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Sample records for human enteric protozoan

  1. Epidemiology and geographical distribution of enteric protozoan infections in Sydney, Australia

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    Stephanie Fletcher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Enteric protozoa are associated with diarrhoeal illnesses in humans; however there are no recent studies on their epidemiology and geographical distribution in Australia. This study describes the epidemiology of enteric protozoa in the state of New South Wales and incorporates spatial analysis to describe their distribution. Design and methods. Laboratory and clinical records from four public hospitals in Sydney for 910 patients, who tested positive for enteric protozoa over the period January 2007-December 2010, were identified, examined and analysed. We selected 580 cases which had residence post code data available, enabling us to examine the geographic distribution of patients, and reviewed the clinical data of 252 patients to examine possible links between protozoa, demographic and clinical features. Results. Frequently detected protozoa were Blastocystis spp. (57%, Giardia intestinalis (27% and Dientamoeba fragilis (12%. The age distribution showed that the prevalence of protozoa decreased with age up to 24 years but increasing with age from 25 years onwards. The geographic provenance of the patients indicates that the majority of cases of Blastocystis (53.1% are clustered in and around the Sydney City Business District, while pockets of giardiasis were identified in regional/rural areas. The distribution of cases suggests higher risk of protozoan infection may exist for some communities. Conclusions. These findings provide useful information for policy makers to design and tailor interventions to target high risk communities. Follow-up investigation into the risk factors for giardiasis in regional/rural area is needed.

  2. Evaluation of five commercial methods for the extraction and purification of DNA from human faecal samples for downstream molecular detection of the enteric protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, and Entamoeba spp.

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    Paulos, Silvia; Mateo, Marta; de Lucio, Aida; Hernández-de Mingo, Marta; Bailo, Begoña; Saugar, José M; Cardona, Guillermo A; Fuentes, Isabel; Mateo, María; Carmena, David

    2016-08-01

    High quality, pure DNA is required for ensuring reliable and reproducible results in molecular diagnosis applications. A number of in-house and commercial methods are available for the extraction and purification of genomic DNA from faecal material, each one offering a specific combination of performance, cost-effectiveness, and easiness of use that should be conveniently evaluated in function of the pathogen of interest. In this comparative study the marketed kits QIAamp DNA stool mini (Qiagen), SpeedTools DNA extraction (Biotools), DNAExtract-VK (Vacunek), PowerFecal DNA isolation (MoBio), and Wizard magnetic DNA purification system (Promega Corporation) were assessed for their efficacy in obtaining DNA of the most relevant enteric protozoan parasites associated to gastrointestinal disease globally. A panel of 113 stool specimens of clinically confirmed patients with cryptosporidiosis (n=29), giardiasis (n=47) and amoebiasis by Entamoeba histolytica (n=3) or E. dispar (n=10) and apparently healthy subjects (n=24) were used for this purpose. Stool samples were aliquoted in five sub-samples and individually processed by each extraction method evaluated. Purified DNA samples were subsequently tested in PCR-based assays routinely used in our laboratory. The five compared methods yielded amplifiable amounts of DNA of the pathogens tested, although performance differences were observed among them depending on the parasite and the infection burden. Methods combining chemical, enzymatic and/or mechanical lysis procedures at temperatures of at least 56°C were proven more efficient for the release of DNA from Cryptosporidium oocysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

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    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  4. Enteric protozoan parasites in stray cats in Kuwait with special references to toxoplasmosis and risk factors affecting its occurrence.

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    Abdou, Nadra-Elwgoud M I; Al-Batel, Maha K; El-Azazy, Osama M E; Sami, Attia M; Majeed, Qais A H

    2013-08-01

    In Kuwait, stray cats were surveyed for enteric protozoan infection using fecal examination and their sera were tested for Toxoplasma gondii IgG using indirect hemagglutination test (IHAT) as well as for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antibodies using ELISA. Out of 240 fecal samples examined 22 (9.2%) were found to be infected with oocysts of four species of coccidian protozoa. Isopspora felis was the most predominant enteric protozoan parasite (7.1%), followed by T. gondii (2.1%), I. rivolta (1.6), Sarcocystis was only found in one case (0.4%). Juvenile cats ( 6 months old) had higher infection rate with oocyst of enteric protozoa than older cats (p-value 0.001). Sero-survey of 240 stray cats revealed that 19.6% were positive to T. gondii IgG. Toxoplasma sero-positivity was observed in higher number of adults compared to young cats suggests that with age the risk of exposure to T. gondii increases. While concurrent retroviral infections were not found to be associated with increased risk for developing T. gondii antibodies.

  5. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

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    Michael J. Brumlik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known.

  6. Efficiency of diagnostic methods for correlation between prevalence of enteric protozoan parasites and HIV/AIDS status--an experience of a tertiary care hospital in East Delhi.

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    Kashyap, Bineeta; Sinha, Sanchaita; Das, Shukla; Rustagi, Nitesh; Jhamb, Rajat

    2010-10-01

    Since the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, opportunistic infections have been recognized as common complications of HIV infection. Enteric protozoan parasitic infections are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. The present study is, therefore, aimed to determine the prevalence of these parasites and study their association with immune status in HIV patients with emphasis on the correlation between various diagnostic techniques to give an accurate diagnosis to avoid empirical treatment. This prospective study, carried out between November 2009 and May 2010 included all HIV seropositive patients presenting with diarrhea to the ART center. A total of 64 stool samples were analyzed by wet mount examination, three different staining techniques, and antigen detection by ELISA for various enteric protozoan infections. Total prevalence of enteric protozoan parasites was 30%. Among the total cases, Cryptosporidium was seen in 12% cases followed by Giardia, E. histolytica and Isospora belli. The maximum diagnostic yield for coccidian parasites was with safranin-methylene blue staining technique. Parasitic burden contributes towards early morbidity in HIV infection. This study provides important information about prevalence of intestinal protozoan parasites in HIV infection. A combination of procedures should be carried out for the screening of stool specimens of HIV patients for better diagnosis and management.

  7. Unconventional actins and actin-binding proteins in human protozoan parasites.

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    Gupta, C M; Thiyagarajan, S; Sahasrabuddhe, A A

    2015-06-01

    Actin and its regulatory proteins play a key role in several essential cellular processes such as cell movement, intracellular trafficking and cytokinesis in most eukaryotes. While these proteins are highly conserved in higher eukaryotes, a number of unicellular eukaryotic organisms contain divergent forms of these proteins which have highly unusual biochemical and structural properties. Here, we review the biochemical and structural properties of these unconventional actins and their core binding proteins which are present in commonly occurring human protozoan parasites.

  8. [Metacaspases and their role in the life cycle of human protozoan parasites].

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    González, Iveth J

    2009-09-01

    Metacaspases are caspase-related cysteine-proteases that are present in organisms devoid of caspases such as plants, yeast, and protozoan parasites. Since caspases are important effector molecules in mammalian apoptosis, the possible role of metacaspases in programmed cell death has been evaluated in the organisms where they are expressed. In some species of the human protozoan parasites Trypanosoma spp. and Leishmania spp., metacaspases have been involved in programmed cell death, although a role of metacaspases in recycling processes in T. brucei has also been suggested. Metacaspases are also expressed in Plasmodium spp., however their role in these organisms is still unknown. More than one metacaspase gene is present in some of these parasites, which suggests that these proteins are physiologically redundant or have different functions depending on their localization and protein interactions. The catalytic activity of metacaspases is different from that of caspases-again noting that metacaspase genes are absent in mammals. These characteristics make metacaspases and their activating mechanisms interesting subjects of research in the development of new drug targets for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and malaria. A summary of the literature on metacaspases is provided, and Latin American researchers are encouraged to more actively explore the metacaspase potential.

  9. Detection and immunolocalization of human erythrocyte spectrin immunoanalogues in Toxoplasma gondii (Protozoan, Parasite).

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    Ghazali, M; Rodier, M H; el Moudni, B E; Babin, P; Fernandez, B; Jacquemin, J L

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrated here the presence of proteins antigenically related to human erythroid spectrin in the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. A high molecular weight doublet (M(r) 245-240,000), present in equimolar ratio, and low molecular weight poly-peptides (M(r) 75,000) were reacted with monoclonal and polyclonal anti-human erythroid spectrin antibodies on electroblotted nitro-cellulose sheets. Indirect immunofluorescence assay clearly showed that these proteins were localized in the anterior pole of the organism. Immunogold staining further revealed specific labeling of conoid, rhoptries, micronemes, and dense granules of the apical complex. The presence of the M(r) 245-240,000 doublet and the M(r) 75,000 spectrin-like proteins in the anterior pole of T. gondii may probably be consistent with a structural stabilizer function in its organelles which are suspected to be involved in the process of host cell invasion.

  10. Enteritis

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001149.htm Enteritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteritis is inflammation of the small intestine. Causes Enteritis ...

  11. Intracellular protozoan parasites of humans: the role of molecular chaperones in development and pathogenesis.

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    Shonhai, Addmore; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M; Blatch, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Certain kinetoplastid (Leishmania spp. and Tryapnosoma cruzi) and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii) are capable of invading human cells as part of their pathology. These parasites appear to have evolved a relatively expanded or diverse complement of genes encoding molecular chaperones. The gene families encoding heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones show significant expansion and diversity (especially for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi), and in particular the Hsp40 family appears to be an extreme example of phylogenetic radiation. In general, Hsp40 proteins act as co-chaperones of Hsp70 chaperones, forming protein folding pathways that integrate with Hsp90 to ensure proteostasis in the cell. It is tempting to speculate that the diverse environmental insults that these parasites endure have resulted in the evolutionary selection of a diverse and expanded chaperone network. Hsp90 is involved in development and growth of all of these intracellular parasites, and so far represents the strongest candidate as a target for chemotherapeutic interventions. While there have been some excellent studies on the molecular and cell biology of Hsp70 proteins, relatively little is known about the biological function of Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in these intracellular parasites. This review focuses on intracellular protozoan parasites of humans, and provides a critique of the role of heat shock proteins in development and pathogenesis, especially the molecular chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp40.

  12. Survey on the Ability of Wolbachia to Control Human Viral, Protozoan, and Filarial Disease Pathogens

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    Garedaghi Yagoob

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most human filarial nematode parasites and arthropods are hosts for a bacterial endosymbiont, Wolbachia. In filariasis, Wolbachia are required for normal development, fertility, and survival. However, in arthropods, Wolbachia are largely parasitic and can influence development and reproduction, but are generally not required for host survival. Materials and Methods: Due to their obligate nature in filarial parasites, Wolbachia have been a target for drug discovery initiatives using several approaches including diversity and focused library screening and genomic sequence analysis. Results: In vitro and in vivo anti-Wolbachia antibiotic treatments have been shown to have adulticidal activity, a long sought goal of filarial parasite drug discovery. In mosquitoes, it has been shown that the presence of Wolbachia can inhibit the transmission of certain viruses, such as dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, West Nile, as well as the infectivity of the malaria-causing protozoan, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. Conclusion: Wolbachia can cause a form of conditional sterility that can be used to suppress populations of mosquitoes and additional medically important insects. Thus, Wolbachia, a pandemic endosymbiont, offers great potential for elimination of a wide-variety of devastating human diseases.

  13. Functional characterization of peroxiredoxins from the human protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis.

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    Daniela Mastronicola

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis, causative of one of the most common human intestinal diseases worldwide, infects the mucosa of the proximal small intestine, where it has to cope with O2 and nitric oxide (NO. Elucidating the antioxidant defense system of this pathogen lacking catalase and other conventional antioxidant enzymes is thus important to unveil novel potential drug targets. Enzymes metabolizing O2, NO and superoxide anion (O2 (-• have been recently reported for Giardia, but it is yet unknown how the parasite copes with H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-. Giardia encodes two yet uncharacterized 2-cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs, GiPrx1a and GiPrx1b. Peroxiredoxins are peroxidases implicated in virulence and drug resistance in several parasitic protozoa, able to protect from nitroxidative stress and repair oxidatively damaged molecules. GiPrx1a and a truncated form of GiPrx1b (deltaGiPrx1b were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and functionally characterized. Both Prxs effectively metabolize H2O2 and alkyl-hydroperoxides (cumyl- and tert-butyl-hydroperoxide in the presence of NADPH and E. coli thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin as the reducing system. Stopped-flow experiments show that both proteins in the reduced state react with ONOO(- rapidly (k = 4×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 and 2×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 at 4°C, for GiPrx1a and deltaGiPrx1b, respectively. Consistent with a protective role against oxidative stress, expression of GiPrx1a (but not deltaGiPrx1b is induced in parasitic cells exposed to air O2 for 24 h. Based on these results, GiPrx1a and deltaGiPrx1b are suggested to play an important role in the antioxidant defense of Giardia, possibly contributing to pathogenesis.

  14. Phytocompounds for the control of human enteric viruses.

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    D'Souza, Doris H

    2014-02-01

    Plant extracts and associated polyphenols are known for their varied health benefits that include antioxidant effects and antimicrobial properties. The increasing consumer demand for cost-effective and natural alternatives to chemically-synthesized antimicrobials and therapeutics that are also sustainable makes the field of phytochemical research rather intriguing and challenging. Human enteric viruses are increasingly recognized worldwide as significant causes of human disease in adults and children, alike. In the absence of available vaccines for the human noroviruses, plant extracts are gaining popularity for the prevention and treatment of viral diseases. Research on plant extracts (particularly polyphenols derived from fruits) for human enteric virus control will be briefly summarized in this article.

  15. Correlation between CD4 counts of HIV patients and enteric protozoan in different seasons – An experience of a tertiary care hospital in Varanasi (India

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    Tuli Lekha

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protozoan infections are the most serious among all the superimposed infections in HIV patients and claim a number of lives every year. The line of treatment being different for diverse parasites necessitates a definitive diagnosis of the etiological agents to avoid empirical treatment. Thus, the present study has been aimed to elucidate the associations between diarrhoea and CD4 counts and to study the effect of HAART along with management of diarrhoea in HIV positive patients. This study is the first of its kind in this area where an attempt was made to correlate seasonal variation and intestinal protozoan infestations. Methods The study period was from January 2006 to October 2007 wherein stool samples were collected from 366 HIV positive patients with diarrhea attending the ART centre, inpatient department and ICTC of S.S. hospital, I.M.S., B.H.U., Varanasi. Simultaneously, CD4 counts were recorded to assess the status of HIV infection vis-à-vis parasitic infection. The identification of pathogens was done on the basis of direct microscopy and different staining techniques. Results Of the 366 patients, 112 had acute and 254 had chronic diarrhea. The percentages of intestinal protozoa detected were 78.5% in acute and 50.7% in chronic cases respectively. Immune restoration was observed in 36.6% patients after treatment on the basis of clinical observation and CD4 counts. In 39.8% of HIV positive cases Cryptosporidium spp. was detected followed by Microsporidia spp. (26.7%. The highest incidence of intestinal infection was in the rainy season. However, infection with Cyclospora spp. was at its peak in the summer. Patients with chronic diarrhea had lower CD4 cell counts. The maximum parasitic isolation was in the patients whose CD4 cell counts were below 200 cells/μl. Conclusion There was an inverse relation between the CD4 counts and duration of diarrhea. Cryptosporidium spp. was isolated maximum among all the parasites in

  16. Localization of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate to lipid rafts and uroids in the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

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    Koushik, Amrita B; Powell, Rhonda R; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2013-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal protozoan parasite and is the causative agent of amoebiasis. During invasive infection, highly motile amoebae destroy the colonic epithelium, enter the blood circulation, and disseminate to other organs such as liver, causing liver abscess. Motility is a key factor in E. histolytica pathogenesis, and this process relies on a dynamic actomyosin cytoskeleton. In other systems, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is known to regulate a wide variety of cellular functions, including signal transduction, actin remodeling, and cell motility. Little is known about the role of PI(4,5)P2 in E. histolytica pathogenicity. In this study, we demonstrate that PI(4,5)P2 is localized to cholesterol-rich microdomains, lipid rafts, and the actin-rich fractions of the E. histolytica membrane. Microscopy revealed that the trailing edge of polarized trophozoites, uroids, are highly enriched in lipid rafts and their constituent lipid, PI(4,5)P2. Polarization and enrichment of uroids and rafts with PI(4,5)P2 were enhanced upon treatment of E. histolytica cells with cholesterol. Exposure to cholesterol also increased intracellular calcium, which is a downstream effector of PI(4,5)P2, with a concomitant increase in motility. Together, our data suggest that in E. histolytica, PI(4,5)P2 may signal from lipid rafts and cholesterol may play a role in triggering PI(4,5)P2-mediated signaling to enhance the motility of this pathogen.

  17. Early enteral feeding with human milk for VLBW infants.

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    De Nisi, G; Berti, M; De Nisi, M; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    In a NICU early enteral feeding is usually possible only when the newborn clinical conditions permit it. Because of the frequent need of umbilical/central catheters, they usually start with parenteral feeding and/or with minimal enteral feeding (trophic feeding). This kind of management is even more frequent in VLBWIs, in which the risk of NEC is very high. In this work we describe a model of early enteral exclusive feeding (EEEF) based on the use of banking human milk followed by mother milk. In the Centre of Neonatology of Trento, as in other Centers, the newborns weighing less than 750g or with a GE 26 weeks define a group in which we find critical neonates, who can not be treated with enteral feeding, and neonates whose clinical conditions permit EEEF. In particular, in a period of 16 years (1994-2009) in Trento, 308 newborns weighing 750-1249 g and GE > than 26 weeks were admitted. The 90,9 % has been treated with prenatal steroids, the 91,9 % was inborn, the 96,1% survived. In the 59,1 % of the cases (175) we gave EEEF. We could continue with a complete EEEF in the 40,2 % of the total (119 cases). The characteristics of these neonates and our centre management, based mainly on early use of banking human milk and mother milk, are detailed described.

  18. Dysfunctions at human intestinal barrier by water-borne protozoan parasites: lessons from cultured human fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines.

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    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-06-01

    Some water-borne protozoan parasites induce diseases through their membrane-associated functional structures and virulence factors that hijack the host cellular molecules and signalling pathways leading to structural and functional lesions in the intestinal barrier. In this Microreview we analyse the insights on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Entamoeba intestinalis, Giardia and Cryptosporidium observed in the human colon carcinoma fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines, cell subpopulations and clones expressing the structural and functional characteristics of highly specialized fully differentiated epithelial cells lining the intestinal epithelium and mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal barrier. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Protozoan Infections

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    1989-01-01

    cooked meat of infected animals, especially sheep and pigs. Toxoplasma infects one-third to one-half of normal humans by age 40, but causes...Toxoplasma in the first trimester, 30-50 per cent deliver an obviously affected infant. Congenital infection is associated with hydrocephalus...chorioretinitis, hepatosplenomegaly, and rash. In survivors, mental retardation, deaf- ness, and cardiac malformations may be noted. Chorioretinitis may also

  20. Protozoan Parasites.

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    Custodio, Haidee

    2016-02-01

    fetus/infant or decrease infectious sequelae to the fetus. (2) • On the basis of growing research evidence as well as consensus, trichomoniasis is associated with many health-related concerns, including adverse pregnancy outcomes and increased risk of acquisition and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. (3)(25) Similar to toxoplasmosis,many infections are asymptomatic, and the true public health impact of trichomoniasis is difficult to define. Further research is warranted.

  1. Exploring in vitro and in vivo Hsp90 inhibitors activity against human protozoan parasites.

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    Giannini, Giuseppe; Battistuzzi, Gianfranco

    2015-02-01

    A set of compounds, previously selected as potent Hsp90α inhibitors, has been studied on a panel of human parasites. 5-Aryl-3,4-isoxazolediamide derivatives (1) were active against two protozoa, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Plasmodium falciparum, with a good tolerability toward cytotoxicity on non-malignant L6 rat myoblast cell line, unlike the 1,5-diaryl,4-carboxamides-1,2,3-triazole derivatives (2) which, while showing a single-digit nM range activity against the same protozoa, were also highly cytotoxic on L6 cells. In a subsequent in vivo study, two isoxazolediamide derivatives, 1a and 1b, were very efficacious on the sleeping sickness-causing agent with a clear parasitaemia during treatment. These data, however, showed that not all protozoa are sensitive to Hsp90 inhibitors, as well as not all Hsp90 inhibitors are equally active on parasites.

  2. Lecithin decreases human milk fat loss during enteral pumping.

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    Chan, Melissa M; Nohara, Masaru; Chan, Benjamin R; Curtis, Julie; Chan, Gary M

    2003-05-01

    The fat content of human milk provides the majority of calories for infants. However, large fat losses in human milk have been observed using enteral pump systems, causing poor growth in infants. The fat may adhere in the pump system. Lecithin, a phospholipid, has been used in the food industry as a lipophilic emulsifier of fats. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of lecithin on the delivery of human milk fat from an enteral pump. It is hypothesized that the addition of lecithin would decrease the fat loss during human milk delivery. Six mothers at a mature stage of lactation (>4 weeks of lactation) donated human milk. The human milk samples were stored separately at -20 degrees C before analysis and evaluated individually. The fat content of the milk samples was estimated by the creamatocrit method, in which the samples were centrifuged in a standard hematocrit tube and the fat layer read with vernier calipers and expressed as a percentage of the length of the milk column to the nearest 0.5%. The accuracy of this method is 92%. The Kangaroo 324 Feeding Pump (Sherwood Medical, St. Louis, MO) was used as the continuous pump system. The human milk samples were divided into either control samples without lecithin or with lecithin (1 or 0.5 g soy lecithin dissolved in 50 mL milk). All samples were pumped at 10 to 50 mL/h for at least 4 hours. The pumped milk was collected in an iced container, and creamatocrits were determined in duplicate. There was significant fat loss in the control milk samples compared with the milk samples with added lecithin. The average fat loss was 58% +/- 13% for control samples and 55% +/- 26% for the milk with 0.5 g soy lecithin. Milk with 1 g soy lecithin averaged 2% +/- 2% fat loss. The pumping rate had no effect on fat loss. The greatest fat loss (70% +/- 6%)occurred during the first 4 hours of pumping. The addition of 1 g soy lecithin per 50 mL milk decreased the human milk fat loss during intermittent pumping and may

  3. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

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    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  4. Involvement of the actin cytoskeleton and p21rho-family GTPases in the pathogenesis of the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

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    G.D. Godbold

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that infection with the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills more than 50,000 people a year. Central to the pathogenesis of this organism is its ability to directly lyse host cells and cause tissue destruction. Amebic lesions show evidence of cell lysis, tissue necrosis, and damage to the extracellular matrix. The specific molecular mechanisms by which these events are initiated, transmitted, and effected are just beginning to be uncovered. In this article we review what is known about host cell adherence and contact-dependent cytolysis. We cover the involvement of the actin cytoskeleton and small GTP-binding proteins of the p21rho-family in the process of cell killing and phagocytosis, and also look at how amebic interactions with molecules of the extracellular matrix contribute to its cytopathic effects.

  5. Metabolomics and protozoan parasites.

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    Paget, Timothy; Haroune, Nicolas; Bagchi, Sushmita; Jarroll, Edward

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we examine the state-of-the-art technologies (gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance, etc.) in the well-established area of metabolomics especially as they relate to protozoan parasites.

  6. Foodborne protozoan parasites.

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    Dawson, David

    2005-08-25

    This report addresses Cryptosporidium, Giardia, Cyclospora, and more briefly, Toxoplasma as the main parasitic protozoa of concern to food production worldwide. Other parasitic protozoa may be spread in food or water but are not considered as great a risk to food manufacture. The protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have proven potential to cause waterborne and foodborne disease. Toxoplasma gondii has been considered a risk in specific cases, but humans are not its primary host. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are widespread in the environment, particularly the aquatic environment, and major outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis have occurred as a result of contaminated drinking water. Large outbreaks of waterborne cyclosporiasis have not been identified. Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora have potential significance in the preparation and consumption of fresh produce and in catering practice, in which ready-to-eat foods may be served that have not received heat treatment. None of the three organisms Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and Cyclospora has been shown to be a problem for heat processed food or tap water that has undergone appropriate treatment at a water treatment works. All three are sensitive to standard pasteurisation techniques. Although humans are not a primary host for T. gondii, the potential exists for both waterborne and foodborne toxoplasmosis. Parasitic protozoa do not multiply in foods, but they may survive in or on moist foods for months in cool, damp environments. Their ecology makes control of these parasites difficult. For general control of parasitic protozoa in the food chain, the following steps are necessary: - Follow good hygienic practice in food service and catering industries.- Minimise dissemination of cysts and oocysts in the farming environment and via human waste management.- Include these microorganisms in Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plans of water suppliers, industries or sectors

  7. Round-robin comparison of methods for the detection of human enteric viruses in lettuce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Guyader, Francoise S.; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Haugarreau, Larissa

    2004-01-01

    Five methods that detect human enteric virus contamination in lettuce were compared. To mimic multiple contaminations as observed after sewage contamination, artificial contamination was with human calicivirus and poliovirus and animal calicivirus strains at different concentrations. Nucleic acid...

  8. Human enteric pathogen internalization by root uptake into food crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an increasing number of outbreaks and illnesses associated with pre-harvest contaminated produce, understanding the potential and mechanisms of produce contamination by enteric pathogens can aid in the development of preventative measures and post-harvest processing to reduce microbial populati...

  9. Seasonality in human zoonotic enteric diseases: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Lal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although seasonality is a defining characteristic of many infectious diseases, few studies have described and compared seasonal patterns across diseases globally, impeding our understanding of putative mechanisms. Here, we review seasonal patterns across five enteric zoonotic diseases: campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, vero-cytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC, cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis in the context of two primary drivers of seasonality: (i environmental effects on pathogen occurrence and pathogen-host associations and (ii population characteristics/behaviour. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically reviewed published literature from 1960-2010, resulting in the review of 86 studies across the five diseases. The Gini coefficient compared temporal variations in incidence across diseases and the monthly seasonality index characterised timing of seasonal peaks. Consistent seasonal patterns across transnational boundaries, albeit with regional variations was observed. The bacterial diseases all had a distinct summer peak, with identical Gini values for campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis (0.22 and a higher index for VTEC (Gini  0.36. Cryptosporidiosis displayed a bi-modal peak with spring and summer highs and the most marked temporal variation (Gini = 0.39. Giardiasis showed a relatively small summer increase and was the least variable (Gini = 0.18. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Seasonal variation in enteric zoonotic diseases is ubiquitous, with regional variations highlighting complex environment-pathogen-host interactions. Results suggest that proximal environmental influences and host population dynamics, together with distal, longer-term climatic variability could have important direct and indirect consequences for future enteric disease risk. Additional understanding of the concerted influence of these factors on disease patterns may improve assessment and prediction of enteric disease burden in temperate

  10. Human mast cell mediator cocktail excites neurons in human and guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemann, M; Michel, K; Ceregrzyn, M; Zeller, F; Seidl, S; Bischoff, S C

    2005-04-01

    Neuroimmune interactions are an integral part of gut physiology and involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and functional bowel disorders. Mast cells and their mediators are important conveyors in the communication from the innate enteric immune system to the enteric nervous system (ENS). However, it is not known whether a mediator cocktail released from activated human mast cells affects neural activity in the ENS. We used the Multi-Site Optical Recording Technique to image single cell activity in guinea-pig and human ENS after application of a mast cell mediator cocktail (MCMC) that was released from isolated human intestinal mucosa mast cells stimulated by IgE-receptor cross-linking. Local application of MCMC onto individual ganglia evoked an excitatory response consisting of action potential discharge. This excitatory response occurred in 31%, 38% or 11% neurons of guinea-pig submucous plexus, human submucous plexus, or guinea-pig myenteric plexus, respectively. Compound action potentials from nerve fibres or fast excitatory synaptic inputs were not affected by MCMC. This study demonstrates immunoneural signalling in the human gut and revealed for the first time that an MCMC released from stimulated human intestinal mast cells induces excitatory actions in the human and guinea-pig ENS.

  11. A genomewide overexpression screen identifies genes involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in the human protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koushik, Amrita B; Welter, Brenda H; Rock, Michelle L; Temesvari, Lesly A

    2014-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. E. histolytica relies on motility, phagocytosis, host cell adhesion, and proteolysis of extracellular matrix for virulence. In eukaryotic cells, these processes are mediated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Thus, PI3K may be critical for virulence. We utilized a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose products may operate in the PI3K pathway in E. histolytica. We treated a population of trophozoites that were overexpressing genes from a cDNA library with a near-lethal dose of the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. This screen was based on the rationale that survivors would be overexpressing gene products that directly or indirectly function in the PI3K pathway. We sequenced the overexpressed genes in survivors and identified a cDNA encoding a Rap GTPase, a protein previously shown to participate in the PI3K pathway. This supports the validity of our approach. Genes encoding a coactosin-like protein, EhCoactosin, and a serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) were also identified. Cells overexpressing EhCoactosin or SREHP were also less sensitive to a second PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. This corroborates the link between these proteins and PI3K. Finally, a mutant cell line with an increased level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, the product of PI3K activity, exhibited increased expression of SREHP and EhCoactosin. This further supports the functional connection between these proteins and PI3K in E. histolytica. To our knowledge, this is the first forward-genetics screen adapted to reveal genes participating in a signal transduction pathway in this pathogen.

  12. Rhodococcus equi human clinical isolates enter and survive within human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Vivas, J; Pilares-Ortega, L; Remuzgo-Martínez, S; Padilla, D; Gutiérrez-Díaz, J L; Navas-Méndez, J

    2011-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an emerging opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people, especially those infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathogen resides primarily within lung macrophages of infected patients, which may explain in part its ability to escape normal pulmonary defense mechanisms. Despite numerous studies as a pulmonary pathogen in foals, where a plasmid seems to play an important role in virulence, information on the pathogenesis of this pathogen in humans is still scarce. In this study, fluorescence microscopy and vancomycin protection assays were used to investigate the ability of R. equi human isolates to adhere to and to invade the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549. Our findings indicate that some R. equi clinical strains are capable of adhering, entering and surviving within the alveolar cell line, which may contribute to the pathogen persistence in lung tissues. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Gelatinization of Enteral Nutrients on Human Gastric Emptying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Naruo; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Odaira, Hironori; Noro, Takuji; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2010-06-01

    Gastrointestinal side effects, particularly diarrhea, are still the main reasons for discontinuation of enteral nutrition. Gelatinization of liquid meal for the prevention of diarrhea has been reported as effective. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of gelatinization of liquid meal on gastric emptying. Ten healthy volunteers were studied two times, with 2-week interval between tests. The total calorific value was set at 225 kcal, and 3 test meals were prepared: liquid meal and 2 types of gelatinized meals. These 2 types of gelatinized meals are different viscosity. (13)C-sodium acetate (100 mg) was thoroughly mixed, and exhaled air was sampled. The results of gastric emptying were expressed as the time of peak excretion (Tmax), and absorption was expressed as the area under the (13)CO2 curve up to Tmax (AUC-Tmax). At the same time, blood samples were collected to measure levels of blood glucose, insulin and gastrin. The mean value of Tmax were 52.0, 77.3 and 85.6 min. Compared to liquid meal, gastric emptying for gelatinized meals was significantly delayed. The mean value of AUC-Tmax were 22.7, 28.7 and 33.7%dose, respectively, and no significant differences in absorption were seen. No significant differences existed in blood glucose, gastrin and insulin. Gelatinization of liquid meal delays gastric emptying. Gelatinized liquid meal may be useful for the management of diarrhea accompanied with enteral nutrition without influencing gastrointestinal hormone and blood glucose.

  14. Comparison of methods for evaluating the thermal stability of human enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Sabastine E; Gibson, Kristen E

    2015-03-01

    Human enteric viruses have been identified as one of the predominant causative agents of food-borne illnesses in developed countries, and it is estimated that human norovirus accounts for a majority of these illnesses each year. Not all of these viruses can be cultured and hence relatively little is known about their pathogenesis and physicochemical properties. To overcome this, researchers have utilized different virus surrogates for the study of non-cultivable human enteric viruses. In this review, we discuss various methods utilized for the evaluation of the thermal stability of human enteric viruses, compare the results of these methods, and examine how researchers may move toward a single standard approach (i.e., temperatures, virus concentrations, volume/weight of matrices, etc.) for determining thermal inactivation profiles of human enteric viruses and their surrogates. Based on our review, we found that temperature, time of exposure, type of matrix, analysis type, type of heat application, and the concentration and volume of virus used in the experiments were highly variable across virus surrogates even for the same surrogates. Because of these differences-along with the inherent limitations of using surrogate viruses-comparison of these methods and how the results may be extrapolated to human enteric viruses is quite challenging. As a result, we discuss how researchers may move toward a single standard approach for determining thermal inactivation profiles of human enteric viruses and their surrogates.

  15. Effects of Gelatinization of Enteral Nutrients on Human Gastric Emptying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Naruo; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Odaira, Hironori; Noro, Takuji; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal side effects, particularly diarrhea, are still the main reasons for discontinuation of enteral nutrition. Gelatinization of liquid meal for the prevention of diarrhea has been reported as effective. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of gelatinization of liquid meal on gastric emptying. Methods Ten healthy volunteers were studied two times, with 2-week interval between tests. The total calorific value was set at 225 kcal, and 3 test meals were prepared: liquid meal and 2 types of gelatinized meals. These 2 types of gelatinized meals are different viscosity. 13C-sodium acetate (100 mg) was thoroughly mixed, and exhaled air was sampled. The results of gastric emptying were expressed as the time of peak excretion (Tmax), and absorption was expressed as the area under the 13CO2 curve up to Tmax (AUC-Tmax). At the same time, blood samples were collected to measure levels of blood glucose, insulin and gastrin. Results The mean value of Tmax were 52.0, 77.3 and 85.6 min. Compared to liquid meal, gastric emptying for gelatinized meals was significantly delayed. The mean value of AUC-Tmax were 22.7, 28.7 and 33.7%dose, respectively, and no significant differences in absorption were seen. No significant differences existed in blood glucose, gastrin and insulin. Conclusions Gelatinization of liquid meal delays gastric emptying. Gelatinized liquid meal may be useful for the management of diarrhea accompanied with enteral nutrition without influencing gastrointestinal hormone and blood glucose. PMID:27942287

  16. Energy enters guilty plea. [Department of Energy human experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhijani, A. (Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, Takoma Park, MD (United States))

    This article discusses the history leading up to the admission from Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary that the Energy Department had conducted secret, dangerous, and immoral experiments on the American people. The article describes some of the experimentation on human subjects, attempts to identify the rationale behind exposing human subjects to radiation, and discusses the lack of ethics displayed by the Energy Department in both its experimentation and in its analysis of results. 16 refs.

  17. First reported case of Campylobacter lanienae enteritis in a human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Frédéric; Bekal, Sadjia; Frost, Eric H.; Michaud, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Campylobacters are the most frequently identified bacteria causing diarrhoea in humans worldwide. Campylobacter lanienae was isolated for the first time in 2000 from faecal samples of two asymptomatic abattoir workers in Switzerland during a routine hygiene screen, but has never been associated with human disease. Case presentation: At hospital admission, the patient reported diarrhoea, lower abdominal cramps, nausea, one episode of bilious vomiting and low-grade fever of 38 °C. The patient was having 10 or more diarrheic stools per day as well as during the night, and had noticed blood mixed with the stools on several occasions. Stool cultures were negative for species of Salmonella and Shigella, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica, but were positive for C. lanienae. Identification was made by classical biochemical testing, as well as 16S rRNA gene and cpn60 sequencing. The patient slowly improved without antibiotic treatment and was discharged nine days after admission with complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusion: On the whole it seems very likely that C. lanienae was the causative agent. Clinical microbiologists should be aware of this micro-organism which can be identified by phenotypic and molecular methods. The real burden of C. lanienae infection in humans might be underestimated and should be further investigated as a potential cause of human diarrhoea disease.

  18. Humanized HLA-DR4 mice fed with the protozoan pathogen of oysters Perkinsus marinus (Dermo do not develop noticeable pathology but elicit systemic immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wathsala Wijayalath

    Full Text Available Perkinsus marinus (Phylum Perkinsozoa is a marine protozoan parasite responsible for "Dermo" disease in oysters, which has caused extensive damage to the shellfish industry and estuarine environment. The infection prevalence has been estimated in some areas to be as high as 100%, often causing death of infected oysters within 1-2 years post-infection. Human consumption of the parasites via infected oysters is thus likely to occur, but to our knowledge the effect of oral consumption of P. marinus has not been investigated in humans or other mammals. To address the question we used humanized mice expressing HLA-DR4 molecules and lacking expression of mouse MHC-class II molecules (DR4.EA(0 in such a way that CD4 T cell responses are solely restricted by the human HLA-DR4 molecule. The DR4.EA(0 mice did not develop diarrhea or any detectable pathology in the gastrointestinal tract or lungs following single or repeated feedings with live P. marinus parasites. Furthermore, lymphocyte populations in the gut associated lymphoid tissue and spleen were unaltered in the parasite-fed mice ruling out local or systemic inflammation. Notably, naïve DR4.EA(0 mice had antibodies (IgM and IgG reacting against P. marinus parasites whereas parasite specific T cell responses were undetectable. Feeding with P. marinus boosted the antibody responses and stimulated specific cellular (IFNγ immunity to the oyster parasite. Our data indicate the ability of P. marinus parasites to induce systemic immunity in DR4.EA(0 mice without causing noticeable pathology, and support rationale grounds for using genetically engineered P. marinus as a new oral vaccine platform to induce systemic immunity against infectious agents.

  19. The glyoxalase pathway in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Silva, Marta; Ferreira, António E N; Gomes, Ricardo; Tomás, Ana M; Ponces Freire, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    The glyoxalase system is the main catabolic route for methylglyoxal, a non-enzymatic glycolytic byproduct with toxic and mutagenic effects. This pathway includes two enzymes, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, which convert methylglyoxal to d-lactate by using glutathione as a catalytic cofactor. In protozoan parasites the glyoxalase system shows marked deviations from this model. For example, the functional replacement of glutathione by trypanothione (a spermidine-glutathione conjugate) is a characteristic of trypanosomatids. Also interesting are the lack of glyoxalase I and the presence of two glyoxalase II enzymes in Trypanosoma brucei. In Plasmodium falciparum the glyoxalase pathway is glutathione-dependent, and glyoxalase I is an atypical monomeric enzyme with two active sites. Although it is tempting to exploit these differences for their potential therapeutic value, they provide invaluable clues regarding methylglyoxal metabolism and the evolution of protozoan parasites. Glyoxalase enzymes have been characterized in only a few protozoan parasites, namely Plasmodium falciparum and the trypanosomatids Leishmania and Trypanosoma. In this review, we will focus on the key features of the glyoxalase pathway in major human protozoan parasites, with particular emphasis on the characterized systems in Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. We will also search for genes encoding glyoxalase I and II in Toxoplasma gondii, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia lamblia.

  20. Human enteric viruses–potential indicators for enhanced monitoring of recreational water quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erin; Allmann; Updyke; Zi; Wang; Si; Sun; Christina; Connell; Marek; Kirs; Mayee; Wong; Yuanan; Lu

    2015-01-01

    Recreational waters contaminated with human fecal pollution are a public health concern, and ensuring the safety of recreational waters for public use is a priority of both the Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC). Current recreational water standards rely on fecal indicator bacteria(FIB) levels as indicators of human disease risk. However present evidence indicates that levels of FIB do not always correspond to the presence of other potentially harmful organisms, such as viruses. Thus, enteric viruses are currently tested as water quality indicators, but have yet to be successfully implemented in routine monitoring of water quality. This study utilized enteric viruses as possible alternative indicators of water quality to examine 18 different fresh and offshore recreational waters on O‘ahu, Hawai‘i, by using newly established laboratory techniques including highly optimized PCR, real time PCR, and viral infectivity assays. All sample sites were detected positive for human enteric viruses by PCR including enterovirus, norovirus genogroups I and II, and male specific FRNA coliphage. A six time-point seasonal study of enteric virus presence indicated significant variation in virus detection between the rainy and dry seasons. Quantitative PCR detected the presence of norovirus genogroup II at levels at which disease risk may occur, and there was no correlation found between enteric virus presence and FIB counts. Under the present laboratory conditions, no infectious viruses were detected from the samples PCR-positive for enteric viruses. These data emphasize both the need for additional indicators for improved monitoring of water quality, and the feasibility of using enteric viruses as these indicators.

  1. Subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes contribute to resistance against experimental infection with a human protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana R Dominguez

    Full Text Available During adaptive immune response, pathogen-specific CD8(+ T cells recognize preferentially a small number of epitopes, a phenomenon known as immunodominance. Its biological implications during natural or vaccine-induced immune responses are still unclear. Earlier, we have shown that during experimental infection, the human intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi restricts the repertoire of CD8(+ T cells generating strong immunodominance. We hypothesized that this phenomenon could be a mechanism used by the parasite to reduce the breath and magnitude of the immune response, favoring parasitism, and thus that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire could favor the host. Here, we confirmed our previous observation by showing that CD8(+ T cells of H-2(a infected mice recognized a single epitope of an immunodominant antigen of the trans-sialidase super-family. In sharp contrast, CD8(+ T cells from mice immunized with recombinant genetic vaccines (plasmid DNA and adenovirus expressing this same T. cruzi antigen recognized, in addition to the immunodominant epitope, two other subdominant epitopes. This unexpected observation allowed us to test the protective role of the immune response to subdominant epitopes. This was accomplished by genetic vaccination of mice with mutated genes that did not express a functional immunodominant epitope. We found that these mice developed immune responses directed solely to the subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes and a significant degree of protective immunity against infection mediated by CD8(+ T cells. We concluded that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire contributes to host resistance against infection, a finding that has implications for the host-parasite relationship and vaccine development.

  2. Groundwater sampling methods using glass wool filtration to trace human enteric viruses in Madison, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses have been detected in the Madison, Wisconsin deep municipal well system. Earlier projects by the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) have used glass wool filters to sample groundwater for these viruses directly from the deep municipal wells. Polymerase chain...

  3. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1--low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2--the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3--knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  4. The role of extracellular vesicles in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Mantel, Pierre-Yves; MARTI, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Protozoan parasites and other microorganisms use various pathways to communicate within their own populations and to manipulate their outside environments, with the ultimate goal of balancing the rate of growth and transmission. In higher eukaryotes, including humans, circulating extracellular vesicles are increasingly recognized as key mediators of physiological and pathological processes. Recent evidence suggests that protozoan parasites, including those responsible for major human diseases...

  5. Round-robin comparison of methods for the detection of human enteric viruses in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guyader, Françoise S; Schultz, Anna-Charlotte; Haugarreau, Larissa; Croci, Luciana; Maunula, Leena; Duizer, Erwin; Lodder-Verschoor, Froukje; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Suffredini, Elizabetha; van der Poel, Wim M M; Reymundo, Rosanna; Koopmans, Marion

    2004-10-01

    Five methods that detect human enteric virus contamination in lettuce were compared. To mimic multiple contaminations as observed after sewage contamination, artificial contamination was with human calicivirus and poliovirus and animal calicivirus strains at different concentrations. Nucleic acid extractions were done at the same time in the same laboratory to reduce assay-to-assay variability. Results showed that the two critical steps are the washing step and removal of inhibitors. The more reliable methods (sensitivity, simplicity, low cost) included an elution/concentration step and a commercial kit. Such development of sensitive methods for viral detection in foods other than shellfish is important to improve food safety.

  6. Human therapeutic and agricultural uses of antibacterial drugs and resistance of the enteric flora of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D; Huber, W G; Drysdale, S

    1975-11-01

    Fecal samples were collected from five groups of people differing in the manner of their exposure to antibacterial drugs. The groups included: (i) people working on farms who were continuously in contact with the predominantly resistant florae of farm animals receiving rations containing antibacterial drugs, (ii) people residing on the same farms with no direct exposure to the farm animals, (iii) people treated with antibacterial drugs, (iv) untreated people residing with treated individuals, and (v) untreated people with no exposure to farm animals or treated individuals. The samples were examined by quantitative plating for proportions of antibiotic-resistant, gram-negative enteric organisms. Individual isolates were also examined for their susceptibility to 11 different antibacterial drugs. The results indicate that enteric florae unexposed directly to the selective effects of antibacterial drugs may be affected by contact with predominantly resistant florae directly exposed to antibacterial drugs.

  7. Human Metapneumovirus Is Capable of Entering Cells by Fusion with Endosomal Membranes.

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    Reagan G Cox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a leading cause of lower respiratory illness. Although receptor binding is thought to initiate fusion at the plasma membrane for paramyxoviruses, the entry mechanism for HMPV is largely uncharacterized. Here we sought to determine whether HMPV initiates fusion at the plasma membrane or following internalization. To study the HMPV entry process in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B cells, we used fluorescence microscopy, an R18-dequenching fusion assay, and developed a quantitative, fluorescence microscopy assay to follow virus binding, internalization, membrane fusion, and visualize the cellular site of HMPV fusion. We found that HMPV particles are internalized into human bronchial epithelial cells before fusing with endosomes. Using chemical inhibitors and RNA interference, we determined that HMPV particles are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a dynamin-dependent manner. HMPV fusion and productive infection are promoted by RGD-binding integrin engagement, internalization, actin polymerization, and dynamin. Further, HMPV fusion is pH-independent, although infection with rare strains is modestly inhibited by RNA interference or chemical inhibition of endosomal acidification. Thus, HMPV can enter via endocytosis, but the viral fusion machinery is not triggered by low pH. Together, our results indicate that HMPV is capable of entering host cells by multiple pathways, including membrane fusion from endosomal compartments.

  8. Innervation of enteric mast cells by primary spinal afferents in guinea pig and human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Qu, Meihua; Xia, Yun; Needleman, Bradley J; Mikami, Dean J; Wood, Jackie D

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells express the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immunoassay showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin released SP and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system. The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin neurokinin 1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease-activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell-stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by 1) exposure to SP or CGRP, 2) capsaicin, 3) compound 48/80, 4) elevation of mast cell Ca²⁺ by ionophore A23187, and 5) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers cromolyn and doxantrazole suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by SP, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents, or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in a diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of enteric nervous system neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.

  9. Necrotizing Lung Infection Caused by the Protozoan Balantidium coli

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    Sat Sharma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs.

  10. Sending a message: extracellular vesicles of pathogenic protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szempruch, Anthony J; Dennison, Lauren; Kieft, Rudo; Harrington, John M; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2016-11-01

    Parasitic unicellular eukaryotes use extracellular vesicles (EVs) as vehicles for intercellular communication and host manipulation. By using various mechanisms to generate EVs and by transferring a wide range of molecules through EVs, pathogenic protozoans are able to establish infective niches, modulate the immune system of the host and cause disease. In addition to effects on the host, EVs are able to transfer virulence factors, drug-resistance genes and differentiation factors between parasites. In this Progress article, we explore recent insights into the biology of EVs from human infectious protozoan parasites, including Trichomonas vaginalis, Plasmodium spp. and kinetoplastids, such as Trypanosoma spp. and Leishmania spp.

  11. First molecular characterization of enteric protozoa and the human pathogenic microsporidian, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, in captive snakes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md Robiul; Yu, Fuchang; Li, Jian; Li, Junqiang; Zhang, Longxian; Wang, Rongjun; Rume, Farzana Islam; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Sumei; Ning, Changshen

    2014-08-01

    Enteric protozoa are frequently found in snakes. Nevertheless, few studies regarding genetic characterization of these parasites have been carried out. We describe here the first molecular survey of protozoan pathogens from snakes in China and the first report on Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotyping in snakes in the world. Here, 240 fecal specimens were collected from two species of captive snakes, Naja naja (Indian cobra) and Ptyas mucosus (Oriental rat snake), in Guangxi Province, China, and examined by PCR amplification of the small subunit-ribosomal RNA of enteric protozoa and the internal transcribed spacer of ribosomal RNA of E. bieneusi. Cryptosporidium serpentis was identified in three specimens (2.1%) of Oriental rat snakes. Caryospora was found in 5.4% specimens, including eight from cobras (8.1%) and five from rat snakes (3.6%), and represented six new species-Caryospora sp. SKC-2014a to Caryospora sp. SKC-2014 f. Three new Eimeria species, Eimeria sp. SKE-2014a to Eimeria sp. SKE-2014c, were detected in three specimens (2.1%) from rat snakes. Additionally, Sarcocystis sp. SKS-2014 was detected in one specimen from a cobra. The infection rates of E. bieneusi were 3.0% in cobras and 5.7% in rat snakes. Sequence analysis of 11 PCR products revealed the presence of six E. bieneusi genotypes-two known genotypes (type IV and Henan V) and four new genotypes (CRep-1 to CRep-4). All six E. bieneusi genotypes belonged to the zoonotic group (group 1). This result raised the possibility that E. bieneusi could be present in animals consumed by snakes. This should be taken into consideration to better understand the diversity of the parasite, its transmission through the predator-prey relationship, and public health implications.

  12. Glucose-coated gold nanoparticles transfer across human brain endothelium and enter astrocytes in vitro.

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    Radka Gromnicova

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier prevents the entry of many therapeutic agents into the brain. Various nanocarriers have been developed to help agents to cross this barrier, but they all have limitations, with regard to tissue-selectivity and their ability to cross the endothelium. This study investigated the potential for 4 nm coated gold nanoparticles to act as selective carriers across human brain endothelium and subsequently to enter astrocytes. The transfer rate of glucose-coated gold nanoparticles across primary human brain endothelium was at least three times faster than across non-brain endothelia. Movement of these nanoparticles occurred across the apical and basal plasma membranes via the cytosol with relatively little vesicular or paracellular migration; antibiotics that interfere with vesicular transport did not block migration. The transfer rate was also dependent on the surface coating of the nanoparticle and incubation temperature. Using a novel 3-dimensional co-culture system, which includes primary human astrocytes and a brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3, we demonstrated that the glucose-coated nanoparticles traverse the endothelium, move through the extracellular matrix and localize in astrocytes. The movement of the nanoparticles through the matrix was >10 µm/hour and they appeared in the nuclei of the astrocytes in considerable numbers. These nanoparticles have the correct properties for efficient and selective carriers of therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier.

  13. [Biology, epidemiology and diagnostics of pathogenic waterborne protozoan parasites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leońska-Duniec, Agata; Adamska, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, Giardia intestinalis, Cyclospora cayetanensis, Isosopra belli and micropsoridia are the most important and common pathogens found in humans and many other species of vertebrates. In humans, mainly in immunocompromised patients, children, pregnant women and elderly people, they are the most frequently identified protozoan parasites causing gastrointestinal disease worldwide. These pathogens have several transmission routes, including anthroponotic and zoonotic transmission. What is more, in many cases of epidemics caused by mentioned pathogens the major cause of infection was contaminated with these organisms water and food. In spite of many existing regulations of clearing and making use of drinking water supplies and recreational water, cosmopolitan protozoan parasites are still the danger of public health. These organisms are responsible for many waterborne outbreaks worldwide. Light microscopy and immunofluorescence assay have been used to identify these organisms in most laboratories. However, these traditional techniques have major limitations in the specific diagnosis, these methods are not sensitive enough to detect cysts or oocysts in environmental samples, so the new molecular tools must be applied. Recently, PCR-based techniques have been developed for detection and genetic characterization of the different species and population variants of protozoan parasites is central to the prevention, surveillance and control of gastrointestinal diseases. In this review were characterized biology, epidemiology and the progress in technology for detection and surveillance of the most important waterborne protozoan parasites.

  14. Apoptotic markers in protozoan parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasel Nicolas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The execution of the apoptotic death program in metazoans is characterized by a sequence of morphological and biochemical changes that include cell shrinkage, presentation of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface, mitochondrial alterations, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, membrane blebbing and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Methodologies for measuring apoptosis are based on these markers. Except for membrane blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, all other events have been observed in most protozoan parasites undergoing cell death. However, while techniques exist to detect these markers, they are often optimised for metazoan cells and therefore may not pick up subtle differences between the events occurring in unicellular organisms and multi-cellular organisms. In this review we discuss the markers most frequently used to analyze cell death in protozoan parasites, paying special attention to changes in cell morphology, mitochondrial activity, chromatin structure and plasma membrane structure/permeability. Regarding classical regulators/executors of apoptosis, we have reviewed the present knowledge of caspase-like and nuclease activities.

  15. Protein palmitoylation in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvi, Maria Martha; Berthiaume, Luc Gerard; De Napoli, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    Palmitoylation plays an important role in the regulation of the localization and function of the modified protein. Although many aspects of protein palmitoylation have been identified in mammalian and yeast cells, little information is available of this modification in protozoan parasites. Protein palmitoylation has been described for a few set of proteins in E.tenella, P. falciparum, T. gondii, G. lamblia and T. cruzi. Interestingly, in all these parasites palmitoylated proteins appears to be involved in vital processes such as invasion and motility. In addition, most of these parasites contain in their genomes genes that encode for putative palmitoyl-acyl transferases, the enzymes catalyzing the palmitoylation reaction. Although protein palmitoylation could be playing key roles in invasion and motility in a variety of parasites, little is known about this important reversible modification of proteins that typically plays a role in membrane tethering. As such, this review will focus on the main features of protein palmitoylation as well as provide an overview of the state of knowledge of this modification in protozoan parasites.

  16. Apoptotic markers in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio; Alzate, Juan Fernando; Macleod, Ewan Thomas; Lüder, Carsten Günter Kurt; Fasel, Nicolas; Hurd, Hilary

    2010-11-09

    The execution of the apoptotic death program in metazoans is characterized by a sequence of morphological and biochemical changes that include cell shrinkage, presentation of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface, mitochondrial alterations, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, membrane blebbing and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Methodologies for measuring apoptosis are based on these markers. Except for membrane blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, all other events have been observed in most protozoan parasites undergoing cell death. However, while techniques exist to detect these markers, they are often optimised for metazoan cells and therefore may not pick up subtle differences between the events occurring in unicellular organisms and multi-cellular organisms.In this review we discuss the markers most frequently used to analyze cell death in protozoan parasites, paying special attention to changes in cell morphology, mitochondrial activity, chromatin structure and plasma membrane structure/permeability. Regarding classical regulators/executors of apoptosis, we have reviewed the present knowledge of caspase-like and nuclease activities.

  17. An experimental study of preventing and treating acute radioactive enteritis with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Wei Yuan; Qiang Zhao; Peng Song; Ji Yue; Shi-De Lin; Ting-Bao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To test the curative effect of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells on rat acute radioactive enteritis and thus to provide clinical therapeutic basis for radiation sickness.Methods:Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultivatedin vitro and the model of acute radioactive enteritis of rats was established.Then, the umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were injected into the rats via tail vein.Visual and histopathological changes of the experimental rats were observed.Results:After the injection, the rats in the prevention group and treatment group had remarkably better survival status than those in the control group.The histological observations revealed that the former also had better intestinal mucosa structure, more regenerative cells and stronger proliferation activity than the latter.Conclusions:Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells have a definite therapeutic effect on acute radioactive enteritis in rats.

  18. Colonization with the enteric protozoa Blastocystis is associated with increased diversity of human gut bacterial microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Christophe; Even, Gaël; Cian, Amandine; Safadi, Dima El; Certad, Gabriela; Delhaes, Laurence; Pereira, Bruno; Nourrisson, Céline; Poirier, Philippe; Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Delbac, Frédéric; Morelle, Christelle; Bastien, Patrick; Lachaud, Laurence; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Botterel, Françoise; Candolfi, Ermanno; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Morio, Florent; Pomares, Christelle; Rabodonirina, Meja; Loywick, Alexandre; Merlin, Sophie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the composition of commensal bacterial populations, a phenomenon known as dysbiosis, are linked to multiple gastrointestinal disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, or to infections by diverse enteric pathogens. Blastocystis is one of the most common single-celled eukaryotes detected in human faecal samples. However, the clinical significance of this widespread colonization remains unclear, and its pathogenic potential is controversial. To address the issue of Blastocystis pathogenicity, we investigated the impact of colonization by this protist on the composition of the human gut microbiota. For that purpose, we conducted a cross-sectional study including 48 Blastocystis-colonized patients and 48 Blastocystis-free subjects and performed an Ion Torrent 16S rDNA gene sequencing to decipher the Blastocystis-associated gut microbiota. Here, we report a higher bacterial diversity in faecal microbiota of Blastocystis colonized patients, a higher abundance of Clostridia as well as a lower abundance of Enterobacteriaceae. Our results contribute to suggesting that Blastocystis colonization is usually associated with a healthy gut microbiota, rather than with gut dysbiosis generally observed in metabolic or infectious inflammatory diseases of the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27147260

  19. Biodetection of potential genotoxic pollutants entering the human food chain through ashes used in livestock diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vicente, Laura; Herraez, Elisa; Briz, Oscar; Nogales, Rogelio; Molina-Alcaide, Eduarda; Marin, Jose J G

    2016-08-15

    Ash derived from energy generation is used as a source of minerals in livestock feeds. The microbial biosensor recApr-Luc2 was built to detect genotoxic hazard in recycled ash. Escherichia coli SOS gene (recA, lexA, dinI and umuC) expression in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage led to the selection of the recA promoter. The biosensor required functional RecA expression to respond to genotoxic heavy metals (Cr>Cd≈Pb), and polluted ash induced a strong recApr-Luc2 response. In human liver and intestinal cells, heavy metals induced acute toxicity (Cr>Cd>Pb) at concentrations sufficient to activate recApr-Luc2. Cytostatic effects, including genotoxicity, were cell- and metal-dependent, apart from Cr. In agreement with the recApr-Luc2 bioassay, Cr had the strongest effect in all cells. In conclusion, recApr-Luc2 could be useful for evaluating the genotoxic risk of pollutants present in ash that might be concentrated in animal products and, thus, entering the human food chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enteric Opportunistic Parasitic Infections among HIV-Seropositive Patients at Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta D Patel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enteric opportunistic parasitic infections are the major source of diarrheal disease in developing countries mainly in Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients. Objective: The study was to detect enteric parasites causing diarrhea and their association with immune status in HIV-seropositive patients. Methods: The present study was conducted in tertiary care teaching Hospital, Baroda between January 2006 to January 2007 involving 100 Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. Stool was examined for enteric parasites by microscopy with special staining methods. Results: A total of 100 HIV sero-positive patients with and without diarrhea were included in the study. Of the 100 patients, the protozoan parasitic infection was found in 28% (28/100. Out of 100 patients, 50 had diarrhea in which parasitic infection was 24 (48% and 4 (4/50 protozoal parasites positive cases did not have diarrhea. A significant difference (p<0.05 was observed in the level of infection of intestinal protozoan between the HIV seropositive with diarrhea and HIV-seropositive without diarrhea. Conclusion Enteric opportunistic parasitic infections were detected in 28% among HIV-seropositive patients. Early detection of enteric parasitic infections will help in the management and to improve the quality of life for HIV-infected individuals. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(3.000: 190-193

  1. Prevalence of Stray Dogs with Intestinal Protozoan Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirzaei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Intestinal protozoan parasites are important enteropathogens in dogs. Moreover, several canine intestinal protozoan parasites are zoonotic and are considered important to public health. This study investigates the level of intestinal protozoan parasites in stray dogs, in Kerman city, Iran. Approach: Determination of the prevalence of infections was based on faecal examination. Stool samples (n = 98 collected from dogs of different ages and gender were analyzed using five techniques, i.e., centrifugal flotation in sucrose solution, centrifugal flotation in 33% Zinc solphate solution, Ziehl-Neelsen staining, trichrome staining and iodine staining. Results: The overall prevalence of parasitism was 13 (13.26% dogs. The parasites most frequently detected were: Giardia spp. (7.14%, Isospora spp. (5.1% and Cryptosporidium spp. (4.08%. Single parasitic infection was present in 11 (11.22% dogs. There was no significant difference in the prevalence between male (13.3% and female (13.2% dogs (p>0.05. There was significantly (pConclusion/Recommendations: The results of this research showed that stray dogs are reservoirs for zoonotic intestinal protozoan parasites and should be considered important to public health. So that, it is imperative for human to avoid faecal contamination in streets, public gardens and parks. Also stray dogs should be euthanized in dog population control program in Iran.

  2. Effect of Age on the Enteric Nervous System of the Human Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Cheryl E.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J.; Lurken, Matthew S.; Schmalz, Philip F.; Roeder, Jaime L.; Linden, David; Cima, Robert R.; Dozois, Eric J.; Larson, David W.; Camilleri, Michael; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Pozo, Maria J; Hicks, Gareth A.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2009-01-01

    The effect of age on the anatomy and function of the human colon is incompletely understood. The prevalence of disorders in adults such as constipation increase with age but it is unclear if this is due to confounding factors or age-related structural defects. The aim of this study was to determine number and subtypes of enteric neurons and neuronal volumes in the human colon of different ages. Normal colon (descending and sigmoid) from 16 patients (9 male) was studied; ages 33–99. Antibodies to HuC/D, ChAT, nNOS, and PGP9.5 were used. Effect of age was determined by testing for linear trends using regression analysis. In the myenteric plexus, number of Hu-positive neurons declined with age (slope = −1.3 neurons/mm/10yrs, p =0.03). The number of ChAT-positive neurons also declined with age (slope = −1.1 neurons/mm/10yrs of age, p=0.02). The number of nNOS-positive neurons did not decline with age. As a result, the ratio of nNOS to Hu increased (slope= 0.03 per 10yrs of age, p=0.01). In the submucosal plexus, the number of neurons did not decline with age (slope = − 0.3 neurons/mm/10 yrs, p =0.09). Volume of nerve fibers in the circular muscle and volume of neuronal structures in the myenteric plexus did not change with age. In conclusion, the number of neurons in the human colon declines with age with sparing of nNOS- positive neurons. This change was not accompanied by changes in total volume of neuronal structures suggesting compensatory changes in the remaining neurons. PMID:19220755

  3. Assessment of sewer source contamination of drinking water wells using tracers and human enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J; Borchardt, Mark A; Richards, Kevin D; Spencer, Susan K

    2010-10-15

    This study investigated the source, transport, and occurrence of human enteric viruses in municipal well water, focusing on sanitary sewer sources. A total of 33 wells from 14 communities were sampled once for wastewater tracers and viruses. Wastewater tracers were detected in four of these wells, and five wells were virus- positive by qRT-PCR. These results, along with exclusion of wells with surface water sources, were used to select three wells for additional investigation. Viruses and wastewater tracers were found in the groundwater at all sites. Some wastewater tracers, such as ionic detergents, flame retardants, and cholesterol, were considered unambiguous evidence of wastewater. Sampling at any given time may not show concurrent virus and tracer presence; however, given sufficient sampling over time, a relation between wastewater tracers and virus occurrence was identified. Presence of infectious viruses at the wellhead demonstrates that high-capacity pumping induced sufficiently short travel times for the transport of infectious viruses. Therefore, drinking-water wells are vulnerable to contaminants that travel along fast groundwater flowpaths even if they contribute a small amount of virus-laden water to the well. These results suggest that vulnerability assessments require characterization of "low yield-fast transport" in addition to traditional "high yield-slow transport", pathways.

  4. Monitoring of human enteric viruses and coliform bacteria in waters after urban flood in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanuwan, C; Takizawa, S; Oguma, K; Katayama, H; Yunika, A; Ohgaki, S

    2006-01-01

    Floodwaters in Kampung Melayu village, Jakarta, Indonesia, as well as river water and consumable water (including groundwater and tap water) samples in flooded and non-flooded areas, were quantitatively analysed to assess occurrence of viruses and total coliforms and E. coli as bacterial indicators after flooding event. High numbers of enterovirus, hepatitis A virus, norovirus (G1, G2) and adenovirus were detected at high concentration in floodwaters and waters sampled from Ciliwung River which runs across metropolitan Jakarta and is used widely for agriculture and domestic purposes by poor residents. One out of three groundwater wells in the flooded area was contaminated with all viruses tested while no viruses were found in groundwater samples in non-flooded areas and tap water samples. The results revealed that human enteric viruses, especially hepatitis A virus and adenovirus, were prevalent in Jakarta, Indonesia. This study suggested that flooding posed a higher risk of viral infection to the people through contamination of drinking water sources or direct contact with floodwaters.

  5. Vinegar lacks antiglycemic action on enteral carbohydrate absorption in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbe, Arline D; Johnston, Carol S; Buyukbese, M Akif; Tsitouras, Panayiotis D; Harman, S Mitchell

    2009-12-01

    The antiglycemic effects of vinegar have been known for more than a century and have been demonstrated in animal as well as human studies. Although the exact mechanism of vinegar action is not known, several possibilities have been proposed including suppression of disaccharidase activity, delayed gastric emptying, enhanced glucose uptake in the periphery and conversion to glycogen, and increased satiety. We hypothesized that by suppressing endogenous insulin secretion, we could estimate the glucose absorption rate from an oral carbohydrate load and determine the effects of vinegar ingestion on this rate. To do so, 5 subjects had 4 studies at 1-week intervals, randomly receiving placebo twice (60 mL water) and vinegar twice (20 mL apple cider vinegar, 40 mL water), followed 2 minutes later by a meal of mashed potatoes (0.75 g carbohydrate per kilogram body weight) that was consumed over 20 minutes. At the beginning of the meal, an oral octreotide/insulin suppression test (25-microg bolus octreotide; 180 minute infusion 5 mU/m(2) body surface area per minute regular human insulin, and 0.5 microg/min octreotide) was begun. Blood samples for insulin and glucose were drawn at 20-minute intervals. The oral octreotide/insulin suppression test suppressed endogenous insulin secretion for the first 100 minutes of the study. During this time, the rate of rise of glucose was modestly but significantly (P = .01) greater after vinegar ingestion compared to placebo, suggesting that vinegar does not act to decrease glycemia by interference with enteral carbohydrate absorption.

  6. Complex Adaptive Immunity to enteric fevers in humans: Lessons learned and the path forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo B. Sztein

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, and S. Paratyphi A and B, causative agents of paratyphoid fever, are major public health threats throughout the world. Although two licensed typhoid vaccines are currently available, they are only moderately protective and immunogenic necessitating the development of novel vaccines. A major obstacle in the development of improved typhoid, as well as paratyphoid vaccines is the lack of known immunological correlates of protection in humans. Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding the complex adaptive host responses against S. Typhi. Although the induction of S. Typhi-specific antibodies (including their functional properties and memory B cells, as well as their cross-reactivity with S. Paratyphi A and S. Paratyphi B has been shown, the role of humoral immunity in protection remains undefined. Cell mediated immunity (CMI is likely to play a dominant role in protection against enteric fever pathogens. Detailed measurements of CMI performed in volunteers immunized with attenuated strains of S. Typhi have shown, among others, the induction of lymphoproliferation, multifunctional type 1 cytokine production and CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses. In addition to systemic responses, the local microenvironment of the gut is likely to be of paramount importance in protection from these infections. In this review we will critically assess current knowledge regarding the role of CMI and humoral immunity following natural S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi infections, experimental challenge, and immunization in humans. We will also address recent advances regarding cross-talk between the host’s gut microbiota and immunization with attenuated S. Typhi, mechanisms of systemic immune responses, and the homing potential of S. Typhi-specific B and T cells to the gut and other tissues.

  7. Virus rejection with two model human enteric viruses in membrane bioreactor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) with gravity drain was tested for virus rejection with two coliphages, T4 and f2, which were used as surrogates for human enteric viruses. Virus rejection was investigated by PVDF and PP membrane modules, with the pore sizes of 0.22 and 0.1 μm, respectively. In tap water system, 2.1 lg rejection of coliphage T4 could be achieved by PVDF membrane compared with complete rejection by PP membrane, while for coliphage f2 with smaller diameter, 0.3―0.5 lg rejection of the influent virus was removed by the two membranes. In domestic wastewater system, cake layer and gel layer on the membrane surface changed the cut-off size of the membrane so that there was no significant difference between PP and PVDF for each coliphage. The removal ratios of coliphage T4 and f2 in the MBR were more than 5.5 and 3.0 lg, respectively. Compared with 5.5 lg removal for virus T4 in the MBR system, only 2.1 lg (96.8%―99.9%) removal rate was observed in the conventional activated sludge system with the influent virus concentration fluctuating from 1830 to 57000 PFU/mL. Only 0.8%―22% virus removal was the effect of adsorption to activated sludge, which showed a decreasing tendency with the retention time, while 75%―98% was the effect of virus inactivation by microbial activity. It indicated that the major mechanism of virus removal was not the transfer of viruses from the water phase to the sludge phase but inactivation in the biological treatment process.

  8. Virus rejection with two model human enteric viruses in membrane bioreactor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Xiang; LIU JunXin

    2007-01-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) with gravity drain was tested for virus rejection with two coliphages, T4 and f2, which were used as surrogates for human enteric viruses. Virus rejection was investigated by PVDF and PP membrane modules, with the pore sizes of 0.22 and 0.1 μm, respectively. In tap water system, 2.1 lg rejection of coliphage T4 could be achieved by PVDF membrane compared with complete rejection by PP membrane, while for coliphage f2 with smaller diameter, 0.3-0.5 lg rejection of the influent virus was removed by the two membranes. In domestic wastewater system, cake layer and gel layer on the membrane surface changed the cut-off size of the membrane so that there was no significant difference between PP and PVDF for each coliphage. The removal ratios of coliphage T4 and f2 in the MBR were more than 5.5 and 3.0 lg, respectively. Compared with 5.5 lg removal for virus T4 in the MBR system, only 2.1 lg (96.8%-99.9%) removal rate was observed in the conventional activated sludge system with the influent virus concentration fluctuating from 1830 to 57000 PFU/mL. Only 0.8 %-22 % virus removal was the effect of adsorption to activated sludge, which showed a decreasing tendency with the retention time, while 75%-98% was the effect of virus inactivation by microbial activity. It indicated that the major mechanism of virus removal was not the transfer of viruses from the water phase to the sludge phase but inactivation in the biological treatment process.

  9. Accelerated modern human-induced species losses: Entering the sixth mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Gerardo; Ehrlich, Paul R; Barnosky, Anthony D; García, Andrés; Pringle, Robert M; Palmer, Todd M

    2015-06-01

    The oft-repeated claim that Earth's biota is entering a sixth "mass extinction" depends on clearly demonstrating that current extinction rates are far above the "background" rates prevailing between the five previous mass extinctions. Earlier estimates of extinction rates have been criticized for using assumptions that might overestimate the severity of the extinction crisis. We assess, using extremely conservative assumptions, whether human activities are causing a mass extinction. First, we use a recent estimate of a background rate of 2 mammal extinctions per 10,000 species per 100 years (that is, 2 E/MSY), which is twice as high as widely used previous estimates. We then compare this rate with the current rate of mammal and vertebrate extinctions. The latter is conservatively low because listing a species as extinct requires meeting stringent criteria. Even under our assumptions, which would tend to minimize evidence of an incipient mass extinction, the average rate of vertebrate species loss over the last century is up to 100 times higher than the background rate. Under the 2 E/MSY background rate, the number of species that have gone extinct in the last century would have taken, depending on the vertebrate taxon, between 800 and 10,000 years to disappear. These estimates reveal an exceptionally rapid loss of biodiversity over the last few centuries, indicating that a sixth mass extinction is already under way. Averting a dramatic decay of biodiversity and the subsequent loss of ecosystem services is still possible through intensified conservation efforts, but that window of opportunity is rapidly closing.

  10. The role of extracellular vesicles in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, Pierre-Yves; Marti, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Protozoan parasites and other microorganisms use various pathways to communicate within their own populations and to manipulate their outside environments, with the ultimate goal of balancing the rate of growth and transmission. In higher eukaryotes, including humans, circulating extracellular vesicles are increasingly recognized as key mediators of physiological and pathological processes. Recent evidence suggests that protozoan parasites, including those responsible for major human diseases such as malaria and Chagas disease, use similar machinery. Indeed, intracellular and extracellular protozoan parasites secrete extracellular vesicles to promote growth and induce transmission, to evade the host immune system, and to manipulate the microenvironment. In this review we will discuss the general pathways of extracellular vesicle biogenesis and their functions in protozoan infections.

  11. Metagenomic analysis of the shrew enteric virome reveals novel viruses related to human stool-associated viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michihito; Orba, Yasuko; Ueno, Keisuke; Ishii, Akihiro; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Ito, Kimihito; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2015-02-01

    Shrews are small insectivorous mammals that are distributed worldwide. Similar to rodents, shrews live on the ground and are commonly found near human residences. In this study, we investigated the enteric virome of wild shrews in the genus Crocidura using a sequence-independent viral metagenomics approach. A large portion of the shrew enteric virome was composed of insect viruses, whilst novel viruses including cyclovirus, picornavirus and picorna-like virus were also identified. Several cycloviruses, including variants of human cycloviruses detected in cerebrospinal fluid and stools, were detected in wild shrews at a high prevalence rate. The identified picornavirus was distantly related to human parechovirus, inferring the presence of a new genus in this family. The identified picorna-like viruses were characterized as different species of calhevirus 1, which was discovered previously in human stools. Complete or nearly complete genome sequences of these novel viruses were determined in this study and then were subjected to further genetic characterization. Our study provides an initial view of the diversity and distinctiveness of the shrew enteric virome and highlights unique novel viruses related to human stool-associated viruses.

  12. The protozoan associates of some crustaceans

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Santhakumari, V.; Gopalan, U.K.

    Protozoan associates found on the estuarine shrimp Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius) and the tanaidacean Apseudes chilkensis (Chilton) from Cochin backwaters have been described. A peritrich ciliate Zoothamnium rigidum (Precht.), a heterotrich...

  13. Using the Ciliate Protozoan Vorticella in Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alick R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes methods for collection, culture, observation, and making permanent stained preparations of the protozoan vorticella. Suggestions are made for experiments to investigate growth, reproduction, settlement, ecology, feeding, and osmoregulation. (CS)

  14. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Andrew A; Waldvogel, Sarah M; Luthman, Adam J; Sehorn, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity.

  15. Adhesion of human pathogenic enteric viruses and surrogate viruses to inert and vegetal food surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboosere, Nathalie; Pinon, Anthony; Caudrelier, Yvette; Delobel, Alexandre; Merle, Ghislaine; Perelle, Sylvie; Temmam, Sarah; Loutreul, Julie; Morin, Thierry; Estienney, Marie; Belliot, Gael; Pothier, Pierre; Gantzer, Christophe; Vialette, Michèle

    2012-10-01

    Enteric viruses, particularly human Noroviruses (NoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV), are key food-borne pathogens. The attachment of these pathogens to foodstuff and food-contact surfaces is an important mechanism in the human contamination process. Studies were done to investigate the nature of the physicochemical forces, such as hydrophobic and electrostatic ones, involved in the interaction virus/matrix but, at this day, only few data are available concerning surface properties of viruses and prediction of the adhesion capacity of one specific virus onto matrices is still very difficult. The purpose of this study was to propose a reference system, including a representative virus surrogate, able to predict as close as possible behaviour of pathogenic viruses in term of adhesion on inert (stainless steel and polypropylene) and food surfaces (lettuce leaves, strawberries and raspberries). The adhesion of human pathogenic enteric viruses, cultivable strain of HAV and non-cultivable strains of human NoV (genogroups I and II), have been quantified and compared to these of human enteric viruses surrogates, included the MNV-1 and three F-specific RNA bacteriophages (MS2, GA and Qβ). A standardized approach was developed to assess and quantify viral adhesion on tested matrices after a contact time with each virus using real-time RT-PCR. Methods used for virus recovery were in accordance with the CEN recommendations, including a bovine Enterovirus type 1 as control to monitor the efficiency of the extraction process and amplification procedure from directly extracted or eluted samples. The adhesion of human pathogenic viruses, ranging from 0.1 to 2%, could be comparable for all matrices studied, except for NoV GII on soft fruits. Adhesion percentages obtained for the studied surrogate virus and phages were shown to be comparable to those of HAV and NoV on inert and lettuce surfaces. The MNV-1 appeared as the best candidate to simulate adhesion phenomena of all human

  16. Occurrence of human enteric viruses at freshwater beaches during swimming season and its link to water inflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Cheonghoon; Marion, Jason; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-02-15

    Human enteric viruses are significant etiological agents for many recreational waterborne illnesses. The occurrence and density of human enteric viruses such as human adenovirus (HAdV), human enterovirus (HEnV), and human norovirus genogroups I/II (HNoV GI/GII) were investigated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at freshwater beaches along with monitoring fecal indicators and environmental parameters. During the 2009 swimming season, water samples were collected from three inland freshwater beaches in Ohio, USA. Of the total samples, 40% (26/65) and 17% (11/65) were positive for HAdV and HEnV respectively, but HNoV GI/GII were not detected. There was no significant association among the detected human enteric viruses (HAdV and HEnV) and fecal bacteria indicators (Escherichia coli and Bacteroides) by Spearman correlation and principal component analyses. Logistic regression analysis also revealed that the odds of finding HAdV or HEnV was not influenced by levels of fecal bacteria indicators. However, there was a 14-fold increase in the odds of HEnV detection for each 1-log increase in daily water inflow (m(3)/s) into freshwater beach reservoirs (adjusted odds ratio=14.2; 95% confidence interval=1.19-171). In summary, the viral occurrence at the freshwater beaches was not readily explained by the levels of fecal bacteria indicators, but appeared to be more related to water reservoir inflows. These results suggest that hydrological data must be considered in future epidemiology efforts aimed at characterizing beach water safety.

  17. Cupiennin 1a exhibits a remarkably broad, non-stereospecific cytolytic activity on bacteria, protozoan parasites, insects, and human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn-Nentwig, Lucia; Willems, Jean; Seebeck, Thomas; Shalaby, Tarek; Kaiser, Marcel; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Cupiennin 1a, a cytolytic peptide isolated from the venom of the spider Cupiennius salei, exhibits broad membranolytic activity towards bacteria, trypanosomes, and plasmodia, as well as human blood and cancer cells. In analysing the cytolytic activity of synthesised all-D: - and all-L: -cupiennin 1a towards pro- and eukaryotic cells, a stereospecific mode of membrane destruction could be excluded. The importance of negatively charged sialic acids on the outer leaflet of erythrocytes for the binding and haemolytic activity of L: -cupiennin 1a was demonstrated. Reducing the overall negative charges of erythrocytes by partially removing their sialic acids or by protecting them with tri- or pentalysine results in reduced haemolytic activity of the peptide.

  18. Cryptosporidium enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000617.htm Cryptosporidium enteritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cryptosporidium enteritis is an infection of the small intestine that ...

  19. Leishmania donovani tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase structure in complex with a tyrosyl adenylate analog and comparisons with human and protozoan counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Álvarez, Ximena; Kerchner, Keshia M; Koh, Cho Yeow; Turley, Stewart; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Ranade, Ranae M; Gillespie, J Robert; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Buckner, Frederick S; Hol, Wim G J

    2017-07-01

    The crystal structure of Leishmania donovani tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (LdTyrRS) in complex with a nanobody and the tyrosyl adenylate analog TyrSA was determined at 2.75 Å resolution. Nanobodies are the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies. The nanobody makes numerous crystal contacts and in addition reduces the flexibility of a loop of LdTyrRS. TyrSA is engaged in many interactions with active site residues occupying the tyrosine and adenine binding pockets. The LdTyrRS polypeptide chain consists of two pseudo-monomers, each consisting of two domains. Comparing the two independent chains in the asymmetric unit reveals that the two pseudo-monomers of LdTyrRS can bend with respect to each other essentially as rigid bodies. This flexibility might be useful in the positioning of tRNA for catalysis since both pseudo-monomers in the LdTyrRS chain are needed for charging tRNA(Tyr). An "extra pocket" (EP) appears to be present near the adenine binding region of LdTyrRS. Since this pocket is absent in the two human homologous enzymes, the EP provides interesting opportunities for obtaining selective drugs for treating infections caused by L. donovani, a unicellular parasite causing visceral leishmaniasis, or kala azar, which claims 20,000 to 30,000 deaths per year. Sequence and structural comparisons indicate that the EP is a characteristic which also occurs in the active site of several other important pathogenic protozoa. Therefore, the structure of LdTyrRS could inspire the design of compounds useful for treating several different parasitic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  20. BIOTECHNOLOGY IN THE STUDY OF PROTOZOAN PARASITES

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    Donald E. Burgess

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade extraordinary advances have been made in the study of protozoan parasites. Particular progress has occurred in areas such as cultivation of protozoan parasites, immunobiology of protozoan parasitic diseases, the biochemistry of protozoa and molecular genetics of these organisms. The application of sophisticated culture, monoclonal antibody and recombinant DNA technologies has resulted in elucidation of many of the biochemical and molecular bases of such phenomena as antigenic variation in African trypanosomas, the autoimmune basis of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease, protective immunity in malaria and parasite evasion of host defense mechanisms. As a result a new generation of diagnostic procedures have to provide more accurate detection of protozoan infections and thus improved epidemiological information. Vigorous vaccine development efforts are underway which will lead to molecularly defined vaccines taylored to specific applications and will provide new weapons to combat protozoan diseases. Perhaps most importantly the molecular bases of host-parasite interactions are being established and will allow identification of unique biochemical aspects of the biology of protozoa thereby revealing appropriate targets for development of vaccines, accurate detection procedures and more efficacious chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Canonical and variant histones of protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmasso, Maria Carolina; Sullivan, William Joseph; Angel, Sergio Oscar

    2011-06-01

    Protozoan parasites have tremendously diverse lifestyles that require adaptation to a remarkable assortment of different environmental conditions. In order to complete their life cycles, protozoan parasites rely on fine-tuning gene expression. In general, protozoa use novel regulatory elements, transcription factors, and epigenetic mechanisms to regulate their transcriptomes. One of the most surprising findings includes the nature of their histones--these primitive eukaryotes lack some histones yet harbor novel histone variants of unknown function. In this review, we describe the histone components of different protozoan parasites based on literature and database searching. We summarize the key discoveries regarding histones and histone variants and their impact on chromatin regulation in protozoan parasites. In addition, we list histone genes IDs, sequences, and genomic localization of several protozoan parasites and Microsporidia histones, obtained from a thorough search of genome databases. We then compare these findings with those observed in higher eukaryotes, allowing us to highlight some novel aspects of epigenetic regulation in protists and to propose questions to be addressed in the upcoming years.

  2. IMPORTANT PROTOZOAN PARASITES IN INDONESIA

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    Srisasi Gandahusada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The most important protozoan parasites in Indonesia are the malaria parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Entamoeba histolytica. After the second world war the residual insecticides and effective antimalarial drugs were used in the control of malaria. After development of resistance among mosquitoes to insecticides, the Malaria Control Programme was switched over to the Malaria Eradication Programme. Malaria incidence dropped heavily. However, due to the quick development of vector resistance and financial limitations, malaria came back and so did the Malaria Control Programme. P. falciparum and P.vivax are the most common species in Indonesia. Important vectors are An. sundaicus, An. aconitus, An. maculatus, An. hyrcanus group, An. balabacensis, An. farauti etc. An. sundaicus and An. aconitus have developed resistance to DDT and Dieldrin in Java. In 1959 the Malaria Eradication Programme was started in Java, Bali and Lampung. In 1965 the API dropped to 0,15 per thousand. From 1966 onwards malaria transmission was on the increase, because spraying activities were slowed down, but dropped again from 1974 onwards by occasional residual house spraying with DDT or Fenitrothion, malaria surveillance and treatment of malaria cases, resulting in an API of 0.18 per thousand in 1987. At present malaria is not transmitted in Jakarta and in capitals of the provinces and kabupatens, except in Irian Jaya, Nusa Tenggara Timur and one or two other provinces, but it still exists in rural areas. The distribution of chloroquine resistant P.falciparum is patchy. Resistance is at the RI, RII and RUT levels. The main problems of malaria control are : the increasing development of resistance of the vector to insecticides, the change of An.aconitus from zoophili to anthropophili and from indoor to outdoor biting, the increasing resistance of P.falciparum to chloroquine, the shortage of skilled manpower and limitation of budget. In Indonesia many newborns with congenital

  3. IMPORTANT PROTOZOAN PARASITES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisasi Gandahusada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The most important protozoan parasites in Indonesia are the malaria parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Entamoeba histolytica. After the second world war the residual insecticides and effective antimalarial drugs were used in the control of malaria. After development of resistance among mosquitoes to insecticides, the Malaria Control Programme was switched over to the Malaria Eradication Programme. Malaria incidence dropped heavily. However, due to the quick development of vector resistance and financial limitations, malaria came back and so did the Malaria Control Programme. P. falciparum and P.vivax are the most common species in Indonesia. Important vectors are An. sundaicus, An. aconitus, An. maculatus, An. hyrcanus group, An. balabacensis, An. farauti etc. An. sundaicus and An. aconitus have developed resistance to DDT and Dieldrin in Java. In 1959 the Malaria Eradication Programme was started in Java, Bali and Lampung. In 1965 the API dropped to 0,15 per thousand. From 1966 onwards malaria transmission was on the increase, because spraying activities were slowed down, but dropped again from 1974 onwards by occasional residual house spraying with DDT or Fenitrothion, malaria surveillance and treatment of malaria cases, resulting in an API of 0.18 per thousand in 1987. At present malaria is not transmitted in Jakarta and in capitals of the provinces and kabupatens, except in Irian Jaya, Nusa Tenggara Timur and one or two other provinces, but it still exists in rural areas. The distribution of chloroquine resistant P.falciparum is patchy. Resistance is at the RI, RII and RUT levels. The main problems of malaria control are : the increasing development of resistance of the vector to insecticides, the change of An.aconitus from zoophili to anthropophili and from indoor to outdoor biting, the increasing resistance of P.falciparum to chloroquine, the shortage of skilled manpower and limitation of budget. In Indonesia many newborns with congenital

  4. Improved orthologous databases to ease protozoan targets inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowski, Nelson; Jardim, Rodrigo; Dávila, Alberto M R

    2015-09-29

    Homology inference helps on identifying similarities, as well as differences among organisms, which provides a better insight on how closely related one might be to another. In addition, comparative genomics pipelines are widely adopted tools designed using different bioinformatics applications and algorithms. In this article, we propose a methodology to build improved orthologous databases with the potential to aid on protozoan target identification, one of the many tasks which benefit from comparative genomics tools. Our analyses are based on OrthoSearch, a comparative genomics pipeline originally designed to infer orthologs through protein-profile comparison, supported by an HMM, reciprocal best hits based approach. Our methodology allows OrthoSearch to confront two orthologous databases and to generate an improved new one. Such can be later used to infer potential protozoan targets through a similarity analysis against the human genome. The protein sequences of Cryptosporidium hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Leishmania infantum genomes were comparatively analyzed against three orthologous databases: (i) EggNOG KOG, (ii) ProtozoaDB and (iii) Kegg Orthology (KO). That allowed us to create two new orthologous databases, "KO + EggNOG KOG" and "KO + EggNOG KOG + ProtozoaDB", with 16,938 and 27,701 orthologous groups, respectively. Such new orthologous databases were used for a regular OrthoSearch run. By confronting "KO + EggNOG KOG" and "KO + EggNOG KOG + ProtozoaDB" databases and protozoan species we were able to detect the following total of orthologous groups and coverage (relation between the inferred orthologous groups and the species total number of proteins): Cryptosporidium hominis: 1,821 (11 %) and 3,254 (12 %); Entamoeba histolytica: 2,245 (13 %) and 5,305 (19 %); Leishmania infantum: 2,702 (16 %) and 4,760 (17 %). Using our HMM-based methodology and the largest created orthologous database, it was possible to infer 13

  5. A review of recent patents on the protozoan parasite HSP90 as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Sergio O; Matrajt, Mariana; Echeverria, Pablo C

    2013-04-01

    Diseases caused by protozoan parasites are still an important health problem. These parasites can cause a wide spectrum of diseases, some of which are severe and have high morbidity or mortality if untreated. Since they are still uncontrolled, it is important to find novel drug targets and develop new therapies to decrease their remarkable social and economic impact on human societies. In the past years, human HSP90 has become an interesting drug target that has led to a large number of investigations both at state organizations and pharmaceutical companies, followed by clinical trials. The finding that HSP90 has important biological roles in some protozoan parasites like Plasmodium spp, Toxoplasma gondii and trypanosomatids has allowed the expansion of the results obtained in human cancer to these infections. This review summarizes the latest important findings showing protozoan HSP90 as a drug target and presents three patents targeting T. gondii, P. falciparum and trypanosomatids HSP90.

  6. Protozoan parasites and type I interferons: a cold case reopened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiting, Daniel P

    2014-10-01

    Protozoan parasites, such as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, trypanosomes, and Leishmania, are a major cause of disease in both humans and other animals, highlighting the need to understand the full spectrum of strategies used by the host immune system to sense and respond to parasite infection. Although type II interferon (IFN-γ) has long been recognized as an essential antiparasite immune effector, much less is known about the role of type I interferons (IFN-α and -β) in host defense, particularly in vivo. Recent studies are reviewed which collectively highlight that type I IFN can be induced in response to parasite infection and influence the outcome of infection.

  7. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Protozoan Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo T. Bozza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a cytokine that plays a central role in immune and inflammatory responses. In the present paper, we discussed the participation of MIF in the immune response to protozoan parasite infections. As a general trend, MIF participates in the control of parasite burden at the expense of promoting tissue damage due to increased inflammation.

  8. Growth and Development Symposium: promoting healthier humans through healthier livestock: animal agriculture enters the metagenomics era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D N

    2011-03-01

    The priorities of public health and agricultural sciences intersect through a shared objective to foster better human health. Enhancements in food quality and reductions in the environmental effects of modern agriculture represent 2 distinct paths through which animal sciences can contribute to the cause of public health. Recent developments in the study of human-associated microbial communities (microbiotas), notably in association with disease, indicate that better understanding of the microbial ecology of livestock can contribute to achieving the goals of better foods and a cleaner environment. Culture-independent microbiological technologies now permit comprehensive study of complex microbial communities in their natural environments. Microbiotas associated with both humans and animals provide myriad beneficial services to their hosts that, if lost or diminished, could compromise host health. Dysfunctional microbial communities have been noted in several human conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Examination of the mechanisms by which the human microbiota influences health and disease susceptibility can inform similar studies of host-microbe function in the animal sciences. Insights gained from human studies indicate strategies to raise not only healthier livestock, through selective manipulation of microbial communities, but also healthier humans.

  9. Enteric Protozoa in the Developed World: a Public Health Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephanie M.; Stark, Damien; Harkness, John

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Several enteric protozoa cause severe morbidity and mortality in both humans and animals worldwide. In developed settings, enteric protozoa are often ignored as a cause of diarrheal illness due to better hygiene conditions, and as such, very little effort is used toward laboratory diagnosis. Although these protozoa contribute to the high burden of infectious diseases, estimates of their true prevalence are sometimes affected by the lack of sensitive diagnostic techniques to detect them in clinical and environmental specimens. Despite recent advances in the epidemiology, molecular biology, and treatment of protozoan illnesses, gaps in knowledge still exist, requiring further research. There is evidence that climate-related changes will contribute to their burden due to displacement of ecosystems and human and animal populations, increases in atmospheric temperature, flooding and other environmental conditions suitable for transmission, and the need for the reuse of alternative water sources to meet growing population needs. This review discusses the common enteric protozoa from a public health perspective, highlighting their epidemiology, modes of transmission, prevention, and control. It also discusses the potential impact of climate changes on their epidemiology and the issues surrounding waterborne transmission and suggests a multidisciplinary approach to their prevention and control. PMID:22763633

  10. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Neglected Cause of Human Enteric Infections in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraka, Daniel; Savin, Cyril; Kouassi, Stephane; Cissé, Bakary; Koffi, Eugène; Cabanel, Nicolas; Brémont, Sylvie; Faye-Kette, Hortense; Dosso, Mireille; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic Yersinia circulate in the pig reservoir and are the third bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal infections in Europe. In West Africa, reports of human yersiniosis are rare. This study was conducted to determine whether pathogenic Yersinia are circulating in pig farms and are responsible for human infections in the Abidjan District. Methodology/Principal findings From June 2012 to December 2013, pig feces were collected monthly in 41 swine farms of the Abidjan district. Of the 781 samples collected, 19 Yersinia strains were isolated in 3 farms: 7 non-pathogenic Yersinia intermedia and 12 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Farm animals other than pigs and wild animals were not found infected. Furthermore, 2 Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were isolated from 426 fecal samples of patients with digestive disorders. All 14 Y. enterocolitica strains shared the same PFGE and MLVA profile, indicating their close genetic relationship. However, while 6 of them displayed the usual phage type VIII, the other 8 had the highly infrequent phage type XI. Whole genome sequencing and SNP analysis of individual colonies revealed that phage type XI strains had unusually high rates of mutations. These strains displayed a hypermutator phenotype that was attributable to a large deletion in the mutS gene involved in DNA mismatch repair. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that pathogenic Y. enterocolitica circulate in the pig reservoir in Côte d'Ivoire and cause human infections with a prevalence comparable to that of many developed countries. The paucity of reports of yersiniosis in West Africa is most likely attributable to a lack of active detection rather than to an absence of the microorganism. The identification of hypermutator strains in pigs and humans is of concern as these strains can rapidly acquire selective advantages that may increase their fitness, pathogenicity or resistance to commonly used treatments. PMID

  11. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Neglected Cause of Human Enteric Infections in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraka, Daniel; Savin, Cyril; Kouassi, Stephane; Cissé, Bakary; Koffi, Eugène; Cabanel, Nicolas; Brémont, Sylvie; Faye-Kette, Hortense; Dosso, Mireille; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia circulate in the pig reservoir and are the third bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal infections in Europe. In West Africa, reports of human yersiniosis are rare. This study was conducted to determine whether pathogenic Yersinia are circulating in pig farms and are responsible for human infections in the Abidjan District. From June 2012 to December 2013, pig feces were collected monthly in 41 swine farms of the Abidjan district. Of the 781 samples collected, 19 Yersinia strains were isolated in 3 farms: 7 non-pathogenic Yersinia intermedia and 12 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Farm animals other than pigs and wild animals were not found infected. Furthermore, 2 Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were isolated from 426 fecal samples of patients with digestive disorders. All 14 Y. enterocolitica strains shared the same PFGE and MLVA profile, indicating their close genetic relationship. However, while 6 of them displayed the usual phage type VIII, the other 8 had the highly infrequent phage type XI. Whole genome sequencing and SNP analysis of individual colonies revealed that phage type XI strains had unusually high rates of mutations. These strains displayed a hypermutator phenotype that was attributable to a large deletion in the mutS gene involved in DNA mismatch repair. This study demonstrates that pathogenic Y. enterocolitica circulate in the pig reservoir in Côte d'Ivoire and cause human infections with a prevalence comparable to that of many developed countries. The paucity of reports of yersiniosis in West Africa is most likely attributable to a lack of active detection rather than to an absence of the microorganism. The identification of hypermutator strains in pigs and humans is of concern as these strains can rapidly acquire selective advantages that may increase their fitness, pathogenicity or resistance to commonly used treatments.

  12. Protozoan growth rates on secondary-metabolite-producing Pseudomonas spp. correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette L.; Winding, Anne; Altenburger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Different features can protect bacteria against protozoan grazing, for example large size, rapid movement, and production of secondary metabolites. Most papers dealing with these matters focus on bacteria. Here, we describe protozoan features that affect their ability to grow on secondary...... with membrane-bound metabolites. Interestingly, protozoan response seemed to correlate with high-level protozoan taxonomy, and amoeboid taxa tolerated a broader range of Pseudomonas strains than did the non-amoeboid taxa. This stresses the importance of studying both protozoan and bacterial characteristics...

  13. Cyst and encystment in protozoan parasites: optimal targets for new life-cycle interrupting strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Díaz, Hugo; Carrero, Julio César; Argüello-García, Raúl; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2011-10-01

    Certain protozoan parasites use survival strategies to reside outside the host such as the formation of cysts. This dormant and resistant stage results from the complex process of encystment that involves diverse molecular and cellular modifications. The stimuli and changes associated with cyst biogenesis are a matter of ongoing studies in human and animal protozoan parasites such as amoeba and Giardia species because blocking every step in the encystment pathway should, in theory, interrupt their life cycles. The present review thoroughly examines this essential process in those protozoan parasites and discusses the possibility of using that information to develop new kinds of anti-parasite specific and life cycle-interrupting drugs, aimed at holding back the dissemination of these infections.

  14. Blastocistosis y otras infecciones por protozoos intetinales en comunidades humanas ribereñas de la cuenca del rio Valdivia, Chile Blastocystosis and other intestinal protozoan infections in human riverside communities from - Valdivia River Basin, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Torres

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Entre marzo y octubre de 1987 se examinaron muestras coprológicas de 970 personas (20, 9% de la población pertenecientes a 209 grupos familiares de las comunidades ribereñas de la cuenca del rio Valdivia, Chile; con el propósito de determinar las prevalencias de infección por Blastocystis hominis y otros protozoos intestinales para establecer relaciones con la edad y sexo de los hospedadores, saneamiento ambiental y porcentaje de individuos infectados por grupo familiar. Un 72, 5% de las personas presentó una o más especies de protozoos intestinales. La mayor prevalencia se registró para B. hominis (61, 8%, que se incrementó con la edad del hospedador al igual que en las infecciones por Endolimax nana y Entamoeba coli. No se demostró asociación entre el sexo del hospedador y la prevalencia de infección por B. hominis y otras especies de protozoos. La prevalencia de B. hominis fue mayor en individuos que habitaban viviendas cuya disposition de excrementos era no sanitaria. Más del 60% de los integrantes de los grupos familiares presentaron infección por B. hominis en el 53, 1% de las familias encuestadas en contraposición al 2,4%-21,8% observado en infecciones por otros protozoos. El examen de 45 muestras de excrementos de cerdos, reveló infección por Blastocystis en el 22,2% de estos animales.Between March and October 1987, the prevalence of infection by Blastocystis hominis and other intestinal protozoan, their relationship with the age and sex of the hosts, and the percentage of in fected persons in family groups were determined in riverside communities of Valdivia River Basin, Chile. One or more intestinal protozoan species were determined in 72.5% of the examined persons. The prevalence was greater for B. hominis (61.8%. The prevalences of B. hominis, Endolimax nana and Entamoeba coli were greater in relation to the age of the host. The sex of the host and prevalence of infections by B. hominis and other species of

  15. Entering into dialogue with the taboo: Reflective writing in a social work human sexuality course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Killelea McEntarfer, David Skiba & Sarah A. Robert

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a unique reflective writing assignment used in an undergraduate social work course on human sexuality. We ask what new understandings reflective writing mediates (Vygotsky, 1978 regarding sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender relations—oft-neglected topics within pre-professional academic programs. One goal for this assignment was to mediate future social workers' abilities to differentiate between thoughts and feelings, and we evaluate the degree to which students did so in their writing. By adapting Hatton and Smith's (1994 framework for analyzing reflective writing, we also distinguish between descriptive and dialogical reflection, identifying and analyzing examples of both within the students' writing. Findings suggest that students engaged primarily in descriptive reflection, but also engaged in some dialogical reflection. We argue that both are useful but that the latter mediates deeper and more useful learning. We present recommendations for enhancing reflective writing assignment design in pre-professional academic programs.

  16. Cancer in the parasitic protozoans Trypanosoma brucei and Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lai, De-Hua; Wen, Yan-Zi; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Shen, Ji-Long; Yang, Ting-Bo; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Hide, Geoff; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    Cancer is a general name for more than 100 malignant diseases. It is postulated that all cancers start from a single abnormal cell that grows out of control. Untreated cancers can cause serious consequences and deaths. Great progress has been made in cancer research that has significantly improved our knowledge and understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the disease, but the origins of cancer are far from being well understood due to the limitations of suitable model systems and to the complexities of the disease. In view of the fact that cancers are found in various species of vertebrates and other metazoa, here, we suggest that cancer also occurs in parasitic protozoans such as Trypanosoma brucei, a blood parasite, and Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular pathogen. Without treatment, these protozoan cancers may cause severe disease and death in mammals, including humans. The simpler genomes of these single-cell organisms, in combination with their complex life cycles and fascinating life cycle differentiation processes, may help us to better understand the origins of cancers and, in particular, leukemias.

  17. The roles of intramembrane proteases in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, L David

    2013-12-01

    Intramembrane proteolysis is widely conserved throughout different forms of life, with three major types of proteases being known for their ability to cleave peptide bonds directly within the transmembrane domains of their substrates. Although intramembrane proteases have been extensively studied in humans and model organisms, they have only more recently been investigated in protozoan parasites, where they turn out to play important and sometimes unexpected roles. Signal peptide peptidases are involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control and signal peptide degradation from exported proteins. Recent studies suggest that repurposing inhibitors developed for blocking presenilins may be useful for inhibiting the growth of Plasmodium, and possibly other protozoan parasites, by blocking signal peptide peptidases. Rhomboid proteases, originally described in the fly, are also widespread in parasites, and are especially expanded in apicomplexans. Their study in parasites has revealed novel roles that expand our understanding of how these proteases function. Within this diverse group of parasites, rhomboid proteases contribute to processing of adhesins involved in attachment, invasion, intracellular replication, phagocytosis, and immune evasion, placing them at the vertex of host-parasite interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases.

  18. Eosinofil enteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjersøe, P; Rasmussen, S N; Hansen, B F

    2000-01-01

    We present a case of eosinophilic enteritis in a 45 year-old male with clinical and radiological signs of stenotic inflammatory ileal disease. A diagnosis of Crohn's disease was considered. He developed small bowel obstruction and sixty cm of obstructed ileum was resected. Histopathological...... examination revealed the diagnosis of eosinophilic enteritis primarily localized to the tunica muscularis. One year postoperatively he relapsed and small bowel X-ray demonstrated 1 m narrow and irregular ileum. He was treated with mesalamine, azathioprine, and cromoglicate, went into remission and fares well...

  19. One-year Surveillance of Human Enteric Viruses in Raw and Treated Wastewaters, Downstream River Waters, and Drinking Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaconelli, M; Muscillo, M; Della Libera, S; Fratini, M; Meucci, L; De Ceglia, M; Giacosa, D; La Rosa, G

    2017-03-01

    Human enteric viruses are a major cause of waterborne diseases, and can be transmitted by contaminated water of all kinds, including drinking and recreational water. The objectives of the present study were to assess the occurrence of enteric viruses (enterovirus, norovirus, adenovirus, hepatitis A and E virus) in raw and treated wastewaters, in rivers receiving wastewater discharges, and in drinking waters. Wastewater treatment plants' (WWTP) pathogen removal efficiencies by adenovirus quantitative real-time PCR and the presence of infectious enterovirus, by cell culture assays, in treated wastewaters and in surface waters were also evaluated. A total of 90 water samples were collected: raw and treated wastewaters (treated effluents and ultrafiltered water reused for industrial purposes), water from two rivers receiving treated discharges, and drinking water. Nested PCR assays were used for the identification of viral DNA/RNA, followed by direct amplicon sequencing. All raw sewage samples (21/21), 61.9 % of treated wastewater samples (13/21), and 25 % of ultrafiltered water samples (3/12) were contaminated with at least one viral family. Multiple virus families and genera were frequently detected. Mean positive PCRs per sample decreased significantly from raw to treated sewage and to ultrafiltered waters. Moreover, quantitative adenovirus data showed a reduction in excess of 99 % in viral genome copies following wastewater treatment. In surface waters, 78.6 % (22/28) of samples tested positive for one or more viruses by molecular methods, but enterovirus-specific infectivity assays did not reveal infectious particles in these samples. All drinking water samples tested negative for all viruses, demonstrating the effectiveness of treatment in removing viral pathogens from drinking water. Integrated strategies to manage water from all sources are crucial to ensure water quality.

  20. Enteric viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristic clinical signs associated with viral enteritis in young poultry include diarrhea, anorexia, litter eating, ruffled feathers, and poor growth. Intestines may have lesions; intestines are typically dilated and are filled with fluid and gaseous contents. The sequela to clinical disease...

  1. Neurogastroenterology of tegaserod (HTF 919) in the submucosal division of the guinea-pig and human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X; Liu, S; Wang, X-Y; Gao, N; Hu, H-Z; Wang, G-D; Cook, C H; Needleman, B J; Mikami, D J; Xia, Y; Fei, G-J; Hicks, G A; Wood, J D

    2008-01-01

    Actions of the 5-HT(4) serotonergic receptor partial agonist, tegaserod, were investigated on mucosal secretion in the guinea-pig and human small intestine and on electrophysiological behaviour of secretomotor neurons in the guinea-pig small intestinal submucosal plexus. Expression of 5-HT(4) receptor protein and immunohistochemical localization of the 5-HT(4) receptor in the submucosal plexus in relation to expression and localization of choline acetyltransferase and the vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter were determined for the enteric nervous system of human and guinea-pig small intestine. Immunoreactivity for the 5-HT(4) receptor was expressed as ring-like fluorescence surrounding the perimeter of the neuronal cell bodies and co-localized with the vesicular ACh transporter. Exposure of mucosal/submucosal preparations to tegaserod in Ussing chambers evoked increases in mucosal secretion reflected by stimulation of short-circuit current. Stimulation of secretion had a relative high EC(50) of 28.1 +/- 1.3 mumol L(-1), was resistant to neural blockade and appeared to be a direct action on the secretory epithelium. Tegaserod acted at presynaptic 5-HT(4) receptors to facilitate the release of ACh at nicotinic synapses on secretomotor neurons in the submucosal plexus. The 5-HT(2B) receptor subtype was not involved in actions at nicotinic synapses or stimulation of secretion.

  2. Epidemiology, Phylogeny, and Evolution of Emerging Enteric Picobirnaviruses of Animal Origin and Their Relationship to Human Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal S. Malik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Picobirnavirus (PBV which has been included in the list of viruses causing enteric infection in animals is highly versatile because of its broad host range and genetic diversity. PBVs are among the most recent and emerging small, nonenveloped viruses with a bisegmented double-stranded RNA genome, classified under a new family “Picobirnaviridae.” PBVs have also been detected from respiratory tract of pigs, but needs further close investigation for their inhabitant behavior. Though, accretion of genomic data of PBVs from different mammalian species resolved some of the ambiguity, quite a few questions and hypotheses regarding pathogenesis, persistence location, and evolution of PBVs remain unreciprocated. Evolutionary analysis reveals association of PBVs with partitiviruses especially fungi partitiviruses. Although, PBVs may have an ambiguous clinical implication, they do pose a potential public health concern in humans and control of PBVs mainly relies on nonvaccinal approach. Based upon the published data, from 1988 to date, generated from animal PBVs across the globe, this review provides information and discussion with respect to genetic analysis as well as evolution of PBVs of animal origin in relation to human strains.

  3. Human rhinovirus 14 enters rhabdomyosarcoma cells expressing icam-1 by a clathrin-, caveolin-, and flotillin-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Ghafoor; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Gajdzik, Leszek; Marlovits, Thomas C; Fuchs, Renate; Blaas, Dieter

    2010-04-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mediates binding and entry of major group human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Whereas the entry pathway of minor group HRVs has been studied in detail and is comparatively well understood, the pathway taken by major group HRVs is largely unknown. Use of immunofluorescence microscopy, colocalization with specific endocytic markers, dominant negative mutants, and pharmacological inhibitors allowed us to demonstrate that the major group virus HRV14 enters rhabdomyosarcoma cells transfected to express human ICAM-1 in a clathrin-, caveolin-, and flotillin-independent manner. Electron microscopy revealed that many virions accumulated in long tubular structures, easily distinguishable from clathrin-coated pits and caveolae. Virus entry was strongly sensitive to the Na(+)/H(+) ion exchange inhibitor amiloride and moderately sensitive to cytochalasin D. Thus, cellular uptake of HRV14 occurs via a pathway exhibiting some, but not all, characteristics of macropinocytosis and is similar to that recently described for adenovirus 3 entry via alpha(v) integrin/CD46 in HeLa cells.

  4. Human Rhinovirus 14 Enters Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells Expressing ICAM-1 by a Clathrin-, Caveolin-, and Flotillin-Independent Pathway ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Ghafoor; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Gajdzik, Leszek; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Fuchs, Renate; Blaas, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mediates binding and entry of major group human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Whereas the entry pathway of minor group HRVs has been studied in detail and is comparatively well understood, the pathway taken by major group HRVs is largely unknown. Use of immunofluorescence microscopy, colocalization with specific endocytic markers, dominant negative mutants, and pharmacological inhibitors allowed us to demonstrate that the major group virus HRV14 enters rhabdomyosarcoma cells transfected to express human ICAM-1 in a clathrin-, caveolin-, and flotillin-independent manner. Electron microscopy revealed that many virions accumulated in long tubular structures, easily distinguishable from clathrin-coated pits and caveolae. Virus entry was strongly sensitive to the Na+/H+ ion exchange inhibitor amiloride and moderately sensitive to cytochalasin D. Thus, cellular uptake of HRV14 occurs via a pathway exhibiting some, but not all, characteristics of macropinocytosis and is similar to that recently described for adenovirus 3 entry via αv integrin/CD46 in HeLa cells. PMID:20130060

  5. Mobile genetic elements in protozoan parasites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudha Bhattacharya; Abhijeet Bakre; Alok Bhattacharya

    2002-08-01

    Mobile genetic elements, by virtue of their ability to move to new chromosomal locations, are considered important in shaping the evolutionary course of the genome. They are widespread in the biological kingdom. Among the protozoan parasites several types of transposable elements are encountered. The largest variety is seen in the trypanosomatids—Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Crithidia fasciculata. They contain elements that insert site-specifically in the spliced-leader RNA genes, and others that are dispersed in a variety of genomic locations. Giardia lamblia contains three families of transposable elements. Two of these are subtelomeric in location while one is chromosome-internal. Entamoeba histolytica has an abundant retrotransposon dispersed in the genome. Nucleotide sequence analysis of all the elements shows that they are all retrotransposons, and, with the exception of one class of elements in T. cruzi, all of them are non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons. Although most copies have accumulated mutations, they can potentially encode reverse transcriptase, endonuclease and nucleic-acid-binding activities. Functionally and phylogenetically they do not belong to a single lineage, showing that retrotransposons were acquired early in the evolution of protozoan parasites. Many of the potentially autonomous elements that encode their own transposition functions have nonautonomous counterparts that probably utilize the functions in trans. In this respect these elements are similar to the mammalian LINEs and SINEs (long and short interspersed DNA elements), showing a common theme in the evolution of retrotransposons. So far there is no report of a DNA transposon in any protozoan parasite. The genome projects that are under way for most of these organisms will help understand the evolution and possible function of these genetic elements.

  6. Different responsiveness of excitatory and inhibitory enteric motor neurons in the human esophagus to electrical field stimulation and to nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Asensio A; Farré, Ricard; Clavé, Pere

    2004-07-01

    To compare electrical field stimulation (EFS) with nicotine in the stimulation of excitatory and inhibitory enteric motoneurons (EMN) in the human esophagus, circular lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and circular and longitudinal esophageal body (EB) strips from 20 humans were studied in organ baths. Responses to EFS or nicotine (100 microM) were compared in basal conditions, after N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA; 100 microM), and after l-NNA and apamin (1 microM). LES strips developed myogenic tone enhanced by TTX (5 microM) or l-NNA. EFS-LES relaxation was abolished by TTX, unaffected by hexamethonium (100 microM), and enhanced by atropine (3 microM). Nicotine-LES relaxation was higher than EFS relaxation, reduced by TTX or atropine, and blocked by hexamethonium. After l-NNA, EFS elicited a strong cholinergic contraction in circular LES and EB, and nicotine elicited a small relaxation in LES and no contractile effect in EB. After l-NNA and apamin, EFS elicited a strong cholinergic contraction in LES and EB, and nicotine elicited a weak contraction amounting to 6.64 +/- 3.19 and 9.20 +/- 5.51% of that induced by EFS. EFS elicited a contraction in longitudinal strips; after l-NNA and apamin, nicotine did not induce any response. Inhibitory EMN tonically inhibit myogenic LES tone and are efficiently stimulated both by EFS and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located in somatodendritic regions and nerve terminals, releasing nitric oxide and an apamin-sensitive neurotransmitter. In contrast, although esophageal excitatory EMN are efficiently stimulated by EFS, their stimulation through nAChRs is difficult and causes weak responses, suggesting the participation of nonnicotinic mechanisms in neurotransmission to excitatory EMN in human esophagus.

  7. [Protozoan infection causes diarrhea in calves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurden, T; Claerebout, E; Vercruysse, J

    2005-12-01

    The role of protozoan parasites in the etiology of diarrhea in calves is highlighted with emphasis on correct diagnosis. In neonatal calves, Cryptosporidium parvum is isolated in more than 44% of the faeces of diarrhetic calves. In calves older than one month, both Eimeria bovis and E. zuernii, and Giardia duodenalis are associated with diarrhea and poor growth. Clinical diagnosis has to be confirmed by examination of host faecal material. Both for C. parvum and G. duodenalis immunological assays are available. Control measures must aim to reduce or prevent oocyst or cyst transmission, by combining management measures, desinfection and chemotherapeutic treatment.

  8. Chapter A7. Section 7.3. Protozoan Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushon, Rebecca N.; Francy, Donna S.

    2003-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are widely distributed in the aquatic environment. Cryptosporidium and Giardia are the principal protozoan pathogens that are known to affect the acceptability of water supplies for public use within the United States. A sampling program for protozoan pathogens should be conducted over an extended period of time because of cyclical and seasonal variations in their concentrations in the environment. This report provides information on the equipment, sampling protocols, and laboratory method that are in standard use by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel for the collection of data on protozoan pathogens.

  9. DNA Vaccines against Protozoan Parasites: Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dumonteil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years, DNA vaccines have gone from a scientific curiosity to one of the most dynamic research field and may offer new alternatives for the control of parasitic diseases such as leishmaniasis and Chagas disease. We review here some of the advances and challenges for the development of DNA vaccines against these diseases. Many studies have validated the concept of using DNA vaccines for both protection and therapy against these protozoan parasites in a variety of mouse models. The challenge now is to translate what has been achieved in these models into veterinary or human vaccines of comparable efficacy. Also, genome-mining and new antigen discovery strategies may provide new tools for a more rational search of novel vaccine candidates.

  10. Population Density, Poor Sanitation, and Enteric Infections in Nueva Santa Rosa, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarquin, Claudia; Arnold, Benjamin F; Muñoz, Fredy; Lopez, Beatriz; Cuéllar, Victoria M; Thornton, Andrew; Patel, Jaymin; Reyes, Lisette; Roy, Sharon L; Bryan, Joe P; McCracken, John P; Colford, John M

    2016-04-01

    Poor sanitation could pose greater risk for enteric pathogen transmission at higher human population densities because of greater potential for pathogens to infect new hosts through environmentally mediated and person-to-person transmission. We hypothesized that incidence and prevalence of diarrhea, enteric protozoans, and soil-transmitted helminth infections would be higher in high-population-density areas compared with low-population-density areas, and that poor sanitation would pose greater risk for these enteric infections at high density compared with low density. We tested our hypotheses using 6 years of clinic-based diarrhea surveillance (2007-2013) including 4,360 geolocated diarrhea cases tested for 13 pathogens and a 2010 cross-sectional survey that measured environmental exposures from 204 households (920 people) and tested 701 stool specimens for enteric parasites. We found that population density was not a key determinant of enteric infection nor a strong effect modifier of risk posed by poor household sanitation in this setting.

  11. Inflammasomes in host response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Dario S; Lima-Junior, Djalma S

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric complexes of proteins that are assembled in the host cell cytoplasm in response to specific stress signals or contamination of the cytoplasm by microbial molecules. The canonical inflammasomes are composed of at least three main components: an inflammatory caspase (caspase-1, caspase-11), an adapter molecule (such as ASC), and a sensor protein (such as NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRP12, NAIP1, NAIP2, NAIP5, or AIM2). The sensor molecule determines the inflammasome specificity by detecting specific microbial products or cell stress signals. Upon activation, these molecular platforms facilitate restriction of microbial replication and trigger an inflammatory form of cell death called pyroptosis, thus accounting for the genesis of inflammatory processes. Inflammasome activation has been widely reported in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, recent reports have highlighted the important role of the inflammasomes in the host response to the pathogenesis of infections caused by intracellular protozoan parasites. Herein, we review the activation and specific roles of inflammasomes in recognition and host responses to intracellular protozoan parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., and Leishmania spp.

  12. Harmonised investigation of the occurrence of human enteric viruses in the leafy green vegetable supply chain in three European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, P; Kozyra, I; Lazic, S; Bouwknegt, M; Rutjes, S; Willems, K; Moloney, R; de Roda Husman, A M; Kaupke, A; Legaki, E; D'Agostino, M; Cook, N; Rzeżutka, A; Petrovic, T; Vantarakis, A

    2012-12-01

    Numerous outbreaks have been attributed to the consumption of raw or minimally processed leafy green vegetables contaminated with enteric viral pathogens. The aim of the present study was an integrated virological monitoring of the salad vegetables supply chain in Europe, from production, processing and point-of-sale. Samples were collected and analysed in Greece, Serbia and Poland, from 'general' and 'ad hoc' sampling points, which were perceived as critical points for virus contamination. General sampling points were identified through the analysis of background information questionnaires based on HACCP audit principles, and they were sampled during each sampling occasion where as-ad hoc sampling points were identified during food safety fact-finding visits and samples were only collected during the fact-finding visits. Human (hAdV) and porcine (pAdV) adenovirus, hepatitis A (HAV) and E (HEV) virus, norovirus GI and GII (NoV) and bovine polyomavirus (bPyV) were detected by means of real-time (RT-) PCR-based protocols. General samples were positive for hAdV, pAdV, HAV, HEV, NoV GI, NoV GII and bPyV at 20.09 % (134/667), 5.53 % (13/235), 1.32 % (4/304), 3.42 % (5/146), 2 % (6/299), 2.95 % (8/271) and 0.82 % (2/245), respectively. Ad hoc samples were positive for hAdV, pAdV, bPyV and NoV GI at 9 % (3/33), 9 % (2/22), 4.54 % (1/22) and 7.14 % (1/14), respectively. These results demonstrate the existence of viral contamination routes from human and animal sources to the salad vegetable supply chain and more specifically indicate the potential for public health risks due to the virus contamination of leafy green vegetables at primary production.

  13. REVERSETRANSCIPTION-PCR ASSAYS FOR THE DETECTION OF BOVINE ENTERIC CALICIVIRUSES (BEC) AND ANALYSIS OF THE GENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG BEC AND HUMAN CALICIVIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two genetically distinct bovine enteric caliciviruses (BEC) have been identified: the Norwalk-like-viruses (NLV), which are genetically related to human NLV, and the distinct NB-like BEC, which is most closely related to Sapporo-like viruses and lagoviruses, but potentially may ...

  14. Survey for protozoan parasites in Eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from the Gulf of Maine using PCR-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Nicholas D; Record, Nicholas R; Robledo, José A Fernández

    2015-10-01

    Protozoan pathogens represent a serious threat to oyster aquaculture, since they can lead to significant production loses. Moreover, oysters can concentrate human pathogens through filter feeding, thus putting at risk raw oyster consumers' health. Using PCR-based assays in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Maine, we expand the Northeast range in the USA for the protozoans Perkinsus marinus, Perkinsus chesapeaki, and Haplosporidium nelsoni, and report for the first time the detection of the human pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. Oysters hosting both P. marinus and P. chesapeaki were more than three times as likely to be infected by a non-Perkinsus than those free of Perkinsus infections.

  15. Neural Crest Cell Implantation Restores Enteric Nervous System Function and Alters the Gastrointestinal Transcriptome in Human Tissue-Engineered Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Schlieve

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired or congenital disruption in enteric nervous system (ENS development or function can lead to significant mechanical dysmotility. ENS restoration through cellular transplantation may provide a cure for enteric neuropathies. We have previously generated human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-derived tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI from human intestinal organoids (HIOs. However, HIO-TESI fails to develop an ENS. The purpose of our study is to restore ENS components derived exclusively from hPSCs in HIO-TESI. hPSC-derived enteric neural crest cell (ENCC supplementation of HIO-TESI establishes submucosal and myenteric ganglia, repopulates various subclasses of neurons, and restores neuroepithelial connections and neuron-dependent contractility and relaxation in ENCC-HIO-TESI. RNA sequencing identified differentially expressed genes involved in neurogenesis, gliogenesis, gastrointestinal tract development, and differentiated epithelial cell types when ENS elements are restored during in vivo development of HIO-TESI. Our findings validate an effective approach to restoring hPSC-derived ENS components in HIO-TESI and may implicate their potential for the treatment of enteric neuropathies.

  16. Invasion mechanisms among emerging food-borne protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Nobuko; Tyler, Kevin M; Llewellyn, Martin S

    2011-10-01

    Food-borne parasitic diseases, many known to be more prevalent in poor countries with deficient sanitary conditions, are becoming common worldwide. Among the emerging protozoan parasites, the most prominent is Trypanosoma cruzi, rarely reported in the past to be transmitted by the oral route but currently responsible for frequent outbreaks of acute cases of Chagas disease contracted orally and characterized by high mortality. Several other food-borne protozoans considered emerging include the apicomplexans Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium, as well as Giardia and Entamoeba histolytica. Here, the interactions of these protozoans with the mucosal epithelia of the host are discussed.

  17. Continuous administration of enteral lipid- and protein-rich nutrition limits inflammation in a human endotoxemia model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, T.; Kox, M.; Haan, J.J. de; Greve, J.W.; Pompe, J.C.; Ramakers, B.P.C.; Pickkers, P.; Buurman, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : An overzealous inflammatory response is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical, trauma, and critically ill patients. Enteral administration of lipid-rich nutrition was previously shown to attenuate inflammation and reduce organ damage via a cholecystokinin-1 receptor-

  18. Invasion and intracellular survival by protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, L David

    2011-03-01

    Intracellular parasitism has arisen only a few times during the long ancestry of protozoan parasites including in diverse groups such as microsporidians, kinetoplastids, and apicomplexans. Strategies used to gain entry differ widely from injection (e.g. microsporidians), active penetration of the host cell (e.g. Toxoplasma), recruitment of lysosomes to a plasma membrane wound (e.g. Trypanosoma cruzi), to host cell-mediated phagocytosis (e.g. Leishmania). The resulting range of intracellular niches is equally diverse ranging from cytosolic (e.g. T. cruzi) to residing within a non-fusigenic vacuole (e.g. Toxoplasma, Encephalitozoon) or a modified phagolysosome (e.g. Leishmania). These lifestyle choices influence access to nutrients, interaction with host cell signaling pathways, and detection by pathogen recognition systems. As such, intracellular life requires a repertoire of adaptations to assure entry-exit from the cell, as well as to thwart innate immune mechanisms and prevent clearance. Elucidating these pathways at the cellular and molecular level may identify key steps that can be targeted to reduce parasite survival or augment immunologic responses and thereby prevent disease.

  19. Quantitative assessment of glial cells in the human and guinea pig enteric nervous system with an anti-Sox8/9/10 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Sebastian; Zeller, Florian; von Weyhern, Claus Werner Hann; Wegner, Michael; Schemann, Michael; Michel, Klaus; Rühl, Anne

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative changes of enteric glia (EGC) have been implicated in gastrointestinal disorders. To facilitate future studies of EGC in human pathology, we aimed to characterize thoroughly glial markers in the human enteric nervous system (ENS) and to compare EGC in man and guinea pig. Whole-mount preparations of the enteric nerve plexuses from human and guinea pig ileum and colon were labeled with antibodies against S100b, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and p75NGFR and the transcription factors Sox8/9/10 and neuronally counterstained. Abundant immunoreactivity (IR) for S100b, GFAP, p75NGFR, and Sox8/9/10 was detected in EGC of all studied regions. Although the cytoplasmatic staining pattern of most markers did not permit glial quantification, the nuclear localization of Sox8/9/10-IR allowed to identify and count all EGC individually. In both man and guinea pig, myenteric ganglia were larger and contained more EGC and neurons than submucous ganglia. Furthermore, there were more EGC in the human than in the guinea pig myenteric plexus (MP), glial density was consistently higher in the human ENS, and the glia index (glia:neuron ratio) ranged from 1.3 to 1.9 and from 5.9 to 7.0 in the human submucous plexus (SMP) and MP, respectively, whereas, in guinea pig, the glia index was 0.8-1.0 in the SMP and 1.7 in the MP. The glia index was the most robust quantitative descriptor within one species. This is a comprehensive set of quantitative EGC measures in man and guinea pig that provides a basis for pathological assessment of glial proliferation and/or degeneration in the diseased gut.

  20. Assessment of the efficacy of membrane filtration processes to remove human enteric viruses and the suitability of bacteriophages and a plant virus as surrogates for those viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaki, N; Matsushita, T; Matsui, Y; Murai, K

    2017-02-24

    Here, we evaluated the efficacy of direct microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) to remove three representative human enteric viruses (i.e., adenovirus [AdV] type 40, coxsackievirus [CV] B5, and hepatitis A virus [HAV] IB), and one surrogate of human caliciviruses (i.e., murine norovirus [MNV] type 1). Eight different MF membranes and three different UF membranes were used. We also examined the ability of coagulation pretreatment with high-basicity polyaluminum chloride (PACl) to enhance virus removal by MF. The removal ratios of two bacteriophages (MS2 and φX174) and a plant virus (pepper mild mottle virus; PMMoV) were compared with the removal ratios of the human enteric viruses to assess the suitability of these viruses to be used as surrogates for human enteric viruses. The virus removal ratios obtained with direct MF with membranes with nominal pore sizes of 0.1-0.22 μm differed, depending on the membrane used; adsorptive interactions, particularly hydrophobic interactions between virus particles and the membrane surface, were dominant factors for virus removal. In contrast, direct UF with membranes with nominal molecular weight cutoffs of 1-100 kDa effectively removed viruses through size exclusion, and >4-log10 removal was achieved when a membrane with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 1 kDa was used. At pH 7 and 8, in-line coagulation-MF with nonsulfated high-basicity PACls containing Al30 species had generally a better virus removal (i.e., >4-log10 virus removal) than the other aluminum-based coagulants, except for φX174. For all of the filtration processes, the removal ratios of AdV, CV, HAV, and MNV were comparable and strongly correlated with each other. The removal ratios of MS2 and PMMoV were comparable or smaller than those of the three human enteric viruses and MNV, and were strongly correlated with those of the three human enteric viruses and MNV. The removal ratios obtained with coagulation-MF for φX174 were markedly smaller than

  1. Inactivation of protozoan parasites in food, water, and environmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Ortega, Ynes R

    2006-11-01

    Protozoan parasites can survive under ambient and refrigerated storage conditions when associated with a range of substrates. Consequently, various treatments have been used to inactivate protozoan parasites (Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Cyclospora) in food, water, and environmental systems. Physical treatments that affect survival or removal of protozoan parasites include freezing, heating, filtration, sedimentation, UV light, irradiation, high pressure, and ultrasound. Ozone is a more effective chemical disinfectant than chlorine or chlorine dioxide for inactivation of protozoan parasites in water systems. However, sequential inactivation treatments can optimize existing treatments through synergistic effects. Careful selection of methods to evaluate inactivation treatments is needed because many studies that have employed vital dye stains and in vitro excystation have produced underestimations of the effectiveness of these treatments.

  2. Off the hook - how bacteria survive protozoan grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Kjelleberg, S.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial growth and survival in numerous environments are constrained by the action of bacteria-consuming protozoa. Recent findings suggest that bacterial adaptations against protozoan predation might have a significant role in bacterial persistence and diversification. We argue that selective...

  3. Do you see what I see: Recognition of protozoan parasites by Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debopam; Stumhofer, Jason S

    2013-08-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important for recognizing a variety of pathogens, including protozoan parasites, and initiating innate immune responses against them. TLRs are localized on the cell surface as well as in the endosome, and are implicated in innate sensing of these parasites. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the identification of parasite-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns and the TLRs that bind them. The role of these TLRs in initiating the immune response against protozoan parasitic infections in vivo will be presented in the context of murine models of infection utilizing TLR-deficient mice. Additionally, we will explore evidence that TLRs and genetic variants of TLRs may impact the outcome of these parasitic infections in humans.

  4. DNA repair mechanisms in eukaryotes: Special focus in Entamoeba histolytica and related protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Camarillo, César; Lopez-Casamichana, Mavil; Weber, Christian; Guillen, Nancy; Orozco, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A

    2009-12-01

    Eukaryotic cell viability highly relies on genome stability and DNA integrity maintenance. The cellular response to DNA damage mainly consists of six biological conserved pathways known as homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER), mismatch repair (MMR), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and methyltransferase repair that operate in a concerted way to minimize genetic information loss due to a DNA lesion. Particularly, protozoan parasites survival depends on DNA repair mechanisms that constantly supervise chromosomes to correct damaged nucleotides generated by cytotoxic agents, host immune pressure or cellular processes. Here we reviewed the current knowledge about DNA repair mechanisms in the most relevant human protozoan pathogens. Additionally, we described the recent advances to understand DNA repair mechanisms in Entamoeba histolytica with special emphasis in the use of genomic approaches based on bioinformatic analysis of parasite genome sequence and microarrays technology.

  5. The past, present and future of fluorescent protein tags in anaerobic protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Adeline, Victoria; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The world health organization currently recognizes diarrhoeal diseases as a significant cause of death in children globally. Protozoan parasites such as Giardia and Entamoeba that thrive in the oxygen-deprived environment of the human gut are common etiological agents of diarrhoea. In the urogenital tract of humans, the anaerobic protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is notorious as the most common non-viral, sexually transmitted pathogen. Even with high medical impact, our understanding of anaerobic parasite physiology is scarce and as a result, treatment choices are limited. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are invaluable tools as genetically encoded protein tags for advancing knowledge of cellular function. These FP tags emit fluorescent colours and once attached to a protein of interest, allow tracking of parasite proteins in the dynamic cellular space. Application of green FPs-like FPs in anaerobic protozoans is hindered by their oxygen dependency. In this review, we examine aspects of anaerobic parasite biology that clash with physio-chemical properties of FPs and limit their use as live-parasite protein tags. We expose novel FPs, such as miniSOG that do not require oxygen for signal production. The potential use of novel FPs has the opportunity to leverage the anaerobe parasitologist toolkit to that of aerobe parasitologist.

  6. Transfection of the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Robledo, José A; Lin, Zhuoer; Vasta, Gerardo R

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing efforts for sequencing the genome of the protozoan parasite Perkinsus marinus, together with functional genomic initiatives, have continued to provide invaluable information about genes and metabolic pathways that not only will increase our understanding of its biology, but also have the potential to reveal useful targets for intervention. The lack of molecular tools for the functional characterization of genes of interest, however, has hindered progress in this regard. Here we report the development and validation of transfection methodology for this parasite. We first selected from our P. marinus EST collection a highly expressed gene, which we designated "MOE" (PmMOE), to which we fused at the C-terminus the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene (pPmMOE-GFP). The exogenous DNA was introduced into the trophozoite stage of the parasite by electroporation using the Nucleofector technology. The transfection efficiency was 37.8% with fluorescence detected as early as 14 h after electroporation, with the transfectants still remaining fluorescent after 8 months even in the absence of drug selection. The 5' flanking region was essential for transcription; constructs with 100 and 204 bp flanking the transcription start site also drove transcription effectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses was consistent with integration by non-homologous recombination. This transfection technique, the first one reported for a member of the Perkinsozoa, provides a new tool for studies of gene regulation and expression, protein targeting, and protein-protein interactions, and should significantly contribute to gain further insight into the biology of Perkinsus spp.

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Enters Human Keratinocytes by a Nectin-1-Dependent, Rapid Plasma Membrane Fusion Pathway That Functions at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Charlotte L; Elliott, Gillian

    2016-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infects humans through stratified epithelia that are composed primarily of keratinocytes. The route of HSV-1 entry into keratinocytes has been the subject of limited investigation, but it is proposed to involve pH-dependent endocytosis, requiring the gD-binding receptor nectin-1. Here, we have utilized the nTERT human keratinocyte cell line as a new model for dissecting the mechanism of HSV-1 entry into the host. Although immortalized, these cells nonetheless retain normal growth and differentiation properties of primary cells. Using short interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion studies, we confirm that, despite nTERT cells expressing high levels of the alternative gD receptor HVEM, HSV-1 requires nectin-1, not HVEM, to enter these cells. Strikingly, virus entry into nTERT cells occurred with unusual rapidity, such that maximum penetration was achieved within 5 min. Moreover, HSV-1 was able to enter keratinocytes but not other cell types at temperatures as low as 7°C, conditions where endocytosis was shown to be completely inhibited. Transmission electron microscopy of early entry events at both 37°C and 7°C identified numerous examples of naked virus capsids located immediately beneath the plasma membrane, with no evidence of virions in cytoplasmic vesicles. Taken together, these results imply that HSV-1 uses the nectin-1 receptor to enter human keratinocyte cells via a previously uncharacterized rapid plasma membrane fusion pathway that functions at low temperature. These studies have important implications for current understanding of the relationship between HSV-1 and its relevant in vivo target cell. The gold standard of antiviral treatment for any human virus infection is the prevention of virus entry into the host cell. In the case of HSV-1, primary infection in the human begins in the epidermis of the skin or the oral mucosa, where the virus infects keratinocytes, and it is therefore important to understand the molecular events

  8. The immunogenic properties of protozoan glycosylphosphatidylinositols in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Romanico B G; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Schwarz, Ralph T; Faye, Ingrid

    2009-02-01

    In contrast to humans, mosquitoes do not have an adaptive immune response to deal with pathogens, and therefore must rely on their innate immune system to deal with invaders. This facilitates the recognition of different microbes on the basis of surface components or antigens. Such antigens have been identified in various types of microbe such as bacteria and fungi, yet none has been identified in the genus protozoa, which includes pathogens such as the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. This study allowed us to test the antigenic properties of protozoan glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) on the mosquito immune system. We found that both P. falciparum GPI and T. gondii GPI induce the strong expression of several antimicrobial peptides following ingestion, and that as a result of the immune response against the GPIs, the number of eggs produced by the mosquito is reduced dramatically. Such effects have been associated with malaria infected mosquitoes, but never associated with a Plasmodium specific antigen. This study demonstrates that protozoan GPIs can be considered as protozoan specific immune elicitors in mosquitoes, and that P. falciparum GPI plays a critical role in the malaria parasite manipulation of the mosquito vector to facilitate its transmission.

  9. Iron-sulphur clusters, their biosynthesis, and biological functions in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Vahab; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Fe-S clusters are ensembles of sulphide-linked di-, tri-, and tetra-iron centres of a variety of metalloproteins that play important roles in reduction and oxidation of mitochondrial electron transport, energy metabolism, regulation of gene expression, cell survival, nitrogen fixation, and numerous other metabolic pathways. The Fe-S clusters are assembled by one of four distinct systems: NIF, SUF, ISC, and CIA machineries. The ISC machinery is a house-keeping system conserved widely from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes, while the other systems are present in a limited range of organisms and play supplementary roles under certain conditions such as stress. Fe-S cluster-containing proteins and the components required for Fe-S cluster biosynthesis are modulated under stress conditions, drug resistance, and developmental stages. It is also known that a defect in Fe-S proteins and Fe-S cluster biogenesis leads to many genetic disorders in humans, which indicates the importance of the systems. In this review, we describe the biological and physiological significance of Fe-S cluster-containing proteins and their biosynthesis in parasitic protozoa including Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Giardia, Trichomonas, Entamoeba, Cryptosporidium, Blastocystis, and microsporidia. We also discuss the roles of Fe-S cluster biosynthesis in proliferation, differentiation, and stress response in protozoan parasites. The heterogeneity of the systems and the compartmentalization of Fe-S cluster biogenesis in the protozoan parasites likely reflect divergent evolution under highly diverse environmental niches, and influence their parasitic lifestyle and pathogenesis. Finally, both Fe-S cluster-containing proteins and their biosynthetic machinery in protozoan parasites are remarkably different from those in their mammalian hosts. Thus, they represent a rational target for the development of novel chemotherapeutic and prophylactic agents against protozoan infections.

  10. Successful in vitro expansion and Characterization of Human Enteric Neuronal cells- A step towards Cell based therapies for Hirschsprung’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Enteric Nervous system (ENS is a part of the Peripheral nervous system (PNS that controls the peristaltic activity of the gut wall which is essential for propulsion of food in the digestive tract. It is composed of a large number of neurons and glial cells, distributed throughout the length of the gut. These ganglion cells develop from the neural crest in the embryo. Failure of complete colonization of the gut by these enteric neural crest cells during early development of life results in absence of ganglia or neurons in a portion of the gut, usually the colon which leads to aperistaltis and severe intestinal obstruction. This is known as Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR also known as congenital megacolon. HSCR affects 1 in 4500 newborns (1, 2. It appears either sporadically or has a familial basis and is often associated with other developmental defects. The main forms of treatment of HSCR are surgical resection of the aganglionic segment and pull through of the normal bowel. At present research is aimed at developing Cell based therapies for replacement of ganglion cells or enteric neuronal cells in the aganglionic portion of the gut thus aiming at restoring the function of the gut (1, 3, 5. In this study we have isolated, in vitro expanded and characterized the Enteric Neuronal cells derived from human gut full thickness biopsy samplesMATERIALS AND METHODS: The postnatal gut full thickness biopsy samples of size 2-4 mm were obtained using from 13 patients undergoing gut resection surgery after informed consent. The samples were washed in Phosphate Buffer saline and using forceps, the outer smooth muscle layers along with the myenteric plexus were peeled off from the underlying tissue as strips. The strips were washed in Phosphate Buffer saline (PBS and treated with 1mg/ml Collagenase/Dispase mixture in PBS for 30-45 min at 37°C. The digested cells were filtered with 70µm filter and the cell suspensions were centrifuged at 1800

  11. Entering the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vince, Gaia

    2016-04-01

    There is growing evidence that we are now entering a new geological age defined by human influence on the planet, the Anthropocene. Millions of years from now, a stripe in the accumulated layers of rock on Earth's surface will reveal our human fingerprint just as we can see evidence of dinosaurs in rocks of the Jurassic, or the explosion of life that marks the Cambrian. There is now no part of the planet untouched by human influence. The realisation that we wield such planetary power requires a quite extraordinary shift in perception, fundamentally toppling the scientific, cultural and religious philosophies that define our place in the world. This session explores these issues and examines our new relationship with nature now that we so strongly influence the biosphere. And this session will look at what the impacts of our planetary changes mean for us, and how we might deal with the consequences of the Anthropocene we have created.

  12. Artemisinin and its derivatives in treating protozoan infections beyond malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Cecilia Shi Ni; Lam, Nelson Siu Kei; Yu, Deying; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Lu, Fangli

    2017-03-01

    Parasitic protozoan diseases continue to rank among the world's greatest global health problems, which are also common among poor populations. Currently available drugs for treatment present drawbacks, urging the need for more effective, safer, and cheaper drugs. Artemisinin (ART) and its derivatives are some of the most important classes of antimalarial agents originally derived from Artemisia annua L. However, besides the outstanding antimalarial and antischistosomal activities, ART and its derivatives also possess activities against other parasitic protozoa. In this paper we review the activities of ART and its derivatives against protozoan parasites in vitro and in vivo, including Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Eimeria tenella, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Naegleria fowleri, Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Babesia spp. We conclude that ART and its derivatives may be good alternatives for treating other non-malarial protozoan infections in developing countries, although more studies are necessary before they can be applied clinically.

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Genital Infections Among Newly Diagnosed Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Adults Entering Human Immunodeficiency Virus Care in Windhoek, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomand, Gaston; Schlefer, Madeleine; Gutreuter, Steve; Tobias, Sarah; Patel, Roopal; DeLuca, Nickolas; Hood, Julia; Sawadogo, Souleymane; Chen, Cheng; Muadinohamba, Alexinah; Lowrance, David W.; Bock, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying and treating genital infections, including sexually transmitted infections (STI), among newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals may benefit both public and individual health. We assessed prevalence of genital infections and their correlates among newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals enrolling in HIV care services in Namibia. Methods Newly diagnosed HIV-infected adults entering HIV care at 2 health facilities in Windhoek, Namibia, were recruited from December 2012 to March 2014. Participants provided behavioral and clinical data including CD4+ T lymphocyte counts. Genital and blood specimens were tested for gonorrhea, Chlamydia, trichomoniasis, Mycoplasma genitalium, syphilis, bacterial vaginosis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis. Results Among 599 adults, 56% were women and 15% reported consistent use of condoms in the past 6 months. The most common infections were bacterial vaginosis (37.2%), trichomoniasis (34.6%) and Chlamydia (14.6%) in women and M. genitalium (11.4%) in men. Correlates for trichomoniasis included being female (adjusted relative risk, [aRR], 7.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.07–12.65), higher education (aRR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38–0.89), and lower CD4 cell count (aRR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.08–2.40). Being female (aRR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.27–4.50), nonmarried (aRR, 2.30; (95% CI, 1.28–4.14), and having condomless sex (aRR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.06–7.00) were independently associated with chlamydial infection. Across all infections, female (aRR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.79–2.98), nonmarried participants (aRR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.06–1.59), had higher risk to present with any STI, whereas pregnant women (aRR, 1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.31) were at increased risk of any STI or reproductive tract infection. PMID:27893600

  14. Water quality indicators: bacteria, coliphages, enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Johnson; Ganesh, Atheesha

    2013-12-01

    Water quality through the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms may affect human health. Coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and coliphages are normally used as indicators of water quality. However, the presence of above-mentioned indicators do not always suggest the presence of human enteric viruses. It is important to study human enteric viruses in water. Human enteric viruses can tolerate fluctuating environmental conditions and survive in the environment for long periods of time becoming causal agents of diarrhoeal diseases. Therefore, the potential of human pathogenic viruses as significant indicators of water quality is emerging. Human Adenoviruses and other viruses have been proposed as suitable indices for the effective identification of such organisms of human origin contaminating water systems. This article reports on the recent developments in the management of water quality specifically focusing on human enteric viruses as indicators.

  15. ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AMONG ENTERIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM HUMAN AND ANIMAL WASTES AND IMPACTED SURFACE WATERS: COMPARISON WITH NARMS FINDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human infection with bacteria exhibiting mono or multiple antimicrobial resistance (MAR) has been a growing problem in the US, and studies have implicated livestock as a source of MAR bacteria primarily through foodborne transmission routes. However, waterborne transmission of...

  16. Water-soluble ruthenium complexes bearing activity against protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarniguet, Cynthia; Toloza, Jeannette; Cipriani, Micaella; Lapier, Michel; Vieites, Marisol; Toledano-Magaña, Yanis; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno, Virtudes; Maya, Juan Diego; Azar, Claudio Olea; Gambino, Dinorah; Otero, Lucía

    2014-06-01

    Parasitic illnesses are major causes of human disease and misery worldwide. Among them, both amebiasis and Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasites, Entamoeba histolytica and Trypanosoma cruzi, are responsible for thousands of annual deaths. The lack of safe and effective chemotherapy and/or the appearance of current drug resistance make the development of novel pharmacological tools for their treatment relevant. In this sense, within the framework of the medicinal inorganic chemistry, metal-based drugs appear to be a good alternative to find a pharmacological answer to parasitic diseases. In this work, novel ruthenium complexes [RuCl2(HL)(HPTA)2]Cl2 with HL=bioactive 5-nitrofuryl containing thiosemicarbazones and PTA=1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane have been synthesized and fully characterized. PTA was included as co-ligand in order to modulate complexes aqueous solubility. In fact, obtained complexes were water soluble. Their activity against T. cruzi and E. histolytica was evaluated in vitro. [RuCl2(HL4)(HPTA)2]Cl2 complex, with HL4=N-phenyl-5-nitrofuryl-thiosemicarbazone, was the most active compound against both parasites. In particular, it showed an excellent activity against E. histolytica (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50)=5.2 μM), even higher than that of the reference drug metronidazole. In addition, this complex turns out to be selective for E. histolytica (selectivity index (SI)>38). The potential mechanism of antiparasitic action of the obtained ruthenium complexes could involve oxidative stress for both parasites. Additionally, complexes could interact with DNA as second potential target by an intercalative-like mode. Obtained results could be considered a contribution in the search for metal compounds that could be active against multiple parasites.

  17. Expression of PROKR1 and PROKR2 in human enteric neural precursor cells and identification of sequence variants suggest a role in HSCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Ruiz-Ferrer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enteric nervous system (ENS is entirely derived from neural crest and its normal development is regulated by specific molecular pathways. Failure in complete ENS formation results in aganglionic gut conditions such as Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR. Recently, PROKR1 expression has been demonstrated in mouse enteric neural crest derived cells and Prok-1 was shown to work coordinately with GDNF in the development of the ENS. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, ENS progenitors were isolated and characterized from the ganglionic gut from children diagnosed with and without HSCR, and the expression of prokineticin receptors was examined. Immunocytochemical analysis of neurosphere-forming cells demonstrated that both PROKR1 and PROKR2 were present in human enteric neural crest cells. In addition, we also performed a mutational analysis of PROKR1, PROKR2, PROK1 and PROK2 genes in a cohort of HSCR patients, evaluating them for the first time as susceptibility genes for the disease. Several missense variants were detected, most of them affecting highly conserved amino acid residues of the protein and located in functional domains of both receptors, which suggests a possible deleterious effect in their biological function. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that not only PROKR1, but also PROKR2 might mediate a complementary signalling to the RET/GFRα1/GDNF pathway supporting proliferation/survival and differentiation of precursor cells during ENS development. These findings, together with the detection of sequence variants in PROKR1, PROK1 and PROKR2 genes associated to HSCR and, in some cases in combination with RET or GDNF mutations, provide the first evidence to consider them as susceptibility genes for HSCR.

  18. Molecular assays for targeting human and bovine enteric viruses in coastal waters and their application for library-independent source tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, T.-T.; Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, E.K.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid population growth and urban development along waterways and coastal areas have led to decreasing water quality. To examine the effects of upstream anthropogenic activities on microbiological water quality, methods for source-specific testing are required. In this study, molecular assays targeting human enteroviruses (HEV), bovine enteroviruses (BEV), and human adenoviruses (HAdV) were developed and used to identify major sources of fecal contamination in the lower Altamaha River, Georgia. Two-liter grab samples were collected monthly from five tidally influenced stations between July and December 2002. Samples were analyzed by reverse transcription- and nested-PCR. PCR results were confirmed by dot blot hybridization. Eleven and 17 of the 30 surface water samples tested positive for HAdV and HEV, respectively. Two-thirds of the samples tested positive for either HEV or HAdV, and the viruses occurred simultaneously in 26% of samples. BEV were detected in 11 of 30 surface water samples. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of both human and bovine enteric viruses was not significantly related to either fecal coliform or total coliform levels. The presence of these viruses was directly related to dissolved oxygen and streamflow but inversely related to water temperature, rainfall in the 30 days preceding sampling, and chlorophyll-?? concentrations. The stringent host specificity of enteric viruses makes them good library-independent indicators for identification of water pollution sources. Viral pathogen detection by PCR is a highly sensitive and easy-to-use tool for rapid assessment of water quality and fecal contamination when public health risk characterization is not necessary. Copyright ?? 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. In vivo transplantation of neurosphere-like bodies derived from the human postnatal and adult enteric nervous system: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Hetz

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the in vitro characterization of human adult enteric neural progenitor cells have opened new possibilities for cell-based therapies in gastrointestinal motility disorders. However, whether these cells are able to integrate within an in vivo gut environment is still unclear. In this study, we transplanted neural progenitor-containing neurosphere-like bodies (NLBs in a mouse model of hypoganglionosis and analyzed cellular integration of NLB-derived cell types and functional improvement. NLBs were propagated from postnatal and adult human gut tissues. Cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR and subtelomere fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. For in vivo evaluation, the plexus of murine colon was damaged by the application of cationic surfactant benzalkonium chloride which was followed by the transplantation of NLBs in a fibrin matrix. After 4 weeks, grafted human cells were visualized by combined in situ hybridization (Alu and immunohistochemistry (PGP9.5, GFAP, SMA. In addition, we determined nitric oxide synthase (NOS-positive neurons and measured hypertrophic effects in the ENS and musculature. Contractility of treated guts was assessed in organ bath after electrical field stimulation. NLBs could be reproducibly generated without any signs of chromosomal alterations using subtelomere FISH. NLB-derived cells integrated within the host tissue and showed expected differentiated phenotypes i.e. enteric neurons, glia and smooth muscle-like cells following in vivo transplantation. Our data suggest biological effects of the transplanted NLB cells on tissue contractility, although robust statistical results could not be obtained due to the small sample size. Further, it is unclear, which of the NLB cell types including neural progenitors have direct restoring effects or, alternatively may act via 'bystander' mechanisms in vivo. Our findings provide further evidence that NLB transplantation can be

  20. ATHEANA: {open_quotes}a technique for human error analysis{close_quotes} entering the implementation phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.; O`Hara, J.; Luckas, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) has become an increasingly important tool in the nuclear power industry, both for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the operating utilities. The NRC recently published a final policy statement, SECY-95-126, encouraging the use of PRA in regulatory activities. Human reliability analysis (HRA), while a critical element of PRA, has limitations in the analysis of human actions in PRAs that have long been recognized as a constraint when using PRA. In fact, better integration of HRA into the PRA process has long been a NRC issue. Of particular concern, has been the omission of errors of commission - those errors that are associated with inappropriate interventions by operators with operating systems. To address these concerns, the NRC identified the need to develop an improved HRA method, so that human reliability can be better represented and integrated into PRA modeling and quantification. The purpose of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) project, entitled `Improved HRA Method Based on Operating Experience` is to develop a new method for HRA which is supported by the analysis of risk-significant operating experience. This approach will allow a more realistic assessment and representation of the human contribution to plant risk, and thereby increase the utility of PRA. The project`s completed, ongoing, and future efforts fall into four phases: (1) Assessment phase (FY 92/93); (2) Analysis and Characterization phase (FY 93/94); (3) Development phase (FY 95/96); and (4) Implementation phase (FY 96/97 ongoing).

  1. Immunohistochemical localisation of cholinergic muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1r) in the guinea pig and human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A M; Hutson, J M; Southwell, B R

    2007-07-01

    Little is known regarding the location of cholinergic muscarinic receptor 1 (M1r) in the ENS, even though physiological data suggest that M1rs are central to cholinergic neurotransmission. This study localised M1rs in the ENS of the guinea pig ileum and human colon using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR in human colon. Double labelling using antibodies against neurochemical markers was used to identify neuron subytpes bearing M1r. M1r immunoreactivity (IR) was present on neurons in the myenteric and submucosal ganglia. The two antibodies gave similar M1r-IR patterns and M1r-IR was abolished upon antibody preabsorption. M1r-IR was present on cholinergic and nNOS-IR nerve cell bodies in both guinea pig and human myenteric neurons. Presynaptic M1r-IR was present on NOS-IR and VAChT-IR nerve fibres in the circular muscle in the human colon. In the submucosal ganglia, M1r-IR was present on a population of neurons that contained cChAT-IR, but did not contain NPY-IR or calretinin-IR. M1r-IR was present on endothelial cells of blood vessels in the submucosal plexus. The localisation of M1r-IR in the guinea pig and human ENS shown in this study agrees with physiological studies. M1r-IR in cholinergic and nitrergic neurons and nerve fibres indicate that M1rs have a role in both cholinergic and nitrergic transmission. M1r-IR present in submucosal neurons suggests a role in mediating acetylcholine's effect on submucosal sensory and secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. M1r-IR present on blood vessel endothelial cells suggests that M1rs may also mediate acetylcholine's direct effect on vasoactivation.

  2. B-Cell Response during Protozoan Parasite Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Amezcua Vesely

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss how protozoan parasites alter immature and mature B cell compartment. B1 and marginal zone (MZ B cells, considered innate like B cells, are activated during protozoan parasite infections, and they generate short lived plasma cells providing a prompt antibody source. In addition, protozoan infections induce massive B cell response with polyclonal activation that leads to hypergammaglobulnemia with serum antibodies specific for the parasites and self and/or non related antigens. To protect themselves, the parasites have evolved unique ways to evade B cell immune responses inducing apoptosis of MZ and conventional mature B cells. As a consequence of the parasite induced-apoptosis, the early IgM response and an already establish humoral immunity are affected during the protozoan parasite infection. Moreover, some trypanosomatides trigger bone marrow immature B cell apoptosis, influencing the generation of new mature B cells. Simultaneously with their ability to release antibodies, B cells produce cytokines/quemokines that influence the characteristic of cellular immune response and consequently the progression of parasite infections.

  3. Host-lipidome as a potential target of protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rub, Abdur; Arish, Mohd; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Ahmed, Niyaz; Akhter, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Host-lipidome caters parasite interaction by acting as first line of recognition, attachment on the cell surface, intracellular trafficking, and survival of the parasite inside the host cell. Here, we summarize how protozoan parasites exploit host-lipidome by suppressing, augmenting, engulfing, remodeling and metabolizing lipids to achieve successful parasitism inside the host.

  4. Innate immune receptors in carp: recognition of protozoan parasites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis reports on pattern recognition receptors involved in the immune responses of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to two protozoan parasites Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii. The immune responses of carp are fundamentally different when comparing these two extracellular blood

  5. The Combined Deficiency of Immunoproteasome Subunits Affects Both the Magnitude and Quality of Pathogen- and Genetic Vaccination-Induced CD8+ T Cell Responses to the Human Protozoan Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersching, Jonatan; Vasconcelos, José R.; Ferreira, Camila P.; Caetano, Braulia C.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Bruna–Romero, Oscar; Baron, Monique A.; Ferreira, Ludmila R. P.; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The β1i, β2i and β5i immunoproteasome subunits have an important role in defining the repertoire of MHC class I-restricted epitopes. However, the impact of combined deficiency of the three immunoproteasome subunits in the development of protective immunity to intracellular pathogens has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrate that immunoproteasomes play a key role in host resistance and genetic vaccination-induced protection against the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas disease), immunity to which is dependent on CD8+ T cells and IFN-γ (the classical immunoproteasome inducer). We observed that infection with T. cruzi triggers the transcription of immunoproteasome genes, both in mice and humans. Importantly, genetically vaccinated or T. cruzi-infected β1i, β2i and β5i triple knockout (TKO) mice presented significantly lower frequencies and numbers of splenic CD8+ effector T cells (CD8+CD44highCD62Llow) specific for the previously characterized immunodominant (VNHRFTLV) H-2Kb-restricted T. cruzi epitope. Not only the quantity, but also the quality of parasite-specific CD8+ T cell responses was altered in TKO mice. Hence, the frequency of double-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) or single-positive (IFN-γ+) cells specific for the H-2Kb-restricted immunodominant as well as subdominant T. cruzi epitopes were higher in WT mice, whereas TNF single-positive cells prevailed among CD8+ T cells from TKO mice. Contrasting with their WT counterparts, TKO animals were also lethally susceptible to T. cruzi challenge, even after an otherwise protective vaccination with DNA and adenoviral vectors. We conclude that the immunoproteasome subunits are key determinants in host resistance to T. cruzi infection by influencing both the magnitude and quality of CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:27128676

  6. The Neisseria meningitidis ADP-Ribosyltransferase NarE Enters Human Epithelial Cells and Disrupts Epithelial Monolayer Integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeri

    Full Text Available Many pathogenic bacteria utilize ADP-ribosylating toxins to modify and impair essential functions of eukaryotic cells. It has been previously reported that Neisseria meningitidis possesses an ADP-ribosyltransferase enzyme, NarE, retaining the capacity to hydrolyse NAD and to transfer ADP-ribose moiety to arginine residues in target acceptor proteins. Here we show that upon internalization into human epithelial cells, NarE gains access to the cytoplasm and, through its ADP-ribosylating activity, targets host cell proteins. Notably, we observed that these events trigger the disruption of the epithelial monolayer integrity and the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Overall, our findings provide, for the first time, evidence for a biological activity of NarE on host cells, suggesting its possible involvement in Neisseria pathogenesis.

  7. E. coli enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000296.htm E. coli enteritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. E. coli enteritis is swelling (inflammation) of the small intestine from ...

  8. Developing vaccines to control protozoan parasites in ruminants: dead or alive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Elisabeth A; Bartley, Paul M; Rocchi, Mara; Benavidas-Silvan, Julio; Burrells, Alison; Hotchkiss, Emily; Chianini, Francesca; Canton, German; Katzer, Frank

    2011-08-04

    Protozoan parasites are among some of the most successful organisms worldwide, being able to live and multiply within a very wide range of hosts. The diseases caused by these parasites cause significant production losses in the livestock sector involving reproductive failure, impaired weight gain, contaminated meat, reduced milk yields and in severe cases, loss of the animal. In addition, some protozoan parasites affecting livestock such as Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum may also be transmitted to humans where they can cause serious disease. Data derived from experimental models of infection in ruminant species enables the study of the interactions between parasite and host. How the parasite initiates infection, becomes established and multiplies within the host and the critical pathways that may lead to a disease outcome are all important to enable the rational design of appropriate intervention strategies. Once the parasites invade the hosts they induce both innate and adaptive immune responses and the induction and function of these immune responses are critical in determining the outcome of the infection. Vaccines offer green solutions to control disease as they are sustainable, reducing reliance on pharmacological drugs and pesticides. The use of vaccines has multiple benefits such as improving animal health and welfare by controlling animal infections and infestations; improving public health by controlling zoonoses and food borne pathogens in animals; solving problems associated with resistance to acaricides, antibiotics and anthelmintics; keeping animals and the environment free of chemical residues and maintaining biodiversity. All of these attributes should lead to improved sustainability of animal production and economic benefit. Using different protozoan parasitic diseases as examples this paper will discuss various approaches used to develop vaccines to protect against disease in livestock and discuss the relative merits of using live

  9. Candida albicans Targets a Lipid Raft/Dectin-1 Platform to Enter Human Monocytes and Induce Antigen Specific T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Turris, Valeria; Teloni, Raffaela; Chiani, Paola; Bromuro, Carla; Mariotti, Sabrina; Pardini, Manuela; Nisini, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogens have been described to enter host cells via cholesterol-enriched membrane lipid raft microdomains. We found that disruption of lipid rafts by the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by the cholesterol-binding antifungal drug Amphotericin B strongly impairs the uptake of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by human monocytes, suggesting a role of raft microdomains in the phagocytosis of the fungus. Time lapse confocal imaging indicated that Dectin-1, the C-type lectin receptor that recognizes Candida albicans cell wall-associated β-glucan, is recruited to lipid rafts upon Candida albicans uptake by monocytes, supporting the notion that lipid rafts act as an entry platform. Interestingly disruption of lipid raft integrity and interference with fungus uptake do not alter cytokine production by monocytes in response to Candida albicans but drastically dampen fungus specific T cell response. In conclusion, these data suggest that monocyte lipid rafts play a crucial role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in humans and highlight a new and unexpected immunomodulatory function of the antifungal drug Amphotericin B.

  10. Candida albicans Targets a Lipid Raft/Dectin-1 Platform to Enter Human Monocytes and Induce Antigen Specific T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria de Turris

    Full Text Available Several pathogens have been described to enter host cells via cholesterol-enriched membrane lipid raft microdomains. We found that disruption of lipid rafts by the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by the cholesterol-binding antifungal drug Amphotericin B strongly impairs the uptake of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by human monocytes, suggesting a role of raft microdomains in the phagocytosis of the fungus. Time lapse confocal imaging indicated that Dectin-1, the C-type lectin receptor that recognizes Candida albicans cell wall-associated β-glucan, is recruited to lipid rafts upon Candida albicans uptake by monocytes, supporting the notion that lipid rafts act as an entry platform. Interestingly disruption of lipid raft integrity and interference with fungus uptake do not alter cytokine production by monocytes in response to Candida albicans but drastically dampen fungus specific T cell response. In conclusion, these data suggest that monocyte lipid rafts play a crucial role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in humans and highlight a new and unexpected immunomodulatory function of the antifungal drug Amphotericin B.

  11. A human strain of Oxalobacter (HC-1) promotes enteric oxalate secretion in the small intestine of mice and reduces urinary oxalate excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Marguerite; Freel, Robert W

    2013-10-01

    Enteric oxalate secretion that correlated with reductions in urinary oxalate excretion was previously reported in a mouse model of primary hyperoxaluria, and in wild type (WT) mice colonized with a wild rat strain (OXWR) of Oxalobacter (Am J Physiol 300:G461–G469, 2010). Since a human strain of the bacterium is more likely to be clinically used as a probiotic therapeutic, we tested the effects of HC-1 in WT. Following artificial colonization of WT mice with HC-1, the bacteria were confirmed to be present in the large intestine and, unexpectedly, detected in the small intestine for varying periods of time. The main objective of the present study was to determine whether the presence of HC-1 promoted intestinal secretion in the more proximal segments of the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, we determined whether HC-1 colonization led to reductions in urinary oxalate excretion in these mice. The results show that the human Oxalobacter strain promotes a robust net secretion of oxalate in the distal ileum as well as in the caecum and distal colon and these changes in transport correlate with the beneficial effect of reducing renal excretion of oxalate. We conclude that OXWR effects on intestinal oxalate transport and oxalate homeostasis are not unique to the wild rat strain and that, mechanistically, HC-1 has significant potential for use as a probiotic treatment for hyperoxaluria especially if it is also targeted to the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Protozoan grazing reduces the current output of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Nevin, Kelly P; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Woodard, Trevor L; Strickland, Justin N; Lovley, Derek R

    2015-10-01

    Several experiments were conducted to determine whether protozoan grazing can reduce current output from sediment microbial fuel cells. When marine sediments were amended with eukaryotic inhibitors, the power output from the fuel cells increased 2-5-fold. Quantitative PCR showed that Geobacteraceae sequences were 120 times more abundant on anodes from treated fuel cells compared to untreated fuel cells, and that Spirotrichea sequences in untreated fuel cells were 200 times more abundant on anode surfaces than in the surrounding sediments. Defined studies with current-producing biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens and pure cultures of protozoa demonstrated that protozoa that were effective in consuming G. sulfurreducens reduced current production up to 91% when added to G. sulfurreducens fuel cells. These results suggest that anode biofilms are an attractive food source for protozoa and that protozoan grazing can be an important factor limiting the current output of sediment microbial fuel cells.

  13. Neutrophils cast extracellular traps in response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S; Denkers, Eric Y

    2012-01-01

    Release of extracellular traps by neutrophils is a now well-established phenomenon that contributes to the innate response to extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. The importance of NETs during protozoan infection has been less explored, but recent findings suggest an emerging role for release of neutrophil-derived extracellular DNA in response to this class of microbial pathogens. The present review summarizes findings to date regarding elicitation of NETs by Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Eimeria bovis, and Leishmania spp.

  14. First record of protozoan parasites, Tetrahymena rostrata and Callimastix equi from the edible oyster in Sundarbans region of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tanima; Bandyopadhyay, Probir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Several protozoan parasites have been found infecting the edible oysters, hence deteriorating the meat quality. Protozoan parasites such as, Tetrahymena rostrata and Callimastix equi infested the edible oyster in Sundarbans region, West Bengal, India, are first record from this region. Due to filter feeding habit of the organisms, oysters provides excellent ecological services in regard to efficient cleaning of infectious agents from surrounding water as a potential measure to improve water quality. However, these environmental benefits are associated with public heath risks from contaminated oysters intended for human consumption.

  15. Recent Advances in Human Protozoan Parasites of Gastrointestinal Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    ELISA ) to detect antibodies of the parasite have been successfully used by Witmer, Maayan, Farrer & Tanowitz (1983), as well as others. Counter...immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) has been used to detect antigen in feces (Craft & Nelson, 1982) and the ELISA has also been used for the detection of antigens in...found infected with Campylobacter sp. and 12 with parasites: five were E. histolytica and seven were G. Iamblia. The scuba divers now practice in

  16. [Protozoa and protozoan infections of humans in Central Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walochnik, Julia; Aspöck, Horst

    2014-10-01

    This article is a condensed review of the medically relevant protozoa in Central Europe and the infections and diseases caused by them. Information is given on modes and sources of infection, organs involved in the disease, prevalence, diagnostics, therapy, and prophylaxis. Moreover, travel-associated infections with protozoa are briefly outlined.

  17. [History of the Entamoeba histolytica protozoan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Análida Elizabeth; López, Myriam Consuelo; Viasus, Diego Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a history of Entamoeba histolytica spanning since the remote times when it was not even recognized as a cause of human disease to the recent molecular advances. Feder Losch (1875) in Saint Petersburg, found amoebae in fecal samples but only regarded them as responsible for maintaining the inflammatory process, not as a cause of dysentery. Fritz Schaudinn (1903) established the differentiation between Entamoeba histolytica and Endamoeba coli, Schaudinn decided to call it E. histolytica because of its ability to cause tissue lysis. Emile Brumpt (1925) based on experimental studies, pointed out the existence of E. Histolytica as a species complex, comprising two morphologically indistinguishable species, E. dysenteríae which is the cause of symptomatic infection, and Entamoeba dispar found only in asymptomatic carriers. Louis Diamond et al (1961) during the 1960s developed an axenic culture medium for E. histolytica which allowed in vivo and in vitro studies. Sargeaunt and Williams (1978) distinguished for the first time E. histolytica strains by isoenzyme electrophoresis, thus confirming that E. hystolytica was indeed a species complex comprising both pathogenic and non-pathogenic species. William Petri et al (1987 demonstrated that the 170 kDa protein with greater antigenicity was the Gal/GalNac-specific lectin. Diamond and Clark (1993) described again Brumpt's original 1925 hypothesis, concluding that there was enough evidence to support the existence of two morphologically indistinguishable species, a pathogenic and a nonpathogenic one, corresponding to E. histolytica and Entamoeba dispar respectively. The World Health Organization accepted this hypothesis in 1997.

  18. Assessing protozoan risks for surface drinking water supplies in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkosek, Wendy; Reed, Victoria; Gagnon, Graham A

    2016-02-01

    Protozoa, such as Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia, pose a human health risk when present in drinking water. To minimize health risks, the Nova Scotia Treatment Standards for surface water and groundwater under the direct influence of surface water require a 3-log reduction for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. This study determined the protozoan risk of municipal surface source waters in Nova Scotia, through the use of a pre-screening risk analysis of water supplies, followed by subsequent water quality analysis of the seven highest risk supplies. The water supplies were monitored monthly for 1 year to obtain baseline data that could be used for a quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The QMRA model outcomes were compared to the Health Canada health target of 10(-6) disability-adjusted life years/person/year. QMRA modeling shows that the treatment facilities meet the required log reductions and disability-adjusted life year target standards under current conditions. Furthermore, based on the results of this work, Nova Scotia should maintain the current 3-log reduction standard for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. The results of this study show that a pre-screening step can help to inform water sources that are particularly vulnerable to protozoan contamination, which can lead to more focused, cost-effective sampling, and monitoring programs.

  19. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  20. Differential interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-23 production by human blood monocytes and dendritic cells in response to commensal enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuzak, Jennifer; Dillon, Stephanie; Wilson, Cara

    2012-08-01

    Human peripheral blood contains antigen-presenting cells (APC), including dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, that may encounter microbes that have translocated from the intestine to the periphery in disease states like HIV-1 infection and inflammatory bowel disease. We investigated the response of DC and monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to a panel of representative commensal enteric bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus sp., and Bacteroides fragilis. All three bacteria induced significant upregulation of the maturation and activation markers CD40 and CD83 on myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). However, only mDC produced cytokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12p40/70, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in response to bacterial stimulation. Cytokine profiles in whole PBMC differed depending on the stimulating bacterial species: B. fragilis induced production of IL-23, IL-12p70, and IL-10, whereas E. coli and Enterococcus induced an IL-10-predominant response. mDC and monocyte depletion experiments indicated that these cell types differentially produced IL-10 and IL-23 in response to E. coli and B. fragilis. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron did not induce levels of IL-23 similar to those of B. fragilis, suggesting that B. fragilis may have unique proinflammatory properties among Bacteroides species. The addition of recombinant human IL-10 to PBMC cultures stimulated with commensal bacteria abrogated the IL-23 response, whereas blocking IL-10 significantly enhanced IL-23 production, suggesting that IL-10 controls the levels of IL-23 produced. These results indicate that blood mDC and monocytes respond differentially to innate stimulation with whole commensal bacteria and that IL-10 may play a role in controlling the proinflammatory response to translocated microbes.

  1. Thermal inactivation of enteric viruses and bioaccumulation of enteric foodborne viruses in live oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses are one of the main causative agents of shellfish associated outbreaks. In this study, the kinetics of viral bioaccumulation in live oysters and the heat stability of the most predominant enteric viruses were determined in both tissue culture and in oyster tissues. A human nor...

  2. Recent highlights in anti-protozoan drug development and resistance research

    OpenAIRE

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Waters, Norman C; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the highlights of research presented in January, 2012, at the Keystone Symposium on “Drug Discovery for Protozoan Parasites” held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This symposium which convenes approximately every 2 years provides a forum for leading investigators around the world to present data covering basic sciences to clinical trials relating to anti-protozoan drug development and drug resistance. Many talks focused on malaria, but other protozoan diseases receiving attent...

  3. Protozoan Acanthamoeba polyphaga as a potential reservoir for Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson-Olsson, Diana; Waldenström, Jonas; Broman, Tina; Olsen, Björn; Holmberg, Martin

    2005-02-01

    We showed by a laboratory experiment that four different Campylobacter jejuni strains are able to infect the protozoan Acanthamoeba polyphaga. C. jejuni cells survived for longer periods when cocultured with amoebae than when grown in culture alone. The infecting C. jejuni cells aggregated in amoebic vacuoles, in which they were seen to be actively moving. Furthermore, a resuscitation of bacterial cultures that were previously negative in culturability tests was observed after reinoculation into fresh amoeba cultures. After spontaneous rupture of the amoebae, C. jejuni could be detected by microscopy and culturability tests. Our results indicate that amoebae may serve as a nonvertebrate reservoir for C. jejuni in the environment.

  4. The emerging world of small silencing RNAs in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayde, Vanessa D; Tschudi, Christian; Ullu, Elisabetta

    2011-07-01

    A new RNA world has emerged in the past 10 years with the discovery of a plethora of 20- to 30-nucleotide long small RNAs that are involved in various gene silencing mechanisms. These small RNAs have considerably changed our view of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms, with a major shift towards epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms. In this article, we focus on the striking diversity of small silencing RNAs that have been identified in several protozoan parasites and their potential biological role.

  5. Chromatin modifications, epigenetics, and how protozoan parasites regulate their lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croken, Matthew M; Nardelli, Sheila C; Kim, Kami

    2012-05-01

    Chromatin structure plays a vital role in epigenetic regulation of protozoan parasite gene expression. Epigenetic gene regulation impacts upon parasite virulence, differentiation and cell-cycle control. Recent work in many laboratories has elucidated the functions of proteins that regulate parasite gene expression by chemical modification of constituent nucleosomes. A major focus of investigation has been the characterization of post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones and the identification of the enzymes responsible. Despite conserved features and specificity common to all eukaryotes, parasite enzymes involved in chromatin modification have unique functions that regulate unique aspects of parasite biology.

  6. RNA interference in protozoan parasites: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Nikolay G; Tschudi, Christian; Ullu, Elisabetta

    2011-09-01

    Protozoan parasites that profoundly affect mankind represent an exceptionally diverse group of organisms, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Entamoeba, Giardia, trypanosomes, and Leishmania. Despite the overwhelming impact of these parasites, there remain many aspects to be discovered about mechanisms of pathogenesis and how these organisms survive in the host. Combined with the ever-increasing availability of sequenced genomes, RNA interference (RNAi), discovered a mere 13 years ago, has enormously facilitated the analysis of gene function, especially in organisms that are not amenable to classical genetic approaches. Here we review the current status of RNAi in studies of parasitic protozoa, with special emphasis on its use as a postgenomic tool.

  7. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  8. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of different types of human enteric viruses cause waterborne outbreaks when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet, but other members of the enterovi...

  9. Inactivation modeling of human enteric virus surrogates, MS2, Qβ, and ΦX174, in water using UVC-LEDs, a novel disinfecting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Kyun; Kim, Soo-Ji; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    In order to assure the microbial safety of drinking water, UVC-LED treatment has emerged as a possible technology to replace the use of conventional low pressure (LP) mercury vapor UV lamps. In this investigation, inactivation of Human Enteric Virus (HuEV) surrogates with UVC-LEDs was investigated in a water disinfection system, and kinetic model equations were applied to depict the surviving infectivities of the viruses. MS2, Qβ, and ΦX 174 bacteriophages were inoculated into sterile distilled water (DW) and irradiated with UVC-LED printed circuit boards (PCBs) (266nm and 279nm) or conventional LP lamps. Infectivities of bacteriophages were effectively reduced by up to 7-log after 9mJ/cm(2) treatment for MS2 and Qβ, and 1mJ/cm(2) for ΦX 174. UVC-LEDs showed a superior viral inactivation effect compared to conventional LP lamps at the same dose (1mJ/cm(2)). Non-log linear plot patterns were observed, so that Weibull, Biphasic, Log linear-tail, and Weibull-tail model equations were used to fit the virus survival curves. For MS2 and Qβ, Weibull and Biphasic models fit well with R(2) values approximately equal to 0.97-0.99, and the Weibull-tail equation accurately described survival of ΦX 174. The level of UV-susceptibility among coliphages measured by the inactivation rate constant, k, was statistically different (ΦX 174 (ssDNA)>MS2, Qβ (ssRNA)), and indicated that sensitivity to UV was attributed to viral genetic material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Probiotics and Time to Achieve Full Enteral Feeding in Human Milk-Fed and Formula-Fed Preterm Infants: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceti, Arianna; Gori, Davide; Barone, Giovanni; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Fantini, Maria Pia; Indrio, Flavia; Maggio, Luca; Meneghin, Fabio; Morelli, Lorenzo; Zuccotti, Gianvincenzo; Corvaglia, Luigi

    2016-07-30

    Probiotics have been linked to a reduction in the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis and late-onset sepsis in preterm infants. Recently, probiotics have also proved to reduce time to achieve full enteral feeding (FEF). However, the relationship between FEF achievement and type of feeding in infants treated with probiotics has not been explored yet. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of probiotics in reducing time to achieve FEF in preterm infants, according to type of feeding (exclusive human milk (HM) vs. formula). Randomized-controlled trials involving preterm infants receiving probiotics, and reporting on time to reach FEF were included in the systematic review. Trials reporting on outcome according to type of feeding (exclusive HM vs. formula) were included in the meta-analysis. Fixed-effect or random-effects models were used as appropriate. Results were expressed as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Twenty-five studies were included in the systematic review. In the five studies recruiting exclusively HM-fed preterm infants, those treated with probiotics reached FEF approximately 3 days before controls (MD -3.15 days (95% CI -5.25/-1.05), p = 0.003). None of the two studies reporting on exclusively formula-fed infants showed any difference between infants receiving probiotics and controls in terms of FEF achievement. The limited number of included studies did not allow testing for other subgroup differences between HM and formula-fed infants. However, if confirmed in further studies, the 3-days reduction in time to achieve FEF in exclusively HM-fed preterm infants might have significant implications for their clinical management.

  11. Phototherapies: photosensitized inactivation of viral and protozoan infectious agents and potential application in blood banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Newman, Joseph T.; Chanh, Tran C.; Marengo-Rowe, Alain J.

    1992-06-01

    More than 10 million units of human blood components are processed annually in the United States. Although donor screening and testing have greatly lowered the risk of transmission of viral and protozoan infectious agents, additional sterilization procedures which also preserve blood component function would be of significant value. Use of UV-A and visible-light-range photosensitizers for sterilization of blood platelets and red blood cells, respectively, is currently being aggressively investigated in laboratory-scale optical-mechanical systems. With successful demonstration of the efficacy and safety of these sterilization techniques, implementation in the blood bank setting will require scale-up to optical-mechanical systems capable of handling approximately 25,000 units daily in 500 - 1,000 blood banks in the United States.

  12. Organization of the enteric nervous system in the human colon demonstrated by wholemount immunohistochemistry with special reference to the submucous plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, T; Roblick, U; Gleiss, J; Schiedeck, T; Bruch, H P; Kühnel, W; Krammer, H J

    1999-07-01

    To demonstrate the normal topography and structure of the enteric nervous system (ENS) in the human colon, the colonic wall of patients (n = 10, mean age 66.3 years), who underwent abdominal surgery unrelated to intestinal motility disorders, was submitted to wholemount immunohistochemistry. The specimens were stretched out and separated into the tunica muscularis, the outer and inner portion of the tela submucosa and the tunica mucosa. Prior to the application of the neuronal marker Protein Gene Product (PGP) 9.5, the laminar preparations were pretreated with the maceration agent KOH. The plexus myentericus was composed of prominent ganglia and interconnecting nerve fiber strands (NFS) forming a polygonal network, which was denser in the descending than in the ascending colon. Nerve cells were observed within the ganglia as well as in primary, secondary and tertiary NFS. The latter ramified into the adjacent smooth muscle layers, which contained the aganglionated plexus muscularis longitudinalis and circularis. The submucous plexus comprised three nerve networks of different topography and architecture: the delicate plexus submucosus extremus consisted of parallel orientated NFS with isolated nerve cells and small ganglia and was located at the outermost border of the tela submucosa adjacent to the circular muscle layer. The plexus submucosus externus was closely associated with the plexus submucosus extremus and composed of larger ganglia and thicker NFS. The plexus submucosus internus was situated adjacent to the lamina muscularis mucosae and formed a network with denser meshes but smaller ganglia and NFS than the plexus submucosus externus. The NFS of the aganglionated plexus muscularis mucosae followed the course of the smooth muscle cells of the lamina muscularis mucosae. The honeycomb-like network of the plexus mucosus was located within the lamina propria mucosae and divided into a subglandular and a periglandular portion. Single and accumulated nerve cells

  13. Impact and control of protozoan parasites in maricultured fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Aquaculture, including both freshwater and marine production, has on a world scale exhibited one of the highest growth rates within animal protein production during recent decades and is expected to expand further at the same rate within the next 10 years. Control of diseases is one of the most prominent challenges if this production goal is to be reached. Apart from viral, bacterial, fungal and metazoan infections it has been documented that protozoan parasites affect health and welfare and thereby production of fish in marine aquaculture. Representatives within the main protozoan groups such as amoebae, dinoflagellates, kinetoplastid flagellates, diplomonadid flagellates, apicomplexans, microsporidians and ciliates have been shown to cause severe morbidity and mortality among farmed fish. Well studied examples are Neoparamoeba perurans, Amyloodinium ocellatum, Spironucleus salmonicida, Ichthyobodo necator, Cryptobia salmositica, Loma salmonae, Cryptocaryon irritans, Miamiensis avidus and Trichodina jadranica. The present report provides details on the parasites' biology and impact on productivity and evaluates tools for diagnosis, control and management. Special emphasis is placed on antiprotozoan immune responses in fish and a strategy for development of vaccines is presented.

  14. Heat shock protein 90 from neglected protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nainita; Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Ranade, Shatakshi; Tatu, Utpal

    2012-03-01

    Significant advances have been made in our understanding of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in terms of its structure, biochemical characteristics, post-translational modifications, interactomes, regulation and functions. In addition to yeast as a model several new systems have now been examined including flies, worms, plants as well as mammalian cells. This review discusses themes emerging out of studies reported on Hsp90 from infectious disease causing protozoa. A common theme of sensing and responding to host cell microenvironment emerges out of analysis of Hsp90 in Malaria, Trypanosmiasis as well as Leishmaniasis. In addition to their functional roles, the potential of Hsp90 from these infectious disease causing organisms to serve as drug targets and the current status of this drug development endeavor are discussed. Finally, a unique and the only known example of a split Hsp90 gene from another disease causing protozoan Giardia lamblia and its evolutionary significance are discussed. Clearly studies on Hsp90 from protozoan parasites promise to reveal important new paradigms in Hsp90 biology while exploring its potential as an anti-infective drug target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enteric pathogens and soil: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Johanna; Toranzos, Gary A

    2003-03-01

    It is known that soil is a recipient of solid wastes able to contain enteric pathogens in high concentrations. Although the role of soil as a reservoir of certain bacterial pathogens is not in question, recent findings show that soil may have a larger role in the transmission of enteric diseases than previously thought. Many of the diseases caused by agents from soil have been well characterized, although enteric diseases and their link to soil have not been so well studied. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common diseases caused by enteric bacteria. Some examples are salmonellosis ( Salmonella sp.), cholera ( Vibrio cholerae), dysentery ( Shigella sp.) and other infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia sp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and many other strains. Viruses are the most hazardous and have some of the lowest infectious doses of any of the enteric pathogens. Hepatitis A, hepatitis E, enteric adenoviruses, poliovirus types 1 and 2, multiple strains of echoviruses and coxsackievirus are enteric viruses associated with human wastewater. Among the most commonly detected protozoa in sewage are Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and Cryptosporidium parvum. This article reviews the existing literature of more than two decades on waste disposal practices that favor the entry of enteric pathogens to soil and the possible consequent role of the soil as a vector and reservoir of enteric pathogens.

  16. The enteric nervous system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sasselli, Valentina; Pachnis, Vassilis; Burns, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS), the intrinsic innervation of the gastrointestinal tract, consists of numerous types of neurons, and glial cells, that are distributed in two intramuscular plexuses that extend along the entire...

  17. Enteric viruses in molluscan shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Rosanna; Macaluso, Alessia; Lanni, Luigi; Saccares, Stefano; Di Giamberardino, Fabiola; Cencioni, Barbara; Petrinca, Anna Rita; Divizia, Maurizio

    2007-10-01

    One hundred and thirty-seven bivalves were collected for environmental monitoring and the market; all the samples were analysed by RT-PCR test. Bacteriological counts meeting the European Union shellfish criteria were reached by 69.5% of all the samples, whereas the overall positive values for enteric virus presence were: 25.5%, 18.2%, 8.0% and 2.1% for Rotavirus, Astrovirus, Enteroviruses, Norovirus, respectively. Mussels appear to be the most contaminated bivalves, with 64.8% of positive samples, 55.7% and 22.7% respectively for clams and oysters, whereas in the bivalves collected for human consumption 50.7% were enteric virus positive, as compared to 56.4% of the samples collected for growing-area classification. The overall positive sample was 54.0%.

  18. Folate is absorbed across the human colon: evidence by using enteric-coated caplets containing 13C-labeled [6S]-5-formyltetrahydrofolate1, 2, 3, 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, Alanna; Fazili, Zia; Aufreiter, Susanne; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Connolly, Bairbie; Gregory, Jesse F; Pencharz, Paul B; O’Connor, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    Background Folate intakes that do not meet or greatly exceed requirements may be associated with negative health outcomes. A better understanding of contributors that influence the input side will help establish dietary guidance that ensures health benefits without associated risks. Colonic microbiota produce large quantities of folate, and [13C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate infused during colonoscopy is absorbed. However, it is unclear if significant quantities of folate are absorbed in an intact microbiome. Objective We determined whether and how much of a physiologic dose of [13C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate delivered in a pH-sensitive enteric caplet to an intact colonic microbiome is absorbed. Design Healthy adults ingested a specially designed pH-sensitive acrylic copolymer–coated barium sulfate caplet that contained 855 nmol (400 μg) [13C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate. After a washout period ≥4 wk, subjects received an intravenous injection of the same compound (214 nmol). Serially collected blood samples before and after each test dose were analyzed by using a microbiological assay and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results Caplet disintegration in the colon was observed by fluoroscopic imaging for 6 subjects with a mean (±SD) complete disintegration time of 284 ± 155 min. The mean (±SEM) rate of appearance of [13C5]5-methyltetrahydrofolate in plasma was 0.33 ± 0.09 (caplet) and 5.8 ± 1.2 (intravenous) nmol/h. Likely because of the significant time in the colon, the mean apparent absorption across the colon was 46%. Conclusions Folate is absorbed across the colon in humans with an undisturbed microbiome. This finding and previous observations of the size of the colonic depot of folate and its potential for manipulation by diet (eg, dietary fiber, oligosaccharides, and probiotics) suggest that an individual’s dietary folate requirement may differ depending on the consumption of dietary constituents that affect the size and composition of

  19. Folate is absorbed across the human colon: evidence by using enteric-coated caplets containing 13C-labeled [6S]-5-formyltetrahydrofolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, Alanna; Fazili, Zia; Aufreiter, Susanne; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Connolly, Bairbie; Gregory, Jesse F; Pencharz, Paul B; O'Connor, Deborah L

    2014-11-01

    Folate intakes that do not meet or greatly exceed requirements may be associated with negative health outcomes. A better understanding of contributors that influence the input side will help establish dietary guidance that ensures health benefits without associated risks. Colonic microbiota produce large quantities of folate, and [(13)C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate infused during colonoscopy is absorbed. However, it is unclear if significant quantities of folate are absorbed in an intact microbiome. We determined whether and how much of a physiologic dose of [(13)C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate delivered in a pH-sensitive enteric caplet to an intact colonic microbiome is absorbed. Healthy adults ingested a specially designed pH-sensitive acrylic copolymer-coated barium sulfate caplet that contained 855 nmol (400 μg) [(13)C5]5-formyltetrahydrofolate. After a washout period ≥ 4 wk, subjects received an intravenous injection of the same compound (214 nmol). Serially collected blood samples before and after each test dose were analyzed by using a microbiological assay and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Caplet disintegration in the colon was observed by fluoroscopic imaging for 6 subjects with a mean (± SD) complete disintegration time of 284 ± 155 min. The mean (± SEM) rate of appearance of [(13)C5]5-methyltetrahydrofolate in plasma was 0.33 ± 0.09 (caplet) and 5.8 ± 1.2 (intravenous) nmol/h. Likely because of the significant time in the colon, the mean apparent absorption across the colon was 46%. Folate is absorbed across the colon in humans with an undisturbed microbiome. This finding and previous observations of the size of the colonic depot of folate and its potential for manipulation by diet (eg, dietary fiber, oligosaccharides, and probiotics) suggest that an individual's dietary folate requirement may differ depending on the consumption of dietary constituents that affect the size and composition of their gastrointestinal microbiota. In

  20. Visible-light-responsive ZnCuO nanoparticles: benign photodynamic killers of infectious protozoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadhman A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Akhtar Nadhman,1,2 Samina Nazir,2 Malik Ihsanullah Khan,1 Attiya Ayub,2,3 Bakhtiar Muhammad,3 Momin Khan,1 Dilawar Farhan Shams,4 Masoom Yasinzai1,5 1Department of Biotechnology, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan; 2Nanosciences and Catalysis Division, National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad, Pakistan; 3Department of Chemistry, Hazara University, Dhodial, Pakistan; 4Department of Environmental Sciences, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, Mardan, Pakistan; 5Center of Interdisciplinary Research, International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Human beings suffer from several infectious agents such as viruses, bacteria, and protozoans. Recently, there has been a great interest in developing biocompatible nanostructures to deal with infectious agents. This study investigated benign ZnCuO nanostructures that were visible-light-responsive due to the resident copper in the lattice. The nanostructures were synthesized through a size-controlled hot-injection process, which was adaptable to the surface ligation processes. The nanostructures were then characterized through transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, diffused reflectance spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and photoluminescence analysis to measure crystallite nature, size, luminescence, composition, and band-gap analyses. Antiprotozoal efficiency of the current nanoparticles revealed the photodynamic killing of Leishmania protozoan, thus acting as efficient metal-based photosensitizers. The crystalline nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility when tested for macrophage toxicity and in hemolysis assays. The study opens a wide avenue for using toxic material in resident nontoxic forms as an effective antiprotozoal treatment. Keywords: zinc oxide, nanoparticles, doping, photodynamic therapy, Leishmania

  1. Modulation of mammalian apoptotic pathways by intracellular protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, V; Cordeiro-da-Silva, A; Laforge, M; Ouaissi, A; Silvestre, R; Estaquier, J

    2012-03-01

    During intracellular parasitic infections, pathogens and host cells take part in a complex web of events that are crucial for the outcome of the infection. Modulation of host cell apoptosis by pathogens attracted the attention of scientists during the last decade. Apoptosis is an efficient mechanism used by the host to control infection and limit pathogen multiplication and dissemination. In order to ensure completion of their complex life cycles and to guarantee transmission between different hosts, intracellular parasites have developed mechanisms to block apoptosis and sustain the viability of their host cells. Here, we review how some of the most prominent intracellular protozoan parasites modulate the main mammalian apoptotic pathways by emphasizing the advances from the last decade, which have begun to dissect this dynamic and complex interaction.

  2. Protozoan-induced regulation of cyclic lipopeptide biosynthesis Is an effective predation defense mechanism for Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzola, M.; Bruijn, de I.; Cohen, M.F.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental bacteria are exposed to a myriad of biotic interactions that influence their function and survival. The grazing activity of protozoan predators significantly impacts the dynamics, diversification, and evolution of bacterial communities in soil ecosystems. To evade protozoan predation,

  3. Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: literature follows culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Robledo, José A; Vasta, Gerardo R; Record, Nicholas R

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter -feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi-intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer- reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20- to 30- year lifetime in the literature). Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in prioritizing research

  4. ENFit Enteral Nutrition Connectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenter, Peggi; Lyman, Beth

    2016-12-01

    New enteral connectors are now available based on the development of standards using the International Organization of Standardization process to prevent misconnections between systems that should not connect. Enteral devices with the new patient access connectors, called ENFit, are being now introduced for the purpose of improving patient safety. Transitioning to these new connectors poses benefits and challenges for facilities or agencies implementing these new devices. Information from appropriate resources should be sought by clinicians who need to partner with their suppliers and clinical organizations to see how best to meet these challenges.

  5. Rapid biotransformation of arsenic by a model protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Xixiang [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Yongyu; Yang Jun [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Zhu Yongguan, E-mail: ygzhu@rcees.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Arsenic biomethylation and biovolatilization are thought to be two important metabolic pathways in aquatic and soil environments. Tetrahymena thermophila is a genus of free-living ciliated protozoan that is widely distributed in freshwater environments around the world. In this study, we studied arsenic accumulation, speciation, efflux, methylation and volatilization in this unicellular eukaryote exposed to various concentrations of arsenate. Our results show that T. thermophila accumulated 187 mg.kg{sup -1} dry weight of arsenic when exposed to 40 {mu}M for 48 h, with MMAs(V) (monomethylarsenate) and DMAs(V) (dimethylarsenate) as the dominant species, accounting for 66% of the total arsenic. Meanwhile, arsenate, arsenite, MMAs(V) and DMAs(V) were detected in the culture medium; the last three were released by the cells. The production of volatile arsenic increased with increasing external As(V) concentrations and exposure time. To our knowledge, this is the first study on arsenic metabolism, particularly biomethylation and biovolatilization, in protozoa. - Tetrahymena thermophila can rapidly methylate arsenic, and produce volatile arsenicals.

  6. Hormonal actions in the Protozoan stress: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2015-12-01

    In the higher ranked animals the alteration of the environment can provoke a uniform reaction named general adaptation system (GAS), which is a manifestation of stress, caused by different stressors. During GAS certain organs show typical reactions and two members of the hormonal system are activated: epinephine and glucocorticoids. As the unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena also synthesize most of the mammalian-like hormones (except steroids), it can respond to stress by a hormonal reaction. The main differences, related to the mammalian GAS hormonal reaction are, that 1) in Tetrahymena the level of all of the hormones studied significantly elevates under the effect of heat, osmotic or chemical stress and 2) the single stress effect is durable. It is manifested at least to the 100th generations, which means that it is inherited epigenetically. Not only hormone synthesis but the receptorial hormone binding is also elevated, which means that the whole hormonal system is activated. The stress reaction (GAS) phylogenetically can be deduced to a unicellular (Protozoan) level however, prokaryotes - which are also stress-reactive - are using another mechanisms.

  7. Methods for parasitic protozoans detection in the environmental samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skotarczak B.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental route of transmission of many parasitic protozoa and their potential for producing large numbers of transmissive stages constitute persistent threats to public and veterinary health. Conventional and new immunological and molecular methods enable to assess the occurrence, prevalence, levels and sources of waterborne protozoa. Concentration, purification, and detection are the three key steps in all methods that have been approved for routine monitoring of waterborne cysts and oocysts. These steps have been optimized to such an extent that low levels of naturally occurring (oocysts of protozoan can be efficiently recovered from water. Ten years have passed since the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA introduced the 1622 and 1623 methods and used them to concentrate and detect the oocysts of Cryptosporidium and cysts of Giardia in water samples. Nevertheless, the methods still need studies and improvements. Pre-PCR processing procedures have been developed and they are still improved to remove or reduce the effects of PCR inhibitors. The progress in molecular methods allows to more precise distinction of species or simultaneous detection of several parasites, however, they are still not routinely used and need standardization. Standardized methods are required to maximize public health surveillance.

  8. Methods for parasitic protozoans detection in the environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotarczak, B

    2009-09-01

    The environmental route of transmission of many parasitic protozoa and their potential for producing large numbers of transmissive stages constitute persistent threats to public and veterinary health. Conventional and new immunological and molecular methods enable to assess the occurrence, prevalence, levels and sources of waterborne protozoa. Concentration, purification, and detection are the three key steps in all methods that have been approved for routine monitoring of waterborne cysts and oocysts. These steps have been optimized to such an extent that low levels of naturally occurring (oo)cysts of protozoan can be efficiently recovered from water. Ten years have passed since the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) introduced the 1622 and 1623 methods and used them to concentrate and detect the oocysts of Cryptosporidium and cysts of Giardia in water samples. Nevertheless, the methods still need studies and improvements. Pre-PCR processing procedures have been developed and they are still improved to remove or reduce the effects of PCR inhibitors. The progress in molecular methods allows to more precise distinction of species or simultaneous detection of several parasites, however, they are still not routinely used and need standardization. Standardized methods are required to maximize public health surveillance.

  9. HIV Protease Inhibitors: Effect on the Opportunistic Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Yenisey; Monzote, Lianet

    2011-01-01

    The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the natural history of AIDS disease has been allowed to prolong the survival of people with HIV infection, particularly whose with increased HIV viral load. Additionally, the antiretroviral therapy could exert a certain degree of protection against parasitic diseases. A number of studies have been evidenced a decrease in the incidence of opportunistic parasitic infections in the era of HAART. Although these changes have been attributed to the restoration of cell-mediated immunity, induced by either non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or HIV protease inhibitors, in combination with at least two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors included in HAART, there are evidence that the control of these parasitic infections in HIV-positive persons under HAART, is also induced by the inhibition of the proteases of the parasites. This review focuses on the principal available data related with therapeutic HIV-protease inhibitors and their in vitro and in vivo effects on the opportunistic protozoan parasites.

  10. Global analysis of gene expression in response to L-Cysteine deprivation in the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeelani Ghulam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric protozoan parasite, causes amebic colitis and extra intestinal abscesses in millions of inhabitants of endemic areas. E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione metabolism but possesses L-cysteine as the principle low molecular weight thiol. L-Cysteine is essential for the structure, stability, and various protein functions, including catalysis, electron transfer, redox regulation, nitrogen fixation, and sensing for regulatory processes. Recently, we demonstrated that in E. histolytica, L-cysteine regulates various metabolic pathways including energy, amino acid, and phospholipid metabolism. Results In this study, employing custom-made Affymetrix microarrays, we performed time course (3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h gene expression analysis upon L-cysteine deprivation. We identified that out of 9,327 genes represented on the array, 290 genes encoding proteins with functions in metabolism, signalling, DNA/RNA regulation, electron transport, stress response, membrane transport, vesicular trafficking/secretion, and cytoskeleton were differentially expressed (≥3 fold at one or more time points upon L-cysteine deprivation. Approximately 60% of these modulated genes encoded proteins of no known function and annotated as hypothetical proteins. We also attempted further functional analysis of some of the most highly modulated genes by L-cysteine depletion. Conclusions To our surprise, L-cysteine depletion caused only limited changes in the expression of genes involved in sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress defense. In contrast, we observed significant changes in the expression of several genes encoding iron sulfur flavoproteins, a major facilitator super-family transporter, regulator of nonsense transcripts, NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase, short chain dehydrogenase, acetyltransferases, and various other genes involved in diverse cellular functions. This study represents the first

  11. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reif, Andrew G.; Donna A. Crouse,; Isaacs, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfbO157) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but notCryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfbO157, STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2

  12. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph W; Reif, Andrew G; Krouse, Donna A; Isaacs, Natasha M

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfb(O157)) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but not Cryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfb(O157), STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2, stx1, and rfb

  13. Effect of nickel on nutrient removal by selected indigenous protozoan species in wastewater systems

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient and heavy metal pollutions are major concern worldwide. This study aimed at comparing the effect of Ni2+ on nutrient removal efficiency of four indigenous wastewater protozoan species (Aspidisca sp., Paramecium sp., Peranema sp., Trachelophyllum sp.). Specific physicochemical parameters and microbial growth/die-off were measured using standard methods. The results revealed that protozoan species were able to simultaneously remove phosphate, nitrate and Ni2+ at concentrations ranging ...

  14. Effects of oral adenosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine in enteric-coated capsules on indomethacin-induced permeability changes in the human small intestine: a randomized cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bours Martijn JL

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well-known that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs can cause damage to the small bowel associated with disruption of mucosal barrier function. In healthy human volunteers, we showed previously that topical administration of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP by naso-intestinal tube attenuated a rise in small intestinal permeability induced by short-term challenge with the NSAID indomethacin. This finding suggested that ATP may be involved in the preservation of intestinal barrier function. Our current objective was to corroborate the favourable effect of ATP on indomethacin-induced permeability changes in healthy human volunteers when ATP is administered via enteric-coated capsules, which is a more practically feasible mode of administration. Since ATP effects may have been partly mediated through its breakdown to adenosine, effects of encapsulated adenosine were tested also. Methods By ingesting a test drink containing 5 g lactulose and 0.5 g L-rhamnose followed by five-hour collection of total urine, small intestinal permeability was assessed in 33 healthy human volunteers by measuring the urinary lactulose/rhamnose excretion ratio. Urinary excretion of lactulose and L-rhamnose was determined by fluorescent detection high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Basal permeability of the small intestine was assessed as a control condition (no indomethacin, no ATP/adenosine. As a model of increased small intestinal permeability, two dosages of indomethacin were ingested at 10 h (75 mg and 1 h (50 mg before ingesting the lactulose/rhamnose test drink. At 1.5 h before indomethacin ingestion, two dosages of placebo, ATP (2 g per dosage or adenosine (1 g per dosage were administered via enteric-coated hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC capsules with Eudragit© L30D-55. Results Median urinary lactulose/rhamnose excretion ratio (g/g in the control condition was 0.032 (interquartile range: 0.022–0.044. Compared to the

  15. Tracing enteric viruses in the European berry fruit supply chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maunula, L.; Kaupke, A.; Vasickova, P.; Soderberg, K.; Kozyra, I.; Lazic, S.; Poel, van der W.H.M.; Bouwknegt, M.; Rutjes, S.; Willems, K.A.; Moloney, R.; Agostino, D' M.; Husman, A.M.D.; Bonsdorff, C.H.; Rzezutka, A.; Pavlik, I.; Petrovic, T.; Cook, N.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, numerous foodborne outbreaks due to consumption of berry fruit contaminated by human enteric viruses have been reported. This European multinational study investigated possible contamination routes by monitoring the entire food chain for a panel of human and animal enteric viruses.

  16. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000164.htm Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems To use the sharing features ... trouble breathing, call 911. References Mcclave SA. Enteral nutrition. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  17. Behavioural resistance against a protozoan parasite in the monarch butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Chiang, Allen; Kelavkar, Mangala; Li, Hui; Li, James; de Castillejo, Carlos Lopez Fernandez; Oliver, Lindsay; Potini, Yamini; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2012-01-01

    1. As parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, there should be strong selection for hosts to evolve and maintain defence mechanisms against their parasites. One way in which hosts may protect themselves against parasitism is through altered behaviours, but such defences have been much less studied than other forms of parasite resistance. 2. We studied whether monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus L.) use altered behaviours to protect themselves and their offspring against the protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (McLaughlin & Myers (1970), Journal of Protozoology, 17, p. 300). In particular, we studied whether (i) monarch larvae can avoid contact with infectious parasite spores; (ii) infected larvae preferentially consume therapeutic food plants when given a choice or increase the intake of such plants in the absence of choice; and (iii) infected female butterflies preferentially lay their eggs on medicinal plants that make their offspring less sick. 3. We found that monarch larvae were unable to avoid infectious parasite spores. Larvae were also not able to preferentially feed on therapeutic food plants or increase the ingestion of such plants. However, infected female butterflies preferentially laid their eggs on food plants that reduce parasite growth in their offspring. 4. Our results suggest that animals may use altered behaviours as a protection against parasites and that such behaviours may be limited to a single stage in the host-parasite life cycle. Our results also suggest that animals may use altered behaviours to protect their offspring instead of themselves. Thus, our study indicates that an inclusive fitness approach should be adopted to study behavioural defences against parasites. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.

  18. Sensing DNA methylation in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Tal; Isakov, Elada; Harony, Hala; Fisher, Ohad; Siman-Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2006-12-01

    In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, 5-methylcytosine (m5C) was found predominantly in repetitive elements. Its formation is catalysed by Ehmeth, a DNA methyltransferase that belongs to the Dnmt2 subfamily. Here we describe a 32 kDa nuclear protein that binds in vitro with higher affinity to the methylated form of a DNA encoding a reverse transcriptase of an autonomous non-long-terminal repeat retrotransposon (RT LINE) compared with the non-methylated RT LINE. This protein, named E. histolytica-methylated LINE binding protein (EhMLBP), was purified from E. histolytica nuclear lysate, identified by mass spectrometry, and its corresponding gene was cloned. EhMLBP corresponds to a gene of unknown function that shares strong homology with putative proteins present in Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba invadens. In contrast, the homology dropped dramatically when non-Entamoebidae sequences were considered and only a weak sequence identity was found with Trypanosoma and several prokaryotic histone H1. Recombinant EhMLBP showed the same binding preference for methylated RT LINE as the endogenous EhMLBP. Deletion mapping analysis localized the DNA binding region at the C-terminal part of the protein. This region is sufficient to assure the binding to methylated RT LINE with high affinity. Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy, using an antibody raised against EhMLBP, showed that it has a nuclear localization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) confirmed that EhMLBP interacts with RT LINE in vivo. Finally, we showed that EhMLBP can also bind rDNA episome, a DNA that is methylated in the parasite. This suggests that EhMLBP may serve as a sensor of methylated repetitive DNA. This is the first report of a DNA-methylated binding activity in protozoa.

  19. Drug resistance in the sexually transmitted protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REBECCA L DUNNE; LINDA A DUNN; PETER UPCROFT; PETER J O'DONOGHUE; JACQUELINE A UPCROFT

    2003-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is the most common, sexually transmitted infection. It is caused by the flagellated protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Symptoms include vaginitis and infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight and increased infant mortality, as well as predisposing to HIV/AIDS and cervical cancer. Trichomoniasis has the highest prevalence and incidence of any sexually transmitted infection. The 5-nitroimidazole drugs, of which metronidazole is the most prescribed, are the only approved,effective drugs to treat trichomoniasis. Resistance against metronidazole is frequently reported and crossresistance among the family of 5-nitroimidazole drugs is common, leaving no alternative for treatment, with some cases remaining unresolved. The mechanism of metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis from treatment failures is not well understood, unlike resistance which is developed in the laboratory under increasing metronidazole pressure. In the latter situation, hydrogenosomal function which is involved in activation of the prodrug, metronidazole, is down-regulated. Reversion to sensitivity is incomplete after removal of drug pressure in the highly resistant parasites while clinically resistant strains, so far analysed, maintain their resistance levels in the absence of drug pressure. Although anaerobic resistance has been regarded as a laboratory induced phenomenon, it clearly has been demonstrated in clinical isolates. Pursuit of both approaches will allow dissection of the underlying mechanisms. Many alternative drugs and treatments have been tested in vivo in cases of refractory trichomoniasis, as well as in vitro with some successes including the broad spectrum anti-parasitic drug nitazoxanide. Drug resistance incidence in T. vaginalis appears to be on the increase and improved surveillance of treatment failures is urged.

  20. Seroprevalence rates of antibodies againstLeishmania infantum and other protozoan and rickettsial parasites in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana de Cássia Paulan

    Full Text Available Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL is caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum, which infects dogs and humans in many regions of Brazil. The present study involved an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT to analyze L. infantum,Ehrlichia spp., Babesia canis,Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninuminfection rates in serum samples from 93 dogs in a rural settlement in Ilha Solteira, SP, Brazil. The seroprevalence rates of anti-L. infantum, anti-Ehrlichia, anti-B. canis, anti-T. gondii and anti-N. caninum antibodies were 37.6%, 75.3%, 72%, 47.3% and 6.4%, respectively. In addition to IFAT, direct microscopic examination of popliteal lymph node aspirates revealed 26.9% of CVL positive dogs. Serological tests revealed that 17.2% of the dogs were seropositive for a single parasite, 29% for two parasites, 33% for three, 16.1% for four, and 1.1% for five parasites, while 3.2% were seronegative for five parasites. The presence of antibodies against these parasites in serum samples from dogs confirmed their exposure to these parasites in this rural area. Because of the potential zoonotic risk of these diseases, mainly leishmaniasis, ehrlichiosis and toxoplasmosis, special attention should focus on programs for the improvement of diagnostic assays and control measures against these parasites.

  1. Seroprevalence rates of antibodies against Leishmania infantum and other protozoan and rickettsial parasites in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulan, Silvana de Cássia; Lins, Aline Gouveia de Souza; Tenório, Michely da Silva; Silva, Diogo Tiago da; Pena, Hilda Fátima de Jesus; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Gennari, Solange Maria; Buzetti, Wilma Aparecida Starke

    2013-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is caused by the protozoan Leishmania infantum, which infects dogs and humans in many regions of Brazil. The present study involved an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) to analyze L. infantum, Ehrlichia spp., Babesia canis, Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum infection rates in serum samples from 93 dogs in a rural settlement in Ilha Solteira, SP, Brazil. The seroprevalence rates of anti-L. infantum, anti-Ehrlichia, anti-B. canis, anti-T. gondii and anti-N. caninum antibodies were 37.6%, 75.3%, 72%, 47.3% and 6.4%, respectively. In addition to IFAT, direct microscopic examination of popliteal lymph node aspirates revealed 26.9% of CVL positive dogs. Serological tests revealed that 17.2% of the dogs were seropositive for a single parasite, 29% for two parasites, 33% for three, 16.1% for four, and 1.1% for five parasites, while 3.2% were seronegative for five parasites. The presence of antibodies against these parasites in serum samples from dogs confirmed their exposure to these parasites in this rural area. Because of the potential zoonotic risk of these diseases, mainly leishmaniasis, ehrlichiosis and toxoplasmosis, special attention should focus on programs for the improvement of diagnostic assays and control measures against these parasites.

  2. Global Distribution, Public Health and Clinical Impact of the Protozoan Pathogen Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Putignani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium spp. are coccidians, oocysts-forming apicomplexan protozoa, which complete their life cycle both in humans and animals, through zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission, causing cryptosporidiosis. The global burden of this disease is still underascertained, due to a conundrum transmission modality, only partially unveiled, and on a plethora of detection systems still inadequate or only partially applied for worldwide surveillance. In children, cryptosporidiosis encumber is even less recorded and often misidentified due to physiological reasons such as early-age unpaired immunological response. Furthermore, malnutrition in underdeveloped countries or clinical underestimation of protozoan etiology in developed countries contribute to the underestimation of the worldwide burden. Principal key indicators of the parasite distribution were associated to environmental (e.g., geographic and temporal clusters, etc. and host determinants of the infection (e.g., age, immunological status, travels, community behaviours. The distribution was geographically mapped to provide an updated picture of the global parasite ecosystems. The present paper aims to provide, by a critical analysis of existing literature, a link between observational epidemiological records and new insights on public health, and diagnostic and clinical impact of cryptosporidiosis.

  3. Molecular evidence for bacterial and protozoan pathogens in hard ticks from Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, Mariana; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu; Pfister, Kurt; Hamel, Dietmar; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a preliminary insight into the diversity of tick-borne pathogens circulating at the domestic host-tick interface in Romania. For this, feeding and questing ticks were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu latu, and by PCR and subsequent sequencing for Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. A total of 382 ticks, encompassing 5 species from 4 genera, were collected in April-July 2010 from different areas of Romania; of them, 40 were questing ticks and the remainder was collected from naturally infested cattle, sheep, goats, horses or dogs. Tick species analyzed included Ixodes ricinus, Dermacentor marginatus, Hyalomma marginatum, Rhipicephalus bursa, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Four rickettsiae of the spotted fever group of zoonotic concern were identified for the first time in Romania: Rickettsia monacensis and Rickettsia helvetica in I. ricinus, and Rickettsia slovaca and Rickettsia raoultii in D. marginatus. Other zoonotic pathogens such as A. phagocytophilum, Borrelia afzelii, and Babesia microti were found in I. ricinus. Pathogens of veterinary importance were also identified, including Theileria equi in H. marginatum, Babesia occultans in D. marginatus and H. marginatum, Theileria orientalis/sergenti/buffeli-group in I. ricinus and in H. marginatum and E. canis in R. sanguineus. These findings show a wide distribution of very diverse bacterial and protozoan pathogens at the domestic host-tick interface in Romania, with the potential of causing both animal and human diseases.

  4. Bax function in the absence of mitochondria in the primitive protozoan Giardia lamblia.

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    Adrian B Hehl

    Full Text Available Bax-induced permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane and release of cytochrome c are key events in apoptosis. Although Bax can compromise mitochondria in primitive unicellular organisms that lack a classical apoptotic machinery, it is still unclear if Bax alone is sufficient for this, or whether additional mitochondrial components are required. The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia is one of the earliest branching eukaryotes and harbors highly degenerated mitochondrial remnant organelles (mitosomes that lack a genome. Here we tested whether human Bax expressed in Giardia can be used to ablate mitosomes. We demonstrate that these organelles are neither targeted, nor compromised, by Bax. However, specialized compartments of the regulated secretory pathway are completely ablated by Bax. As a consequence, maturing cyst wall proteins that are sorted into these organelles are released into the cytoplasm, causing a developmental arrest and cell death. Interestingly, this ectopic cargo release is dependent on the carboxy-terminal 22 amino acids of Bax, and can be prevented by the Bax-inhibiting peptide Ku70. A C-terminally truncated Bax variant still localizes to secretory organelles, but is unable to permeabilize these membranes, uncoupling membrane targeting and cargo release. Even though mitosomes are too diverged to be recognized by Bax, off-target membrane permeabilization appears to be conserved and leads to cell death completely independently of mitochondria.

  5. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target.

  6. Waterborne transmission of protozoan parasites: review of worldwide outbreaks - an update 2004-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldursson, Selma; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2011-12-15

    The present update gives a comprehensive review of worldwide waterborne parasitic protozoan outbreaks that occurred and were published globally between January 2004 and December 2010. At least one hundred and ninety-nine outbreaks of human diseases due to the waterborne transmission of parasitic protozoa occurred and were reported during the time period from 2004 to 2010. 46.7% of the documented outbreaks occurred on the Australian continent, 30.6% in North America and 16.5% in Europe. Cryptosporidium spp. was the etiological agent in 60.3% (120) of the outbreaks, Giardia lamblia in 35.2% (70) and other protozoa in 4.5% (9). Four outbreaks (2%) were caused by Toxoplasma gondii, three (1.5%) by Cyclospora cayetanensis. In two outbreaks (1%) Acanthamoeba spp. was identified as the causative agent. In one outbreak, G. lamblia (in 17.6% of stool samples) and Cryptosporidium parvum (in 2.7% of stool samples) as well as Entamoeba histolytica (in 9.4% of stool samples) and Blastocystis hominis (in 8.1% of stool samples) were detected. In those countries that are likely affected most a lack of surveillance systems is noticeable. However, countries that established surveillance systems did not establish an international standardization of reporting systems.

  7. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Christian; San Francisco, Juan; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target.

  8. New drug target in protozoan parasites: the role of thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Rosa M; Reed, Sharon L

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis causes approximately 70,000 deaths annually and is the third cause of death due to parasites worldwide. It is treated primarily with metronidazole, which has adverse side effects, is mutagenic and carcinogenic, and emergence of resistance is an increasing concern. Unfortunately, better therapeutic alternatives are lacking. Re-purposing of older FDA approved drugs is advantageous to drug discovery since safety and pharmacokinetic effects in humans are already known. In high throughput screening studies, we recently demonstrated that auranofin, a gold containing compound originally approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, has activity against trophozoites of E. histolytica, the causative agent of amebiasis. Auranofin's anti-parasitic activity is attributed to its monovalent gold molecule that readily inhibits E. histolytica thioredoxin reductase. This anti-oxidant enzyme is the only thiol-dependent flavo-reductase present in E. histolytica. Auranofin has also shown promising activity against other protozoans of significant public health importance. Altogether, this evidence suggests that auranofin has the potential to become a broad spectrum alternative therapeutic agent for diseases with a large global burden.

  9. The meaning of death: evolution and ecology of apoptosis in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Sarah E; Pollitt, Laura C; Colegrave, Nick; Gardner, Andy

    2011-12-01

    The discovery that an apoptosis-like, programmed cell death (PCD) occurs in a broad range of protozoan parasites offers novel therapeutic tools to treat some of the most serious infectious diseases of humans, companion animals, wildlife, and livestock. Whilst apoptosis is an essential part of normal development, maintenance, and defence in multicellular organisms, its occurrence in unicellular parasites appears counter-intuitive and has proved highly controversial: according to the Darwinian notion of "survival of the fittest", parasites are expected to evolve strategies to maximise their proliferation, not death. The prevailing, and untested, opinion in the literature is that parasites employ apoptosis to "altruistically" self-regulate the intensity of infection in the host/vector. However, evolutionary theory tells us that at most, this can only be part of the explanation, and other non-mutually exclusive hypotheses must also be tested. Here, we explain the evolutionary concepts that can explain apoptosis in unicellular parasites, highlight the key questions, and outline the approaches required to resolve the controversy over whether parasites "commit suicide". We highlight the need for integration of proximate and functional approaches into an evolutionary framework to understand apoptosis in unicellular parasites. Understanding how, when, and why parasites employ apoptosis is central to targeting this process with interventions that are sustainable in the face of parasite evolution.

  10. A transposon toolkit for gene transfer and mutagenesis in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Jeziel D; Beverley, Stephen M; Tosi, Luiz R O

    2010-03-01

    Protozoan parasites affect millions of people around the world. Treatment and control of these diseases are complicated partly due to the intricate biology of these organisms. The interactions of species of Plasmodium, Leishmania and trypanosomes with their hosts are mediated by an unusual control of gene expression that is not fully understood. The availability of the genome sequence of these protozoa sets the stage for using more comprehensive, genome-wide strategies to study gene function. Transposons are effective tools for the systematic introduction of genetic alterations and different transposition systems have been adapted to study gene function in these human pathogens. A mariner transposon toolkit for use in vivo or in vitro in Leishmania parasites has been developed and can be used in a variety of applications. These modified mariner elements not only permit the inactivation of genes, but also mediate the rescue of translational gene fusions, bringing a major contribution to the investigation of Leishmania gene function. The piggyBac and Tn5 transposons have also been shown to mobilize across Plasmodium spp. genomes circumventing the current limitations in the genetic manipulation of these organisms.

  11. The meaning of death: evolution and ecology of apoptosis in protozoan parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Reece

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that an apoptosis-like, programmed cell death (PCD occurs in a broad range of protozoan parasites offers novel therapeutic tools to treat some of the most serious infectious diseases of humans, companion animals, wildlife, and livestock. Whilst apoptosis is an essential part of normal development, maintenance, and defence in multicellular organisms, its occurrence in unicellular parasites appears counter-intuitive and has proved highly controversial: according to the Darwinian notion of "survival of the fittest", parasites are expected to evolve strategies to maximise their proliferation, not death. The prevailing, and untested, opinion in the literature is that parasites employ apoptosis to "altruistically" self-regulate the intensity of infection in the host/vector. However, evolutionary theory tells us that at most, this can only be part of the explanation, and other non-mutually exclusive hypotheses must also be tested. Here, we explain the evolutionary concepts that can explain apoptosis in unicellular parasites, highlight the key questions, and outline the approaches required to resolve the controversy over whether parasites "commit suicide". We highlight the need for integration of proximate and functional approaches into an evolutionary framework to understand apoptosis in unicellular parasites. Understanding how, when, and why parasites employ apoptosis is central to targeting this process with interventions that are sustainable in the face of parasite evolution.

  12. New drug target in protozoan parasites: the role of thioredoxin reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Andrade

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis causes approximately 70,000 deaths annually and is the third cause of death due to parasites worldwide. It is treated primarily with metronidazole, which has adverse side effects, is mutagenic and carcinogenic, and emergence of resistance is an increasing concern. Unfortunately, better therapeutic alternatives are lacking. Re-purposing of older FDA approved drugs is advantageous to drug discovery since safety and pharmacokinetic effects in humans are already known. In high throughput screening studies, we recently demonstrated that auranofin, a gold containing compound originally approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, has activity against trophozoites of E. histolytica, the causative agent of amebiasis. Auranofin’s anti-parasitic activity is attributed to its monovalent gold molecule that readily inhibits E.histolytica thioredoxin reductase. This anti-oxidant enzyme is the only thiol-dependent flavo-reductase present in E.histolytica. Auranofin has also shown promising activity against other protozoans of significant public health importance. Altogether, this evidence suggests that auranofin has the potential to become a broad spectrum alternative therapeutic agent for diseases with a large global burden.

  13. [Fiber and enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Candela, C; de Cos Blanco, A I; Iglesias Rosado, C

    2002-01-01

    Dietary fibre is a mixture of various substances and is essential for maintaining appropriate intestinal functionality and it is currently considered to be a necessary part of a healthy diet. Current recommendations for fibre consumption by adults range from 20 to 35 g/day. Enteral nutrition is an emerging therapeutic variation in both hospital and domestic settings. To a great extent, this development has been made possible thanks to the design of new formulas that adapt better and better to the clinicla conditions or our patients. The type of fibre used in these preparations varies greatly. Some have only one source of fibre while others use differnet combinations. There are currently 32 formulas available on the Spanish market, without counting the modules or specific preparations of individual types of fibre. Despite the enormous advances in the knowledge of the beneficial effects of fibre, the fact of the matter is that enteral nutrition that we routinely prescribe in normal clinical practice does not contain fibre. The are several explanations for this, perhaps the most plausible is that these formulas may lead to problems in their administration and tolerance. It is necessary to choose the correct calibre of catheter and define the best infusion method and timing. Another difficulty may be the gastrointestinal tolerance of the formulas containing fibre. No large-scale problems of intolerance have however been described in healthy volunteers nor in patients with acute or chronic pathologies, although it is of fundamental importance to monitor the rhythm of depositions in all patients with enteral nutrition (EN) and ensure proper intake of liquids, which would also be useful to prevent occlusion of the catheter. The theoretical benefits of EN with fibre with a view to maintaining or improving normal intestinal structure and function are very varied. Nonetheless, it has noit yet been possible to prove many of these effects in controlled clinical trials. At the

  14. Protozoan Predation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Is Unaffected by the Carriage of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carrie E; Shringi, Smriti; Besser, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a food-borne bacterium that causes hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. While cattle are a known source of E. coli O157:H7 exposure resulting in human infection, environmental reservoirs may also be important sources of infection for both cattle and humans. Bacteriophage-encoded Shiga toxins (Stx) carried by E. coli O157:H7 may provide a selective advantage for survival of these bacteria in the environment, possibly through their toxic effects on grazing protozoa. To determine Stx effects on protozoan grazing, we co-cultured Paramecium caudatum, a common ciliate protozoon in cattle water sources, with multiple strains of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic cattle commensal E. coli. Over three days at ambient laboratory temperature, P. caudatum consistently reduced both E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic E. coli populations by 1-3 log cfu. Furthermore, a wild-type strain of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 (EDL933) and isogenic mutants lacking the A subunit of Stx 2a, the entire Stx 2a-encoding bacteriophage, and/or the entire Stx 1-encoding bacteriophage were grazed with similar efficacy by both P. caudatum and Tetrahymena pyriformis (another ciliate protozoon). Therefore, our data provided no evidence of a protective effect of either Stx or the products of other bacteriophage genes on protozoan predation of E. coli. Further research is necessary to determine if the grazing activity of naturally-occurring protozoa in cattle water troughs can serve to decrease cattle exposure to E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga-toxigenic E. coli.

  15. Protozoan Predation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Is Unaffected by the Carriage of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie E Schmidt

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a food-borne bacterium that causes hemorrhagic diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. While cattle are a known source of E. coli O157:H7 exposure resulting in human infection, environmental reservoirs may also be important sources of infection for both cattle and humans. Bacteriophage-encoded Shiga toxins (Stx carried by E. coli O157:H7 may provide a selective advantage for survival of these bacteria in the environment, possibly through their toxic effects on grazing protozoa. To determine Stx effects on protozoan grazing, we co-cultured Paramecium caudatum, a common ciliate protozoon in cattle water sources, with multiple strains of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic cattle commensal E. coli. Over three days at ambient laboratory temperature, P. caudatum consistently reduced both E. coli O157:H7 and non-Shiga toxigenic E. coli populations by 1-3 log cfu. Furthermore, a wild-type strain of Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O157:H7 (EDL933 and isogenic mutants lacking the A subunit of Stx 2a, the entire Stx 2a-encoding bacteriophage, and/or the entire Stx 1-encoding bacteriophage were grazed with similar efficacy by both P. caudatum and Tetrahymena pyriformis (another ciliate protozoon. Therefore, our data provided no evidence of a protective effect of either Stx or the products of other bacteriophage genes on protozoan predation of E. coli. Further research is necessary to determine if the grazing activity of naturally-occurring protozoa in cattle water troughs can serve to decrease cattle exposure to E. coli O157:H7 and other Shiga-toxigenic E. coli.

  16. Protozoan parasites in group-living primates: testing the biological island hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Colin A; Bowman, Dwight D; Ghai, Ria R; Gogarten, Jan F; Goldberg, Tony L; Rothman, Jessica M; Twinomugisha, Dennis; Walsh, Chesley

    2012-06-01

    A series of articles by W.J. Freeland published in the 1970s proposed that social organization and behavioral processes were heavily influenced by parasitic infections, which led to a number of intriguing hypotheses concerning how natural selection might act on social factors because of the benefits of avoiding parasite infections. For example, Freeland [1979] showed that all individuals within a given group harbored identical gastrointestinal protozoan faunas, which led him to postulate that social groups were akin to "biological islands" and suggest how this isolation could select specific types of ranging and dispersal patterns. Here, we reexamine the biological island hypothesis by quantifying the protozoan faunas of the same primate species examined by Freeland in the same location; our results do not support this hypothesis. In contrast, we quantified two general changes in protozoan parasite community of primates in the study area of Kibale National Park, Uganda, over the nearly 35 years between sample collections: (1) the colobines found free of parasites in the early 1970s are now infected with numerous intestinal protozoan parasites and (2) groups are no longer biological islands in terms of their protozoan parasites. Whatever the ultimate explanation for these changes, our findings have implications for studies proposing selective forces shaping primate behavior and social organization. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evolution of apoptosis-like programmed cell death in unicellular protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sajid, Mohammed; Reece, Sarah E

    2011-03-25

    Apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD) has recently been described in multiple taxa of unicellular protists, including the protozoan parasites Plasmodium, Trypanosoma and Leishmania. Apoptosis-like PCD in protozoan parasites shares a number of morphological features with programmed cell death in multicellular organisms. However, both the evolutionary explanations and mechanisms involved in parasite PCD are poorly understood. Explaining why unicellular organisms appear to undergo 'suicide' is a challenge for evolutionary biology and uncovering death executors and pathways is a challenge for molecular and cell biology. Bioinformatics has the potential to integrate these approaches by revealing homologies in the PCD machinery of diverse taxa and evaluating their evolutionary trajectories. As the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in model organisms are well characterised, and recent data suggest similar mechanisms operate in protozoan parasites, key questions can now be addressed. These questions include: which elements of apoptosis machinery appear to be shared between protozoan parasites and multicellular taxa and, have these mechanisms arisen through convergent or divergent evolution? We use bioinformatics to address these questions and our analyses suggest that apoptosis mechanisms in protozoan parasites and other taxa have diverged during their evolution, that some apoptosis factors are shared across taxa whilst others have been replaced by proteins with similar biochemical activities.

  18. [Modular enteral nutrition in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Sanchís, S; Prenafeta Ferré, M T; Sempere Luque, M D

    1991-01-01

    Modular Enteral Nutrition may be a substitute for Parenteral Nutrition in children with different pathologies. Study of 4 children with different pathologies selected from a group of 40 admitted to the Maternal-Childrens Hospital "Valle de Hebrón" in Barcelona, who received modular enteral nutrition. They were monitored on a daily basis by the Dietician Service. Modular enteral nutrition consists of modules of proteins, peptides, lipids, glucids and mineral salts-vitamins. 1.--Craneo-encephalic traumatisms with loss of consciousness, Feeding with a combination of parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition for 7 days. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended and modular enteral nutrition alone used up to a total of 43 days. 2.--55% burns with 36 days of hyperproteic modular enteral nutrition together with normal feeding. A more rapid recovery was achieved with an increase in total proteins and albumin. 3.--Persistent diarrhoea with 31 days of modular enteral nutrition, 5 days on parenteral nutrition alone and 8 days on combined parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended. 4.--Mucoviscidosis with a total of 19 days on modular enteral nutrition, 12 of which were exclusively on modular enteral nutrition and 7 as a night supplement to normal feeding. We administered proteic intakes of up to 20% of the total calorific intake and in concentrations of up to 1.2 calories/ml of the final preparation, always with a good tolerance. Modular enteral nutrition can and should be used as a substitute for parenteral nutrition in children with different pathologies, thus preventing the complications inherent in parenteral nutrition.

  19. Enteral nutrients potentiate glucagon-like peptide-2 action and reduce dependence on parenteral nutrition in a rat model of human intestinal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkman, Adam S; Murali, Sangita G; Hitt, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    human SBS and requires parenteral nutrition (PN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of five groups and maintained with PN for 18 days: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) alone, TPN + GLP-2 (100 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)), PN + EN + GLP-2(7 days), PN + EN + GLP-2(18 days), and a nonsurgical oral...

  20. Excellent enteric explorers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somford, Matthijs P; Marres, Geertruid Mh; van der Schelling, George P

    2009-12-01

    As if following the natural course of an ingested particle, several structures in the gastrointestinal tract which were named after their discoverers are presented including concise backgrounds of these pioneers of the human intestines.

  1. Helminths and protozoans of aquatic organisms as bioindicators of chemical pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Martínez, V M

    2007-09-01

    There is no doubt that the aquatic environments receive large quantities of chemicals as consequence of human activities and that those substances have a detrimental effect on human health. Despite the obvious need for effective disposal of these substances, we need to understand and prevent the outcome of harmful environmental exposures. Thus, we need biomarkers and bioindicators to advance our understanding to these harmful exposures and their biological effects. In the last three decades a large number of publications has suggested that aquatic organisms and their parasites (mainly helminths and ciliate protozoans) are useful bioindicators of chemical pollution. However, the main weakness of this approach is that after exposure the population size of these parasites can increase or decrease without a consistent pattern. I suggest that this is in part due to the lack of focus on the correct spatial or temporal scales at which the environment is acting over our study object. Thus, I propose to use spatially explicit (= georeferenced) data for determining whether there is spatial structure in our study area. Spatial structure is the tendency of nearby samples to have attribute values more similar than those farther apart. These attributes are shaped by environmental variables acting at specific spatial and temporal scales. Thus, I suggest to consider these tools for determining the correct spatial or temporal scales of study, but also to record pollutant concentrations, bioindicators, biomarkers and parasites at individual host level. Combining this information with long-term monitoring programs is likely to improve our understanding of the effects of chemical pollutants over the aquatic environments.

  2. Chemo-informatic design of antibiotic geldenamycin analogs to target stress proteins HSP90 of pathogenic protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chaya; Atri, Neelam

    2013-01-01

    Stress proteins HSP90 (Heat shock proteins) are essential molecular chaperones involved in signal transduction, cell cycle control, stress management, folding and degradation of proteins. HSP90 have been found in a variety of organisms including pathogens suggesting that they are ancient and conserved proteins. Here, using molecular modeling and docking protocols, antibiotic Geldenamycin and its analog are targeted to the HSP90 homolog proteins of pathogenic protozoans Plasmodium falciparum, Leishmania donovani, Trypanosoma brucei and Entamoeba Histolytica. The designed analogs of geldenamycin have shown drug like property with improved binding affinity to their targets. A decrease in insilico affinity of the analogs for the Human HSP90 target indicates that they can be used as potential drug candidates.

  3. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  4. Immune responses against protozoan parasites: a focus on the emerging role of Nod-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Prajwal; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-08-01

    Nod-like receptors (NLRs) have gained attention in recent years because of the ability of some family members to assemble into a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome. The role of NLRs and the inflammasome in regulating innate immunity against bacterial pathogens has been well studied. However, recent studies show that NLRs and inflammasomes also play a role during infections caused by protozoan parasites, which pose a significant global health burden. Herein, we review the diseases caused by the most common protozoan parasites in the world and discuss the roles of NLRs and inflammasomes in host immunity against these parasites.

  5. Strain differences in fitness of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to resist protozoan predation and survival in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subbarao V Ravva

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157 associated with the 2006 spinach outbreak appears to have persisted as the organism was isolated, three months after the outbreak, from environmental samples in the produce production areas of the central coast of California. Survival in harsh environments may be linked to the inherent fitness characteristics of EcO157. This study evaluated the comparative fitness of outbreak-related clinical and environmental strains to resist protozoan predation and survive in soil from a spinach field in the general vicinity of isolation of strains genetically indistinguishable from the 2006 outbreak strains. Environmental strains from soil and feral pig feces survived longer (11 to 35 days for 90% decreases, D-value with Vorticella microstoma and Colpoda aspera, isolated previously from dairy wastewater; these D-values correlated (P<0.05 negatively with protozoan growth. Similarly, strains from cow feces, feral pig feces, and bagged spinach survived significantly longer in soil compared to clinical isolates indistinguishable by 11-loci multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis. The curli-positive (C+ phenotype, a fitness trait linked with attachment in ruminant and human gut, decreased after exposure to protozoa, and in soils only C- cells remained after 7 days. The C+ phenotype correlated negatively with D-values of EcO157 exposed to soil (rs = -0.683; P = 0.036, Vorticella (rs = -0.465; P = 0.05 or Colpoda (rs = -0.750; P = 0.0001. In contrast, protozoan growth correlated positively with C+ phenotype (Vorticella, rs = 0.730, P = 0.0004; Colpoda, rs = 0.625, P = 0.006 suggesting a preference for consumption of C+ cells, although they grew on C- strains also. We speculate that the C- phenotype is a selective trait for survival and possibly transport of the pathogen in soil and water environments.

  6. Gastro-enteritis in huisartsenpeilstations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, W.J. van; Vinje, J.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duijnhoven, Y.T.P.H. van

    1998-01-01

    De incidentie van huisartsconsulten voor gastro-enteritis van 77 per 10.000 persoonjaren lijkt een lichte daling te vertonen t.o.v. de incidentie van 90 per 10.000 persoonjaren in een vergelijkbaar onderzoek in 1992-1993. De belangrijkste verwekkers van gastro-enteritis waarvoor de huisarts wordt ge

  7. Gastro-enteritis in huisartsenpeilstations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, W.J. van; Vinje, J.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duijnhoven, Y.T.P.H. van

    1998-01-01

    De incidentie van huisartsconsulten voor gastro-enteritis van 77 per 10.000 persoonjaren lijkt een lichte daling te vertonen t.o.v. de incidentie van 90 per 10.000 persoonjaren in een vergelijkbaar onderzoek in 1992-1993. De belangrijkste verwekkers van gastro-enteritis waarvoor de huisarts wordt

  8. Entering the Clone Age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Suppose you make your parents so happy,they decide to have another baby just like you.It might be flattering,but how would you feel about having a little brother or sister who is also your twin? A laboratory experiment conducted last fall suggests it may someday be possible.For the first time ever,scientists made exact copies, or clones, of a human embryo.

  9. Effects of temporally persistent ant nests of soil protozoan communities and the abundance of morphological types of amoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    We compared soil protozoan communities near ant nests with soil protozoans in reference soils 5m from the edge of any mounds. We sampled three species of Chihuahuan Desert ants that construct nests that persist for more than a decade: a seed harvester, Pogonomymex rugosus, a liquid feeding honey-po...

  10. Case Study: Enteral formula: Selecting the right formula for your ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renée Blaauw, Division of Human Nutrition, Stellenbosch University. Anna-Lena du Toit, Dietetics .... standard enteral formulae require specialized renal formulae. Respiratory. • Modified .... not yet referred for renal replacement therapy (RRT).

  11. Enter the Gripping Beast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindbæk, Søren Michael

    2012-01-01

    of communities and their life world. Transcending technology, cultural dispositions and social relations, the study of innovations invites an actor-networks approach, which considers the heterogeneous nature of human-material relations. The archaeological record is potentially a rich source of evidence...... on innovations. Mostly, however, the time-resolution of archaeological data is too coarse-grained to allow us to grasp this potential to the full. In the period c. AD 790-850 a distinctly new artistic motif, the Gripping Beast, emerged in Scandinavia. A series of narrowly dated contexts provide anchor points...

  12. Prevalence of Zoonotic and Other Intestinal Protozoan Parasites in Stray Cats (Felis domesticus of Kerman, South-East of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh BEIGI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal protozoan parasites constitute a major source of diseases for stray cats and have been recognized as important public health problems in several parts of the world. Considering the potential risk of stray cats for public health, present cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the type and frequency of protozoan parasites by faecal examination. A total of 100 stray cats were examined in Kerman city, Iran, Overall 67 cats (67% were infected with at least one protozoan parasite. The following parasites, with their respective prevalence, were found; Isospora felis 38%, Isospora rivolta 25%, Toxoplasma gondii 16%, Sarcocystis spp. 8%, Cryptosporidium spp. 7%, and Giardia sp. 5%. Based on our data, the sex of stray cats was not significantly associated with the prevalence of gastrointestinal protozoan parasites. The high infection rate of zoonotic intestinal protozoan parasites in stray cats is considered to be critical from the viewpoint of public health importance.We

  13. Photodynamic therapy in the cattle protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus cultivated on superhydrophilic carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Susane Moreira [Laboratory of Tissue and Cell Biology, Development and Research Institute (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Urbanova, 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pacheco-Soares, Cristina [Laboratory of Tissue and Cell Biology, Development and Research Institute (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Urbanova, 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Dynamics of Cellular Compartments, Development and Research Institute (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Urbanova, 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Development and Research Institute (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Urbanova, 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Soares da Silva, Newton, E-mail: nsoares@univap.br [Laboratory of Tissue and Cell Biology, Development and Research Institute (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Urbanova, 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Dynamics of Cellular Compartments, Development and Research Institute (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraíba (UNIVAP), Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Urbanova, 12244-000 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-01

    Superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT-O{sub 2}) were used for the first time as scaffolds for photodynamic therapy (PDT) to induce inhibition of cell division in eukaryotic cells. VACNT-O{sub 2} scaffolds were produced on Ti substrates using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique and functionalized by oxygen plasma. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed to characterize the surface changes of the protozoan and interaction with VACNT-O{sub 2}. Characterization of lipid and total protein expression was performed with protozoa that were or not treated with PDT. Quantification of protein was conducted using Qubit fluorometer and separated on a polyacrylamide gel. SEM analysis showed the release of lipid vesicles by protozoa after the PDT. These vesicles were characterized by the PKH26 fluorescent probe. The results demonstrated a greater amount of protein released after PDT than in the control. When analyzing the protein material in polyacrylamide gel, a significant protein expression of approximately 65 kDa was found. A model identified the programmed death of Tritrichomonas foetus after the PDT was also proposed. - Highlights: • VAMWCNT-O{sub 2} used for the first time as scaffolds for study in parasitic protozoan. • VAMWCNT-O{sub 2} films applied to understand spreading mechanisms of parasitic protozoan. • A release of a protein of approximately 65kDa of protozoan was also observed.

  14. Persistence of free-living protozoan communities across rearing cycles in commercial poultry houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baré, Julie; Houf, Kurt; Verstraete, Tine; Vaerewijck, Mario; Sabbe, Koen

    2011-03-01

    The introduction and survival of zoonotic bacterial pathogens in poultry farming have been linked to bacterial association with free-living protozoa. To date, however, no information is available on the persistence of protozoan communities in these environments across consecutive rearing cycles and how it is affected by farm- and habitat-specific characteristics and management strategies. We therefore investigated the spatial and temporal dynamics of free-living protozoa in three habitats (pipeline, water, and miscellaneous samples) in three commercial poultry houses across three rearing cycles by using the molecular fingerprinting technique denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our study provides strong evidence for the long-term (ca. 6-month) persistence of protozoa in broiler houses across consecutive rearing cycles. Various free-living protozoa (flagellates, ciliates, and amoebae), including known vectors of bacterial pathogens, were observed during the down periods in between rearing cycles. In addition, multivariate analysis and variation partitioning showed that the protozoan community structure in the broiler houses showed almost no change across rearing cycles and remained highly habitat and farm specific. Unlike in natural environments, protozoan communities inside broiler houses are therefore not seasonal. Our results imply that currently used biosecurity measures (cleaning and disinfection) applied during the down periods are not effective against many protozoans and therefore cannot prevent potential cross-contamination of bacterial pathogens via free-living protozoa between rearing cycles.

  15. ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES, POTENTIAL VIRULENT FACTORS, IN DIFFERENT STRAINS OF THE OYSTER PROTOZOAN PARASITE, PERKINSUS MARINUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus, is one of the two important parasites causing severe mortality in the eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) on the US east coast. Our recent study suggests that P. marinus cells and its extracellular products (ECP) could scaveng...

  16. Formalin for external protozoan parasites: A report on the prevention and control of Costia necatrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Frederick S.

    1940-01-01

    The smallest and most destructive of the ectoparasitic protozoans infecting salmon and trout, Costia necatrix, has unfortunately been relegated to virtual obscurity during the past few years. Few references to this parasite can be found in the recent literature and, where such things are discussed, one seldom hears a mention of Costia necatrix.

  17. Protozoan ALKBH8 Oxygenases Display both DNA Repair and tRNA Modification Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn

    2014-01-01

    , interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function...

  18. Meeting on the Microbiology of Soils, Autumn 2001: Estimation of protozoan diversity in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekelund, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Different methods of estimating protozoan diversity in soil are discussed in this paper, with the major emphasis on heterotrophic flagellates. Although many species of ciliates and testate amoebae seem to be unique to the soil environment, the communities of heterotrophic flagellates and naked am...

  19. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double......-lumen duodenal perfusion/aspiration techniques over 6 hours. Subjects were assigned to no feeding (n = 7), duodenal feeding with a polymeric diet (n = 7) or low-fat elemental diet (n = 6), mid-distal jejunal feeding (n = 11), or intravenous feeding (n = 5). All diets provided 40 kcal/kg ideal body weight/d and 1...

  20. Pediatric Enteral Access Device Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhadi, Ruba A; Rahe, Katina; Lyman, Beth

    2016-10-13

    Enteral nutrition (EN) support has proven to be a nutrition intervention that can provide full or partial calories to promote growth and development in infants and children. To supply these nutrients, an enteral access device is required, and the use of these devices is growing. Placement of the proper device for the patient need, along with appropriate care and monitoring, is required for individualized patient management. When complications arise, early identification and management can prevent more serious morbidity. Complication management requires a tiered approach starting with staff nurses and ending with a physician expert. In addition to this, each institution needs to have an approach that is coordinated among disciplines and departments to promote consistency of practice. The formation of an enteral access team is a conduit for clinical experts to provide education to families, patients, and healthcare professionals while serving as a platform to address product and practice issues. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Technical aspects of enteral nutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Keymling, M

    1994-01-01

    Advances in technical aspects of enteral feeding such as the manufacture of tubes from polyurethane or silicone have helped promote the science of enteral nutrition. Nasoenteral tubes have few complications, apart from a high unwanted extubation rate and some reluctance from patients because of cosmetic unacceptability. Needle jejunostomy has low morbidity but can only be placed at laparotomy. Percutaneous gastrotomy (in all its different guises) has been established as a low risk procedure a...

  2. EARLY ENTERAL FEEDING AND DELAYED ENTERAL FEEDING- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alli Muthiah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nutrients form the fuel for the body, which comes in the form of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The body is intended to burn fuels in order to perform work. Starvation with malnutrition affects the postoperative patients and patients with acute pancreatitis. There is an increased risk of nosocomial infections and a delay in the wound healing may be noted. They are more prone for respiratory tract infections. Enteral Nutrition (EN delivers nutrition to the body through gastrointestinal tract. This also includes the oral feeding. This study will review the administration, rationale and assess the pros and cons associated with the early initiation of enteral feeding. The aim of this study is to evaluate if early commencement of enteral nutrition compared to traditional management (delayed enteral feeding is associated with fewer complications and improved outcome-  In patients undergoing elective/emergency gastrointestinal surgery.  In patients with acute pancreatitis. It is also used to determine whether a period of starvation (nil by mouth after gastrointestinal surgery or in the early days of acute pancreatitis is beneficial in terms of specific outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective cohort interventional study was conducted using 100 patients from July 2012 to November 2012. Patients satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. Patients admitted in my unit for GIT surgeries or acute pancreatitis constituted the test group, while patients admitted in other units for similar disease processes constituted the control group. RESULTS Our study concluded that early enteral feeding resulted in reduced incidence of surgical site infections. When the decreased length of stay, shorter convalescent period and the lesser post-interventional fatigue were taken into account, early enteral feeding has a definite cost benefit.CONCLUSION Early enteral feeding was beneficial associated with fewer

  3. Comparative examination of cats with feline leukemia virus-associated enteritis and other relevant forms of feline enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipar, A; Kremendahl, J; Jackson, M L; Reinacher, M

    2001-07-01

    Cats with feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated enteritis (FAE), enteritis of other known viral etiology (parvovirus [PV], enteric coronavirus [CoV]), and enteritis of unknown etiology with histologic features similar to those of FAE and PV enteritis (EUE) and FeLV-negative and FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations were examined. Amount and types of infiltrating leukocytes in the jejunum and activity and cellular constituents of mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow were determined. PV and CoV infections were confirmed by immunohistologic demonstration of PV and CoV antigen, ultrastructural demonstration of viral particles in the intestinal content, and in situ hybridization for PV genome. FeLV infection was detected by immunohistology for gp70, p27, and p15E. Latent FeLV infection was excluded by polymerase chain reaction methods for exogenous FeLV DNA. Enterocyte lesions involved the crypts in cats with PV enteritis, FAE, and EUE and the villous tips in cats with CoV enteritis. Inflammatory infiltration was generally dominated by mononuclear cells and was moderate in the unaltered intestine and in cats with PV enteritis and marked in cats with FAE, CoV enteritis, and EUE. In cats with EUE, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-positive macrophages were relatively numerous, suggesting recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes. Lymphoid tissues were depleted in cats with PV enteritis and with EUE but were normal or hyperplastic in cats with FAE. Bone marrow activity was decreased in cats with PV enteritis; in cats with FAE or EUE and in FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations, activity was slightly increased. In cats with FAE and PV enteritis, a T-cell-dominated response prevailed. EUE showed some parallels to human inflammatory bowel disease, indicating a potential harmful effect of infiltrating macrophages on the intestinal epithelium.

  4. Meat-based enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevitskay, O. K.; Dydykin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Enteral nutrition is widely used in hospitals as a means of nutritional support and therapy for different diseases. Enteral nutrition must fulfil the energy needs of the body, be balanced by the nutrient composition and meet patient’s nutritional needs. Meat is a source of full-value animal protein, vitamins and minerals. On the basis of this research, recipes and technology for a meat-based enteral nutrition product were developed. The product is a ready-to-eat sterilised mixture in the form of a liquid homogeneous mass, which is of full value in terms of composition and enriched with vitamins and minerals, consists of particles with a size of not more than 0.3 mm and has the modified fat composition and rheological characteristics that are necessary for passage through enteral feeding tubes. The study presents experimental data on the content of the main macro- and micro-nutrients in the developed product. The new product is characterised by a balanced fatty acid composition, which plays an important role in correction of lipid metabolism disorders and protein-energy deficiency, and it is capable of satisfying patients’ daily requirements for vitamins and the main macro- and microelements when consuming 1500-2000 ml. Meat-based enteral nutrition can be used in diets as a standard mixture for effective correction of the energy and anabolic requirements of the body and support of the nutritional status of patients, including those with operated stomach syndrome.

  5. Transient and stable transfection in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba invadens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M; Singh, Upinder

    2012-07-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an important human pathogen and a major health problem worldwide. Many aspects of parasite biology can be studied with the exception of stage conversion, which cannot be reproduced adequately in E. histolytica. The reptile parasite Entamoeba invadens is a vital model system for studying stage conversion since it can be induced to undergo both encystation and excystation with high efficiency in vitro. However, functional studies using E. invadens have been limited by the lack of genetic tools in this species. Here, we report a new method for both transient and stable transfection of E. invadens. These new tools will greatly enhance research into Entamoeba development.

  6. Geographic distribution of human Blastocystis subtypes in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Juan David; Sánchez, Angie; Hernández, Carolina; Flórez, Carolina; Bernal, María Consuelo; Giraldo, Julio Cesar; Reyes, Patricia; López, Myriam Consuelo; García, Lineth; Cooper, Philip J; Vicuña, Yosselin; Mongi, Florencia; Casero, Rodolfo D

    2016-07-01

    Blastocystis is a cosmopolitan enteric protist colonizing probably more than 1 billion people. This protozoan exhibits genetic diversity and is subdivided into subtypes (STs). The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of Blastocystis STs in symptomatic and asymptomatic human samples from different countries of South America. A total of 346 fecal samples were genotyped by SSU rDNA showing ST1 (28.3%), ST2 (22.2%), ST3 (36.7%), ST4 (2%), ST5 (2.3%), ST6 (2%), ST7 (2.3%), ST8 (0.6%), ST12 (0.9%) and a novel ST (2.7%). These findings update the epidemiology of Blastocystis in South America and expand our knowledge of the phylogeographic differences exhibited by this stramenopile.

  7. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  8. Protozoan parasites of four species of wild anurans from a local zoo in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, K N; Badrul, M M; Mohamad, N; Zainal-Abidin, A H

    2013-12-01

    The parasitic protozoan fauna in sixty-six anurans comprising of Duttaphrynus melanostictus, Phrynoidis juxtaspera, Hylarana erythraea and Polypedates leucomystax collected from Zoo Negara Malaysia was investigated. The distribution and prevalence rate of parasitic species in the digestive tract and blood were examined. Seven species of intestinal protozoa (Opalina ranarum, Cepedea dimidiata, Nycthetorus cordiformis, Entamoeba ranarum, Iodamoeba butschlii, Endamoeba blattae, and Tritrichomonas sp.) and two species of blood protozoa (Lankesterella sp. and Trypanosoma sp.) were recorded. Opalina ranarum was the most common protozoan found in the rectum and intestine (prevalence rate: 34.8%) infecting all host species, with P. juxtaspera heavily infected with the parasite, whereas Tritrichomonas sp. was the least prevalent intestinal species infecting only D. melanostictus. Both Lankesterella sp. and Trypanosoma sp. were found in the blood of H. erythraea.

  9. Incidence of adult brain cancers is higher in countries where the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is common

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Frédéric; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Brodeur, Jacques; Elguero, Eric; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Missé, Dorothée

    2012-01-01

    We explored associations between the common protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and brain cancers in human populations. We predicted that T. gondii could increase the risk of brain cancer because it is a long-lived parasite that encysts in the brain, where it provokes inflammation and inhibits apoptosis. We used a medical geography approach based on the national incidence of brain cancers and seroprevalence of T. gondii. We corrected reports of incidence for national gross domestic product because wealth probably increases the ability to detect cancer. We also included gender, cell phone use and latitude as variables in our initial models. Prevalence of T. gondii explained 19 per cent of the residual variance in brain cancer incidence after controlling for the positive effects of gross domestic product and latitude among nations. Infection with T. gondii was associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of brain cancers across the range of T. gondii prevalence in our dataset (4–67%). These results, though correlational, suggest that T. gondii should be investigated further as a possible oncogenic pathogen of humans.

  10. Multiplex screening for blood-borne viral, bacterial, and protozoan parasites using an OpenArray platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Elena; Fisher, Carolyn; Patel, Sunali; Chancey, Caren; Rios, Maria; Nakhasi, Hira L; Duncan, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    The use of nucleic acid tests for detection of pathogens has improved the safety of blood products. However, ongoing pathogen emergence demonstrates a need for development of devices testing for multiple pathogens simultaneously. One approach combines two proven technologies: Taqman chemistry for target identification and quantification and the OpenArray nanofluidic real-time PCR platform for spatial multiplexing of assays. A panel of Taqman assays was developed to detect nine blood-borne pathogens (BBPs): four viral, two bacterial, and three protozoan parasites. The custom BBP OpenArray plate with 18 assays was tested for specificity and analytical sensitivity for nucleic acid from each purified pathogen and with pathogen-spiked human blood and plasma samples. For most targets, the limits of detection (10 to 10,000 copies/mL) were comparable with existing real-time platforms. The testing of the BBP OpenArray with pathogen-spiked coded human plasma or blood samples and negative control specimens demonstrated no false-positive results among the samples tested and correctly identified pathogens with the lowest concentration detected ranging from 10 cells/mL (Trypanosoma cruzi) to 10,000 cells/mL (Escherichia coli). These results represent a proof of concept that indicated the BBP OpenArray platform in combination with Taqman chemistry may provide a multiplex real-time PCR pathogen detection method that points the way for a next-generation platform for infectious disease testing in blood.

  11. Indiscretion enteritis. A Rabelaisian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, E D; Collins, J; Burke, C

    1986-12-01

    A 76-year-old man had small bowel obstruction and organic small bowel disease following a series of bizarre massive gustatory insults that involved food, medications, and mega-mineral-vitamin supplements. Intestinal obstruction required partial small bowel resection. The dietary indiscretions resulted in severe enteritis (indiscretion enteritis). The sequence has been termed a Rabelaisian syndrome after the great French writer and physician, Francois Rabelais, who vividly described bizarre gustatory habits. Gut injury may result from unwise oral intake of various foods and mineral supplements.

  12. Arsenic oxidation and bioaccumulation by the acidophilic protozoan, Euglena mutabilis, in acid mine drainage (Carnoules, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casiot, C.; Bruneel, O.; Personne, J.-C.; Leblanc, M.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F. [University of Montpellier 2, Montpellier (France)

    2004-03-29

    In the acid stream (pH 2.5-4.7) originating from the Camoules mine tailings, the acidophilic protozoan Euglena mutabilis grows with extremely high sulfate (1.9-4.9 g/l), iron (0.7-1.7 g/l) and arsenic concentrations (0.08-0.26 g/l). Strong variations in flow rate and high sulfate concentrations (up to 4.9 g/l) have been registered in early winter and might be the reason for the reduction in cell number of the protozoan from October to December 2001. No relation was established between arsenic concentration and/or speciation and abundance of the protozoan in the stream. Arsenite, which is the most toxic form, predominates in water. The oxidation of arsenite to arsenate occurred within a few days in laboratory experiments when E. mutabilis was present in Reigous Creek water and synthetic As(III)-rich culture medium. Methylated compounds (MMA, DMA) were not identified in the culture media. The protozoan bioaccumulated As in the cell (336{+-} 112 {mu}g As/g dry wt.) as inorganic arsenite (105 {+-} 52 {mu}g As/g dry wt.) and arsenate (231 {+-} 112 {mu}g As/g dry wt.). Adsorption of As at the cell surface reached 57 mg/g dry wt. in the As(V) form for E. mutabilis grown in 250 mg/l As(III) synthetic medium. Both intracellular accumulation and adsorption at the cell surface increased for increasing As(III) concentration in the medium but the concentration factor in the cell relative to soluble As decreased.

  13. Relative effects of bacterial and protozoan predators on survival of Escherichia coli in estuarine water samples.

    OpenAIRE

    McCambridge, J; McMeekin, T A

    1980-01-01

    The relative effect of protozoan and bacterial predators on the survival of Escherichia coli in estuarine water samples was examined. Predacious protozoa exerted their major influence on E. coli destruction during the first 2 days of a 10-day-decline period. Inhibition of protozoa after day 2 had little effect on E. coli survival. Bacterial predators also contributed to E. coli destruction but in natural estuarine water samples were maintained at lower levels due to "grazing" by predacious pr...

  14. New approaches for the identification of drug targets in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Antiparasitic chemotherapy is an important issue for drug development. Traditionally, novel compounds with antiprotozoan activities have been identified by screening of compound libraries in high-throughput systems. More recently developed approaches employ target-based drug design supported by genomics and proteomics of protozoan parasites. In this chapter, the drug targets in protozoan parasites are reviewed. The gene-expression machinery has been among the first targets for antiparasitic drugs and is still under investigation as a target for novel compounds. Other targets include cytoskeletal proteins, proteins involved in intracellular signaling, membranes, and enzymes participating in intermediary metabolism. In apicomplexan parasites, the apicoplast is a suitable target for established and novel drugs. Some drugs act on multiple subcellular targets. Drugs with nitro groups generate free radicals under anaerobic growth conditions, and drugs with peroxide groups generate radicals under aerobic growth conditions, both affecting multiple cellular pathways. Mefloquine and thiazolides are presented as examples for antiprotozoan compounds with multiple (side) effects. The classic approach of drug discovery employing high-throughput physiological screenings followed by identification of drug targets has yielded the mainstream of current antiprotozoal drugs. Target-based drug design supported by genomics and proteomics of protozoan parasites has not produced any antiparasitic drug so far. The reason for this is discussed and a synthesis of both methods is proposed.

  15. Host lipid bodies as platforms for intracellular survival of protozoan parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A.M. Toledo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens induce several changes in the host cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms in order to evade and manipulate the immune response. One prominent pathogen-mediated change is the formation of lipid-rich organelles, termed lipid bodies or lipid droplets, in the host cell cytoplasm. Protozoan parasites, which contribute expressively to the burden of infectious diseases worldwide, are able to induce lipid body genesis in non-immune and immune cells, mainly macrophages, key players in the initial resistance to the infection. Under host-parasite interaction, lipid bodies not only accumulate in the host cytoplasm but also relocate around and move into parasitophorous vacuoles. There is increasing evidence that protozoan parasites may target host-derived lipid bodies either for gaining nutrients or for escaping the host immune response. Newly formed, parasite-induced lipid bodies may serve as lipid sources for parasite growth and also produce inflammatory mediators that potentially act in the host immune response deactivation. In this mini review, we summarize current knowledge on the formation and role of host lipid bodies as sites exploited by intracellular protozoan parasites as a strategy to maintain their own survival.

  16. Tick and tick borne protozoan diseases of livestock in the selected hilly areas of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.K. Mohanta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the tick and tick borne protozoan diseases of livestock in the hilly areas of Bangladesh, an attempt was made to collect tick and blood samples from cattle, goat and gayal (Bos frontalis from different areas of the three hill districts. In this study, two species of ticks namely, Boophilus microplus (92% and Amblyomma testudinarium (21.6% and two species of blood protozoa like Babesia bigemina (16.63% and Anaplasma marginale (14.94% were recorded. Seasonal prevalence of ticks was highest in summer (97% in comparison to rainy (95% and winter (86% season. On the other hand, the seasonal prevalence of blood protozoa was highest in rainy season (45.45% in comparison to summer (27.87% and winter (16.55%. Again, animals aged more than 2 (two years of age (52% found to be more susceptible to blood protozoan diseases than animals aged between 1-2 years of age (33.97%. But none of the animals under one year of age were found to be infected with blood protozoan diseases.

  17. The regulation of CD4+ T cell responses during protozoan infections.

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    Christian eEngwerda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells are critical for defence against protozoan parasites. Intracellular protozoan parasite infections generally require the development of a Th1 cell response, characterised by the production of IFNγ and TNF that are critical for the generation of microbiocidal molecules by phagocytes, as well as the expression of cytokines and cell surface molecules needed to generate cytolytic CD8+ T cells that can recognise and kill infected host cells . Over the past 25 years, much has been learnt about the molecular and cellular components necessary for the generation of Th1 cell responses, and it has become clear that these responses need to by tightly controlled to prevent disease. However, our understanding of the immunoregulatory mechanisms activated during infection is still not complete. Furthermore, it is apparent that although these mechanisms are critical to prevent inflammation, they can also promote parasite persistence and development of disease. Here, we review how CD4+ T cells are controlled during protozoan infections and how these regulatory mechanisms can influence parasite growth and disease outcome.

  18. Host Lipid Bodies as Platforms for Intracellular Survival of Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Daniel A M; D'Avila, Heloísa; Melo, Rossana C N

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens induce several changes in the host cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms in order to evade and manipulate the immune response. One prominent pathogen-mediated change is the formation of lipid-rich organelles, termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets, in the host cell cytoplasm. Protozoan parasites, which contribute expressively to the burden of infectious diseases worldwide, are able to induce LB genesis in non-immune and immune cells, mainly macrophages, key players in the initial resistance to the infection. Under host-parasite interaction, LBs not only accumulate in the host cytoplasm but also relocate around and move into parasitophorous vacuoles. There is increasing evidence that protozoan parasites may target host-derived LBs either for gaining nutrients or for escaping the host immune response. Newly formed, parasite-induced LBs may serve as lipid sources for parasite growth and also produce inflammatory mediators that potentially act in the host immune response deactivation. In this mini review, we summarize current knowledge on the formation and role of host LBs as sites exploited by intracellular protozoan parasites as a strategy to maintain their own survival.

  19. Molecular players of homologous recombination in protozoan parasites: implications for generating antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti; Norris, Douglas E; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2004-06-01

    A major impediment to vaccine development against infections caused by protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma is the extraordinary ability of these parasites to rapidly change their surface molecules, a phenomenon known as antigenic variation. A prominent determinant of antigenic variation in these organisms is associated with rearrangements of genes, especially those known as var in P. falciparum and vsg in Trypanosoma. However, mechanisms underlying generation of anitgenic diversities among these protozoan parasites are poorly understood. The hypothesis that links all the different sections in this review is that antigenic variations in the protozoan parasites is coupled with genetic rearrangements, which occur during the course of DNA break repair. Here, we provide comprehensive and up-to-date information on Rad51 in these organisms, an eukaryotic homologue of bacterial RecA, and homologous recombination mechanisms. In trypanosomes both Rad51-dependent and -independent mechanisms have been suggested to play roles in antigenic variation. Finally, we speculate on how might similar DNA repair mechanisms contribute to genetic rearrangement associated with antigenic variation in the apicomplexan Plasmodium parasites, an immune evasion strategy.

  20. Prevalence of Intestinal Protozoans among Schoolchildren in Suburban Areas near Yangon, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Kim, Deok-Gyu; Song, Hyemi; Lee, Keon-Hoon; Cho, Seon; Htoon, Thi Thi; Tin, Htay Htay; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Although intestinal protozoans are common etiologies of diarrhea, few studies have been conducted in Myanmar. This study planned to investigate the prevalence of Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica, and Endolimax nana among schoolchildren and their guardians in suburban areas near Yangon, Myanmar. We performed a cross-sectional survey among schoolchildren and their guardians from 7 primary schools in South Dagon and Hlaing Thar Yar districts, Yangon, Myanmar. Stool samples were observed with a microscope after concentration technique and iodine staining. Total 821 stool samples, including 556 from schoolchildren and 265 from guardians, were examined. The median age was 6 years old for schoolchildren and 36 years old for guardians. A 53.1% of the school children and 14.6 % of the guardians were males. The overall prevalence of each intestinal protozoan species was as follows: 3.4% (28/821) for G. lamblia; 3.5% (29/821) for E. coli; 1.2% (10/821) for E. histoytica, and 3.0% for E. nana. This study showed that intestinal protozoans are common in primary schoolchildren and their guardians in suburban areas near Yangon, Myanmar. Health interventions, such as hand washing education, improvement of sanitation, and establishment of water purification systems are urgently needed in this area. PMID:27417092

  1. HIV, opiates, and enteric neuron dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, J J

    2015-04-01

    Human immune deficient virus (HIV) is an immunosuppressive virus that targets CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. HIV infections cause increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancer. HIV infection can also alter central nervous system (CNS) function causing cognitive impairment. HIV does not infect neurons but it does infect astrocytes and microglia in the CNS. HIV can also infect enteric glia initiating an intestinal inflammatory response which causes enteric neural injury and gut dysfunction. Part of the inflammatory response is HIV induced production of proteins including, Transactivator of transcription (Tat) which contribute to neuronal injury after release from HIV infected glial cells. A risk factor for HIV infection is intravenous drug use with contaminated needles and chronic opiate use can exacerbate neural injury in the nervous system. While most research focuses on the actions of Tat and other HIV related proteins and opiates on the brain, recent data indicate that Tat can cause intestinal inflammation and disruption of enteric neuron function, including alteration of Na(+) channel activity and action potential generation. A paper published in this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility extends these findings by identifying an interaction between Tat and morphine on enteric neuron Na(+) channels and on intestinal motility in vivo using a Tat expressing transgenic mouse model. These new data show that Tat protein can enhance the inhibitory actions of morphine on action potential generation and propulsive motility. These findings are important to our understanding of how HIV causes diarrhea in infected patients and for the use of opioid drugs to treat HIV-induced diarrhea.

  2. EVALUATION OF PROTOZOAN PARASITES CAUSING DIARRHOEA IN HIV POSITIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Opportunistic parasitic infections are among the most serious infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive patients and claim a number of lives every year. The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites and to elucidate the association between intestinal opportunistic parasitic infection and CD4 (CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in HIV positive patients. METHODS The study was carried out at Department of Microbiology, on 50 HIV positive patients admitted to or attending the OPD of a tertiary healthcare centre in Kolhapur during the period from June 2013 to June 2015. Air dried smears from stool samples were stained by modified Acid fast stain, directly and after formol ether concentration technique for demonstrating oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum, I. belli and C. cayetanensis. RESULTS Intestinal parasitic pathogens were detected in 54% patients and the major pathogens included Cryptosporidium parvum (18%, the most common followed by Entamoeba histolytica (14%, Giardia lamblia (10%, Ascaris lumbricoides (6% and 4% each of Isospora belli, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura and Strongyloides stercoralis. CONCLUSION Intestinal parasitic infections caused diarrhoea in fifty four percent of patients, which was much more than the control group (16%. Proportion of opportunistic pathogens in patients with CD4 count 200-499 and > 500 cells/mm3 .

  3. Quantitative analysis of erythromycylamine in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application in a bioequivalence study of dirithromycin enteric-coated tablets with a special focus on the fragmentation pattern and carryover effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Wang, Feng; Li, Huan-De; Peng, Wen-Xing; Zhu, Rong-Hua; Deng, Yang; Jiang, Pei; Yan, Miao; Hu, Si-Miao; Lei, Su-Yun; Chen, Chang

    2014-02-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the quantification of erythromycylamine, which is the predominant active metabolite of dirithromycin in human plasma. After solid-phase extraction, the analyte and internal standard (IS) were separated by using an isocratic mobile phase consisting of 20 mM ammonium acetate (pH 3.9, adjusted with formic acid)-acetonitrile (75:25, v/v) on a Phenyl-Hexyl column (150 × 2.1 mm, 3 μm) and then analyzed in positive ion mode under electrospray ionization. Azithromycin was selected as the IS because it has the most similar mass spectrometric and chromatographic behaviors to the analyte. The respective multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions, m/z 368.5>83.2 for erythromycylamine and m/z 375.4>115.2 for IS were chosen to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity in determination. A more acidic mobile phase (pH 3.9) than those of previous reports and a special needle wash (ethylene glycol-acetonitrile-water, 50:30:20, v/v/v, adjusted to pH 3.9 using formic acid) were used to eliminate the carryover effects of the two macrolides. The method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.5-440.0 ng/mL for erythromycylamine in human plasma (r=0.9999). The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and limit of detection (LOD) were 0.5 and 0.05 ng/mL, respectively. The mean extraction recoveries were higher than 94.0% for the analyte and IS. The intra- and inter-day precisions ranged from 1.4 to 5.4% and from 1.6 to 4.0%, respectively. The accuracy varied between 91.2 and 101.2%. The established method was successfully applied to analyze the human plasma samples from 24 healthy subjects in a bioequivalence study of two dirithromycin enteric-coated formulations.

  4. Colleges Enter the Information Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current Issues in Higher Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The implications for higher education of the U.S. transformation from an industrial to an information society are discussed in six papers. Russell Edgerton provides an overview in "Entering the Information Society: An Introduction." In "The Computer: An Enabling Instrument," Louis Robinson considers the current era of the personalization of the…

  5. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  6. Yi Can Enter 2007 NBA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉辉

    2007-01-01

    China’s top young basketball player Yi Jianlian has been given the green light to enter the NBA,after his club finally agreed to let him join the NBA draft."This is a great chance and also a test for me,"said the 2.12-metre forward.

  7. Intrathoracic enteric foregut duplication cyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birmole B

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available A one month old male child presented with respiratory distress since day 10 of life. There was intercostal retraction and decreased air entry on the right side. Investigations revealed a well defined cystic mass in the posterior mediastinum with vertebral anomalies, the cyst was excised by posterolateral thoracotomy. Histopathology revealed it to be an enteric foregut duplication cyst.

  8. Nutrición enteral

    OpenAIRE

    Barrachina Bellés, Lidón; García Hernández, Misericordia; Oto Cavero, Isabel

    1984-01-01

    Este trabajo nos introduce en la administración de la nutrición enteral, haciendo una revisión de los aspectos a tener en cuenta tanto en sus indicaciones, vias, tipos, métodos, cuidados y complicaciones más importantes.

  9. Bromopyrrole Alkaloids as Lead Compounds against Protozoan Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Tasdemir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study,13 bromopyrrole alkaloids, including the oroidin analogs hymenidin (2, dispacamide B (3 and dispacamide D (4, stevensine (5 and spongiacidin B (6, their derivatives lacking the imidazole ring bromoaldisin (7, longamide B (8 and longamide A (9, the dimeric oroidin derivatives sceptrin (10 and dibromopalau’amine (11, and the non-oroidin bromopyrrolohomoarginin (12, manzacidin A (13, and agelongine (14, obtained from marine sponges belonging to Axinella and Agelas generahave been screened in vitro against four parasitic protozoa, i.e., two Trypanosoma species (T. brucei rhodesiense and T. cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum (K1 strain, a chloroquine resistant strain, responsible of human diseases with high morbidity and, in the case of malaria, high mortality. Our results indicate longamide B (8 and dibromopalau’amine (11 to be promising trypanocidal and antileishmanial agents, while dispacamide B (3 and spongiacidin B (6 emerge as antimalarial lead compounds.In addition,evaluation of the activity of the test alkaloids (2–14 against three different enzymes (PfFabI, PfFabG, PfFabZ involved in the de novo fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of P. falciparum (PfFAS-II identified bromopyrrolohomoarginin (12 as a potent inhibitor of PfFabZ. The structural similarity within the series of tested molecules allowed us to draw some preliminary structure-activity relationships. Tests against the mammalian L6 cells revealed important clues on therapeutic index of the metabolites. This is the first detailed study on the antiprotozoal potential of marine bromopyrrole alkaloids.

  10. [Enteral nutrition in burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J L; Garrido, M; Gómez-Cía, T; Serrera, J L; Franco, A; Pumar, A; Relimpio, F; Astorga, R; García-Luna, P P

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional support plays an important role in the treatment of patients with burns. Due to the severe hypercatabolism that develops in these patients, oral support is insufficient in most cases, and this makes it essential to initiate artificial nutritional support (either enteral or parenteral). Enteral nutrition is more physiological than parenteral, and data exist which show that in patients with burns, enteral nutrition exercises a protective effect on the intestine and may even reduce the hypermetabolic response in these patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of enteral nutritional support with a hypercaloric, hyperproteic diet with a high content of branched amino acids in the nutritional support of patients suffering from burns. The study included 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), admitted to the Burns Unit. Average age was 35 +/- 17 years (range: 21-85 years). The percentage of body surface affected by the burns was 10% in two cases, between 10-30% in three cases, between 30-50% in five cases and over 50% in two cases. Initiation of the enteral nutrition was between twenty-four hours and seven days after the burn. The patients were kept in the unit until they were discharged, and the average time spent in the unit was 31.5 days (range: 17-63 days). Total energetic requirements were calculated based on Harris-Benedict, with a variable aggression factor depending on the body surface burned, which varied from 2,000 and 4,000 cal day. Nitrogenous balance was determined on a daily basis, and plasmatic levels of total proteins, albumin and prealbumin on a weekly basis. There was a significant difference between the prealbumin values at the initiation and finalization of the enteral nutrition (9.6 +/- 2.24 mg/dl compared with 19.75 +/- 5.48 mg/dl; p diet was very good, and only mild complications such as diarrhoea developed in two patients. Enteral nutrition is a suitable nutritional support method for patients with

  11. Enteric microbiota leads to new therapeutic strategies for ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Xu; Ren, Li-Hua; Shi, Rui-Hua

    2014-11-14

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a leading form of inflammatory bowel disease that involves chronic relapsing or progressive inflammation. As a significant proportion of UC patients treated with conventional therapies do not achieve remission, there is a pressing need for the development of more effective therapies. The human gut contains a large, diverse, and dynamic population of microorganisms, collectively referred to as the enteric microbiota. There is a symbiotic relationship between the human host and the enteric microbiota, which provides nutrition, protection against pathogenic organisms, and promotes immune homeostasis. An imbalance of the normal enteric microbiota composition (termed dysbiosis) underlies the pathogenesis of UC. A reduction of enteric microbiota diversity has been observed in UC patients, mainly affecting the butyrate-producing bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, which can repress pro-inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that enteric microbiota plays an important role in anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activities, which can benefit UC patients. Therefore, manipulation of the dysbiosis is an attractive approach for UC therapy. Various therapies targeting a restoration of the enteric microbiota have shown efficacy in treating patients with active and chronic forms of UC. Such therapies include fecal microbiota transplantation, probiotics, prebiotics, antibiotics, helminth therapy, and dietary polyphenols, all of which can alter the abundance and composition of the enteric microbiota. Although there have been many large, randomized controlled clinical trials assessing these treatments, the effectiveness and safety of these bacteria-driven therapies need further evaluation. This review focuses on the important role that the enteric microbiota plays in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and discusses new therapeutic strategies targeting the enteric microbiota for UC.

  12. Contamination of Groundwater Systems in the US and Canada by Enteric Pathogens, 1990–2013: A Review and Pooled-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Paul Dylan; Thomas, M. Kate; Pintar, Katarina Dorothy Milena

    2014-01-01

    Background Up to 150 million North Americans currently use a groundwater system as their principal drinking water source. These systems are a potential source of exposure to enteric pathogens, contributing to the burden of waterborne disease. Waterborne disease outbreaks have been associated with US and Canadian groundwater systems over the past two decades. However, to date, this literature has not been reviewed in a comprehensive manner. Methods and Principal Findings A combined review and pooled-analysis approach was used to investigate groundwater contamination in Canada and the US from 1990 to 2013; fifty-five studies met eligibility criteria. Four study types were identified. It was found that study location affects study design, sample rate and studied pathogen category. Approximately 15% (316/2210) of samples from Canadian and US groundwater sources were positive for enteric pathogens, with no difference observed based on system type. Knowledge gaps exist, particularly in exposure assessment for attributing disease to groundwater supplies. Furthermore, there is a lack of consistency in risk factor reporting (local hydrogeology, well type, well use, etc). The widespread use of fecal indicator organisms in reported studies does not inform the assessment of human health risks associated with groundwater supplies. Conclusions This review illustrates how groundwater study design and location are critical for subsequent data interpretation and use. Knowledge gaps exist related to data on bacterial, viral and protozoan pathogen prevalence in Canadian and US groundwater systems, as well as a need for standardized approaches for reporting study design and results. Fecal indicators are examined as a surrogate for health risk assessments; caution is advised in their widespread use. Study findings may be useful during suspected waterborne outbreaks linked with a groundwater supply to identify the likely etiological agent and potential transport pathway. PMID:24806545

  13. Three-dimensional structure of a protozoal double-stranded RNA virus that infects the enteric pathogen Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mandy E W; Takagi, Yuko; Parent, Kristin N; Cardone, Giovanni; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2015-01-15

    Giardia lamblia virus (GLV) is a small, nonenveloped, nonsegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus infecting Giardia lamblia, the most common protozoan pathogen of the human intestine and a major agent of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. GLV (genus Giardiavirus) is a member of family Totiviridae, along with several other groups of protozoal or fungal viruses, including Leishmania RNA viruses and Trichomonas vaginalis viruses. Interestingly, GLV is more closely related than other Totiviridae members to a group of recently discovered metazoan viruses that includes penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV). Moreover, GLV is the only known protozoal dsRNA virus that can transmit efficiently by extracellular means, also like IMNV. In this study, we used transmission electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral image reconstruction to examine the GLV virion at an estimated resolution of 6.0 Å. Its outermost diameter is 485 Å, making it the largest totivirus capsid analyzed to date. Structural comparisons of GLV and other totiviruses highlighted a related "T=2" capsid organization and a conserved helix-rich fold in the capsid subunits. In agreement with its unique capacity as a protozoal dsRNA virus to survive and transmit through extracellular environments, GLV was found to be more thermoresistant than Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1, but no specific protein machinery to mediate cell entry, such as the fiber complexes in IMNV, could be localized. These and other structural and biochemical findings provide a basis for future work to dissect the cell entry mechanism of GLV into a "primitive" (early-branching) eukaryotic host and an important enteric pathogen of humans. Numerous pathogenic bacteria, including Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Salmonella enterica, and Vibrio cholerae, are infected with lysogenic bacteriophages that contribute significantly to bacterial virulence. In line with this phenomenon, several pathogenic protozoa, including Giardia lamblia

  14. Inhibition studies of bacterial, fungal and protozoan β-class carbonic anhydrases with Schiff bases incorporating sulfonamide moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Osman, Sameh M; Alothman, Zeid; Monti, Simona Maria; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-08-01

    A series of new Schiff bases derived from sulfanilamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide or 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonamide containing either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic tail, have been investigated as inhibitors of three β-carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from three different microorganisms. Their antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoan activities have been determined against the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the bacterial pathogen Brucella suis and the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani chagasi, responsible for Leishmaniasis. The results of these inhibition studies show that all three enzymes were efficiently inhibited by the Schiff base sulfonamides with KI values in the nanomolar or submicromolar range, depending on the nature of the tail, coming from the aryl/heteroaryl moiety present in the starting aldehyde employed in the synthesis. Furthermore, the compounds hereby investigated revealed high β-CAs selectivity over the ubiquitous, physiologically relevant and off-target human isoforms (CA I and II) and to be more potent as antifungal and antibacterial than as antiprotozoan potential drugs.

  15. In Silico Elucidation and Inhibition Studies of Selected Phytoligands Against Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases of Protozoan Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chhedi Lal; Akhtar, Salman; Kumar, Nilesh; Ali, Jasarat; Pathak, Neelam; Bajpai, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Parasitic MAPKs exhibiting significant divergence with humans and playing an imperative role in parasitic metabolic activities have been exploited from several years as important targets for development of novel therapeutics. In addition, the emergence of the drug-resistant variants of parasitic diseases in the recent years has aroused a great need for the development of potent inhibitors against them. In the present study, we selected the metabolically active MAPKs LmxMPK4, PfMAP2 and TbMAPK5 of the three parasitic protozoans Leishmania mexicana, Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei, respectively. The homology modeling technique was used to develop the 3D structures of these proteins, and the same was validated by PROCHECK, ERRAT, ProQ and ProSA web servers to check the reliability. Ten phytoligands were employed for molecular docking studies with these proteins to search for potent phytoligand as a broad spectrum inhibitor. In this regard, two phytoligands (aspidocarpine for LmxMPK4 and TbMAPK5 and cubebin for PfMAP2) were found to be more effective inhibitors, in terms of robust binding energy, strong inhibition constant and better interactions between protein-ligand complexes. Furthermore, predicted ADME and toxicity properties suggested that these identified phytoligands exhibited comparable results to control drugs potentiating them as persuasive therapeutic agents for Leishmania, Trypanosoma and Plasmodium sp.

  16. Characterization of cytosine methylated regions and 5-cytosine DNA methyltransferase (Ehmeth) in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ohad; Siman-Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2004-01-01

    The DNA methylation status of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica was heretofore unknown. In the present study, we developed a new technique, based on the affinity of methylated DNA to 5-methylcytosine antibodies, to identify methylated DNA in this parasite. Ribosomal DNA and ribosomal DNA circles were isolated by this method and we confirmed the validity of our approach by sodium bisulfite sequencing. We also report the identification and the characterization of a gene, Ehmeth, encoding a DNA methyltransferase strongly homologous to the human DNA methyltransferase 2 (Dnmt2). Immunofluorescence microscopy using an antibody raised against a recombinant Ehmeth showed that Ehmeth is concentrated in the nuclei of trophozoites. The recombinant Ehmeth has a weak but significant methyltransferase activity when E.histolytica genomic DNA is used as substrate. 5-Azacytidine (5-AzaC), an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase, was used to study in vivo the role of DNA methylation in E.histolytica. Genomic DNA of trophozoites grown with 5-AzaC (23 microM) was undermethylated and the ability of 5-AzaC-treated trophozoites to kill mammalian cells or to cause liver abscess in hamsters was strongly impaired.

  17. CERN openlab enters fifth phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrew Purcell

    2015-01-01

    CERN openlab is a unique public-private partnership between CERN and leading ICT companies. At the start of this year, openlab officially entered its fifth phase, which will run until the end of 2017. For the first time in its history, it has extended beyond the CERN community to include other major European and international research laboratories.   Founded in 2001 to develop the innovative ICT systems needed to cope with the unprecedented computing challenges of the LHC, CERN openlab unites science and industry at the cutting edge of research and innovation. In a white paper published last year, CERN openlab set out the main ICT challenges it will tackle during its fifth phase, namely data acquisition, computing platforms, data storage architectures, computer management and provisioning, networks and connectivity, and data analytics. As it enters its fifth phase, CERN openlab is expanding to include other research laboratories. "Today, research centres in other disciplines are also st...

  18. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  19. Mucin dynamics and enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Michael A; Lindén, Sara K; Sutton, Philip; Florin, Timothy H

    2011-04-01

    The extracellular secreted mucus and the cell surface glycocalyx prevent infection by the vast numbers of microorganisms that live in the healthy gut. Mucin glycoproteins are the major component of these barriers. In this Review, we describe the components of the secreted and cell surface mucosal barriers and the evidence that they form an effective barricade against potential pathogens. However, successful enteric pathogens have evolved strategies to circumvent these barriers. We discuss the interactions between enteric pathogens and mucins, and the mechanisms that these pathogens use to disrupt and avoid mucosal barriers. In addition, we describe dynamic alterations in the mucin barrier that are driven by host innate and adaptive immune responses to infection.

  20. Enteral nutrition in critical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Botello Jaimes, Jhon Jairo; Medico Cuidado Intensivo Clínica San Marcel / Jefe de Urgencias y Unidad de Cuidado Especial Clínica San Marcel / Docente Medicina Interna y Cuidado Intensivo Universidad de Manizales / Docente Internado de Urgencias y de PROFUNDIZACION Urgencias, Cuidado Intermedio e Intensivo Universidad de Caldas / Docente del programa de enfermería Universidad Católica de Manizales / Instructor Internacional / Director Fundación Versalles / Candidato a Magíster en Educación Docencia. Envío co rrespondencia:. Avenida Alberto Mendoza No 93-25 - Clínica San Marcel.; González Rincón, Alejandra; Enfermería Universidad Católica de Manizales. Miembro directivo Fundación Versalles. Miembro Correspondiente Asociación Colombiana de Trauma y Miembro Activo de la Sociedad Panamericana de Trauma. Envío correspondencia: alejita_gonzalez12@ hotmail.com . Calle 50 No 24-14 – Fundación Versalles.

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional support in critically ill patients is of vital importance for its impact on morbidity, hospital stay and preservation of tissue mass among others. It must ensure nutritional support to all critically ill patients enterally ideally by reduced bacterial translocationand stimulation of the function of the intestinal villi. In recent years we have studied immunonutrients as glutamine, arginine, fatty acids and nucleotides with promising effects (Immune response, Intestinal barrier or ...

  1. A Map Enters the Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    'modes of mattering'. In this paper I explore what difference digital cartography can make to STS practice. I draw on three examples from my own work where digitally mediated maps have entered the conversation and made critical, often surprising, differences to the research process. In my first example...... it was trying to chart. I use these examples to discuss the potential modes of mattering afforded by digital cartography in STS....

  2. Expressions of Neurexin and Neuroligin in the human and rodent enteric nervous system%Neurexin、Neuroligin基因在人类及鼠类动物肠神经系统的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健; 张文同; 孙大庆; 刘春喜; 李爱武

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨Neurexin和Neuroligin基因在人类及鼠类动物肠神经系统(ENS)是否有表达,以及对ENS突触结构与功能的作用,探查其在先天性巨结肠各段的表达特征及意义.方法 首先制备小鼠、大鼠、豚鼠、正常人体肠管肌间神经丛铺片,通过双重免疫荧光细胞染色,证明Ne-urexin、Neuroligin基因是否在肠神经系统表达,再采用免疫组织化学技术对20例先天性巨结肠狭窄段,移行段和扩张段肌间神经丛铺片标本染色,判断Neurexin、Neuroligin基因的表达情况.结果①Neurexin、Neuroligin蛋白在小鼠、大鼠、豚鼠、人体的肠肌间神经丛与神经细胞标记Hu在同一细胞表达;而Neurexin蛋白与突触前标记物synaptophysin,Neuroligin蛋白与突触后标记物PSD95也在同一神经组织出现;②Neurexin、Neuroligin蛋白在先天性巨结肠扩张段表达最多,移行段明显减少(P0.05).结论 Neurexin、Neuroligin基因在鼠齿类动物及人体肠神经系统都有表达,不仅在胞体,而且在轴突、树突都有表达,Neurexin在突触前表达,Neuroligin在突触后表达.它们对肠神经系统突触的结构功能起重要作用,与一些胃、肠道动力性疾病有密切关系,是导致先天性巨结肠蠕动功能丧失的重要原因.%Objective To detect the expressions of neurexin and neuroligin in the human and ro-dent enteric nervous system (ENS) and intestine tissues of the patients with Hischsprung's disease (HD). Methods Longitudinal muscle with adherent myenteric plexus (LMMP) were dissected from the intestines of mice,rats,guinea pigs and humans. The myenteric plexus was identified by staining neuron markers of neurexin-1 and Hu,prepsynaptic markers of neurexin-1 and synaptophysin and postsynaptic markers of neuroligin-1 and PSD95. The expressions of the Neurexin and Neurelogin in 20 HD cases were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results Neurexin-1,neuroligin-1-4 and Hu were detected in the some cells of the

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  5. Effect of nickel on nutrient removal by selected indigenous protozoan species in wastewater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamika, Ilunga; Momba, Maggy N B

    2015-03-01

    Nutrient and heavy metal pollutions are major concern worldwide. This study aimed at comparing the effect of Ni(2+) on nutrient removal efficiency of four indigenous wastewater protozoan species (Aspidisca sp., Paramecium sp., Peranema sp., Trachelophyllum sp.). Specific physicochemical parameters and microbial growth/die-off were measured using standard methods. The results revealed that protozoan species were able to simultaneously remove phosphate, nitrate and Ni(2+) at concentrations ranging between 66.4-99.36%, 56.19-99.88% and 45.98-85.69%, respectively. Peranema sp. appeared to be the isolates with the highest removal of nutrients (Phosphate-99.36% and Nitrate-99.88%) while Paramecium sp. showed higher removal of Ni(2+) at 85.69% and low removal of nutrients. Aspidisca sp. was the most sensitive isolate to Ni(2+) but with significant nutrient removal (Phosphate-66.4% and Nitrate-56.19%) at 10 mg-N(2+)/L followed by an inhibition of nutrient removal at Ni(2+) concentration greater than 10 mg/L. Significant correlation between the growth rate and nutrient removal (r = 0.806/0.799, p nutrient removal ability at 10 mg-Ni(2+)/L, an increase in Ni(2+) concentration had a significant effect on nutrient removal efficiency of these indigenous protozoan species. This study suggests that although Ni(2+) appeared to be toxic to microbial isolates, its effect at a low concentration (10 mg-Ni(2+)/L) towards these isolates can be used to enhance the wastewater treatment process for the removal of nutrients. Peranema sp., which was able to remove both Ni(2+) and nutrients from wastewater mixed-liquor, can also be used for bioremediation of wastewater systems.

  6. Multigene eukaryote phylogeny reveals the likely protozoan ancestors of opisthokonts (animals, fungi, choanozoans) and Amoebozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Chao, Ema E; Snell, Elizabeth A; Berney, Cédric; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Lewis, Rhodri

    2014-12-01

    Animals and fungi independently evolved from the protozoan phylum Choanozoa, these three groups constituting a major branch of the eukaryotic evolutionary tree known as opisthokonts. Opisthokonts and the protozoan phylum Amoebozoa (amoebae plus slime moulds) were previously argued to have evolved independently from the little-studied, largely flagellate, protozoan phylum, Sulcozoa. Sulcozoa are a likely evolutionary link between opisthokonts and the more primitive excavate flagellates that have ventral feeding grooves and the most primitive known mitochondria. To extend earlier sparse evidence for the ancestral (paraphyletic) nature of Sulcozoa, we sequenced transcriptomes from six gliding flagellates (two apusomonads; three planomonads; Mantamonas). Phylogenetic analyses of 173-192 genes and 73-122 eukaryote-wide taxa show Sulcozoa as deeply paraphyletic, confirming that opisthokonts and Amoebozoa independently evolved from sulcozoans by losing their ancestral ventral groove and dorsal pellicle: Apusozoa (apusomonads plus anaerobic breviate amoebae) are robustly sisters to opisthokonts and probably paraphyletic, breviates diverging before apusomonads; Varisulca (planomonads, Mantamonas, and non-gliding flagellate Collodictyon) are sisters to opisthokonts plus Apusozoa and Amoebozoa, and possibly holophyletic; Glissodiscea (planomonads, Mantamonas) may be holophyletic, but Mantamonas sometimes groups with Collodictyon instead. Taxon and gene sampling slightly affects tree topology; for the closest branches in Sulcozoa and opisthokonts, proportionally reducing missing data eliminates conflicts between homogeneous-model maximum-likelihood trees and evolutionarily more realistic site-heterogeneous trees. Sulcozoa, opisthokonts, and Amoebozoa constitute an often-pseudopodial 'podiate' clade, one of only three eukaryotic 'supergroups'. Our trees indicate that evolution of sulcozoan dorsal pellicle, ventral pseudopodia, and ciliary gliding (probably simultaneously

  7. Bioinformatic analysis of beta carbonic anhydrase sequences from protozoans and metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari Emameh, Reza; Barker, Harlan; Tolvanen, Martti E E; Ortutay, Csaba; Parkkila, Seppo

    2014-01-21

    Despite the high prevalence of parasitic infections, and their impact on global health and economy, the number of drugs available to treat them is extremely limited. As a result, the potential consequences of large-scale resistance to any existing drugs are a major concern. A number of recent investigations have focused on the effects of potential chemical inhibitors on bacterial and fungal carbonic anhydrases. Among the five classes of carbonic anhydrases (alpha, beta, gamma, delta and zeta), beta carbonic anhydrases have been reported in most species of bacteria, yeasts, algae, plants, and particular invertebrates (nematodes and insects). To date, there has been a lack of knowledge on the expression and molecular structure of beta carbonic anhydrases in metazoan (nematodes and arthropods) and protozoan species. Here, the identification of novel beta carbonic anhydrases was based on the presence of the highly-conserved amino acid sequence patterns of the active site. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on codon-aligned DNA sequences. Subcellular localization prediction for each identified invertebrate beta carbonic anhydrase was performed using the TargetP webserver. We verified a total of 75 beta carbonic anhydrase sequences in metazoan and protozoan species by proteome-wide searches and multiple sequence alignment. Of these, 52 were novel, and contained highly conserved amino acid residues, which are inferred to form the active site in beta carbonic anhydrases. Mitochondrial targeting peptide analysis revealed that 31 enzymes are predicted with mitochondrial localization; one was predicted to be a secretory enzyme, and the other 43 were predicted to have other undefined cellular localizations. These investigations identified 75 beta carbonic anhydrases in metazoan and protozoan species, and among them there were 52 novel sequences that were not previously annotated as beta carbonic anhydrases. Our results will not only change the current information in

  8. The mechanism of killing and exiting the protozoan host Acanthamoeba polyphaga by Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L Y; Kwaik, Y A

    2000-02-01

    The ability of Legionella pneumophila to cause legionnaires' disease is dependent on its capacity to replicate within cells in the alveolar spaces. The bacteria kill mammalian cells in two phases: induction of apoptosis during the early stages of infection, followed by an independent and rapid necrosis during later stages of the infection, mediated by a pore-forming activity. In the environment, L. pneumophila is a parasite of protozoa. The molecular mechanisms by which L. pneumophila kills the protozoan cells, after their exploitation for intracellular proliferation, are not known. In an effort to decipher these mechanisms, we have examined induction of both apoptosis and necrosis in the protozoan Acanthamoeba polyphaga upon infection by L. pneumophila. Our data show that, although A. polyphaga undergoes apoptosis following treatment with actinomycin D, L. pneumophila does not induce apoptosis in these cells. Instead, intracellular L. pneumophila induces necrotic death in A. polyphaga, which is mediated by the pore-forming activity. Mutants of L. pneumophila defective in expression of the pore-forming activity are indistinguishable from the parental strain in intracellular replication within A. polyphaga. The parental strain bacteria cause necrosis-mediated lysis of all the A. polyphaga cells within 48 h after infection, and all the intracellular bacteria are released into the tissue culture medium. In contrast, all cells infected by the mutants remain intact, and the intracellular bacteria are 'trapped' within A. polyphaga after the termination of intracellular replication. Failure to exit the host cell after termination of intracellular replication results in a gradual decline in the viability of the mutant strain bacteria within A. polyphaga starting 48h after infection. Our data show that the pore-forming activity of L. pneumophila is not required for intracellular bacterial replication within A. polyphaga but is required for killing and exiting the protozoan

  9. Host-parasite interactions: Marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, Perkinsus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudant, Philippe; E Chu, Fu-Lin; Volety, Aswani

    2013-10-01

    This review assesses and examines the work conducted to date concerning host and parasite interactions between marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, belonging to Perkinsus species. The review focuses on two well-studied host-parasite interaction models: the two clam species, Ruditapes philippinarum and R. decussatus, and the parasite Perkinsus olseni, and the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the parasite Perkinsus marinus. Cellular and humoral defense responses of the host in combating parasitic infection, the mechanisms (e.g., antioxidant enzymes, extracellular products) employed by the parasite in evading host defenses as well as the role of environmental factors in modulating the host-parasite interactions are described.

  10. Role of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor signaling pathway in host resistance and pathogenesis during infection with protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco A

    2004-10-01

    Different studies have illustrated the activation of the innate immune system during infection with protozoan parasites. Experiments performed in vivo also support the notion that innate immunity has a crucial role in resistance as well as pathogenesis observed during protozoan infections such as malaria, leishmaniasis, toxoplasmosis, and trypanosomiasis. While major advances have been made in the assignment of bacterial molecules as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) agonists as well as defining the role of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) signaling pathway in host resistance to bacterial infection, this research area is now emerging in the field of protozoan parasites. In this review, we discuss the recent studies describing parasite molecules as TLR agonists and those studies indicating the essential role of the TIR-domain bearing molecule named myeloid differentiation factor 88 in host resistance to infection with protozoan parasites. Together, these studies support the hypothesis that the TIR signaling pathway is involved in the initial recognition of protozoan parasites by the immune system of the vertebrate host, early resistance to infection, development of acquired immunity, as well as pathology observed during acute infection with this class of pathogens.

  11. 土壤原生动物群落及其生态功能%Structure of the Protozoan Community in Soil and its Ecological Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高云超; 朱文珊; 陈文新

    2000-01-01

    Soil protozoan is the third largest taxon in soil biota and an important biological regulator for soil organisms and biochemical activities because of its biodiversity predacity and enormous biomass in soil. Different trophic types such as photosynthetic autroph, saprotroph and predacity existed in protozoan. Since predation not only controls the bacteria community but also stimulate nutrient transformation and carbon cycling, the study on protozoan community structure and ecological function is one of the bases for elucidating the soil fertility. The article reviewed the research progresses in protozoan community, trophic types, ecological function and application in soil.

  12. The Enteric Nervous System in Intestinal Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A Sharkey

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Since about the 1950s nerves in the wall of the intestine have been postulated to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Human and animal studies examining the role of nerves in intestinal inflammation are the focus of this review. Consideration is given to two possible ways that nerves are involved in IBD. First, nerves may play a role in the development or maintenance of inflammation through local release of transmitters. Second, once initiated (by whatever means, the processes of inflammation may disrupt the normal pattern of innervation and the interactions of nerves and their target tissues. Many of the functional disturbances observed in IBD are likely due to an alteration in the enteric nervous system either structurally through disruptions of nerve-target relationships or by modifications of neurotransmitters or their receptors. Finally, it appears that the enteric nervous system may be a potential therapeutic target in IBD and that neuroactive drugs acting locally can represent useful agents in the management of this disease.

  13. [New nutrients in enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Martínez, C

    2000-01-01

    1. Medical and surgical stress (major surgery, sepsis, injuries,...) increases requirements of certain essential nutrients and others considered non-essential or semi-essential. 2. Some nutrients such as glutamine, arginine, omega 3 fatty acids nucleotides, ... have a considerable influence on the immune function (delayed hypersensitivity, lymphocyte sub-population counts, immunological tests,..) and improve certain metabolic and nutritional indices (nitrogen balance, medium and short life proteins,...). For this reason, they are called "immunonutrients" or "immunity regulators". 3. The supply of special enteral formulas for situations of immunological compromise, with the addition of one or more of the nutrients considered today as "immunity regulators" has increased since 1988 in both absolute and percentage terms. 4. These nutrient-enriched enteral formulas improve the rate of infections, reduce the number of days on ventilator equipment, the length of hospital stays for critical patients, with a more marked effect on surgical patients. 5. The evidence seems today to support the use of enriched formulas with critical patients. Nonetheless, some caution must be maintained as it has not been possible to show any reduction in the mortality of the cases studied nor, in short, in the prognosis of patients affected by situations of hypercatabolism and reduced immunity. 6. We feel that their use should, therefore, be carried out in accordance with the protocols and in patients expected to survive, where the evolution reveals severe catabolism unhindered by conventional therapy.

  14. Prevalence and distribution of three protozoan symbionts in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) populations across Louisiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-05-11

    Louisiana has one of the largest blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) fisheries in the USA, but little is known about blue crab diseases, parasites, and symbionts in this area. In 2013-2014, large juvenile and adult blue crabs were collected at 4 diverse sites to determine the prevalence of the protozoan symbionts associated with black gill disease (Lagenophrys callinectes), buckshot crabs (Urosporidium crescens), and bitter crab disease (Hematodinium perezi). A high aggregate prevalence of L. callinectes (93.2%) was identified across all seasons at all 4 collection sites regardless of salinity. A moderately low aggregate prevalence of U. crescens (22.4%) was identified across all seasons and sites. Prevalence of U. crescens depended on site salinity, with only 10% of infections detected at sites with callinectes and U. crescens are commensal parasites of blue crabs, infections can result in unmarketable and unappealing meat. In the Louisiana fishery, H. perezi has been blamed circumstantially for adult mortalities in the low salinity nearshore fishing grounds. Despite this, H. perezi was not detected in any of the large crabs sampled, even from the low salinity sites. The prevalence data reported here for these 3 protozoans are the first to include blue crabs sampled seasonally at multiple locations along the Louisiana coast over the period of a year.

  15. Microfaunal indicators, Ciliophora phylogeny and protozoan population shifts in an intermittently aerated and fed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Tanasidis, Spartakos; Melidis, Paraschos

    2011-02-28

    Microfauna community structure was examined in the mixed liquor of a bench-scale bioreactor equipped with an intermittent aeration and feeding system. The reactor was operated under an intermittent aeration of 25 min in every 1 h and varying feeding conditions (0.264, 0.403 and 0.773 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d). A total of 14 protozoan and metazoan taxa were identified by microscopic examination. Sessile ciliates, followed by crawling ciliates, were the major protozoan groups under 0.403 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d organic loading conditions, while sessile ciliate population was remarkably increased under an organic loading of 0.773 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d. Principal Component Analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient tests were performed in order to reveal relationships between microfauna community and operational parameters. Ciliophora specific-18S rRNA gene clone library was constructed to identify ciliate diversity under 0.773 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d organic loading conditions. Ciliophora diversity consisted of members of Aspidiscidae, Epistylidae, Opisthonectidae and Vorticellidae, with the majority of the clones being associated with the species Vorticella fusca. At least one novel phylogenetic linkage among Ciliophora was identified. Comparisons made after molecular characterization and microscopic examination of Ciliophora community showed that the estimation of broad ciliate groups is useful for ecological considerations and evaluation of the operational conditions in wastewater treatment plants.

  16. Microfaunal indicators, Ciliophora phylogeny and protozoan population shifts in an intermittently aerated and fed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntougias, Spyridon, E-mail: sntougia@env.duth.gr [Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Environmental Engineering, Laboratory of Wastewater Management and Treatment Technologies, Vas. Sofias 12, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Tanasidis, Spartakos; Melidis, Paraschos [Democritus University of Thrace, Department of Environmental Engineering, Laboratory of Wastewater Management and Treatment Technologies, Vas. Sofias 12, 67100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2011-02-28

    Microfauna community structure was examined in the mixed liquor of a bench-scale bioreactor equipped with an intermittent aeration and feeding system. The reactor was operated under an intermittent aeration of 25 min in every 1 h and varying feeding conditions (0.264, 0.403 and 0.773 kg BOD{sub 5}/m{sup 3} d). A total of 14 protozoan and metazoan taxa were identified by microscopic examination. Sessile ciliates, followed by crawling ciliates, were the major protozoan groups under 0.403 kg BOD{sub 5}/m{sup 3} d organic loading conditions, while sessile ciliate population was remarkably increased under an organic loading of 0.773 kg BOD{sub 5}/m{sup 3} d. Principal Component Analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient tests were performed in order to reveal relationships between microfauna community and operational parameters. Ciliophora specific-18S rRNA gene clone library was constructed to identify ciliate diversity under 0.773 kg BOD{sub 5}/m{sup 3} d organic loading conditions. Ciliophora diversity consisted of members of Aspidiscidae, Epistylidae, Opisthonectidae and Vorticellidae, with the majority of the clones being associated with the species Vorticella fusca. At least one novel phylogenetic linkage among Ciliophora was identified. Comparisons made after molecular characterization and microscopic examination of Ciliophora community showed that the estimation of broad ciliate groups is useful for ecological considerations and evaluation of the operational conditions in wastewater treatment plants.

  17. A Historical Overview of Research on Babesia orientalis, a Protozoan Parasite Infecting Water Buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Babesiosis is a globally important zoonotic disease caused by tick-borne intraerythrocytic protozoan of the genus Babesia (phylum apicomplexa. In China, there are five species that infect cattle buffalo and cause great economic loss, which include Babesia bigemina, B. bovis, B. major, B. ovata, and B. orientalis. Among them, B. orientalis is the most recently identified new Babesia species epidemic in China. This review summarized the work done in the past 33 years to give an overview of what learned about this parasite. This parasitic protozoan was found in 1984 in Central and South China and then named as B. orientalis in 1997 based on its differences in transmitting host, morphology, pathogenicity and characteristics of in vitro cultivation when compared with B. bigemina and B. bovis. It was found that Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides is the transmitting vector and water buffalo is the only reported host. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 18S rRNA gene also confirmed that B. orientalis is a new species. After species verification, four diagnostic methods including semi-nest PCR, loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay, reverse line blot hybridization assay, and real-time PCR were established for lab and field use purposes. Genomic sequencing was conducted and the complete genomes of mitochondria and apicoplast were annotated. Future work will be focused on developing effective vaccines, identifying drug targets and screening useful drugs for controlling B. orientalis in water buffalo.

  18. Advantages of enteral nutrition over parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Seres, David S.; Valcarcel, Monika; Guillaume, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    It is a strong and commonly held belief among nutrition clinicians that enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. We provide a narrative review of more recent studies and technical reviews comparing enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition. Despite significant weaknesses in the existing data, current literature continues to support the use of enteral nutrition in patients requiring nutrition support, over parenteral nutrition.

  19. Licochalcone A, a novel antiparasitic agent with potent activity against human pathogenic protozoan species of Leishmania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, M; Christensen, S B; Blom, J;

    1993-01-01

    Licochalcone A, an oxygenated chalcone isolated from the roots of Chinese licorice plant, inhibited the growth of both Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani promastigotes and amastigotes. The structure of the licochalcone A was established by mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies...... that licochalcone A in concentrations that are nontoxic to host cells exhibits a strong antileishmanial activity and that appropriate substituted chalcones might be a new class of antileishmanial drugs....

  20. Recurrent wheezing is associated with intestinal protozoan infections in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, Marcella M A; Verhagen, Lilly M; Hermans, Peter W M; del Nogal, Berenice; Sánchez, Adriana Márquez; Acevedo, Natacha Martinez; Murga, Rosalicia Ramirez; Roelfsema, Jeroen; Pinelli, Elena; de Waard, Jacobus H

    2014-05-29

    While in developed countries the prevalence of allergic diseases is rising, inflammatory diseases are relatively uncommon in rural developing areas. High prevalence rates of helminth and protozoan infections are commonly found in children living in rural settings and several studies suggest an inverse association between helminth infections and allergies. No studies investigating the relationship between parasitic infections and atopic diseases in rural children of developing countries under the age of 2 years have been published so far. We performed a cross-sectional survey to investigate the association of helminth and protozoan infections and malnutrition with recurrent wheezing and atopic eczema in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela. From August to November 2012, 229 children aged 0 to 2 years residing in the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela were enrolled. Data were collected through standardized questionnaires and physical examination, including inspection of the skin and anthropometric measurements. A stool sample was requested from all participants and detection of different parasites was performed using microscopy and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We observed high prevalence rates of atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing, respectively 19% and 23%. The prevalence of helminth infections was 26% and the prevalence of protozoan infections was 59%. Atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing were more frequently observed in stunted compared with non-stunted children in multivariable analysis (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.3 - 13.6, p = 0.015 and OR 4.5, 95% CI 0.97 - 21.2, p = 0.055). Furthermore, recurrent wheezing was significantly more often observed in children with protozoan infections than in children without protozoan infections (OR 6.7, 95% CI 1.5 - 30.5). High prevalence rates of atopic eczema and recurrent wheezing in Warao Amerindian children under 2 years of age were related to stunting and intestinal protozoan infections respectively. Helminth

  1. [Morphology and diagnosis of the oral protozoans Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis using the Giemsa-Romanovsky stain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vráblic, J; Vodrázka, J; Tomová, S; Staník, R; Catár, G

    1998-11-01

    In the microscopic diagnosis of Trichomonas tenax and Entamoeba gingivalis is the technically and time not demanding native preparation of a culture, in which both protozoans can be detected according to their typical motility, determining. In the permanent preparation of the culture stained according to Giemsa-Romanovsky, which has also documentary character, are all of the characteristic cell organelles stainable, enabling so their detection without their typical motility. Staining according to Giemsa-Romanovsky is technically simple and not time consuming, not very laborious, low cost and the coloration is permanent, that means optimal for the diagnostic of oral protozoans in permanent preparations. (Fig. 5, Ref. 4.)

  2. In vitro analysis of the TAT protein transduction domain as a drug delivery vehicle in protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Lee, Stephanie Hui; Jefferies, Ryan; Watt, Paul; Hopkins, Richard; Sotzik, Frank; Reid, Simon; Armson, Anthony; Boxell, Annika; Ryan, Una

    2008-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to analyse the capability of HIV-1 derived TAT protein transduction domain (PTD) fused with Green Fluorescent Protein (TAT-GFP) as a delivery vehicle into a range of protozoan parasites. Successful transduction of native purified TAT-GFP was observed by fluorescent microscopy in Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia duodenalis, and Neospora caninum. The ability to transduce peptides and other cargo into protozoan parasites, will greatly assist in the delivery of future peptide-based drugs and target validation peptides.

  3. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sana; Ali, Asad; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood death in resource-poor countries, killing approximately 760,000 children younger than 5 years each year. Although deaths due to diarrhea have declined dramatically, high rates of stunting and malnutrition have persisted. Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination with resultant intestinal inflammation and villous blunting. These histological changes were first described in the 1960s, but the clinical effect of EED is only just being recognized in the context of failure of nutritional interventions and oral vaccines in resource-poor countries. We review the existing literature regarding the underlying causes of and potential interventions for EED in children, highlighting the epidemiology, clinical and histologic classification of the entity, and discussing novel biomarkers and possible therapies. Future research priorities are also discussed.

  4. [Updating enteral feeding by catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, T; Planas, M

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal nutrition can be administered orally or by means of a catheter; the latter method is the focus of this article. The authors' objective is to provide up-to-date information in a succinct manner about the enteral feeding technique. The authors hope health professionals know the advantages as well as the inconveniences of the latest intestinal nutrition advances regarding access ways and the means to administer these. Intestinal nutrition formulas will not be dealt with in this article. However, a health professional should know that there is a wide variety of diets available depending on the complexity of macronutrients included in a diet, the quantity of proteins in a mixture, and that these are designed, in addition to feeding, to treat the specific pathological process a patient suffers from, such as diabetes of cancer.

  5. A Map Enters the Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    Over the past decade STS scholars have been engaged in a continuous dialogue about the performativity of their methods and the interventions of their research practices. A frequently posed question is how STS can make a difference to its fields of study, what John Law has called its different...... 'modes of mattering'. In this paper I explore what difference digital cartography can make to STS practice. I draw on three examples from my own work where digitally mediated maps have entered the conversation and made critical, often surprising, differences to the research process. In my first example...... the map is brought along as an ethnographic device on a piece of fieldwork, in my second example it serves as the central collaborative object in a participatory design project, and in my third example the map becomes the object of contestation as it finds itself centre stage in the controversy...

  6. Enteral Feeding Set Handling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Beth; Williams, Maria; Sollazzo, Janet; Hayden, Ashley; Hensley, Pam; Dai, Hongying; Roberts, Cristine

    2017-04-01

    Enteral nutrition therapy is common practice in pediatric clinical settings. Often patients will receive a pump-assisted bolus feeding over 30 minutes several times per day using the same enteral feeding set (EFS). This study aims to determine the safest and most efficacious way to handle the EFS between feedings. Three EFS handling techniques were compared through simulation for bacterial growth, nursing time, and supply costs: (1) rinsing the EFS with sterile water after each feeding, (2) refrigerating the EFS between feedings, and (3) using a ready-to-hang (RTH) product maintained at room temperature. Cultures were obtained at baseline, hour 12, and hour 21 of the 24-hour cycle. A time-in-motion analysis was conducted and reported in average number of seconds to complete each procedure. Supply costs were inventoried for 1 month comparing the actual usage to our estimated usage. Of 1080 cultures obtained, the overall bacterial growth rate was 8.7%. The rinse and refrigeration techniques displayed similar bacterial growth (11.4% vs 10.3%, P = .63). The RTH technique displayed the least bacterial growth of any method (4.4%, P = .002). The time analysis in minutes showed the rinse method was the most time-consuming (44.8 ± 2.7) vs refrigeration (35.8 ± 2.6) and RTH (31.08 ± 0.6) ( P < .0001). All 3 EFS handling techniques displayed low bacterial growth. RTH was superior in bacterial growth, nursing time, and supply costs. Since not all pediatric formulas are available in RTH, we conclude that refrigerating the EFS between uses is the next most efficacious method for handling the EFS between bolus feeds.

  7. Enteral Nutrition and Care of Risky Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kilicarslan Toruner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Making appropriate and effective enteral feeding is decreasing the morbidity and mortality rates of risky newborns. Most important problems during enteral feeding in risky newborns are realizing the enteral feeding needs late, not following enteral feeding protocols and errors in medical practices (misconnections etc.. The aim of this review article is to describe the gastrointestinal development, nutrition requirements, enteral nutrition, feeding intolerance and care of risky newborns. Increasing the awareness of health care professionals about this topic is promoted the quality of care in risky newborns. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 227-233

  8. Macrophage and T-cell gene expression in a model of early infection with the protozoan Leishmania chagasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Ettinger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis is a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum/chagasi in the New World, or by L. donovani or L. infantum/chagasi in the Old World. Infection leads to a variety of outcomes ranging from asymptomatic infection to active disease, characterized by fevers, cachexia, hepatosplenomegaly and suppressed immune responses. We reasoned that events occurring during the initial few hours when the parasite encounters cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems are likely to influence the eventual immune response that develops. Therefore, we performed gene expression analysis using Affymetrix U133Plus2 microarray chips to investigate a model of early infection with human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs challenged with wild-type L. chagasi parasites, with or without subsequent co-culture with Leishmania-naïve, autologous T-cells. Microarray data generated from total RNA were analyzed with software from the Bioconductor Project and functional clustering and pathway analysis were performed with DAVID and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA, respectively. Many transcripts were down-regulated by infection in cultures containing macrophages alone, and the pattern indicated a lack of a classically activated phenotype. By contrast, the addition of autologous Leishmania-naïve T cells to infected macrophages resulted in a pattern of gene expression including many markers of type 1 immune cytokine activation (IFN-gamma, IL-6, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta. There was simultaneous up-regulation of a few markers of immune modulation (IL-10 cytokine accumulation; TGF-beta Signaling Pathway. We suggest that the initial encounter between L. chagasi and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system stimulates primarily type 1 immune cytokine responses, despite a lack of classical macrophage activation. This local microenvironment at the site of parasite inoculation may determine the initial course of immune T

  9. Tracking amino acid's uptake into the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii by stable-isotope labelling and Raman spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemat, Abida; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Notingher, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    The capacity of pathogens to acquire nutrients from their host cells is one of the most fundamental aspects of infection biology. Hence, measuring the patterns of nutrients' uptake by pathogens is essential for understanding the interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells. In this study, we optimized a technique that allows fast and non-destructive measurement of the amino acid Phenylalanine (Phe) acquired by the trophozoite stage of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii (A. castellanii) as they engage with individual human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). ARPE-19 host cells were pre-saturated with Deuterated Phe (L-Phe(D8)) to replace the native substrate Phe (L-Phe). The uptake of L-Phe(D8) by A. castellanii trophozoites was measured by Raman microspectroscopy. This approach allowed us to characterize the uptake patterns of this essential amino acid into A. castellanii trophozoites at a single cell level. At 24 hours post infection (PI) A. castellanii trophozoites are capable of salvaging L-Phe(D8) from host cells. The uptake pattern was time-dependent during the first 24 hours of infection and complete substitution with L-Phe(D8) in all parasites was detected at 48 hours PI. On the other hand, isolated A. castellanii trachyzoites (grown without host cells) did not show significant uptake for L-Phe(D8) from the media; only achieved an uptake ratio of 16-18% of L-Phe(D8) from the culture medium after 24 hours. These findings demonstrate the potential of combining Raman microspectroscopy and stable isotope labelling approaches to elucidate the role of metabolism in mediating A. castellanii interaction with host cells.

  10. Novel insights into the molecular events linking to cell death induced by tetracycline in the amitochondriate protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ku, Fu-Man; Cheng, Wei-Hung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Huang, Po-Jung; Chu, Lichieh Julie; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Fang, Yi-Kai; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia; Tang, Petrus

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the human urogenital tract and causes trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease. Currently, 5-nitroimidazoles are the only recommended drugs for treating trichomoniasis. However, increased resistance of the parasite to 5-nitroimidazoles has emerged as a highly problematic public health issue. Hence, it is essential to identify alternative chemotherapeutic agents against refractory trichomoniasis. Tetracycline (TET) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against several protozoan parasites, but the mode of action of TET in parasites remains poorly understood. The in vitro effect of TET on the growth of T. vaginalis was examined, and the mode of cell death was verified by various apoptosis-related assays. Next-generation sequencing-based RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was employed to elucidate the transcriptome of T. vaginalis in response to TET. We show that TET has a cytotoxic effect on both metronidazole (MTZ)-sensitive and -resistant T. vaginalis isolates, inducing some features resembling apoptosis. RNA-seq data reveal that TET significantly alters the transcriptome via activation of specific pathways, such as aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and carbohydrate metabolism. Functional analyses demonstrate that TET disrupts the hydrogenosomal membrane potential and antioxidant system, which concomitantly elicits a metabolic shift toward glycolysis, suggesting that the hydrogenosomal function is impaired and triggers cell death. Collectively, we provide in vitro evidence that TET is a potential alternative therapeutic choice for treating MTZ-resistant T. vaginalis. The in-depth transcriptomic signatures in T. vaginalis upon TET treatment presented here will shed light on the signaling pathways linking to cell death in amitochondriate organisms.

  11. Static Clathrin Assemblies at the Peripheral Vacuole-Plasma Membrane Interface of the Parasitic Protozoan Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumthor, Jon Paulin; Cernikova, Lenka; Rout, Samuel; Kaech, Andres; Faso, Carmen; Hehl, Adrian B

    2016-07-01

    Giardia lamblia is a parasitic protozoan that infects a wide range of vertebrate hosts including humans. Trophozoites are non-invasive but associate tightly with the enterocyte surface of the small intestine. This narrow ecological specialization entailed extensive morphological and functional adaptations during host-parasite co-evolution, including a distinctly polarized array of endocytic organelles termed peripheral vacuoles (PVs), which are confined to the dorsal cortical region exposed to the gut lumen and are in close proximity to the plasma membrane (PM). Here, we investigated the molecular consequences of these adaptations on the Giardia endocytic machinery and membrane coat complexes. Despite the absence of canonical clathrin coated vesicles in electron microscopy, Giardia possesses conserved PV-associated clathrin heavy chain (GlCHC), dynamin-related protein (GlDRP), and assembly polypeptide complex 2 (AP2) subunits, suggesting a novel function for GlCHC and its adaptors. We found that, in contrast to GFP-tagged AP2 subunits and DRP, CHC::GFP reporters have no detectable turnover in living cells, indicating fundamental differences in recruitment to the membrane and disassembly compared to previously characterized clathrin coats. Histochemical localization in electron tomography showed that these long-lived GlCHC assemblies localized at distinctive approximations between the plasma and PV membrane. A detailed protein interactome of GlCHC revealed all of the conserved factors in addition to novel or highly diverged proteins, including a putative clathrin light chain and lipid-binding proteins. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence for giardial CHC as a component of highly stable assemblies at PV-PM junctions that likely have a central role in organizing continuities between the PM and PV membranes for controlled sampling of the fluid environment. This suggests a novel function for CHC in Giardia and the extent of molecular remodeling of

  12. Predisposing factors and prevention of Clostridium perfringens-associated enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaart, Janneke G; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Gröne, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is one of the major causes of intestinal disease in humans and animals. Its pathogenicity is contributed to by the production of a variety of toxins. In addition, predisposing environmental factors are important for the induction of C. perfringens-associated enteritis as shown by infection models. Environmental contamination, gastric and intestinal pH, intestinal microflora, nutrition, concurrent infections, and medical interventions may influence the intestinal colonization, growth, and toxin production by C. perfringens. Prevention of C. perfringens-associated enteritis may be mediated by the use of feed additives like probiotics, prebiotics, organic acids, essential oils, bacteriophages, lysozymes, bacteriocins, and antimicrobial peptides. Here we summarize and discuss published data on the influence of different environmental predisposing factors and preventive measures. Further research should focus on feed composition and feed additives in order to prevent C. perfringens-associated enteritis.

  13. Solar and photocatalytic disinfection of protozoan, fungal and bacterial microbes in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonnen, J; Kilvington, S; Kehoe, S C; Al-Touati, F; McGuigan, K G

    2005-03-01

    The ability of solar disinfection (SODIS) and solar photocatalytic (TiO(2)) disinfection (SPC-DIS) batch-process reactors to inactivate waterborne protozoan, fungal and bacterial microbes was evaluated. After 8 h simulated solar exposure (870 W/m(2) in the 300 nm-10 microm range, 200 W/m(2) in the 300-400 nm UV range), both SPC-DIS and SODIS achieved at least a 4 log unit reduction in viability against protozoa (the trophozoite stage of Acanthamoeba polyphaga), fungi (Candida albicans, Fusarium solani) and bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli). A reduction of only 1.7 log units was recorded for spores of Bacillus subtilis. Both SODIS and SPC-DIS were ineffective against the cyst stage of A. polyphaga.

  14. Waterborne transmission of protozoan parasites: Review of worldwide outbreaks - An update 2011-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiou, Artemis; Ongerth, Jerry E; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2017-01-25

    This review provides a comprehensive update of worldwide waterborne parasitic protozoan outbreaks that occurred with reports published since previous reviews largely between January 2011 and December 2016. At least 381 outbreaks attributed to waterborne transmission of parasitic protozoa were documented during this time period. The nearly half (49%) of reports occurred in New Zealand, 41% of the outbreaks in North America and 9% in Europe. The most common etiological agent was Cryptosporidium spp., reported in 63% (239) of the outbreaks, while Giardia spp. was mentioned in 37% (142). No outbreaks attributed to other parasitic protozoa were reported. The distribution of reported outbreaks does not correspond to more broadly available epidemiological data or general knowledge of water and environmental conditions in the reporting countries. Noticeably, developing countries that are probably most affected by such waterborne disease outbreaks still lack reliable surveillance systems, and an international standardization of surveillance and reporting systems has yet to be established.

  15. Comparative use of bacterial, algal and protozoan tests to study toxicity of azo- and anthraquinone dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, Cenek; Dias, Nicolina; Kapanen, Anu; Malachová, Katerina; Vándrovcová, Marta; Itävaara, Merja; Lima, Nelson

    2006-06-01

    Toxicity of two azo dyes (Reactive Orange 16 (RO16); Congo Red (CR)) and two anthraquinone dyes (Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR); Disperse Blue 3 (DB3)) were compared using bacterium Vibrio fischeri, microalga Selenastrum capricornutum and ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis. The following respective endpoints were involved: acute toxicity measured as bacterial luminescence inhibition, algal growth inhibition, and the effects on the protozoa including viability, growth inhibition, grazing effect and morphometric effects. In addition, mutagenicity of the dyes was determined using Ames test with bacterium Salmonella typhimurium His(-). DB3 dye was the most toxic of all dyes in the bacterial, algal and protozoan tests. In contrast to other dyes, DB3 exhibited mutagenic effects after metabolic activation in vitro in all S. typhimurium strains used. Of the methods applied, the algal test was the most sensitive to evaluate toxicity of the dyes tested.

  16. Ecto-phosphatases in protozoan parasites: possible roles in nutrition, growth and ROS sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2011-02-01

    The cellular plasma membrane contains enzymes whose active sites face the external medium rather than the cytoplasm. The activities of these enzymes, referred to as ecto-enzymes, can be measured using living cells. Ecto-phosphatases are ecto-enzymes that presumably hydrolyze extracellular phosphorylated substrates, releasing free inorganic phosphate. Although, several alternative functions have been suggested for these enzymes, such as participation in proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, virulence, and infection, little is known about the physiological roles of these enzymes in protozoa parasites. In this review, we discuss the principal features of ecto-phosphatases in protozoan parasites that are causative agents of important diseases such as Chagas' disease, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis and, sleeping sickness.

  17. Role of extracellular nucleotides in the immune response against intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ojcius, David M

    2012-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are danger signals involved in recognition and control of intracellular pathogens. They are an important component of the innate immune response against intracellular pathogens, inducing the recruitment of inflammatory cells, stimulating secretion of cytokines, and producing inflammatory mediators such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). In the case of extracellular ATP, some of the immune responses are mediated through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and secretion of the cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), through a mechanism dependent on ligation of the P2X7 receptor. Here we review the role of extracellular nucleotides as sensors of intracellular bacteria and protozoan parasites, and discuss how these pathogens manipulate purinergic signaling to diminish the immune response against infection.

  18. Immune response in the adipose tissue of lean mice infected with the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Luzia; Moreira, João; Melo, Joana; Bezerra, Filipa; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Monteiro, Mariana P; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    The adipose tissue can make important contributions to immune function. Nevertheless, only a limited number of reports have investigated in lean hosts the immune response elicited in this tissue upon infection. Previous studies suggested that the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum might affect adipose tissue physiology. Therefore, we investigated in mice challenged with this protozoan if immune cell populations within adipose tissue of different anatomical locations could be differently affected. Early in infection, parasites were detected in the adipose tissue and by 7 days of infection increased numbers of macrophages, regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-bet(+) cells were observed in gonadal, mesenteric, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Increased expression of interferon-γ was also detected in gonadal adipose tissue of infected mice. Two months after infection, parasite DNA was no longer detected in these tissues, but T helper type 1 (Th1) cell numbers remained above control levels in the infected mice. Moreover, the Th1/Treg cell ratio was higher than that of controls in the mesenteric and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, chronically infected mice presented a marked increase of serum leptin, a molecule that plays a role in energy balance regulation as well as in promoting Th1-type immune responses. Altogether, we show that an apicomplexa parasitic infection influences immune cellular composition of adipose tissue throughout the body as well as adipokine production, still noticed at a chronic phase of infection when parasites were already cleared from that particular tissue. This strengthens the emerging view that infections can have long-term consequences for the physiology of adipose tissue.

  19. Enrichment of specific protozoan populations during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Dawn; Giloteaux, L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Thompson, Courtney A.; Roper, Thomas J.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek

    2013-07-28

    The importance of bacteria in the anaerobic bioremediation of groundwater polluted with organic and/or metal contaminants is well-recognized and in some instances so well understood that modeling of the in situ metabolic activity of the relevant subsurface microorganisms in response to changes in subsurface geochemistry is feasible. However, a potentially significant factor influencing bacterial growth and activity in the subsurface that has not been adequately addressed is protozoan predation of the microorganisms responsible for bioremediation. In field experiments at a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, CO, acetate amendments initially promoted the growth of metal-reducing Geobacter species followed by the growth of sulfate-reducers, as previously observed. Analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences revealed a broad diversity of sequences closely related to known bacteriovorous protozoa in the groundwater prior to the addition of acetate. The bloom of Geobacter species was accompanied by a specific enrichment of sequences most closely related to the amoeboid flagellate, Breviata anathema, which at their peak accounted for over 80% of the sequences recovered. The abundance of Geobacter species declined following the rapid emergence of B. anathema. The subsequent growth of sulfate-reducing Peptococcaceae was accompanied by another specific enrichment of protozoa, but with sequences most similar to diplomonadid flagellates from the family Hexamitidae, which accounted for up to 100% of the sequences recovered during this phase of the bioremediation. These results suggest a prey-predator response with specific protozoa responding to increased availability of preferred prey bacteria. Thus, quantifying the influence of protozoan predation on the growth, activity, and composition of the subsurface bacterial community is essential for predictive modeling of in situ uranium bioremediation strategies.

  20. Generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags from the ciliate protozoan parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias Covadonga

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ciliate protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich is an important parasite of freshwater fish that causes 'white spot disease' leading to significant losses. A genomic resource for large-scale studies of this parasite has been lacking. To study gene expression involved in Ich pathogenesis and virulence, our goal was to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs for the development of a powerful microarray platform for the analysis of global gene expression in this species. Here, we initiated a project to sequence and analyze over 10,000 ESTs. Results We sequenced 10,368 EST clones using a normalized cDNA library made from pooled samples of the trophont, tomont, and theront life-cycle stages, and generated 9,769 sequences (94.2% success rate. Post-sequencing processing led to 8,432 high quality sequences. Clustering analysis of these ESTs allowed identification of 4,706 unique sequences containing 976 contigs and 3,730 singletons. These unique sequences represent over two million base pairs (~10% of Plasmodium falciparum genome, a phylogenetically related protozoan. BLASTX searches produced 2,518 significant (E-value -5 hits and further Gene Ontology (GO analysis annotated 1,008 of these genes. The ESTs were analyzed comparatively against the genomes of the related protozoa Tetrahymena thermophila and P. falciparum, allowing putative identification of additional genes. All the EST sequences were deposited by dbEST in GenBank (GenBank: EG957858–EG966289. Gene discovery and annotations are presented and discussed. Conclusion This set of ESTs represents a significant proportion of the Ich transcriptome, and provides a material basis for the development of microarrays useful for gene expression studies concerning Ich development, pathogenesis, and virulence.

  1. Protozoan colonization on artificial substrates in relation to water quality in a tropical Indian harbour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the protozoancolonization patterns on artificial substrates in relation to organic pollution within a tropical harbour. The composition of protozoans and their succession rates on artificial substrates(polyurethane foam units) were compared between two field stations(A and B), and their presence were considered with regards to the prevailing water quality conditions at the study sites. Altogether 44 genera of flagellates and ciliates were documented. The common genera of flagellates and ciliates were documented. The common genera of flagellates encountered included Monas, Polytoma,and Chromalina. Among the ciliates, the predominant genera were Tetrahymena, Vorticella, Lagynophyra, and Heloiphyra. These groups exhibited characteristic successional patterns in relation to ambient water quality. At Station A, located close to the sewage outfall, the water quality parameters included poor Secchi-disc transparency(0.48m), dissolved oxygen of 1.93 mg/ml, salinity of 18 psu, and temperature 31.3 鳦. Here, thenanoflagellates(spumella)colonized first, followed by microcilliate(Tetrahymena) and sessile form(Vorticella). Station B, located on the seaward side, was characterized by relatively less-stressed environmental conditions with transparency 1.85m and dissolved oxygen value of 6.04 mg/ml. Salinity of 27.27 psu, and mean temperature of 30鳦 were recordedat "B". At this station, the nanoflagellate Polytoma was first documented to colonize on the substrate, followed by microcilliate(Lagynophra) and suctorid(Heliophyra). These findings support the use of protozoans as indicator species for evaluating the hazards posed by organic pollution to natural estuarine communities.

  2. Studies evaluating the applicability of utilizing the same concentration techniques for the detection of protozoan parasites and viruses in water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kfir, R

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available was studied using tap water seeded with Giardia muris cysts and compared to methods designed for the detection of protozoan parasites. Recovery of cysts utilizing 1.2 mu m membrane filters was 11.1% (4.5-23%) compared to 11.6% (2.7-25.5%) with ultra...

  3. Detection of protozoan hosts for Legionella pneumophila in engineered water systems by using a biofilm batch test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valster, R.M.; Wullings, B.A.; Kooij, van der D.

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila proliferates in aquatic habitats within free-living protozoa, 17 species of which have been identified as hosts by using in vitro experiments. The present study aimed at identifying protozoan hosts for L. pneumophila by using a biofilm batch test (BBT). Samples (600 ml) collec

  4. Recurrent wheezing is associated with intestinal protozoan infections in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, M.M.; Verhagen, L.M.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Nogal, B. del; Sanchez, AM; Acevedo, N.M.; Murga, R.R.; Roelfsema, J.; Pinelli, E.; Waard, J.H. de

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While in developed countries the prevalence of allergic diseases is rising, inflammatory diseases are relatively uncommon in rural developing areas. High prevalence rates of helminth and protozoan infections are commonly found in children living in rural settings and several studies sugg

  5. CERN openlab enters new phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The newest phase of CERN’s openlab framework was inaugurated this week during a meeting of the openlab partners. This phase will last three years and will bring together existing openlab partners and a new contributor: Huawei.   Group picture taken at the first CERN openlab IV annual Board of Sponsors meeting, in the presence of the CERN Director-General, the partners and the openlab team members. © Fons Rademakers (CERN Photo Club). Eleven years ago, the creation of the CERN openlab created a long-term link between industrial partners and the Organization. Its framework has allowed industry to carry out large-scale IT research and development in an open atmosphere – an “Open Lab”, if you will. For CERN, openlab has contributed to giving the computing centre and, more broadly, the LHC community, the opportunity to ensure that the next generation of services and products is suitable to their needs. Now entering its fourth phase, openlab will ...

  6. [Secondary aorto-enteric fistula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, F; Boneschi, M; Miani, S; Erba, M; Beretta, L

    1998-01-01

    Aortic graft fistula is a rare and life-threatening complication after aortic reconstruction. The incidence ranges from 0.5 to 4%, and even if the diagnosis and treatment is appropriate, the results of surgery are poor: mortality rate ranges from 14 to 70%. The optimal method of treatment is still controversial; prosthetic removal and extra-anatomic bypass has been advocated as the standard method, but more recently, because the high mortality rate associated with this procedure, some have prompted to recommend in situ aortic graft replacement as a more successful treatment. Personal experience with incidence (0.7%) outcome and mortality (57%) in 7 patients treated over a period of 6 years (1990-1996) is reported. Results from this group are compared with another group (6 patients) previously treated (1975-1982) for the same pathology. Our results after 10 years, show the same incidence (0.7 vs 0.6%) and an elevated and unchanged mortality (57 vs 66%). Better results in the management of aorto-enteric fistulas could be achieved with the removal of infected infrarenal aortic prosthetic grafts and in situ homografts replacement.

  7. Enteric Bacteria and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacteria can contribute to cell proliferation and cancer development, particularly in chronic infectious diseases in which bacteria and/or bacterial components might interfere with cell function. The number of microbial cells within the gut lumen is estimated to be 100 trillion, which is about 10-times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells in the human body. Because of the complexity of the gut flora, identifying the specific microbial agents related to human diseases remains challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that the stemness of colon cancer cells is, in part, orchestrated by the microenvironment and is defined by high Wnt activity. In this review article, we will discuss recent progress with respect to intestinal stem cells, cancer stem cells, and the molecular mechanisms of enteric bacteria in the activation of the Wnt pathway. We will also discuss the roles of other pathways, including JAK-STAT, JNK, and Notch, in regulating stem cell niches during bacterial infections using Drosophila models. Insights gained from understanding how host-bacterial interaction during inflammation and cancer may serve as a paradigm for understanding the nature of self-renewal signals.

  8. Factors Associated with High Prevalence of Intestinal Protozoan Infections among Patients in Sana'a City, Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyousefi, Naelah A.; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Mahmud, Rohela; Lim, Yvonne A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intestinal protozoan diseases in Yemen are a significant health problem with prevalence ranging from 18% to 27%. The present study is a cross-sectional study aimed at determining the factors associated with the high prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among patients seeking health care in Sana'a City, the capital of Yemen. Methodology/Principal Findings Stool samples were collected from 503 patients aged between 1 and 80 years old; 219 were males and 284 females. Biodata were collected via pretested standard questionnaire. Faecal samples were processed and examined for (oo)cysts or ova using a wet mount preparation after formal-ether concentration technique. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected using the Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. The overall prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections was 30.9%. Infection rates of Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Cryptosporidium were 17.7%, 17.1% and 1%, respectively. Other parasites detected included Ascaris lumbricoides (2.4%), Schistosoma mansoni (0.3%), Hymenolepis nana (1.4%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.4%). Multivariate analysis using forward stepwise logistic regression based on intestinal protozoan infections showed that contact with animals (OR = 1.748, 95% CI = 1.168–2.617) and taking bath less than twice a week (OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 1.192–2.779) were significant risk factors of protozoan infections. Conclusions/Significance This present study indicated that intestinal protozoan infections are still a public health problem in Yemen, with Giardia and Entamoeba infections being most common. Statistical analysis indicated that low personal hygiene and contact with animals were important predictors for intestinal protozoan infections. As highlighted in this study, in order to effectively reduce these infections, a multi-sectoral effort is needed. Preventive measures should include good hygienic practices, good animal husbandry practices, heightened

  9. Factors associated with high prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among patients in Sana'a City, Yemen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naelah A Alyousefi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal protozoan diseases in Yemen are a significant health problem with prevalence ranging from 18% to 27%. The present study is a cross-sectional study aimed at determining the factors associated with the high prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among patients seeking health care in Sana'a City, the capital of Yemen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Stool samples were collected from 503 patients aged between 1 and 80 years old; 219 were males and 284 females. Biodata were collected via pretested standard questionnaire. Faecal samples were processed and examined for (oocysts or ova using a wet mount preparation after formal-ether concentration technique. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected using the Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. The overall prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections was 30.9%. Infection rates of Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar and Cryptosporidium were 17.7%, 17.1% and 1%, respectively. Other parasites detected included Ascaris lumbricoides (2.4%, Schistosoma mansoni (0.3%, Hymenolepis nana (1.4% and Enterobius vermicularis (0.4%. Multivariate analysis using forward stepwise logistic regression based on intestinal protozoan infections showed that contact with animals (OR = 1.748, 95% CI = 1.168-2.617 and taking bath less than twice a week (OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 1.192-2.779 were significant risk factors of protozoan infections. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This present study indicated that intestinal protozoan infections are still a public health problem in Yemen, with Giardia and Entamoeba infections being most common. Statistical analysis indicated that low personal hygiene and contact with animals were important predictors for intestinal protozoan infections. As highlighted in this study, in order to effectively reduce these infections, a multi-sectoral effort is needed. Preventive measures should include good hygienic practices, good animal husbandry practices, heightened

  10. Enteric protozoa of cats and their zoonotic potential-a field study from Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinney, Barbara; Ederer, Christina; Stengl, Carina; Wilding, Katrin; Štrkolcová, Gabriela; Harl, Josef; Flechl, Eva; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Joachim, Anja

    2015-05-01

    Domestic cats can be infected with a variety of enteric protozoa. Genotyping of protozoan species, especially Giardia as the most common, can improve assessment of their relevance as zoonotic agents. For an overview on the occurrence of feline enteric protozoa, 298 faecal samples of cats from private households, catteries and animal shelters in Austria were collected. All samples were examined by flotation and using a rapid test for Giardia (FASTest). For the detection of Tritrichomonas blagburni, freshly voided faeces (n = 40) were processed using a commercial culturing system (InPouch TF-Feline). Genotyping was done at the β-giardin gene loci (each sample) and triosephosphate isomerase gene loci (positive samples) for Giardia and at the 18S rRNA gene (positive samples) for Cryptosporidium. Thirty-seven samples (12.4%) were positive for Giardia by flotation and/or using a rapid test. Cryptosporidium was present in 1.7%, Cystoisospora in 4.0%, Sarcocystis in 0.3% and T. blagburni in 2.5% of the samples. Genotyping revealed Giardia cati, the potentially zoonotic Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium felis. Most of the infected cats had no diarrhoea. Cats from shelters were significantly more often infected than owned cats (p = 0.01). When comparing Giardia detection methods, the rapid test had a higher sensitivity than flotation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were mostly independent from the other two tests.

  11. A Comparative Study of the Common Protozoan Parasites of Clarias gariepinus from the Wild and Cultured Environments in Benue State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omeji, S; Solomon, S G; Idoga, E S

    2011-01-01

    A total of one hundred and twenty Clarias gariepinus comprising 30 dead and 30 live fishes were examined for protozoan parasites infestation, sixty each from the wild and a pond (cultured environment) over a period of six months. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis was the most common protozoan parasites found in C. gariepinus from the wild (River Benue) and cultured (pond) environments. These protozoan parasites constitute 37.08% of the total parasites encountered for fishes in the pond and 42.51% of fishes in the wild. Among the body parts of the sampled fishes from the pond, the gills had the highest parasite load (38.86%). Also, the gills had the highest parasite load (40.54%) among the body parts of the fishes sampled from the wild. Fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the pond constituted 36.70% of the total fish sampled. On the other hand, fishes not infested with any protozoan parasites from the wild constituted 31.65% of the total fish sampled. Female fishes had more protozoan parasites than the male fishes. Bigger fishes of total length (25-48 cm) had more parasite load than the smaller ones (19-24 cm). Also, fishes between 150-750 g had more parasite load than the smaller ones of less than 150 g. Protozoan parasite load of fish from the cultured environment (pond) did not differ significantly (P < 0.05) from those from River Benue (wild).

  12. Complications in pediatric enteral and vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, James S; Stitelman, David H

    2016-12-01

    Obtaining reliable enteral and vascular access constitutes a significant fraction of a pediatric surgeon׳s job. Multiple approaches are available. Given the complicated nature of this patient population multiple complications can also occur. This article discusses the various techniques and potential complications associated with short- and long-term enteral and vascular access. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B.W.M.; Bruno, M.J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  14. Enteral nutrition and acute pancreatitis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.M. Spanier (Marcel); M.J. Bruno (Marco); E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen (Elisabeth)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of

  15. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.M. Spanier; M.J. Bruno; E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  16. Campylobacter Enteritis among Children in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Pourmand

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter enteritis is a common form of acute gastroenteritis. Among children, especially in developing countries, Campylobacter infections can cause sever life-threatening diarrheal disease. The incidence of Campylobacter infection among children is age related with a higher incidence among younger children in the developing world whereas in industrialized countries the incidence is highest in older children. In a study of American children, Campylobacter was isolated in 4.8% of diarrheal stools in aged 1-4 years. In 1985 the prevalence of Campylobacter diarrheal was 4.4%, whereas in current report 6% of stool samples from children aged<5 years with diarrhea grew Campylobacter jejuni. There were no significant differences between age groups of patients. All thirteen isolated strains of Campylobacter were resistance to Bactrim, Colistin and Polymyxin B and were sensitive to Neomycin, Erythromycin, Gentamicin and Nalidixic acid. The incidence of human campylobacteriosis is increasing worldwide. Thus, public health awareness about the problem is necessary, with a view towards setting up national surveillance programs.

  17. Enteric Ganglionitis in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight in...

  18. Enteric microbiota leads to new therapeutic strategies for ulcerative colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei-Xu; Ren, Li-Hua; Shi, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a leading form of inflammatory bowel disease that involves chronic relapsing or progressive inflammation. As a significant proportion of UC patients treated with conventional therapies do not achieve remission, there is a pressing need for the development of more effective therapies. The human gut contains a large, diverse, and dynamic population of microorganisms, collectively referred to as the enteric microbiota. There is a symbiotic relationship between the huma...

  19. First record of protozoan parasites in cyprinid fish, Schizothorax niger Heckel, 1838 from Dal lake in Kashmir Himalayas with study on their pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Shoaib Ali; Kaur, Harpreet; Chishti, M Z; Ahmad, Fayaz; Tak, Irfan ur Rauf; Dar, Gowhar Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Trichodina heterodentata Duncan, 1977 and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876 obtained from gills during a parasitological survey conducted for the protozoan parasitic fauna of Schizothorax niger a snow trout in Dal Lake, Kashmir, India during the period October 2013 and March 2015. Thirty out of 180 fish were found infected with protozoan parasites. During the study of their pathogenecity the most common deteriorating signs observed in gill tissue were necrosis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia and fusion of secondary lamellae. Prevalence of infection was found to be 16.66%. This is the first record of the protozoan fauna of the schizothoracines from Kashmir valley, India.

  20. Endobiont viruses sensed by the human host - beyond conventional antiparasitic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina N Fichorova

    Full Text Available Wide-spread protozoan parasites carry endosymbiotic dsRNA viruses with uncharted implications to the human host. Among them, Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasite adapted to the human genitourinary tract, infects globally ∼250 million each year rendering them more susceptible to devastating pregnancy complications (especially preterm birth, HIV infection and HPV-related cancer. While first-line antibiotic treatment (metronidazole commonly kills the protozoan pathogen, it fails to improve reproductive outcome. We show that endosymbiotic Trichomonasvirus, highly prevalent in T. vaginalis clinical isolates, is sensed by the human epithelial cells via Toll-like receptor 3, triggering Interferon Regulating Factor -3, interferon type I and proinflammatory cascades previously implicated in preterm birth and HIV-1 susceptibility. Metronidazole treatment amplified these proinflammatory responses. Thus, a new paradigm targeting the protozoan viruses along with the protozoan host may prevent trichomoniasis-attributable inflammatory sequelae.

  1. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Alexandre; Martinez-Vinson, Christine; Goulet, Olivier; Badens, Catherine

    2013-01-09

    Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases.

  2. Faecal and protozoan parasite contamination of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) cultivated in urban wastewater in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anh, Vuong Tuan; Tram, Nguyen Thuy; Klank, Lise Tønner

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify the level of contamination with thermotolerant coliforms (ThC), intestinal helminth eggs and protozoan parasites in water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) cultivated in a wastewater-fed lake in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Methods The investigation was carried out from July 2004 to May...... into a stream. Water spinach samples were harvested at each of the three locations with and without wastewater contact according to the normal practices of farmers, and analysed for ThC, protozoan parasites (Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora), and helminth eggs (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichura...... and hookworm) using standard methods. Wastewater samples were also collected at each of the three locations and analysed for ThC and helminth eggs. Results High concentrations of ThC (approximately 10(5)-10(7)/g) were found in water spinach samples. ThC mean counts did not differ significantly, neither between...

  3. Water used to moisten vegetables is a source of Escherichia coli and protozoan parasite contamination at markets in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tram, Nguyen Thuy; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2014-12-01

    The study was done to assess the level of fecal (Escherichia coli) and protozoan parasite (Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp.) contamination in water used by traders to moisten vegetables at markets in Hanoi, Vietnam. A total of 200 splashing water samples from markets located within eight districts were analyzed for E. coli and Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. (oo)cysts. Giardia cysts were found in 17 splashing water samples and Cryptosporidium oocysts in nine samples, with median values of 20 cysts ml(-1) and 10 oocysts ml(-1), respectively. E. coli was found with a median concentration of 636 cfu ml(-1) and its occurrence was negatively correlated with the numbers of protozoan parasites. The splashing water was kept in buckets that were rarely cleaned and often used for handwashing. The finding of these pathogens in splashing water is likely to represent real food safety hazards.

  4. Whole-genome amplification: a useful approach to characterize new genes in unculturable protozoan parasites such as Bonamia exitiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-Alvarez, Maria; Couraleau, Yann; Chollet, Bruno; Tourbiez, Delphine; Arzul, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    Bonamia exitiosa is an intracellular parasite (Haplosporidia) that has been associated with mass mortalities in oyster populations in the Southern hemisphere. This parasite was recently detected in the Northern hemisphere including Europe. Some representatives of the Bonamia genus have not been well categorized yet due to the lack of genomic information. In the present work, we have applied Whole-Genome Amplification (WGA) technique in order to characterize the actin gene in the unculturable protozoan B. exitiosa. This is the first protein coding gene described in this species. Molecular analysis revealed that B. exitiosa actin is more similar to Bonamia ostreae actin gene-1. Actin phylogeny placed the Bonamia sp. infected oysters in the same clade where the herein described B. exitiosa actin resolved, offering novel information about the classification of the genus. Our results showed that WGA methodology is a promising and valuable technique to be applied to unculturable protozoans whose genomic material is limited.

  5. Enteric Methane Emission from Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henry; Theil, Peter Kappel; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2011-01-01

    The modern pig industry rely on relatively few feedstuffs mostly from cereals (corn, wheat, barley, oats, rye and rice), cereal co-products (different milling fractions, residues from biofuel and alcohol industries, etc.), cereal substitutes (tapioca, maniocca), legumes (peas, beans, lupins......), protein concentrates (meal or cakes of soybean, rape, sunflower, cotton) and co-products from the sugar and starch industries to produce compounds feeds. The classical pig diet can also be characterised as relatively concentrated but an increased demand of high energy cereals for direct human use...... and increased availability of fibre rich ingredients from, for instance, the feed milling or starch extraction/fermentation industries have promoted an increased utilisation of fibre rich co-products in the pig feeds (Serena et al. 2007). Especially pregnant sows may be supplied with fibre rich diets without...

  6. Methane Production from Protozoan Endosymbionts Following Stimulation of Microbial Metabolism within Subsurface Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Elena Holmes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that protozoa prey on Fe(III- and sulfate-reducing bacteria that are enriched when acetate is added to uranium contaminated subsurface sediments to stimulate U(VI reduction. In order to determine whether protozoa continue to impact subsurface biogeochemistry after these acetate amendments have stopped, 18S rRNA and ß-tubulin sequences from this phase of an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were analyzed. Sequences most similar to Metopus species predominated, with the majority of sequences most closely related to M. palaeformis, a cilitated protozoan known to harbor methanogenic symbionts. Quantification of mcrA mRNA transcripts in the groundwater suggested that methanogens closely related to Metopus endosymbionts were metabolically active at this time. There was a strong correlation between the number of mcrA transcripts from the putative endosymbiotic methanogen and Metopus ß-tubulin mRNA transcripts during the course of the field experiment, suggesting that the activity of the methanogens was dependent upon the activity of the Metopus species. Addition of the eukaryotic inhibitors cyclohexamide and colchicine to laboratory incubations of acetate-amended subsurface sediments significantly inhibited methane production and there was a direct correlation between methane concentration and Metopus ß-tubulin and putative symbiont mcrA gene copies. These results suggest that, following the stimulation of subsurface microbial growth with acetate, protozoa harboring methanogenic endosymbionts become important members of the microbial community, feeding on moribund biomass and producing methane.

  7. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma R Cold

    Full Text Available The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1 Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2 Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3 Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications.

  8. Identification and characterization of a type III Trichomonas vaginalis virus in the protozoan pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessarab, Irina N; Nakajima, Rui; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2011-02-01

    A type III Trichomonas vaginalis virus, which may be involved in transcriptional regulation of the major surface protein gene P270 of the protozoan pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, was purified and characterized in the present study. The complete 4844-base-pair complementary DNA sequence of the viral genome reveals overlapping cap and pol genes with a putative ribosomal frame-shifting signal within the overlap region. The type III virus is related more closely to the type II virus than to the type I virus in the sequence of its ribosomal frameshift signal and in its capsid protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these viruses could be grouped in the same clade as a genus distantly related to other genera in the family Totiviridae. Virus-induced P270 gene expression was only evident in Trichomonas vaginalis cells infected with either a type II or type III virus, but not with a type I virus. These findings suggest that transcription of the P270 gene is likely regulated by viral factors common to type II and type III viruses and thus provides important information for future investigation of virus-host interactions.

  9. Molecular characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA genes and transcripts in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Vélez-Ramírez, Daniel E; Padilla-Mejía, Norma E; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Manning-Cela, Rebeca; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic 5S rRNA, synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit. Most organisms contain hundreds of 5S rRNA genes organized into tandem arrays. However, the genome of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major contains only 11 copies of the 5S rRNA gene, which are interspersed and associated with other Pol III-transcribed genes. Here we report that, in general, the number and order of the 5S rRNA genes is conserved between different species of Leishmania. While in most organisms 5S rRNA genes are normally associated with the nucleolus, combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence experiments showed that 5S rRNA genes are mainly located at the nuclear periphery in L. major. Similarly, the tandemly repeated 5S rRNA genes in Trypanosoma cruzi are dispersed throughout the nucleus. In contrast, 5S rRNA transcripts in L. major were localized within the nucleolus, and scattered throughout the cytoplasm, where mature ribosomes are located. Unlike other rRNA species, stable antisense RNA complementary to 5S rRNA is not detected in L. major.

  10. Migratory dermal dendritic cells act as rapid sensors of protozoan parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Guan Ng

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC, including those of the skin, act as sentinels for intruding microorganisms. In the epidermis, DC (termed Langerhans cells, LC are sessile and screen their microenvironment through occasional movements of their dendrites. The spatio-temporal orchestration of antigen encounter by dermal DC (DDC is not known. Since these cells are thought to be instrumental in the initiation of immune responses during infection, we investigated their behavior directly within their natural microenvironment using intravital two-photon microscopy. Surprisingly, we found that, under homeostatic conditions, DDC were highly motile, continuously crawling through the interstitial space in a Galpha(i protein-coupled receptor-dependent manner. However, within minutes after intradermal delivery of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, DDC became immobile and incorporated multiple parasites into cytosolic vacuoles. Parasite uptake occurred through the extension of long, highly dynamic pseudopods capable of tracking and engulfing parasites. This was then followed by rapid dendrite retraction towards the cell body. DDC were proficient at discriminating between parasites and inert particles, and parasite uptake was independent of the presence of neutrophils. Together, our study has visualized the dynamics and microenvironmental context of parasite encounter by an innate immune cell subset during the initiation of the immune response. Our results uncover a unique migratory tissue surveillance program of DDC that ensures the rapid detection of pathogens.

  11. The ability of the rumen ciliate protozoan Diploplastron affine to digest and ferment starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wereszka, K; Michałowski, T

    2012-07-01

    The ciliate Diploplastron affine is known as a common species of the rumen fauna in cattle and sheep. This protozoon is able to digest cellulose, whereas its amylolytic activity is not well known. The objective of the reported studies was to examine the ability of D. affine to digest starch and to use this polysaccharide to cover the requirement for energy. The enzymatic studies showed that the protozoal cell extract degraded starch to reducing products with the rate being equivalent to 2.4 ± 0.47 μmol/L glucose per mg protein per min. Maltose, maltotriose and a small quantity of glucose were the end products of starch degradation. The degradation rate of maltose was only 0.05 μmol/L glucose per mg protein per min. Two peaks in α-amylase and a single peak in maltase activity were found following molecular filtration of ciliate cell extract, whereas three starch-degrading enzymes were identified by a zymographic technique. Incubation of the bacteria-free ciliates with starch in the presence of antibiotics resulted in a release of volatile fatty acids with the net rate of 25 pmol per protozoan per h. Acetic acid followed by butyric acid was the main product of starch fermentation. The results confirmed the ability of D. affine to utilize starch in energy-yielding processes.

  12. Protozoan biomass relation to nutrient and chemical oxygen demand removal in activated sludge mixed liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpor, Oghenerobor B; Momba, Maggy N B; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2008-08-01

    The relationship between biomass concentration to nutrient and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in mixed liquor supplemented with sodium acetate was investigated, using three protozoan isolates and three different initial biomass concentrations (10(1), 10(2) and 10(3) cells/mL). The study was carried out in a shaking flask environment at a shaking speed of 100 rpm for 96 h at 25 degrees C. Aliquot samples were taken periodically for the determination of phosphate, nitrate, COD and dissolved oxygen, using standard methods. The results revealed remarkable phosphate removal of 82-95% at biomass concentration of 10(3)cells/mL. A high nitrate removal of over 87% was observed at all initial biomass concentration in mixed liquor. There was an observed COD increase of over 50% in mixed liquor in at the end of 96-h incubation and this was irrespective of initial biomass concentration used for inoculation. The study shows the trend in nutrient and COD removal at different biomass concentrations of the test isolates in mixed liquor.

  13. Tudor domain proteins in protozoan parasites and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum tudor staphylococcal nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Manzar J; Korde, Reshma; Singh, Shivani; Mohmmed, Asif; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, V S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2008-04-01

    RNA-binding proteins play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In eukaryotic cells, a multitude of RNA-binding proteins with several RNA-binding domains/motifs have been described. Here, we show the existence of two Tudor domain containing proteins, a survival of motor neuron (SMN)-like protein and a Staphylococcus aureus nuclease homologue referred to as TSN, in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites. Activity analysis shows that Plasmodium falciparum TSN (PfTSN) possesses nuclease activity and Tudor domain is the RNA-binding domain. A specific inhibitor of micrococcal nucleases, 3',5'-deoxythymidine bisphosphate (pdTp) inhibits the nuclease as well as RNA-binding activities of the protein. PfTSN shows a predominant nuclear localization. Treatment of P. falciparum with pdTp, inhibited in vitro growth of both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum, while a four fold concentration of pdTp did not have any significant effect on the mammalian cell line, Huh-7D12. Altogether, these results suggest that PfTSN is an essential enzyme in the parasite's life cycle.

  14. Role of the Gut Microbiota of Children in Diarrhea Due to the Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Petri, Sarah E; Schneider, Brittany N; Reichman, Daniel J; Jiang, Nona; Begum, Sharmin; Watanabe, Koji; Jansen, Caroline S; Elliott, K Pamela; Burgess, Stacey L; Ma, Jennie Z; Alam, Masud; Kabir, Mamun; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A

    2016-05-15

    An estimated 1 million children die each year before their fifth birthday from diarrhea. Previous population-based surveys of pediatric diarrheal diseases have identified the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, the etiological agent of amebiasis, as one of the causes of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. We prospectively studied the natural history of E. histolytica colonization and diarrhea among infants in an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Approximately 80% of children were infected with E. histolytica by the age of 2 years. Fecal anti-galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine lectin immunoglobulin A was associated with protection from reinfection, while a high parasite burden and expansion of the Prevotella copri level was associated with diarrhea. E. histolytica infection was prevalent in this population, with most infections asymptomatic and diarrhea associated with both the amount of parasite and the composition of the microbiota. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  15. Protozoan and metazoan parasites of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus cultured in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderson Pantoja MF

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study describes the parasitic fauna and relative condition factor (Kn in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L. (Cichlidae from fish farms in the State of Amapá. Material and methods. 123 fish from four fish farms in the state of Amapá, Brazil were necropsied for parasitological and Kn analysis. Results. 64.2% of the examined fish, had the gills infected with Cichlidogyrus tilapiae Paperna, 1960 (Monogenoidea: Dactylogyridae; Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet, 1876 (Protozoa: Ciliophora, Trichodina Ehrenberg, 1830 and Paratrichodina africana Kazubski & El-Tantawy, 1986 (Protozoa: Trichodinidae. The highest prevalence found corresponded to Monogenoidea C. tilapiae while the lowest corresponded to Trichodinidae. However, I. multifiliis was the parasite that presented the greatest intensity and abundance. The differences found in the infection rates of the different fish farms due to causes further discussed. The parasitism did not influence the relative condition factor (Kn of fish. This was the first record of P. africana in Brazil and occurred in the Eastern Amazon. Conclusions. In Brazil, Lamproglena sp. is an emerging parasite in the Southern and Southeastern regions, but this crustacean was not found in the Nile tilapia in the State of Amapá. The parasitic infections in Nile tilapia farmed in Brazil are caused by protozoan, monogenoidea, crustacea and digenea species, and the regional differences on their prevalence and intensity rates are discussed in this study.

  16. Inferring host range dynamics from comparative data: the protozoan parasites of new world monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, David; Weinert, Lucy A; Welch, John J

    2014-07-01

    Uncovering the ecological determinants of parasite host range is a central goal of comparative parasitology and infectious disease ecology. But while parasites are often distributed nonrandomly across the host phylogeny, such patterns are difficult to interpret without a genealogy for the parasite samples and without knowing what sorts of ecological dynamics might lead to what sorts of nonrandomness. We investigated inferences from comparative data, using presence/absence records from protozoan parasites of the New World monkeys. We first demonstrate several distinct types of phylogenetic signal in these data, showing, for example, that parasite species are clustered on the host tree and that closely related host species harbor similar numbers of parasite species. We then show that all of these patterns can be generated by a single, simple dynamical model, in which parasite host range changes more rapidly than host speciation/extinction and parasites preferentially colonize uninfected host species that are closely related to their existing hosts. Fitting this model to data, we then estimate its parameters. Finally, we caution that quite different ecological processes can lead to similar signatures but show how phylogenetic variation in host susceptibility can be distinguished from a tendency for parasites to colonize closely related hosts. Our new process-based analyses, which estimate meaningful parameters, should be useful for inferring the determinants of parasite host range and transmission success.

  17. An Agar-Based Method for Plating Marine Protozoan Parasites of the Genus Perkinsus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cold, Emma R; Freyria, Nastasia J; Martínez Martínez, Joaquín; Fernández Robledo, José A

    2016-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of mollusks responsible for losses in the aquaculture industry and hampering the recovery of natural shellfish beds worldwide, and they are a key taxon for understanding intracellular parasitism adaptations. The ability to propagate the parasite in liquid media, in the absence of the host, has been crucial for improving understanding of its biology; however, alternative techniques to grow the parasite are needed to explore other basic aspects of the Perkinsus spp. biology. We optimized a DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- containing solid agar medium for plating Perkinsus marinus. This solid medium supported trophozoite propagation both by binary fission and schizogony. Colonies were visible to the naked eye 17 days after plating. We tested the suitability of this method for several applications, including the following: 1) Subcloning P. marinus isolates: single discrete P. marinus colonies were obtained from DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates, which could be further propagated in liquid medium; 2) Subcloning engineered Perkinsus mediterraneus MOE[MOE]: GFP by streaking cultures on plates; 3) Chemical susceptibility: Infusing the DME: Ham's F12-5% FBS- 0.75% agar plates with triclosan resulted in inhibition of the parasite propagation in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, our plating method has the potential for becoming a key tool for investigating diverse aspects of Perkinsus spp. biology, developing new molecular tools, and for biotechnological applications.

  18. Community of protozoans and metazoans parasitizing Auchenipterus nuchalis (Auchenipteridae, a catfish from the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tavares Dias

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first study on parasite diversity in Auchenipterus nuchalis Spix & Agassiz, 1829 (Auchenipteridae. In 31 fish caught in a tributary of the Amazon River, 10,708 parasites were collected, such as Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, Piscinoodinium pilullare, Cosmetocleithrum striatuli, metacercariae of Posthodiplostomum sp, and larvae and adults of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus inopinatus. These parasite species showed aggregated dispersion, except for C. striatuli, which had a uniform dispersion. The component community of parasites showed a low Brillouin diversity (0.67 ± 0.27, low species richness (3.5 ± 0.8 and low evenness (0.43 ± 0.17, and it was characterized by the presence of species with high prevalence and abundance. Protozoan species were the prevalent parasites, which may be a consequence of the host’s mode of life, while the low presence of endoparasites in A. nuchalis suggests that this fish may occupy an intermediate trophic level in the food web. These data represent the first record of such parasite species for this host.

  19. Epigenome mapping highlights chromatin-mediated gene regulation in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Ji; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Yeeun; Yi, Myung-hee; Kim, Juri; Park, Soon-Jung; Yong, Tai-Soon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular flagellated protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis, one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted diseases. To survive and to maintain infection, T. vaginalis adapts to a hostile host environment by regulating gene expression. However, the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are poorly understood for this parasite. Histone modification has a marked effect on chromatin structure and directs the recruitment of transcriptional machinery, thereby regulating essential cellular processes. In this study, we aimed to outline modes of chromatin-mediated gene regulation in T. vaginalis. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) alters global transcriptional responses and induces hyperacetylation of histones and hypermethylation of H3K4. Analysis of the genome of T. vaginalis revealed that a number of enzymes regulate histone modification, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms are important to controlling gene expression in this organism. Additionally, we describe the genome-wide localization of two histone H3 modifications (H3K4me3 and H3K27Ac), which we found to be positively associated with active gene expression in both steady and dynamic transcriptional states. These results provide the first direct evidence that histone modifications play an essential role in transcriptional regulation of T. vaginalis, and may help guide future epigenetic research into therapeutic intervention strategies against this parasite. PMID:28345651

  20. Molecular detection of protozoan parasites infecting Apis mellifera colonies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tomomi; Kojima, Yuriko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Kimura, Kiyoshi; Yang, Bu; Peng, Guangda; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2013-02-01

    The role of protozoan parasites in honey bee health and distribution in the world is not well understood. Therefore, we carried out a molecular survey for the presence of Crithidia mellificae and Apicystis bombi in the colonies of both non-native Apis mellifera and native Apis cerana japonica in Japan. We found that A. mellifera, but not A. c. japonica, colonies are parasitized with C. mellificae and A. bombi. Their absence in A. c. japonica colonies indicates that A. mellifera is their native host. Nevertheless, the prevalence in A. mellifera colonies is low compared with other pathogens such as viruses and Nosema microsporidia. Japanese C. mellificae isolates share well-conserved nuclear-encoded gene sequences with Swiss and US isolates. We have found two Japanese haplotypes (A and B) with two nucleotide differences in the kinetoplast-encoded cytochrome b sequence. The haplotype A is identical to Swiss isolate. These results demonstrate that C. mellificae and A. bombi distribute in Asia, Oceania, Europe, and South and North Americas.

  1. Purification and properties of a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from the parasitic protozoan Tritrichomonas foetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, D E; Johnston, M

    1985-07-05

    A novel secondary alcohol dehydrogenase has been isolated from Tritrichomonas foetus, the protozoan parasite which is responsible for bovine trichomonal abortion. The enzyme has been obtained in apparently homogeneous form after a 120-fold purification from cell homogenates, thus indicating that this activity constitutes an unusually high 1% of the total cytosolic protein. The native Mr = 115,000, determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels suggests that the enzyme is composed of 6-8 subunits, identical as to molecular size (Mr = 17,000). The enzyme catalyzes the reversible oxidation of 2-propanol to acetone, using NADP+ (and not NAD+) as the redox-active co-substrate. Other small secondary alcohols, such as 2-butanol, 2- and 3-pentanol, cyclobutanol, and cyclopentanol are substrates, as are the corresponding ketones of these alcohols. Primary alcohols, such as ethanol and 1-propanol, are oxidized at rates less than 5% of that observed for 2-propanol. Product inhibition studies demonstrate an ordered kinetic mechanism, wherein the co-substrate (NADP+/NADPH) binds to the enzyme prior to binding of the substrate (alcohol/ketone).

  2. Changes in vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and neuropeptide Y-ergic structures of the enteric nervous system in the carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Mirosław Łakomy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was aimed at immunohistochemical analysis of potential changes in the enteric nervous system caused by cancer of the large intestine. In this purpose, neurons and nerve fibers of intestinal plexuses containing neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and neuropeptide Y (NPY, in pathologically changed part of the large intestine were microscpically observed and compared. Samples were taken from patients operated due to cancer of the sigmoid colon and rectum. The number of neurons and density of nerve fibres containing neuropeptides found in sections with cancer tissues were compared to those observed in sections from the uninvolved intestinal wall. Changes relating to reductions in the number of NPY-ergic neurons and density of nerve fibres in submucous and myenteric plexuses in the sections with cancer tissues (pathological sections were statistically significant. A statistically similar presence of VIP-ergic and PACAP-ergic neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses was observed in both the pathological and control sections. On the other hand, in the pathological sections, VIP-ergic nerve fibres in the myenteric plexuses and PACAP-ergic nerve fibres in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses were found to be less dense. Analysis revealed changes in pathologically affected part of the large intestine may caused disruption of proper intestinal function. Observed changes in the neural elements which are responsible for relaxation of the intestine may suggest dysfunction in the innervation of this part of the colon.

  3. First record of an epibiont protozoan Epistylis sp. (Ciliophora, Peritrichia attached to Ergasilus chelangulatus (Ergasilidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RK. Azevedo

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we described the first record of an epibiont protozoan Epistylis sp. Ehrenberg, 1830 (Ciliophora, Peritrichia attached to Ergasilus chelangulatus Thatcher and Brasil-Sato, 2008, parasite of Pimelodus maculatus Lacépède, 1803 in Brazil, with electron microscope observations. Fish were collected in Veados River, state of São Paulo and the crustacean Ergasilus chelangulatus being registered for the first time in this river, expanding its geographical distribution in Brazil.

  4. Dos casos de Enteritis con bacteriemia por Campylobacter jejuni Two cases of enteritis with bacteremia due to Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Borda

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter es un importante agente causante de enfermedad en el ser humano en nuestro medio. Los casos de bacteriemia ocurren principalmente en pacientes inmunosuprimidos y son debidos frecuentemente a C. fetus. Sin embargo la bacteriemia es un episodio que también se ha observado en pacientes con enteritis por C. jejuni. Referimos dos pacientes con enteritis grave y bacteriemia, ambos con enfermedades concomitantes compatibles con inmunodepresión: uno con síndrome nefrótico de larga data y otro con hepatopatía crónica con cirrosis. Destacamos que los dos casos presentaron hematemesis y uno de ellos, enterorragia. Sugerimos prestar atención a la coloración de Gram durante el subcultivo de los caldos con hemocultivos, en busca de formas características de esta especie, y en ese caso emplear medios de cultivo en microaerofilia a 37 y 42 °C.Campylobacter is an important agent of illness in human beings. Bacteremia occurs principally in the immunocompromissed host and is frequently due to C. fetus. Nevertheless bacteremia also has been observed in patients with enteritis due to C. jejuni. We refer two cases of patients with severe enteritis and bacteremia, both of them with immunosupressive concomitant diseases such as nephrotic syndrome and chronic cirrotic hepatopathy. Both patients presented hemathemesis.

  5. [Protozoans in superficial waters and faecal samples of individuals of rural populations of the Montes municipality, Sucre state, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Leonor; Martínez, Indira; Figuera, Lourdes; Segura, Merlyn; Del Valle, Guilarte

    2010-12-01

    In Sucre state, the Manzanares river is threatened by domestic, agricultural and industrial activities, becoming an environmental risk factor for its inhabitants. In this sense, the presence of protozoans in superficial waters of tributaries of the Manzanares river (Orinoco river, Quebrada Seca, San Juan river), Montes municipality, Sucre state, as well as the analysis of faecal samples from inhabitants of towns bordering these tributaries were evaluated. We collected faecal and water samples from may 2006 through april 2007. The superficial water samples were processed after centrifugation by the direct examination and floculation, using lugol, modified Kinyoun and trichromic colorations. Fecal samples where analyzed by direct examination with physiological saline solution and the modified Ritchie concentration method and using the other colorations techniques above mentioned. The most frequently observed protozoans in superficial waters in the three tributaries were: Amoebas, Blastocystis sp, Endolimax sp., Chilomastix sp. and Giardia sp. Whereas in faecal samples, Blastocystis hominis, Endolimax nana and Entaomeba coli had the greatest frequencies in the three communities. The inhabitants of Orinoco La Peña turned out to be most susceptible to these parasitic infections (77.60%), followed by San Juan River (46.63%) and Quebrada Seca (39.49%). The presence of pathogenic and nonpathogenic protozoans in superficial waters demonstrates the faecal contamination of the tributaries, representing a constant focus of infection for their inhabitants, inferred by the observation of the same species in both types of samples.

  6. Untranslated regions of mRNA and their role in regulation of gene expression in protozoan parasites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHILPA J RAO; SANGEETA CHATTERJEE; JAYANTA K PAL

    2017-03-01

    Protozoan parasites are one of the oldest living entities in this world that throughout their existence have shown excellentresilience to the odds of survival and have adapted beautifully to ever changing rigors of the environment. In view of thedynamic environment encountered by them throughout their life cycle, and in establishing pathogenesis, it is unsurprisingthat modulation of gene expression plays a fundamental role in their survival. In higher eukaryotes, untranslated regions(UTRs) of transcripts are one of the crucial regulators of gene expression (influencing mRNA stability and translationefficiency). Parasitic protozoan genome studies have led to the characterization (in silico, in vitro and in vivo) of a largenumber of their genes. Comparison of higher eukaryotic UTRs with parasitic protozoan UTRs reveals the existence ofseveral similar and dissimilar facets of the UTRs. This review focuses on the elements of UTRs of medically importantprotozoan parasites and their regulatory role in gene expression. Such information may be useful to researchers in designinggene targeting strategies linked with perturbation of host-parasite relationships leading to control of specific parasites.

  7. Enteric neuropathies: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgio, Roberto; Bianco, Francesca; Latorre, Rocco; Caio, Giacomo; Clavenzani, Paolo; Bonora, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Enteric neuropathy is a term indicating an impairment of the innervation supplying the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical phenotypes of the enteric neuropathies are the 'tip of the iceberg' of severe functional digestive diseases, such as intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndromes (e.g., chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction). Despite progress acquired over the years, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to enteric neuropathies are still far from being elucidated and the therapeutic approaches to these patients are mainly supportive, rather than curative.The purpose of this chapter is to review the advancements that have been done in the knowledge of enteric neuropathies identified in adult patients ('tomorrow'), going through where we currently are ('today') following a brief history of the major milestones on the pioneering discoveries in the field ('yesterday').

  8. Experimental Yersinia pseudotuberculosis enteritis in laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... Visceral organs of infected rabbits showed enteritis with necrotic lesions but no pathological changes were .... effects of the host's immune system and thus survive and .... The estimation of bacterial power of the blood J. Hyg.

  9. Nutricion enteral en el paciente critico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jairo Botello Jaimes, Jhon; Gonzalez Rincon, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    ... entre otros. Se debe garantizar un soporte nutricional a todos los pacientes criticos idealmente por via enteral por ia disminucion de la traslocacion bacteriana y la estimulacion de la funcion de las vellosidades intestinales...

  10. Duck Virus Enteritis - A Contingency Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Duck plague, also known as duck virus enteritis (DVE) is a highly contagious, extremely deadly epizootic virus with a potential for devastating continental waterfowl...

  11. Trends and factors in human immunodeficiency virus and/or hepatitis C virus testing and infection among injection drug users newly entering methadone maintenance treatment in Guangdong Province, China 2006-2013: a consecutive cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Liu, Yu; Zou, Xia; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2017-07-13

    To assess trends and related factors in HIV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody testing and infection among injection drug users (IDUs) newly entering methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Guangdong Province, China. Consecutive cross sectional surveys were conducted in 14 MMT clinics from July 2006 to December 2013 in Guangdong Province, China. IDUs were excluded if they were re-enrolled or referred from other MMT clinics. Trend tests were used to examine HIV and/or HCV testing and infection, sociodemographic characteristics, drug use related behaviours and the past 3 month sexual behaviours on enrolment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify correlates of HIV and/or HCV testing and infection. 7539 IDUs with an average age of 35.6±6.2 years were newly enrolled with a history of injection for an average of 11.8±4.9 years. The average frequency of injection before enrolment had been increasing. HIV, HCV and HIV/HCV dual testing increased from 2006 to 2013 (ptrend0.05) until reaching a peak in 2011, excluding the first year. Associating with fellow drug users 1-4 times during the past month, injecting for 15+ years and having multiple sexual partners during the past 3 months predicted higher percentages for HIV and/or HCV testing (ptests (pdrug use and sharing needles or sharing more frequently were major risk factors for HIV, HCV and HIV/HCV co-infection (p<0.05). The prevalence of HIV and HCV were high and quite stable among new IDU entrants in MMT. Publicising MMT, routine screening, and behavioural and structural interventions is needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. [Indications and practice of enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallay, Judit; Nagy, Dániel; Fülesdi, Béla

    2014-12-21

    Malnutrition in hospitalised patients has a significant and disadvantageous impact on treatment outcome. If possible, enteral nutrition with an energy/protein-balanced nutrient should be preferred depending on the patient's condition, type of illness and risk factors. The aim of the nutrition therapy is to increase the efficacy of treatment and shorten the length of hospital stay in order to ensure rapid rehabilitation. In the present review the authors summarize the most important clinical and practical aspects of enteral nutrition therapy.

  13. Bacteriophages as indicators of faecal pollution and enteric ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are an attractive alternative to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), particularly as surrogates of enteric virus fate and transport due to their closer morphological and biological properties compared to FIB. Based on a meta-analysis of published data, we summarize concentrations of coliphages (F+ and somatic), Bacteroides spp. and enterococci bacteriophages (phages) in human waste, non-human waste, fresh and marine waters as well as removal through wastewater treatment processes. We also provide comparisons with FIB and enteric viruses whenever possible. Lastly, we examine fate and transport characteristics in the environment and provide an overview of the methods available for detection and enumeration of bacteriophages. In summary, concentrations of FIB bacteriophages in various sources were consistently lower than FIB, but more reflective of infectious enteric virus levels. Our investigation supports use of bacteriophages as viral surrogates especially for wastewater treatment processes, while additional research is needed to clarify their utility as indicators of viral fate and transport in the ambient water. Describes concentrations and removal through environmental and engineered systems of bacteriophages, fecal indicator bacteria and viral pathogens.

  14. Enteric neuropathology of congenital intestinal obstruction: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Di Nardo; Rosanna Cogliandro; Cesare Cremon; Alessandra Gori; Roberto Corinaldesi; Kenton M Sanders; Roberto De Giorgio; Vincenzo Stanghellini; Salvatore Cucchiara; Giovanni Barbara; Gianandrea Pasquinelli; Donatella Santini; Cristina Felicani; Gianluca Grazi; Antonio D Pinna

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that chronic mechanical sub-occlusion of the intestine may damage the enteric nervous system (ENS), although data in humans are lacking. We here describe the first case of enteric degenerative neuropathy related to a congenital obstruction of the gut. A 3-year and 9-mo old girl began to complain of vomiting, abdominal distension, constipation with air-fluid levels at plane abdominal radiology.Her subsequent medical history was characterized by 3 operations: the first showed dilated duodeno-jejunal loops in the absence of occlusive lesions; the second (2 years later) was performed to obtain full-thickness biopsies of the dilated intestinal loops and revealed hyperganglionosis at histopathology; the third (9 years after the hyperganglionosis was identified) disclosed a Ladd's band which was removed and the associated gut malrotation was corrected. Repeated intraoperative full-thickness biopsies showed enteric degenerative neuropathy along with reduced interstitial cells of Cajal network in dilated loops above the obstruction and a normal neuromuscular layer below the Ladd's band. One year after the latest surgery the patient tolerated oral feeding and did well, suggesting that congenital (partial) mechanical obstruction of the small bowel in humans can evoke progressive adaptive changes of the ENS which are similar to those found in animal models of intestinal mechanical occlusion. Such ENS changes mimic neuronal abnormalities observed in intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  15. Scheme for Entering Binary Data Into a Quantum Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin

    2005-01-01

    A quantum algorithm provides for the encoding of an exponentially large number of classical data bits by use of a smaller (polynomially large) number of quantum bits (qubits). The development of this algorithm was prompted by the need, heretofore not satisfied, for a means of entering real-world binary data into a quantum computer. The data format provided by this algorithm is suitable for subsequent ultrafast quantum processing of the entered data. Potential applications lie in disciplines (e.g., genomics) in which one needs to search for matches between parts of very long sequences of data. For example, the algorithm could be used to encode the N-bit-long human genome in only log2N qubits. The resulting log2N-qubit state could then be used for subsequent quantum data processing - for example, to perform rapid comparisons of sequences.

  16. Significantly Diverged Did2/Vps46 Orthologues from the Protozoan Parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Somnath; Saha, Nabanita; Ray, Atrayee; Sarkar, Srimonti

    2015-09-01

    The endosomal compartment performs extensive sorting functions in most eukaryotes, some of which are accomplished with the help of the multivesicular body (MVB) sorting pathway. This pathway depends on the sequential action of complexes, termed the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). After successful sorting, the crucial step of recycling of the ESCRT complex components requires the activation of the AAA ATPase Vps4, and Did2/Vps46 plays an important role in this activation event. The endolysosomal system of the protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia appears to lack complexity, for instead of having distinct early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes, there are only peripheral vesicles (PVs) that are located close to the cell periphery. Additionally, comparative genomics studies predict the presence of only a subset of the ESCRT components in G. lamblia. Thus, it is possible that the MVB pathway is not functional in G. lamblia. To address this issue, the present study focused on the two putative orthologues of Did2/Vps46 of G. lamblia as their function is likely to be pivotal for a functional MVB sorting pathway. In spite of considerable sequence divergence, compared to other eukaryotic orthologues, the proteins encoded by both these genes have the ability to function as Did2/Vps46 in the context of the yeast ESCRT pathway. Furthermore, they also localized to the cellular periphery, where PVs are also located. Thus, this report is the first to provide experimental evidence indicating the presence of a functional ESCRT component in G. lamblia by characterizing the putative Did2/Vps46 orthologues.

  17. Occurrence and host specificity of a neogregarine protozoan in four milkweed butterfly hosts (Danaus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Paola A; Sternberg, Eleanore D; Lefèvre, Thierry; de Roode, Jacobus C; Altizer, Sonia

    2016-10-01

    Throughout their global range, wild monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) are infected with the protozoan Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE). In monarchs, OE infection reduces pupal eclosion, adult lifespan, adult body size and flight ability. Infection of other butterfly hosts with OE is rare or unknown, and the only previously published records of OE infection were on monarch and queen butterflies (D. gilippus). Here we explored the occurrence and specificity of OE and OE-like parasites in four Danaus butterfly species. We surveyed wild D. eresimus (soldier), D. gilippus (queen), D. petilia (lesser wanderer), and D. plexippus (monarch) from five countries to determine the presence of infection. We conducted five cross-infection experiments, on monarchs and queen butterflies and their OE and OE-like parasites, to determine infection probability and the impact of infection on their hosts. Our field survey showed that OE-like parasites were present in D. gilippus, D. petilia, and D. plexippus, but were absent in D. eresimus. Infection probability varied geographically such that D. gilippus and D. plexippus populations in Puerto Rico and Trinidad were not infected or had low prevalence of infection, whereas D. plexippus from S. Florida and Australia had high prevalence. Cross-infection experiments showed evidence for host specificity, in that OE strains from monarchs were more effective at infecting monarchs than queens, and monarchs were less likely to be infected by OE-like strains from queens and lesser wanderers relative to their own natal strains. Our study showed that queens are less susceptible to OE and OE-like infection than monarchs, and that the reduction in adult lifespan following infection is more severe in monarchs than in queens.

  18. Protozoan Parasites of Rodents and Their Zoonotic Significance in Boyer-Ahmad District, Southwestern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifollahi, Zeinab; Sarkari, Bahador; Motazedian, Mohammad Hossein; Asgari, Qasem; Ranjbar, Mohammad Javad; Abdolahi Khabisi, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. Wild rodents are reservoirs of various zoonotic diseases, such as toxoplasmosis, babesiosis, and leishmaniasis. The current study aimed to assess the protozoan infection of rodents in Boyer-Ahmad district, southwestern Iran. Materials and Methods. A total of 52 rodents were collected from different parts of Boyer-Ahmad district, in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, using Sherman live traps. Each rodent was anesthetized with ether, according to the ethics of working with animals, and was dissected. Samples were taken from various tissues and stool samples were collected from the contents of the colon and small intestines. Moreover, 2 to 5 mL of blood was taken from each of the rodents and the sera were examined for anti-Leishmania antibodies, by ELISA, or anti-T. gondii antibodies, by modified agglutination test (MAT). DNA was extracted from brain tissue samples of each rodent and PCR was used to identify the DNA of T. gondii. Results. Of the 52 stool samples of rodents studied by parasitological methods, intestinal protozoa infection was seen in 28 cases (53.8%). From 52 rodents, 19 (36.5%) were infected with Trichomonas, 10 (19.2%) with Giardia muris, and 11 (21.2%) with Entamoeba spp. Also, 10 cases (19.2%) were infected with Blastocystis, 3 (5.8%) were infected with Chilomastix, 7 (13.5%) were infected with Endolimax, 1 (1.9%) was infected with Retortamonas, 3 (5.77%) were infected with T. gondii, and 6 (11.54%) were infected with Trypanosoma lewisi. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in the sera of 5 (9.61%) cases. Results of the molecular study showed T. gondii infection in 3 (5.77%) of the rodents. Findings of this study showed that rodents in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, southwestern Iran, are infected with several blood and intestinal parasites; some of them might be potential risks to residents and domestic animals in the region.

  19. DNA extraction from protozoan oocysts/cysts in feces for diagnostic PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawash, Yousry

    2014-06-01

    PCR detection of intestinal protozoa is often restrained by a poor DNA recovery or by inhibitors present in feces. The need for an extraction protocol that can overcome these obstacles is therefore clear. QIAamp® DNA Stool Mini Kit (Qiagen) was evaluated for its ability to recover DNA from oocysts/cysts directly from feces. Twenty-five Giardia-positive, 15 Cryptosporidium-positive, 15 Entamoeba histolytica-positive, and 45 protozoa-free samples were processed as control by microscopy and immunoassay tests. DNA extracts were amplified using 3 sets of published primers. Following the manufacturer's protocol, the kit showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% towards Giardia and Entamoeba. However, for Cryptosporidium, the sensitivity and specificity were 60% (9/15) and 100%, respectively. A series of optimization experiments involving various steps of the kit's protocol were conducted using Cryptosporidium-positive samples. The best DNA recoveries were gained by raising the lysis temperature to the boiling point for 10 min and the incubation time of the InhibitEX tablet to 5 min. Also, using a pre-cooled ethanol for nucleic acid precipitation and small elution volume (50-100 µl) were valuable. The sensitivity of the amended protocol to Cryptosporidium was raised to 100%. Cryptosporidium DNA was successfully amplified by either the first or the second primer set. When applied on parasite-free feces spiked with variable oocysts/cysts counts, ≈ 2 oocysts/cysts were theoretically enough for detection by PCR. To conclude, the Qiagen kit with the amended protocol was proved to be suitable for protozoan DNA extraction directly from feces and support PCR diagnosis.

  20. 9 CFR 113.204 - Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.204 Mink Enteritis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Mink Enteritis Vaccine... have developed mink enteritis following inoculation with virulent mink enteritis virus. Each...

  1. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Cytomegalovirus enteritis in immunocompetent subjects: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karigane, Daiki; Takaya, Saho; Seki, Yuki; Mastumoto, Yuka; Onose, Akira; Kosakai, Arifumi; Sugaya, Norio; Mori, Takehiko

    2014-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis (or colitis) is generally diagnosed in immunocompromised patients in association with human immunodeficiency virus infection as well as in recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant. CMV enteritis has been reported only sporadically in immunocompetent individuals. We encountered a 76-year-old woman who developed CMV enteritis without any previously identified immunocompromised states. An extensive literature review of 33 cases of CMV enteritis or colitis diagnosed in immunocompetent individuals, including the present case, revealed that the median age of the patients was 68, the accompanying symptoms were diarrhea (76%), abdominal pain (52%), and hematochezia or melena (27%), and that the outcome was generally favorable, including resolution without any treatment in 24% of the patients. CMV enteritis should be recognized more widely as a disease entity not only in immunocompromised patients but also in immunocompetent individuals, especially in elderly populations.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)≤18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI≤18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good

  4. Hydrogen peroxide enteritis: the "snow white" sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, J J; Waye, J D

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a useful disinfectant that has achieved widespread utility in varied clinical settings. We report an epidemic of hydrogen peroxide enteritis that developed in seven patients in our gastrointestinal endoscopy unit during a 2-week period in early 1988. During endoscopy, using recently sterilized endoscopes that were flushed with 3% hydrogen peroxide after the glutaraldehyde cycle, instantaneous blanching (the "snow white" sign) and effervescence were noted on the mucosal surfaces when the water button was depressed. No patient subsequently suffered morbidity or mortality associated with this peroxide enteritis, and the biopsy specimens revealed nonspecific inflammation. The toxicity of hydrogen peroxide when used in enema form is reviewed, as well as the pathogenesis of peroxide enteritis.

  5. Enteric coating of granules containing the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyar Hassan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a capsule formulation composed of enteric coated granules of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4962 was developed using Eudragit L30D-55 as enteric polymer. Optimization of the capsule formulation was achieved with a maximum viable cell count after 2 h of incubation in acid medium and disintegration time of 1 h in buffer pH 6.8. The amount of Eudragit L30D-55 in the capsules correlated with gastric juice resistance. The best protective qualities against artificial gastric juice were observed when capsules were prepared from granules composed of L. acidophilus, corn starch, lactose monohydrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone and coated with 12.5 % (m/V of Eudragit L30D-55. Capsule formulation of L. acidophilus in edible broth medium suspension serves as a cheap alternative to the expensive freeze-drying procedure for preparing L. acidophilus. In addition, the enteric coating using Eudragit L30D-55 could protect probiotics from the acidic gastric environment and enhance the bioactivity of probiotics along with replacement of pathogenic microbes in human intestine

  6. Ecosystem response to antibiotics entering the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Simon D; Murby, John; Bates, John

    2005-01-01

    Awareness of antibiotics in wastewaters and aquatic ecosystems is growing as investigations into alternate pollutants increase and analytical techniques for detecting these chemicals improve. The presence of three antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and cephalexin) was evaluated in both sewage effluent and environmental waters downstream from a sewage discharge. Bacteria cultured from the sewage bioreactor and receiving waters were tested for resistance against six antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, ampicillin, trimethoprim, erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole) and effects of short term exposure (24 h) to antibiotics on bacterial denitrification rates were examined. Antibiotics were detected entering the sewage treatment plant with varying levels of removal during the treatment process. Antibiotics were also detected in effluent entering receiving waters and detectable 500 m from the source. Among the bacteria cultured from the sewage bioreactor, resistance was displayed against all six antibiotics tested and bacteria cultured from receiving waters were resistant against two of the antibiotics tested. Rates of denitrification were observed to decrease in response to some antibiotics and not to others, though this was only observed at concentrations exceeding those likely to be found in the environment. Findings from this preliminary research have indicated that antibiotics are entering our aquatic systems and pose a potential threat to ecosystem function and potentially human health.

  7. Gastritis, Enteritis, and Colitis in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzal, Francisco A; Diab, Santiago S

    2015-08-01

    The gastrointestinal system of horses is affected by a large variety of inflammatory infectious and noninfectious conditions. The most prevalent form of gastritis is associated with ulceration of the pars esophagea. Although the diagnostic techniques for alimentary diseases of horses have improved significantly over the past few years, difficulties still exist in establishing the causes of a significant number of enteric diseases in this species. This problem is compounded by several agents of enteric disease also being found in the intestine of clinically normal horses, which questions the validity of the mere detection of these agents in the intestine.

  8. Enteric alpha defensins in norm and pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisitsyn Nikolai A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbes living in the mammalian gut exist in constant contact with immunity system that prevents infection and maintains homeostasis. Enteric alpha defensins play an important role in regulation of bacterial colonization of the gut, as well as in activation of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses of the adaptive immune system cells in lamina propria. This review summarizes currently available data on functions of mammalian enteric alpha defensins in the immune defense and changes in their secretion in intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer.

  9. Enteric and indicator virus removal by surface flow wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmadi, Andri T; Kitajima, Masaaki; Pepper, Ian L; Gerba, Charles P

    2016-01-15

    We investigated the occurrence and attenuation of several human enteric viruses (i.e., norovirus, adenovirus, Aichi virus 1, polyomaviruses, and enterovirus) as well as a plant virus, pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), at two surface flow wetlands in Arizona. The retention time in one of the wetlands was seven days, whereas in the other wetland it could not be defined. Water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet from the wetlands over nine months, and concentration of viral genomes was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Of the human enteric viruses tested, adenovirus and Aichi virus 1 were found in the greatest prevalence in treated wastewater (i.e., inlet of the wetlands). Reduction efficiencies of enteric viruses by the wetlands ranged from 1 to 3 log10. Polyomaviruses were generally removed to below detection limit, indicating at least 2 to 4 log10 removal. PMMoV was detected in a greater concentration in the inlet of both wetlands for all the viruses tested (10(4) to 10(7) genome copies/L), but exhibited little or no removal (1 log10 or less). To determine the factors associated with virus genome attenuation (as determined by qPCR), the persistence of PMMoV and poliovirus type 1 (an enterovirus) was studied in autoclaved and natural wetland water, and deionized water incubated under three different temperatures for 21 days. A combination of elevated water temperature and biological activities reduced poliovirus by 1 to 4 log10, while PMMoV was not significantly reduced during this time period. Overall, PMMoV showed much greater persistence than human viruses in the wetland treatment.

  10. Progestin and AdipoQ Receptor 7, Progesterone Membrane Receptor Component 1 (PGRMC1), and PGRMC2 and Their Role in Regulating Progesterone's Ability to Suppress Human Granulosa/Luteal Cells from Entering into the Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueldo, Carolina; Liu, Xiufang; Peluso, John J

    2015-09-01

    The present studies were designed to determine the role of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), PGRMC2, progestin and adipoQ receptor 7 (PAQR7), and progesterone receptor (PGR) in mediating the antimitotic action of progesterone (P4) in human granulosa/luteal cells. For these studies granulosa/luteal cells of 10 women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation were isolated, maintained in culture, and depleted of PGRMC1, PGRMC2, PAQR7, or PGR by siRNA treatment. The rate of entry into the cell cycle was assessed using the FUCCI cell cycle sensor to determine the percentage of cells in the G1/S stage of the cell cycle. PGRMC1, PGRMC2, PAQR7, and PGR mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR and their interactions monitored by in situ proximity ligation assays (PLAs). These studies revealed that PGRMC1, PGRMC2, PAQR7, and PGR were expressed by granulosa/luteal cells from all patients, with PGRMC1 mRNA being most abundant, followed by PAQR7, PGRMC2, and PGR. However, their mRNA levels showed considerable patient variation. P4's ability to suppress entry into the cell cycle was dependent on PGRMC1, PGRMC2, and PAQR7 but not PGR. Moreover, PLAs indicated that PGRMC1, PGRMC2, and PAQR7 formed a complex within the cytoplasm. Based on these studies, it is proposed that these three P4 mediators form a complex within the cytoplasm that is required for P4's action. Moreover, P4's ability to regulate human follicle development may be dependent in part on the expression levels of each of these P4 mediators.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of the model protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila, using Deep RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xiong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila is a well-studied single-celled eukaryote model organism for cellular and molecular biology. However, the lack of extensive T. thermophila cDNA libraries or a large expressed sequence tag (EST database limited the quality of the original genome annotation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This RNA-seq study describes the first deep sequencing analysis of the T. thermophila transcriptome during the three major stages of the life cycle: growth, starvation and conjugation. Uniquely mapped reads covered more than 96% of the 24,725 predicted gene models in the somatic genome. More than 1,000 new transcribed regions were identified. The great dynamic range of RNA-seq allowed detection of a nearly six order-of-magnitude range of measurable gene expression orchestrated by this cell. RNA-seq also allowed the first prediction of transcript untranslated regions (UTRs and an updated (larger size estimate of the T. thermophila transcriptome: 57 Mb, or about 55% of the somatic genome. Our study identified nearly 1,500 alternative splicing (AS events distributed over 5.2% of T. thermophila genes. This percentage represents a two order-of-magnitude increase over previous EST-based estimates in Tetrahymena. Evidence of stage-specific regulation of alternative splicing was also obtained. Finally, our study allowed us to completely confirm about 26.8% of the genes originally predicted by the gene finder, to correct coding sequence boundaries and intron-exon junctions for about a third, and to reassign microarray probes and correct earlier microarray data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: RNA-seq data significantly improve the genome annotation and provide a fully comprehensive view of the global transcriptome of T. thermophila. To our knowledge, 5.2% of T. thermophila genes with AS is the highest percentage of genes showing AS reported in a unicellular eukaryote. Tetrahymena thus becomes an excellent unicellular

  12. Protozoan Parasites of Rodents and Their Zoonotic Significance in Boyer-Ahmad District, Southwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Seifollahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds. Wild rodents are reservoirs of various zoonotic diseases, such as toxoplasmosis, babesiosis, and leishmaniasis. The current study aimed to assess the protozoan infection of rodents in Boyer-Ahmad district, southwestern Iran. Materials and Methods. A total of 52 rodents were collected from different parts of Boyer-Ahmad district, in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, using Sherman live traps. Each rodent was anesthetized with ether, according to the ethics of working with animals, and was dissected. Samples were taken from various tissues and stool samples were collected from the contents of the colon and small intestines. Moreover, 2 to 5 mL of blood was taken from each of the rodents and the sera were examined for anti-Leishmania antibodies, by ELISA, or anti-T. gondii antibodies, by modified agglutination test (MAT. DNA was extracted from brain tissue samples of each rodent and PCR was used to identify the DNA of T. gondii. Results. Of the 52 stool samples of rodents studied by parasitological methods, intestinal protozoa infection was seen in 28 cases (53.8%. From 52 rodents, 19 (36.5% were infected with Trichomonas, 10 (19.2% with Giardia muris, and 11 (21.2% with Entamoeba spp. Also, 10 cases (19.2% were infected with Blastocystis, 3 (5.8% were infected with Chilomastix, 7 (13.5% were infected with Endolimax, 1 (1.9% was infected with Retortamonas, 3 (5.77% were infected with T. gondii, and 6 (11.54% were infected with Trypanosoma lewisi. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in the sera of 5 (9.61% cases. Results of the molecular study showed T. gondii infection in 3 (5.77% of the rodents. Findings of this study showed that rodents in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, southwestern Iran, are infected with several blood and intestinal parasites; some of them might be potential risks to residents and domestic animals in the region.

  13. The role of carbohydrates in infection strategies of enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Ishiwa, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Enteric pathogens cause considerable public health concerns worldwide including tropical regions. Here, we review the roles of carbohydrates in the infection strategies of various enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and protozoa, which infect the epithelial lining of the human and animal intestine. At host cell entry, enteric viruses, including norovirus, recognize mainly histo-blood group antigens. At the initial step of bacterial infections, carbohydrates also function as receptors for attachment. Here, we describe the function of carbohydrates in infection by Salmonella enterica and several bacterial species that produce a variety of fimbrial adhesions. During invasion by enteropathogenic protozoa, apicomplexan parasites utilize sialic acids or sulfated glycans. Carbohydrates serve as receptors for infection by these microbes; however, their usage of carbohydrates varies depending on the microbe. On the surface of the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, various carbohydrate moieties are present and play a crucial role in infection, representing the site of infection or route of access for most microbes. During the infection and/or invasion process of the microbes, carbohydrates function as receptors for various microbes, but they can also function as a barrier to infection. One approach to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial agents is to modify the drug structure. Another approach is to modify the mode of inhibition of infection depending on the individual pathogen by using and mimicking the interactions with carbohydrates. In addition, similarities in mode of infection may also be utilized. Our findings will be useful in the development of new drugs for the treatment of enteric pathogens.

  14. 2013 European Guideline on the management of proctitis, proctocolitis and enteritis caused by sexually transmissible pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Henry J C; Zingoni, Adele; White, John A; Ross, Jonathan D C; Kreuter, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Proctitis is defined as an inflammatory syndrome of the distal 10-12 cm of the anal canal, also called the rectum. Infectious proctitis can be sexually transmitted via genital-anal mucosal contact, but some also via mutual masturbation.N. gonorrhoeae,C. trachomatis(including lymphogranuloma venereum), Herpes Simplex Virus andT. pallidumare the most common sexually transmitted anorectal pathogens. Shigellosis can be transferred via oral-anal contact and may lead to proctocolitis or enteritis. Although most studies on these infections have concentrated on men who have sex with men (MSM), a significant proportion of women have anal intercourse and therefore may also be at risk. A presumptive clinical diagnosis of proctitis can be made when there are symptoms and signs, and a definitive diagnosis when the results of laboratory tests are available. The symptoms of proctitis include anorectal itching, pain, cramps (tenesmus) and discharge in and around the anal canal. Asymptomatic proctitis occurs frequently and can only be detected by laboratory tests. The majority of rectal chlamydia and gonococcal infections are asymptomatic. Therefore when there is a history of receptive anal contact, exclusion of anorectal infections is generally indicated as part of standard screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Condom use does not guarantee protection from bacterial and protozoan STIs, which are often spread without penile penetration.

  15. The evaluation of enteric viruses in asymptomatic free-ranging non-human primates (Alouatta guariba clamitans, Alouatta caraya, Callithrix spp., Callithrix penicillata, and Leontopithecus caissara) in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Fabiana; Alfieri, Amauri A; Alfieri, Alice F; Lorenzetti, Elis; Headley, Selwyn A; Passos, Fernando; Silvestre, Thiago; Zago, Luciana; Mottin, Viviane; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano; Lange, Rogério; Svoboda, Walfrido; Gomes, Eliane

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the presence of rotavirus groups A, B, and C (RV-A, RV-B, and RV-C), sapovirus (SaV), and norovirus (NoV) in asymptomatic non-human primates (NHP). Fecal samples were collected from 19 recently captured (Red-howler, Alouatta guariba clamitans, n = 18; Howler, Alouatta caraya, n = 1) and 43 free-ranging NHP (Marmosets, Callithrix spp., Callithrix penicillata, n = 30; Black-faced lion tamarin, Leontopithecus caissara, n = 12, Red-howler, Alouatta guariba clamitans, n = 1) that were maintained in southern Brazil without manifestation of diarrhea. Screening was performed by a combination of silver-stained polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (ss-PAGE) and RT-PCR analyses. All samples were negative for RV-A, RV-B, RV-C, SaV, and NoV by both assays. The negative results obtained might be due to the absence of clinical manifestations of disease in the population of NHP evaluated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Fetal cyst reveling retroperitoneal enteric duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imene Dahmane Ayadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneum is a very uncommon site of enteric duplication (ED. We report a new case of retroperitoneal ED cyst suspected in utero. Prenatal ultrasound showed an abdominal cystic mass. Noncommunicating retroperitoneal ED cyst measuring 70 mm × 30 mm was resected. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis.

  17. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  18. Campylobacter jejuni enteritis and reactive arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Short, C. D.; Klouda, P T; Smith, Lorna

    1982-01-01

    A further case of reactive arthritis following Campylobacter jejuni enteritis is reported. The interim results of a small prospective study are discussed. It may be desirable to do serological studies for campylobacter infection in the investigation of mono- or polyarthritis of acute onset.

  19. Aspects of enteral nutrition in cancer chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jitske Martha

    1985-01-01

    This thesis deals with several aspects of the influences of intensive cancer chemotherapy on the nutritional status, the metabolism, and the gastrointestinal tract of the host and describes whether these results can be influenced by enteral hyperalimentation, We studied these aspects in patients

  20. Aspects of enteral nutrition in cancer chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jitske Martha

    1985-01-01

    This thesis deals with several aspects of the influences of intensive cancer chemotherapy on the nutritional status, the metabolism, and the gastrointestinal tract of the host and describes whether these results can be influenced by enteral hyperalimentation, We studied these aspects in patients wit

  1. Kokainudløst iskaemisk enteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Lise; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    and a pill cam capsule endoscopy were normal. In all cases the condition normalized spontaneously. A thorough interview revealed a recreational use of cocaine, and diary recordings confirmed the association between her abdominal pain and cocaine use. Ischaemic enteritis has previously been described...... in cocaine users. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Sep...

  2. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  3. Manipulation of enteric flora in ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Reviewing the available therapeutic options in the medical treatment of ulcerative colitis, Xu et al.[1], have omitted to mention an important aspect in the pharmacological management of the disease, namely the possibility to promote clinical and endoscopic improvement by manipulating the enteric flora.

  4. Enteric bacterial growth rates in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C W

    1972-08-01

    Enteric bacteria, including stocked strains of pathogenic species and organisms naturally present in the stream, were capable of growth in a chemostat with autoclaved river water taken 750 m below a sewage outfall. Maximal specific growth rates for all organisms occurred at 30 C, whereas culture generation times ranged between 33.3 and 116 hr. Of the six laboratory strains of enteric species used, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes grew at generation times of 34.5 and 33.3 hr, respectively, while the remaining Proteus, Arizona, Salmonella, and Shigella spp. reproduced at a rate two to three times slower than the coliforms. Little or no growth occurred in the water at incubation temperatures of 20 and 5 C, and death was observed for Salmonella senftenberg at 20 and 5 C and for E. aerogenes and Proteus rettgeri at 5 C. When enteric bacteria naturally present in the river water were employed in similar experiments, coliform bacteria demonstrated a generation time of approximately 116 hr, whereas fecal coliforms failed to grow. Growth of the bacteria from the river demonstrated a periodicity of approximately 100 hr, which suggests that much of the growth of these organisms in the chemostat may be on the glass surfaces. This phenomenon, however, was not observed with any of the stocked enteric species. Neither the stock cultures nor the aquatic strains were capable of growth in autoclaved river water taken above the sewage outfall at the three temperatures tested.

  5. [Enteral alimentation at home: why PEG now?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y; Hanyu, N; Kashiwagi, H; Kubo, T; Aoki, T

    1996-12-01

    The history of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is relatively short. In 1980, a report entitled "Gastrostomy without laparotomy: A percutaneous endoscopic technique" by Ponsky and Gaudere was first published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Thereafter, PEG soon saw widespread use in Western countries because of its clinical efficacy and economy. It has been performed in about 170,000 cases annually in the US. In contrast, its spread in Japan has been extremely slow: only about 10,000 cases have undergone this procedure annually, and this number accounted for less than 5% of patients receiving enteral alimentation. The reason why PEG has not spread may be the medical insurance system in Japan and the local distaste for operation scarring. However, in consideration of the unprecedented ageing of society that is surely coming in the near future, the role of PEG in Japan must be reexamined. In this report, we presented the methodology of enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG, giving special consideration to: (1) "What points are improved by using enteral alimentation at home by means of PEG in various diseases; (2) dysphagia due to cerebral angiopathy; (3) terminal cancer; (4) otolaryngological diseases; and (5) Crohn disease. We also discussed "Why PEG is important now?" in performing enteral alimentation at home.

  6. [Enteral nutrition in the multiple trauma patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J A; Montejo González, J C

    1992-01-01

    The hypermetabolism that develops in patients with severe polytraumatism has led to the need for an aggressive metabolic-nutritional support from the start. Parenteral Nutrition is the preferred technique in many instances, due to the doubts on the effectiveness of enteral nutrition in the control of the metabolic response and to problems of gastrointestinal tolerance derived from its administration. However, the role of enteral nutrition as an important factor which limits the development of bacterial translocation and the chain of events leading to multiorganic failure appears to be more and more well-established and is an important argument for justifying the early administration of enteral nutrition in these patients. In accordance with the accumulated experience of several authors over the past few years, enteral nutrition may be administered early in polytraumatized patients. This is not only accompanied by the evidence of acceptable gastrointestinal tolerance to the diet, but also by additional advantages compared to parenteral nutrition, such as the maintenance of trophism and immunocompetence of the digestive mucosa, the reduction of septic complications and also greater nutritional effectiveness which can be evaluated by the behaviour of the seric proteins used as nutritional evolution markers. The interest of the different diet formulae which exist at present, for example diets enriched with branched-chain amino acids, diets with added fibre, peptidic diets, specific pulmonary diets or "euglycaemic diets" is evaluated in this review. All these diets may mean an increase in the effectiveness and/or tolerance of enteral nutrition in polytraumatized patients, and also contribute to the handling of specific problems such as "stress" hyperglycaemia or the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation support. The use of specific nutrients for the digestive mucosa, such as glutamine or short chain fatty acids seems to be an important factor in the reduction of

  7. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabre Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la

  8. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases. Abstract in French Les diarrhées syndromiques ou syndrome tricho-hepato-enterique (SD/THE) sont un syndrome rare et sévère dont l’incidence est estimée à 1 cas pour 1 million de naissances et la transmission

  9. Strain differences in fitness of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to resist protozoan predation and survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravva, Subbarao V; Sarreal, Chester Z; Mandrell, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157) associated with the 2006 spinach outbreak appears to have persisted as the organism was isolated, three months after the outbreak, from environmental samples in the produce production areas of the central coast of California. Survival in harsh environments may be linked to the inherent fitness characteristics of EcO157. This study evaluated the comparative fitness of outbreak-related clinical and environmental strains to resist protozoan predation and survive in soil from a spinach field in the general vicinity of isolation of strains genetically indistinguishable from the 2006 outbreak strains. Environmental strains from soil and feral pig feces survived longer (11 to 35 days for 90% decreases, D-value) with Vorticella microstoma and Colpoda aspera, isolated previously from dairy wastewater; these D-values correlated (PVorticella (rs = -0.465; P = 0.05) or Colpoda (rs = -0.750; P = 0.0001). In contrast, protozoan growth correlated positively with C+ phenotype (Vorticella, rs = 0.730, P = 0.0004; Colpoda, rs = 0.625, P = 0.006) suggesting a preference for consumption of C+ cells, although they grew on C- strains also. We speculate that the C- phenotype is a selective trait for survival and possibly transport of the pathogen in soil and water environments.

  10. Early evolution of eukaryote feeding modes, cell structural diversity, and classification of the protozoan phyla Loukozoa, Sulcozoa, and Choanozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    I discuss how different feeding modes and related cellular structures map onto the eukaryote evolutionary tree. Centrally important for understanding eukaryotic cell diversity are Loukozoa: ancestrally biciliate phagotrophic protozoa possessing a posterior cilium and ventral feeding groove into which ciliary currents direct prey. I revise their classification by including all anaerobic Metamonada as a subphylum and adding Tsukubamonas. Loukozoa, often with ciliary vanes, are probably ancestral to all protozoan phyla except Euglenozoa and Percolozoa and indirectly to kingdoms Animalia, Fungi, Plantae, and Chromista. I make a new protozoan phylum Sulcozoa comprising subphyla Apusozoa (Apusomonadida, Breviatea) and Varisulca (Diphyllatea; Planomonadida, Discocelida, Mantamonadida; Rigifilida). Understanding sulcozoan evolution clarifies the origins from them of opisthokonts (animals, fungi, Choanozoa) and Amoebozoa, and their evolutionary novelties; Sulcozoa and their descendants (collectively called podiates) arguably arose from Loukozoa by evolving posterior ciliary gliding and pseudopodia in their ventral groove. I explain subsequent independent cytoskeletal modifications, accompanying further shifts in feeding mode, that generated Amoebozoa, Choanozoa, and fungi. I revise classifications of Choanozoa, Conosa (Amoebozoa), and basal fungal phylum Archemycota. I use Choanozoa, Sulcozoa, Loukozoa, and Archemycota to emphasize the need for simply classifying ancestral (paraphyletic) groups and illustrate advantages of this for understanding step-wise phylogenetic advances.

  11. Seasonal incidence of protozoan parasites of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) of Sundarbans, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Jayati; Bandyapadhyay, Probir K

    2011-06-01

    There is a delicate balance between the host, pathogen and environment. Aquatic organisms, including shellfish, respond directly to climatic changes in their biological environment as their metabolic processes are influenced by temperature, salinity, and oxygen levels. Certain environmental conditions are more conducive to diseases than others among which water temperature is significantly associated with disease outbreak. The present study showed that Peneaus monodon of Sundarbans serve as a host for many protozoan parasites and epibionts including ciliates, gregarines and microsporidia. The protozoan parasites also require a particular environmental condition for their maximum growth and survival. The intensity of infection significantly increases with rise in temperature (P < 0.05) following a definite trend but no significant relationship between infection rate of ciliates and pH of water. In case of gregarine parasites significance (P < 0.05) exists among infection rate and temperature as well as pH of the farm water. Microsporidian parasites do not follow any significant seasonal trend in infecting the host P. monodon.

  12. Far beyond Phagocytosis: Phagocyte-Derived Extracellular Traps Act Efficiently against Protozoan Parasites In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana M. R. Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional mononuclear phagocytes such as polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN, monocytes, and macrophages are considered as the first line of defence against invasive pathogens. The formation of extracellular traps (ETs by activated mononuclear phagocytes is meanwhile well accepted as an effector mechanism of the early host innate immune response acting against microbial infections. Recent investigations showed evidence that ETosis is a widely spread effector mechanism in vertebrates and invertebrates being utilized to entrap and kill bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoan parasites. ETs are released in response to intact protozoan parasites or to parasite-specific antigens in a controlled cell death process. Released ETs consist of nuclear DNA as backbone adorned with histones, antimicrobial peptides, and phagocyte-specific granular enzymes thereby producing a sticky extracellular matrix capable of entrapping and killing pathogens. This review summarizes recent data on protozoa-induced ETosis. Special attention will be given to molecular mechanisms of protozoa-induced ETosis and on its consequences for the parasites successful reproduction and life cycle accomplishment.

  13. Far beyond Phagocytosis: Phagocyte-Derived Extracellular Traps Act Efficiently against Protozoan Parasites In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliana M R; Muñoz-Caro, Tamara; Burgos, Rafael A; Hidalgo, Maria A; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Professional mononuclear phagocytes such as polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), monocytes, and macrophages are considered as the first line of defence against invasive pathogens. The formation of extracellular traps (ETs) by activated mononuclear phagocytes is meanwhile well accepted as an effector mechanism of the early host innate immune response acting against microbial infections. Recent investigations showed evidence that ETosis is a widely spread effector mechanism in vertebrates and invertebrates being utilized to entrap and kill bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoan parasites. ETs are released in response to intact protozoan parasites or to parasite-specific antigens in a controlled cell death process. Released ETs consist of nuclear DNA as backbone adorned with histones, antimicrobial peptides, and phagocyte-specific granular enzymes thereby producing a sticky extracellular matrix capable of entrapping and killing pathogens. This review summarizes recent data on protozoa-induced ETosis. Special attention will be given to molecular mechanisms of protozoa-induced ETosis and on its consequences for the parasites successful reproduction and life cycle accomplishment.

  14. Functional analysis of the murine T lymphocyte immune response to a protozoan parasite, Leishmania tropica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Engers

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The results presented in this review summarize a seirs of experiments designed to characterize the murine T cell imune response to the protozoan parasite Leishmania tropica. Enriched T cell populations and T cell clones specific for L. tropica antigens were derived from lymph nodes of primed mice and maintained in continous culture in vitro. These T lymphocytes were shown (A to express the Lyt 1+ 3- cell surface phenotype, (B to proliferate specifically in vitro in response to parasite antigens, together with a source of irradiated syngeneic macrophages, (C to transfer antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses to normal syngeneic mice, (D to induce specific activation of parasitized macrophages in vitro resulting in the destruction of intracellular parasites, (E to provide specific helper activity for antibody responses in vitro in a hapten-carrier system. Protection studies using these defiened T cell populations should allow the characterization of parasite antigen(s implicated in the induction of cellular immune responses beneficial for the host.Os resultados apresentados nesta revisão, sumariam uma série de experimentos planejados no sentido de caracterizar a resposta imune de linfócitos T de camundongos, para o protozoário parasita Leishmania tropica. Populações enriquecidas de linfócitos T e clones de linfócitos T específicos para antígenos de L. tropica foram derivados de gânglios linfáticos de camundongos primados e a seguir mantidos em cultura contínua in vivo. Ficou demonstrado que estes linfócitos T eram capazes de: A Expressar o fenótipo de superfície celular Lyt 1+ 2-, B Proliferar en vitro especificamente em resposta aos antígenos parasitários quando em presença de macrófagos singênicos irradiados, C Transferir uma resposta tipo hipersensibilidade retardada antiígeno especifico à camundongos normais singênicos, D Induzir ativação específica de macrófagos parasitizados in vitro

  15. Enteric methane emissions from German pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Schulz, Joachim; Klausing, Heinrich Kleine

    2012-01-01

    Methane emissions from enteric fermentation of pigs are object of emission reporting. Hitherto they were treated as part of the energy balance of pigs, in accordance with IPCC guidance documents. They were calculated from the gross energy intake rate and a constant methane conversion ratio....... Meanwhile numerous experimental data on methane emissions from enteric fermentation is available in Germany and abroad; the results are compiled in this work. These results also allow for a description of transformation processes in the hind gut and a subsequent establishment of models that relate emissions...... to feed and performance data. The model by Kirchgeßner et al. (1995) is based on German experimental data and reflects typical national diet compositions. It is used to quantify typical emissions and methane conversion ratios. The results agree with other experimental findings at home and abroad...

  16. Enteric methane emissions from German pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Schulz, Joachim; Klausing, Heinrich Kleine

    2012-01-01

    Methane emissions from enteric fermentation of pigs are object of emission reporting. Hitherto they were treated as part of the energy balance of pigs, in accordance with IPCC guidance documents. They were calculated from the gross energy intake rate and a constant methane conversion ratio....... Meanwhile numerous experimental data on methane emissions from enteric fermentation is available in Germany and abroad; the results are compiled in this work. These results also allow for a description of transformation processes in the hind gut and a subsequent establishment of models that relate emissions...... to feed and performance data. The model by Kirchgeßner et al. (1995) is based on German experimental data and reflects typical national diet compositions. It is used to quantify typical emissions and methane conversion ratios. The results agree with other experimental findings at home and abroad...

  17. Clinical and nutritional implications of radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, W.H.; Fan, A.; Halsted, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical and nutritional significance of radiation enteritis was assessed in eight patients with chronic diarrhea which followed curative doses of radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Steatorrhea, found in seven malnourished patients, was ascribed to ileal disease or previous surgery, or to bacterial contamination of the small intestine. Lactose intolerance, assessed by breath hydrogen excretion after oral lactose and by jejunal lactase levels, was found in six patients. In a subgroup of five patients, the administration of two different defined formula liquid diets by nasoduodenal infusion decreased fecal fluid and energy losses by about one-half. Compared to Vivonex-HN, the infusion of Criticare-HN was associated with greater likelihood of intestinal gas production but a three-fold greater utilization of protein. Intestinal malabsorption and malnutrition in radiation enteritis has diverse etiologies. Whereas nutritional support by liquid diet limits fecal fluid and energy losses, these diets differ significantly in clinical tolerance and biologic value.

  18. Enteral nutrition of the premature infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Cho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early nutritional support for preterm infants is critical because such support influences long-term outcome. Minimal enteral feeding should be initiated as soon as possible if an infant is stable and if feeding advancement is recommended as relevant to the clinical course. Maternal milk is the gold standard for enteral feeding, but fortification may be needed to achieve optimal growth in a rapidly growing premature infant. Erythromycin may aid in promoting gastrointestinal motility in cases that exhibit feeding intolerance. Selected preterm infants need vitamins, mineral supplements, and calorie enhancers to meet their nutritional needs. Despite all that is known about this topic, additional research is needed to guide postdischarge nutrition of preterm infants in order to maintain optimal growth and neurodevelopment.

  19. Enteric glial cells and their role in gastrointestinal motor abnormalities: Introducing the neuro-gliopathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabrio Bassotti; Vincenzo Villanacci; Simona Fisogni; Elisa Rossi; Paola Baronio; Carlo Clerici; Christoph A Maurer; Gieri Cathomas; Elisabetta Antonelli

    2007-01-01

    The role of enteric glial cells has somewhat changed from that of mere mechanical support elements, gluing together the various components of the enteric nervous system, to that of active participants in the complex interrelationships of the gut motor and inflammatory events. Due to their multiple functions, spanning from supporting elements in the myenteric plexuses to neurotransmitters, to neuronal homeostasis, to antigen presenting cells, this cell population has probably more intriguing abilities than previously thought. Recently,some evidence has been accumulating that shows how these cells may be involved in the pathophysiological aspects of some diseases. This review will deal with the properties of the enteric glial cells more strictly related to gastrointestinal motor function and the human pathological conditions in which these cells may play a role, suggesting the possibility of enteric neurogliopathies.

  20. Disease-specific alterations in the enteric virome in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jason M; Handley, Scott A; Baldridge, Megan T; Droit, Lindsay; Liu, Catherine Y; Keller, Brian C; Kambal, Amal; Monaco, Cynthia L; Zhao, Guoyan; Fleshner, Phillip; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; McGovern, Dermot P B; Keshavarzian, Ali; Mutlu, Ece A; Sauk, Jenny; Gevers, Dirk; Xavier, Ramnik J; Wang, David; Parkes, Miles; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-29

    Decreases in the diversity of enteric bacterial populations are observed in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Less is known about the virome in these diseases. We show that the enteric virome is abnormal in CD and UC patients. In-depth analysis of preparations enriched for free virions in the intestine revealed that CD and UC were associated with a significant expansion of Caudovirales bacteriophages. The viromes of CD and UC patients were disease and cohort specific. Importantly, it did not appear that expansion and diversification of the enteric virome was secondary to changes in bacterial populations. These data support a model in which changes in the virome may contribute to intestinal inflammation and bacterial dysbiosis. We conclude that the virome is a candidate for contributing to, or being a biomarker for, human inflammatory bowel disease and speculate that the enteric virome may play a role in other diseases.

  1. Enteral Nutrition in Dementia: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Brooke

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  2. Haematological and biochemical analysis in canine enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Ali Bhat

    Full Text Available Aim: The present investigation screened eighteen clinical cases of canine enteritis for haematological and biochemical analyses. Materials and Methods: Eighteen dogs suffering from enteritis were selected and detailed clinical manifestations were noted. Hematological and biochemical parameters were estimated by using various kits. Blood was also collected from twelve healthy dogs for establishing control values and data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: The affected dogs showed anorexia, diarrhoea, depression, varying degree of dehydration and tachycardia. There were significant changes in packed cell volume, neutrophils, lymphocytes and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration. Biochemical investigation revealed significant decrease in plasma glucose, total plasma protein, albumin and albumin:globulin ratio (A:G ratio. The level of potassium and chloride was markedly decreased. Significant increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT and blood urea nitrogen (BUN was observed. Conclusion: Packed Cell Volume (PCV and Total Erythrocyte Count (TEC remained almost similar between healthy dogs and dogs affected with diarrhoea. Mean Total Leukocyte Count (TLC value was significantly higher as compared to the control group. Hypoglycemia, hypoproteinemia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia and increase in blood urea nitrogen was observed in dogs suffering from enteritis. [Vet World 2013; 6(7.000: 380-383

  3. Enteral nutrition in dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Joanne; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2015-04-03

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the role of enteral nutrition in dementia. The prevalence of dementia is predicted to rise worldwide partly due to an aging population. People with dementia may experience both cognitive and physical complications that impact on their nutritional intake. Malnutrition and weight loss in dementia correlates with cognitive decline and the progress of the disease. An intervention for long term eating difficulties is the provision of enteral nutrition through a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy tube to improve both nutritional parameters and quality of life. Enteral nutrition in dementia has traditionally been discouraged, although further understanding of physical, nutritional and quality of life outcomes are required. The following electronic databases were searched: EBSCO Host, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar for publications from 1st January 2008 and up to and including 1st January 2014. Inclusion criteria included the following outcomes: mortality, aspiration pneumonia, pressure sores, nutritional parameters and quality of life. Each study included separate analysis for patients with a diagnosis of dementia and/or neurological disease. Retrospective and prospective observational studies were included. No differences in mortality were found for patients with dementia, without dementia or other neurological disorders. Risk factors for poor survival included decreased or decreasing serum albumin levels, increasing age or over 80 years and male gender. Evidence regarding pneumonia was limited, although did not impact on mortality. No studies explored pressure sores or quality of life.

  4. Pediatric enteric neuropathies: diagnosis and current management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfal, Maggie L; Goldstein, Allan M

    2017-06-01

    Neurointestinal diseases are increasingly recognized as causes of significant gastrointestinal morbidity in children. This review highlights the most common pediatric enteric neuropathies and their diagnosis and management, emphasizing insights and discoveries from the most recent literature available. The embryologic and histopathologic causes of enteric neuropathies are varied. They range from congenital aganglionosis in Hirschsprung disease, to autoimmune-mediated loss of neuronal subtypes in esophageal achalasia and Chagas disease, to degenerative neuropathies in some cases of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and gastroparesis. Increased awareness of the clinical presentation and diagnostic evaluation of these conditions is essential as it allows for earlier initiation of treatment and improved outcomes. Most current therapies, which include medical management, neurostimulation, and operative intervention, aim to minimize the symptoms caused by these conditions. The evidence base for many of these treatments in children is poor, and multiinstitutional prospective studies are needed. An innovative therapy on the horizon involves using neuronal stem cell transplantation to treat the underlying disorder by replacing the missing or damaged neurons in these diseases. Although recent advances in basic and clinical neurogastroenterology have significantly improved our awareness and understanding of enteric neuropathies, the efficacy of current treatment approaches is limited. The development of novel therapies, including pharmacologic modulators of neurointestinal function, neurostimulation to enhance gut motility, and neuronal cell-based therapies, is essential to improve the long-term outcomes in children with these disorders.

  5. Properties of enteric coated sodium valproate pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, L Diane; Petereit, Hans-Ulrich; Beckert, Thomas; McGinity, James W

    2003-10-02

    The influence of subcoat application and micro-environmental pH on the dissolution properties of enteric coated sodium valproate pellets was investigated. The pellets were prepared by solution-layering or wet-mass extrusion-spheronization methods. In order to pass the USP enteric test, the solution-layered and wet-mass extruded pellets required 35 and 25% weight gain of Eudragit L 30D-55, respectively. The application of a subcoat of either Methocel-E5 (HPMC) or Opadry AMB to the pellets resulted in a delay in sodium valproate release in 0.1N HCl. Further delay in drug release was observed when citric acid was present in a HPMC subcoat or when added to the core pellet formulation. The amount of drug released from coated pellets was a function of the level of citric acid in the pellet core or subcoat and subsequent micro-environmental pH of the pellets. Citric acid exerted a plasticizing effect on the enteric polymer film and improved film formation and polymer coalescence. When greater than 10% (w/w) citric acid was present in the pellets, a decrease in drug content was observed due to the conversion of sodium valproate to the volatile compound, valproic acid. Pellets containing less than 10% (w/w) citric acid maintained potency during processing.

  6. Prevalence of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium on three organic pig farms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Heidi H.; Jianmin, Wang; Mejer, Helena;

    2013-01-01

    Pigs are a potential source of contamination with Cryptosporidium spp., which can lead to infection in humans. Two species C. parvum and C. hominis can cause an acute diarrheal illness in humans, which can become severe in e.g. patients with HIV. The oocyst can survive for long periods in the env...

  7. ADEPT - Abnormal Doppler Enteral Prescription Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Kenny

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancies complicated by abnormal umbilical artery Doppler blood flow patterns often result in the baby being born both preterm and growth-restricted. These babies are at high risk of milk intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis, as well as post-natal growth failure, and there is no clinical consensus about how best to feed them. Policies of both early milk feeding and late milk feeding are widely used. This randomised controlled trial aims to determine whether a policy of early initiation of milk feeds is beneficial compared with late initiation. Optimising neonatal feeding for this group of babies may have long-term health implications and if either of these policies is shown to be beneficial it can be immediately adopted into clinical practice. Methods and Design Babies with gestational age below 35 weeks, and with birth weight below 10th centile for gestational age, will be randomly allocated to an "early" or "late" enteral feeding regimen, commencing milk feeds on day 2 and day 6 after birth, respectively. Feeds will be gradually increased over 9-13 days (depending on gestational age using a schedule derived from those used in hospitals in the Eastern and South Western Regions of England, based on surveys of feeding practice. Primary outcome measures are time to establish full enteral feeding and necrotising enterocolitis; secondary outcomes include sepsis and growth. The target sample size is 400 babies. This sample size is large enough to detect a clinically meaningful difference of 3 days in time to establish full enteral feeds between the two feeding policies, with 90% power and a 5% 2-sided significance level. Initial recruitment period was 24 months, subsequently extended to 38 months. Discussion There is limited evidence from randomised controlled trials on which to base decisions regarding feeding policy in high risk preterm infants. This multicentre trial will help to guide clinical practice and may also

  8. Prediction of enteric methane emissions from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Luis E; Strathe, Anders B; Fadel, James G; Casper, David P; Kebreab, Ermias

    2014-07-01

    Agriculture has a key role in food production worldwide and it is a major component of the gross domestic product of several countries. Livestock production is essential for the generation of high quality protein foods and the delivery of foods in regions where animal products are the main food source. Environmental impacts of livestock production have been examined for decades, but recently emission of methane from enteric fermentation has been targeted as a substantial greenhouse gas source. The quantification of methane emissions from livestock on a global scale relies on prediction models because measurements require specialized equipment and may be expensive. The predictive ability of current methane emission models remains poor. Moreover, the availability of information on livestock production systems has increased substantially over the years enabling the development of more detailed methane prediction models. In this study, we have developed and evaluated prediction models based on a large database of enteric methane emissions from North American dairy and beef cattle. Most probable models of various complexity levels were identified using a Bayesian model selection procedure and were fitted under a hierarchical setting. Energy intake, dietary fiber and lipid proportions, animal body weight and milk fat proportion were identified as key explanatory variables for predicting emissions. Models here developed substantially outperformed models currently used in national greenhouse gas inventories. Additionally, estimates of repeatability of methane emissions were lower than the ones from the literature and multicollinearity diagnostics suggested that prediction models are stable. In this context, we propose various enteric methane prediction models which require different levels of information availability and can be readily implemented in national greenhouse gas inventories of different complexity levels. The utilization of such models may reduce errors

  9. Enteral nutrition. Potential complications and patient monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, C L; Keithley, J K

    1989-06-01

    Enteral feedings are safely tolerated by most patients. When complications occur, gastrointestinal disturbances are most frequently encountered, followed by mechanical and metabolic complications. Nurses can prevent many of the problems associated with enteral feeding through careful monitoring. Based on the current literature, the authors make the following recommendations: 1. All patients receiving tube feedings should be placed on a protocol that provides guidelines for (a) confirming correct tube placement; (b) preventing/managing tube obstruction; (c) handling and selecting formulas; (d) administering formulas; and (e) monitoring patients. 2. Fine-bore tubes are easily misplaced or dislodged; ensure correct positioning both before and during feeding. Food coloring should be added to all feedings to help detect aspiration/tube displacement. 3. Multiple factors can cause diarrhea in tube-fed patients and, therefore, require periodic assessment. These factors include concomitant drug therapy; malnutrition/hypoalbuminemia; formula-related factors (for example, lactose content, osmolality); and bacterial contamination. 4. Urine sugar and acetone levels should be checked every 6 hours (until stable). Vital signs and fluid intake and output should be determined every 8 hours, and weight should be measured on a daily basis. Serum electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen, and glucose levels should be determined daily, until serum levels stabilize. Weekly measurements of trace elements should be made to ensure adequate mineral replacement. 5. Use a controller pump to administer continuous feedings at a constant rate or to administer formulas that are viscous. Flush feeding tubes with water every 4 hours during continuous feedings, after giving intermittent feedings, after giving medications, and after checking for gastric residuals. If tube obstruction occurs, attempt to irrigate the tube with either water or cola. 6. Select feedings that contain appropriate nutrient sources

  10. Molecular evidence of the protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens in Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Grijalva-Chon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for exotic pathogens related to the outbreaks and in surveillance samplings of the Mexican oyster farms, is a recent activity achieved by academic institutions and state committees for Aquatic Animal Health, with remarkable results. In samples of Crassostrea gigas collected through December 2009, January 2010 and November 2010, and of C. corteziensis in September 2011, the protozoan Marteilia refringens was detected for the first time in the Gulf of California. The carrier oysters were from cultures without abnormal mortality rates, whereby, the use of histology, in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy studies are necessary to determine if M. refringens has become established in the Gulf of California oyster cultures. Detection of M. refringens is of great concern to the global oyster farming industry.

  11. Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia on the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections

    CERN Document Server

    Grazú, V; Moros, M; Asín, L; Torres, T E; Marquina, C; Ibarra, M R; Goya, G F; 10.2147/IJN.S35510

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia is currently an EU-approved clinical therapy against tumor cells that uses magnetic nanoparticles under a time varying magnetic field (TVMF). The same basic principle seems promising against trypanosomatids causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness, since therapeutic drugs available display severe side effects and drug-resistant strains. However, no applications of this strategy against protozoan-induced diseases have been reported so far. In the present study, Crithidia fasciculata, a widely used model for therapeutic strategies against pathogenic trypanosomatids, was targeted with Fe_{3}O_{4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in order to remotely provoke cell death using TVMFs. The MNPs with average sizes of d approx. 30 nm were synthesized using a precipitation of FeSO_{4}4 in basic medium. The MNPs were added to Crithidia fasciculata choanomastigotes in exponential phase and incubated overnight. The amount of uploaded MNPs per cell was determined by magnetic measurements. Cell viabili...

  12. [Bacteriologic and serologic diagnosis of enteral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelmann, R

    1988-09-01

    Infections of the gastrointestinal tract still are numerous, ranging on the second place after infections of the respiratory tract. Some of them show quite severe or prolonged course. In contrast to other infections, especially those of the urinary tract, laboratory diagnostic of enteritis is only scarcely ordered. During the last ten years new methods and knowledge of etiologic germs like Campylobacter, Yersinia, various types of E. coli, Clostridium difficile, Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Giardia, Blastomyces and Cryptosporidia have been accumulated. A better etiologic diagnosis of these infections should enable the clinician to start a more precise and therefore more effective therapy.

  13. Enteral nutrition as primary therapy in short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, I W

    1994-01-01

    The spectacular success of parenteral nutrition in supporting patients during small intestinal adaptation after massive resection, tends to obscure the prolonged periods often needed for such adaptation to take place. After neonatal small intestinal resection for example, it may take more than five years before adaptation is complete. There is therefore a strong argument for examining ways in which adaptation can be facilitated, in particular, by the addition of novel substrates to enteral feeds. Pectin is completely fermented by colonic bacteria to short chain fatty acids. In the rat, addition of pectin to enteral feeds led to a more rapid adaptive response in both the small and large intestine after massive small intestinal resection, although faecal nitrogen losses were increased. In a similar rat model, the provision of 40% of non-protein energy as short chain triglycerides facilitated the adaptive response in the jejunum, colon, and pancreas. The importance of glutamine as a metabolic substrate for the small intestine makes it another potential candidate and some, but not all animal studies, have suggested a therapeutic effect: increasing the glutamine content of feeds to 25% of total amino acids produced enhanced jejunal and ileal hyperplasia, even on a hypocaloric feed, and an improved overall weight gain. Studies in humans are very limited, but such promising results in the experimental animal suggest that this is probably a fruitful area for further study.

  14. Heterogeneity in the attachment and uptake mechanisms of the Legionnaires' disease bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, by protozoan hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, O S; Venkataraman, C; Haack, B J; Gao, L Y; Kwaik, Y A

    1998-01-01

    Invasion and intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila within protozoa in the environment plays a major role in the transmission of Legionnaires' disease. Intracellular replication of L. pneumophila within protozoa occurs in a rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER)-surrounded phagosome (Y. Abu Kwaik, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2022-2028, 1996). Since the subsequent fate of many intracellular pathogens is determined by the route of entry, we compared the mechanisms of attachment and subsequent uptake of L. pneumophila by the two protozoa Hartmannella vermiformis and Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Our data provide biochemical and genetic evidence that the mechanisms of attachment and subsequent uptake of L. pneumophila by the two protozoan hosts are, in part, different. First, uptake of L. pneumophila by H. vermiformis is completely blocked by the monovalent sugars galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but these sugars partially blocked A. polyphaga. Second, attachment of L. pneumophila to H. vermiformis is associated with a time-dependent and reversible tyrosine dephosphorylation of multiple host proteins. In contrast, only a slight dephosphorylation of a 170-kDa protein of A. polyphaga is detected upon infection. Third, synthesis of H. vermiformis proteins but not of A. polyphaga proteins is required for uptake of L. pneumophila. Fourth, we have identified L. pneumophila mutants that are severely defective in attachment to A. polyphaga but which exhibit minor reductions in attachment to H. vermiformis and, thus, provide a genetic basis for the difference in mechanisms of attachment to both protozoa. The data indicate a remarkable adaptation of L. pneumophila to attach and invade different protozoan hosts by different mechanisms, yet invasion is followed by a remarkably similar intracellular replication within a RER-surrounded phagosome and subsequent killing of the host cell.

  15. Detection of protozoan hosts for Legionella pneumophila in engineered water systems by using a biofilm batch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valster, Rinske M; Wullings, Bart A; van der Kooij, Dick

    2010-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila proliferates in aquatic habitats within free-living protozoa, 17 species of which have been identified as hosts by using in vitro experiments. The present study aimed at identifying protozoan hosts for L. pneumophila by using a biofilm batch test (BBT). Samples (600 ml) collected from 21 engineered freshwater systems, with added polyethylene cylinders to promote biofilm formation, were inoculated with L. pneumophila and subsequently incubated at 37°C for 20 days. Growth of L. pneumophila was observed in 16 of 18 water types when the host protozoan Hartmannella vermiformis was added. Twelve of the tested water types supported growth of L. pneumophila or indigenous Legionella anisa without added H. vermiformis. In 12 of 19 BBT flasks H. vermiformis was indicated as a host, based on the ratio between maximum concentrations of L. pneumophila and H. vermiformis, determined with quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), and the composition of clone libraries of partial 18S rRNA gene fragments. Analyses of 609 eukaryotic clones from the BBTs revealed that 68 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed the highest similarity to free-living protozoa. Forty percent of the sequences clustering with protozoa showed ≥99.5% similarity to H. vermiformis. None of the other protozoa serving as hosts in in vitro studies were detected in the BBTs. In several tests with growth of L. pneumophila, the protozoa Diphylleia rotans, Echinamoeba thermarum, and Neoparamoeba sp. were identified as candidate hosts. In vitro studies are needed to confirm their role as hosts for L. pneumophila. Unidentified protozoa were implicated as hosts for uncultured Legionella spp. grown in BBT flasks at 15°C.

  16. Identification of scaffold/Matrix Attachment (S/MAR like DNA element from the gastrointestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Pennathur

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin in the nucleus of all eukaryotes is organized into a system of loops and domains. These loops remain fastened at their bases to the fundamental framework of the nucleus, the matrix or the scaffold. The DNA sequences which anchor the bases of the chromatin loops to the matrix are known as Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions or S/MARs. Though S/MARs have been studied in yeast and higher eukaryotes and they have been found to be associated with gene organization and regulation of gene expression, they have not been reported in protists like Giardia. Several tools have been discovered and formulated to predict S/MARs from a genome of a higher eukaryote which take into account a number of features. However, the lack of a definitive consensus sequence in S/MARs and the randomness of the protozoan genome in general, make it a challenge to predict and identify such sequences from protists. Results Here, we have analysed the Giardia genome for the probable S/MARs predicted by the available computational tools; and then shown these sequences to be physically associated with the nuclear matrix. Our study also reflects that while no single computational tool is competent to predict such complex elements from protist genomes, a combination of tools followed by experimental verification is the only way to confirm the presence of these elements from these organisms. Conclusion This is the first report of S/MAR elements from the protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. This initial work is expected to lay a framework for future studies relating to genome organization as well as gene regulatory elements in this parasite.

  17. Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia in the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazú, V; Silber, AM; Moros, M; Asín, L; Torres, TE; Marquina, C; Ibarra, MR; Goya, GF

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic hyperthermia is currently a clinical therapy approved in the European Union for treatment of tumor cells, and uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under time-varying magnetic fields (TVMFs). The same basic principle seems promising against trypanosomatids causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness, given that the therapeutic drugs available have severe side effects and that there are drug-resistant strains. However, no applications of this strategy against protozoan-induced diseases have been reported so far. In the present study, Crithidia fasciculata, a widely used model for therapeutic strategies against pathogenic trypanosomatids, was targeted with Fe3O4 MNPs in order to provoke cell death remotely using TVMFs. Methods Iron oxide MNPs with average diameters of approximately 30 nm were synthesized by precipitation of FeSO4 in basic medium. The MNPs were added to C. fasciculata choanomastigotes in the exponential phase and incubated overnight, removing excess MNPs using a DEAE-cellulose resin column. The amount of MNPs uploaded per cell was determined by magnetic measurement. The cells bearing MNPs were submitted to TVMFs using a homemade AC field applicator (f = 249 kHz, H = 13 kA/m), and the temperature variation during the experiments was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess morphological changes after the TVMF experiments. Cell viability was analyzed using an MTT colorimetric assay and flow cytometry. Results MNPs were incorporated into the cells, with no noticeable cytotoxicity. When a TVMF was applied to cells bearing MNPs, massive cell death was induced via a nonapoptotic mechanism. No effects were observed by applying TVMF to control cells not loaded with MNPs. No macroscopic rise in temperature was observed in the extracellular medium during the experiments. Conclusion As a proof of principle, these data indicate that intracellular hyperthermia is a suitable technology to induce death of protozoan parasites

  18. Soil microbial toxicity of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds: effects on nitrification, the genetic diversity of bacteria, and the total number of protozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverdrup, Line Emilie; Ekelund, Flemming; Krogh, Paul Henning;

    2002-01-01

    Eight polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were tested for their toxic effect on the soil nitrification process, bacterial genetic diversity, and the total number of protozoans (naked amoebae and heterotrophic flagellates). After four weeks of exposure in a well-characterized agricultural soil...

  19. Mining free-text medical records for companion animal enteric syndrome surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anholt, R M; Berezowski, J; Jamal, I; Ribble, C; Stephen, C

    2014-03-01

    Large amounts of animal health care data are present in veterinary electronic medical records (EMR) and they present an opportunity for companion animal disease surveillance. Veterinary patient records are largely in free-text without clinical coding or fixed vocabulary. Text-mining, a computer and information technology application, is needed to identify cases of interest and to add structure to the otherwise unstructured data. In this study EMR's were extracted from veterinary management programs of 12 participating veterinary practices and stored in a data warehouse. Using commercially available text-mining software (WordStat™), we developed a categorization dictionary that could be used to automatically classify and extract enteric syndrome cases from the warehoused electronic medical records. The diagnostic accuracy of the text-miner for retrieving cases of enteric syndrome was measured against human reviewers who independently categorized a random sample of 2500 cases as enteric syndrome positive or negative. Compared to the reviewers, the text-miner retrieved cases with enteric signs with a sensitivity of 87.6% (95%CI, 80.4-92.9%) and a specificity of 99.3% (95%CI, 98.9-99.6%). Automatic and accurate detection of enteric syndrome cases provides an opportunity for community surveillance of enteric pathogens in companion animals.

  20. Field survey of enteric viruses in solid waste landfill leachates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sobsey, M D

    1978-01-01

    Because municipal solid waste may contain fecal material from a variety of sources, there is concern that the leachate discharged from some solid waste landfills may contain enteric pathogens, including enteric viruses...

  1. Probiotics and prebiotics to combat enteric infections and HIV in the developing world: A consensus report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monachese, M.; Cunningham-Rundles, S.; Diaz, M.A.; Guerrant, R.; Hummelen, R.; Kemperman, R.; Kerac, M.; Kort, R.; Merenstein, D.; Panigrahi, P.; Ramakrishna, B.; Safdar, N.; Shane, A.; Trois, L.; Reid, G.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease in the developing world continues to represent one of the greatest challenges facing humanity. Every year over a million children suffer and die from the sequela of enteric infections, and in 2008 was estimated almost 2.7 million (UNAIDS 2009 update) adults and children became

  2. Genome analysis of Clostridium perfringens isolates from healthy and necrotic enteritis infected chickens and turkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronco, Troels; Stegger, Marc; Ng, Kim Lee

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Clostridium perfringens causes gastrointestinal diseases in both humans and domestic animals. Type A strains expressing the NetB toxin are the main cause of necrotic enteritis (NE) in chickens, which has remarkable impact on animal welfare and production economy in the international...

  3. Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses Era Tuladhar Abstract Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute and outbreak associated gastroenteritis worldwide. The outbreaks occur often in

  4. Genetically disparate Fayoumi chicken lines show different response to avian Necrotic Enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) has reemerged as a significant problem as a result of growing restrictions of antibiotics in agricultural animal production and increasing concerns over antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. To enhance our understanding of host-pathogen immunobiology in NE, transcriptomi...

  5. Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses Era Tuladhar Abstract Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute and outbreak associated gastroenteritis worldwide. The outbreaks occur often in hospitals

  6. Genotypic characterization of canine coronaviruses associated with fatal canine neonatal enteritis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, Beth N; Whittaker, Gary R; Dubovi, Edward J; Duhamel, Gerald E

    2014-12-01

    Emerging canine coronavirus (CCoV) variants that are associated with systemic infections have been reported in the European Union; however, CCoV-associated disease in the United States is incompletely characterized. The purpose of this study was to correlate the clinicopathological findings and viral antigen distribution with the genotypic characteristics of CCoV in 11 puppies from nine premises in five states that were submitted for diagnostic investigation at Cornell University between 2008 and 2013. CCoV antigen was found in epithelial cells of small intestinal villi in all puppies and the colon in 2 of the 10 puppies where colon specimens were available. No evidence of systemic CCoV infection was found. Comparative sequence analyses of viral RNA extracted from intestinal tissues revealed CCoV-II genotype in 9 out of 11 puppies. Of the nine CCoV-IIs, five were subtyped as group IIa and one as IIb, while three CCoVs could not be subtyped. One of the CCoV-IIa variants was isolated in cell culture. Infection with CCoV alone was found in five puppies, of which two also had small intestinal intussusception. Concurrent infections with either parvovirus (n = 1), attaching-effacing Escherichia coli (n = 4), or protozoan parasites (n = 3) were found in the other six puppies. CCoV is an important differential diagnosis in outbreaks of severe enterocolitis among puppies between 4 days and 21 weeks of age that are housed at high population density. These findings will assist with the rapid laboratory diagnosis of enteritis in puppies and highlight the need for continued surveillance for CCoV variants and intestinal viral diseases of global significance.

  7. Analysis of multiple enteric viral targets as sewage markers in coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Erin K.; Futch, J. Carrie; Griffin, Dale W.

    2007-01-01

    Water and coral mucus samples were collected from throughout the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and the Dry Tortugas for three years and were analyzed for human enteric viruses (enteroviruses, noroviruses, hepatitis A virus and adenoviruses) as conservative markers of human sewage using molecular methods. Of the 100 coral and water samples collected, 40 contained genetic material from one or more human enteric viruses. DNA-based adenoviruses were detected widely, in 37.8% of samples and at 91% of stations, including ‘pristine’ reefs in the Dry Tortugas; however, the detection rate was ⩽12% for the RNA-based enteroviruses and noroviruses (hepatitis A virus was never detected). The disparity between the prevalence of RNA- and DNA-based viruses suggests the need for additional work to determine the utility of adenovirus as marker of human sewage.

  8. Detection of enteric pathogens in Turkey flocks affected with severe enteritis, in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura-Alvarez, Joelma; Nuñez, Luis F N; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Knöbl, Terezinha; Chacón, Jorge L; Moreno, Andrea M; Jones, Richard C; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2014-08-01

    Twenty-two flocks of turkeys affected by enteric problems, with ages between 10 and 104 days and located in the Southern region of Brazil, were surveyed for turkey by PCR for turkey astrovirus type 2 (TAstV-2), turkey coronavirus (TCoV), hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV), rotavirus, reovirus, Salmonella spp., and Lawsonia intracellularis (Li) infections. Eleven profiles of pathogen combination were observed. The most frequently encountered pathogen combinations were TCoV-Li, followed by TCoV-TAstV-2-Li, TCoV-TastV-2. Only TCoV was detected as the sole pathogen in three flocks. Eight and 19 flocks of the 22 were positive for TAstV-2 and TCoV, respectively. Six were positive for Salmonella spp. and L. intracellularis was detected in 12 turkey flocks. Reovirus and HEV were not detected in this survey. These results throw new light on the multiple etiology of enteritis in turkeys. The implications of these findings and their correlation with the clinical signs are comprehensively discussed, illustrating the complexity of the enteric diseases.

  9. Jiangsu:Seven enter million club%Jiangsu: Seven enter million club

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Without doubt, Jiangsu Province was the largest shipbuilding base in China. As the capacity of China Shipping Industry broke through 1 m dwt, currently seven shipbuilders in Jiangsu has entered lm dwt club. The figure was expected to hit eight in this year, taking the first place of China.

  10. Enteric methane emissions from German dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammgen, U; Rosemann, C; Haenel, H D

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, the German agricultural emission inventory used a model for the assessment of methane emissions from enteric fermentation that combined an estimate of the energy and feed requirements as a function of performance parameters and diet composition, with the constant methane conversion rate......, as stated by IPCC. A methane emission model was selected here that is based on German feed data. It was combined with the hitherto applied model describing energy requirements. The emission rates thus calculated deviate from those previously obtained. In the new model, the methane conversion rate is back......-calculated from emission rates and gross energy intake rates. For German conditions of animal performance and diet composition, the national means of methane conversion rates range between 71 kJ MJ(-1) and 61 kJ MJ(-1) for low and high performances (4700 kg animal(-1) a(-1) in 1990 to 7200 kg animal(-1) a(-1...

  11. Enteric methane emissions from German dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammgen, U; Rosemann, C; Haenel, H D

    2012-01-01

    Up to now, the German agricultural emission inventory used a model for the assessment of methane emissions from enteric fermentation that combined an estimate of the energy and feed requirements as a function of performance parameters and diet composition, with the constant methane conversion rate......, as stated by IPCC. A methane emission model was selected here that is based on German feed data. It was combined with the hitherto applied model describing energy requirements. The emission rates thus calculated deviate from those previously obtained. In the new model, the methane conversion rate is back......-calculated from emission rates and gross energy intake rates. For German conditions of animal performance and diet composition, the national means of methane conversion rates range between 71 kJ MJ(-1) and 61 kJ MJ(-1) for low and high performances (4700 kg animal(-1) a(-1) in 1990 to 7200 kg animal(-1) a(-1...

  12. [SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME AND NUTRITIONAL ENTERAL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariadel Cobo, Diana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Socas Macías, María; Serrano Aguayo, Pilar; Gómez Liébana, Eulalia; Morales Conde, Salvador; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The particularity of this case is the nutritional management that has managed to avoid the use of prolonged parenteral nutrition and possible complications by placing jejunal tube at the distal end in patients with short bowel. It is a 34-year-old colecistectomizado complicated with postoperative peritonitis and dehiscence; two years he studied with small bowel obstruction, he was made de-volvulus and was complicated with two leak at different times after the second escape took place jejunostomy side double barreled shotgun level dehiscence, presented high debits by afferent loop of the terminal jejunostomy; during admission, polyurethane probe enteral feeding was inserted by the efferent loop jejunostomy. He received jejunal tube feeding laundry in the efferent loop terminal with decreased weight gain and subsequent reconstruction of intestinal transit debit proximal jejunostomy.

  13. Pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella serotypes are a major cause of food-borne diseases worldwide. Animal models other than the mouse have been employed for the study of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections because the murine model is not suitable for the study of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. The microbe has developed mechanisms to exploit the host cell machinery to its own purpose. Bacterial proteins delivered directly into the host cell cytosol cause cytoskeletal changes and interfere with host cell signaling pathways, which ultimately enhance disease manifestation. Recently, marked advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular interactions between Salmonella serotypes and their hosts. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis.

  14. Enteral Feeding in Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V Grigoryev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to substantiate the choice of a gastrointestinal tract (GIT function support regimen as a mode for correction of the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS. Subjects and methods. Forty-three patients with different causes of inadequate GIT function of various origin and ACS (disseminated peritonitis (45%, pancreatitis (24%, and severe concomitant injury (31% were examined. Group 1 (control received complete parenteral nutritional feeding (n=23; APACHE II scores, 21±4; calculated probability of fatal outcome, 33.5%. In Group II (study, complete parenteral feeding in the first 24 hours after stabilization was supplemented with GIT function support with Pepsisorb (Nutricia in doses of 500, 1000, and 1500 ml on days 1, 2, and 3, respectively (n=20; APACHE II scores, 20±6; calculated probability of fatal outcome, 37.1%. During early enteral nutritional support, the SOFA score was significantly less than that in Group 1 on days 2—3; the oxygenation index significantly increased on day 3; the value of intra-abdominal hypertension decreased to the control values. The positive effect of the GIT function support regimen on regression of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS was confirmed by the lowered levels of biological markers (von Willebrand factor (WF and endothelin-1 as markers of endothelial damage of MODS. Correlation analysis showed a direct correlation between the markers of endothelial damage and the SOFA scores (r=0.34; p=0.05 for WF and r=0.49;p=0.03 for endothelin. Conclusion. The GIT function support regimen via early enteral alimentation with Peptisorb, which was initiated in the first 24 hours after admission, is able to level off the manifestations of the early stages of the abdominal compartment syndrome, with the acceptable values of oxygen balance and water-electrolyte and osmotic homeostasis being achieved. Key words: abdominal compartment syndrome, nutritional support, biological markers, oxygenation index

  15. Mechanosensitivity in the enteric nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma eMazzuoli-Weber

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The enteric nervous system (ENS autonomously controls gut muscle activity. Mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN initiate reflex activity by responding to mechanical deformation of the gastrointestinal wall. MEN throughout the gut primarily respond to compression or stretch rather than to shear force. Some MEN are multimodal as they respond to compression and stretch. Depending on the region up to 60% of the entire ENS population responds to mechanical stress. MEN fire action potentials after mechanical stimulation of processes or soma although they are more sensitive to process deformation. There are at least two populations of MEN based on their sensitivity to different modalities of mechanical stress and on their firing pattern. 1 Rapidly, slowly and ultra-slowly adapting neurons which encode compressive forces. 2 Ultra-slowly adapting stretch-sensitive neurons encoding tensile forces. Rapid adaptation of firing is typically observed after compressive force while slow adaptation or ongoing spike discharge occurs often during tensile stress (stretch. All MEN have some common properties: they receive synaptic input, are low fidelity mechanoreceptors and are multifunctional in that some serve interneuronal others even motor functions. Consequently, MEN possess processes with mechanosensitive as well as efferent functions. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that MEN sense and control muscle activity at the same time as servo-feedback loop. The mechanosensitive channel(s or receptor(s expressed by the different MEN populations are unknown. Future concepts have to incorporate compressive and tensile-sensitive MEN into neural circuits that controls muscle activity. They may interact to control various forms of a particular motor pattern or regulate different motor patterns independently from each other.

  16. Epidemiological review of Toxoplasmosis in humans and animals in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infections by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii are widely prevalent in humans and other animals worldwide. However, information from former East European countries, including Romania is sketchy. Unfortunately, in many Eastern European countries, including Romania it has been assumed that T. ...

  17. Control of the risk of human toxoplasmosis transmitted by meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, A.; Jongert, E.

    2008-01-01

    One-third of the human world population is infected with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Recent calculations of the disease burden of toxoplasmosis rank this foodborne disease at the same level as salmonellosis or campylobacteriosis. The high disease burden in combination with disappointin

  18. [Sequential enteral nutrition support for patients with severe cerebral stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiefang; He, Xudong; Zhang, Lisan; Hu, Xingyue

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sequential enteral nutrition support in patients with severe cerebral stroke. Forty-nine patients with severe cerebral stroke met the inclusion criteria were randomly divided into sequential enteral nutrition group (Group A, n=24) and conventional enteral nutrition group (Group B, n=25). Patients in Group A received short-peptide-based enteral nutrition support first, then gradually transferred to intact protein enteral nutrition. Meanwhile, patients in Group B constantly received intact protein enteral nutrition support. The nutritional indexes and the rate of complications were compared between two groups. The nutritional indexes were decreased in both groups within 4 weeks after admission, but the decreasing levels of hemoglobin and albumin in Group A were significantly lower than those in Group B (P0.05). Sequential enteral nutritional support can improve the nutritional status and decrease the incidence of complications in critical patients with cerebral stroke.

  19. Tetanus Toxin and Botulinum Toxin A Utilize Unique Mechanisms To Enter Neurons of the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Faith C.; Chen CHEN; Kroken, Abby R.; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) are the most toxic proteins for humans. While BoNTs cause flaccid paralysis, TeNT causes spastic paralysis. Characterized BoNT serotypes enter neurons upon binding dual receptors, a ganglioside and a neuron-specific protein, either synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) or synaptotagmin, while TeNT enters upon binding gangliosides as dual receptors. Recently, TeNT was reported to enter central nervous system (CNS) neurons upon synaptic ves...

  20. Modulation of intestinal inflammation by minimal enteral nutrition with amniotic fluid in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Bering, Stine Brandt; Jensen, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a severe inflammatory disorder, associated with the difficult transition from parenteral to enteral feeding after preterm birth. We hypothesized that minimal enteral nutrition (MEN) with amniotic fluid (AF), prior to enteral formula feeding, would...... improve resistance to NEC in preterm pigs. Methods: Experiment 1: IEC-6 cells were incubated with porcine (pAF) and human AF (hAF) to test AF-stimulated enterocyte proliferation and migration in vitro. Experiment 2: Cesarean-delivered, preterm pigs were fed parenteral nutrition and MEN with pAF, h...... fed AF as MEN, but NEC incidences were similar (NEC-pAF) or increased (NEC-hAF) compared with controls. Conclusions: Intake of pAF or hAF improved body growth and modulated intestinal inflammatory cytokines during a period of parenteral nutrition, but did not protect against later formula-induced NEC...

  1. Detection and characterization of enteric viruses in flood water from the 2011 thai flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaosuwankul, Nathamon; Thippornchai, Narin; Yamashita, Akifumi; Vargas, Ronald E Morales; Tunyong, Witawat; Mahakunkijchareon, Yuvadee; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan

    2013-01-01

    Severe flooding, which is associated with numerous outbreaks of a wide range of infectious diseases, particularly those caused by enteric viruses, occurred in all areas of Thailand in 2011. To determine the prevalence of five human enteric viruses, namely enterovirus, rotavirus (RV), norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and hepatitis E virus, in the flood water, 100 water samples were collected from flood-damaged areas in central Thailand. Viral RNA was extracted from concentrated samples and analyzed by RT-PCR and sequencing. NV was the most commonly detected pathogen in the tested samples (14%). RV and HAV were detected in 9% and 7% of samples, respectively. This study is the first to detect enteric viral genes in flood water in Thailand. Furthermore, it is the first to detect an NV gene in any type of environmental water in Thailand. These results provide useful information for estimating the risk of flood waterborne viral infection.

  2. Measurement and prediction of enteric methane emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Lal, Rattan; Lakritz, Jeffrey; Ezeji, Thaddeus

    2011-01-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the agricultural sector account for about 25.5% of total global anthropogenic emission. While CO2 receives the most attention as a factor relative to global warming, CH4, N2O and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) also cause significant radiative forcing. With the relative global warming potential of 25 compared with CO2, CH4 is one of the most important GHGs. This article reviews the prediction models, estimation methodology and strategies for reducing enteric CH4 emissions. Emission of CH4 in ruminants differs among developed and developing countries, depending on factors like animal species, breed, pH of rumen fluid, ratio of acetate:propionate, methanogen population, composition of diet and amount of concentrate fed. Among the ruminant animals, cattle contribute the most towards the greenhouse effect through methane emission followed by sheep, goats and buffalos, respectively. The estimated CH4 emission rate per cattle, buffaloe, sheep and goat in developed countries are 150.7, 137, 21.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) respectively. However, the estimated rates in developing countries are significantly lower at 95.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) per cattle and sheep, respectively. There exists a strong interest in developing new and improving the existing CH4 prediction models to identify mitigation strategies for reducing the overall CH4 emissions. A synthesis of the available literature suggests that the mechanistic models are superior to empirical models in accurately predicting the CH4 emission from dairy farms. The latest development in prediction model is the integrated farm system model which is a process-based whole-farm simulation technique. Several techniques are used to quantify enteric CH4 emissions starting from whole animal chambers to sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer techniques. The latest technology developed to estimate CH4 more accurately is the micrometeorological mass difference technique. Because the conditions under which

  3. Virus-mediated expression of firefly luciferase in the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, a prevalent human pathogen and one of the lineages that branched earliest from prokaryotes, can be infected with a double-stranded RNA virus, giardiavirus (GLV). The 6,277-bp viral genome has been previously cloned (A.L. Wang, H.-M. Yang, K.A. Shen, and C.C. Wang, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:8595-8599, 1993; C.-H. Wu, C.C. Wang, H.M. Yang, and A.L. Wang, Gene, in press) and was converted to a transfection vector for G. lamblia in the present study. By flanking the firefly l...

  4. Experimental inoculation of juvenile rhesus macaques with primate enteric caliciviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Sestak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue culture-adapted Tulane virus (TV, a GI.1 rhesus enteric calicivirus (ReCV, and a mixture of GII.2 and GII.4 human norovirus (NoV-containing stool sample were used to intrastomacheally inoculate juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta in order to evaluate infection caused by these viruses. METHODOLOGY & FINDINGS: Two of the three TV-inoculated macaques developed diarrhea, fever, virus-shedding in stools, inflammation of duodenum and 16-fold increase of TV-neutralizing (VN serum antibodies but no vomiting or viremia. No VN-antibody responses could be detected against a GI.2 ReCV strain FT285, suggesting that TV and FT285 represent different ReCV serotypes. Both NoV-inoculated macaques remained asymptomatic but with demonstrable virus shedding in one animal. Examination of duodenum biopsies of the TV-inoculated macaques showed lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria and villous blunting. TV antigen-positive (TV+ cells were detected in the lamina propria. In most of the TV+ cells TV co-localized perinuclearly with calnexin--an endoplasmic reticulum protein. A few CD20+TV+ double-positive B cells were also identified in duodenum. To corroborate the authenticity of CD20+TV+ B cells, in vitro cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from healthy macaques were inoculated with TV. Multicolor flow cytometry confirmed the presence of TV antigen-containing B cells of predominantly CD20+HLA-DR+ phenotype. A 2-log increase of viral RNA by 6 days post inoculation (p<0.05 suggested active TV replication in cultured lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results show that ReCVs represent an alternative cell culture and animal model to study enteric calicivirus replication, pathogenesis and immunity.

  5. White paper on guidelines concerning enteric nervous system stem cell therapy for enteric neuropathies⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alan J.; Goldstein, Allan M.; Newgreen, Donald F.; Stamp, Lincon; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Metzger, Marco; Hotta, Ryo; Young, Heather M.; Andrews, Peter W.; Thapar, Nikhil; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Bondurand, Nadege; Bornstein, Joel C.; Chan, Wood Yee; Cheah, Kathryn; Gershon, Michael D.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.; Hofstra, Robert M.W.; Just, Lothar; Kapur, Raj P.; King, Sebastian K.; McCann, Conor J.; Nagy, Nandor; Ngan, Elly; Obermayr, Florian; Pachnis, Vassilis; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Sham, Mai Har; Tam, Paul; Berghe, Pieter Vanden

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing focus on the development of novel stem cell based therapies for the treatment of disorders and diseases affecting the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal tract (so-called enteric neuropathies). Here, the idea is that ENS progenitor/stem cells could be transplanted into the gut wall to replace the damaged or absent neurons and glia of the ENS. This White Paper sets out experts’ views on the commonly used methods and approaches to identify, isolate, purify, expand and optimize ENS stem cells, transplant them into the bowel, and assess transplant success, including restoration of gut function. We also highlight obstacles that must be overcome in order to progress from successful preclinical studies in animal models to ENS stem cell therapies in the clinic. PMID:27059883

  6. Adsorption characteristics of an enteric virus-binding protein to norovirus, rotavirus and poliovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imai Takahiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Water contamination with human enteric viruses has posed human health risks all over the world. Reasonable and facile methodologies for recovering and quantifying infectious enteric viruses in environmental samples are needed to address the issues of waterborne viral infectious diseases. In this study, a bacterial protein that has a binding capability with several enteric viruses is discovered, and its binding characteristics were investigated for utilizing it as a viral adsorbent in virus recovery and detection technologies. Results A gene of an enteric virus-binding protein (EVBP, derived from a monomer of a bacterial chaperon protein GroEL, was successfully acquired from a genomic DNA library of activated sludge microorganisms with nested PCR. Equilibrium dissociation constants between EVBP and norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs of genotypes GI.7 and GII.4, estimated with quartz crystal microbalance method, were 240 and 210 nM, respectively. These values of equilibrium dissociation constant imply that the binding affinity between EVBP and NoVLPs is 1 to 3-log weaker than that in general antigen-antibody interactions, but about 2-log stronger than that in weak specific interactions of proteins with cations and organic polymers. The adsorptions of EVBP to norovirus, group A rotavirus and poliovirus type 1 were found to be significant in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Meanwhile, the binding of native GroEL tetradecamer to viral particles was weaker than that of EVBP, presumably because of a steric hindrance. The small molecule of EVBP could have an advantage in the access to the surface of viral particles with rugged structure. Conclusions EVBP that has a broad binding spectrum to enteric viruses was newly discovered. The broad binding characteristic of EVBP would allow us to utilize it as a novel adsorbent for detecting diverse enteric viruses in clinical and environmental samples.

  7. Enteric bacterial catalysts for fuel ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, L.O.; Aldrich, H.C.; Borges, A.C.C. [and others

    1999-10-01

    The technology is available to produce fuel ethanol from renewable lignocellulosic biomass. The current challenge is to assemble the various process options into a commercial venture and begin the task of incremental improvement. Current process designs for lignocellulose are far more complex than grain to ethanol processes. This complexity results in part from the complexity of the substrate and the biological limitations of the catalyst. Their work at the University of Florida has focused primarily on the genetic engineering of Enteric bacteria using genes encoding Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. These two genes have been assembled into a portable ethanol production cassette, the PET operon, and integrated into the chromosome of Escherichia coli B for use with hemicellulose-derived syrups. The resulting strain, KO11, produces ethanol efficiently from all hexose and pentose sugars present in the polymers of hemicellulose. By using the same approach, the authors integrated the PET operon into the chromosome of Klebsiella oxytoca to produce strain P2 for use in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process for cellulose. Strain P2 has the native ability to ferment cellobiose and cellotriose, eliminating the need for one class of cellulase enzymes.

  8. Enteral Nutrition in Pancreaticoduodenectomy: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Buscemi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD is considered the gold standard treatment for periampullory carcinomas. This procedure presents 30%–40% of morbidity. Patients who have undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy often present perioperative malnutrition that is worse in the early postoperative days, affects the process of healing, the intestinal barrier function and the number of postoperative complications. Few studies focus on the relation between enteral nutrition (EN and postoperative complications. Our aim was to perform a review, including only randomized controlled trial meta-analyses or well-designed studies, of evidence regarding the correlation between EN and main complications and outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy, as delayed gastric emptying (DGE, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF, postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH, length of stay and infectious complications. Several studies, especially randomized controlled trial have shown that EN does not increase the rate of DGE. EN appeared safe and tolerated for patients after PD, even if it did not reveal any advantages in terms of POPF, PPH, length of stay and infectious complications.

  9. Growth of bacteria in enteral feeding solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, A

    1985-08-01

    Solutions of Clinifeed ISO, Triosorbon, Vivonex Standard (full- and half-strength) and Vivonex HN were experimentally contaminated with two strains each of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella aerogenes, Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae at concentrations of 10(2)-10(3) organisms/ml. Samples were incubated at 4, 25 or 37 degrees C and viable counts were made at 0, 4, 8 and 24 h. No increase in numbers of any of the organisms was observed in any of the feeds during 24 h at 4 degrees C. All organisms multiplied rapidly in Clinifeed ISO and in Triosorbon at 25 and 37 degrees C. There was less rapid growth in half-strength Vivonex Standard at 25 degrees C, although at 37 degrees C all strains multiplied rapidly except for the two S. aureus strains, the growth of which was inhibited in half-strength Vivonex Standard at both 25 and 37 degrees C. In full-strength Vivonex Standard at 25 degrees C, only P. aeruginosa showed any increase in numbers during 24 h, whereas P. aeruginosa, K. aerogenes and E. cloacae all multiplied at 37 degrees C. None of the test organisms multiplied in full strength Vivonex HN at any of the temperatures studied. The results of the study show that bacteria survive and may multiply even in feeds with low pH and high osmolarity, and emphasise the importance of strict hygiene during the preparation and handling of all enteral feeds.

  10. Treatment of radiation enteritis: a comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiudice, T.A.; Lang, J.A.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with severe radiation injury to the small bowel seen over a 4-year period were randomized to four treatment groups: 1) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po, 2) methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously plus total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, 3) total parenteral nutrition, 2.5 L/day, and 4) Vivonex-HN, 2 L/day po. Patients received nothing by mouth except water in groups II and III, and only Vivonex-HN in groups I and IV. Patients were treated for 8-wk periods. Improvement was gauged by overall nutritional assessment measurements, nitrogen balance data and by radiological and clinical parameters. No significant difference between groups I, II, III, and IV could be found for age, sex, mean radiation dosage, time of onset after radiation therapy, or initial nutritional assessment data. Differences statistically could be found between groups II and III and I and IV regarding nutritional assessment data, nitrogen balance, radiographic and clinical parameters after therapy, with marked improvement noted in groups II and III. We conclude that a treatment regimen consisting of total parenteral nutrition and bowel rest is beneficial in the treatment of radiation enteritis. Methylprednisolone appears to enhance this effect and indeed, may be responsible for a longer lasting response.

  11. Introduction of caveolae structural proteins into the protozoan Toxoplasma results in the formation of heterologous caveolae but not caveolar endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Lige

    Full Text Available Present on the plasma membrane of most metazoans, caveolae are specialized microdomains implicated in several endocytic and trafficking mechanisms. Caveolins and the more recently discovered cavins are the major protein components of caveolae. Previous studies reported that caveolar invaginations can be induced de novo on the surface of caveolae-negative mammalian cells upon heterologous expression of caveolin-1. However, it remains undocumented whether other components in the transfected cells participate in caveolae formation. To address this issue, we have exploited the protozoan Toxoplasma as a heterologous expression system to provide insights into the minimal requirements for caveogenesis and caveolar endocytosis. Upon expression of caveolin-1, Toxoplasma accumulates prototypical exocytic caveolae 'precursors' in the cytoplasm. Toxoplasma expressing caveolin-1 alone, or in conjunction with cavin-1, neither develops surface-located caveolae nor internalizes caveolar ligands. These data suggest that the formation of functional caveolae at the plasma membrane in Toxoplasma and, by inference in all non-mammalian cells, requires effectors other than caveolin-1 and cavin-1. Interestingly, Toxoplasma co-expressing caveolin-1 and cavin-1 displays an impressive spiraled network of membranes containing the two proteins, in the cytoplasm. This suggests a synergistic activity of caveolin-1 and cavin-1 in the morphogenesis and remodeling of membranes, as illustrated for Toxoplasma.

  12. The water-born protein pheromones of the polar protozoan ciliate, Euplotes nobilii: Coding genes and molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Dini, Fernando; Pedrini, Bill; Wüthrich, Kurt; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2010-08-01

    The protozoan ciliate Euplotes nobilii found in Antarctic and Arctic coastal waters relies on secretion of water-soluble cell type-specific signal proteins (pheromones) to regulate its vegetative growth and sexual mating. For three of these psychrophilic pheromones we previously determined the three-dimensional structures by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with protein solutions purified from the natural sources, which led to evidence that their adaptation to cold is primarily achieved by increased flexibility through an extension of regions free of regular secondary structures, and by increased exposure of negative charges on the protein surface. Then we cloned the coding genes of these E. nobilii pheromones from the transcriptionally active cell somatic nucleus (macronucleus) and characterized the full-length sequences. These sequences all contain an open reading frame of 252-285 nucleotides, which is specific for a cytoplasmic pheromone precursor that requires two proteolytic cleavages to remove a signal peptide and a pro segment before release of the mature protein into the extracellular environment. The 5‧ and 3‧ non-coding regions are two- to three-fold longer than the coding region and appear to be tightly conserved, probably in relation to the inclusion of intron sequences destined to be alternatively removed to play key regulatory roles in the mechanism of the pheromone gene expression.

  13. Genotyping of the protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii using high-resolution melting analysis of the repeated B1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jean-Marc; Cabaret, Odile; Moukoury, Sandrine; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2011-09-01

    Genetic studies of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii have identified three main distinct types according to virulence in some hosts. Several methods have been developed to differentiate genotypes currently dominated by microsatellite markers targeting single-copy loci. We analyzed the possibility of using the 35-fold repetitive B1 gene via high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis. Sequencing of the B1 gene of 14 reference strains (four Type I, six Type II, and four Type III strains) identified 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Primers were designed to amplify eight of them for HRM analysis and for relative quantification of each nucleotide variation using SNaPshot mini-sequencing. Genotyping with five microsatellite markers was performed for comparison. Two to four HRM profiles were obtained depending on the SNP tested. The differences observed relied on the different ratios of nucleotides at the SNP locus as evidenced via SNaPshot mini-sequencing. The three main lineages could be distinguished by using several HRM profiles. Some HRM profiles proved more informative than the analysis based on five microsatellite markers, showing additional differences in Type I and Type II strains. Using HRM analysis, we obtained at least an equally good discrimination of the main lineages than that based on five microsatellite markers.

  14. A P450 gene associated with robust resistance to DDT in ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila by efficient degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lifang; Fu, Chengjie; Yuan, Dongxia; Miao, Wei

    2014-04-01

    Analysis of metabolic mechanisms of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) accumulation and degradation in microorganisms, which could be used to reduce its hazard to higher organisms at the higher in the food chain, have not been investigated. Robust resistance to DDT (grows well in 256 mg/L DDT) and a surprising ability to degrade DDT (more than 70% DDT within 4h) were found in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. A P450 gene (CYP5013C2) was found to respond specifically to DDT treatment. In the presence of 256 mg/L DDT, cells with overexpressing CYP5013C2 (p450-OE) grew faster and degraded DDT more efficiently than wild-type (WT) cells, while cells with CYP5013C2 partially knocked down (p450-KD) grew slower and exhibited reduced ability to degrade DDT compared to WT cells. Both dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) were detected in cells after exposure to DDT, and the concentration of DDD in the p450-OE strain gradually decreased from 0.5 to 4h. Thus, we argue that this P450 gene (CYP5013C2), by efficiently degrading DDT to DDD, is associated with robust resistance to DDT in Tetrahymena, and that a strain overexpressing this gene has the potential to serve as bioreactor that degrades environmental DDT.

  15. 2-acylamino-5-nitro-1,3-thiazoles: preparation and in vitro bioevaluation against four neglected protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava-Zuazo, Carlos; Chávez-Silva, Fabiola; Moo-Puc, Rosa; Chan-Bacab, Manuel Jesús; Ortega-Morales, Benjamín Otto; Moreno-Díaz, Hermenegilda; Díaz-Coutiño, Daniel; Hernández-Núñez, Emanuel; Navarrete-Vázquez, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    The 2-acylamino-5-nitro-1,3-thiazole derivatives (1-14) were prepared using a one step reaction. All compounds were tested in vitro against four neglected protozoan parasites (Giardia intestinalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi). Acetamide (9), valeroylamide (10), benzamide (12), methylcarbamate (13) and ethyloxamate (14) derivatives were the most active compounds against G. intestinalis and T. vaginalis, showing nanomolar inhibition. Compound 13 (IC50=10nM), was 536-times more active than metronidazole, and 121-fold more effective than nitazoxanide against G. intestinalis. Compound 14 was 29-times more active than metronidazole and 6.5-fold more potent than nitazoxanide against T. vaginalis. Ureic derivatives 2, 3 and 5 showed moderate activity against L. amazonensis. None of them were active against T. cruzi. Ligand efficiency indexes analysis revealed higher intrinsic quality of the most active 2-acylamino derivatives than nitazoxanide and metronidazole. In silico toxicity profile was also computed for the most active compounds. A very low in vitro mammalian cytotoxicity was obtained for 13 and 14, showing selectivity indexes (SI) of 246,300 and 141,500, respectively. Nitazoxanide showed an excellent leishmanicidal and trypanocidal effect, repurposing this drug as potential new antikinetoplastid parasite compound.

  16. Comparison of protein expression profiles between three Perkinsus spp., protozoan parasites of molluscs, through 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Boo, S; Chicano-Gálvez, E; Alhama, J; Barea, J L; Villalba, A; Cao, A

    2014-05-01

    The genus Perkinsus includes protozoan parasites of a wide range of marine molluscs worldwide, some of which have been responsible for heavy mollusc mortalities and dramatic economic losses. This study was performed with the aim of increasing the knowledge of Perkinsus spp. proteome. Proteins extracted from in vitro cultured cells of three species of this genus, P. marinus, P. olseni and P. chesapeaki, were analysed using 2D electrophoresis. Four gels from each species were produced. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons among gels were performed with Proteamweaver software. Cluster analysis grouped the four gels of each Perkinsus sp.; furthermore, P. marinus and P. olseni gels were grouped in a cluster different from P. chesapeaki. Around 2000 spots of each species were considered, from which 213 spots were common to the 3 species; P. chesapeaki and P. marinus shared 310 spots, P. chesapeaki and P. olseni shared 315 spots and P. marinus and P. olseni shared 242 spots. A number of spots were exclusive of each Perkinsus species: 1161 spots were exclusive of P. chesapeaki, 1124 of P. olseni and 895 of P. marinus. A total of 84 spots, including common and species-specific ones, were excised from the gels and analysed using MALDI-TOF and nESI-IT (MS/MS) techniques. Forty-two spots were successfully sequenced, from which 28 were annotated, most of them clustered into electron transport, oxidative stress and detoxification, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, signal transduction, metabolic process and proteolysis.

  17. Hsp60 is targeted to a cryptic mitochondrion-derived organelle ("crypton") in the microaerophilic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Z; Ghosh, S; Frisardi, M; Rosenthal, B; Rogers, R; Samuelson, J

    1999-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a microaerophilic protozoan parasite in which neither mitochondria nor mitochondrion-derived organelles have been previously observed. Recently, a segment of an E. histolytica gene was identified that encoded a protein similar to the mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60 or chaperonin 60), which refolds nuclear-encoded proteins after passage through organellar membranes. The possible function and localization of the amebic Hsp60 were explored here. Like Hsp60 of mitochondria, amebic Hsp60 RNA and protein were both strongly induced by incubating parasites at 42 degreesC. 5' and 3' rapid amplifications of cDNA ends were used to obtain the entire E. histolytica hsp60 coding region, which predicted a 536-amino-acid Hsp60. The E. histolytica hsp60 gene protected from heat shock Escherichia coli groEL mutants, demonstrating the chaperonin function of the amebic Hsp60. The E. histolytica Hsp60, which lacked characteristic carboxy-terminal Gly-Met repeats, had a 21-amino-acid amino-terminal, organelle-targeting presequence that was cleaved in vivo. This presequence was necessary to target Hsp60 to one (and occasionally two or three) short, cylindrical organelle(s). In contrast, amebic alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and ferredoxin, which are bacteria-like enzymes, were diffusely distributed throughout the cytosol. We suggest that the Hsp60-associated, mitochondrion-derived organelle identified here be named "crypton," as its structure was previously hidden and its function is still cryptic.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum‐resident Rab8A GTPase is involved in phagocytosis in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanadate, Yuki; Saito‐Nakano, Yumiko; Nakada‐Tsukui, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phagocytosis is indispensable for the pathogenesis of the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Here, we showed that in E. histolytica Rab8A, which is generally involved in trafficking from the trans‐Golgi network to the plasma membrane in other organisms but was previously identified in phagosomes of the amoeba in the proteomic analysis, primarily resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and participates in phagocytosis. We demonstrated that down‐regulation of EhRab8A by small antisense RNA‐mediated transcriptional gene silencing remarkably reduced adherence and phagocytosis of erythrocytes, bacteria and carboxylated latex beads. Surface biotinylation followed by SDS‐PAGE analysis revealed that the surface expression of several proteins presumably involved in target recognition was reduced in the EhRab8A gene‐silenced strain. Further, overexpression of wild‐type EhRab8A augmented phagocytosis, whereas expression of the dominant‐negative form of EhRab8A resulted in reduced phagocytosis. These results indicated that EhRab8A regulates transport of surface receptor(s) for the prey from the ER to the plasma membrane. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the ER‐resident Rab GTPase is involved in phagocytosis through the regulation of trafficking of a surface receptor, supporting a premise of direct involvement of the ER in phagocytosis. PMID:26807810

  19. Detection of protozoan and bacterial pathogens of public health importance in faeces of Corvus spp. (large-billed crow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H Y; Stephen, A; Sushela, D; Mala, M

    2008-08-01

    Parasites and bacteria are reported in the faeces of birds in the current study. Fresh faecal samples of the large-billed crow (Corvus spp.) were collected from the study site at Bangsar, an urban setting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. These samples were transported to laboratory and analysed for parasites and bacteria. Pre-prepared XLD agar plates were used for culturing the bacteria in the laboratory. Using the API 20ETM Test Strips, 9 different species of bacteria were identified belonging to the family Enterobacteriacea. They were Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata, Salmonella arizonae, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei. The protozoan parasites detected include Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora spp., Blastocystis spp., and Capillaria hepatica and Ascaris lumbricoidus ova. Environmental air samples collected on agar plates using an air sampler in the area only produced fungal colonies. Some of these pathogens found in the crows are of zoonotic importance, especially Cryptosporidium, Blastocystis, Cyclopsora, Salmonella, Shigella and Kluyvera. The finding of Kluyvera spp. in crows in our current study highlights its zoonotic potential in an urban setting.

  20. In vitro activity of Etanidazole against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia B Petray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the in vitro action of an hydrosoluble 2-nitroimidazole, Etanidazole (EZL, against Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. EZL displayed lethal activity against isolated trypomastigotes as well as amastigotes of T. cruzi (RA strain growing in Vero cells or J774 macrophages, without affecting host cell viability. Although not completely equivalent to Benznidazole (BZL, the reference drug for Chagas chemotherapy, EZL takes advantage in exertingits anti-T. cruzi activity for longer periods without serious toxic side effects, as those recorded in BZL-treated patients. Our present results encourage further experiments to study in depth the trypanocidal properties of this drug already licensed for use in human cancers.

  1. In vitro activity of Etanidazole against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petray, Patricia B; Morilla, María J; Corral, Ricardo S; Romero, Eder L

    2004-03-01

    We investigated the in vitro action of an hydrosoluble 2-nitroimidazole, Etanidazole (EZL), against Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. EZL displayed lethal activity against isolated trypomastigotes as well as amastigotes of T. cruzi (RA strain) growing in Vero cells or J774 macrophages, without affecting host cell viability. Although not completely equivalent to Benznidazole (BZL), the reference drug for Chagas chemotherapy, EZL takes advantage in exerting its anti-T. cruzi activity for longer periods without serious toxic side effects, as those recorded in BZL-treated patients. Our present results encourage further experiments to study in depth the trypanocidal properties of this drug already licensed for use in human cancers.

  2. Targeting essential pathways in trypanosomatids gives insights into protozoan mechanisms of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasel Nicolas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis is a normal component of the development and health of multicellular organisms. However, apoptosis is now considered a prerogative of unicellular organisms, including the trypanosomatids of the genera Trypanosoma spp. and Leishmania spp., causative agents of some of the most important neglected human diseases. Trypanosomatids show typical hallmarks of apoptosis, although they lack some of the key molecules contributing to this process in metazoans, like caspase genes, Bcl-2 family genes and the TNF-related family of receptors. Despite the lack of these molecules, trypanosomatids appear to have the basic machinery to commit suicide. The components of the apoptotic execution machinery of these parasites are slowly coming into light, by targeting essential processes and pathways with different apoptogenic agents and inhibitors. This review will be confined to the events known to drive trypanosomatid parasites to apoptosis.

  3. Two distinct populations of bovine IL-17⁺ T-cells can be induced and WC1⁺IL-17⁺γδ T-cells are effective killers of protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, R K; Brill, R; Foster, D S; Bowen, A L; Leigh, J A; Coffey, T J; Flynn, R J

    2014-06-25

    IL-17 has emerged as a key player in the immune system, exhibiting roles in protection from infectious diseases and promoting inflammation in autoimmunity. Initially thought to be CD4 T-cell-derived, the sources of IL-17 are now known to be varied and belong to both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Mechanisms for inducing IL-17 production in lymphoid cells are thought to rely on appropriate antigenic stimulation in the context of TGF-β1, IL-6 and/or IL-1β. Using culture protocols adapted from human studies, we have effectively induced both bovine CD4(+) and WC1(+) γδ T-cells to produce IL-17 termed Th17 and γδ17 cells, respectively. The negative regulatory effect of IFN-γ on mouse and human IL-17 production can be extended to the bovine model, as addition of IFN-γ decreases IL-17 production in both cell types. Furthermore we show that infection with the protozoan Neospora caninum will induce fibroblasts to secrete pro-IL-17 factors thereby inducing a γδ17 phenotype that preferentially kills infected target cells. Our study identifies two T-cell sources of IL-17, and is the first to demonstrate a protective effect of IL-17(+) T-cells in ruminants. Our findings offer further opportunities for future adjuvants or vaccines which could benefit from inducing these responses.

  4. Temporal population dynamics of dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum in a semi-enclosed mariculture pond and its relationship to environmental factors and protozoan grazers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许恒龙; MIN; Gi-Sik; CHOI; Joong-Ki; 朱明壮; 姜勇; AL-RASHEID; Khaled; A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The ecological processes and interrelationships between protists,either autotrophic or heterotrophic,and environmental factors in mariculture ponds are largely unknown.This study investigated the temporal dynamics of potentially harmful dinoflagellate,Prorocentrum minimum (Pavillard) Schiller,and its relationship to physico-chemical factors and protozoan grazers over a complete cycle in a semi-enclosed shrimp-farming pond near Qingdao,Northern China.P.minimum occurred frequently in low numbers from June to ...

  5. Comparison of different methods of detection of enteric pathogenic protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, N H; Chowdhary, A

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to compare different methods of detection of pathogenic protozoan parasites in stool specimens of People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA). Stool specimens of 242 HIV sero-positive patients were examined using the wet mount technique, modified Ziehl-Neelsen's (ZN) staining, auto-fluorescence and auramine fluorescence staining. Patient specimens, 94 and 40 out of 242, were also subjected to Giardia antigen detection using an enzyme immunoassay and Cryptosporidium antigen detection by immuno-chromatography, respectively. For calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, light microscopy of wet mounts and modified ZN stained smears for Giardia and Coccidia, respectively, were considered as gold standards. Sensitivity of auto-fluorescence, auramine-O staining and antigen detection techniques was found to be 100% as compared to the routine standards. The specificity of auto-fluorescence was 90.6% and 100% for Cyclospora and Isospora, respectively; that of auramine-O staining was 98.9% for Cryptosporidium, 99.30% for Cyclospora and 100% for Isospora; and that of antigen detection was 90.6% and 97.7% for Cryptosporidium and Giardia, respectively. In laboratories requiring screening of large number of stool specimens for detection of protozoan parasites, fluorescence microscopy and antigen detection can be useful techniques. Confirmation of positive results, however, needs to be done with the standard techniques.

  6. Coronavirus–associated enteritis in a quail farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Camarda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An enteric syndrome observed in semi-intensively reared quails is described. The affected birds showed depression, severe diarrhoea and dehydration. The mortality occurred particularly in young birds. At necropsy, the prominent lesion was catarrhal enteritis. Laboratory investigations demonstrated the presence of coronavirus in the gut of dead animals. No additional pathogens were detected. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence for the presence of CoVs in quail with enteritis.

  7. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Piña-Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina. The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa.

  8. Prevalence and pathology of the nematode Heterakis gallinarum, the trematode Paratanaisia bragai, and the protozoan Histomonas meleagridis in the turkey, Meleagris gallopavo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Beatriz; Tortelly, Rogério; Menezes, Rodrigo Caldas; Muniz-Pereira, Luís C; Pinto, Roberto Magalhães

    2006-09-01

    The prevalence of infection and associated pathology induced by two helminth and one protozoan species infecting Brazilian turkeys are reported. The intestinal nematode Heterakis gallinarum appeared with a prevalence of 70% in the infected birds, without gross lesions when not associated to the protozoan Histomonas meleagridis. Histological findings in the ceca were represented by the presence of H. gallinarum worms, intense chronic diffuse inflammatory processes with mononuclear and polymorphonuclear (heterophils) leucocyte infiltrations. The prevalence of the protozoan H. meleagridis associated to H. gallinarum was of 2.5% and microscopic examination revealed a severe inflammatory process in the liver and cecum with the presence of small clear areas with round eosinophilic parasites. Gross lesions were absent in turkeys infected with the renal digenetic trematode Paratanaisia bragai; the parasite was prevalent in 20% of the cases and cross-sections of the kidneys showed a remarkable distension of the collecting ducts with several worms in the lumen. The walls of the ducts presented a discrete heterophilic infiltrate among mononuclear cells.

  9. Prevalence and pathology of the nematode Heterakis gallinarum, the trematode Paratanaisia bragai, and the protozoan Histomonas meleagridis in the turkey, Meleagris gallopavo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Brener

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of infection and associated pathology induced by two helminth and one protozoan species infecting Brazilian turkeys are reported. The intestinal nematode Heterakis gallinarum appeared with a prevalence of 70% in the infected birds, without gross lesions when not associated to the protozoan Histomonas meleagridis. Histological findings in the ceca were represented by the presence of H. gallinarum worms, intense chronic diffuse inflammatory processes with mononuclear and polymorphonuclear (heterophils leucocyte infiltrations. The prevalence of the protozoan H. meleagridis associated to H. gallinarum was of 2.5% and microscopic examination revealed a severe inflammatory process in the liver and cecum with the presence of small clear areas with round eosinophilic parasites. Gross lesions were absent in turkeys infected with the renal digenetic trematode Paratanaisia bragai; the parasite was prevalent in 20% of the cases and cross-sections of the kidneys showed a remarkable distension of the collecting ducts with several worms in the lumen. The walls of the ducts presented a discrete heterophilic infiltrate among mononuclear cells.

  10. Structure and seasonal dynamics of the protozoan community (heterotrophic flagellates, ciliates, amoeboid protozoa) in the plankton of a large river (River Danube, Hungary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Aron Keve; Acs, Eva; Kiss, Keve Tihamér; Török, Júlia Katalin

    2009-05-01

    Seasonal dynamics of all major protozoan groups were investigated in the plankton of the River Danube, upstream of Budapest (Hungary), by bi-weekly sampling over a 1-year long period. Sixty-one heterotrophic flagellate, 14 naked amoeba, 50 testate amoeba, 4 heliozoan and 83 ciliate morphospecies were identified. The estimated abundance ranges of major groups throughout the year were as follows: heterotrophic flagellates, 0.27-7.8 x 10(6)ind.l(-1); naked amoebae, max. 3300ind.l(-1); testaceans, max. 1600ind.l(-1); heliozoans, max. 8500ind.l(-1); ciliates, 132-34,000ind.l(-1). In terms of biovolume, heterotrophic flagellates dominated throughout the year (max. 0.58mm(3)l(-1)), and ciliates only exceeded their biovolume in summer (max. 0.76mm(3)l(-1)). Naked amoeba and heliozoan biovolume was about one, and testacean biovolume 1-3, orders of magnitude lower than that of ciliates. In winter, flagellates, mainly chrysomonads, had the highest biomass, whilst ciliates were dominated by peritrichs. In 2005 from April to July a long spring/summer peak occurred for all protozoan groups. Beside chrysomonads typical flagellates were choanoflagellates, bicosoecids and abundant microflagellates (large chrysomonads and Collodictyon). Most abundant ciliates were oligotrichs, while Phascolodon, Urotricha, Vorticella, haptorids, Suctoria, Climacostomum and Stokesia also contributed significantly to biovolume during rapid succession processes. In October and November a second high protozoan peak occurred, with flagellate dominance, and slightly different taxonomic composition.

  11. Genome and transcriptome studies of the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Giardia intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Alexandra J. E.

    Vocal fold (VF) diseases and disorders are difficult to treat surgically or therapeutically. Tissue engineering offers an alternative strategy for the restoration of functional VF. In this work, we have developed tissue engineering methodologies for the functional reconstruction of VF. As a first step, the structure, composition and mechanical properties of native VF tissues have been investigated. In pigs ranging from fetal to 2+ years old, the VF structure and viscoelastic properties were found to be age-dependent. Adult tissues were more organized, displaying a denser lamina propria, and mature elastin fibers compared to fetal tissues, resulting in higher storage moduli. Secondly, biomimetic scaffolds which recaptured the mechanical properties of the native VF were developed. Chemically-defined collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA) composite hydrogels, and elastin-mimetic hybrid polymers (EMHPs) were successfully used as conducive 3D matrices, and 2D elastic scaffolds respectively, to in vitro static culture of fibroblasts. While the collagen-HA hydrogels allowed for in situ cell encapsulation and supported cell attachment and proliferation in 3D, the integrin-binding domain RGDSP was needed for cell proliferation on EMHPs. To emulate in vitro the mechanical environment of the native VF tissue, a dynamic culture system capable of generating vibratory stimulations at human phonation frequencies was successfully created and characterized. Gene expression analysis of fibroblasts subjected to 1 hour vibrations in 2D revealed that the expression of ECM-related genes was altered in response to changes in vibratory frequency and amplitude. Finally, expanding on our previous studies, the dynamic culture system was modified to accommodate for the long-term dynamic culture of cell-laden hydrogels. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in a collagen/HA-based hydrogel, cultured in presence of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and subjected to high frequency

  12. [Sensory evaluation of enteral nutritional supplements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell Vidal, Lina; Sánchez Juan, Carlos; Alfonso García, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) is indicated in patients who, although they may not eat enough food, maintain a sufficient function to receive, digest and absorb nutrients digestive system. Oral Nutritional Supplements (SON) are nutritionally complete or incomplete formulas (depending on whether or not provide all the nutrients needed to serve as the sole source of nutrients), which supplement inadequate oral diet. This study aims to evaluate the organoleptic characteristics of hyperproteic, normoproteic and fiber-enriched oral SON. SON test, carried out at the Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition Consortium Hospital General Universitario de Valencia from October 2012 to February 2013. 137 SON were evaluated in total, of which 47 were hyperproteic, 46 normoproteic and 44 enriched in fiber. Of the SON evaluated in the group of hyperproteic the following 3 SON obtained the best scores: Fresenius Prot Energy Drink® (21,27, vanilla flavor), Avant Standard Nut® (20.3 , strawberry flavor) and Resource® Protein (20.01, chocolate flavor) In the group of normoproteic SON the 3 best rated were: Ensure Plus® (22.3, banana flavor), Ensure Plus® (21.9, peach flavor) and Fresubin Energy Drink® (21, strawberry flavor) In the group of fiber-enriched the 3 SON most appreciated were: 2 Kcal Fresubin Fibre Drink® (23.78, vanilla flavor), Ensure Plus® TwoCal (22.9, banana flavor) and Fortimel Compact® (21.5, strawberry flavor) The study aims to guide clinicians on what SON may be more acceptable to the patient, so that the SON serve their purpose and restore or improve nutritional status, as the SON intervention is safe and cost - effective, since they improve both the functionality and quality of life. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Avian rotavirus enteritis - an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Saminathan, Mani; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Naveen; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are among the leading causes of enteritis and diarrhea in a number of mammalian and avian species, and impose colossal loss to livestock and poultry industry globally. Subsequent to detection of rotavirus in mammalian hosts in 1973, avian rotavirus (AvRV) was first reported in turkey poults in USA during 1977 and since then RVs of group A (RVA), D (RVD), F (RVF) and G (RVG) have been identified around the globe. Besides RVA, other AvRV groups (RVD, RVF and RVG) may also contribute to disease. However, their significance has yet to be unraveled. Under field conditions, co-infection of AvRVs occurs with other infectious agents such as astroviruses, enteroviruses, reoviruses, paramyxovirus, adenovirus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, cryptosporidium and Eimeria species prospering severity of disease outcome. Birds surviving to RV disease predominantly succumb to secondary bacterial infections, mostly E. coli and Salmonella spp. Recent developments in molecular tools including state-of-the-art diagnostics and vaccine development have led to advances in our understanding towards AvRVs. Development of new generation vaccines using immunogenic antigens of AvRV has to be explored and given due importance. Till now, no effective vaccines are available. Although specific as well as sensitive approaches are available to identify and characterize AvRVs, there is still need to have point-of-care detection assays to review disease burden, contemplate new directions for adopting vaccination and follow improvements in public health measures. This review discusses AvRVs, their epidemiology, pathology and pathogenesis, immunity, recent trends in diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics as well as appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  14. Enteral feeding pumps: efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White H

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Helen White, Linsey King Nutrition and Dietetic Group, School of Health and Wellbeing, Faculty Health and Social Science, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, United Kingdom Abstract: Enteral feeding is a long established practice across pediatric and adult populations, to enhance nutritional intake and prevent malnutrition. Despite recognition of the importance of nutrition within the modern health agenda, evaluation of the efficacy of how such feeds are delivered is more limited. The accuracy, safety, and consistency with which enteral feed pump systems dispense nutritional formulae are important determinants of their use and acceptability. Enteral feed pump safety has received increased interest in recent years as enteral pumps are used across hospital and home settings. Four areas of enteral feed pump safety have emerged: the consistent and accurate delivery of formula; the minimization of errors associated with tube misconnection; the impact of continuous feed delivery itself (via an enteral feed pump; and the chemical composition of the casing used in enteral feed pump manufacture. The daily use of pumps in delivery of enteral feeds in a home setting predominantly falls to the hands of parents and caregivers. Their understanding of the use and function of their pump is necessary to ensure appropriate, safe, and accurate delivery of enteral nutrition; their experience with this is important in informing clinicians and manufacturers of the emerging needs and requirements of this diverse patient population. The review highlights current practice and areas of concern and establishes our current knowledge in this field. Keywords: nutrition, perceptions, experience

  15. [Update of enteral nutrition at the patient's home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Luna, P P; Parejo Campos, J; Fenoy Macías, J L

    1999-05-01

    Home enteral nutrition is the administration of enteral formulae into the digestive tract using a tube, with the objective of preventing or correcting malnutrition patients who are seen at home. Home enteral nutrition is a type of nutritional support that is growing, that improves the nutritional status of the patient with a lower cost and with a greater quality of life of the family unit than enteral nutrition in the hospital. The prevalence is clearly increasing although the data of the national registers of patients with at home enteral nutrition are under estimated. Patients who are candidates for home enteral nutrition can be all those with an indication for enteral nutrition and whose underlying disease is stabilized or does not require all the technical means of the hospital in a permanent and essential manner. Neoplasias and neurological diseases are those that benefit most from at home enteral nutrition and in all registries each group varies between 30 and 40%. All access routes and all enteral nutrition formulae can be used in patients with home enteral nutrition. The use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomies is ever more recommended in patients who need at home enteral nutrition for a period longer than 4 weeks. Since the publication of the Ministerial Order of June 2nd 1998, home enteral nutrition is considered a health care service that can be covered by the Social Security. This order lists a series of disease that are likely to be treated with at home enteral nutrition (in our opinion the list is not complete but it is likely to be changed in the future by an Assessing Committee), and it presents some basic norms that all patients must comply with, regardless of the autonomous community in which they live. Before beginning at home enteral nutrition the training of the patient and/or the family with regard to the management of at home enteral nutrition is essential. The existence of qualified personnel with experience in this nutritional support

  16. The prevalence of Blastocystis hominis and other protozoan parasites in soldiers returning from peacekeeping missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Aleksandra; Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta; Lanocha-Arendarczyk, Natalia; Kołodziejczyk, Lidia; Lanocha, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a common intestinal parasite found in humans living in poor sanitary conditions, living in tropical and subtropical climates, exposed to infected animals, or consuming contaminated food or water. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of B. hominis in Polish military personnel returning from peacekeeping missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. In total, 1,826 stool samples were examined. Gastrointestinal parasites were detected in 17% of the soldiers. The examined stool samples most frequently contained vacuolar forms of B. hominis (15.3%) and cysts of Entamoeba coli (1.0%) or Giardia lamblia (0.7%). In 97.1% of stool samples from infected soldiers, we observed less than five developmental forms of B. hominis in the field of view (40×). The parasite infections in soldiers were diagnosed in the autumn and the spring. There was no statistical correlation between age and B. hominis infection. Our results show that peacekeeping missions in countries with tropical or subtropical climates could be associated with risk for parasitic diseases, including blastocystosis.

  17. Lipid synthesis in protozoan parasites: a comparison between kinetoplastids and apicomplexans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Serricchio, Mauro; Striepen, Boris; Bütikofer, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Lipid metabolism is of crucial importance for pathogens. Lipids serve as cellular building blocks, signalling molecules, energy stores, posttranslational modifiers, and pathogenesis factors. Parasites rely on a complex system of uptake and synthesis mechanisms to satisfy their lipid needs. The parameters of this system change dramatically as the parasite transits through the various stages of its life cycle. Here we discuss the tremendous recent advances that have been made in the understanding of the synthesis and uptake pathways for fatty acids and phospholipids in apicomplexan and kinetoplastid parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, Trypanosoma and Leishmania. Lipid synthesis differs in significant ways between parasites from both phyla and the human host. Parasites have acquired novel pathways through endosymbiosis, as in the case of the apicoplast, have dramatically reshaped substrate and product profiles, and have evolved specialized lipids to interact with or manipulate the host. These differences potentially provide opportunities for drug development. We outline the lipid pathways for key species in detail as they progress through the developmental cycle and highlight those that are of particular importance to the biology of the pathogens and/or are the most promising targets for parasite-specific treatment.

  18. Lipid Synthesis in Protozoan Parasites: a Comparison Between Kinetoplastids and Apicomplexans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Serricchio, Mauro; Striepen, Boris; Bütikofer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is of crucial importance for pathogens. Lipids serve as cellular building blocks, signalling molecules, energy stores, posttranslational modifiers, and pathogenesis factors. Parasites rely on a complex system of uptake and synthesis mechanisms to satisfy their lipid needs. The parameters of this system change dramatically as the parasite transits through the various stages of its life cycle. Here we discuss the tremendous recent advances that have been made in the understanding of the synthesis and uptake pathways for fatty acids and phospholipids in apicomplexan and kinetoplastid parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, Trypanosoma and Leishmania. Lipid synthesis differs in significant ways between parasites from both phyla and the human host. Parasites have acquired novel pathways through endosymbiosis, as in the case of the apicoplast, have dramatically reshaped substrate and product profiles, and have evolved specialized lipids to interact with or manipulate the host. These differences potentially provide opportunities for drug development. We outline the lipid pathways for key species in detail as they progress through the developmental cycle and highlight those that are of particular importance to the biology of the pathogens and/or are the most promising targets for parasite-specific treatment. PMID:23827884

  19. Enteral nutrition: past and future Nutrición enteral: pasado y futuro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bengmark

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative nutrition has during the last century been transformed from a tool to provide calorie and nitrogen support to a tool to boost the immune system and increase resistance to complications. Despite all progress in medicine and surgery has perioperative morbidity, rate of infections, thrombosis and development of serosal adhesions remained the same as long as can be judged or at least during the last eighty years. Most prone to develop complications are persons above the age of 65 and persons with depressed immunity. About cighty percent of the immune system is localised in the gastrointestinal tract, which offers great opportunities for modulation through enterar nutrition. As the stomach has a tendency to develop postoperative paralysis, tube feeding is often necessary. Andresen demonstrated already in 1918 the advantages of enteral nutrition, which starts already on the table. Mulholland et al and Rhoads and co-workers demonstrated during the 1940s certain advantages of enteral tube feeding. Also works by Alexander, Fischer, Ryan and their co-workers supported the value of early enteral feeding, and suggested enteral feeding as an effective tool to boost the immune system. it was, however, works published in the early nineties by Moore et al and by Kudsk et al, which made surgeons more aware of the advantages of early enteral nutrition. Major surgery is known to have a high rate of complications. Uninterrupted perioperative nutrition, eg nutrition during the night before, during surgery and immediately after offers a strong tool to prevent complications. lt is essential that the nutrition provides food also for the colon, e.g. fibres and healthy bacteria (probiotics to ferment the fibre and boost the immune system.Durante el último siglo la nutrición perioperatoria ha pasado de ser un mero instrumento para proporcionar calorías y soporte nitrogenado a una herramienta reforzadora del sistema inmunológico aumentando la resistencia

  20. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Jane C.; Settimo, Luca; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (DA; Berenil®), cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (melarsoprol/pentamidine cross resistance, MPXR) is the result of loss of a separate high affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the “selectivity region” of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a