinking Water, and Handwashing Water) in Urban Harare: Correlations and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Friedrich, Max N D; Gächter, Marja; Montealegre, Maria Camila; Mlambo, Linn S; Nhiwatiwa, Tamuka; Mosler, Hans-Joachim; Julian, Timothy R

    2018-01-22

    Escherichia coli pathotypes (i.e., enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic) have been identified among the pathogens most responsible for moderate-to-severe diarrhea in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Pathogenic E. coli are transmitted from infected human or animal feces to new susceptible hosts via environmental reservoirs such as hands, water, and soil. Commensal E. coli, which includes nonpathogenic E. coli strains, are widely used as fecal bacteria indicator, with their presence associated with increased likelihood of enteric pathogens and/or diarrheal disease. In this study, we investigated E. coli contamination in environmental reservoirs within households (N = 142) in high-population density communities of Harare, Zimbabwe. We further assessed the interconnectedness of the environmental compartments by investigating associations between, and household-level risk factors for, E. coli contamination. From the data we collected, the source and risk factors for E. coli contamination are not readily apparent. One notable exception is the presence of running tap water on the household plot, which is associated with significantly less E. coli contamination of drinking water, handwashing water, and hands after handwashing. In addition, E. coli levels on hands after washing are significantly associated with handwashing water contamination, hand contamination before washing, and diarrhea incidence. Finally, we observed that animal ownership increases E. coli contamination in soil, and E. coli in soil are correlated with contamination on hands before washing. This study highlights the complexity of E. coli contamination in household environment within LMICs. More, larger, studies are needed to better identify sources and exposure pathways of E. coli-and enteric pathogens generally-to identify effective interventions.

  7. Microbiological quality of water from the rivers of Curitiba, Paraná State, Brazil, and the susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs and pathogenicity of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giowanella, Melissa; Bozza, Angela; do Rocio Dalzoto, Patricia; Dionísio, Jair Alves; Andraus, Sumaia; Guimarães, Edson Luiz Gomes; Pimentel, Ida Chapaval

    2015-11-01

    Water safety is determined by several markers, and Escherichia coli is one of the most important indicators of water quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological parameters in environmental samples of fresh water from rivers of Curitiba and its metropolitan area in Paraná State, Brazil. In addition, we evaluated the pathogenicity and susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs in E. coli. These evaluations were performed by quantitative and qualitative methods employing selective media for isolating thermotolerant coliforms and biochemical tests for identifying E. coli. Pathogenic strains of E. coli were detected by PCR multiplex using specific primers. From the water samples, 494 thermotolerant coliforms were obtained, of which 96 (19.43%) isolates were characterized as E. coli. Three isolates were identified as enteroaggregative E. coli, one as enterotoxigenic E. coli, one as enteropathogenic E. coli, and two carried the Eae virulence gene. E. coli susceptibility to commonly employed antimicrobial drugs was analyzed by the disc diffusion method. The results showed 49 (51.04%) isolates resistant to all the drugs assayed, 16 (16.67%) with an intermediate resistance to all drugs, and 31 (32.29%) intermediately or fully resistant to one or more drugs tested. The highest rate of resistance was observed for tetracycline 30 μg, streptomycin 10 μg, and ceftazidime 30 μg. Detection of E. coli is associated with water contamination by fecal material from humans and warm-blooded animals. The occurrence of resistant strains can be the result of the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor sanitation in the areas assayed.

  8. Characterization of Inflammasome Components in Pig Intestine and Analysis of the Influence of Probiotic Enterococcus Faecium during an Escherichia Coli Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Martina; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Tedin, Karsten; Pieper, Robert; Loss, Henriette; Lodemann, Ulrike

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate systematically the expression of inflammasome components in pig intestine and to analyze the influence of age and long-term supplementation with the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (E. faecium). In order to examine probiotic effects on the inflammasomes during a challenge with pathogens, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and E. faecium were directly added to pig jejunum in Ussing chambers. The mRNA expression of inflammasome components generally decreased in an oral-aboral direction in intestinal tissues. In 29-day-old piglets, the expression levels of NLRP3 were significantly higher and ASC (apoptotic speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain) expression were lower compared with those in the ileum of 70-day-old pigs (p ≤ 0.05). Long-term supplementation with E. faecium significantly increased ASC expression levels in the jejunum and ileum of 29-day-old piglets compared to control animals (p ≤ 0.05). Ex vivo addition of ETEC or E. faecium did not affect mRNA expression of inflammasome components significantly, whereas IL-1β protein release was significantly elevated in ETEC-incubated jejunum (p ≤ 0.05), providing evidence for the functional activation of the inflammasome, which was prevented by pre-incubation with E. faecium. We conclude that pre-incubation with E. faecium has a protective effect during ETEC challenge; this effect is probably not located at the inflammasome transcription level. The results of this study of the expression and regulation of inflammasome components in pigs are similar to those obtained in humans, reinforcing the use of pigs as a suitable model for translational inflammasome research.

  9. Molecular characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli hemolysin gene (EHEC-hlyA)-harboring isolates from cattle reveals a diverse origin and hybrid diarrheagenic strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari Badouei, Mahdi; Morabito, Stefano; Najafifar, Arash; Mazandarani, Emad

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the occurrence of Escherichia coli strains harboring the gene encoding enterohemorrhagic E. coli hemolysin (EHEC-HlyA) in cattle and the association of this gene with various diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) pathotypes. First, the bovine E. coli isolates were screened for EHEC-hlyA gene by PCR, and then they were characterized for the phylogenetic groups and the presence of the major virulence genes of different DEC pathotypes. In total, 25 virulence gene profiles were observed in 54 EHEC-hlyA+ isolates that reflect a considerable heterogeneity. The EHEC-hlyA+ strains were mostly associated with EHEC (72%), while only 7.4% were enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We also showed the presence of estA gene of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) in 6 isolates (11.1%). Interestingly, two of the estA+ strains showed hybrid pathotypes with one carrying eae/estA (EPEC/ETEC), and the other one stx2/astA/estA (EHEC/ETEC). None of the isolates were related to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAggEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC). The EHEC-plasmid encoded genes occurred in seven different combinations with EHEC-hlyA/saa/subA/espP being the most prevalent (46.3%). All stx-/eae+ strains carried O island 57 (OI-57) molecular marker(s) that may indicate these to be the progenitors of EHEC or strains losing stx. The most prevalent phylogroup was B1 (61.1%), but the most heterogeneous strains including the hybrid strains belonged to A phylogroup. Overall, our results indicate that cattle EHEC-hlyA encoding E. coli isolates consist of diverse diarrheagenic strains with the possible existence of hybrid pathotypes. Future studies are required to clarify the evolutionary aspects and clinical significance of these strains in humans and domestic animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Virulence and extended-spectrum β-lactamase encoding genes in Escherichia coli recovered from chicken meat intended for hospitalized human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Younis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study describes the prevalence of Escherichia coli in frozen chicken meat intended for human consumption with emphasis on their virulence determinants through detection of the virulence genes and recognition of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL encoding genes (blaOXA and blaTEM genes. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 frozen chicken meat samples were investigated for isolation of E. coli. All isolates were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Eight serotypes isolated from samples were analyzed for the presence of various virulence genes (stx1, stx2, and eae A genes using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique. Moreover, the strains were evaluated for the ESBL encoding genes (blaTEM and blaOXA. Results: Overall, 11.66% (14/120 chicken meat samples carried E. coli according to cultural and biochemical properties. The most predominant serotypes were O78 and O128: H2 (21.5%, each, followed by O121: H7 and O44: H18. Molecular method detected that 2 strains (25% harbored stx1, 3 strains (37.5% stx2, and 3 strains (37.5% both stx1 and stx2, while 1 (12.5% strain carried eae A gene. Particularly, only O26 serotype had all tested virulence genes (stx1, stx2, and eae A. The results revealed that all examined 8 serotypes were Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC. The ESBL encoding genes (blaTEM and blaOXA of STEC were detected in 4 (50% isolates by multiplex PCR. The overall incidence of blaTEM and blaOXA genes was 3 (37.5% and 2 (25% isolates. Conclusion: The present study indicates the prevalence of virulent and ESBL-producing E. coli in frozen chicken meat intended for hospitalized human consumption due to poor hygienic measures and irregular use of antibiotics. Therefore, the basic instructions regarding good hygienic measures should be adapted to limit public health hazard.

  11. Both group 4 capsule and lipopolysaccharide O-antigen contribute to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli resistance to human α-defensin 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny-Lee Thomassin

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC are food-borne pathogens that colonize the small intestine and colon, respectively. To cause disease, these pathogens must overcome the action of different host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs secreted into these distinct niches. We have shown previously that EHEC expresses high levels of the OmpT protease to inactivate the human cathelicidin LL-37, an AMP present in the colon. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms used by EPEC to resist human α-defensin 5 (HD-5, the most abundant AMP in the small intestine. Quantitative PCR was used to measure transcript levels of various EPEC surface structures. High transcript levels of gfcA, a gene required for group 4 capsule (G4C production, were observed in EPEC, but not in EHEC. The unencapsulated EPEC ∆gfcA and EHEC wild-type strains were more susceptible to HD-5 than EPEC wild-type. Since the G4C is composed of the same sugar repeats as the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen, an -antigen ligase (waaL deletion mutant was generated in EPEC to assess its role in HD-5 resistance. The ∆waaL EPEC strain was more susceptible to HD-5 than both the wild-type and ∆gfcA strains. The ∆gfcA∆waaL EPEC strain was not significantly more susceptible to HD-5 than the ∆waaL strain, suggesting that the absence of -antigen influences G4C formation. To determine whether the G4C and -antigen interact with HD-5, total polysaccharide was purified from wild-type EPEC and added to the ∆gfcA∆waaL strain in the presence of HD-5. The addition of exogenous polysaccharide protected the susceptible strain against HD-5 killing in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that HD-5 binds to the polysaccharides present on the surface of EPEC. Altogether, these findings indicate that EPEC relies on both the G4C and the -antigen to resist the bactericidal activity of HD-5.

  12. Detection of sul1, sul2 and sul3 in sulphonamide resistant Escherichia coli isolates obtained from healthy humans, pork and pigs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette Marie; Sandvag, Dorthe; Andersen, Sigrid R.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of sulphonamide resistance was investigated in 998 Escherichia coli isolates, obtained from pig faeces collected at slaughter, Danish pork collected at retail outlets and from faeces from healthy persons in Denmark. In total 18% (n = 35), 20% (n = 38) and 26% (n = 161) of the E. co...

  13. Elucidation of enterotoxigenic Bacillus cereus outbreaks in Austria by complementary epidemiological and microbiological investigations, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Daniela; Rademacher, Corinna; Kanitz, Elisabeth Eva; Frenzel, Elrike; Simons, Erica; Allerberger, Franz; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-09-02

    Identifying Bacillus cereus as the causative agent of a foodborne outbreak still poses a challenge. We report on the epidemiological and microbiological investigation of three outbreaks of food poisoning (A, B, and C) in Austria in 2013. A total of 44% among 32 hotel guests (A), 22% among 63 employees (B) and 29% among 362 residents of a rehab clinic (C) fell sick immediately after meal consumption. B. cereus isolated from left overs or retained samples from related foods were characterized by toxin gene profiling, and molecular typing using panC sequencing and M13-PCR typing (in outbreak A and C). We identified two B. cereus strains in outbreak A, and six B. cereus strains, each in outbreak B and C; we also found Staphylococcus aureus and staphylococcal enterotoxins in outbreak A. The panC sequence based phylogenetic affiliation of the B. cereus strains, together with findings of the retrospective cohort analyses, helped determining their etiological role. Consumption of a mashed potatoes dish in outbreak A (RR: ∞), a pancake strips soup in outbreak B (RR 13.0; 95% CI 1.8-93.0) and for outbreak C of a fruit salad (RR 1.50; 95% CI 1.09-2.00), deer ragout (RR: 1.99; 95% CI 1.23-3.22) and a cranberry/pear (RR 2.46; 95% CI 1.50-4.03)were associated with increased risk of falling sick. An enterotoxigenic strain affiliated to the phylogenetic group with the highest risk of food poisoning was isolated from the crème spinach and the strawberry buttermilk, and also from the stool samples of the one B. cereus positive outbreak case-patient, who ate both. Our investigation of three food poisoning outbreaks illustrates the added value of a combined approach by using epidemiological, microbiological and genotyping methods in identifying the likely outbreak sources and the etiological B. cereus strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Purification of active human plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 from Escherichia coli. Comparison with natural and recombinant forms purified from eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, D; Strandberg, L; Grundström, T; Ny, T

    1989-12-22

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) inhibits both tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and, therefore, is an important regulator of plasminogen activation. We have developed eucaryotic and procaryotic expression systems for PAI-1 and characterized the recombinant glycosylated and non-glycosylated products, together with a non-recombinant natural control, produced in the histosarcoma cell line HT 1080. For eucaryotic expression, the PAI-1 cDNA was stably transfected into chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells), while procaryotic expression in Escherichia coli was examined after inserting the DNA sequence encoding the mature PAI-1 protein into an inducible expression vector. Recombinant PAI-1 from CHO cells was purified approximately 50-fold in two steps and was indistinguishable from natural PAI-1. Between 3% and 4% of total cellular protein in the procaryotic expression system consisted of PAI-1, from which it was purified approximately 30-fold, with yields of between 15% and 20%. This PAI-1 formed 1:1 complexes with uPA and also with the single- and two-chain forms of tPA. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the procaryote-produced PAI-1 had an inhibitory activity towards all three forms of PA that resembled that of natural PAI-1 with association rate constants of approximately 10(7) M-1 s-1. In contrast to PAI-1 from eucaryotic cells, the PAI-1 from E. coli had an inherent activity equal to that of guanidine/HCl-activated natural PAI-1. The activity could not be increased by treatment with denaturants suggesting that the latent form of PAI-1 was absent. However, at 37 degrees C the procaryote-produced PAI-1 lost activity at the same rate as natural PAI-1, with approximately 50% of the activity remaining after 3 h. This activity could be partially restored by treatment with 4 M guanidine/HCl. E. coli-derived PAI-1, added to human plasma and fractionated by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography, eluted in two peaks

  15. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...... to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic UTI, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the growth characteristics in human urine as well as adhesin repertoire of nine ABU strains; the ability of ABU strains to compete...

  16. Resistance to drugs and heavy metals, colicin production, and biochemical characteristics of selected bovine and porcine Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, N M; Gyles, C L

    1984-11-01

    A study was made of resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics, biochemical characteristics, and colicinogeny in selected strains of Escherichia coli of O serogroups 8, 9, 20, 64, 101, and X46. Of 42 strains that were investigated, 26 were porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), 8 were porcine non-enterotoxigenic E. coli (NETEC), and 8 were bovine ETEC. Multiple resistance to antimicrobial agents was common among the strains, and resistance to chloramphenicol and kanamycin was less common than resistance to other drugs, possibly reflecting the lower frequency of use of these agents in pigs and calves. Colicin production was a more common property of porcine ETEC (80.8%) than of porcine NETEC (25%), and all porcine ETEC of O serogroups 101 and 64 were colicinogenic. Equal numbers of bovine ETEC strains were colicinogenic as were non-colicinogenic. Resistance of bovine and porcine strains to sodium arsenate, mercury, and tellerium was 90, 16, and 5%, respectively. There was a close relationship between serogroup and biochemical reactions among the E. coli strains tested.

  17. Resistance to drugs and heavy metals, colicin production, and biochemical characteristics of selected bovine and porcine Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, N M; Gyles, C L

    1984-01-01

    A study was made of resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics, biochemical characteristics, and colicinogeny in selected strains of Escherichia coli of O serogroups 8, 9, 20, 64, 101, and X46. Of 42 strains that were investigated, 26 were porcine enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), 8 were porcine non-enterotoxigenic E. coli (NETEC), and 8 were bovine ETEC. Multiple resistance to antimicrobial agents was common among the strains, and resistance to chloramphenicol and kanamycin was less common than resistance to other drugs, possibly reflecting the lower frequency of use of these agents in pigs and calves. Colicin production was a more common property of porcine ETEC (80.8%) than of porcine NETEC (25%), and all porcine ETEC of O serogroups 101 and 64 were colicinogenic. Equal numbers of bovine ETEC strains were colicinogenic as were non-colicinogenic. Resistance of bovine and porcine strains to sodium arsenate, mercury, and tellerium was 90, 16, and 5%, respectively. There was a close relationship between serogroup and biochemical reactions among the E. coli strains tested. PMID:6391383

  18. Epidemiology of pathogenic enterobacteria in humans, livestock, and peridomestic rodents in rural Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, DeAnna C; Wright, Patricia C; Bodager, Jonathan R; Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T; Bliska, James B; Gillespie, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    Among the families of enteric bacteria are globally important diarrheal agents. Despite their potential for zoonotic and environmental transmission, few studies have examined the epidemiology of these pathogens in rural systems characterized by extensive overlap among humans, domesticated and peridomestic animals. We investigated patterns of infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, and Yersinia spp. (enterocolitica, and pseudotuberculosis) in Southeastern Madagascar where the potential for the aforementioned interactions is high. In this pilot project we conducted surveys to examine behaviors potentially associated with risk of infection and if infection with specific enterobacteria species was associated with diarrheal disease. PCR was conducted on DNA from human, livestock, and rodent fecal samples from three villages. Overall, human prevalence was highest (77%), followed by rodents (51%) and livestock (18%). Rodents were ∼2.8 times more likely than livestock to carry one of the bacteria. The incidence of individual species varied between villages, with the observation that, E. coli and Shigella spp. were consistently associated with co-infections. As an aggregate, there was a significant risk of infection linked to a water source in one village. Individually, different pathogens were associated with certain behaviors, including: those who had used medication, experienced diarrhea in the past four weeks, or do not use toilets. Different bacteria were associated with an elevated risk of infection for various human activities or characteristics. Certain bacteria may also predispose people to co-infections. These data suggest that a high potential for transmission among these groups, either directly or via contaminated water sources. As these bacteria were most prevalent in humans, it is possible that they are maintained in humans and that transmission to other species is infrequent. Further studies are

  19. Epidemiology of pathogenic enterobacteria in humans, livestock, and peridomestic rodents in rural Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeAnna C Bublitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the families of enteric bacteria are globally important diarrheal agents. Despite their potential for zoonotic and environmental transmission, few studies have examined the epidemiology of these pathogens in rural systems characterized by extensive overlap among humans, domesticated and peridomestic animals. We investigated patterns of infection with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, and Yersinia spp. (enterocolitica, and pseudotuberculosis in Southeastern Madagascar where the potential for the aforementioned interactions is high. In this pilot project we conducted surveys to examine behaviors potentially associated with risk of infection and if infection with specific enterobacteria species was associated with diarrheal disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PCR was conducted on DNA from human, livestock, and rodent fecal samples from three villages. Overall, human prevalence was highest (77%, followed by rodents (51% and livestock (18%. Rodents were ∼2.8 times more likely than livestock to carry one of the bacteria. The incidence of individual species varied between villages, with the observation that, E. coli and Shigella spp. were consistently associated with co-infections. As an aggregate, there was a significant risk of infection linked to a water source in one village. Individually, different pathogens were associated with certain behaviors, including: those who had used medication, experienced diarrhea in the past four weeks, or do not use toilets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Different bacteria were associated with an elevated risk of infection for various human activities or characteristics. Certain bacteria may also predispose people to co-infections. These data suggest that a high potential for transmission among these groups, either directly or via contaminated water sources. As these bacteria were most prevalent in humans, it is possible that they are

  20. Toll-like receptor signaling activation by Entamoeba histolytica induces beta defensin 2 in human colonic epithelial cells: its possible role as an element of the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Téllez-López, Victor M; Domínguez-Robles, M del Carmen; Shibayama-Salas, Mineko; Meza, Isaura

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, a protozoan parasite of humans, produces dysenteric diarrhea, intestinal mucosa damage and extraintestinal infection. It has been proposed that the intestinal microbiota composition could be an important regulatory factor of amebic virulence and tissue invasion, particularly if pathogenic bacteria are present. Recent in vitro studies have shown that Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites induced human colonic CaCo2 cells to synthesize TLR-2 and TLR-4 and proinflammatory cytokines after binding to the amebic Gal/GalNac lectin carbohydrate recognition domain. The magnitude of the inflammatory response induced by trophozoites and the subsequent cell damage were synergized when cells had previously been exposed to pathogenic bacteria. We show here that E. histolytica activation of the classic TLR pathway in CaCo2 cells is required to induce β defensin-2 (HBD2) mRNA expression and production of a 5-kDa cationic peptide with similar properties to the antimicrobial HBD2 expressed by CaCo2 cells exposed to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The induced peptide showed capacity to permeabilize membranes of bacteria and live trophozoites. This activity was abrogated by inhibition of TLR2/4-NFκB pathway or by neutralization with an anti-HBD2 antibody. Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites bind to human intestinal cells and induce expression of HBD2; an antimicrobial molecule with capacity to destroy pathogenic bacteria and trophozoites. HDB2's possible role as a modulator of the course of intestinal infections, particularly in mixed ameba/bacteria infections, is discussed.

  1. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli O1:K1:H7/NM from human and avian origin: detection of clonal groups B2 ST95 and D ST59 with different host distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulin-Schouleur Maryvonne

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC strains of serotype O1:K1:H7/NM are frequently implicated in neonatal meningitis, urinary tract infections and septicemia in humans. They are also commonly isolated from colibacillosis in poultry. Studies to determine the similarities of ExPEC from different origins have indicated that avian strains potentially have zoonotic properties. Results A total of 59 ExPEC O1:K1:H7/NM isolates (21 from avian colibacillosis, 15 from human meningitis, and 23 from human urinary tract infection and septicemia originated from four countries were characterized by phylogenetic PCR grouping, Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and genotyping based on several genes known for their association with ExPEC or avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC virulence. APEC and human ExPEC isolates differed significantly in their assignments to phylogenetic groups, being phylogroup B2 more prevalent among APEC than among human ExPEC (95% vs. 53%, P = 0.001, whereas phylogroup D was almost exclusively associated with human ExPEC (47% vs. 5%, P = 0.0000. Seven virulence genes showed significant differences, being fimAvMT78 and sat genes linked to human isolates, while papGII, tsh, iron, cvaC and iss were significantly associated to APEC. By MLST, 39 of 40 ExPEC belonging to phylogroup B2, and 17 of 19 belonging to phylogroup D exhibited the Sequence Types (STs ST95 and ST59, respectively. Additionally, two novel STs (ST1013 and ST1006 were established. Considering strains sharing the same ST, phylogenetic group, virulence genotype and PFGE cluster to belong to the same subclone, five subclones were detected; one of those grouped six strains of human and animal origin from two countries. Conclusion Present results reveal that the clonal group B2 O1:K1:H7/NM ST95, detected in strains of animal and human origin, recovered from different dates and geographic sources, provides

  2. Occurrence of Hybrid Escherichia coli Strains Carrying Shiga Toxin and Heat-Stable Toxin in Livestock of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johura, Fatema-Tuz; Parveen, Rozina; Islam, Atiqul; Sadique, Abdus; Rahim, Md Niaz; Monira, Shirajum; Khan, Anisur R; Ahsan, Sunjukta; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo; Chakraborty, Subhra; George, Christine M; Cravioto, Alejandro; Navarro, Armando; Hasan, Badrul; Alam, Munirul

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are important causes of diarrhea in humans and animals worldwide. Although ruminant animals are the main source of STEC, diarrhea due to this pathotype is very low in Bangladesh where ETEC remains the predominant group associated with childhood diarrhea. In the present study, E. coli strains (n = 35) isolated from Bangladesh livestock (goats, sheep, and cattle) and poultry (chicken and ducks) were analyzed for the presence of major virulence factors, such as Shiga toxins (STX-1 and STX-2), heat-labile toxin, and heat-stable toxins (STa and STb). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction results revealed 23 (66%) E. coli strains to be virulent possessing either sta (n = 5), stx (stx1, n = 8; stx2, n = 2), or both (n = 8) genes in varying combinations. Thirty-four percent (8/23) of strains from livestock were hybrid type that carried both stx (either stx1 or stx2) and ETEC-specific enterotoxin gene sta. Serotyping results revealed that the ETEC strains belonged to five serotypes, namely O36:H5, O174:H-, O152:H8, O109:H51, and O8:H21, while the STEC-producing strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16 (n = 2), OR:H2 (n = 1), O110:H16 (n = 1), and O152:H8 (n = 1). The STEC-ETEC hybrid strains belonged to serotypes O76:H19 (n = 3), O43:H2 (n = 2), O87:H16, OR:H2, and O152:H8. Forty percent (2/5) of the ETEC and 20% (2/10) of the STEC strains were multidrug resistant with the highest drug resistance (50%) being found in the hybrid strains. Molecular fingerprinting determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and cluster analyses by dendrogram revealed that, genetically, STEC-ETEC hybrid strains were highly heterogeneous. Multidrug-resistant E. coli STEC-ETEC hybrid strains in domesticated animals pose a public health threat for humans in Bangladesh.

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Escherichia coli [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli Escherichia coli Escherichia_coli_L.png Escherichia_coli_NL.png Escherichia_coli..._S.png Escherichia_coli_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NS ...

  4. Colonization of porcine small intestine by Escherichia coli: colonization and adhesion factors of pig enteropathogens that lack K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, R E; Nagy, B; Moon, H W

    1977-04-01

    The colonizing and adhesive attributes of enterotoxigenic acapsular and/or nonpiliated mutants from K88-negative enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains were compared with their capsulated and piliated parents (parents were piliated when grown in vitro and in vivo). Acapsular, nonpiliated mutants from three different colonizing strains of enteropathogenic E. coli lost their ability to colonize the ileum of newborn pigs. Acapsular, piliated and capsular, nonpiliated mutants were derived from one of the parental strains (987), and both mutants lacked the ability to colonize the ileum of pigs. The only mutants available from a fourth strain (431) were acapsular and piliated, and they colonized as well as their parents. These data indicate that both capsule and pili are involved in colonization by strain 987. In contrast, capsule is not required for colonization by strain 431, but pili may be.

  5. The Genetia, Harbored by the Subtilase-Encoding Pathogenicity Island, Is Involved in the Ability of Locus of Enterocyte Effacement-Negative Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains To Invade Monolayers of Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondì, Roslen; Chiani, Paola; Michelacci, Valeria; Minelli, Fabio; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-negative Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are human pathogens that lack the LEE locus, a pathogenicity island (PAI) involved in the intimate adhesion of LEE-positive strains to the host gut epithelium. The mechanism used by LEE-negative STEC strains to colonize the host intestinal mucosa is still not clear. The cell invasion determinant tia , previously described in enterotoxigenic E. coli strains, has been identified in LEE-negative STEC strains that possess the subtilase-encoding pathogenicity island (SE-PAI). We evaluated the role of the gene tia , present in these LEE-negative STEC strains, in the invasion of monolayers of cultured cells. We observed that these strains were able to invade Caco-2 and HEp-2 cell monolayers and compared their invasion ability with that of a mutant strain in which the gene tia had been inactivated. Mutation of the gene tia resulted in a strong reduction of the invasive phenotype, and complementation of the tia mutation with a functional copy of the gene restored the invasion activity. Moreover, we show that the gene tia is overexpressed in bacteria actively invading cell monolayers, demonstrating that tia is involved in the ability to invade cultured monolayers of epithelial cells shown by SE-PAI-positive E. coli , including STEC, strains. However, the expression of the tia gene in the E. coli K-12 strain JM109 was not sufficient, in its own right, to confer to this strain the ability to invade cell monolayers, suggesting that at least another factor must be involved in the invasion ability displayed by the SE-PAI-positive strains. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  7. Fimbrial adhesins from extraintestinal Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) represent an important subclass of E. coli that cause a wide spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. Fimbriae are key virulence factors of ExPEC strains. These long surface located rod-shaped organelles mediate receptor-specific attachment...

  8. Identification, characterization and molecular epidemiology of Escherichia coli isolated from lamb and goat kids with diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süheyla Türkyılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal diarrhoea is a serious health problem on commercial farms. Enterovirulent Escherichia coli is a significant aetiological agent of neonatal diarrhoea. In this work, identification and classification of E. coli isolates obtained from lambs and goat kids with diarrhoea were studied along with antibiotic resistance and clonal relationships of enterovirulent strains. A total of 107 E. coli strains isolated from animals on 43 farms were investigated. Specific virulence genes were determined by multiplex and uniplex polymerase chain reaction. Testing of antibiotic susceptibility was carried out by the Vitek II compact system. The relationship of E. coli isolates was determined by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction. A total of 39 (36.4% enterovirulent E. coli strains were identified and of this 19 (48.7% were shiga toxigenic, 12 (30.8% enterotoxigenic and 8 (20.5% enteropathogenic. Three isolates (7.7% were found to be positive for extended spectrum beta lactamase; 10 (25.6% isolates showed multi-drug resistance to antimicrobials. A total of 28 types were detected by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction. Twenty strains had distinct types while 5 types were common for 2 strains and 3 types were common for 3 strains. This is the first current determination of types, clonality and antibiotic resistance of enterovirulent E. coli isolated from small ruminants with diarrhoea. The results of this study showed that the rates of shiga toxigenic, enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic isolates of E. coli are high in the western part of Turkey. Although these isolates were not clonal, presence of multidrug resistant isolates may cause public health problems.

  9. Molecular and Phenotypic Characterization of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Bacteremic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros, Maribel; García, Wilfredo; García, Coralith; Durand, David; Mercado, Erik; Ruiz, Joaquim; Ochoa, Theresa J

    2017-11-01

    Escherichia coli is an important cause of Gram-negative bacteremia. The aim of this study was to characterize at the molecular and phenotypic levels E. coli strains belonging to different diarrheagenic pathotypes [diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC)] isolated from bacteremia in children younger than 5 years of age. Seventy bacteremia E. coli strains were collected in a prospective study in 12 hospitals in Lima, Peru. The presence of virulence genes associated with DEC [enterotoxigenic (lt and st), enteropathogenic (eaeA), shiga toxin-producing (stx1and stx2), enteroinvasive (ipaH), enteroaggregative (aggR), and diffusely adherent (daaD)] was determined by multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Those positive E. coli strains were further analyzed for 18 additional virulence factors encoding genes and others phenotypic features. Virulence genes associated with DEC were identified in seven bacteremic children (10%), including: one aggR-positive [enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC)], one eaeA-positive [enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC)], one st-positive [enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC)], one daaD-positive [diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC)], and three strain positive for aggR and daaD (EAEC/DAEC) at the same time. All strains, except EPEC, had the Ag43 adhesin, and all, except ETEC had the siderophore gene fyuA. The phylogenetic profile of these strains was variable, two (B2), two (D), two (A), and one (B1) strain. These isolates were susceptible to all tested antibacterial agents except to ampicillin and gentamicin. The three EAEC/DAEC strains showed biofilm formation and aggregative adhesion and had the same repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR patterns. These findings suggest that some DEC strains, especially agg-R and daa-D positive, might cause bacteremia in children.

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Factors of Escherichia coli in Cheese Made from Unpasteurized Milk in Three Cities in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laryssa Freitas; Barbosa, Mayhara Martins Cordeiro; Pinto, Fernanda de Rezende; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Oliveira, Mônica Costa; de Souza, Viviane; de Medeiros, Maria Izabel Merino; Borges, Lucimara Antonio; do Amaral, Luiz Augusto; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2016-09-01

    The production of cheeses from unpasteurized milk is still widespread in Brazil, even with a legal ban imposed on its marketing. The manufacture of this cheese is a public health problem, due to the use of raw milk and the poor hygienic conditions throughout the supply chain process. Contamination may occur from several sources and involve several different pathogenic microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli. The latter can cause different clinical manifestations depending on the pathotype involved. Furthermore, some isolates manifest antimicrobial resistance and may be a risk for public health. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic E. coli in raw-milk cheese in Brazil and their possible risk to public health. A total of 83 cheeses were collected from three different cities and 169 E. coli isolates were characterized for the presence of enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigatoxigenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) virulence genes, phylogenetic type, antimicrobial resistance, O serogroup, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The number of samples positive for E. coli was highest in Aracaju (90.32%, 28/31). The prevalence of samples positive for potential ExPEC genes was similar for Uberaba and Aracaju (23.07%); the most prevalent ExPEC virulence genes were tsh, iucD, and papC. Isolates from Uberaba had a higher prevalence of resistance to tetracycline (38.46%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (58.85%), and ampicillin (61.54%) than the other cities. Overall, antimicrobial resistance genes tetB, blaTEM, and blaCMY-2 were the most prevalent genes (26.32%, 15.79%, and 28.95%, respectively) and the most prevalent serotypes were O4 (8%), 018 (12%), and O23 (8%). Clones originating from the same regions and from different regions were observed. These results emphasize the presence of a potential danger for humans in the consumption of raw-milk cheeses in three cities in Brazil due to

  11. Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli, Listeria and Salmonella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli, Listeria and Salmonella isolates from retail ... Antibiotics sensitivity test was assayed on thirty (30) isolates (10 each for ... their way into human population through food chain and occupational exposure.

  12. Epidemiology and clinical manifestations of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Olsen, Katharina E P; Struve, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) represents a heterogeneous group of E. coli strains. The pathogenicity and clinical relevance of these bacteria are still controversial. In this review, we describe the clinical significance of EAEC regarding patterns of infection in humans, transmission...

  13. Comparative proteomics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli during growth in human urine identify UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae as an adherence factor involved in biofilm formation and binding to uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurpel, Daniël J; Totsika, Makrina; Allsopp, Luke P; Webb, Richard I; Moriel, Danilo G; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-01-10

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in humans. For the successful colonisation of the human urinary tract, UPEC employ a diverse collection of secreted or surface-exposed virulence factors including toxins, iron acquisition systems and adhesins. In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was utilised to define the UPEC pan and core surface proteome following growth in pooled human urine. Identified proteins were investigated for subcellular origin, prevalence and homology to characterised virulence factors. Fourteen core surface proteins were identified, as well as eleven iron uptake receptor proteins and four distinct fimbrial types, including type 1, P, F1C/S and a previously uncharacterised fimbrial type, designated UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae in this study. These pathogenicity island (PAI)-associated fimbriae are related to UCA fimbriae of Proteus mirabilis, associated with UPEC and exclusively found in members of the E. coli B2 and D phylogroup. We further demonstrated that UCL fimbriae promote significant biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and mediate specific attachment to exfoliated human uroepithelial cells. Combined, this study has defined the surface proteomic profiles and core surface proteome of UPEC during growth in human urine and identified a new type of fimbriae that may contribute to UTI. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of putative new Escherichia coli flagellar antigens from human origin using serology, PCR-RFlP and DNA sequencing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Ribeiro Tiba

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli has been isolated frequently, showing flagellar antigens that are not recognized by any of the 53 antisera, provided by the most important reference center of E. coli, The International Escherichia and Klebsiella Center (WHO of the Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. The objective of this study was to characterize flagellar antigens of E. coli that express non-typeable H antigens. The methods used were serology, PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing. This characterization was performed by gene amplification of the fliC (flagellin protein by polymerase chain reaction in all 53 standards E.coli strains for the H antigens and 20 E. coli strains for which the H antigen was untypeable. The amplicons were digested by restriction enzymes, and different restriction enzyme profiles were observed. Anti-sera were produced in rabbits, for the non-typeable strains, and agglutination tests were carried out. In conclusion,the results showed that although non-typeable and typable H antigens strains had similar flagellar antigens, the two types of strains were distinct in terms of nucleotide sequence, and did not phenotypically react with the standard antiserum, as expected. Thirteen strains had been characterized as likely putative new H antigen using PCR-RFLP techniques, DNA sequencing and/or serology.

  15. Detection of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from children with and without diarrhea in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Bueris

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We identified different diarrheagenic (DEC Escherichia coli pathotypes isolated from 1,207 children with and without acute endemic diarrhea in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil collected as part of a case-control study. Since the identification of DEC cannot be based on only biochemical and culture criteria, we used a multiplex polymerase chain reaction developed by combining five specific primer pairs for Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli/ Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (STEC/EHEC, Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC and Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC to detect these pathotypes simultaneously in a single-step reaction. In order to distinguish typical and atypical EPEC strains, these were tested for the presence of EAF plasmid. The prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli in this sample of a global case-control study was 25.4% (259 patients and 18.7% (35 patients in the diarrhea group (1,020 patients and the control group (187 patients, respectively. The most frequently isolated pathotype was EAEC (10.7%, followed by atypical EPEC (9.4%, ETEC (3.7%, and STEC (0.6%. Typical EPEC was detected only in one sample. The prevalence of the pathotypes studied in children with diarrhea was not significantly different from that in children without diarrhea.

  16. Enterobacteria identification and detection of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in a Port Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Frota Macatrão Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Port Complex of Maranhão (PCM is the second largest port complex in Brazil, receiving ships with large volumes of ballast water. To evaluate the microbiological quality of its waters, physicochemical parameters (pH and salinity, the number of coliforms (thermotolerants and totals, and the presence of enterobacterias and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains were analyzed. In order to identify the presence of E. coli virulence genes target regions of the stx, elt, est, aggR, CVD432, ipaH and eae nucleotide sequences were studied. The presence of totals and thermotolerants coliforms were positive. Analyzing the salinity parameter, a significant increase in total coliforms was observed during the rainy season. We identified the species Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella ozaenae, Morganella morganii, Enterobacter cloacae and Edwardsiella tarda. Out of the 51 E. coli isolated, two were positive for the elt gene and one was positive for the CVD432 sequence, features of enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative strains, respectively. This study reveals that the PCM is contaminated by enterobacteria and diarrheagenic E.coli thus providing evidence regarding the risk of these bacteria being carried by ships to other countries, and draws attention to the input of fecal bacteria brought by ships in the port waters of Maranhão.

  17. Enterobacteria identification and detection of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in a Port Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Clarissa Frota Macatrão; Monteiro Neto, Valério; Santos, Bruno Rafael de Carvalho; Costa, Bruno Rafael Rabelo; Azevedo, Alexandre; Serra, Josilene Lima; Mendes, Hermínio Benítez Rabello; Nascimento, Adenilde Ribeiro; Mendes, Mariana Bonfim Pinto; Kuppinger, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The Port Complex of Maranhão (PCM) is the second largest port complex in Brazil, receiving ships with large volumes of ballast water. To evaluate the microbiological quality of its waters, physicochemical parameters (pH and salinity), the number of coliforms (thermotolerants and totals), and the presence of enterobacterias and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains were analyzed. In order to identify the presence of E. coli virulence genes target regions of the stx, elt, est, aggR, CVD432, ipaH and eae nucleotide sequences were studied. The presence of totals and thermotolerants coliforms were positive. Analyzing the salinity parameter, a significant increase in total coliforms was observed during the rainy season. We identified the species Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella ozaenae, Morganella morganii, Enterobacter cloacae and Edwardsiella tarda. Out of the 51 E. coli isolated, two were positive for the elt gene and one was positive for the CVD432 sequence, features of enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative strains, respectively. This study reveals that the PCM is contaminated by enterobacteria and diarrheagenic E.coli thus providing evidence regarding the risk of these bacteria being carried by ships to other countries, and draws attention to the input of fecal bacteria brought by ships in the port waters of Maranhão.

  18. Germination of Bacillus cereus spores is induced by germinants from differentiated caco-2 cells, a human cell line mimicking the epithelial cells of the small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Leusden, van F.M.; Abee, T.

    2007-01-01

    Spores of 11 enterotoxigenic strains of Bacillus cereus isolated from foods and humans adhered with similar efficiencies to Caco-2 cells, whereas subsequent germination triggering was observed with only 8 of these strains. Notably, Hep-2 cells did not trigger germination, while spores of all strains

  19. Efficacy of Urtoxazumab (TMA-15 Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Specific for Shiga Toxin 2 Against Post-Diarrheal Neurological Sequelae Caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection in the Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Moxley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is the most common cause of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in human patients, with brain damage and dysfunction the main cause of acute death. We evaluated the efficacy of urtoxazumab (TMA-15, Teijin Pharma Limited, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Shiga toxin (Stx 2 for the prevention of brain damage, dysfunction, and death in a piglet EHEC infection model. Forty-five neonatal gnotobiotic piglets were inoculated orally with 3 × 109 colony-forming units of EHEC O157:H7 strain EDL933 (Stx1+, Stx2+ when 22–24 h old. At 24 h post-inoculation, piglets were intraperitoneally administered placebo or TMA-15 (0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg body weight. Compared to placebo (n = 10, TMA-15 (n = 35 yielded a significantly greater probability of survival, length of survival, and weight gain (p <0.05. The efficacy of TMA-15 against brain lesions and death was 62.9% (p = 0.0004 and 71.4% (p = 0.0004, respectively. These results suggest that TMA-15 may potentially prevent or reduce vascular necrosis and infarction of the brain attributable to Stx2 in human patients acutely infected with EHEC. However, we do not infer that TMA-15 treatment will completely protect human patients infected with EHEC O157:H7 strains that produce both Stx1 and Stx2.

  20. Developing and utilizing controlled human models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Chad K; Louis Bourgeois, A; Frenck, Robert W; Prouty, Michael; Maier, Nicole; Riddle, Mark S

    2017-12-14

    The controlled human infection model (CHIM) to assess the efficacy of vaccines against Shigella and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) has several unique features that could significantly enhance the ability to test candidate vaccines. Despite increasing interest in these models, questions remain as to how to best incorporate them into vaccine development and how to maximize results. We designed a workshop focused on CHIM as part of the Vaccines Against Shigella and ETEC (VASE) Conference. The workshop, using the World Café method, focused on; clinical outcomes, nonclinical outcomes and model standardization. Researchers with a variety of expertise and experience rotated through each focus area and discussed relevant sub-topics. The results of these discussions were presented and questions posed to guide future workshops. Clinical endpoint discussions focused on the need for harmonized definitions; optimized attack rates; difficulties of sample collection and a need for non-stool based endpoints. Nonclinical discussions centered on evolving omics-based opportunities, host predictors of susceptibility and novel characterizations of the immune response. Model standardization focused on the value of shared procedures across institutions for clinical and non-clinical endpoints as well as for strain preparation and administration and subject selection. Participants agreed CHIMs for Shigella and ETEC vaccine development could accelerate vaccine development of a promising candidate; however, it was also appreciated that variability in the model and our limited understand of the host-pathogen interaction may yield results that could negatively impact a suitable candidate. Future workshops on CHIM are needed to ensure the optimal application of these models moving forward. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Characterization of the human gut microbiome during travelers' diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youmans, Bonnie P; Ajami, Nadim J; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Campbell, Frederick; Wadsworth, W Duncan; Petrosino, Joseph F; DuPont, Herbert L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota are correlated with ailments such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and diarrhea. Up to 60% of individuals traveling from industrialized to developing countries acquire a form of secretory diarrhea known as travelers' diarrhea (TD), and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and norovirus (NoV) are the leading causative pathogens. Presumably, TD alters the gut microbiome, however the effect of TD on gut communities has not been studied. We report the first analysis of bacterial gut populations associated with TD. We examined and compared the gut microbiomes of individuals who developed TD associated with ETEC, NoV, or mixed pathogens, and TD with no pathogen identified, to healthy travelers. We observed a signature dysbiotic gut microbiome profile of high Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratios in the travelers who developed diarrhea, regardless of etiologic agent or presence of a pathogen. There was no significant difference in α-diversity among travelers. The bacterial composition of the microbiota of the healthy travelers was similar to the diarrheal groups, however the β-diversity of the healthy travelers was significantly different than any pathogen-associated TD group. Further comparison of the healthy traveler microbiota to those from healthy subjects who were part of the Human Microbiome Project also revealed a significantly higher Firmicutes:Bacteriodetes ratio in the healthy travelers and significantly different β-diversity. Thus, the composition of the gut microbiome in healthy, diarrhea-free travelers has characteristics of a dysbiotic gut, suggesting that these alterations could be associated with factors such as travel.

  2. Apramycin treatment affects selection and spread of a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain able to colonize the human gut in the intestinal microbiota of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Hansen, Monica Hegstad

    2016-01-01

    The effect of apramycin treatment on transfer and selection of an Escherichia coli strain (E. coli 912) in the intestine of pigs was analyzed through an in vivo experiment. The strain was sequenced and assigned to the sequence type ST101 and serotype O11. It carried resistance genes to apramycin/gentamicin...... of treatment, and apramycin treatment resulted in significantly higher counts compared to the non-treated group. This represents the first demonstration of how antimicrobial treatment affects spread of resistant bacteria in pig production. The use of apramycin may lead to enhanced spread of gentamicin-resistant......-treated (pen 3), along with a non-inoculated control group (pen 1). Two pigs of pen 2 and 3 were inoculated intragastrically with a rifampicin resistant variant of the strain. Apramycin treatment in pen 2 was initiated immediately after inoculation. Strain colonization was assessed in the feces from all pigs...

  3. In vitro antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts against Escherichia coli strains from human clinical specimens and interactions with antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushimaru, P I; Barbosa, L N; Fernandes, A A H; Di Stasi, L C; Fernandes, A

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of medicinal plants have been documented worldwide for many centuries. We aimed to evaluate interactions between crude extracts from Psidium guajava, Zingiber officinale, Cymbopogon citratus, Caryophyllus aromaticus, Mikania glomerata and Allium sativum samples and antimicrobial drugs against Escherichia coli strains. The susceptibility test performed was disc diffusion, and crude extracts were diluted (%v/v) into Müller-Hinton agar (MHA) at one quarter of the minimal inhibitory concentration for 90% (MIC(90%)) of E. coli strains found previously. Synergistic interactions were observed between C. citratus and polymyxin, and A. sativum extracts and gentamicin. The crude A. sativum extract was the only one that did not show any antagonism with the antimicrobial drugs. The results thus showed the potential use of these medicinal plants against E. coli strains, although antagonism with antimicrobial drugs is a negative aspect in the combined therapy of infectious diseases caused by E. coli.

  4. Data for the co-expression and purification of human recombinant CaMKK2 in complex with calmodulin in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Gerner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2 has been implicated in a range of conditions and pathologies from prostate to hepatic cancer. Here, we describe the expression in Escherichia coli and the purification protocol for the following constructs: full-length CaMKK2 in complex with CaM, CaMKK2 ‘apo’, CaMKK2 (165-501 in complex with CaM, and the CaMKK2 F267G mutant. The protocols described have been optimized for maximum yield and purity with minimal purification steps required and the proteins subsequently used to develop a fluorescence-based assay for drug binding to the kinase, “Using the fluorescent properties of STO-609 as a tool to assist structure-function analyses of recombinant CaMKK2” [1].

  5. Epithelial Cell Invasion and Adherence Directed by the Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli tib Locus Is Associated with a 104-Kilodalton Outer Membrane Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    pertussis, locus. The position of the ibA gene within the tib locus was Campylobacter jejuni , Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneu- identified by T7...added to 100 tLg/ml where indicated. 3463 94 82519 9 3464 ELSINGHORST AND WEITZ INFELAr. IMMtUN. TABLE 1. Plasmids used in this study nal antibodies ...filters, bound antibody was pACYCI84 Cloning vector; pl5A replication origin 4 detected with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated goat anti- pCVD437 EPEC eae

  6. Diarrhea-like condition and intestinal muscosal responses in susceptible homozygous and heterozygous F4R+ pigs challenged with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2012-01-01

    to ETEC differ between genotypes. This study investigated a diarrhea-like condition and intestinal mucosal responses in F4 homo- and heterozygous susceptible weaner pigs. Sixteen weaned pigs (28 d of age) were used in a 2 × 2 factorial study with genotype (homo- or heterozygous F4R+) and inoculation...

  7. The Epidemiology of Travelers’ Diarrhea in Incirlik, Turkey: A Region with a Predominance of Heat-Stabile Toxin Producing Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Clyptosporidium parvum, Giardia Iamblia, and Entamoeba histolytica, a colorimetric immunoassay was used-Triage (Biosite, San Diego, CA) (Sharp et al...Parasite Panel for detection of Giardia Iamblia, Entamoeba histo~vticaiEuta­ moeba di.fpw-, and Cryptosporidium parvum in patient stool specimens. J

  8. Sekuen Nukleotida Gene Shiga like toxin-2 dari Isolat Lokal Escherichia coli O157:H7 asal Hewan dan Manusia (NUCLEOTIDES SQUENCES OF SHIGA-LIKE TOXIN 2 GENES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 LOCAL ISOLATES ORIGINATED FROM ANIMALS AND HUMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Suardana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Animals/livestock, especially cattle, are known as the main reservoir of Escherichia coli O157: H7. As theonly one of zoonotic E. coli, the pathogenicity of these bacteria is determined by its ability to produce oneor more very potent cytotoxin known as Shiga-like toxin (Stx or verocytotoxin, particularly of the Stx2 typethat is closely related to the incidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in humans. This study analyzedthe nucleotide sequences of stx2 gene between isolates from animals and humans in an effort to assess thepotential zoonoses of the agent. The research activity was initiated by cultivating 20 isolates of E. coliO157:H7 collection based on result in the previous study i.e. 2 isolates originated from cattle feces, 2isolates originated from beef, 2 isolates originated from chicken feces, 2 isolates originated from humanfaeces and 12 non-clinical isolates originated from human fecal who were suffering with renal failure. Allisolates were confirmed on selective medium Sorbitol MacConkey Agar (SMAC followed by testing onaglutination O157 latex test, and H7 antisera. Molecular analysis of stx2 gene covering open reading frame (ORF of the stx2 gene was performed using the primer which was designed by researcher i.e. Stx2 (F/ Stx2 (R. The results showed, there were 2 isolates i.e. KL-48 (2 originated from human feces and SM-25(1 originated from cattle feces were positive for carrying a stx2 gene, which was marked by the 1587 bpPCR product. Analysis of sequencing showed both isolates had identical to stx2 nucleotide squences withE. phaga 933 as well as E. coli ATCC 933. These results indicate the both local isolates are potential aszoonotic agents with clinical effects similar to E. phaga 933 and E. coli ATCC 43894

  9. Enterotoxigenic potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Artisan Minas cheese from the Serra da Canastra - MG, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Therezinha das Dores

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the presence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus in the endogenous starter and in Artisan Minas cheeses from the Serra da Canastra. Sixteen samples of endogenous starters and cheese were collected during the rainy and dry seasons. The isolation and enumeration of S. aureus were performed using the PetrifilmTM-Rapid S. aureus Plate Count method. The presence of enterotoxin in the cheese samples was analyzed by the Optimal Sensitivity Plate (OSP method and the ELFA-VIDAS®-Staph enterotoxin-II assay. S. aureus strains were tested for their ability to produce enterotoxins using the Optimal Sensitivity Plate (OSP method and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay for the classical enterotoxin genes. The Optimal Sensitivity Plate (OSP method data showed that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA was detected in 75% of the cheese samples, but no toxin was detected with the ELFA-VIDAS method. It was found that 12.5% of the isolated strains produced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA and staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC. When using the the polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay, only one isolate was found to harbor an enterotoxin gene, contrary our expectations. However, discrepancies between the immunological and molecular assays are not uncommon. Despite the fact that most isolates did not produce classical enterotoxins, high S. aureus counts in the cheese samples causes concern since there is a risk of the presence of non-classical enterotoxins.

  10. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction for identification of Escherichia coli, Escherichia albertii and Escherichia fergusonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Garcia-Toledo, L; Fasulo, D; Gladney, L M; Strockbine, N

    2017-09-01

    Escherichia coli, Escherichia albertii, and Escherichia fergusonii are closely related bacteria that can cause illness in humans, such as bacteremia, urinary tract infections and diarrhea. Current identification strategies for these three species vary in complexity and typically rely on the use of multiple phenotypic and genetic tests. To facilitate their rapid identification, we developed a multiplex PCR assay targeting conserved, species-specific genes. We used the Daydreamer™ (Pattern Genomics, USA) software platform to concurrently analyze whole genome sequence assemblies (WGS) from 150 Enterobacteriaceae genomes (107 E. coli, 5 Shigella spp., 21 E. albertii, 12 E. fergusonii and 5 other species) and design primers for the following species-specific regions: a 212bp region of the cyclic di-GMP regulator gene (cdgR, AW869_22935 from genome K-12 MG1655, CP014225) for E. coli/Shigella; a 393bp region of the DNA-binding transcriptional activator of cysteine biosynthesis gene (EAKF1_ch4033 from genome KF1, CP007025) for E. albertii; and a 575bp region of the palmitoleoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)-dependent acyltransferase (EFER_0790 from genome ATCC 35469, CU928158) for E. fergusonii. We incorporated the species-specific primers into a conventional multiplex PCR assay and assessed its performance with a collection of 97 Enterobacteriaceae strains. The assay was 100% sensitive and specific for detecting the expected species and offers a quick and accurate strategy for identifying E. coli, E. albertii, and E. fergusonii in either a single reaction or by in silico PCR with sequence assemblies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Expression and purification of the functional ectodomain of human anthrax toxin receptor 2 in Escherichia coli Origami B cells with assistance of bacterial Trigger Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquez, Pedro; Lei, Ningjing; Weigt, David; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun

    2014-03-01

    The ectodomain of anthrax toxin receptor 2 (ANTXR2) is composed of a von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain that binds to anthrax toxin protective antigen (PA) and a newly defined immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain, in which the disulfide bonds are required for PA pore formation and for the folding of ANTXR2. While the VWA domain has been well characterized, the structure and function of the whole ectodomain (VWA-Ig) are poorly defined, which is mainly due to the limited production of the soluble recombinant protein of the ectodomain. In the present study, the ANTXR2 ectodomain was fused to the C-terminus of bacterial Trigger Factor (TF), a chaperone that mediates the ribosome-associated, co-translational folding of newly synthesized polypeptides in Escherichia coli. Under the control of a cold shock promoter, the fusion protein was overly expressed as a dominant soluble protein at a low temperature in the oxidative cytoplasm of Origami B cells, where formation of the disulfide bonds is favored. Through a series of chromatography, the ANTXR2 ectodomain was purified into homogeneity. The purified ectodomain is functional in binding to PA and mediating PA pore formation on the liposomal membranes, and the yield is applicable for future biochemical and structural characterization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Limited similarity between plasmids encoding CTX-M-1 β-lactamase in Escherichia coli from humans, pigs, cattle, organic poultry layers and horses in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Bortolaia, Valeria; Bielak, Eliza Maria

    2015-01-01

    typing, plasmid multilocus sequence typing, restriction fragment length polymorphism, and sequencing. Human and animal strains were unrelated based on PFGE. IncI1 was more common in human isolates (13/22) than in animal isolates (7/43), whereas the opposite trend was observed for IncN (5/22 human...... isolates and 24/43 animal isolates). Full characterisation of the plasmids harbouring blaCTX-M-1 revealed host-specific patterns in the distribution of plasmid types, with specific IncI1, IncN and IncH1 plasmid subtypes being predominant in humans, livestock and horses, respectively. Three...... indistinguishable human, bovine and porcine IncI1/ST49 plasmids had high nucleotide sequence homology and differed by the presence of IS66 elements in the bovine plasmid and the absence of one gene within the microcin-encoding operon in the human plasmid. In conclusion, this work suggests a minor contribution...

  13. Association Between Antimicrobial Resistance in Escherichia coli Isolates from Food Animals and Blood Stream Isolates from Humans in Europe: An Ecological Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Antonio; Collignon, Peter; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    and 2008 for 11 countries, using available surveillance data. We also assessed the correlation between human antimicrobial usage and the occurrence of resistance in E. coli isolates from blood stream infections.Results: Strong and significant correlations between prevalences of resistance to ampicillin (r......=0.94), aminoglycosides (r=0.72), third-generation cephalosporins (r=0.76), and fluoroquinolones (r=0.68) were observed for human and poultry E. coli isolates. Similar significant correlations were observed for ampicillin (r=0.91), aminoglycosides (r=0.73), and fluoroquinolone resistance (r=0.......74) in pig and human isolates. In cattle isolates, only ampicillin resistance (r=0.72) was significantly correlated to human isolates. When usage of antimicrobials in humans was analyzed with antimicrobial resistance among human isolates, only correlations between fluoroquinolones (r=0.90) and third...

  14. Interleukin-8, CXCL1, and MicroRNA miR-146a Responses to Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Enteropathogenic E. coli in Human Intestinal Epithelial T84 and Monocytic THP-1 Cells after Apical or Basolateral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Harshana; Cichon, Christoph; Ölschläger, Tobias A; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Bacterium-host interactions in the gut proceed via directly contacted epithelial cells, the host's immune system, and a plethora of bacterial factors. Here we characterized and compared exemplary cytokine and microRNA (miRNA) responses of human epithelial and THP-1 cells toward the prototype enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strain E2348/69 (O127:H6) and the probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) (O6:K5:H1). Human T84 and THP-1 cells were used as cell culture-based model systems for epithelial and monocytic cells. Polarized T84 monolayers were infected apically or basolaterally. Bacterial challenges from the basolateral side resulted in more pronounced cytokine and miRNA responses than those observed for apical side infections. Interestingly, the probiotic EcN also caused a pronounced transcriptional increase of proinflammatory CXCL1 and interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels when human T84 epithelial cells were infected from the basolateral side. miR-146a, which is known to regulate adaptor molecules in Toll-like receptor (TLR)/NF-κB signaling, was found to be differentially regulated in THP-1 cells between probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. To assess the roles of flagella and flagellin, we employed several flagellin mutants of EcN. EcN flagellin mutants induced reduced IL-8 as well as CXCL1 responses in T84 cells, suggesting that flagellin is an inducer of this cytokine response. Following infection with an EPEC type 3 secretion system (T3SS) mutant, we observed increased IL-8 and CXCL1 transcription in T84 and THP-1 cells compared to that in wild-type EPEC. This study emphasizes the differential induction of miR-146a by pathogenic and probiotic E. coli strains in epithelial and immune cells as well as a loss of probiotic properties in EcN interacting with cells from the basolateral side. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Escherichia coli-derived and Staphylococcus aureus-derived extracellular vesicles induce MUC5AC expression via extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang Hoon; Choi, Yoon Seok; Song, Si-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Yong-Dae

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) release extracellular vesicles (EVs). E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs are associated with neutrophilic respiratory inflammation. In neutrophilic respiratory inflammation of human, expression of mucin is increased in airway epithelial cells and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality of the affected patients. However, no study on the effects of EVs on expression of mucin genes has been reported in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, this study was conducted in order to examine the effects and the brief signaling pathways of E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs on MUC5AC expression in human airway epithelial cells. In mucin-producing human NCI-H292 airway epithelial cells and primary cultures of normal nasal epithelial cells, the effects and signaling pathways of E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs on MUC5AC expression were examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoblot analysis with several specific inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA). E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs induced MUC5AC expression. E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs significantly activated phosphorylation of extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p38 MAPK. ERK1/2 MAPK inhibitor, p38 MAPK inhibitor, ERK1/2 MAPK siRNA, and p38 MAPK siRNA significantly blocked E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs induced MUC5AC messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. The results of this study suggest that E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs induced MUC5AC expression via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in human airway epithelial cells. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Phage Types and Genotypes of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates from Humans and Animals in Spain: Identification and Characterization of Two Predominating Phage Types (PT2 and PT8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jesús E.; Alonso, M. Pilar; Dhabi, Ghizlane; Thomson-Carter, Fiona; Usera, Miguel A.; Bartolomé, Rosa; Prats, Guillermo; Blanco, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Phage typing and DNA macrorestriction fragment analysis by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE) were used for the epidemiological subtyping of a collection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 strains isolated in Spain between 1980 and 1999. Phage typing distinguished a total of 18 phage types among 171 strains isolated from different sources (67 humans, 82 bovines, 12 ovines, and 10 beef products). However, five phage types, phage type 2 (PT2; 42 strains), PT8 (33 strains), PT14 (14 strains), PT21/28 (11 strains), and PT54 (16 strains), accounted for 68% of the study isolates. PT2 and PT8 were the most frequently found among strains from both humans (51%) and bovines (46%). Interestingly, we detected a significant association between PT2 and PT14 and the presence of acute pathologies. A group of 108 of the 171 strains were analyzed by PFGE, and 53 distinct XbaI macrorestriction patterns were identified, with 38 strains exhibiting unique PFGE patterns. In contrast, phage typing identified 15 different phage types. A total of 66 phage type-PFGE subtype combinations were identified among the 108 strains. PFGE subtyping differentiated between unrelated strains that exhibited the same phage type. The most common phage type-PFGE pattern combinations were PT2-PFGE type 1 (1 human and 11 bovine strains), PT8-PFGE type 8 (2 human, 6 bovine, and 1 beef product strains), PT2-PFGE subtype 4A (1 human, 3 bovine, and 1 beef product strains). Nine (29%) of 31 human strains showed phage type-PFGE pattern combinations that were detected among the bovine strains included in this study, and 26 (38%) of 68 bovine strains produced phage type-PFGE pattern combinations observed among human strains included in this study, confirming that cattle are a major reservoir of strains pathogenic for humans. PT2 and PT8 strains formed two groups which differed from each other in their motilities, stx genotypes, PFGE patterns, and the severity of the illnesses that they caused

  17. The Adherent/Invasive Escherichia coli Strain LF82 Invades and Persists in Human Prostate Cell Line RWPE-1, Activating a Strong Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Maria P; Aleandri, Marta; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Conte, Antonietta L; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Gambara, Guido; Palombi, Fioretta; De Cesaris, Paola; Ziparo, Elio; Palamara, Anna T; Riccioli, Anna; Longhi, Catia

    2016-11-01

    Adherent/invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains have recently been receiving increased attention because they are more prevalent and persistent in the intestine of Crohn's disease (CD) patients than in healthy subjects. Since AIEC strains show a high percentage of similarity to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli (NMEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, here we compared AIEC strain LF82 with a UPEC isolate (strain EC73) to assess whether LF82 would be able to infect prostate cells as an extraintestinal target. The virulence phenotypes of both strains were determined by using the RWPE-1 prostate cell line. The results obtained indicated that LF82 and EC73 are able to adhere to, invade, and survive within prostate epithelial cells. Invasion was confirmed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Moreover, cytochalasin D and colchicine strongly inhibited bacterial uptake of both strains, indicating the involvement of actin microfilaments and microtubules in host cell invasion. Moreover, both strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are strong biofilm producers. In silico analysis reveals that LF82 shares with UPEC strains several virulence factors: namely, type 1 pili, the group II capsule, the vacuolating autotransporter toxin, four iron uptake systems, and the pathogenic island (PAI). Furthermore, compared to EC73, LF82 induces in RWPE-1 cells a marked increase of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and of NF-κB already by 5 min postinfection, thus inducing a strong inflammatory response. Our in vitro data support the hypothesis that AIEC strains might play a role in prostatitis, and, by exploiting host-cell signaling pathways controlling the innate immune response, likely facilitate bacterial multiplication and dissemination within the male genitourinary tract. Copyright © 2016 Conte et al.

  18. Human papillomavirus L1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli self-assembles into virus-like particles that are highly immunogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yumei; Liu, Yunchao; Zhang, Gaiping; Wang, Aiping; Dong, Ziming; Qi, Yanhua; Wang, Jucai; Zhao, Baolei; Li, Ning; Jiang, Min

    2016-07-15

    HPV vaccines based on L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) provided a high degree of protection against HPVs infection. In this study, the codon optimized HPV16 L1 gene were sub-cloned into five procaryotic expression vectors (pET-28a, pET-32a, pGEX-4T-2, pE-sumo and pHSIE), and fused with different protein tags. No recombinant proteins were expressed in pET-28a-L1 and pHSIE-L1, and the proteins expressed by pET-32a-L1 plasmid with TRX-tag were in the form of inclusion body. Only SUMO-tagged and GST-tagged L1 proteins expressed by pE-Sumo-L1 or pGEX-4T-L1 were soluble. The yield of SUMO-L1 protein reached 260mg/L fermentation medium in shake flask. After SUMO tags were eliminated, a 90% purity of L1 proteins was generated by ion-exchange and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified HPV16 L1 protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) and showed a haemagglutination activity. High titers specific and neutralizing antibodies were detected in HPV 16 L1VLPs vaccinated mice. Cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-2 showed significant higher in VLPs vaccinated mice compared with negative control (p<0.05, p=0.055). Thus, the expression of recombinant HPV16 L1 VLPs in Escherichia coli was feasible, which could potentially be used for a VLP-based HPV vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathogenesis of human diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): current insights and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servin, Alain L

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as "silent pathogens" with the capacity to emerge as "pathobionts" for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights

  20. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli specific enterohemolysin induced IL-1β in human macrophages and EHEC-induced IL-1β required activation of NLRP3 inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoai; Cheng, Yuli; Xiong, Yanwen; Ye, Changyun; Zheng, Han; Sun, Hui; Zhao, Hongqing; Ren, Zhihong; Xu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a major foodborne pathogen causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The role of EHEC O157:H7-enterohemolysin (Ehx) in the pathogenesis of infections remains poorly defined. In this study, we used gene deletion and complement methods to confirm its putative functions. Results demonstrated that, in THP-1 cells, EHEC O157:H7-Ehx is associated with greater production of extracellular interleukin (IL)-1β than other cytokines. The data also showed that EHEC O157:H7-Ehx contributed to cytotoxicity in THP-1 cells, causing the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Although we observed a positive correlation between IL-1β production and cytotoxicity in THP-1 cells infected with different EHEC O157:H7 strains, our immunoblot results showed that the majority of IL-1β in the supernatant was mature IL-1β and not the pro-IL-1β that can be released after cell death. However, EHEC O157:H7-Ehx had no detectable effect on biologically inactive pro-IL-1β at the mRNA or protein synthesis levels. Neither did it affect the expression of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), caspase-1, or NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). RNA interference experiments showed that EHEC O157:H7-induced IL-1β production required the involvement of ASC, caspase-1, and NLRP3 expression in THP-1 cells. Our results demonstrate that Ehx plays a crucial role in EHEC O157:H7-induced IL-1β production and its cytotoxicity to THP-1 cells. NLRP3 inflammasome activation is also involved in EHEC O157:H7-stimulated IL-1β release.

  1. Pathogenesis of Human Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Expressing Afa/Dr Adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): Current Insights and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as “silent pathogens” with the capacity to emerge as “pathobionts” for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  2. Molecular characterisation of human Shiga toxin-producingEscherichia coliO26 strains: results of an outbreak investigation, Romania, February to August 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usein, Codruţa-Romaniţa; Ciontea, Adriana Simona; Militaru, Cornelia Mãdãlina; Condei, Maria; Dinu, Sorin; Oprea, Mihaela; Cristea, Daniela; Michelacci, Valeria; Scavia, Gaia; Zota, Lavinia Cipriana; Zaharia, Alina; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    IntroductionAt the beginning of 2016, an increase in paediatric haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases was observed in Romania. The microbiological investigations allowed isolation of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 as the causative agent from most cases. Methods: An enhanced national surveillance of HUS and severe diarrhoea was established across the country following the identification of the first cases and was carried out until August 2016. A total of 15 strains were isolated from 10 HUS and five diarrhoea cases. Strains were characterised by virulence markers (i.e. stx type/subtype, eae , ehxA genes), phylogroup, genetic relatedness and clonality using PCR-based assays, PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The first six strains were further characterised by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Results: Five PCR-defined genotypes were distinguished. All strains from HUS cases harboured stx2a and eae , with or without stx1a , while strains from diarrhoea cases carried exclusively stx1a and eae genes. PFGE resolved strains into multiple pulsotypes, compatible with a certain geographic segregation of the cases, and strains were assigned to phylogroup B1 and sequence type (ST) 21. WGS confirmed the results of conventional molecular methods, brought evidence of O26:H11 serotype, and complemented the virulence profiles. Discussion/conclusion: This first description of STEC O26 strains from cases in Romania showed that the isolates belonged to a diverse population. The virulence content of most strains highlighted a high risk for severe outcome in infected patients. Improving the national surveillance strategy for STEC infections in Romania needs to be further considered.

  3. Expression and Characterization of a Single-Chain Variable Fragment against Human LOX-1 inEscherichia coliandBrevibacillus choshinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Xiang, Jun-Yan; Kong, Ping; Liu, Ling; Xie, Qiuhong; Xiang, Hongyu

    2017-05-28

    The single-chain variable fragment (scFv) against lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a promising molecule for its potential use in the diagnosis and immunotherapy of atherosclerosis. Producing this scFv in several milligram amounts could be the starting point for further engineering and application of the scFv. In this study, the abundant expression of the anti-LOX-1 scFv was attempted using Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) and Brevibacillus choshinensis (B. choshinensis) . The scFv had limited soluble yield in E. coli , but it was efficiently secreted by B. choshinensis . The optimized fermentation was determined using the Plackett-Burman screening design and response surface methodology, under which the yield reached up to 1.5 g/l in a 5-L fermentor. Moreover, the properties of the scFvs obtained from the two expression systems were different. The antigen affinity, transition temperature, and particle diameter size were 1.01E-07 M, 55.2 ± 0.3°C, and 9.388 nm for the scFv expressed by B. choshinensis , and 4.53E-07 M, 52.5 ± 0.3°C, and 13.54 nm for the scFv expressed by E. coli . This study established an efficient scale-up production methodology for the anti-LOX-1 scFv, which will boost its use in LOX-1-based therapy.

  4. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Specific Enterohemolysin Induced IL-1β in Human Macrophages and EHEC-Induced IL-1β Required Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanwen; Ye, Changyun; Zheng, Han; Sun, Hui; Zhao, Hongqing; Ren, Zhihong; Xu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a major foodborne pathogen causing hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The role of EHEC O157:H7-enterohemolysin (Ehx) in the pathogenesis of infections remains poorly defined. In this study, we used gene deletion and complement methods to confirm its putative functions. Results demonstrated that, in THP-1 cells, EHEC O157:H7-Ehx is associated with greater production of extracellular interleukin (IL)-1β than other cytokines. The data also showed that EHEC O157:H7-Ehx contributed to cytotoxicity in THP-1 cells, causing the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Although we observed a positive correlation between IL-1β production and cytotoxicity in THP-1 cells infected with different EHEC O157:H7 strains, our immunoblot results showed that the majority of IL-1β in the supernatant was mature IL-1β and not the pro-IL-1β that can be released after cell death. However, EHEC O157:H7-Ehx had no detectable effect on biologically inactive pro-IL-1β at the mRNA or protein synthesis levels. Neither did it affect the expression of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), caspase-1, or NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). RNA interference experiments showed that EHEC O157:H7-induced IL-1β production required the involvement of ASC, caspase-1, and NLRP3 expression in THP-1 cells. Our results demonstrate that Ehx plays a crucial role in EHEC O157:H7-induced IL-1β production and its cytotoxicity to THP-1 cells. NLRP3 inflammasome activation is also involved in EHEC O157:H7-stimulated IL-1β release. PMID:23209696

  5. The effects of antibiotic usage in food animals on the development of antimicrobial resistance of importance for humans in Campylobacter and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1999-01-01

    Modern food animal production depends on use of large amounts of antibiotics for disease control. This provides favourable conditions for the spread and persistence of antimicrobial-resistant zoonotic bacteria such as Campylobacter and E. coli O157. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance...... to antimicrobials used in human therapy is increasing in human pathogenic Campylobacter and E. coli from animals. There is an urgent need to implement strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in food animal production to prevent further increases in the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance in food-borne human...

  6. Broiler chickens, broiler chicken meat, pigs and pork as sources of ExPEC related virulence genes and resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from community-dwelling humans and UTI patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Spangholm, Daniel J; Pedersen, Karl; Jensen, Lars B; Emborg, Hanne-Dorthe; Agersø, Yvonne; Aarestrup, Frank M; Hammerum, Anette M; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2010-08-15

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections. UTI is primarily caused by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) from the patients' own fecal flora. The ExPEC often belong to phylogroups B2 and D, the groups which include potent human ExPEC isolates causing UTI, bacteremia, and meningitis. The external sources of these ExPEC in the human intestine are unknown. The food supply may transmit ExPEC to humans. However, evidence of this hypothesis is limited. To assess this hypothesis, the objective of our study was to investigate the presence of ExPEC related virulence genes in E. coli isolates from UTI patients, community-dwelling humans, meat, and production animals. Accordingly, we included 964 geographically and temporally matched E. coli isolates from UTI patients (n=102), community-dwelling humans (n=109), fresh Danish (n=197) and imported broiler chicken meat (n=86), broiler chickens (n=138), fresh Danish (n=177) and imported pork (n=10), and pigs (n=145) in the study. All isolates were investigated for the presence of eight ExPEC related genes (kpsM II, papA, papC, iutA, sfaS, focG, afa, hlyD) using PCR. To investigate any similarities between isolates from the different origins, we performed a cluster analysis including antimicrobial resistance data previously published. We detected seven of the eight ExPEC related genes in isolates from broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork and pigs. Our findings suggest that broiler chicken meat, broiler chickens, pork and pigs could be the source of strains with these ExPEC related virulence genes in community-dwelling humans and UTI patients. Especially detection of ExPEC related virulence genes in isolates belonging to phylogroups B2 and D is very concerning and may have a significant medical impact. The cluster analysis of virulence gene and antimicrobial resistance profiles showed strong similarities between UTI patient, community-dwelling human isolates, meat, and

  7. Detection of Shiga toxin-producing and other diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by the BioFire FilmArray® Gastrointestinal Panel in human fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rauw, K; Detemmerman, L; Breynaert, J; Piérard, D

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was the evaluation of the performance of the BioFire FilmArray® Gastrointestinal (FA-GI) Panel, a multiplexed molecular stool screening assay, for the detection of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC), with emphasis on Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). A dilution series of 12 STEC reference strains was tested with the FA-GI Panel to assess the analytical sensitivity. A total of 389 patient samples were analyzed with the FA-GI Panel and confirmation of the detected DEC was attempted with an in-house culture-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. All Shiga toxin genes, except the one encoding Stx2f, were detected in bacterial dilutions ranging from 10(4) to 10(2) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. eae + stx2f + STEC was misclassified as enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). Different sensitivities for various gene targets present in one isolate led to differing identifications depending on the concentration. Using the in-house method as a reference, the FA-GI Panel had a sensitivity of 90.6 % [confidence interval (CI) 75.0 %-98.0 %] and a specificity of 97.2 % (CI 94.9 %-98.6 %) for STEC detection in feces. At least one DEC was reported in 35.5 % (171/389) of the patient specimens, with EPEC being the most prevalent (n = 71). Only 59.7 % of the detected DEC could be confirmed, presumably because the comparator method was not applied directly on feces. The FA-GI Panel could not detect the stx2f subtype, misclassified certain pathogens, and the high detection rate of EPEC needs further investigation. Nevertheless, we believe that this sensitive and convenient system will prove to be an invaluable tool for the rapid diagnosis of most DEC infections, but culturing of the detected microorganisms should always be attempted.

  8. The ST131 Escherichia coli H22 subclone from human intestinal microbiota: Comparison of genomic and phenotypic traits with those of the globally successful H30 subclone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Petitjean, Marie; Mora, Azucena; Mayer, Noémie; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Boulet, Olivier; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Blanco, Jorge; Hocquet, Didier

    2017-03-27

    In 2006, we found healthy subjects carrying ST131 Escherichia coli in their intestinal microbiota consisting of two populations: a subdominant population of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli belonging to subclone H30 (H30-R or subclade C1), the current worldwide dominant ST131 subclone, and a dominant E. coli population composed of antibiotic-susceptible E. coli belonging to subclone H22 (clade B), the precursor of subclone H30. We sequenced the whole genome of fecal H22 strain S250, compared it to the genomes of ExPEC ST131 H30-Rx strain JJ1886 and commensal ST131 H41 strain SE15, sought the H22-H30 genomic differences in our fecal strains and assessed their phenotypic consequences. We detected 173 genes found in the Virulence Factor Database, of which 148 were shared by the three ST131 genomes, whereas some were genome-specific, notably those allowing determination of virotype (D for S250 and C for JJ1886). We found three sequences of the FimH site involved in adhesion: two in S250 and SE15 close and identical, respectively, to that previously reported to confer strong intestinal adhesion, and one in JJ1886, corresponding to that commonly present in uropathogenic E. coli. Among the genes involved in sugar metabolism, one encoding a gluconate kinase lacked in S250 and JJ1886. Although this gene was also absent in both our fecal H22 and H30-R strains, H22 strains showed a higher capacity to grow in minimal medium with gluconate. Among the genes involved in gluconate metabolism, only the ghrB gene differed between S250/H22 and JJ1886/H30-R strains, resulting in different gluconate reductases. Of the genes involved in biofilm formation, two were absent in the three genomes and one, fimB, in the JJ1886 genome. Our fecal H30-R strains lacking intact fimB displayed delayed biofilm formation relative to our fecal H22 strains. The H22 strains differed by subclade B type and plasmid content, whereas the H30-R strains were identical. Phenotypic analysis of our fecal strains

  9. Human Escherichia coli isolates from hemocultures: Septicemia linked to urogenital tract infections is caused by isolates harboring more virulence genes than bacteraemia linked to other conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micenková, Lenka; Beňová, Alžbeta; Frankovičová, Lucia; Bosák, Juraj; Vrba, Martin; Ševčíková, Alena; Kmeťová, Marta; Šmajs, David

    2017-04-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of bloodstream infections and community-acquired sepsis. The main aim of this study was to determine virulence characteristics of E. coli isolates from hemocultures of patients with a primary disease of urogenital tract, digestive system, a neoplastic blood disease, or other conditions. Results from a set of 314 E. coli isolates from hemocultures were compared to data from a previously published analysis of 1283 fecal commensal E. coli isolates. Genetic profiling of the 314 E. coli isolates involved determination of phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, D, C, E, and F), identification of 21 virulence factors, as well as 30 bacteriocin-encoding determinants. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to analyze clonal character of the hemoculture-derived isolates. The E. coli isolates from hemocultures belonged mainly to phylogenetic groups B2 (59.9%) and D (21.0%), and less frequently to phylogroups A (10.2%) and B1 (5.7%). Commonly detected virulence factors included adhesins (fimA 92.0%, pap 47.1%, and sfa 26.8%), and iron-uptake encoding genes (fyuA 87.9%, fepC 79.6%, aer 70.7%, iucC 68.2%, and ireA 13.7%), followed by colibactin (pks island 31.5%), and cytotoxic necrotizing factor (cnf1 11.1%). A higher frequency of microcin producers (and microcin M determinant) and a lower frequency of colicin Ib and microcin B17 was found in hemoculture-derived isolates compared to commensal fecal isolates. E. coli isolates from hemocultures harbored more virulence genes compared to fecal E. coli isolates. In addition, hemoculture E. coli isolates from patients with primary diagnosis related to urogenital tract were clearly different and more virulence genes were detected in these isolates compared to both fecal isolates and hemoculture-derived isolates from patients with blood and gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of some of the south-Indian spices against serotypes of Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Aeromonas hydrophila Atividade antimicrobiana de condimentos do sul da India sobre Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes e Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Indu

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity of extracts of Allium sativum (garlic, Myristica fragrans (nutmeg, Zingiber officinale (ginger, Allium cepa (onion and Piper nigrum (pepper has been evaluated against 20 different serogroups of Escherichia coli, 8 serotypes of Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Aeromonas hydrophila. Garlic extract showed excellent antibacterial activity against all the test organisms, except L. monocytogenes. Nutmeg showed good anti-listerial activity, although activity against E. coli and Salmonella were serotype dependent. Both garlic and nutmeg extracts were effective against A. hydrophila. Extracts of ginger showed inhibitory activity against two serogroups of E. coli: as O8 (enterotoxigenic E. coli and O88 only. Extracts of onion and pepper did not show any antibacterial activity against the test organisms.Avaliou-se a atividade antimicrobiana de extratos de alho (Allium sativum, noz-moscada (Mysritica frangrans, gengibre (Zingiber officinale cebola (Allium cepa e pimenta do reino (Piper nigrum sobre 20 sorotipos de Escherichia coli, 8 sorotipos de Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes e Aeromonas hydrophila. O alho apresentou atividade antimicrobiana excelente sobre todos os microrganismos testados, excepto L. monocytogenes. A noz-moscada apresentou boa atividade antilisteria, emboara atividade sobre E. coli e Salmonella tenha sido sorotipo-dependente. Tanto alho como noz-moscada foram eficientes contra A. hydrophila. O extrato de gengibre apresentou atividade inibitória sobre dois sorotipos de E. coli: 08 (enterotoxigenico e 088. Os extratos de cebola e pimenta do reino não apresentaram nenhuma atividade contra os microrganismos testados.

  11. Escherichia coli Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makvana, Sejal; Krilov, Leonard R

    2015-04-01

    Virulent strains of Escherichia coli are responsible for most diarrheal infections, meningitis, septicemia, and urinary tract infections in children worldwide. Clinicians must learn to recognize, treat, and prevent these infections. After completing this article, readers should be able to: 1. Describe the epidemiology of E coli infections. 2. Recognize the clinical features of E coli infections, including the O157: H7 strain. 3. Appropriately treat children with various types of E coli infections. 4. Understand ways to prevent E coli infections.

  12. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently.

  13. Analysis and modeling of heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli suggests a novel space with insights into receptor preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Raja, M; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Vino, S; Sajitha Lulu, S

    2015-01-01

    Features of heat-labile enterotoxins of Escherichia coli which make them fit to use as novel receptors for antidiarrheals are not completely explored. Data-set of 14 different serovars of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli producing heat-labile toxins were taken from NCBI Genbank database and used in the study. Sequence analysis showed mutations in different subunits and also at their interface residues. As these toxins lack crystallography structures, homology modeling using Modeller 9.11 led to the structural approximation for the E. coli producing heat-labile toxins. Interaction of modeled toxin subunits with proanthocyanidin, an antidiarrheal showed several strong hydrogen bonding interactions at the cost of minimized energy. The hits were subsequently characterized by molecular dynamics simulation studies to monitor their binding stabilities. This study looks into novel space where the ligand can choose the receptor preference not as a whole but as an individual subunit. Mutation at interface residues and interaction among subunits along with the binding of ligand to individual subunits would help to design a non-toxic labile toxin and also to improve the therapeutics.

  14. Antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli isolated from five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on the resistance profiles of clinical and non clinical human bacteria isolates in the developing countries can serve as important means of understanding the human pathogens drug resistance interactions in the zone. Escherichia coli isolated from five geopolitical zones of Nigeria were screened for anti-microbial ...

  15. Search for Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are important zoonotic bacteria responsible for enteric infections in humans. The present study investigated the possible role of kittens in the zoonotic transmission of antimicrobial resistant EHEC O157 and Salmonella enterica to human using ...

  16. Isolation and genomic characterization of Escherichia coli O157:NM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human diseases caused by Escherichia coli O157:NM and E. coli O157:H7 strains have been reported throughout the world. In developed countries, serotype O157:H7 represents the major cause of human diseases; however, there have been increasing reports of non-O157 Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli strains ...

  17. Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: a survey of dairy cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The zoonotic potential of enterohaemorrhagic. Escherichia coli (EHEC) subtype O157 represents a serious food-borne threat to human health. (1Б3). A common animal vector of this pathogen is cattle, and human cases of infection are frequently caused by ingesting food products contaminated with bacteria shed in the ...

  18. Jumlah Bakteri Coliform dan Deteksi Escherichia Coli pada Daging Ayam di Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Juwita, Usna; Haryani, Yuli; Jose, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Coliform bacteria are often referred as indicator organisms to indicate the potential presence of disease-causing bacteria. Escherichia coli is a type of Coliform bacteria. Most Escherichia coli are harmless and commonly found in the intestines of humans and animals. However, some strains can cause illness. Coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli contamination in chicken could be detected using Most Probable Number (MPN) multi-step assay which consists of presumptive, confirmed, and completed ...

  19. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adassa Gama Tavares

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl, potassium chloride (KCl, lactic acid (LA and acetic acid (AA after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO. The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation.

  20. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Adassa Gama; Monte, Daniel Farias Marinho do; Albuquerque, Allan Dos Reis; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Magnani, Marciane; Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto de; Souza, Evandro Leite de

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO). The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation.