WorldWideScience

Sample records for human dynamic orientation

  1. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application.

  2. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  3. Relationships between observer and Kalman Filter models for human dynamic spatial orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Pierre; Oman, Charles M

    2012-01-01

    How does the central nervous system (CNS) combine sensory information from semicircular canal, otolith, and visual systems into perceptions of rotation, translation and tilt? Over the past four decades, a variety of input-output ("black box") mathematical models have been proposed to predict human dynamic spatial orientation perception and eye movements. The models have proved useful in vestibular diagnosis, aircraft accident investigation, and flight simulator design. Experimental refinement continues. This paper briefly reviews the history of two widely known model families, the linear "Kalman Filter" and the nonlinear "Observer". Recent physiologic data supports the internal model assumptions common to both. We derive simple 1-D and 3-D examples of each model for vestibular inputs, and show why - despite apparently different structure and assumptions - the linearized model predictions are dynamically equivalent when the four free model parameters are adjusted to fit the same empirical data, and perceived head orientation remains near upright. We argue that the motion disturbance and sensor noise spectra employed in the Kalman Filter formulation may reflect normal movements in daily life and perceptual thresholds, and thus justify the interpretation that the CNS cue blending scheme may well minimize least squares angular velocity perceptual errors.

  4. Dynamics of cell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel A.

    2007-09-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to mechanical forces generated by the contractile activity of the cell or by external stresses. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitivity of cells and the elasticity of the matrix, we predict the dynamics and orientation of cells in both the absence and presence of applied stresses. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the cellular forces in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency.

  5. Human Aquaporin 4 Gating Dynamics under Perpendicularly-Oriented Electric-Field Impulses: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marracino, Paolo; Liberti, Micaela; Trapani, Erika; Burnham, Christian J.; Avena, Massimiliano; Garate, José-Antonio; Apollonio, Francesca; English, Niall J.

    2016-01-01

    Human aquaporin 4 has been studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the absence and presence of pulses of external static electric fields. The pulses were 10 ns in duration and 0.012–0.065 V/Å in intensity acting along both directions perpendicular to the pores. Water permeability and the dipolar response of all residues of interest (including the selectivity filter) within the pores have been studied. Results showed decreased levels of water osmotic permeability within aquaporin channels during orthogonally-oriented field impulses, although care must be taken with regard to statistical certainty. This can be explained observing enhanced “dipolar flipping” of certain key residues, especially serine 211, histidine 201, arginine 216, histidine 95 and cysteine 178. These residues are placed at the extracellular end of the pore (serine 211, histidine 201, and arginine 216) and at the cytoplasm end (histidine 95 and cysteine 178), with the key role in gating mechanism, hence influencing water permeability. PMID:27428954

  6. Orientational dynamics of human red blood cells in an optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, Praveen; Nagesh, Belavadi V; Lakkegowda, Yogesha; Iyengar, Shruthi S; Ananthamurthy, Sharath; Bhattacharya, Sarbari

    2013-02-01

    We report here on studies of reorientation of human red blood cells (RBCs) in an optical trap. We have measured the time required, tre, for the plane of the RBC entering the optical trap to undergo a 90-deg rotation to acquire an edge on orientation with respect to the beam direction. This has been studied as a function of laser power, P, at the trap center. The variation of tre with increasing P shows an initial sharp decrease followed by a much smaller rate of further decrease. We find that this experimentally measured variation is not in complete agreement with the variation predicted by a theoretical model where the RBC is treated as a perfectly rigid circular disk-like body. We argue that this deviation arises due to deformation of the RBC. We further reason that this feature is dominated by the elastic behavior of the RBC membrane. We compare the studies carried out on normal RBCs with RBCs where varying conditions of membrane stiffness are expected. We propose that the value of energy used for maximum deformation possible during a reorientation process is an indicator of the membrane elasticity of the system under study.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics of cell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; de, Rumi

    2009-12-01

    The nonlinear dependence of cellular orientation on an external, time-varying stress field determines the distribution of orientations in the presence of noise and the characteristic time, τc , for the cell to reach its steady-state orientation. The short, local cytoskeletal relaxation time distinguishes between high-frequency (nearly perpendicular) and low-frequency (random or parallel) orientations. However, τc is determined by the much longer, orientational relaxation time. This behavior is related to experiments for which we predict the angle and characteristic time as a function of frequency.

  8. Dynamics of market orientation in Croatian economy

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana First; Bruno Grbac

    2011-01-01

    It was the goal of this research to examine the dynamics of Croatian transformation to market orientation and test whether the market orientation model changes with time as the business environment changes. Based on the literature analysis, we proposed a hypothetical model which relies on behavioural approach in understanding market orientation. To empirically test the hypothetical model, we used data previously collected for 2001, and by replicating the same questionnaire now collected data ...

  9. Dynamic Slicing of Object-Oriented Programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Program slice has many applications such as program debugging,testing, maintena n ce, and complexity measurement. A static slice consists of all statements in pro gram P that may effect the value of variable v at some point p, and a dynamic s lice consists only of statements that influence the value of variable occurrence for specific program inputs. In this paper, we concern the problem of dynamic s licing of object-oriented programs which, to our knowledge, has not been addres s ed in the literatures. To solve this problem, we present the dynamic object-ori e nted dependence graph (DODG)which is an arc-classified digraph to explicitly re p resent various dynamic dependence between statement instances for a particular e xecution of an object-oriented program. Based on the DODG, we present a two-ph as e backward algorithm for computing a dynamic slice of an object-oriented program.

  10. Dynamics of market orientation in Croatian economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana First

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It was the goal of this research to examine the dynamics of Croatian transformation to market orientation and test whether the market orientation model changes with time as the business environment changes. Based on the literature analysis, we proposed a hypothetical model which relies on behavioural approach in understanding market orientation. To empirically test the hypothetical model, we used data previously collected for 2001, and by replicating the same questionnaire now collected data for 2011. Data was analyzed by hierarchical regression analysis on the two sets of data. Our findings reveal that Croatian organizations reached the level of moderate market orientation leaving space for improvement. Findings also reveal that higher level of market orientation correlates with higher business performance. Furthermore, with development of ICT, the model of market orientation modified in time in a way that in predicting successful market oriented reaction, specific information on consumer satisfaction gains importance, while general information from competitor and consumer databases lose importance. Despite the changes in the relationships among the elements of market orientation, the model itself similarly predicts performance today as it did ten years ago. Managers are advised to increase implementation of market orientation especially focusing on market responsiveness as such behaviour will lead to better performance.

  11. Moral Orientation Dynamics in Adolescence and Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molchanov S.V.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of moral development is actual for modern psychology. Modern conception of moral development defines two main principles in the basis of moral orientation: care principle and justice principle. Adolescence and youth are sensitive period to develop moral orientation. 139 subjects from three age groups: young adolescents, older adolescents and youth took part in the investigation. Results shows age dynamic of moral judgments preferences, moral dilemma solving with different levels of motivation to achieve and be approved.

  12. Learning Dynamic Control of Body Roll Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Vimal, Vivekanand Pandey; Lackner, James R.; DiZio, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to examine how the control of orientation is learned in a task involving dynamically balancing about an unstable equilibrium point, the gravitational vertical, in the absence of leg reflexes and muscle stiffness. Subjects (n=10) used a joystick to set themselves to the gravitational vertical while seated in a multi-axis rotation system device (MARS) programmed with inverted pendulum dynamics. The MARS is driven by powerful servomotors and can faithfully follow joystick comma...

  13. Object Oriented Modelling and Dynamical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1998-01-01

    This report with appendix describes the work done in master project at DTU.The goal of the project was to develop a concept for simulation of dynamical systems based on object oriented methods.The result was a library of C++-classes, for use when both building componentbased models and when...

  14. Object Oriented Modelling and Dynamical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1998-01-01

    This report with appendix describes the work done in master project at DTU.The goal of the project was to develop a concept for simulation of dynamical systems based on object oriented methods.The result was a library of C++-classes, for use when both building componentbased models and when...... onduction simulation experiments....

  15. Concept-Oriented Modeling of Dynamic Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, P.C.; Borutzky, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    This chapter introduces the reader to the concept-oriented approach to modeling that clearly separates ideal concepts from the physical components of a system when modeling its dynamic behavior for a specific problem context. This is done from a port-based point of view for which the domain-independ

  16. Dynamical scenarios for chromosome bi-orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongli; Oliveira, Raquel A; Schmierer, Bernhard; Novák, Béla

    2013-06-18

    Chromosome bi-orientation at the metaphase spindle is essential for precise segregation of the genetic material. The process is error-prone, and error-correction mechanisms exist to switch misaligned chromosomes to the correct, bi-oriented configuration. Here, we analyze several possible dynamical scenarios to explore how cells might achieve correct bi-orientation in an efficient and robust manner. We first illustrate that tension-mediated feedback between the sister kinetochores can give rise to a bistable switch, which allows robust distinction between a loose attachment with low tension and a strong attachment with high tension. However, this mechanism has difficulties in explaining how bi-orientation is initiated starting from unattached kinetochores. We propose four possible mechanisms to overcome this problem (exploiting molecular noise; allowing an efficient attachment of kinetochores already in the absence of tension; a trial-and-error oscillation; and a stochastic bistable switch), and assess their impact on the bi-orientation process. Based on our results and supported by experimental data, we put forward a trial-and-error oscillation and a stochastic bistable switch as two elegant mechanisms with the potential to promote bi-orientation both efficiently and robustly.

  17. Minireview: Hormones and Human Sexual Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Balthazart, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Many people believe that sexual orientation (homosexuality vs. heterosexuality) is determined by education and social constraints. There are, however, a large number of studies indicating that prenatal factors have an important influence on this critical feature of human sexuality. Sexual orientation is a sexually differentiated trait (over 90% of men are attracted to women and vice versa). In animals and men, many sexually differentiated characteristics are organized during early life by sex...

  18. Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Callum J; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2012-11-01

    The same pattern of vestibular afferent feedback may signify a loss of balance or a change in body orientation, depending upon the initial head posture. To resolve this ambiguity and generate an appropriate motor response, the CNS must transform vestibular information from a head-centred reference frame into relevant motor coordinates. But what if the reference frame is continuously moving? Here, we ask if this neural transformation process is continuously updated during a voluntary change in head posture. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to induce a sensation of head roll motion in blindfolded subjects marching on the spot. When head orientation was fixed, this caused unconscious turning behaviour that was maximal during neck flexion, minimal with the head level and reversed direction with neck extension. Subjects were then asked to produce a continuous voluntary change in head pitch, while GVS was applied. As the neck moved from full flexion into extension, turn velocity was continuously modulated and even reversed direction, reflecting the pattern observed during the head-fixed condition. Hence, an identical vestibular input resulted in motor output which was dynamically modulated by changes in head pitch. However, response magnitude was significantly reduced, suggesting possible suppression of vestibular input during voluntary head movement. Nevertheless, these results show that the CNS continuously reinterprets vestibular exafference to account for ongoing voluntary changes in head posture. This may explain why the head can be moved freely without losing the sense of balance and orientation.

  19. Minireview: Hormones and human sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balthazart, Jacques

    2011-08-01

    Many people believe that sexual orientation (homosexuality vs. heterosexuality) is determined by education and social constraints. There are, however, a large number of studies indicating that prenatal factors have an important influence on this critical feature of human sexuality. Sexual orientation is a sexually differentiated trait (over 90% of men are attracted to women and vice versa). In animals and men, many sexually differentiated characteristics are organized during early life by sex steroids, and one can wonder whether the same mechanism also affects human sexual orientation. Two types of evidence support this notion. First, multiple sexually differentiated behavioral, physiological, or even morphological traits are significantly different in homosexual and heterosexual populations. Because some of these traits are known to be organized by prenatal steroids, including testosterone, these differences suggest that homosexual subjects were, on average, exposed to atypical endocrine conditions during development. Second, clinical conditions associated with significant endocrine changes during embryonic life often result in an increased incidence of homosexuality. It seems therefore that the prenatal endocrine environment has a significant influence on human sexual orientation but a large fraction of the variance in this behavioral characteristic remains unexplained to date. Genetic differences affecting behavior either in a direct manner or by changing embryonic hormone secretion or action may also be involved. How these biological prenatal factors interact with postnatal social factors to determine life-long sexual orientation remains to be determined.

  20. Modulation of stimulus contrast on the human pupil orienting response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-An; Munoz, Douglas P

    2014-09-01

    The sudden appearance of a novel stimulus initiates a series of responses to orient the body for appropriate actions, including not only shifts of gaze and attention, but also transient pupil dilation. Modulation of pupil dynamics by stimulus properties is less understood, although its effects on other components of orienting have been extensively explored. Microstimulation of the superior colliculus evoked transient pupil dilation, and the initial component of pupil dilation evoked by microstimulation was similar to that elicited by the presentation of salient sensory stimuli, suggesting a coordinated role of the superior colliculus on this behavior, although evidence in humans is yet to be established. To examine pupil orienting responses in humans, we presented visual stimuli while participants fixated on a central visual spot. Transient pupil dilation in humans was elicited after presentation of a visual stimulus in the periphery. The evoked pupil responses were modulated systematically by stimulus contrast, with faster and larger pupil responses triggered by higher contrast stimuli. The pupil response onset latencies for high contrast stimuli were similar to those produced by the light reflex and significantly faster than the darkness reflex, suggesting that the initial component of pupil dilation is probably mediated by inhibition of the parasympathetic pathway. The contrast modulation was pronounced under different levels of baseline pupil size. Together, our results demonstrate visual contrast modulation on the orienting pupil response in humans.

  1. Human Body Orientation Estimation using a Committee based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ichim, M; Tan, R.T.; van der Aa, N.P.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Human body orientation estimation is useful for analyzing the activities of a single person or a group of people. Estimating body orientation can be subdivided in two tasks: human tracking and orientation estimation. In this paper, the second task of orientation estimation is accomplished by using H

  2. Dynamic object-oriented geospatial modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Richta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Published literature about moving objects (MO simplifies the problem to the representation and storage of moving points, moving lines, or moving regions. The main insufficiency of this approach is lack of MO inner structure and dynamics modeling – the autonomy of moving agent. This paper describes basics of the object-oriented geospatial methodology for modeling complex systems consisting of agents, which move within spatial environment. The main idea is that during the agent movement, different kinds of connections with other moving or stationary objects are established or disposed, based on some spatial constraint satisfaction or nonfulfilment respectively. The methodology is constructed with regard to following two main conditions – 1 the inner behavior of agents should be represented by any formalism, e.g.  Petri net, finite state machine, etc., and 2 the spatial characteristic of environment should be supplied by any information system, that is able to store defined set of spatial types, and support defined set of spatial operations. Finally, the methodology is demonstrated on simple simulation model of tram transportation system.

  3. Unified rotational dynamics of molecular crystals with orientational phase transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, K.H.; Raedt, H. De

    1976-01-01

    A unified theory for the rotational dynamics of molecular crystals with orientational phase transitions is given. As basic secular variables one takes symmetry adapted functions, which describe the molecular orientations, and the angular momenta of the molecules. Using Mori’s projection operator tec

  4. Human resource management in the project-oriented organization: Employee well-being and ethical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, R.; Huemann, M.; Keegan, A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a wider study into human resource management (HRM) practices in project-oriented organizations, we investigated the issue of employee well-being. Project-oriented organizations adopt temporary work processes to deliver products and services to clients. This creates a dynamic work environm

  5. Human resource management in the project-oriented organization: Employee well-being and ethical treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, R.; Huemann, M.; Keegan, A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a wider study into human resource management (HRM) practices in project-oriented organizations, we investigated the issue of employee well-being. Project-oriented organizations adopt temporary work processes to deliver products and services to clients. This creates a dynamic work

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.sternberg@partner.kit.edu; Witter, Raiker [Tallinn University of Technology, Technomedicum (Estonia)

    2015-11-15

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide.

  8. Decision science a human-oriented perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Mengov, George

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a new perspective on human decision-making by comparing the established methods in decision science with innovative modelling at the level of neurons and neural interactions. The book presents a new generation of computer models, which can predict with astonishing accuracy individual economic choices when people make them by quick intuition rather than by effort. A vision for a new kind of social science is outlined, whereby neural models of emotion and cognition capture the dynamics of socioeconomic systems and virtual social networks. The exposition is approachable by experts as well as by advanced students. The author is an Associate Professor of Decision Science with a doctorate in Computational Neuroscience, and a former software consultant to banks in the City of London.  .

  9. Prior implicit knowledge shapes human threshold for orientation noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeppe H; Bex, Peter J; Fiser, József

    2015-01-01

    , resulting in an image-class-specific threshold that changes the shape and position of the dipper function according to image class. These findings do not fit a filter-based feed-forward view of orientation coding, but can be explained by a process that utilizes an experience-based perceptual prior...... of the expected local orientations and their noise. Thus, the visual system encodes orientation in a dynamic context by continuously combining sensory information with expectations derived from earlier experiences....

  10. Macroscopic lamellae orientations of diblock copolymer induced by dynamic shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红东; 杨玉良

    1997-01-01

    Computer simulation based on the coupled map lattices has been carried out for morphologies of the diblock copolymeric system under applied periodic shear deformation.The main effort is concentrated on the influence of pre-annenling history on the lamellae orientations in dynamically sheared diblock copolymers.It is found that whatever the quenching temperature is,the perpendicular orientation (i.e.the lamellae normal is parallel to the vorticity axis) is always observed if the dynamic shear deformation with shear amplitude F=1.0 and reduced shear frequency=0.005 is applied during annealing.In contrast to that,the parallel orientation (i.e.the lamellae normal is parallel to the velocity gradient direction) is observed if the dynamic shear with the same amplitude and frequency is applied to a thoroughly annealed (with the annealing time t>4 000) diblock copolymer.Therefore,it is pointed out that the selection of lamellar orientations in dynamically sheared diblock copolymers is not solely dependent on th

  11. Human resource management in the project-oriented organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Turner; M. Huemann; A. Keegan

    2008-01-01

    Human Resource Management (HRM) in project-oriented organizations is a relatively unexplored topic though it is essential to the success of the organization and its competitive advantage. Project-oriented organizations operate differently from classic business organizations in that they adopt tempor

  12. Human resource management in the project-oriented organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, J.R.; Huemann, M.; Keegan, A.

    2008-01-01

    Human Resource Management (HRM) in project-oriented organizations is a relatively unexplored topic though it is essential to the success of the organization and its competitive advantage. Project-oriented organizations operate differently from classic business organizations in that they adopt

  13. Static and Dynamic Quality Assurance by Aspect Oriented Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Knabe, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    The overall goal of the described research project was to create applicable quality assurance patterns for Java software systems using the aspect-oriented programming language extension AspectJ 5. We tried to develop aspects to check static quality criteria as a variable mutator convention and architectural layering rules. We successfully developed aspects for automating the following dynamic quality criteria: Parameterized Exception Chaining, Comfortable Declaration of Parameterized Exceptions, Not-Null Checking of Reference Variables.

  14. An Executable Choreography Framework for Dynamic Service-Oriented Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkawi, Faisal; Cottenier, Thomas; Alena, Richard L.; Fletcher, Daryl P.; Duncavage, Daniel P.; Elrad, Tzilla

    2006-01-01

    Interoperability and loose coupling requirements are pushing the next generation of distributed applications towards more decentralized and more dynamic interaction schemes, which the classic requestJresponse communication paradigm can hardly accommodate. Hence, sound foundations and mechanisms for the establishment of unmticiptitteb peer-to-peer interactions across organizational boundaries are of significant importance to upcoming middleware platforms. The Executable Choreography Framework (ECF) is a middleware-level framework that targets dynamic and decentralized service compositions. The ECF combines transparent context propagation with aspect-oriented software composition techniques to dynamically refine the default control and data flow of service invocations. The framework provides a ground for experimentation with dynamic and distributed workflows, and a base to assess their safety and applicability when depioyed across organizational boundaries.

  15. Lamellae orientation in dynamically sheared diblock copolymer melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppi, Kurt A.; Tirrell, Matthew; Bates, Frank S.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Colby, Ralph H.

    1992-11-01

    Two distinct lamellae orientaitons have been identified by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in dynamically sheared poly(ethylene-propylene)-poly(ethylethylene) (PEP-PEE) diblock copolymer melts. Near the order-disorder transition temperature, Tto T_ODT, and at low shear frequencies, the lamellae arrange with unit normal perpendicular to the flow direction and parallel to the velocity gradient direction (parallel orientation). Higher frequency processing leads to lamellae with unit normal permendicular to both the flow and velocity gradient directions (perpendicular orientation). The crossover from low to high frequency behavior occurs at ω≈tau^{-1} where tau is the relaxation time for local domain deformations. At temperatures further from the ODT, Torientation is obtained at all shearing frequencies. Based on dynamic and steady shear rheological measurements we propose two mechanisms to account for these results. The perpendicular orientation is proposed to arise from shear-induced disordering, followed by reordering in the perpendicular direction due to the effect of vorticity. Parallel lamellae are believed to be a manifestation of defect mediated stress relaxation. These findings are supported by additional experiments on various other shear-oriented polyolefin diblock copolymers. Nous avons identifié, par diffusion de neutrons aux petits angles, deux orientation différentes des lamelles dans des échantillons de copolymères séquencés poly(éthylène-propylène)- poly(éthylétylène) (PEP-PEE) qui ont été cisaillés dynamiquement. A des températures proches de la transition ordre-désordre et aux fréquences de cisaillement faibles, la normale aux couches est perpendiculaire à la direction d'écoulement et parallèle au gradient de vitesse (orientation parllèle). Aux fréquences plus élevées, la normale est perpendiculaire à la direction d'écoulement et au gradient de vitesse (orientation perpendiculaire). Le changement d'orientation

  16. People-oriented Development and Human Rights Protection for Criminals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YUQIAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ People-oriented development refers to the economic and social integrative development that regards human beings as the orientation and subject of economic and social development and considers the development of human beings the essence, objective, momentum and symbol of development.One of its important connotations is to protect human beings' rights and interests in all links and works of economic and social development.On December 10,2008, Hu Jintao, secretary general of the CPC Central Committee, clarified that "We will, as always, adhere to people-oriented principles in building a well-off society in an all-round way and accelerating the process of socialist modernization" in his letter to the China Society for Human Rights Studies.

  17. Oriental Culture and Human Rights Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leon Wessels

    DETERMINED? This speech is an attempt to offer á perspective, given the particular .... The universal nature of these rights and freedoms is beyond question…19. ▫ All human ... Islamic Middle East” Policial Studies (1995), XLIII, 155. 25 Espiell ...

  18. Orientation anisotropies in human primary visual cortex depend on contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ryan T; Clifford, Colin W G

    2015-10-01

    Orientation processing in visual cortex appears matched to the environment, such that larger neural populations are tuned to cardinal (horizontal/vertical) than oblique orientations. This may be manifested perceptually as a cardinal bias: poorer sensitivity to oblique compared to cardinal orientations (the "oblique effect"). However, a growing body of psychophysical data reveals the opposite pattern of anisotropy: a bias towards the oblique over the cardinal orientations (the "horizontal effect"), something matched by recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that have found an increased response to the oblique over the cardinal orientations in early visual cortex. This may reveal the operation of an efficient coding strategy optimised to the diet of orientations encountered during natural viewing. From consideration of coding efficiency, it might be expected that the anisotropies would change as the quality/strength of the oriented stimulus changes. In two experiments, fMRI response modulations were measured in retinotopically-defined human early visual cortex as a function of the contrast and orientation of sinusoidal gratings. Both experiments revealed a marked change in the V1 response from a cardinal (vertical) bias at low contrast to an oblique bias at high contrast. In Experiment 2, this was also apparent in areas V2 and V3. On average, there was no systematic "radial bias" (a preference for orientations aligned with the visual field meridian) in V1, although it was present in some individual subjects. The change in orientation anisotropies with contrast is consistent with an adaptive stimulus coding strategy in cortex that shifts according to the strength of the sensory inputs.

  19. Human rights orientation and modern anti-Semitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Kopf-Beck

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The manifestations of anti-Semitism in Germany have changed since the end of WWII. Whereas in the past German anti-Semitism was overtly racist, today it is characterized more by subtle and latent facets. How are these modern facets, such as secondary anti-Semitism, latent anti-Semitism and anti-Semitic criticism of Israel, related to human rights orientations? A survey of experts and a pre-study provided the basis for developing the Human Rights Orientation Scale, which includes the four subscales of Endorsement, Application, Restriction and Willingness to engage in human rights activity. In a study of 304 German subjects, data was collected on human rights orientations and facets of modern anti-Semitism. The present paper introduces the questionnaire, discusses the relevance of the study for determining the relationships between human rights orientations and facets of modern anti-Semitism and summarizes the study's implications for viewing secondary anti-Semitism and prejudicial criticism of Israel as facets of modern anti-Semitism.

  20. Orienting asymmetries and lateralized processing of sounds in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rübsamen Rudolf

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateralized processing of speech is a well studied phenomenon in humans. Both anatomical and neurophysiological studies support the view that nonhuman primates and other animal species also reveal hemispheric differences in areas involved in sound processing. In recent years, an increasing number of studies on a range of taxa have employed an orienting paradigm to investigate lateralized acoustic processing. In this paradigm, sounds are played directly from behind and the direction of turn is recorded. This assay rests on the assumption that a hemispheric asymmetry in processing is coupled to an orienting bias towards the contralateral side. To examine this largely untested assumption, speech stimuli as well as artificial sounds were presented to 224 right-handed human subjects shopping in supermarkets in Germany and in the UK. To verify the lateralized processing of the speech stimuli, we additionally assessed the brain activation in response to presentation of the different stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Results In the naturalistic behavioural experiments, there was no difference in orienting behaviour in relation to the stimulus material (speech, artificial sounds. Contrary to our predictions, subjects revealed a significant left bias, irrespective of the sound category. This left bias was slightly but not significantly stronger in German subjects. The fMRI experiments confirmed that the speech stimuli evoked a significant left lateralized activation in BA44 compared to the artificial sounds. Conclusion These findings suggest that in adult humans, orienting biases are not necessarily coupled with lateralized processing of acoustic stimuli. Our results – as well as the inconsistent orienting biases found in different animal species – suggest that the orienting assay should be used with caution. Apparently, attention biases, experience, and experimental conditions may all affect head turning

  1. Research on Sexual Orientation and Human Development: A Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Bonnie R.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of research over the past 25 years on sexual orientation and its effects on human development, concluding that gay and lesbian interests and behavior appear to result from a complex interplay of genetic, prenatal, and environmental influences. Notes that gender identity develops early, especially for males, and is difficult…

  2. Manipulating Human-oriented Dictionaries with very simple tools

    CERN Document Server

    Gaschler, J; Lafourcade, Mathieu; Gaschler, J

    1994-01-01

    Abstract: This paper presents a methodology for building and manipulating human-oriented dictionaries. This methodology has been applied in the construction of a French-English-Malay dictionary which has been obtained by "crossing" semi-automatically two bilingual dictionaries. We use only Microsoft Word, a specialized language for writing transcriptors and a small but powerful dictionary tool.

  3. Orientation toward humans predicts cognitive performance in orang-utans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damerius, Laura A.; Forss, Sofia I. F.; Kosonen, Zaida K.; Willems, Erik P.; Burkart, Judith M.; Call, Josep; Galdikas, Birute M. F.; Liebal, Katja; Haun, Daniel B. M.; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-human animals sometimes show marked intraspecific variation in their cognitive abilities that may reflect variation in external inputs and experience during the developmental period. We examined variation in exploration and cognitive performance on a problem-solving task in a large sample of captive orang-utans (Pongo abelii & P. pygmaeus, N = 103) that had experienced different rearing and housing conditions during ontogeny, including human exposure. In addition to measuring exploration and cognitive performance, we also conducted a set of assays of the subjects’ psychological orientation, including reactions towards an unfamiliar human, summarized in the human orientation index (HOI), and towards novel food and objects. Using generalized linear mixed models we found that the HOI, rather than rearing background, best predicted both exploration and problem-solving success. Our results suggest a cascade of processes: human orientation was accompanied by a change in motivation towards problem-solving, expressed in reduced neophobia and increased exploration variety, which led to greater experience, and thus eventually to higher performance in the task. We propose that different experiences with humans caused individuals to vary in curiosity and understanding of the physical problem-solving task. We discuss the implications of these findings for comparative studies of cognitive ability. PMID:28067260

  4. A Model of Human Orientation and Self Motion Perception during Body Acceleration: The Orientation Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Aviation accident investigators often conduct qualitative perceptual analyses of mishaps when spatial disorientation is inferred as a cause. We have...developed a quantitative perceptual model of human spatial orientation and have employed it to evaluate data from a variety of acceleration situations, in...Research and Material Command (USAMRMC; In-House Laboratory Independent Research), Small Business Innovative Research program (PEO Aviation), and the

  5. Heuristic Scheduling Algorithm Oriented Dynamic Tasks for Imaging Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maocai Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging satellite scheduling is an NP-hard problem with many complex constraints. This paper researches the scheduling problem for dynamic tasks oriented to some emergency cases. After the dynamic properties of satellite scheduling were analyzed, the optimization model is proposed in this paper. Based on the model, two heuristic algorithms are proposed to solve the problem. The first heuristic algorithm arranges new tasks by inserting or deleting them, then inserting them repeatedly according to the priority from low to high, which is named IDI algorithm. The second one called ISDR adopts four steps: insert directly, insert by shifting, insert by deleting, and reinsert the tasks deleted. Moreover, two heuristic factors, congestion degree of a time window and the overlapping degree of a task, are employed to improve the algorithm’s performance. Finally, a case is given to test the algorithms. The results show that the IDI algorithm is better than ISDR from the running time point of view while ISDR algorithm with heuristic factors is more effective with regard to algorithm performance. Moreover, the results also show that our method has good performance for the larger size of the dynamic tasks in comparison with the other two methods.

  6. Dynamic electronic institutions in agent oriented cloud robotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Vineet; Morel, Olivier; Malik, Aamir; Saad, Naufal; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The dot-com bubble bursted in the year 2000 followed by a swift movement towards resource virtualization and cloud computing business model. Cloud computing emerged not as new form of computing or network technology but a mere remoulding of existing technologies to suit a new business model. Cloud robotics is understood as adaptation of cloud computing ideas for robotic applications. Current efforts in cloud robotics stress upon developing robots that utilize computing and service infrastructure of the cloud, without debating on the underlying business model. HTM5 is an OMG's MDA based Meta-model for agent oriented development of cloud robotic systems. The trade-view of HTM5 promotes peer-to-peer trade amongst software agents. HTM5 agents represent various cloud entities and implement their business logic on cloud interactions. Trade in a peer-to-peer cloud robotic system is based on relationships and contracts amongst several agent subsets. Electronic Institutions are associations of heterogeneous intelligent agents which interact with each other following predefined norms. In Dynamic Electronic Institutions, the process of formation, reformation and dissolution of institutions is automated leading to run time adaptations in groups of agents. DEIs in agent oriented cloud robotic ecosystems bring order and group intellect. This article presents DEI implementations through HTM5 methodology.

  7. Orientation pop-out processing in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogler, Carsten; Bode, Stefan; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2013-11-01

    Visual stimuli can "pop out" if they are different to their background. There has been considerable debate as to the role of primary visual cortex (V1) versus higher visual areas (esp. V4) in pop-out processing. Here we parametrically modulated the relative orientation of stimuli and their backgrounds to investigate the neural correlates of pop-out in visual cortex while subjects were performing a demanding fixation task in a scanner. Whole brain and region of interest analyses confirmed a representation of orientation contrast in extrastriate visual cortex (V4), but not in striate visual cortex (V1). Thus, although previous studies have shown that human V1 can be involved in orientation pop-out, our findings demonstrate that there are cases where V1 is "blind" and pop-out detection is restricted to higher visual areas. Pop-out processing is presumably a distributed process across multiple visual regions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Universality of human microbial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashan, Amir; Gibson, Travis E.; Friedman, Jonathan; Carey, Vincent J.; Weiss, Scott T.; Hohmann, Elizabeth L.; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Human-associated microbial communities have a crucial role in determining our health and well-being, and this has led to the continuing development of microbiome-based therapies such as faecal microbiota transplantation. These microbial communities are very complex, dynamic and highly personalized ecosystems, exhibiting a high degree of inter-individual variability in both species assemblages and abundance profiles. It is not known whether the underlying ecological dynamics of these communities, which can be parameterized by growth rates, and intra- and inter-species interactions in population dynamics models, are largely host-independent (that is, universal) or host-specific. If the inter-individual variability reflects host-specific dynamics due to differences in host lifestyle, physiology or genetics, then generic microbiome manipulations may have unintended consequences, rendering them ineffective or even detrimental. Alternatively, microbial ecosystems of different subjects may exhibit universal dynamics, with the inter-individual variability mainly originating from differences in the sets of colonizing species. Here we develop a new computational method to characterize human microbial dynamics. By applying this method to cross-sectional data from two large-scale metagenomic studies—the Human Microbiome Project and the Student Microbiome Project—we show that gut and mouth microbiomes display pronounced universal dynamics, whereas communities associated with certain skin sites are probably shaped by differences in the host environment. Notably, the universality of gut microbial dynamics is not observed in subjects with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection but is observed in the same set of subjects after faecal microbiota transplantation. These results fundamentally improve our understanding of the processes that shape human microbial ecosystems, and pave the way to designing general microbiome-based therapies.

  9. Modeling Human Perception of Orientation in Altered Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torin K. Clark

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Altered gravity environments, such as those experienced by astronauts, impact spatial orientation perception and can lead to spatial disorientation and sensorimotor impairment. To more fully understand and quantify the impact of altered gravity on orientation perception, several mathematical models have been proposed. The utricular shear, tangent, and the idiotropic vector models aim to predict static perception of tilt in hyper-gravity. Predictions from these prior models are compared to the available data, but are found to systematically err from the perceptions experimentally observed. Alternatively, we propose a modified utricular shear model for static tilt perception in hyper-gravity. Previous dynamic models of vestibular function and orientation perception are limited to 1 G. Specifically, they fail to predict the characteristic overestimation of roll tilt observed in hyper-gravity environments. To address this, we have proposed a modification to a previous observer-type canal otolith interaction model based upon the hypothesis that the central nervous system treats otolith stimulation in the utricular plane differently than stimulation out of the utricular plane. Here we evaluate our modified utricular shear and modified observer models in four altered gravity motion paradigms: a static roll tilt in hyper-gravity, b static pitch tilt in hyper-gravity, c static roll tilt in hypo-gravity, and d static pitch tilt in hypo-gravity. The modified models match available data in each of the conditions considered. Our static modified utricular shear model and dynamic modified observer model may be used to help quantitatively predict astronaut perception of orientation in altered gravity environments.

  10. Prenatal Exposure to Progesterone Affects Sexual Orientation in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, June M; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Sanders, Stephanie A

    2017-07-01

    Prenatal sex hormone levels affect physical and behavioral sexual differentiation in animals and humans. Although prenatal hormones are theorized to influence sexual orientation in humans, evidence is sparse. Sexual orientation variables for 34 prenatally progesterone-exposed subjects (17 males and 17 females) were compared to matched controls (M age = 23.2 years). A case-control double-blind design was used drawing on existing data from the US/Denmark Prenatal Development Project. Index cases were exposed to lutocyclin (bioidentical progesterone = C21H30O2; M W : 314.46) and no other hormonal preparation. Controls were matched on 14 physical, medical, and socioeconomic variables. A structured interview conducted by a psychologist and self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data on sexual orientation, self-identification, attraction to the same and other sex, and history of sexual behavior with each sex. Compared to the unexposed, fewer exposed males and females identified as heterosexual and more of them reported histories of same-sex sexual behavior, attraction to the same or both sexes, and scored higher on attraction to males. Measures of heterosexual behavior and scores on attraction to females did not differ significantly by exposure. We conclude that, regardless of sex, exposure appeared to be associated with higher rates of bisexuality. Prenatal progesterone may be an underappreciated epigenetic factor in human sexual and psychosexual development and, in light of the current prevalence of progesterone treatment during pregnancy for a variety of pregnancy complications, warrants further investigation. These data on the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous progesterone also suggest a potential role for natural early perturbations in progesterone levels in the development of sexual orientation.

  11. [Influence of genetic factors on human sexual orientation. Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Larralde, Alvaro; Paradisi, Irene

    2009-09-01

    Human sexual orientation is a complex trait, influenced by several genes, experiential and sociocultural factors. These elements interact and produce a typical pattern of sexual orientation towards the opposite sex. Some exceptions exist, like bisexuality and homosexuality, which seem to be more frequent in males than females. Traditional methods for the genetic study of behavior multifactorial characteristics consist in detecting the presence of familial aggregation. In order to identify the importance of genetic and environmental factors in this aggregation, the concordance of the trait for monozygotic and dizygotic twins and for adopted sibs, reared together and apart, is compared. These types of studies have shown that familial aggregation is stronger for male than for female homosexuality. Based on the threshold method for multifactorial traits, and varying the frequency of homosexuality in the population between 4 and 10%, heritability estimates between 0.27 and 0.76 have been obtained. In 1993, linkage between homosexuality and chromosomal region Xq28 based on molecular approaches was reported. Nevertheless, this was not confirmed in later studies. Recently, a wide search of the genome has given significant or close to significant linkage values with regions 7q36, 8p12 and 10q26, which need to be studied more closely. Deviation in the proportion of X chromosome inactivation in mothers of homosexuals seems to favor the presence of genes related with sexual orientation in this chromosome. There is still much to be known about the genetics of human homosexuality.

  12. Analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice from EBSD orientation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Tommasi, Andrea; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution observations of microstructure and texture evolution during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of ice polycrystals deformed in the laboratory at high temperature (≈0.98Tm). Ice possesses a significant viscoplastic anisotropy that induces strong strain heterogeneities, which result in an early occurrence of DRX mechanisms. It is therefore a model material to explore these mechanisms. High resolution c-axis measurements at sample scale by optical techniques and full crystallographic orientation measurements by cryo- Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) provide a solid database for analyzing the relative impact of the macroscopic imposed stress versus the local and internal stress field on DRX mechanisms. Analysis of misorientation gradients in the EBSD data highlights a heterogeneous dislocation distribution, which is quantified by the Nye tensor estimation. Joint analyses of the dislocation density maps and microstructural observations highlight spatial correlation between high dislocation density sites and the onset of nucleation taking place by grain-boundary bulging, subgrain rotation or by the formation of kink-bands.

  13. Human motion simulation predictive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Malek, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Simulate realistic human motion in a virtual world with an optimization-based approach to motion prediction. With this approach, motion is governed by human performance measures, such as speed and energy, which act as objective functions to be optimized. Constraints on joint torques and angles are imposed quite easily. Predicting motion in this way allows one to use avatars to study how and why humans move the way they do, given specific scenarios. It also enables avatars to react to infinitely many scenarios with substantial autonomy. With this approach it is possible to predict dynamic motion without having to integrate equations of motion -- rather than solving equations of motion, this approach solves for a continuous time-dependent curve characterizing joint variables (also called joint profiles) for every degree of freedom. Introduces rigorous mathematical methods for digital human modelling and simulation Focuses on understanding and representing spatial relationships (3D) of biomechanics Develops an i...

  14. Humane Orientation as a New Cultural Dimension of the GLOBE Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlösser, Oliver; Frese, Michael; Heintze, Anna-Maria

    2013-01-01

    study used student samples from 25 countries that were either high or low in humane orientation (N = 876) and studied their relation to the traditional GLOBE scale and other cultural-level measures (agreeableness, religiosity, authoritarianism, and welfare state score). Findings revealed a strong...... correlation between humane orientation and agreeableness, welfare state score, and religiosity. Out-group humane orientation proved to be the more relevant subfacet of the original humane orientation construct, suggesting that future research on humane orientation should make use of this measure instead...

  15. Object Oriented Toolbox for Modelling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Per Grove; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin; Wagner, Falko Jens;

    1999-01-01

    Design and Implementation of a simulation toolbox based on Object Oriented modelling Techniques.Experimental implementation in C++ using the Godess ODE-solution platform.......Design and Implementation of a simulation toolbox based on Object Oriented modelling Techniques.Experimental implementation in C++ using the Godess ODE-solution platform....

  16. Plant cortical microtubule dynamics and cell division plane orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakrabortty, Bandan

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work aimed at a better understanding of the molecular basis of oriented cell division in plant cell. As, the efficiency of plant morphogenesis depends on oriented cell division, this work should contribute  towards a fundamental understanding of the  molecular basis of

  17. Dynamical safety assessment of the nuclear power plant component using the information feedback oriented system dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho; Jung, Byung Ryul; Kwak, Sang Man [The Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2002-05-01

    A feedback oriented dynamical safety assessment in nuclear power plant is constructed. A commercial software for System Dynamics, Ventana Simulation Environment (Vensim), is used to develop a dynamics model for the Auxiliary Feed Water System (AFWS) of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The 18-month refuel cycle is described for the real situation. The failure rate is higher when the plant is in zero power state like maintenance, test, and refueling, which is not well described in conventional Event/Fault Tree based safety assessment. This also means a human failure rate is high in the standby and shutdown states. Time Step is introduced for the different time weighted frequency of failure cases. The Common Cause Failure is affected by Time Step process. The simulation shows dynamically for the standby-running and shutdown-running of nuclear power plant. The modeling is easily made by a unique graphic designed method and understood by operator or reviewer well. The logical and systems thinking is simulated.

  18. Agent-oriented modeling of the dynamics of complex biological processes I: single agent models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    In the pair of papers of which this is Part I, the agent-oriented modeling perspective to cope with biological complexity is discussed. Three levels of dynamics are distinguished and related to each other: dynamics of externally observable agent behavior, dynamics of internal agent processes, and dy

  19. DynamicSchema: a lightweight persistency framework for context-oriented data management

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Sergio; González, Sebastián; Mens, Kim; Denker, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    International audience; While context-oriented programming technology so far has focused mostly on behavioral adaptation, context-oriented data management has received much less attention. In this paper we make a case for the problem of context-oriented data management, using a concrete example of a mobile application. We illustrate some of the issues involved and propose a lightweight persistency framework, called DynamicSchema, that resolves some of these issues. The solution consists in a ...

  20. Numerical simulation of human orientation perception during lunar landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Torin K.; Young, Laurence R.; Stimpson, Alexander J.; Duda, Kevin R.; Oman, Charles M.

    2011-09-01

    In lunar landing it is necessary to select a suitable landing point and then control a stable descent to the surface. In manned landings, astronauts will play a critical role in monitoring systems and adjusting the descent trajectory through either supervisory control and landing point designations, or by direct manual control. For the astronauts to ensure vehicle performance and safety, they will have to accurately perceive vehicle orientation. A numerical model for human spatial orientation perception was simulated using input motions from lunar landing trajectories to predict the potential for misperceptions. Three representative trajectories were studied: an automated trajectory, a landing point designation trajectory, and a challenging manual control trajectory. These trajectories were studied under three cases with different cues activated in the model to study the importance of vestibular cues, visual cues, and the effect of the descent engine thruster creating dust blowback. The model predicts that spatial misperceptions are likely to occur as a result of the lunar landing motions, particularly with limited or incomplete visual cues. The powered descent acceleration profile creates a somatogravic illusion causing the astronauts to falsely perceive themselves and the vehicle as upright, even when the vehicle has a large pitch or roll angle. When visual pathways were activated within the model these illusions were mostly suppressed. Dust blowback, obscuring the visual scene out the window, was also found to create disorientation. These orientation illusions are likely to interfere with the astronauts' ability to effectively control the vehicle, potentially degrading performance and safety. Therefore suitable countermeasures, including disorientation training and advanced displays, are recommended.

  1. Action versus result-oriented schemes in a grassland agroecosystem: a dynamic modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatier, Rodolphe; Doyen, Luc; Tichit, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Effects of agri-environment schemes (AES) on biodiversity remain controversial. While most AES are action-oriented, result-oriented and habitat-oriented schemes have recently been proposed as a solution to improve AES efficiency. The objective of this study was to compare action-oriented, habitat-oriented and result-oriented schemes in terms of ecological and productive performance as well as in terms of management flexibility. We developed a dynamic modelling approach based on the viable control framework to carry out a long term assessment of the three schemes in a grassland agroecosystem. The model explicitly links grazed grassland dynamics to bird population dynamics. It is applied to lapwing conservation in wet grasslands in France. We ran the model to assess the three AES scenarios. The model revealed the grazing strategies respecting ecological and productive constraints specific to each scheme. Grazing strategies were assessed by both their ecological and productive performance. The viable control approach made it possible to obtain the whole set of viable grazing strategies and therefore to quantify the management flexibility of the grassland agroecosystem. Our results showed that habitat and result-oriented scenarios led to much higher ecological performance than the action-oriented one. Differences in both ecological and productive performance between the habitat and result-oriented scenarios were limited. Flexibility of the grassland agroecosystem in the result-oriented scenario was much higher than in that of habitat-oriented scenario. Our model confirms the higher flexibility as well as the better ecological and productive performance of result-oriented schemes. A larger use of result-oriented schemes in conservation may also allow farmers to adapt their management to local conditions and to climatic variations.

  2. Action versus result-oriented schemes in a grassland agroecosystem: a dynamic modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolphe Sabatier

    Full Text Available Effects of agri-environment schemes (AES on biodiversity remain controversial. While most AES are action-oriented, result-oriented and habitat-oriented schemes have recently been proposed as a solution to improve AES efficiency. The objective of this study was to compare action-oriented, habitat-oriented and result-oriented schemes in terms of ecological and productive performance as well as in terms of management flexibility. We developed a dynamic modelling approach based on the viable control framework to carry out a long term assessment of the three schemes in a grassland agroecosystem. The model explicitly links grazed grassland dynamics to bird population dynamics. It is applied to lapwing conservation in wet grasslands in France. We ran the model to assess the three AES scenarios. The model revealed the grazing strategies respecting ecological and productive constraints specific to each scheme. Grazing strategies were assessed by both their ecological and productive performance. The viable control approach made it possible to obtain the whole set of viable grazing strategies and therefore to quantify the management flexibility of the grassland agroecosystem. Our results showed that habitat and result-oriented scenarios led to much higher ecological performance than the action-oriented one. Differences in both ecological and productive performance between the habitat and result-oriented scenarios were limited. Flexibility of the grassland agroecosystem in the result-oriented scenario was much higher than in that of habitat-oriented scenario. Our model confirms the higher flexibility as well as the better ecological and productive performance of result-oriented schemes. A larger use of result-oriented schemes in conservation may also allow farmers to adapt their management to local conditions and to climatic variations.

  3. The Influence of Human Body Orientation on Distance Judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard eJung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available People maintain larger distances to other peoples’ front than to their back. We investigated if humans also judge another person as closer when viewing their front than their back. Participants watched animated virtual characters (avatars and moved a virtual plane towards their location after the avatar was removed. In Experiment 1, participants judged avatars, which were facing them as closer and made quicker estimates than to avatars looking away. In Experiment 2, avatars were rotated in 30 degree steps around the vertical axis. Observers judged avatars roughly facing them (i.e., looking max. 60 degrees away as closer than avatars roughly looking away. No particular effect was observed for avatars directly facing and also gazing at the observer. We conclude that body orientation was sufficient to generate the asymmetry. Sensitivity of the orientation effect to gaze and to interpersonal distance would have suggested involvement of social processing, but this was not observed. We discuss social and lower-level processing as potential reasons for the effect.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics in human behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huys, Raoul [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 13 - Marseille (France); Marseille Univ. (France). Movement Science Inst.; Jirsa, Viktor K. (eds.) [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 13 - Marseille (France); Marseille Univ. (France). Movement Science Inst.; Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States). Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Humans engage in a seemingly endless variety of different behaviors, of which some are found across species, while others are conceived of as typically human. Most generally, behavior comes about through the interplay of various constraints - informational, mechanical, neural, metabolic, and so on - operating at multiple scales in space and time. Over the years, consensus has grown in the research community that, rather than investigating behavior only from bottom up, it may be also well understood in terms of concepts and laws on the phenomenological level. Such top down approach is rooted in theories of synergetics and self-organization using tools from nonlinear dynamics. The present compendium brings together scientists from all over the world that have contributed to the development of their respective fields departing from this background. It provides an introduction to deterministic as well as stochastic dynamical systems and contains applications to motor control and coordination, visual perception and illusion, as well as auditory perception in the context of speech and music. (orig.)

  5. Humane Orientation as a New Cultural Dimension of the GLOBE Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlösser, Oliver; Frese, Michael; Heintze, Anna-Maria

    2013-01-01

    We validate, extend, and empirically and theoretically criticize the cultural dimension of humane orientation of the project GLOBE (Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness Research Program). Theoretically, humane orientation is not just a one-dimensionally positive concept about...... study used student samples from 25 countries that were either high or low in humane orientation (N = 876) and studied their relation to the traditional GLOBE scale and other cultural-level measures (agreeableness, religiosity, authoritarianism, and welfare state score). Findings revealed a strong...

  6. Dynamics of Investment for Market-Oriented Farmers in Chile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes, A.; Kuyvenhoven, A.; Lensink, R.; Moll, H.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Using panel data from a survey conducted in 2006 and 2008 of 177 market-oriented farmers in central Chile, we investigate investment under imperfect capital markets. Specifically we determine the impact of formal credit constraints on fixed investment. By controlling for endogeneity problems, we fin

  7. Object Oriented Toolbox for Modelling and Simulation of Dynamical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin; Wagner, Falko Jens; Thomsen, Per Grove

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an ongoing project, dealing with design and implementation of a simulation toolbox based on object oriented modelling techniques. The paper describes an experimental implementation of parts of such a toolbox in C++, and discusses the experiences drawn from...

  8. EMOTIONAL MODULATION OF ATTENTION ORIENTING BY GAZE VARIES WITH DYNAMIC CUE SEQUENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Amandine; Itier, Roxane J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent gaze cueing studies using dynamic cue sequences have reported increased attention orienting by gaze with faces expressing fear, surprise or anger. Here, we investigated whether the type of dynamic cue sequence used impacted the magnitude of this effect. When the emotion was expressed before or concurrently with gaze shift, no modulation of gaze-oriented attention by emotion was seen. In contrast, when the face cue averted gaze before expressing an emotion (as if reacting to the object after first localizing it), the gaze orienting effect was clearly increased for fearful, surprised and angry faces compared to neutral faces. Thus, the type of dynamic sequence used, and in particular the order in which the gaze shift and the facial expression are presented, modulate gaze-oriented attention, with maximal modulation seen when the expression of emotion follows gaze shift.

  9. The dynamic pattern of human attention

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min

    2013-01-01

    A mass of traces of human activities show diverse dynamic patterns. In this paper, we comprehensively investigate the dynamic pattern of human attention defined by the quantity of interests on subdisciplines in an online academic communication forum. Both the expansion and exploration of human attention have a power-law scaling relation with browsing actions, of which the exponent is close to that in one-dimension random walk. Furthermore, the memory effect of human attention is characterized by the power-law distributions of both the return interval time and return interval steps, which is reinforced by studying the attention shift that monotonically increase with the interval order between pairs of continuously segmental sequences of expansion. At last, the observing dynamic pattern of human attention in the browsing process is analytically described by a dynamic model whose generic mechanism is analogy to that of human spatial mobility. Thus, our work not only enlarges the research scope of human dynamics,...

  10. Analysing animal social network dynamics: the potential of stochastic actor-oriented models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David N; Ilany, Amiyaal; Silk, Matthew J; Tregenza, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Animals are embedded in dynamically changing networks of relationships with conspecifics. These dynamic networks are fundamental aspects of their environment, creating selection on behaviours and other traits. However, most social network-based approaches in ecology are constrained to considering networks as static, despite several calls for such analyses to become more dynamic. There are a number of statistical analyses developed in the social sciences that are increasingly being applied to animal networks, of which stochastic actor-oriented models (SAOMs) are a principal example. SAOMs are a class of individual-based models designed to model transitions in networks between discrete time points, as influenced by network structure and covariates. It is not clear, however, how useful such techniques are to ecologists, and whether they are suited to animal social networks. We review the recent applications of SAOMs to animal networks, outlining findings and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of SAOMs when applied to animal rather than human networks. We go on to highlight the types of ecological and evolutionary processes that SAOMs can be used to study. SAOMs can include effects and covariates for individuals, dyads and populations, which can be constant or variable. This allows for the examination of a wide range of questions of interest to ecologists. However, high-resolution data are required, meaning SAOMs will not be useable in all study systems. It remains unclear how robust SAOMs are to missing data and uncertainty around social relationships. Ultimately, we encourage the careful application of SAOMs in appropriate systems, with dynamic network analyses likely to prove highly informative. Researchers can then extend the basic method to tackle a range of existing questions in ecology and explore novel lines of questioning. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society.

  11. Impact of memory on human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, A

    2006-01-01

    Our experience of web access slowing down is a consequence of the aggregated web access pattern of web users. This is just one example among several human oriented services which are strongly affected by human activity patterns. Recent empirical evidence is indicating that human activity patterns are characterized by power law distributions of inter-event times, where large fluctuations rather than regularity is the common case. I show that this temporal heterogeneity can be explained by two mechanisms: (i) humans have some perception of their past activity rate and (ii) based on that they react by accelerating or reducing their activity rate. Using these two mechanisms I explain the inter-event time statistics of Darwin's and Einstein's correspondence and the email activity within an university environment. Moreover, they are typical examples of the the accelerating and reducing class, respectively. These results are relevant to the system design of human oriented services.

  12. Interactive Correspondence Analysis in a Dynamic Object-Oriented Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bond

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available A highly interactive, user-friendly object-oriented software package written in LispStat is introduced that performs simple and multiple correspondence analysis, and profile analysis. These three techniques are integrated into a single environment driven by a user-friendly graphical interface that takes advantage of Lisp-Stat's advanced graphical capabilities. Techniques that assess the stability of the solution are also introduced. Some of the features of the package include colored graphics, incremental graph zooming capabilities, manual point separation to determine identities of overlapping points, and stability and fit measures. The features of the package are used to show some interesting trends in a large educational dataset.

  13. Analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice from EBSD orientation mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurine eMontagnat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present high resolution observations of microstructure and texture evolution during dynamicrecrystallization (DRX of ice polycrystals deformed in the laboratory at high temperature(≈0.98Tm. Ice possesses a significant viscoplastic anisotropy that induces strong strainheterogeneities, which result in an early occurrence of DRX mechanisms. It is thereforea model material to explore these mechanisms. High resolution c-axis measurements atsample scale by optical techniques and full crystallographic orientation measurements by cryo-Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD provide a solid database for analyzing the relativeimpact of the macroscopic imposed stress versus the local and internal stress field on DRXmechanisms. Analysis of misorientation gradients in the EBSD data highlights a heterogeneousdislocation distribution, which is quantified by the Nye tensor estimation. Joint analyses of thedislocation density maps and microstructural observations highlight spatial correlation betweenhigh dislocation density sites and the onset of nucleation taking place by grain-boundary bulging,subgrain rotation or by the formation of kink-bands.

  14. Torsional dynamics and orientation of DNA-DAPI complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Barcellona, ML; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    The flexibility of calf thymus DNA and several polynucleotides was measured using the anisotropy decay of DAPI bound to DNA, a minor groove probe. DNA torsional dynamics were analyzed using the Schurr model [Allison, S. A., and Schutt, J. M. (1979) Chem. Phys. 41, 35-44] in the infinite polymer length approximation. Time-resolved fluorescence depolarization was measured using a frequency-doubled mode-locked dye laser and frequency- domain acquisition methods. At very high P/D ratios, the anis...

  15. The dynamics of team cognition: A process-oriented theory of knowledge emergence in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, James A; Braun, Michael T; Kuljanin, Goran; Kozlowski, Steve W J; Chao, Georgia T

    2016-10-01

    Team cognition has been identified as a critical component of team performance and decision-making. However, theory and research in this domain continues to remain largely static; articulation and examination of the dynamic processes through which collectively held knowledge emerges from the individual- to the team-level is lacking. To address this gap, we advance and systematically evaluate a process-oriented theory of team knowledge emergence. First, we summarize the core concepts and dynamic mechanisms that underlie team knowledge-building and represent our theory of team knowledge emergence (Step 1). We then translate this narrative theory into a formal computational model that provides an explicit specification of how these core concepts and mechanisms interact to produce emergent team knowledge (Step 2). The computational model is next instantiated into an agent-based simulation to explore how the key generative process mechanisms described in our theory contribute to improved knowledge emergence in teams (Step 3). Results from the simulations demonstrate that agent teams generate collectively shared knowledge more effectively when members are capable of processing information more efficiently and when teams follow communication strategies that promote equal rates of information sharing across members. Lastly, we conduct an empirical experiment with real teams participating in a collective knowledge-building task to verify that promoting these processes in human teams also leads to improved team knowledge emergence (Step 4). Discussion focuses on implications of the theory for examining team cognition processes and dynamics as well as directions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Estimating Target Orientation with a Single Camera for Use in a Human-Following Robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a monocular vision-based technique for extracting orientation information from a human torso for use in a robotic human-follower. Typical approaches to human-following use an estimate of only human position for navigation...

  17. Polarity and cell division orientation in the cleavage embryo: from worm to human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajduk, Anna; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Cleavage is a period after fertilization, when a 1-cell embryo starts developing into a multicellular organism. Due to a series of mitotic divisions, the large volume of a fertilized egg is divided into numerous smaller, nucleated cells—blastomeres. Embryos of different phyla divide according to different patterns, but molecular mechanism of these early divisions remains surprisingly conserved. In the present paper, we describe how polarity cues, cytoskeleton and cell-to-cell communication interact with each other to regulate orientation of the early embryonic division planes in model animals such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and mouse. We focus particularly on the Par pathway and the actin-driven cytoplasmic flows that accompany it. We also describe a unique interplay between Par proteins and the Hippo pathway in cleavage mammalian embryos. Moreover, we discuss the potential meaning of polarity, cytoplasmic dynamics and cell-to-cell communication as quality biomarkers of human embryos. PMID:26660321

  18. Effects of basic human values on host community acculturation orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Irene; Hichy, Zira; Guarnera, Maria; Nuovo, Santo Di

    2010-08-01

    Although literature provides evidence for the relationship between values and acculturation, the relationship between host community acculturation orientations has not yet been investigated. In this study we tested the effects of four high-order values (openness to change, self-transcendence, conservation, and self-enhancement, devised according to Schwartz's model) on host community acculturation orientations towards immigrants (devised according the interactive acculturation model) in the public domain of employment and the private domain of endogamy/exogamy. Participants were 264 Italian University students, who completed a questionnaire containing the Portrait Values Questionnaire, a measure of personal values, and the Host Community Acculturation Scale, aimed at measuring Italian acculturation strategies towards three groups of immigrants: Immigrants (the general category), Chinese (the valued immigrant group), and Albanians (the devalued immigrant group). Results showed that personal values are related to the adoption of acculturation orientations: In particular, the values that mostly impacted on acculturation orientations were self-transcendence and conservation. Values concerning self-transcendence encourage the adoption of integrationism, integrationism-transformation, and individualism and reduce the adoption of assimilationism, segregationism, and exclusionism. Values concerning conservation encourage the adoption of assimilation, segregation and exclusion orientations and reduce the adoption of both types of integrationism and individualism. Minor effects were found regarding self-enhancement and openness to change.

  19. Two-motor single-inverter field-oriented induction machine drive dynamic performance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhakti M Joshi; Mukul C Chandorkar

    2014-04-01

    Multi-machine, single-inverter induction motor drives are attractive in situations in which all machines are of similar ratings, and operate at approximately the same load torques. The advantages include small size compared to multi-inverter system, lower weight and overall cost. However, field oriented control of such drives is a challenge since no two motors will have exactly the same operating conditions at any time. In general, at least some motors in the system will operate away from perfect field orientation. It is therefore important to analyse their torque dynamics carefully. This paper discusses existing multi-machine field-oriented control methods, and analyses and compares them from the viewpoint of dynamic performance. For this, an analytical framework based on small-signal analysis is developed to compare multi-machine control methods. This analysis is verified by simulations and experiments.

  20. Orientation and conformation of a lipase at an interface studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Jensen, T.R.; Kjær, Kristian

    2002-01-01

    Electron density profiles calculated from molecular dynamics trajectories are used to deduce the orientation and conformation of Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase and a mutant adsorbed at an air-water interface. It is demonstrated that the profiles display distinct fine structures, which uniquely...... characterize enzyme orientation and conformation. The density profiles are, on the nanosecond timescale, determined by the average enzyme conformation. We outline a Computational scheme that from a single molecular dynamics trajectory allows for extraction of electron density profiles referring to different...... orientations of the lipase relative to an implicit interface. Profiles calculated for the inactive and active conformations of the lipase are compared with experimental electron density profiles measured by x-ray reflectivity for the lipase adsorbed at an air-water interface. The experimental profiles contain...

  1. A Control-Oriented Dynamic Model for Wakes in Wind Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebraad, P.M.O.; Van Wingerden, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel control-oriented model for predicting wake effects in wind plants, called the FLOw Redirection and Induction Dynamics (FLORIDyn) model. The model predicts the wake locations and the effective flow velocities at each turbine, and the resulting turbine electrical

  2. Cross-Sector Partnerships and the Co-creation of Dynamic Capabilities for Stakeholder Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentoni, D.; Bitzer, V.C.; Pascucci, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between business experience in cross-sector partnerships (CSPs) and the co-creation of what we refer to as ‘dynamic capabilities for stakeholder orientation,’ consisting of the four dimensions of (1) sensing, (2) interacting with, (3) learning from and (4) changi

  3. Dynamic Mechanism of Sustainable Molecular Orientation Generated From Cyclic Rotational States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Fang-Ping; YANG Yu-Jun; HUANG Yu-Xin; ZHU Qi-Ren

    2006-01-01

    @@ Recently, two papers presented by Ortigoso et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 073001 and Phys. Rev. A 72(2005) 053401] develop a novel strategy in which the best sustainable molecular alignment/orientation has been achieved. We intend to analyse the dynamic mechanisms, including those Ortigoso et al. have not clarified.

  4. North American oriented strand board markets, arbitrage activity, and market price dynamics: A smooth transition approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry Goodwin; Matthew Holt; Jeffrey P. Prestemon

    2011-01-01

    Price dynamics for North American oriented strand board markets are examined. The role of transactions costs are explored vis-à-vis the law of one price. Nonlinearities induced by unobservable transactions costs are modeled by estimating time-varying smooth transition autoregressions (TV-STARs). Results indicate that nonlinearity and structural change are important...

  5. A dynamic object-oriented architecture approach to ecosystem modeling and simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolph, J. E.; Majerus, K. A.; Sydelko, P. J.; Taxon, T. N.

    1999-04-09

    Modeling and simulation in support of adaptive ecosystem management can be better accomplished through a dynamic, integrated, and flexible approach that incorporates scientific and technological components into a comprehensive ecosystem-modeling framework. The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) integrates ecological models and decision support techniques, through a geographic information system (GIS)-based framework. The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) sponsored the development of IDLAMS. Initially built upon a GIS framework, IDLAMS is migrating to an object-oriented (OO) architectural framework. An object-oriented architecture is more flexible and modular. It allows disparate applications and dynamic models to be integrated in a manner that minimizes (or eliminates) the need to rework or recreate the system as new models are added to the suite. In addition, an object-oriented design makes it easier to provide run-time feedback among models, thereby making it a more dynamic tool for exploring and providing insight into the interactions among ecosystem processes. Finally, an object-oriented design encourages the reuse of existing technology because OO-IDLAMS is able to integrate disparate models, databases, or applications executed in their native languages. Reuse is also accomplished through a structured approach to building a consistent and reusable object library. This reusability can substantially reduce the time and effort needed to develop future integrated ecosystem simulations.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of orientational and spectral dynamics of single molecules in nanostructured host-guest materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christophe; Hellriegel, Christian; Platschek, Barbara; Wöhrle, Dieter; Bein, Thomas; Michaelis, Jens; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2007-05-02

    Nanostructured host-guest materials are important for various applications in nanoscience, and therefore, a thorough understanding of the dynamics of the guest molecules within the host matrix is needed. To this aim we used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to simultaneously examine the spectral and the orientational behavior of single molecules in nanostructured porous host materials. Two types of host-guest systems have been investigated. First, oxazine-1 dye molecules were fixed rigidly in the channels of microporous AlPO4-5 crystals. Second, it was shown that terrylenediimide (TDI) dye molecules move in the mesoporous network of an uncalcined M41S thin film. In the first sample both spectral fluctuations ( approximately 5 nm) and rare spectral jumps (>10 nm) of the emission maximum were observed. However, the orientation of the emission dipole of the dye molecules remained constant. In contrast, the second system showed orientational dynamics as well as substantially more spectral dynamics. In this system the molecules were found to move between different regions in the host. The typical motion of the TDI molecules in the pores of M41S was not continuous but characterized by jumps between specific sites. Moreover, the spectral and orientational dynamics were correlated and arose directly from the different environments that were being explored by the mobile molecule.

  7. Cross-Sector Partnerships and the Co-creation of Dynamic Capabilities for Stakeholder Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dentoni, D.; Bitzer, V.C.; Pascucci, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between business experience in cross-sector partnerships (CSPs) and the co-creation of what we refer to as ‘dynamic capabilities for stakeholder orientation,’ consisting of the four dimensions of (1) sensing, (2) interacting with, (3) learning from and (4)

  8. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, F.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P.

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP.

  9. Changes in the anisotropy of oriented membrane dynamics induced by myelin basic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F. [OGG-INFM, Grenoble (France); Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Relini, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Genova (Italy); Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Fasano, A. [Dipartimento di Biochimica e Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Bari (Italy); Riccio, P. [Dipartimento di Biologia D.B.A.F., Universita della Basilicata, Potenza (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    We report recent results showing the evidence of the effect induced by physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the dynamics of dimyristoyl L-a-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) membranes. Incoherent elastic neutron scattering scans, performed over a wide temperature range, have shown that the anisotropy of motions in oriented membranes is significantly enhanced by the presence of MBP. (orig.)

  10. Construction of Cubic Dynamic and User-oriented Taxonomy forAutomatic Classification of Internet Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on the requirements of the development of Internet, thenecessity of establishing cubic dynamic and user-oriented taxonomy for automatic classification is presented. Then the basic algorithm to construct such taxonomy is discussed. The view is up to date in current world.

  11. C++ Toolbox for Object-Oriented Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Physical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the efforts made in an ongoing project that exploits the advantages of using object-oriented methodologies for describing and simulating dynamical systems. The background for this work is a search for new and better ways to simulate physical systems....

  12. Teachers, Sexual Orientation, and the Law in Canada: A Human Rights Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher expression on the subject of sexual orientation is a hotly contested topic that has led to many recent legal challenges in the United States and Canada. The purpose of this article is to offer readers an introduction to Canadian cases regarding teacher expression and sexual orientation and demonstrate how the application of a human rights…

  13. Born globals trough knowledge-based dynamic capabilities and network market orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Monferrer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the influence of network market orientation on Spanish born globals’ adaptation, absorption and innovation dynamic capabilities as well as their influence on the performance achieved by these companies. Based on an ambidexterity approach, which points to born globals’ need to adopt a double exploration/exploitation function, this study considers these three specific knowledge-based dynamic capabilities analysing their interrelationship taking into account their exploration/exploitation duality. Results from the testing of the structural equation model proposed confirm that network market orientation facilitates the development of dynamic, exploratory capabilities (adaptation and absorption capabilities in born globals and that these, in turn, influence their capacity to exploit knowledge through innovations, thereby obtaining higher performance.

  14. Coarse-scale biases for spirals and orientation in human visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jeremy; Heeger, David J; Merriam, Elisha P

    2013-12-11

    Multivariate decoding analyses are widely applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, but there is controversy over their interpretation. Orientation decoding in primary visual cortex (V1) reflects coarse-scale biases, including an over-representation of radial orientations. But fMRI responses to clockwise and counter-clockwise spirals can also be decoded. Because these stimuli are matched for radial orientation, while differing in local orientation, it has been argued that fine-scale columnar selectivity for orientation contributes to orientation decoding. We measured fMRI responses in human V1 to both oriented gratings and spirals. Responses to oriented gratings exhibited a complex topography, including a radial bias that was most pronounced in the peripheral representation, and a near-vertical bias that was most pronounced near the foveal representation. Responses to clockwise and counter-clockwise spirals also exhibited coarse-scale organization, at the scale of entire visual quadrants. The preference of each voxel for clockwise or counter-clockwise spirals was predicted from the preferences of that voxel for orientation and spatial position (i.e., within the retinotopic map). Our results demonstrate a bias for local stimulus orientation that has a coarse spatial scale, is robust across stimulus classes (spirals and gratings), and suffices to explain decoding from fMRI responses in V1.

  15. Design Dynamic Coupling Measurement of Distributed Object Oriented Software Using Trace Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Babu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A common way to define and measure coupling is through structural properties and static code analysis. However, because of polymorphism, dynamic binding and the common presence of unused code in commercial software, the resulting coupling measures are imprecise as they do not perfectly reflect the actual coupling taking place among classes at run-time. For example, when using static analysis to measure coupling, it is difficult and sometimes impossible to determine what actual methods can be invoked from a client class if those methods are overridden in the subclasses of the server classes. Approach: Coupling measurement has traditionally been performed using static code analysis, because most of the existing work was done on non-object oriented code and because dynamic code analysis is more expensive and complex to perform. We refer to this type of coupling as dynamic coupling. In this study we propose a dynamic and efficient measurement technique over object oriented software. Result: We propose a hybrid model to measure the dynamic coupling present in distributed object oriented software. The proposed method has three steps; they are instrumentation process, post process and coupling measurement. First, the instrumentation process is performed. In this process, to trace method calls, a modified instrumented JVM has been used. During this process, three trace files, .prf, .clp and .svp are created. In the second step, the information present in these files, are merged. At the end of this step, the merged detailed trace of each Jvms contains pointers to the merged trace files of the other JVM’s such that the path of each remote call from the client to the server can be uniquely identified. Conclusion: Finally, the coupling metrics are measured dynamically. The proposed system was implemented in JAVA.The implementation results show that the proposed system effectively measures the dynamic coupling.

  16. Visualization of nerve fiber orientation in gross histological sections of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axer, H; Berks, G; Keyserlingk, D G

    2000-12-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) allows visualization of the orientation of the nervous fibers in the living brain. For comparison, a method was developed to examine the orientation of fibers in histological sections of the human brain. Serial sections through the entire human brain were analyzed regarding fiber orientation using polarized light. Direction of fibers in the cutting plane was obtained by measuring the azimuth with the lowest intensity value at each point, and inclination of fibers in the section was evaluated using fuzzy logic approximations. Direction and inclination of fibers revealing their three-dimensional orientation were visualized by colored arrows mapped into the images. Using this procedure, various fiber tracts were identified (pyramidal tract, radiatio optica, radiatio acustica, arcuate fascicle, and 11 more). Intermingled fibers could be separated from each other. The orientation of the fiber tracts derived from polarized light microscopy was validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy in a defined volume of the internal capsule, where the fiber orientation was studied in four human brains. The polarization method visualizes the high degree of intermingled fiber bundles in the brain, so that distinct fiber pathways cannot be understood as solid, compact tracts: Neighbouring bundles of fibers can belong to different systems of fibers distinguishable by their orientation.

  17. The biological basis of human sexual orientation: is there a role for epigenetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngun, Tuck C; Vilain, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Sexual orientation is one of the largest sex differences in humans. The vast majority of the population is heterosexual, that is, they are attracted to members of the opposite sex. However, a small but significant proportion of people are bisexual or homosexual and experience attraction to members of the same sex. The origins of the phenomenon have long been the subject of scientific study. In this chapter, we will review the evidence that sexual orientation has biological underpinnings and consider the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms. We will first discuss studies that show that sexual orientation has a genetic component. These studies show that sexual orientation is more concordant in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic ones and that male sexual orientation is linked to several regions of the genome. We will then highlight findings that suggest a link between sexual orientation and epigenetic mechanisms. In particular, we will consider the case of women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). These women were exposed to high levels of testosterone in utero and have much higher rates of nonheterosexual orientation compared to non-CAH women. Studies in animal models strongly suggest that the long-term effects of hormonal exposure (such as those experienced by CAH women) are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. We conclude by describing a hypothetical framework that unifies genetic and epigenetic explanations of sexual orientation and the continued challenges facing sexual orientation research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A microfluidic device for the study of the orientational dynamics of microrods

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Y N; John, O A; Andersson, P; Mehlig, B; Hanstorp, D

    2012-01-01

    We describe a microfluidic device for studying the orientational dynamics of microrods. The device enables us to experimentally investigate the tumbling of microrods immersed in the shear flow in a microfluidic channel with a depth of 400 mu and a width of 2.5 mm. The orientational dynamics was recorded using a 20 X microscopic objective and a CCD camera. The microrods were produced by shearing microdroplets of photocurable epoxy resin. We show different examples of empirically observed tumbling. On the one hand we find that short stretches of the experimentally determined time series are well described by fits to solutions of Jeffery's approximate equation of motion [Jeffery, Proc. R. Soc. London. 102 (1922), 161-179]. On the other hand we find that the empirically observed trajectories drift between different solutions of Jeffery's equation. We discuss possible causes of this orbit drift.

  19. Nonlinear-dynamical arrhythmia control in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christini, D J; Stein, K M; Markowitz, S M; Mittal, S; Slotwiner, D J; Scheiner, M A; Iwai, S; Lerman, B B

    2001-05-08

    Nonlinear-dynamical control techniques, also known as chaos control, have been used with great success to control a wide range of physical systems. Such techniques have been used to control the behavior of in vitro excitable biological tissue, suggesting their potential for clinical utility. However, the feasibility of using such techniques to control physiological processes has not been demonstrated in humans. Here we show that nonlinear-dynamical control can modulate human cardiac electrophysiological dynamics by rapidly stabilizing an unstable target rhythm. Specifically, in 52/54 control attempts in five patients, we successfully terminated pacing-induced period-2 atrioventricular-nodal conduction alternans by stabilizing the underlying unstable steady-state conduction. This proof-of-concept demonstration shows that nonlinear-dynamical control techniques are clinically feasible and provides a foundation for developing such techniques for more complex forms of clinical arrhythmia.

  20. Parallel performance of an object-oriented contact implementation for transient solid dynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyong, Bai; Yingbo, He; Chengjun, Chen

    2010-06-01

    In order to make it easier to extend an finite element software framework with contact implementation for transient solid dynamic analysis, we have designed a general-purposed framework-oriented parallel contact class in this article. A parallel contact computation algorithm model has been generated based on contact schemes reported on last two decades. The class is integrated to an open source platform easily without affecting the rest code of the platform.

  1. Orientational dynamics and energy landscape features of thermotropic liquid crystals: An analogy with supercooled liquids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biman Jana; Biman Bagchi

    2007-09-01

    Recent optical kerr effect (OKE) studies have revealed that orientational relaxation of rodlike nematogens near the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase boundary and also in the nematic phase exhibit temporal power law decay at intermediate times. Such behaviour has drawn an intriguing analogy with supercooled liquids. Here, we have investigated the single-particle and collective orientational dynamics of a family of model system of thermotropic liquid crystals using extensive computer simulations. Several remarkable features of glassy dynamics are on display including non-exponential relaxation, dynamical heterogeneity, and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the orientational relaxation time. Over a temperature range near the I-N phase boundary, the system behaves like a fragile glass-forming liquid. Using proper scaling, we construct the usual relaxation time versus inverse temperature plot and explicitly demonstrate that one can successfully define a density dependent fragility of liquid crystals. The fragility of liquid crystals shows a temperature and density dependence which is remarkably similar to the fragility of glass forming supercooled liquids. Energy landscape analysis of inherent structures shows that the breakdown of the Arrhenius temperature dependence of relaxation rate occurs at a temperature that marks the onset of the growth of the depth of the potential energy minima explored by the system.

  2. Fluoropolymer Microstructure and Dynamics: Influence of Molecular Orientation Induced by Uniaxial Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Daniel; Yin, Chaoqing; Runt, James

    Fluorinated semi-crystalline polymer films are attractive for dielectric film applications due to their chemical inertness, heat resistance, and high thermal stability. In the present investigation we explore the influence of orientation induced by uniaxial drawing on the crystalline microstructure and relaxation processes of poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE), in order to ascertain how morphological control can benefit polymer dielectric design. When drawn below or near the Tg, the crystallinity of the drawn films is unchanged, and oriented amorphous structures and crystalline microfibrils form at high draw ratios. This orientation slows segmental relaxation, reflected by an increase in the dynamic Tg, and also delays the transition to the high temperature crystalline form of ETFE. When drawing above the Tg, the films undergo strain-induced crystallization at high draw ratios. For these films an increase in the dynamic Tg is also observed, in addition to a second segmental relaxation process, appearing as a shoulder on the primary process. We propose that this represents a contribution from a rigid amorphous fraction, having slowed chain dynamics. Supported by Office of Naval Research.

  3. A Neural Dynamic Model Generates Descriptions of Object-Oriented Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Mathis; Lins, Jonas; Schöner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Describing actions entails that relations between objects are discovered. A pervasively neural account of this process requires that fundamental problems are solved: the neural pointer problem, the binding problem, and the problem of generating discrete processing steps from time-continuous neural processes. We present a prototypical solution to these problems in a neural dynamic model that comprises dynamic neural fields holding representations close to sensorimotor surfaces as well as dynamic neural nodes holding discrete, language-like representations. Making the connection between these two types of representations enables the model to describe actions as well as to perceptually ground movement phrases-all based on real visual input. We demonstrate how the dynamic neural processes autonomously generate the processing steps required to describe or ground object-oriented actions. By solving the fundamental problems of neural pointing, binding, and emergent discrete processing, the model may be a first but critical step toward a systematic neural processing account of higher cognition.

  4. Scale and Orientation-Based Background Weighted Histogram for Human Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaroussi, Khadija; Saaidi, Abderrahim; Masrar, Mohamed; Satori, Khalid

    2016-09-01

    The Mean Shift procedure is a popular object tracking algorithm since it is fast, easy to implement and performs well in a range of conditions. However, classic Mean Shift tracking algorithm fixes the size and orientation of the tracking window, which limits the performance when the target's orientation and scale change. In this paper, we present a new human tracking algorithm based on Mean Shift technique in order to estimate the position, scale and orientation changes of the target. This work combines moment features of the weight image with background information to design a robust tracking algorithm entitled Scale and Orientation-based Background Weighted Histogram (SOBWH). The experimental results show that the proposed approach SOBWH presents a good compromise between tracking precision and calculation time, also they validate its robustness, especially to large background variation, scale and orientation changes and similar background scenes.

  5. EEG correlates of spatial orientation in the human retrosplenial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-T; Chiu, T-C; Gramann, K

    2015-10-15

    Studies on spatial navigation reliably demonstrate that the retrosplenial complex (RSC) plays a pivotal role for allocentric spatial information processing by transforming egocentric and allocentric spatial information into the respective other spatial reference frame (SRF). While more and more imaging studies investigate the role of the RSC in spatial tasks, high temporal resolution measures such as electroencephalography (EEG) are missing. To investigate the function of the RSC in spatial navigation with high temporal resolution we used EEG to analyze spectral perturbations during navigation based on allocentric and egocentric SRF. Participants performed a path integration task in a clearly structured virtual environment providing allothetic information. Continuous EEG recordings were decomposed by independent component analysis (ICA) with subsequent source reconstruction of independent time source series using equivalent dipole modeling. Time-frequency transformation was used to investigate reference frame-specific orientation processes during navigation as compared to a control condition with identical visual input but no orientation task. Our results demonstrate that navigation based on an egocentric reference frame recruited a network including the parietal, motor, and occipital cortices with dominant perturbations in the alpha band and theta modulation in frontal cortex. Allocentric navigation was accompanied by performance-related desynchronization of the 8-13 Hz frequency band and synchronization in the 12-14 Hz band in the RSC. The results support the claim that the retrosplenial complex is central to translating egocentric spatial information into allocentric reference frames. Modulations in different frequencies with different time courses in the RSC further provide first evidence of two distinct neural processes reflecting translation of spatial information based on distinct reference frames and the computation of heading changes.

  6. Influence of human behavior on cholera dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Gao, Daozhou; Wang, Jin

    2015-09-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the impact of human behavior on cholera infection. We start with a cholera ordinary differential equation (ODE) model that incorporates human behavior via modeling disease prevalence dependent contact rates for direct and indirect transmissions and infectious host shedding. Local and global dynamics of the model are analyzed with respect to the basic reproduction number. We then extend the ODE model to a reaction-convection-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) model that accounts for the movement of both human hosts and bacteria. Particularly, we investigate the cholera spreading speed by analyzing the traveling wave solutions of the PDE model, and disease threshold dynamics by numerically evaluating the basic reproduction number of the PDE model. Our results show that human behavior can reduce (a) the endemic and epidemic levels, (b) cholera spreading speeds and (c) the risk of infection (characterized by the basic reproduction number). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of human behavior on cholera dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xueying; Gao, Daozhou; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the impact of human behavior on cholera infection. We start with a cholera ordinary differential equation (ODE) model that incorporates human behavior via modeling disease prevalence dependent contact rates for direct and indirect transmissions and infectious host shedding. Local and global dynamics of the model are analyzed with respect to the basic reproduction number. We then extend the ODE model to a reaction-convection-diffusion partial differential equa...

  8. Human infants' preference for left-to-right oriented increasing numerical sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores de Hevia

    Full Text Available While associations between number and space, in the form of a spatially oriented numerical representation, have been extensively reported in human adults, the origins of this phenomenon are still poorly understood. The commonly accepted view is that this number-space association is a product of human invention, with accounts proposing that culture, symbolic knowledge, and mathematics education are at the roots of this phenomenon. Here we show that preverbal infants aged 7 months, who lack symbolic knowledge and mathematics education, show a preference for increasing magnitude displayed in a left-to-right spatial orientation. Infants habituated to left-to-right oriented increasing or decreasing numerical sequences showed an overall higher looking time to new left-to-right oriented increasing numerical sequences at test (Experiment 1. This pattern did not hold when infants were presented with the same ordinal numerical information displayed from right to left (Experiment 2. The different pattern of results was congruent with the presence of a malleable, context-dependent baseline preference for increasing, left-to-right oriented, numerosities (Experiment 3. These findings are suggestive of an early predisposition in humans to link numerical order with a left-to-right spatial orientation, which precedes the acquisition of symbolic abilities, mathematics education, and the acquisition of reading and writing skills.

  9. Development of Dynamic Coupling Measurement of Distributed Object Oriented Software Based on Trace Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Babu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Software metrics are increasingly playing a central role in the planning and control of softwaredevelopment projects. Coupling measures have important applications in software development andmaintenance. Existing literature on software metrics is mainly focused on centralized systems, while workin the area of distributed systems, particularly in service-oriented systems, is scarce. Distributed systemswith service oriented components are even more heterogeneous networking and execution environment.Traditional coupling measures take into account only “static” couplings. They do not account for“dynamic” couplings due to polymorphism and may significantly underestimate the complexity of softwareand misjudge the need for code inspection, testing and debugging. This is expected to result in poorpredictive accuracy of the quality models in distributed Object Oriented systems that utilize static couplingmeasurements. In order to overcome these issues, we propose a hybrid model in Distributed ObjectOriented Software for measure the coupling dynamically. In the proposed method, there are three stepssuch as Instrumentation process, Post processing and Coupling measurement. Initially the instrumentationprocess is done. In this process the instrumented JVM that has been modified to trace method calls. Duringthis process, three trace files are created namely .prf, .clp, .svp. In the second step, the information in thesefile are merged. At the end of this step, the merged detailed trace of each JVM contains pointers to themerged trace files of the other JVM such that the path of every remote call from the client to the server canbe uniquely identified. Finally, the coupling metrics are measured dynamically. The implementation resultsshow that the proposed system will effectively measure the coupling metrics dynamically.

  10. Human Arm Motion Tracking by Orientation-Based Fusion of Inertial Sensors and Kinect Using Unscented Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrsaei, Arash; Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2016-09-01

    Due to various applications of human motion capture techniques, developing low-cost methods that would be applicable in nonlaboratory environments is under consideration. MEMS inertial sensors and Kinect are two low-cost devices that can be utilized in home-based motion capture systems, e.g., home-based rehabilitation. In this work, an unscented Kalman filter approach was developed based on the complementary properties of Kinect and the inertial sensors to fuse the orientation data of these two devices for human arm motion tracking during both stationary shoulder joint position and human body movement. A new measurement model of the fusion algorithm was obtained that can compensate for the inertial sensors drift problem in high dynamic motions and also joints occlusion in Kinect. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by an optical motion tracker system. The errors were reduced by almost 50% compared to cases when either inertial sensor or Kinect measurements were utilized.

  11. Role of gravitational versus egocentric cues for human spatial orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Nils; Bock, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Our perception of the vertical depends on allocentric information about the visual surrounds, egocentric information about the own body axis and gravicentric information about the pull of gravity. Previous work has documented that some individuals rely strongly on allocentric information, while others do not, and the present work scrutinizes the existence of yet another dichotomy: We hypothesize that in the absence of allocentric cues, some individuals rely strongly on gravicentric information, while others do not. Twenty-four participants were tested at three angles of body pitch (0° = upright, -90° = supine, -110° = head down) after eliminating visual orientation cues. When asked to adjust a rotating tree '…such that the tree looks right,' nine persons set the tree consistently parallel to gravity, eight consistently parallel to their longitudinal axis and seven switched between these two references; responses mid-between gravity and body axis were rare. The outcome was similar when tactile cues were masked by body vibration, as well as when participants were asked to adjust the tree '… such that leaves are at the top and roots are at the bottom'; the incidence of gravicentric responses increased with the instruction to set the tree '… such that leaves are at the top and roots are at the bottom in space, irrespective of your own position.' We conclude that the perceived vertical can be anchored in gravicentric or in egocentric space, depending on instructions and individual preference.

  12. Human Action Perception is Consistent, Flexible, and Orientation Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Jeff; Pechey, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has found that observers of object-directed human action pay more attention to information regarding hand contact over information regarding spatial trajectories in action, and that processing of trajectory information is disrupted by inversion. However, observers can also flexibly modulate their attention to spatial trajectory depending on the goal or context of the actor. In Experiments 1(a) and 1b of the current research, we directly compared attention with hand and trajectory information across placing and dropping actions in order to determine whether the hand bias is always present or whether flexibility in action perception can attenuate this bias. Results demonstrated that observers attend more to hand information for placing, but attend equally to hand and trajectory information for dropping. Experiment 2 explored the role of the actor's goal in processing spatial trajectory for mimed dropping actions and non-human control stimuli, and the role of goals in the inversion effect. Results indicated that goal relevance increases processing of trajectory information, and that processing of all spatial trajectories in human action is disrupted by inversion, regardless of the actor's goal. The present findings highlight the role of prediction in action perception, and suggest that human action is processed with expertise.

  13. Segmenting Dynamic Human Action via Statistical Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Dare; Andersson, Annika; Saffran, Jenny; Meyer, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Human social, cognitive, and linguistic functioning depends on skills for rapidly processing action. Identifying distinct acts within the dynamic motion flow is one basic component of action processing; for example, skill at segmenting action is foundational to action categorization, verb learning, and comprehension of novel action sequences. Yet…

  14. The role of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and water velocity in determining river temperature dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Grace; Malcolm, Iain A.; Sadler, Jonathan P.; Hannah, David M.

    2017-10-01

    A simulation experiment was used to understand the importance of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and flow velocity for stream energy budgets and river temperature dynamics. Water temperature and meteorological observations were obtained in addition to hemispherical photographs along a ∼1 km reach of the Girnock Burn, a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland. Data from nine hemispherical images (representing different uniform canopy density scenarios) were used to parameterise a deterministic net radiation model and simulate radiative fluxes. For each vegetation scenario, the effects of eight channel orientations were investigated by changing the position of north at 45° intervals in each hemispheric image. Simulated radiative fluxes and observed turbulent fluxes drove a high-resolution water temperature model of the reach. Simulations were performed under low and high water velocity scenarios. Both velocity scenarios yielded decreases in mean (≥1.6 °C) and maximum (≥3.0 °C) temperature as canopy density increased. Slow-flowing water resided longer within the reach, which enhanced heat accumulation and dissipation, and drove higher maximum and lower minimum temperatures. Intermediate levels of shade produced highly variable energy flux and water temperature dynamics depending on the channel orientation and thus the time of day when the channel was shaded. We demonstrate that in many reaches relatively sparse but strategically located vegetation could produce substantial reductions in maximum temperature and suggest that these criteria are used to inform future river management.

  15. Computational approaches to spatial orientation: from transfer functions to dynamic Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeilage, Paul R; Ganesan, Narayan; Angelaki, Dora E

    2008-12-01

    Spatial orientation is the sense of body orientation and self-motion relative to the stationary environment, fundamental to normal waking behavior and control of everyday motor actions including eye movements, postural control, and locomotion. The brain achieves spatial orientation by integrating visual, vestibular, and somatosensory signals. Over the past years, considerable progress has been made toward understanding how these signals are processed by the brain using multiple computational approaches that include frequency domain analysis, the concept of internal models, observer theory, Bayesian theory, and Kalman filtering. Here we put these approaches in context by examining the specific questions that can be addressed by each technique and some of the scientific insights that have resulted. We conclude with a recent application of particle filtering, a probabilistic simulation technique that aims to generate the most likely state estimates by incorporating internal models of sensor dynamics and physical laws and noise associated with sensory processing as well as prior knowledge or experience. In this framework, priors for low angular velocity and linear acceleration can explain the phenomena of velocity storage and frequency segregation, both of which have been modeled previously using arbitrary low-pass filtering. How Kalman and particle filters may be implemented by the brain is an emerging field. Unlike past neurophysiological research that has aimed to characterize mean responses of single neurons, investigations of dynamic Bayesian inference should attempt to characterize population activities that constitute probabilistic representations of sensory and prior information.

  16. Orientational order and translational dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2016-08-10

    Implementing extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the organization of magnetic particle assemblies (clusters) in a uniaxial liquid crystalline matrix comprised of rodlike particles. The magnetic particles are modelled as soft dipolar spheres with diameter significantly smaller than the width of the rods. Depending on the dipolar strength coupling the magnetic particles arrange into head-to-tail configurations forming various types of clusters including rings (closed loops) and chains. In turn, the liquid crystalline matrix induces long range orientational ordering to these structures and promotes their diffusion along the director of the phase. Different translational dynamics are exhibited as the liquid crystalline matrix transforms either from isotropic to nematic or from nematic to smectic state. This is caused due to different collective motion of the magnetic particles into various clusters in the anisotropic environments. Our results offer a physical insight for understanding both the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle assemblies in liquid crystalline matrices.

  17. Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ruina; Bennis, Fouad; Ma, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Human muscle fatigue is considered to be one of the main reasons for Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD). Recent models have been introduced to define muscle fatigue for static postures. However, the main drawbacks of these models are that the dynamic effect of the human and the external load are not taken into account. In this paper, each human joint is assumed to be controlled by two muscle groups to generate motions such as push/pull. The joint torques are computed using Lagrange's formulation to evaluate the dynamic factors of the muscle fatigue model. An experiment is defined to validate this assumption and the result for one person confirms its feasibility. The evaluation of this model can predict the fatigue and MSD risk in industry production quickly.

  18. Community-oriented Curriculum Design for Medical Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duu-Jian Tsai

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Various recent surveys in Taiwan show physicians' decreasing satisfaction and increasing frustration with their working environment. Their major complaints are stress, long hours, salary, management's disrespect, and lack of trust from patients and society. To move towards restoration of social trust, this paper proposes incorporating the concept of “doctor as mediator in the changing relationship with patients” into the medical curriculum, as will be described in detail. This paper argues that structured community service for medical students facilitates self-learning, and will not only motivate them to develop good clinical and communication skills, but will also lead them to realize that the essence of medicine must be social trust. These effects have been seen after several years of an experimental curriculum involving more than 800 students. A program using methodology for community empowerment has been realized in a two-stage curriculum design. Students' self-assessment of achievements in these courses included further improvement in communication skills, courage to express own position, appropriate planning in advance, management of human resources, ability to deal with limited space and time, and experience of a profoundly moving learning process. In conclusion, community-based curriculum designs that facilitate self-learning for medical students should be the key element of reformed humanities education in Taiwan medical schools. Moreover, medical humanities continues to be a key element contributing to ongoing intellectual movements in Taiwan for building civil society and rooting democracy in the community.

  19. Are Caribbean reef sharks, Carcharhinus perezi, able to perceive human body orientation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Erich K; Amin, Raid

    2014-05-01

    The present study examines the potential capability of Caribbean reef sharks to perceive human body orientation, as well as discussing the sharks' swimming patterns in a person's vicinity. A standardized video method was used to record the scenario of single SCUBA divers kneeling in the sand and the approach patterns of sharks, combined with a control group of two divers kneeling back-to-back. When approaching a single test-subject, significantly more sharks preferred to swim outside the person's field of vision. The results suggest that these sharks are able to identify human body orientation, but the mechanisms used and factors affecting nearest distance of approach remain unclear.

  20. Learning Human Actions by Combining Global Dynamics and Local Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guan; Yang, Shuang; Tian, Guodong; Yuan, Chunfeng; Hu, Weiming; Maybank, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of human action recognition through combining global temporal dynamics and local visual spatio-temporal appearance features. For this purpose, in the global temporal dimension, we propose to model the motion dynamics with robust linear dynamical systems (LDSs) and use the model parameters as motion descriptors. Since LDSs live in a non-Euclidean space and the descriptors are in non-vector form, we propose a shift invariant subspace angles based distance to measure the similarity between LDSs. In the local visual dimension, we construct curved spatio-temporal cuboids along the trajectories of densely sampled feature points and describe them using histograms of oriented gradients (HOG). The distance between motion sequences is computed with the Chi-Squared histogram distance in the bag-of-words framework. Finally we perform classification using the maximum margin distance learning method by combining the global dynamic distances and the local visual distances. We evaluate our approach for action recognition on five short clips data sets, namely Weizmann, KTH, UCF sports, Hollywood2 and UCF50, as well as three long continuous data sets, namely VIRAT, ADL and CRIM13. We show competitive results as compared with current state-of-the-art methods.

  1. The basis of orientation decoding in human primary visual cortex: fine- or coarse-scale biases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ryan T

    2015-01-01

    Orientation signals in human primary visual cortex (V1) can be reliably decoded from the multivariate pattern of activity as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The precise underlying source of these decoded signals (whether by orientation biases at a fine or coarse scale in cortex) remains a matter of some controversy, however. Freeman and colleagues (J Neurosci 33: 19695-19703, 2013) recently showed that the accuracy of decoding of spiral patterns in V1 can be predicted by a voxel's preferred spatial position (the population receptive field) and its coarse orientation preference, suggesting that coarse-scale biases are sufficient for orientation decoding. Whether they are also necessary for decoding remains an open question, and one with implications for the broader interpretation of multivariate decoding results in fMRI studies. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. An ERP study about the effects of different spatial frequencies and orientations on human brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lingling; Chan, Leanne L H

    2015-01-01

    Spatial, temporal frequencies as well as orientations are important visual stimulus properties, which will affect human perception. In this paper, we investigated the effects of gratings with different spatial, temporal frequencies and orientations on visual evoked potentials. Two positive components (P1 and P2) were observed after stimulation. Our results showed that the amplitude of P1 component was higher for gratings with 0.3 cycles per degree (cpd) spatial frequency compared to 0.05 and 0.1 cpd. While the amplitude differences of P2 component occurred between 0.05 and 0.1 cpd. The amplitude of both components were higher when subjects were viewing gratings at vertical orientation than horizontal orientation.

  3. The neural code for face orientation in the human fusiform face area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Fernando M; Cichy, Radoslaw M; Allefeld, Carsten; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Humans recognize faces and objects with high speed and accuracy regardless of their orientation. Recent studies have proposed that orientation invariance in face recognition involves an intermediate representation where neural responses are similar for mirror-symmetric views. Here, we used fMRI, multivariate pattern analysis, and computational modeling to investigate the neural encoding of faces and vehicles at different rotational angles. Corroborating previous studies, we demonstrate a representation of face orientation in the fusiform face-selective area (FFA). We go beyond these studies by showing that this representation is category-selective and tolerant to retinal translation. Critically, by controlling for low-level confounds, we found the representation of orientation in FFA to be compatible with a linear angle code. Aspects of mirror-symmetric coding cannot be ruled out when FFA mean activity levels are considered as a dimension of coding. Finally, we used a parametric family of computational models, involving a biased sampling of view-tuned neuronal clusters, to compare different face angle encoding models. The best fitting model exhibited a predominance of neuronal clusters tuned to frontal views of faces. In sum, our findings suggest a category-selective and monotonic code of face orientation in the human FFA, in line with primate electrophysiology studies that observed mirror-symmetric tuning of neural responses at higher stages of the visual system, beyond the putative homolog of human FFA.

  4. A stochastic model of human gait dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef; M. Hausdorff, Jeffrey; Ch. Ivanov, Plamen; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a stochastic model of gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, that reproduces distinctive statistical properties of normal human walking. By tuning one model parameter, the transition (hopping) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood-including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation. The model also generates time series with multifractal spectra whose broadness depends only on this parameter. Moreover, we find that the volatility exponent increases monotonically as a function of the width of the multifractal spectrum, suggesting the possibility of a change in multifractality with maturation.

  5. The influence of molecular pre-orientation on the resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Miao; Li, Jing-Lun; Yu, Jie; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the influence of molecular pre-orientation on the resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) dynamics, taking the LiH molecule for example. The LiH molecule is first pre-oriented by a single-cycle pulse (SCP) in terahertz (THz) region, and then excited by the femtosecond pump pulse, and finally ionized by the femtosecond probe pulse. We focus on the impact of the pre-orientation on the ionization probability, energy- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distribution (PAD). It is found that the ionization probability and peak intensity of energy-resolved photoelectron spectra are significantly affected by molecular orientation. The angle-resolved photoelectron spectra are related to the molecular orientation. The PAD can be changed by varying the delay time between the THz SCP and pump pulse. We also investigate the effect of temperature on excitation and ionization dynamics.

  6. Orientation-dependent recrystallization in an oxide dispersion strengthened steel after dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Tao, N.R.; Mishin, Oleg V.

    2015-01-01

    dynamic plastic deformation. Different boundary spacings and different stored energy densities for regions belonging to either of the two fibre texture components result in a quite heterogeneous deformation microstructure. Upon annealing, preferential recovery and preferential nucleation...... of recrystallization are found in the 〈111〉- oriented lamellae, which had a higher stored energy density in the as-deformed condition. In the course of recrystallization, the initial duplex fibre texture is replaced by a strong 〈111〉 fibre recrystallization texture....

  7. Fractal Analysis on Human Behaviors Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Chao; Zha, Yi-Long

    2010-01-01

    The study of human dynamics has attracted much interest from many fields recently. In this paper, the fractal characteristic of human behaviors is investigated from the perspective of time series constructed with the amount of library loans. The Hurst exponents and length of non-periodic cycles calculated through Rescaled Range Analysis indicate that the time series of human behaviors is fractal with long-range correlation. Then the time series are converted to complex networks by visibility graph algorithm. The topological properties of the networks, such as scale-free property, small-world effect and hierarchical structure imply that close relationships exist between the amounts of repetitious actions performed by people during certain periods of time, especially for some important days. Finally, the networks obtained are verified to be not fractal and self-similar using box-counting method. Our work implies the intrinsic regularity shown in human collective repetitious behaviors.

  8. Estimating three-dimensional orientation of human body parts by inertial/magnetic sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    User-worn sensing units composed of inertial and magnetic sensors are becoming increasingly popular in various domains, including biomedical engineering, robotics, virtual reality, where they can also be applied for real-time tracking of the orientation of human body parts in the three-dimensional (3D) space. Although they are a promising choice as wearable sensors under many respects, the inertial and magnetic sensors currently in use offer measuring performance that are critical in order to achieve and maintain accurate 3D-orientation estimates, anytime and anywhere. This paper reviews the main sensor fusion and filtering techniques proposed for accurate inertial/magnetic orientation tracking of human body parts; it also gives useful recipes for their actual implementation.

  9. Human head orientation and eye visibility as indicators of attention for goats (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Christian; McElligott, Alan G

    2017-01-01

    Animals domesticated for working closely with humans (e.g. dogs) have been shown to be remarkable in adjusting their behaviour to human attentional stance. However, there is little evidence for this form of information perception in species domesticated for production rather than companionship. We tested domestic ungulates (goats) for their ability to differentiate attentional states of humans. In the first experiment, we investigated the effect of body and head orientation of one human experimenter on approach behaviour by goats. Test subjects (N = 24) significantly changed their behaviour when the experimenter turned its back to the subjects, but did not take into account head orientation alone. In the second experiment, goats (N = 24) could choose to approach one of two experimenters, while only one was paying attention to them. Goats preferred to approach humans that oriented their body and head towards the subject, whereas head orientation alone had no effect on choice behaviour. In the third experiment, goats (N = 32) were transferred to a separate test arena and were rewarded for approaching two experimenters providing a food reward during training trials. In subsequent probe test trials, goats had to choose between the two experimenters differing in their attentional states. Like in Experiments 1 and 2, goats did not show a preference for the attentive person when the inattentive person turned her head away from the subject. In this last experiment, goats preferred to approach the attentive person compared to a person who closed their eyes or covered the whole face with a blind. However, goats showed no preference when one person covered only the eyes. Our results show that animals bred for production rather than companionship show differences in their approach and choice behaviour depending on human attentive state. However, our results contrast with previous findings regarding the use of the head orientation to attribute attention and show the importance

  10. Dynamic efficiency of the human intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Biagi, Elena; Turroni, Silvia; Maccaferri, Simone; Figini, Paolo; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    The emerging dynamic dimensions of the human intestinal microbiota (IM) are challenging the traditional definition of healthy gut microbiota, principally based on the static concepts of phylogenetic and functional core. On the other hand, recent researches are revealing that the microbiota plasticity is strategic for several aspects of our biology, addressing the different immunological and metabolic needs at various ages, and adjusting the ecosystem services in response to different lifestyle, physiological states or diets. In light of these studies, we propose to revise the traditional concept of healthy human IM, including its degree of plasticity among the fundamental requisites for providing host health. In order to make a model taking into account the relative importance of IM core functions and plasticity for the maintenance of host health, we address to Economics, where the efficiency of a productive system is measured by computing static and dynamic parameters.

  11. Compensation of Magnetic Disturbances Improves Inertial and Magnetic Sensing of Human Body Segment Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roetenberg, Daniel; Luinge, Henk; Baten, Chris T.M.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a complementary Kalman filter design to estimate orientation of human body segments by fusing gyroscope, accelerometer, and magnetometer signals from miniature sensors. Ferromagnetic materials or other magnetic fields near the sensor module disturb the local earth magnetic field

  12. Schools, Animals, and Kids. Orientation to the Humanities (Latin), Part 3: 7500.03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    In an effort to orient the student of Latin to the humanities, a series of three quinmester courses focus on various aspects of life of a Roman family in the first century A. D. The third part of the trilogy, to be used independently or in sequence, concentrates on the telling of time by day and year, all about schools, animals, and gladiatorial…

  13. Human Resource Development Practices as Determinant of HRD Climate and Quality Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Arif; Hashim, Junaidah; Ismail, Ahmad Zaki Hj

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to measure employees' perception of human resource development (HRD) practices, to explore whether ISO certification leads to any improvements in HRD system, and to examine the role of HRD practices on employees' development climate and quality orientation in the organization. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  14. Review: From disgust to humanity--sexual orientation and constitutional law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Izado Leon Hernandez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available

    REVIEW

    FROM DISGUST TO HUMANITY: SEXUAL ORIENTATION AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW

    Martha C. Nussbaum
    Oxford University Press 2010
    217 pages,
    ISBN-13: 978-0-19-530531-9

  15. Service Oriented Architecture for Business Dynamics: An Agent Based Business Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Rishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In today's rapidly changing environment the industries areinterested in executing business functions that has scope inmultiple applications. Business dynamics and technologicalinnovations have felt organizations to comply with adisparate mix of operating systems, applications anddatabases. This makes it difficult, time-consuming and costlyfor IT departments to deliver new applications that integrateheterogeneous technologies. It demands high interoperabilityand more flexible and adaptive business processmanagement. The inclination is to have systems assembled,from a loosely coupled collection of Web services, which areuniversal and integrated. This technical area appears tohave scope where the Agent Technology can be exploitedwith significant advantages. With Service OrientedArchitecture a decomposable architecture, and associatedset of development and IT management disciplines,composed of loosely coupled services communicating viapre-established protocols, these services can be assembledad-hoc to form customized applications that address a widevariety of business requirements.In the present paper, we propose a conceptual frameworkfor agent-based Service Oriented Architecture (SOA. Inwhich we try to integrate Service Oriented Architecture withthe agent technology & other tactical technologies like webservices, business workflow services, Business meta-rules,search optimization of services and semantic Webtechnology for business service mappings.

  16. Orientation and dynamics of melittin in membranes of varying composition utilizing NBD fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuraman, H; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-02-15

    Melittin is a cationic hemolytic peptide isolated from the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. The organization of membrane-bound melittin has earlier been shown to be dependent on the physical state and composition of membranes. In this study, we covalently labeled the N-terminal (Gly-1) and Lys-7 of melittin with an environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, the NBD group, to monitor the influence of negatively charged lipids and cholesterol on the organization and dynamics of membrane-bound melittin. Our results show that the NBD group of melittin labeled at its N-terminal end does not exhibit red edge excitation shift in DOPC and DOPC/DOPG membranes, whereas the NBD group of melittin labeled at Lys-7 exhibits REES of approximately 8 nm. This could be attributed to difference in membrane microenvironment experienced by the NBD groups in these analogs. Interestingly, the membrane environment of the NBD groups is sensitive to the presence of cholesterol, which is supported by time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Importantly, the orientation of melittin is found to be parallel to the membrane surface as determined by membrane penetration depth analysis using the parallax method in all cases. Our results constitute the first report to our knowledge describing the orientation of melittin in cholesterol-containing membranes. These results assume significance in the overall context of the role of membrane lipids in the orientation and function of membrane proteins and peptides.

  17. Retractile processes in T lymphocyte orientation on a stimulatory substrate: morphology and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, Sergey N.; Maly, Ivan V.

    2008-03-01

    T cells of the immune system target infected and tumor cells in crowded tissues with high precision by coming into direct contact with the intended target and orienting the intracellular Golgi apparatus and the associated organelles to the area of the cell-cell contact. The mechanism of this orientation remains largely unknown. To further elucidate it we used three-dimensional microscopy of living T cells presented with an artificial substrate mimicking the target cell surface. The data indicate that long, finger-like processes emanate from the T cell surface next to the intracellular Golgi apparatus. These processes come in contact with the substrate and retract. The retraction accompanies the reorientation of the T cell body which brings the Golgi apparatus closer to the stimulatory substrate. Numerical modeling indicates that considering the forces involved the retraction of a process attached with one end to the cell body near the Golgi apparatus and with the other end to the substrate can bring the Golgi apparatus to the substrate by moving the entire cell body. The dynamic scenarios that are predicted by the quantitative model explain features of the reorientation movements that we measured but could not explain previously. We propose that retraction of the surface processes is a force-generating mechanism contributing to the functional orientation of T lymphocytes.

  18. Structures and orientation-dependent interaction forces of titania nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, George; Antony, S. Joseph; Hammond, Robert B.; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-07-01

    Engineering nanowires to develop new products and processes is highly topical due to their ability to provide highly enhanced physical, chemical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. In this work, using molecular dynamics simulations, we report fundamental information, about the structural and thermodynamic properties of individual anatase titania (TiO2) nanowires with cross-sectional diameters between 2 and 6 nm, and aspect ratio (length to diameter) of 6:1 at temperatures ranging from 300 to 3000 K. Estimates of the melting transition temperature of the nanowires are between 2000 and 2500 K. The melting transition temperature predicted from the radial distribution functions (RDFs) shows strong agreement with those predicted from the total energy profiles. Overall, the transition temperature is in reasonable agreement with melting points predicted from experiments and simulations reported in the literature for spherical nanoparticles of similar sizes. Hence, the melting transition temperature of TiO2 nanowires modelled here can be considered as shape independent. Furthermore, for the first time based on MD simulations, interaction forces between two nanowires are reported at ambient temperature (300 K) for different orientations: parallel, perpendicular and end-to-end. It is observed that end-to-end orientations manifested the strongest attraction forces, while the parallel and perpendicular orientations displayed weaker attractions. The results reported here could form a foundation in future multiscale modelling studies of the structured titania nanowire assemblies, depending on the inter-wire interaction forces.

  19. Lightweight object oriented structure analysis: tools for building tools to analyze molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Tod D; Leioatts, Nicholas; Grossfield, Alan

    2014-12-15

    LOOS (Lightweight Object Oriented Structure-analysis) is a C++ library designed to facilitate making novel tools for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations by abstracting out the repetitive tasks, allowing developers to focus on the scientifically relevant part of the problem. LOOS supports input using the native file formats of most common biomolecular simulation packages, including CHARMM, NAMD, Amber, Tinker, and Gromacs. A dynamic atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included and is easily accessible to the tool-writer. In addition, LOOS is bundled with over 140 prebuilt tools, including suites of tools for analyzing simulation convergence, three-dimensional histograms, and elastic network models. Through modern C++ design, LOOS is both simple to develop with (requiring knowledge of only four core classes and a few utility functions) and is easily extensible. A python interface to the core classes is also provided, further facilitating tool development.

  20. Exploring the dynamics of ownership in community-oriented design projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Light, Ann; Hansen, Nicolai Brodersen; Halskov, Kim

    2013-01-01

    : what motivates ownership; how ownership transitions; structures to support ownership; and facilitating efficacy among participants. Specifically, we study the contribution of a Danish research team to the production of a media façade for a Swedish municipality and how British researchers engaged......This paper contributes an exploration of ownership as a dynamic process in community-oriented projects. We use case study accounts of two design projects to consider participation in contexts where social structure is relevant to design outcomes. In studying these dynamics, we consider four aspects...... community groups in making internet radio podcasts to share insight. We examine the complexity of the social process involved and trace patterns of change, before concluding with pragmatic and ethical reasons for technology design to pay attention to ownership issues....

  1. Dynamic Clustering in Object-Oriented Databases: An Advocacy for Simplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Jérôme; Régnier, Stéphane; Gruenwald, Le; Schneider, Michel

    2007-01-01

    We present in this paper three dynamic clustering techniques for Object-Oriented Databases (OODBs). The first two, Dynamic, Statistical & Tunable Clustering (DSTC) and StatClust, exploit both comprehensive usage statistics and the inter-object reference graph. They are quite elaborate. However, they are also complex to implement and induce a high overhead. The third clustering technique, called Detection & Reclustering of Objects (DRO), is based on the same principles, but is much simpler to implement. These three clustering algorithm have been implemented in the Texas persistent object store and compared in terms of clustering efficiency (i.e., overall performance increase) and overhead using the Object Clustering Benchmark (OCB). The results obtained showed that DRO induced a lighter overhead while still achieving better overall performance.

  2. Protein-membrane interaction: effect of myelin basic protein on the dynamics of oriented lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natali, F.; Relini, A.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P

    2003-08-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on pure dimyristoyl L-{alpha}-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) oriented membranes. The investigation has been carried out using several complementary experimental methods to provide a detailed characterization of the proteo-lipid complexes. In particular, taking advantage of the power of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique as optimal probe in biology, a significant effect is suggested to be induced by MBP on the anisotropy of lipid dynamics across the liquid-gel phase transition. Thus, the enhancement of the spatially restricted, vertical translation motion of DMPA is suggested to be the main responsible for the increased contribution of the out of plane lipid dynamics observed at 340 K.

  3. Protein membrane interaction: effect of myelin basic protein on the dynamics of oriented lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, F.; Relini, A.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P.

    2003-08-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on pure dimyristoyl L-α-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) oriented membranes. The investigation has been carried out using several complementary experimental methods to provide a detailed characterization of the proteo-lipid complexes. In particular, taking advantage of the power of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique as optimal probe in biology, a significant effect is suggested to be induced by MBP on the anisotropy of lipid dynamics across the liquid-gel phase transition. Thus, the enhancement of the spatially restricted, vertical translation motion of DMPA is suggested to be the main responsible for the increased contribution of the out of plane lipid dynamics observed at 340 K.

  4. Dynamic landscapes in human evolution and dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devès, Maud; King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Inglis, Robyn; Williams, Matthew; Winder, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    Archaeological studies of human settlement in its wider landscape setting usually focus on climate change as the principal environmental driver of change in the physical features of the landscape, even on the long time scales of early human evolution. We emphasize that landscapes evolve dynamically due to an interplay of processes occurring over different timescales. Tectonic deformation, volcanism, sea level changes, by acting on the topography, the lithology and on the patterns of erosion-deposition in a given area, can moderate or amplify the influence of climate at the regional and local scale. These processes impose or alleviate physical barriers to movement, and modify the distribution and accessibility of plant and animal resources in ways critical to human ecological and evolutionary success (King and Bailey, JHE 2006; Bailey and King, Antiquity 2011, Winder et al. Antiquity in press). The DISPERSE project, an ERC-funded collaboration between the University of York and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, aims to develop systematic methods for reconstructing landscapes associated with active tectonics, volcanism and sea level change at a variety of scales in order to study their potential impact on patterns of human evolution and dispersal. Examples are shown to illustrate the ways in which changes of significance to human settlement can occur at a range of geographical scales and on time scales that range from lifetimes to tens of millennia, creating and sustaining attractive conditions for human settlement and exercising powerful selective pressures on human development.

  5. VH-VL orientation prediction for antibody humanization candidate selection: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Lipsmeier, Florian; Harris, Seth F; Benz, Jörg; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Georges, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Antibody humanization describes the procedure of grafting a non-human antibody's complementarity-determining regions, i.e., the variable loop regions that mediate specific interactions with the antigen, onto a β-sheet framework that is representative of the human variable region germline repertoire, thus reducing the number of potentially antigenic epitopes that might trigger an anti-antibody response. The selection criterion for the so-called acceptor frameworks (one for the heavy and one for the light chain variable region) is traditionally based on sequence similarity. Here, we propose a novel approach that selects acceptor frameworks such that the relative orientation of the 2 variable domains in 3D space, and thereby the geometry of the antigen-binding site, is conserved throughout the process of humanization. The methodology relies on a machine learning-based predictor of antibody variable domain orientation that has recently been shown to improve the quality of antibody homology models. Using data from 3 humanization campaigns, we demonstrate that preselecting humanization variants based on the predicted difference in variable domain orientation with regard to the original antibody leads to subsets of variants with a significant improvement in binding affinity.

  6. Dynamics of coupled human-landscape systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B. T.; McNamara, D. E.

    2007-11-01

    A preliminary dynamical analysis of landscapes and humans as hierarchical complex systems suggests that strong coupling between the two that spreads to become regionally or globally pervasive should be focused at multi-year to decadal time scales. At these scales, landscape dynamics is dominated by water, sediment and biological routing mediated by fluvial, oceanic, atmospheric processes and human dynamics is dominated by simplifying, profit-maximizing market forces and political action based on projection of economic effect. Also at these scales, landscapes impact humans through patterns of natural disasters and trends such as sea level rise; humans impact landscapes by the effect of economic activity and changes meant to mitigate natural disasters and longer term trends. Based on this analysis, human-landscape coupled systems can be modeled using heterogeneous agents employing prediction models to determine actions to represent the nonlinear behavior of economic and political systems and rule-based routing algorithms to represent landscape processes. A cellular model for the development of New Orleans illustrates this approach, with routing algorithms for river and hurricane-storm surge determining flood extent, five markets (home, labor, hotel, tourism and port services) connecting seven types of economic agents (home buyers/laborers, home developers, hotel owners/ employers, hotel developers, tourists, port services developer and port services owners/employers), building of levees or a river spillway by political agents and damage to homes, hotels or port services within cells determined by the passage or depth of flood waters. The model reproduces historical aspects of New Orleans economic development and levee construction and the filtering of frequent small-scale floods at the expense of large disasters.

  7. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo.

  8. The concept design and dynamics analysis of a novel vehicle suspension mechanism with invariable orientation parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Shan; Li, Lingyang; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Yunqing

    2010-12-01

    This paper starts with a classical mechanism synthesis problem and focuses on the concept design and dynamics analysis of an independent suspension that has invariable orientation parameters when the wheel moves up (jounces) and down (rebounds). The paper first proposes a symmetric redundant constraint suspension structure that has invariable orientation parameters. And then, it analyses the mechanism mobility with the reciprocal screw theory, after which it establishes the displacement constraint equations of the suspension. This type of suspension has all the advantages of the sliding pillar suspension but overcomes its disadvantage of over-wearing. Through differentiating the constraint equations with respect to time, it obtains the kinematics relationship and builds up the dynamics equations of the suspension via Newton-Euler method. Numerical simulations indicate that this kind of independent suspensions should not only eliminate the shambling shocks induced by the jumping of wheels but also decrease the abrasion of the wheels. Therefore, this kind of independent suspensions can obviously improve the ride and handling properties of advanced automobiles.

  9. Effects of chamber shape and fiber orientation on relations between fiber dynamics and chamber dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regen, D M

    1988-01-01

    The function of a chamber depends on its hydrodynamic properties: isometric pressures it can exert in the operating range of distensions, compliances in the operating range of distensions, and wall-displacement resistances in the operating range of distensions. Wall-displacement resistance is the departure of pressure from isometric pressure relative to rate of cavity-volume change. The dependence of pressure on average stress and wall/cavity volume ratio is indifferent to chamber shape, which suggests that the volume-based compliance-elastance and resistance-viscosity equations would be only moderately shape dependent. The present study shows that this supposition is correct. If the wall is thin, these relations are shape indifferent. At higher wall/cavity volume ratio, cylindricity increases slightly the P-V-curve slope relative to elastance and either increases slightly or does not affect resistance relative to viscosity. The compliance-elastance and resistance-viscosity relations also depend only slightly on fiber orientation. Therefore, with the sphere equations, one can account accurately for normal and abnormal function of a prolate spheroid in terms of volume dimensions of the wall and apparent average fiber properties.

  10. Application of Vehicle Dynamic Modeling in Uavs for Precise Determination of Exterior Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaghani, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2016-06-01

    Advances in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and especially micro aerial vehicle (MAV) technology together with increasing quality and decreasing price of imaging devices have resulted in growing use of MAVs in photogrammetry. The practicality of MAV mapping is seriously enhanced with the ability to determine parameters of exterior orientation (EO) with sufficient accuracy, in both absolute and relative senses (change of attitude between successive images). While differential carrier phase GNSS satisfies cm-level positioning accuracy, precise attitude determination is essential for both direct sensor orientation (DiSO) and integrated sensor orientation (ISO) in corridor mapping or in block configuration imaging over surfaces with low texture. Limited cost, size, and weight of MAVs represent limitations on quality of onboard navigation sensors and puts emphasis on exploiting full capacity of available resources. Typically short flying times (10-30 minutes) also limit the possibility of estimating and/or correcting factors such as sensor misalignment and poor attitude initialization of inertial navigation system (INS). This research aims at increasing the accuracy of attitude determination in both absolute and relative senses with no extra sensors onboard. In comparison to classical INS/GNSS setup, novel approach is presented here to integrated state estimation, in which vehicle dynamic model (VDM) is used as the main process model. Such system benefits from available information from autopilot and physical properties of the platform in enhancing performance of determination of trajectory and parameters of exterior orientation consequently. The navigation system employs a differential carrier phase GNSS receiver and a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) grade inertial measurement unit (IMU), together with MAV control input from autopilot. Monte-Carlo simulation has been performed on trajectories for typical corridor mapping and block imaging. Results reveal

  11. TMF/ARA160 Governs the Dynamic Spatial Orientation of the Golgi Apparatus during Sperm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkis, Yoav; Bel, Shai; Rahimi, Roni; Lerer-Goldstein, Tali; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Babushkin, Tatiana; Shpungin, Sally; Nir, Uri

    2015-01-01

    TMF/ARA160 is known to be a TATA element Modulatory Factor (TMF). It was initially identified as a DNA-binding factor and a coactivator of the Androgen receptor. It was also characterized as a Golgi-associated protein, which is essential for acrosome formation during functional sperm development. However, the molecular roles of TMF in this intricate process have not been revealed. Here, we show that during spermiogenesis, TMF undergoes a dynamic change of localization throughout the Golgi apparatus. Specifically, TMF translocates from the cis-Golgi to the trans-Golgi network and to the emerging vesicles surface, as the round spermatids develop. Notably, lack of TMF led to an abnormal spatial orientation of the Golgi and to the deviation of the trans-Golgi surface away from the nucleus of the developing round spermatids. Concomitantly, pro-acrosomal vesicles derived from the TMF-/- Golgi lacked targeting properties and did not tether to the spermatid nuclear membrane thereby failing to form the acrosome anchoring scaffold, the acroplaxome, around the cell-nucleus. Absence of TMF also perturbed the positioning of microtubules, which normally lie in proximity to the Golgi and are important for maintaining Golgi spatial orientation and dynamics and for chromatoid body formation, which is impaired in TMF-/- spermatids. In-silico evaluation combined with molecular and electron microscopic analyses revealed the presence of a microtubule interacting domain (MIT) in TMF, and confirmed the association of TMF with microtubules in spermatogenic cells. Furthermore, the MIT domain in TMF, along with microtubules integrity, are required for stable association of TMF with the Golgi apparatus. Collectively, we show here for the first time that a Golgi and microtubules associated protein is crucial for maintaining proper Golgi orientation during a cell developmental process.

  12. TMF/ARA160 Governs the Dynamic Spatial Orientation of the Golgi Apparatus during Sperm Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Elkis

    Full Text Available TMF/ARA160 is known to be a TATA element Modulatory Factor (TMF. It was initially identified as a DNA-binding factor and a coactivator of the Androgen receptor. It was also characterized as a Golgi-associated protein, which is essential for acrosome formation during functional sperm development. However, the molecular roles of TMF in this intricate process have not been revealed. Here, we show that during spermiogenesis, TMF undergoes a dynamic change of localization throughout the Golgi apparatus. Specifically, TMF translocates from the cis-Golgi to the trans-Golgi network and to the emerging vesicles surface, as the round spermatids develop. Notably, lack of TMF led to an abnormal spatial orientation of the Golgi and to the deviation of the trans-Golgi surface away from the nucleus of the developing round spermatids. Concomitantly, pro-acrosomal vesicles derived from the TMF-/- Golgi lacked targeting properties and did not tether to the spermatid nuclear membrane thereby failing to form the acrosome anchoring scaffold, the acroplaxome, around the cell-nucleus. Absence of TMF also perturbed the positioning of microtubules, which normally lie in proximity to the Golgi and are important for maintaining Golgi spatial orientation and dynamics and for chromatoid body formation, which is impaired in TMF-/- spermatids. In-silico evaluation combined with molecular and electron microscopic analyses revealed the presence of a microtubule interacting domain (MIT in TMF, and confirmed the association of TMF with microtubules in spermatogenic cells. Furthermore, the MIT domain in TMF, along with microtubules integrity, are required for stable association of TMF with the Golgi apparatus. Collectively, we show here for the first time that a Golgi and microtubules associated protein is crucial for maintaining proper Golgi orientation during a cell developmental process.

  13. Punctuated equilibrium dynamics in human communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dan; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-10-01

    A minimal model based on network incorporating individual interactions is proposed to study the non-Poisson statistical properties of human behavior: individuals in system interact with their neighbors, the probability of an individual acting correlates to its activity, and all the individuals involved in action will change their activities randomly. The model reproduces varieties of spatial-temporal patterns observed in empirical studies of human daily communications, providing insight into various human activities and embracing a range of realistic social interacting systems, particularly, intriguing bimodal phenomenon. This model bridges priority queueing theory and punctuated equilibrium dynamics, and our modeling and analysis is likely to shed light on non-Poisson phenomena in many complex systems.

  14. Influence of orientation degree of freedom on fission dynamics of higly excited nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadtochy P.N.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Four-dimensional dynamical model was developed and employed for study fission characteristics in a wide range of fissility parameter. The three collective shape coordinates plus the K coordinate, which is the spin of the nucleus with respect to the symmetry (fission axis, were considered dynamically from the ground state deformation till the scission into fission fragments. A modified one-body mechanism for nuclear dissipation with a reduction coefficient ks of the contribution from a “wall” formula have been used in the study. The four-dimensional calculations for heavy nuclei could describe the fission fragment mass-energy distribution (MED parameters and prescission neutron multiplicity with almost single ks value, in contrast with 3D dynamical calculations, where a consistent description of all observables with the same ks is not possible for heavy nuclei. The estimation of a dissipation coefficient for the orientation degree of freedom γK = 0.077(MeV zs−1/2 is good for heavy nuclei and lower value of γK = 0.05(MeV zs−1/2 is needed for nuclei with mass A ≃ 200. The results of 4D and 3D Langevin dynamical calculations for light nuclei near the Businaro-Gallone point predict close results for the fission fragment MED parameters and prescission particles multiplicities.

  15. Mitotic spindle orientation predicts outer radial glial cell generation in human neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMonica, Bridget E; Lui, Jan H; Hansen, David V; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2013-01-01

    The human neocortex is increased in size and complexity as compared with most other species. Neocortical expansion has recently been attributed to protracted neurogenesis by outer radial glial cells in the outer subventricular zone, a region present in humans but not in rodents. The mechanisms of human outer radial glial cell generation are unknown, but are proposed to involve division of ventricular radial glial cells; neural stem cells present in all developing mammals. Here we show that human ventricular radial glial cells produce outer radial glial cells and seed formation of the outer subventricular zone via horizontal divisions, which occur more frequently in humans than in rodents. We further find that outer radial glial cell mitotic behaviour is cell intrinsic, and that the basal fibre, inherited by outer radial glial cells after ventricular radial glial division, determines cleavage angle. Our results suggest that altered regulation of mitotic spindle orientation increased outer radial glial cell number, and ultimately neuronal number, during human brain evolution.

  16. Universal activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Formentin, Marco; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new universal pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent's contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We show this universal behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one's environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns constrain future models of com...

  17. Blobs versus bars: psychophysical evidence supports two types of orientation response in human color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheiratmand, Mina; Meese, Tim S; Mullen, Kathy T

    2013-01-02

    The classic hypothesis of Livingstone and Hubel (1984, 1987) proposed two types of color pathways in primate visual cortex based on recordings from single cells: a segregated, modular pathway that signals color but provides little information about shape or form and a second pathway that signals color differences and so defines forms without the need to specify their colors. A major problem has been to reconcile this neurophysiological hypothesis with the behavioral data. A wealth of psychophysical studies has demonstrated that color vision has orientation-tuned responses and little impairment on form related tasks, but these have not revealed any direct evidence for nonoriented mechanisms. Here we use a psychophysical method of subthreshold summation across orthogonal orientations for isoluminant red-green gratings in monocular and dichoptic viewing conditions to differentiate between nonoriented and orientation-tuned responses to color contrast. We reveal nonoriented color responses at low spatial frequencies (0.25-0.375 c/deg) under monocular conditions changing to orientation-tuned responses at higher spatial frequencies (1.5 c/deg) and under binocular conditions. We suggest that two distinct pathways coexist in color vision at the behavioral level, revealed at different spatial scales: one is isotropic, monocular, and best equipped for the representation of surface color, and the other is orientation-tuned, binocular, and selective for shape and form. This advances our understanding of the organization of the neural pathways involved in human color vision and provides a strong link between neurophysiological and behavioral data.

  18. The soundscape dynamics of human agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Haroldo V; De Souza, Rodolfo T; Lenzi, Ervin K; Mendes, Renio S; Evangelista, Luiz R, E-mail: hvr@dfi.uem.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringa, PR (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    We report on a statistical analysis of the people agglomeration soundscape. Specifically, we investigate the normalized sound amplitudes and intensities that emerge from human collective meetings. Our findings support the existence of non-trivial dynamics characterized by heavy tail distributions in the sound amplitudes, long-range correlations in the sound intensity and non-exponential distributions in the return interval distributions. Additionally, motivated by the time-dependent behavior present in the volatility/variance series, we compare the observational data with those obtained from a minimalist autoregressive stochastic model, namely the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic process (the GARCH process), and find that there is good agreement.

  19. Zipf's law in human heartbeat dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kalda, J; Vainu, M; Laan, M

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the distribution of low variability periods in the activity of human heart rate typically follows a multi-scaling Zipf's law. The presence or failure of a power law, as well as the values of the scaling exponents, are personal characteristics depending on the daily habits of the subjects. Meanwhile, the distribution function of the low-variability periods as a whole discriminates efficiently between various heart pathologies. This new technique is also applicable to other non-linear time-series and reflects these aspects of the underlying intermittent dynamics, which are not covered by other methods of linear- and nonlinear analysis.

  20. Development of the Object-Oriented Dynamic Simulation Models Using Visual C++ Freeware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I. Kozynchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper mostly focuses on the methodological and programming aspects of developing a versatile desktop framework to provide the available basis for the high-performance simulation of dynamical models of different kinds and for diverse applications. So the paper gives some basic structure for creating a dynamical simulation model in C++ which is built on the Win32 platform with an interactive multiwindow interface and uses the lightweight Visual C++ Express as a free integrated development environment. The resultant simulation framework could be a more acceptable alternative to other solutions developed on the basis of commercial tools like Borland C++ or Visual C++ Professional, not to mention the domain specific languages and more specialized ready-made software such as Matlab, Simulink, and Modelica. This approach seems to be justified in the case of complex research object-oriented dynamical models having nonstandard structure, relationships, algorithms, and solvers, as it allows developing solutions of high flexibility. The essence of the model framework is shown using a case study of simulation of moving charged particles in the electrostatic field. The simulation model possesses the necessary visualization and control features such as an interactive input, real time graphical and text output, start, stop, and rate control.

  1. Distributed Dynamic Traffic Modeling and Implementation Oriented Different Levels of Induced Travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to respond to the variable state of traffic network in time, a distributed dynamic traffic assignment strategy is proposed which can improve the intelligent traffic management. The proposed dynamic assignment method is based on utility theory and is oriented to different levels of induced users. A distributed model based on the marginal utility is developed which combines the advantages of both decentralized paradigm and traveler preference, so as to provide efficient and robust dynamic traffic assignment solutions under uncertain network conditions. Then, the solution algorithm including subroute update and subroute calculation is proposed. To testify the effectiveness of the proposed model in optimizing traffic network operation and minimizing traveler’s cost on different induced levels, a sequence numerical experiment is conducted. In the experiment, there are two test environments: one is in different network load conditions and the other is in different deployment coverage of local agents. The numerical results show that the proposed model not only can improve the running efficiency of road network but also can significantly decrease the average travel time.

  2. Chaotic and regular shear-induced orientational dynamics of nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienäcker, G.; Kröger, M.; Hess, S.

    2002-12-01

    Based on a relaxation equation for the alignment tensor characterizing the molecular orientation in liquid crystals under flow we present results for the full orientational dynamics of homogeneous liquid crystals in a shear flow. We extend the analysis of the symmetry-adapted states by Rienäcker and Hess (Physica A 267 (1999) 294), which invoke only 3 of the 5 components of the tensor to full alignment. The steady and transient states of reduced model are preserved in this more general description, except for log-rolling, which turns out to be unstable in the range of parameters considered. However, the states reported earlier are only stable within a certain range of the parameters and there is a variety of new, symmetry-breaking transient states with the director out of the shear plane, which partially coexist with the in-plane states. The new, out-of-plane states can be divided in two classes: simple periodic and complex orbits. The first class consists of a kayaking-tumbling and a kayaking-wagging state, where the projection of the director onto the shear plane describes a tumbling or wagging motion, respectively. The second class of states, which can be found only in a small parameter range, consists of a variety of either complicated periodic or irregular, chaotic orbits. Both an intermittency route and a period-doubling route to chaos are found. A link to the corresponding rheological properties is made.

  3. Time-resolved dynamics of odd and even harmonic emission from oriented asymmetric molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Yu, Shujuan; Chen, Yanjun; Jiang, Xiangqian; Sun, Xiudong

    2015-11-01

    We study the time-resolved dynamics of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from oriented asymmetric molecules in intense laser fields theoretically. Previous studies have shown that the odd-even HHG spectra of asymmetric molecules don't show the striking two-center-interference-induced minimum, as the symmetric molecules do, due to the symmetry breaking. Surprisingly, with considering only the short-trajectory contribution, an apparent groove with small amplitudes is observed in the HHG time-frequency distribution, which implies that the harmonic emission is strongly suppressed in a specific time-frequency region. The position of this groove is sensitive to the molecular parameters and the orientation. Our analyses on this origin of the groove reveal different time-frequency properties of odd versus even signals, where the interplay of intramolecular interference and the permanent-dipole effect plays an important role. We show that the even-odd ratio often used in high-harmonic spectroscopy can be influenced significantly by the interference effect.

  4. Application-Oriented Confidentiality and Integrity Dynamic Union Security Model Based on MLS Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mingfu; Hu, Aiqun; He, Chunlong

    We propose a new security model based on MLS Policy to achieve a better security performance on confidentiality, integrity and availability. First, it realizes a combination of BLP model and Biba model through a two-dimensional independent adjustment of integrity and confidentiality. And, the subject's access range is adjusted dynamically according to the security label of related objects and the subject's access history. Second, the security level of the trusted subject is extended to writing and reading privilege range respectively, following the principle of least privilege. Third, it adjusts the objects' security levels after adding confidential information to prevent the information disclosure. Fourth, it uses application-oriented logic to protect specific applications to avoid the degradation of security levels. Thus, it can ensure certain applications operate smoothly. Lastly, examples are presented to show the effectiveness and usability of the proposed model.

  5. THE DYNAMICS OF STUDENTS’ PROFESSIONAL SELF-DETERMINATION VALUE ORIENTATION (THE SOCIOLOGICAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya Vladislavovna Yarina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the issues of students’ professional self-determination in the university community. It represents empirical analysis of the dynamics of professional value orientation of students in the period of  2005– 2013 as exemplified by the students of Moscow state university of railway engineering .The analysis revealed the motives for choice and the evaluation of the potential of the profession, the youngsters are studying for  in the university. The results of the research in certainty and expectations of the students in terms of employment are compared to the official statistic in the recruitment sphere.  The article also represented clearly defined conditions necessary for the provision of the successful formation of the professional self-determination in tertiary education.

  6. The future of future-oriented cognition in non-humans: theory and the empirical case of the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osvath, Mathias; Martin-Ordas, Gema

    2014-11-05

    One of the most contested areas in the field of animal cognition is non-human future-oriented cognition. We critically examine key underlying assumptions in the debate, which is mainly preoccupied with certain dichotomous positions, the most prevalent being whether or not 'real' future orientation is uniquely human. We argue that future orientation is a theoretical construct threatening to lead research astray. Cognitive operations occur in the present moment and can be influenced only by prior causation and the environment, at the same time that most appear directed towards future outcomes. Regarding the current debate, future orientation becomes a question of where on various continua cognition becomes 'truly' future-oriented. We question both the assumption that episodic cognition is the most important process in future-oriented cognition and the assumption that future-oriented cognition is uniquely human. We review the studies on future-oriented cognition in the great apes to find little doubt that our closest relatives possess such ability. We conclude by urging that future-oriented cognition not be viewed as expression of some select set of skills. Instead, research into future-oriented cognition should be approached more like research into social and physical cognition. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydroxyl and water molecule orientations in trypsin: Comparison to molecular dynamics structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, R.S.; Kossiakoff, A.A. [Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A comparison is presented of experimentally observed hydroxyl and water hydrogens in trypsin determined from neutron density maps with the results of a 140ps molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Experimental determination of hydrogen and deuterium atom positions in molecules as large as proteins is a unique capability of neutron diffraction. The comparison addresses the degree to which a standard force-field approach can adequately describe the local electrostatic and van der Waals forces that determine the orientations of these hydrogens. Neutron densities, derived from 2.1{Angstrom} D{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O difference Fourier maps, provide a database of 27 well-ordered hydroxyl hydrogens. Most of the simulated hydroxyl orientations are within a standard deviation of the experimentally-observed positions, including several examples in which both the simulation and the neutron density indicate that a hydroxyl group is shifted from a {open_quote}standard{close_quote} rotamer. For the most highly ordered water molecules, the hydrogen distributions calculated from the trajectory were in good agreement with neutron density; simulated water molecules that displayed multiple hydrogen bonding networks had correspondingly broadened neutron density profiles. This comparison was facilitated by development of a method to construct a pseudo 2{Angstrom} density map based on the hydrogen atom distributions from the simulation. The degree of disorder of internal water molecules is shown to result primarily from the electrostatic environment surrounding that water molecule as opposed to the cavity size available to the molecule. A method is presented for comparing the discrete observations sampled in a dynamics trajectory with the time- averaged data obtained from X-ray or neutron diffraction studies. This method is particularly useful for statically-disordered water molecules, in which the average location assigned from a trajectory may represent a site of relatively low occupancy.

  8. Dynamic Properties of Human Bronchial Airway Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Pallai, Prathap; Corrigan, Chris J; Lee, Tak H

    2011-01-01

    Young's Modulus and dynamic force moduli were measured on human bronchial airway tissues by compression. A simple and low-cost system for measuring the tensile-strengh of soft bio-materials has been built for this study. The force-distance measurements were undertaken on the dissected bronchial airway walls, cartilages and mucosa from the surgery-removed lungs donated by lung cancer patients with COPD. Young's modulus is estimated from the initial slope of unloading force-displacement curve and the dynamic force moduli (storage and loss) are measured at low frequency (from 3 to 45 Hz). All the samples were preserved in the PBS solution at room temperature and the measurements were perfomed within 4 hours after surgery. Young's modulus of the human bronchial airway walls are fond ranged between 0.17 and 1.65 MPa, ranged between 0.25 to 1.96 MPa for cartilages, and between 0.02 to 0.28 MPa for mucosa. The storage modulus are found varying 0.10 MPa with frequency while the loss modulus are found increasing from ...

  9. Human Security Analysis as a Framework for Value-Oriented Governance – the example of climate change.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ ‘Good governance’ may be viewed as governance which effectively promotes human rights, human security and human development. The paper discusses human security analysis, which in certain ways offers an integration of these ‘human’ perspectives and also a ‘social’ orient

  10. Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Reed, John A.

    2003-01-01

    The following reports are presented on this project:A first year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable,Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; A second year progress report on: Development of a Dynamically Configurable, Object-Oriented Framework for Distributed, Multi-modal Computational Aerospace Systems Simulation; An Extensible, Interchangeable and Sharable Database Model for Improving Multidisciplinary Aircraft Design; Interactive, Secure Web-enabled Aircraft Engine Simulation Using XML Databinding Integration; and Improving the Aircraft Design Process Using Web-based Modeling and Simulation.

  11. Evidence against global attention filters selective for absolute bar-orientation in human vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverso, Matthew; Sun, Peng; Chubb, Charles; Wright, Charles E; Sperling, George

    2016-01-01

    The finding that an item of type A pops out from an array of distractors of type B typically is taken to support the inference that human vision contains a neural mechanism that is activated by items of type A but not by items of type B. Such a mechanism might be expected to yield a neural image in which items of type A produce high activation and items of type B low (or zero) activation. Access to such a neural image might further be expected to enable accurate estimation of the centroid of an ensemble of items of type A intermixed with to-be-ignored items of type B. Here, it is shown that as the number of items in stimulus displays is increased, performance in estimating the centroids of horizontal (vertical) items amid vertical (horizontal) distractors degrades much more quickly and dramatically than does performance in estimating the centroids of white (black) items among black (white) distractors. Together with previous findings, these results suggest that, although human vision does possess bottom-up neural mechanisms sensitive to abrupt local changes in bar-orientation, and although human vision does possess and utilize top-down global attention filters capable of selecting multiple items of one brightness or of one color from among others, it cannot use a top-down global attention filter capable of selecting multiple bars of a given absolute orientation and filtering bars of the opposite orientation in a centroid task.

  12. Nanofiber orientation and surface functionalization modulate human mesenchymal stem cell behavior in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolambkar, Yash M; Bajin, Mehmet; Wojtowicz, Abigail; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; García, Andrés J; Guldberg, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Electrospun nanofiber meshes have emerged as a new generation of scaffold membranes possessing a number of features suitable for tissue regeneration. One of these features is the flexibility to modify their structure and composition to orchestrate specific cellular responses. In this study, we investigated the effects of nanofiber orientation and surface functionalization on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) migration and osteogenic differentiation. We used an in vitro model to examine hMSC migration into a cell-free zone on nanofiber meshes and mitomycin C treatment to assess the contribution of proliferation to the observed migration. Poly (ε-caprolactone) meshes with oriented topography were created by electrospinning aligned nanofibers on a rotating mandrel, while randomly oriented controls were collected on a stationary collector. Both aligned and random meshes were coated with a triple-helical, type I collagen-mimetic peptide, containing the glycine-phenylalanine-hydroxyproline-glycine-glutamate-arginine (GFOGER) motif. Our results indicate that nanofiber GFOGER peptide functionalization and orientation modulate cellular behavior, individually, and in combination. GFOGER significantly enhanced the migration, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs on nanofiber meshes. Aligned nanofiber meshes displayed increased cell migration along the direction of fiber orientation compared to random meshes; however, fiber alignment did not influence osteogenic differentiation. Compared to each other, GFOGER coating resulted in a higher proliferation-driven cell migration, whereas fiber orientation appeared to generate a larger direct migratory effect. This study demonstrates that peptide surface modification and topographical cues associated with fiber alignment can be used to direct cellular behavior on nanofiber mesh scaffolds, which may be exploited for tissue regeneration.

  13. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical "big data" sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover power-law scaling associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk ...

  14. The Human Face as a Dynamic Tool for Social Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Rachael E; Schyns, Philippe G

    2015-07-20

    As a highly social species, humans frequently exchange social information to support almost all facets of life. One of the richest and most powerful tools in social communication is the face, from which observers can quickly and easily make a number of inferences - about identity, gender, sex, age, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, physical health, attractiveness, emotional state, personality traits, pain or physical pleasure, deception, and even social status. With the advent of the digital economy, increasing globalization and cultural integration, understanding precisely which face information supports social communication and which produces misunderstanding is central to the evolving needs of modern society (for example, in the design of socially interactive digital avatars and companion robots). Doing so is challenging, however, because the face can be thought of as comprising a high-dimensional, dynamic information space, and this impacts cognitive science and neuroimaging, and their broader applications in the digital economy. New opportunities to address this challenge are arising from the development of new methods and technologies, coupled with the emergence of a modern scientific culture that embraces cross-disciplinary approaches. Here, we briefly review one such approach that combines state-of-the-art computer graphics, psychophysics and vision science, cultural psychology and social cognition, and highlight the main knowledge advances it has generated. In the light of current developments, we provide a vision of the future directions in the field of human facial communication within and across cultures.

  15. The Time Diagram Control Approach for the Dynamic Representation of Time-Oriented Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Dornberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic representation of time-oriented data on small screen devices is of increasing importance. Most solution approaches use issue-specific requirements based on established desktop technologies. Applied to mobile devices with small multi-touch displays such approaches often lead to a limited usability. Particularly, the time-dependent data can only be fragmentarily visualized due to limited screen sizes. Instead of reducing the complexity by visualizing the data, the interpretation of the data is getting more complex. This paper proposes a Time Diagram Control (TDC approach, a new way of representing time-based diagrams on small screen devices. The TDC uses a principle of cybernetics to integrate the user in the visualization process and thus reduce complexity. TDC focuses on simplicity of design by only providing 2D temporal line diagrams with a dynamic zooming function that works via standard multi-touch controls. Involving the user into a continuous loop of refining the visualization, TDC allows to compare data of different temporal granularities without losing the overall context of the presented data. The TDC approach ensures constant information reliability on small screen devices.

  16. Determining human target facing orientation using bistatic radar micro-Doppler signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Dustin P.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-06-01

    Micro-Doppler radar signals can be used to separate moving human targets from stationary clutter and also to identify and classify human movements. Traditional micro-Doppler radar systems which use a single sensor, monostatic system, suffer from the drawback that only the radial component of the micro-Doppler signal will be observed by the radar operator. This reduces the sensitivity of human activity recognition if the movements are not directly towards or away with respect to the line-of-sight to the radar antenna. In this paper, we propose the use of two bistatic micro-Doppler sensors to overcome this limitation. By using multiple sensors, the orientation of oscillating targets with respect to the radar line-of-sight can be inferred, thereby providing additional information to the radar operator. This approach can be used to infer the facing direction of the human with respect to the radar beam.

  17. Exploring Value Orientations toward the Human-Nature Relationship: A Comparison of Urban Youth in Minnesota, USA and Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Ernst, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Research exploring urban youths' value orientations toward the human-nature relationship was conducted with 59 students from a school in Minneapolis, Minnesota (USA) and 51 students from a school in Guangzhou, Guangdong (China). Quantitative findings suggest that the majority of participants in both groups shared a similar value orientation,…

  18. Human dynamics revealed through Web analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Ramasco, José J.

    2008-08-01

    The increasing ubiquity of Internet access and the frequency with which people interact with it raise the possibility of using the Web to better observe, understand, and monitor several aspects of human social behavior. Web sites with large numbers of frequently returning users are ideal for this task. If these sites belong to companies or universities, their usage patterns can furnish information about the working habits of entire populations. In this work, we analyze the properly anonymized logs detailing the access history to Emory University’s Web site. Emory is a medium-sized university located in Atlanta, Georgia. We find interesting structure in the activity patterns of the domain and study in a systematic way the main forces behind the dynamics of the traffic. In particular, we find that linear preferential linking, priority-based queuing, and the decay of interest for the contents of the pages are the essential ingredients to understand the way users navigate the Web.

  19. Orienting asymmetries in dogs' responses to different communicatory components of human speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Victoria F; Reby, David

    2014-12-15

    It is well established that in human speech perception the left hemisphere (LH) of the brain is specialized for processing intelligible phonemic (segmental) content (e.g., [1-3]), whereas the right hemisphere (RH) is more sensitive to prosodic (suprasegmental) cues. Despite evidence that a range of mammal species show LH specialization when processing conspecific vocalizations, the presence of hemispheric biases in domesticated animals' responses to the communicative components of human speech has never been investigated. Human speech is familiar and relevant to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), who are known to perceive both segmental phonemic cues and suprasegmental speaker-related and emotional prosodic cues. Using the head-orienting paradigm, we presented dogs with manipulated speech and tones differing in segmental or suprasegmental content and recorded their orienting responses. We found that dogs showed a significant LH bias when presented with a familiar spoken command in which the salience of meaningful phonemic (segmental) cues was artificially increased but a significant RH bias in response to commands in which the salience of intonational or speaker-related (suprasegmental) vocal cues was increased. Our results provide insights into mechanisms of interspecific vocal perception in a domesticated mammal and suggest that dogs may share ancestral or convergent hemispheric specializations for processing the different functional communicative components of speech with human listeners.

  20. Fluid Dynamics of Human Phonation and Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajat; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of the fluid dynamics, flow-structure interactions, and acoustics associated with human phonation and speech. Our voice is produced through the process of phonation in the larynx, and an improved understanding of the underlying physics of this process is essential to advancing the treatment of voice disorders. Insights into the physics of phonation and speech can also contribute to improved vocal training and the development of new speech compression and synthesis schemes. This article introduces the key biomechanical features of the laryngeal physiology, reviews the basic principles of voice production, and summarizes the progress made over the past half-century in understanding the flow physics of phonation and speech. Laryngeal pathologies, which significantly enhance the complexity of phonatory dynamics, are discussed. After a thorough examination of the state of the art in computational modeling and experimental investigations of phonatory biomechanics, we present a synopsis of the pacing issues in this arena and an outlook for research in this fascinating subject.

  1. A dynamic human health risk assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Umesh; Singh, Gurmit; Pant, A B

    2012-05-01

    An online human health risk assessment system (OHHRAS) has been designed and developed in the form of a prototype database-driven system and made available for the population of India through a website - www.healthriskindia.in. OHHRAS provide the three utilities, that is, health survey, health status, and bio-calculators. The first utility health survey is functional on the basis of database being developed dynamically and gives the desired output to the user on the basis of input criteria entered into the system; the second utility health status is providing the output on the basis of dynamic questionnaire and ticked (selected) answers and generates the health status reports based on multiple matches set as per advise of medical experts and the third utility bio-calculators are very useful for the scientists/researchers as online statistical analysis tool that gives more accuracy and save the time of user. The whole system and database-driven website has been designed and developed by using the software (mainly are PHP, My-SQL, Deamweaver, C++ etc.) and made available publically through a database-driven website (www.healthriskindia.in), which are very useful for researchers, academia, students, and general masses of all sectors.

  2. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  3. New activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formentin, Marco; Lovison, Alberto; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent’s contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We furthermore show that this new behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one’s environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns might be universal, being present in other general interactive environments, and constrain future models of communication and interaction networks, affecting their architecture and evolution.

  4. Oriental Imagination and Human Frailty: Huet and Sade on the Origins of the Novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Marinčič

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper compares and contrasts two early treatises on the novel: Traité sur l´Origine des romans by P. D. Huet (1670 and Idée sur les romans by the Marquis de Sade (1800. Arguing for an Oriental origin of the novel, Huet cites his observations on the Oriental temperament, which is, in his view, best attuned to the demands of the genre. By contrast, the Marquis de Sade perceives the concept of temperament as a larger one (while opting for the Greek origins of the novel. For Sade, the novel is the product of two basic human needs, the need for prayer and the need for love: while it might be supposed to have made its first appearance (as such in Egypt, the cradle of all cults, novels have been emerging always and everywhere.

  5. On the dynamics of chain systems. [applications in manipulator and human body models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, R. L.; Passerello, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    A computer-oriented method for obtaining dynamical equations of motion for chain systems is presented. A chain system is defined as an arbitrarily assembled set of rigid bodies such that adjoining bodies have at least one common point and such that closed loops are not formed. The equations of motion are developed through the use of Lagrange's form of d'Alembert's principle. The method and procedure is illustrated with an elementary study of a tripod space manipulator. The method is designed for application with systems such as human body models, chains and cables, and dynamic finite-segment models.

  6. Human sperm pattern of movement during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Soledad Blengini; Maria Eugenia Teves; Diego Rafael Unates; Hector Alejandro Guidobaldi; Laura Virginia Gatica; Laura Cecilia Giojalas

    2011-01-01

    @@ Human spermatozoa may chemotactically find out the egg by following an increasing gradient of attractant molecules.Although human spermatozoa have been observed to show several of the physiological characteristics of chemotaxis,the chemotactic pattern of movement has not been easy to describe.However,it is apparent that chemotactic cells may be identified while returning to the attractant source.This study characterizes the pattern of movement of human spermatozoa during chemotactic re-orientation towards a progesterone source,which is a physiological attractant candidate.By means of videomicroscopy and image analysis,a chemotactic pattern of movement was identified as the spermatozoon returned towards the source of a chemotactic concentration of progesterone (10 pmol l-1).First,as a continuation of its original path,the spermatozoon swims away from the progesterone source with linear movement and then turns back with a transitional movement that can be characterized by an increased velocity and decreased linearity.This sperm behaviour may help the spermatozoon to re-orient itself towards a progesterone source and may be used to identify the few cells that are undergoing chemotaxis at a given time.

  7. EFFECT OF COMPATIBILITY ON PHASE MORPHOLOGY AND ORIENTATION OF ISOTACTIC POLYPROPYLENE (IPP) BLENDS OBTAINED BY DYNAMIC PACKING INJECTION MOLDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Li; Qin Zhang; Cong Wang; Hong Yang; Rong-ni Du; Qiang Fu

    2006-01-01

    The effect of compatibility on phase morphology and orientation of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) blends under shear stress was investigated via dynamic packing injection molding (DPIM). The compatibility of iPP blended with other polymers, namely, atactic polypropylene (aPP), octane-ethylene copolymer (POE), ethylene-propylene-diene rubber (EPDM)and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA), have first been studied using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). These blends were subjected to DPIM, which relies on the application of shear stress fields to the melt/solid interfaces during the packing stage by means of hydraulically actuated pistons. The phase morphology, orientation and mechanical properties of the injection-molded samples were characterized by SEM, 2D WAXS and Instron. For incompatible iPP/EVA blends, a much elongated and deformed EVA particles and a higher degree of iPP chain orientation were observed under the effect of shear.However, for compatible iPP/aPP blends, a less deformed and elongated aPP particles and less oriented iPP chains were deduced. It can be concluded that the compatibility between the components decreases the deformation and orientation in the polymer blends. This is most likely due to the hindering effect, resulting from the molecular entanglement and interaction in the compatible system.

  8. Human-Oriented Leadership and Organizational Commitment in US Subsidiary Company Based in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article was conducted to examine the relationship between human-oriented leadership (HOL and organizational commitment. A survey method was employed to obtain data from the employees of one US subsidiary companybased in Sarawak. Results of the Partial Least Squares (SmartPLS model analysis confirmed that participative leadership, supportive leadership, and empowerment act as important antecedents of organizational commitment.These findings reveal that the capability of managers practicing HOL styles (supportive, participative, and empowerment has enhanced employees’ commitment to the organization.

  9. Highly Developed Information-oriented Society and Humanity ; Medical Information Services and Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakimoto, Atsuko

    Change in social circumstances caused by arrival of highly developed information-oriented society has altered what information services in medical libraries should be dramatically. Keeping with complication and diversification of needs by users such as medical doctors, researchers, medical technicians and so on medical librarians have been playing important role in the information activities, and are required to master more specialized knowledge. This paper outlines changes in circumstances surrounding medical libraries, discusses role of medical librarians in online information retrieval services, and introduces various curriculum for library education. The author proposes that humanity of librarian him or herself is still a key factor for library services regardless of advancement of computerization.

  10. Object-oriented Urban Dynamic Monitoring——A Case Study of Haidian District of Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is crucial to conduct the land use/cover research to obtain the global change information. Urban area is one of the most sensitive areas in land use/cover change. Therefore land use/cover change in urban areas is very important in global change. It is vital to incorporate the information of urban land use/cover change into the process of decision-making about urban area development. In this paper, a new urban change detection approach, urban dynamic monitoring based on objects, is introduced. This approach includes four steps: 1) producing multi-scale objects from multi-temporal remotely sensed images with spectrum, texture and context information; 2) extracting possible changed objects adopting object-oriented classification; 3) obtaining shared objects as the basic units for urban change detection;4) determining the threshold to segment the changed objects from the possible changed objects using Otsu method. In this paper, the object-based approach was applied to detecting the urban expansion in Haidian District, Beijing, China with two Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data in 1997 and 2004. The results indicated that the overall accuracy was about 84.83%, and Kappa about 0.785. Compared with other conventional approaches, the object-based approach was advantageous in reducing the error accumulation of image classification of each datum and in independence to the radiometric correction and image registration accuracy.

  11. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  12. Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation of anorthosites from Oman ophiolite and the dynamics of melt lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Luiz F. G.; Boudier, FrançOise; Nicolas, Adolphe

    2011-04-01

    Microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of anorthosite samples interlayered in the upper and lower gabbro sections in the Oman ophiolite were analyzed in this paper. In the anorthosites registering the dynamics of the melt lenses, foliation is flat lying and starts to develop a few meters below the root zone of the sheeted dike complex (RZSDC). Microstructures and CPO of these rocks were developed in response to four different mechanisms: (1) density-controlled settling of plagioclase on the lens floor, (2) deposition of anorthosites related to convection currents, (3) melt compaction, and (4) uncompacted melt accumulation. In these anorthosites, the poles to (010) of plagioclase are parallel to the flow plane of convection, whereas the [100] axes and poles to (001) express the convection flow direction and the axis of convection rolls, respectively. The effect of subsidence of melt lens floor is recorded immediately below the RZSDC and is characterized by the rapid (but progressive) development of dipping foliation and lineation, reflecting the increase of deformation downsection. The degree of foliation and CPO development in the anorthosites is directly related to the distance of the center of the melt lenses before the subsidence starts. Despite the uncertain origin of the anorthosites from the lower gabbro section, all the samples lost the magmatic microstructural characteristics and presently are reequilibrated aggregates. However, they still preserve plagioclase CPO, where some of these patterns present similarities with the anorthosites from the upper gabbro section, but no evidence of intracrystalline deformation under high temperatures.

  13. Human dynamics revealed through Web analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    When the World Wide Web was first conceived as a way to facilitate the sharing of scientific information at the CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) few could have imagined the role it would come to play in the following decades. Since then, the increasing ubiquity of Internet access and the frequency with which people interact with it raise the possibility of using the Web to better observe, understand, and monitor several aspects of human social behavior. Web sites with large numbers of frequently returning users are ideal for this task. If these sites belong to companies or universities, their usage patterns can furnish information about the working habits of entire populations. In this work, we analyze the properly anonymized logs detailing the access history to Emory University's Web site. Emory is a medium size university located in Atlanta, Georgia. We find interesting structure in the activity patterns of the domain and study in a systematic way the main forces behind the dynamics of the traffi...

  14. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  15. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  16. A dynamic human motion: coordination analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pchelkin, Stepan; Shiriaev, Anton S; Freidovich, Leonid B; Mettin, Uwe; Gusev, Sergei V; Kwon, Woong; Paramonov, Leonid

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the generic structure of the motion coordination system resulting from the application of the method of virtual holonomic constraints (VHCs) to the problem of the generation and robust execution of a dynamic humanlike motion by a humanoid robot. The motion coordination developed using VHCs is based on a motion generator equation, which is a scalar nonlinear differential equation of second order. It can be considered equivalent in function to a central pattern generator in living organisms. The relative time evolution of the degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during a typical motion are specified by a set of coordination functions that uniquely define the overall pattern of the motion. This is comparable to a hypothesis on the existence of motion patterns in biomechanics. A robust control is derived based on a transverse linearization along the configuration manifold defined by the coordination functions. It is shown that the derived coordination and control architecture possesses excellent robustness properties. The analysis is performed on an example of a real human motion recorded in test experiments.

  17. Human monkeypox -- Kasai Oriental, Democratic Republic of Congo, February 1996-October 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-12

    Human monkeypox is a severe smallpox-like illness caused by monkeypox virus (MPV); monkeypox occurs in sporadic outbreaks, and infection is enzootic among squirrels and monkeys in the rainforests of western and central Africa. In 1996, cases of monkeypox were reported from villages in the Katako-Kombe Health Zone, Kasai Oriental, Zaire (i.e., Democratic Republic of Congo). The World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with CDC, investigated this outbreak and identified 92 suspected cases with onset during February 1996-February 1997, and isolated MPV from lesions of active cases. Cases continued to be reported, and a new investigation was initiated by WHO and CDC in October 1997. This report summarizes the results of the field investigation, which indicate that this is the largest human monkeypox outbreak ever recorded.

  18. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional ne

  19. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional ne

  20. The Role of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) and Regional Networks in Promoting Human Rights and Health related to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) in Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ronald

    The UN is increasingly a place where a critical discussion about human rights and sexual orientation and gender identity is taking place. An important institutional component of the UN system of protection of human rights is the creation of National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). The regional

  1. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical ``Big Data'' sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction.

  2. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical “Big Data” sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction. PMID:24326949

  3. Effect of the orientation of doped nanoparticles on thermal transportation of a solid: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahadat, Muhammad Rubayat Bin; Masnoon, Ahmed Shafkat; Ahmed, Shafkat; Morshed, A. K. M. M.

    2017-06-01

    Interstitial phenomena like different types of atoms, doping and their orientation in nano scale influence the heat transfer and these effects become very significant with the reduction of material size. Non equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulation was employed in this study to understand the effects of interfacial thermal resistance named kapitza resistance on solid. Argon like solid was considered in this study and LJ potential model was employed for the calculation of atomic interaction. Doping of nanoparticles at different orientation was inserted into the solid. From the simulation, it was observed that a large interfacial mismatch due to change in orientation in homogenous solid causes distortion of phonon frequency causing an increase in thermal resistance. The position of doped particles has a profound effect on thermal conductivity of solid. Interfacial atoms positioned perpendicular to heat flow direction causes sharp reduction in thermal conductivity. Phonon scattering at the material interface has been observed.

  4. Modeling bursts and heavy tails in human dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, A.; Oliveira, J. Gama; Dezso, Z.; Goh, K. -I.; Kondor, I.; Barabasi, A. -L.

    2005-01-01

    Current models of human dynamics, used from risk assessment to communications, assume that human actions are randomly distributed in time and thus well approximated by Poisson processes. We provide direct evidence that for five human activity patterns the timing of individual human actions follow non-Poisson statistics, characterized by bursts of rapidly occurring events separated by long periods of inactivity. We show that the bursty nature of human behavior is a consequence of a decision ba...

  5. Intact soft clay’s critical response to dynamic stress paths on different combinations of principal stress orientation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈扬; 周建; 龚晓南; 刘汉龙

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive tests on Hangzhou intact soft clay were performed, which were used to obtain the soils’ critical response to undrained dynamic stress paths under different combinations of principal stress orientation. The different combinations included cyclic principal stress rotation (CPSR for short), cyclic shear with abrupt change of principal stress orientation (CAPSO for short) and cyclic shear with fixed principal stress orientation (CFPSO for short). On one side, under all these stress paths, samples have obvious strain inflection points and shear bands, and the excess pore water pressure is far from the level of initial effective confining pressure at failure. Stress paths of major principal stress orientation (α) alternating from negative and positive have quite different influence on soil’s properties with those in which α is kept negative or positive. On the other side, due to the soil’s strongly initial anisotropy, samples under double-amplitudes CPSR and CAPSO (or single-amplitude CPSR and CFPSO) have similar properties on dynamic shear strength and pore water pressure development tendency when α is kept within ±45°, while have quite different properties when α oversteps ±45°.

  6. A cascaded two-step Kalman filter for estimation of human body segment orientation using MEMS-IMU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihajehzadeh, S; Loh, D; Lee, M; Hoskinson, R; Park, E J

    2014-01-01

    Orientation of human body segments is an important quantity in many biomechanical analyses. To get robust and drift-free 3-D orientation, raw data from miniature body worn MEMS-based inertial measurement units (IMU) should be blended in a Kalman filter. Aiming at less computational cost, this work presents a novel cascaded two-step Kalman filter orientation estimation algorithm. Tilt angles are estimated in the first step of the proposed cascaded Kalman filter. The estimated tilt angles are passed to the second step of the filter for yaw angle calculation. The orientation results are benchmarked against the ones from a highly accurate tactical grade IMU. Experimental results reveal that the proposed algorithm provides robust orientation estimation in both kinematically and magnetically disturbed conditions.

  7. Joint Scaling Theory of Human Dynamics and Network Science

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Chaoming; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    The increasing availability of large-scale data on human behavior has catalyzed simultaneous advances in network theory, capturing the scaling properties of the interactions between a large number of individuals, and human dynamics, quantifying the temporal characteristics of human activity patterns. These two areas remain disjoint, however, traditionally each pursuing as a separate modeling framework. Here we establish the first formal link between these two areas by showing that the exponents characterizing the degree and link weight distribution in social networks can be expressed in terms of the dynamical exponents characterizing human activity patterns. We test the validity of these theoretical predictions on datasets capturing various facets of human interactions, from mobile calls to tweets. We find evidence of a universal measure, that links networks and human dynamics, but whose value is independent of the means of communication, capturing a fundamental property of human activity.

  8. Wearable Sensor System for Human Dynamics Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko; Zheng, Rencheng

    2010-01-01

    A new wearable sensor system was developed for measuring tri-directional ground reaction force (GRF) and segment orientations. A stationary force plate can not measure more than one stride; moreover, in studies of stair ascent and descent measurements, a complex system consisting of many stationary force plates and a data fusion method must be constructed (Stacoff et al., 2005; Della and Bonato, 2007). The wearable sensor system proposed in this chapter can be applied to successive walking tr...

  9. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney.

  10. MARIKA - A model revision system using qualitative analysis of simulations. [of human orientation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groleau, Nicolas; Frainier, Richard; Colombano, Silvano; Hazelton, Lyman; Szolovits, Peter

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes portions of a novel system called MARIKA (Model Analysis and Revision of Implicit Key Assumptions) to automatically revise a model of the normal human orientation system. The revision is based on analysis of discrepancies between experimental results and computer simulations. The discrepancies are calculated from qualitative analysis of quantitative simulations. The experimental and simulated time series are first discretized in time segments. Each segment is then approximated by linear combinations of simple shapes. The domain theory and knowledge are represented as a constraint network. Incompatibilities detected during constraint propagation within the network yield both parameter and structural model alterations. Interestingly, MARIKA diagnosed a data set from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Vestibular Laboratory as abnormal though the data was tagged as normal. Published results from other laboratories confirmed the finding. These encouraging results could lead to a useful clinical vestibular tool and to a scientific discovery system for space vestibular adaptation.

  11. Dynamic localization of C. elegans TPR-GoLoco proteins mediates mitotic spindle orientation by extrinsic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werts, Adam D; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Goldstein, Bob

    2011-10-01

    Cell divisions are sometimes oriented by extrinsic signals, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Proteins containing TPR and GoLoco-domains (C. elegans GPR-1/2, Drosophila Pins, vertebrate LGN and AGS3) are candidates for mediating mitotic spindle orientation by extrinsic signals, but the mechanisms by which TPR-GoLoco proteins may localize in response to extrinsic cues are not well defined. The C. elegans TPR-GoLoco protein pair GPR-1/2 is enriched at a site of contact between two cells - the endomesodermal precursor EMS and the germline precursor P(2) - and both cells align their divisions toward this shared cell-cell contact. To determine whether GPR-1/2 is enriched at this site within both cells, we generated mosaic embryos with GPR-1/2 bearing a different fluorescent tag in different cells. We were surprised to find that GPR-1/2 distribution is symmetric in EMS, where GPR-1/2 had been proposed to function as an asymmetric cue for spindle orientation. Instead, GPR-1/2 is asymmetrically distributed only in P(2). We demonstrate a role for normal GPR-1/2 localization in P(2) division orientation. We show that MES-1/Src signaling plays an instructive role in P(2) for asymmetric GPR-1/2 localization and normal spindle orientation. We ruled out a model in which signaling localizes GPR-1/2 by locally inhibiting LET-99, a GPR-1/2 antagonist. Instead, asymmetric GPR-1/2 distribution is established by destabilization at one cell contact, diffusion, and trapping at another cell contact. Once the mitotic spindle of P(2) is oriented normally, microtubule-dependent removal of GPR-1/2 prevented excess accumulation, in an apparent negative-feedback loop. These results highlight the role of dynamic TPR-GoLoco protein localization as a key mediator of mitotic spindle alignment in response to instructive, external cues.

  12. Dynamic inverse models in human-cyber-physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ryan M.; Scobee, Dexter R. R.; Burden, Samuel A.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Human interaction with the physical world is increasingly mediated by automation. This interaction is characterized by dynamic coupling between robotic (i.e. cyber) and neuromechanical (i.e. human) decision-making agents. Guaranteeing performance of such human-cyber-physical systems will require predictive mathematical models of this dynamic coupling. Toward this end, we propose a rapprochement between robotics and neuromechanics premised on the existence of internal forward and inverse models in the human agent. We hypothesize that, in tele-robotic applications of interest, a human operator learns to invert automation dynamics, directly translating from desired task to required control input. By formulating the model inversion problem in the context of a tracking task for a nonlinear control system in control-a_ne form, we derive criteria for exponential tracking and show that the resulting dynamic inverse model generally renders a portion of the physical system state (i.e., the internal dynamics) unobservable from the human operator's perspective. Under stability conditions, we show that the human can achieve exponential tracking without formulating an estimate of the system's state so long as they possess an accurate model of the system's dynamics. These theoretical results are illustrated using a planar quadrotor example. We then demonstrate that the automation can intervene to improve performance of the tracking task by solving an optimal control problem. Performance is guaranteed to improve under the assumption that the human learns and inverts the dynamic model of the altered system. We conclude with a discussion of practical limitations that may hinder exact dynamic model inversion.

  13. Simulating Food Web Dynamics along a Gradient: Quantifying Human Influence

    OpenAIRE

    Ferenc Jordán; Nerta Gjata; Shu Mei; Yule, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river...

  14. The effect of body orientation on judgments of human visual attention in western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bania, Amanda E; Stromberg, Erin E

    2013-02-01

    The ability to appreciate the attentional states of others is an important element used in discerning the presence of Theory of Mind in an individual. Whether primates are able to recognize attention, and further, use such information to predict behavior, remains contentious. In this study, six western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) were tested under different conditions that aimed to investigate not only their understanding of what a human experimenter sees, but also what information they use to make these judgments. In all experiments the gorillas selected between two human experimenters, one who could see them and one who could not. In Experiment 1 the gorillas' performance was significantly above chance in conditions where they judged body orientation, head orientation, and eyes. Experiment 2 showed that the gorillas' initial judgments of attention may be based on body orientation rather than facial cues. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the gorillas were better able to utilize facial cues in some conditions, when these cues were paired with a more neutral body orientation. These findings suggest that the gorillas are using a hierarchical approach to determining visual attention, by making an immediate decision based on the most salient cue-body orientation. However, when body orientation is more ambiguous their ability to judge the less prominent cues of the face and eyes does improve.

  15. Dynamical Orientation of Large Molecules on Oxide Surfaces and its Implications for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-11-12

    A dual experimental-computational approach utilizing near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) is presented for determining the orientation of a large adsorbate on an oxide substrate. A system of interest in the field of dye-sensitized solar cells is studied: an organic cyanoacrylic acid-based donor-π-acceptor dye (WN1) bound to anatase TiO2. Assessment of nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra is supported by calculations of the electronic structure that indicate energetically discrete transitions associated with the two π systems of the C-N triple bond in the cyanoacrylic acid portion of the dye. Angle-resolved NEXAFS spectra are fitted to determine the orientation of these two orbital systems, and the results indicate an upright orientation of the adsorbed dye, 63 from the TiO2 surface plane. These experimental results are then compared to computational studies of the WN1 dye on an anatase (101) TiO2 slab. The ground state structure obtained from standard DFT optimization is less upright (45 from the surface) than the NEXAFS results. However, DFT-MD simulations, which provide a more realistic depiction of the dye at room temperature, exhibit excellent agreement - within 2 on average - with the angles determined via NEXAFS, demonstrating the importance of accounting for the dynamic nature of adsorbate-substrate interactions and DFT-MD\\'s powerful predictive abilities. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. The dynamic contributions of the otolith organs to human ocular torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merfeld, D. M.; Teiwes, W.; Clarke, A. H.; Scherer, H.; Young, L. R.

    1996-01-01

    We measured human ocular torsion (OT) monocularly (using video) and binocularly (using search coils) while sinusoidally accelerating (0.7 g) five human subjects along an earth-horizontal axis at five frequencies (0.35, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 Hz). The compensatory nature of OT was investigated by changing the relative orientation of the dynamic (linear acceleration) and static (gravitational) cues. Four subject orientations were investigated: (1) Y-upright-acceleration along the interaural (y) axis while upright; (2) Y-supine-acceleration along the y-axis while supine; (3) Z-RED-acceleration along the dorsoventral (z) axis with right ear down; (4) Z-supine-acceleration along the z-axis while supine. Linear acceleration in the Y-upright, Y-supine and Z-RED orientations elicited conjugate OT. The smaller response in the Z-supine orientation appeared disconjugate. The amplitude of the response decreased and the phase lag increased with increasing frequency for each orientation. This frequency dependence does not match the frequency response of the regular or irregular afferent otolith neurons; therefore the response dynamics cannot be explained by simple peripheral mechanisms. The Y-upright responses were larger than the Y-supine responses (P < 0.05). This difference indicates that OT must be more complicated than a simple low-pass filtered response to interaural shear force, since the dynamic shear force along the interaural axis was identical in these two orientations. The Y-supine responses were, in turn, larger than the Z-RED responses (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the vector sum of the Y-supine responses plus Z-RED responses was not significantly different (P = 0.99) from the Y-upright responses. This suggests that, in this frequency range, the conjugate OT response during Y-upright stimulation might be composed of two components: (1) a response to shear force along the y-axis (as in Y-supine stimulation), and (2) a response to roll tilt of gravitoinertial force (as

  17. Improving the human readability of Arden Syntax medical logic modules using a concept-oriented terminology and object-oriented programming expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Bakken, Suzanne; Lussier, Yves A; Mendonça, Eneida A

    2006-01-01

    Medical logic modules are a procedural representation for sharing task-specific knowledge for decision support systems. Based on the premise that clinicians may perceive object-oriented expressions as easier to read than procedural rules in Arden Syntax-based medical logic modules, we developed a method for improving the readability of medical logic modules. Two approaches were applied: exploiting the concept-oriented features of the Medical Entities Dictionary and building an executable Java program to replace Arden Syntax procedural expressions. The usability evaluation showed that 66% of participants successfully mapped all Arden Syntax rules to Java methods. These findings suggest that these approaches can play an essential role in the creation of human readable medical logic modules and can potentially increase the number of clinical experts who are able to participate in the creation of medical logic modules. Although our approaches are broadly applicable, we specifically discuss the relevance to concept-oriented nursing terminologies and automated processing of task-specific nursing knowledge.

  18. Human hand modelling: kinematics, dynamics, applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustus, A.; Stillfried, G.; Visser, J.; Jörntell, H.; Van der Smagt, P.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of mathematical modelling of the human hand is given. We consider hand models from a specific background: rather than studying hands for surgical or similar goals, we target at providing a set of tools with which human grasping and manipulation capabilities can be studied, and hand funct

  19. Do human activities influence survival and orientation abilities of larval fishes in the ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebeck, Ulrike E; O'Connor, Jack; Braun, Christoph; Leis, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    The larval stages of most marine fishes spend days to weeks in the pelagic environment, where they must find food and avoid predators in order to survive. Some fish only spend part of their life history in the pelagic environment before returning to their adult habitat, for example, a coral reef. The sensory systems of larval fish develop rapidly during the first few days of their lives, and here we concentrate on the various sensory cues the fish have available to them for survival in the pelagic environment. We focus on the larvae of reef fishes because most is known about them. We also review the major threats caused by human activities that have been identified to have worldwide impact and evaluate how these threats may impact larval-fish survival and orientation abilities. Many human activities negatively affect larval-fish sensory systems or the cues the fish need to detect. Ultimately, this could lead to decreased numbers of larvae surviving to settlement, and, therefore, to decreased abundance of adult fishes. Although we focus on species wherein the larvae and adults occupy different habitats (pelagic and demersal, respectively), it is important to acknowledge that the potential anthropogenic effects we identify may also apply to larvae of species like tuna and herring, where both larvae and adults are pelagic. © 2014 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Determination of the Orientation and Dynamics of Ergosterol in Model Membranes Using Uniform 13C Labeling and Dynamically Averaged 13C Chemical Shift Anisotropies as Experimental Restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soubias, O.; Jolibois, F.; Massou, S.; Milon, A.; Réat, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new strategy was established to determine the average orientation and dynamics of ergosterol in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. It is based on the analysis of chemical shift anisotropies (CSAs) averaged by the molecular dynamics. Static 13C CSA tensors were computed by quantum chemistry, using the gauge-including atomic-orbital approach within Hartree-Fock theory. Uniformly 13C-labeled ergosterol was purified from Pichia pastoris cells grown on labeled methanol. After reconstitution into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipids, the complete 1H and 13C assignment of ergosterol's resonances was performed using a combination of magic-angle spinning two-dimensional experiments. Dynamically averaged CSAs were determined by standard side-band intensity analysis for isolated 13C resonances (C3 and ethylenic carbons) and by off-magic-angle spinning experiments for other carbons. A set of 18 constraints was thus obtained, from which the sterol's molecular order parameter and average orientation could be precisely defined. The validity of using computed CSAs in this strategy was verified on cholesterol model systems. This new method allowed us to quantify ergosterol's dynamics at three molar ratios: 16 mol % (Ld phase), 30 mol % (Lo phase), and 23 mol % (mixed phases). Contrary to cholesterol, ergosterol's molecular diffusion axis makes an important angle (14°) with the inertial axis of the rigid four-ring system. PMID:15923221

  1. Quantitative analysis on orientation of human bone integrated with midpalatal implant by micro X-ray diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Masaru, E-mail: murata@hoku-iryo-u.ac.jp [Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Kanazawa, Tobetsu-cho 061-0293 (Japan); Akazawa, Toshiyuki [Hokkaido Research Organization, Nishi-11, Kita-19, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Yuasa, Toshihiro; Okayama, Miki; Tazaki, Junichi [Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Kanazawa, Tobetsu-cho 061-0293 (Japan); Hanawa, Takao [Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kandasurugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Arisue, Makoto; Mizoguchi, Itaru [Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Kanazawa, Tobetsu-cho 061-0293 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A titanium fixture is implanted into palatal bone of an 18-year-old patient as the unmoved anchorage for the orthodontic treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fixture is integrated with compact bone with cortical bone-like osteon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbeam X-ray diffraction denotes the crystallinity and orientation of HAp. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray images of c-face in HAp reveal functionally graded distribution of bone quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal growth of c-face is caused by propagation of the continuous lateral stress. - Abstract: A midpalatal implant system has been used as the unmoved anchorage for teeth movement. An 18-year-old male patient presented with reversed occlusion and was diagnosed as malocclusion. A pure titanium fixture (lengths: 4 mm, diameter: 3.3 mm, Orthosystem{sup Registered-Sign }, Institute Straumann, Switzerland) was implanted into the palatal bone of the patient as the orthodontic anchorage. The implant anchorage was connected with the upper left and right first molars, and had been used for 3 years. After dynamic treatments, the titanium fixture connected with bone was removed surgically, fixed in formalin solution, and embedded in resin. Specimens were cut along the frontal section of face and the direction of longitudinal axis of the implant, stained, and observed histologically. The titanium fixture was integrated directly with compact bone showing cortical bone-like structure such as lamella and osteon. In addition, to qualitatively characterize the implant-supported human bone, the crystallinity and orientation of hydroxyapatite (HAp) phase were evaluated by the microbeam X-ray diffraction analysis. Preferential alignment of c-axis of HAp crystals was represented by the relative intensity ratio of (0 0 2)-face diffraction peak to (3 1 0)-face one. The values decreased monotonously along the direction of the lateral stress from the site near the

  2. The object-oriented development of a parallel application in protein dynamics: why we need software tools for HPCN applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bækdal, Lars; Joosen, Wouter; Larsen, Thomas; Kolafa, Jiri; Ovesen, Jens H.; Perram, John W.; Petersen, Henrik G.; Bywater, Robert; Ratner, Mark

    1996-08-01

    We analyse the concurrency and performance of the various types of force calculations involved in the molecular dynamics simulation of large protein or polyelectrolyte molecules. Although this analysis can in principle be used to write a meta-program to optimize load-balancing of this application on an MPP system, we argue that it is an enormous undertaking not appropriate for the computational scientist. Instead we argue that it is better to exploit research in parallel execution environments which provide automatic load-balancing for concurrent Object-Oriented applications. We also argue that use of Object-Oriented technology in the design of simulation software encapsulates the natural concurrency of the system. We illustrate this point with a discussion of the constraint force calculation for a polymeric molecule.

  3. Stochastic dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles and a mechanism of biological orientation in the geomagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Binhi, V N

    2004-01-01

    The rotations of microscopic magnetic particles, magnetosomes, embedded into the cytoskeleton are considered. A great number of magnetosomes are shown to possess two stable equilibrium positions, between which there occur transitions under the influence of thermal disturbances. The random rotations attain the value of order of radian. The rate of the transitions and the probability of magnetosomes to stay in the different states depend on magnetic field direction with respect to an averaged magnetosome's orientation. This effect explains the ability of migrant birds to faultless orientation in long-term passages in the absence of the direct visibility of optical reference points. The sensitivity to deviation from an `ideal' orientation is estimated to be 1-2 degrees. Possible participation of magnetosomes in biological effects caused by microwave electromagnetic fields is discussed.

  4. Spin orientation driven static and dynamic magnetic process in amorphous FeCoBSi thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Peiheng; Luo, Xiaojia; Zhang, Li; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, National Engineering Research Center of Electromagnetic Radiation Control Materials, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-06-07

    The spin orientation dependence of magnetic hysteresis and microwave ferromagnetic resonance data are investigated in FeCoBSi amorphous thin films. Demagnetization effect allows the weak interface-rooted out-of-plane anisotropy to build up local spin orientation domains under the dominant in-plane anisotropy. As a result, two phase magnetization reversal and double-peak ferromagnetic resonance traces with varying damping behavior are observed. Due to the distribution of in-plane and out-of-plane spin orientations, the ferromagnetic resonance bandwidth has been extensively expanded with the full width at half maximum increased from 1.2 GHz to 3.5 GHz.

  5. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc Jordán

    Full Text Available Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo. The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1, when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling

  6. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordán, Ferenc; Gjata, Nerta; Mei, Shu; Yule, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar) but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1), when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling of eco-dynamics

  7. Human Performance Modeling for Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory; Joe, Jeffrey Clark [Idaho National Laboratory; Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    Part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reac- tor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Charac- terization (RISMC) Pathway develops approaches to estimating and managing safety margins. RISMC simulations pair deterministic plant physics models with probabilistic risk models. As human interactions are an essential element of plant risk, it is necessary to integrate human actions into the RISMC risk framework. In this paper, we review simulation based and non simulation based human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This paper summarizes the founda- tional information needed to develop a feasible approach to modeling human in- teractions in RISMC simulations.

  8. White Matter Changes of Neurite Density and Fiber Orientation Dispersion during Human Brain Maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shin Chang

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies of human brain development have consistently shown widespread, but nonlinear increases in white matter anisotropy through childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood. However, despite its sensitivity to changes in tissue microstructure, DTI lacks the specificity to disentangle distinct microstructural features of white and gray matter. Neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI is a recently proposed multi-compartment biophysical model of brain microstructure that can estimate non-collinear properties of white matter, such as neurite orientation dispersion index (ODI and neurite density index (NDI. In this study, we apply NODDI to 66 healthy controls aged 7-63 years to investigate changes of ODI and NDI with brain maturation, with comparison to standard DTI metrics. Using both region-of-interest and voxel-wise analyses, we find that NDI exhibits striking increases over the studied age range following a logarithmic growth pattern, while ODI rises following an exponential growth pattern. This novel finding is consistent with well-established age-related changes of FA over the lifespan that show growth during childhood and adolescence, plateau during early adulthood, and accelerating decay after the fourth decade of life. Our results suggest that the rise of FA during the first two decades of life is dominated by increasing NDI, while the fall in FA after the fourth decade is driven by the exponential rise of ODI that overcomes the slower increases of NDI. Using partial least squares regression, we further demonstrate that NODDI better predicts chronological age than DTI. Finally, we show excellent test-retest reliability of NODDI metrics, with coefficients of variation below 5% in all measured regions of interest. Our results support the conclusion that NODDI reveals biologically specific characteristics of brain development that are more closely linked to the microstructural features of white

  9. 'Human paced' walking: Followers adopt stride time dynamics of leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmelat, V.C.M.; Delignières, D.; Torre, K.; Beek, P.J.; Daffertshofer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Isochronous cueing is widely used in gait rehabilitation even though it alters the stride-time dynamics toward anti-persistent rather than the persistent, fractal fluctuations characteristic of human walking. In the present experiment we tested an alternative cueing method: pacing by a human. To thi

  10. Model of the human controller of a dynamic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    In de last two decades considerable research effort has been devoted to the study of human involvement in dynamic systems. Especially human control behavior has been investigated, but in the restricted sense of continuous regulating against random disturbances, so as to minimize the system state dev

  11. Statistical Anomaly Detection for Monitoring of Human Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, K.; Fuse, T.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of human dynamics has drawn attention to various areas. Due to the wide spread of positioning technologies that use GPS or public Wi-Fi, location information can be obtained with high spatial-temporal resolution as well as at low cost. By collecting set of individual location information in real time, monitoring of human dynamics is recently considered possible and is expected to lead to dynamic traffic control in the future. Although this monitoring focuses on detecting anomalous states of human dynamics, anomaly detection methods are developed ad hoc and not fully systematized. This research aims to define an anomaly detection problem of the human dynamics monitoring with gridded population data and develop an anomaly detection method based on the definition. According to the result of a review we have comprehensively conducted, we discussed the characteristics of the anomaly detection of human dynamics monitoring and categorized our problem to a semi-supervised anomaly detection problem that detects contextual anomalies behind time-series data. We developed an anomaly detection method based on a sticky HDP-HMM, which is able to estimate the number of hidden states according to input data. Results of the experiment with synthetic data showed that our proposed method has good fundamental performance with respect to the detection rate. Through the experiment with real gridded population data, an anomaly was detected when and where an actual social event had occurred.

  12. Ventricular-Fold Dynamics in Human Phonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Lucie; Bernardoni, Nathalie Henrich; Müller, Frank; Rohlfs, Anna-Katharina; Hess, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed (a) to provide a classification of the ventricular-fold dynamics during voicing, (b) to study the aerodynamic impact of these motions on vocal-fold vibrations, and (c) to assess whether ventricular-fold oscillations could be sustained by aerodynamic coupling with the vocal folds. Method: A 72-sample…

  13. Dinâmica populacional da mariposa oriental em pomares de pessegueiro e ameixeira Population dynamics of oriental fruit moth in peach and plum orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Rodrigues Hickel

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a dinâmica populacional da mariposa oriental [Grapholita molesta (Busk] em pomares de pessegueiro e ameixeira. Os adultos foram monitorados em dois pomares de pessegueiro e um de ameixeira por cinco anos. Séries temporais equivalentes de temperaturas máximas e mínimas foram correlacionadas aos dados de flutuação populacional para se aferir a correspondência entre a ocorrência da praga e as flutuações de temperatura. A análise de Fourier das séries temporais das armadilhas de coleta de mariposas revelou dinâmicas cíclicas, com período principal médio de 53,91 semanas. Um período menor médio, de 7,45 semanas, também ficou evidente e se aproxima do tempo médio de geração do inseto. A análise do espectro de potência das séries temporais, com e sem periodicidade, revelou que a dinâmica populacional de G. molesta possui um componente regular, caracterizado pelos períodos observados, e outro componente irregular, reminiscente de ruído 1/f, caracterizado pelas variações de amplitude, aparentemente irregulares, na ocorrência do inseto. A combinação desses dois componentes ocasiona um processo com domínio de baixas freqüências, próprio das dinâmicas periódicas ruidosas. Os ciclos de aparecimento da praga ocorrem em fase com os ciclos de flutuação de temperaturas máximas e mínimas.The objective of this work was to study the populational dynamics of oriental fruit moth [Grapholita molesta (Busk] in peach and plum orchards. Adults were monitored in two peach and one plum orchards for five years. Equivalent time series of maximum and minimum temperatures were correlated to the population fluctuation data to verify the correspondence between pest occurrence and temperature fluctuations. A Fourier analysis of the moth time series revealed cyclic dynamics, with a main average period of 53.91 weeks. Another mean short period of 7.45 weeks was also obtained, and approximates to the

  14. Functional integrative analysis of the human hip joint: the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum and its relation with the orientation of the femoral neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Noémie; Baylac, Michel; Gagey, Olivier; Tardieu, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.

  15. Research on Dynamic Model of the Human Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-lin; WANG Guang-quan; LU Dun-yong

    2005-01-01

    After summarizing the current situation of the research on human body modeling, a new dynamic model containing 5 equivalent masses has been proposed and the corresponding dynamic equations has been deduced too. By using this new model, more detailed information about the situation of the human body under impact and vibration can be obtained. The new model solves the problem that transmission functions of forces inside the human body can't be deduced by using 3-equivalent-mass model. It will find its usage in many applications.

  16. Approximate P-wave ray tracing and dynamic ray tracing in weakly orthorhombic media of varying symmetry orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Masmoudi, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    We present an approximate, but efficient and sufficiently accurate P-wave ray tracing and dynamic ray tracing procedure for 3D inhomogeneous, weakly orthorhombic media with varying orientation of symmetry planes. In contrast to commonly used approaches, the orthorhombic symmetry is preserved at any point of the model. The model is described by six weak-anisotropy parameters and three Euler angles, which may vary arbitrarily, but smoothly, throughout the model. We use the procedure for the calculation of rays and corresponding two-point traveltimes in a VSP experiment in a part of the BP benchmark model generalized to orthorhombic symmetry.

  17. Predictive dynamics of human pain perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo A Cecchi

    Full Text Available While the static magnitude of thermal pain perception has been shown to follow a power-law function of the temperature, its dynamical features have been largely overlooked. Due to the slow temporal experience of pain, multiple studies now show that the time evolution of its magnitude can be captured with continuous online ratings. Here we use such ratings to model quantitatively the temporal dynamics of thermal pain perception. We show that a differential equation captures the details of the temporal evolution in pain ratings in individual subjects for different stimulus pattern complexities, and also demonstrates strong predictive power to infer pain ratings, including readouts based only on brain functional images.

  18. Punctuated equilibrium dynamics in human communications

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Dan; Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A minimal model based on individual interactions is proposed to study the non-Poisson statistical properties of human behavior: individuals in the system interact with their neighbors, the probability of an individual acting correlates to its activity, and all individuals involved in action will change their activities randomly. The model creates rich non-Poisson spatial-temporal properties in the activities of individuals, in agreement with the patterns of human communication behaviors. Our findings provide insight into various human activities, embracing a range of realistic social interacting systems, particularly, intriguing bimodal phenomenons. This model bridges priority queues and punctuated equilibrium, and our modeling and analysis is likely to shed light on non-Poisson phenomena in many complex systems.

  19. A Physically Based Dynamic Recrystallization Model Considering Orientation Effects for a Nitrogen Alloyed Ultralow Carbon Stainless Steel during Hot Forging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan-lin XIE; An HE; Hai-long ZHANG; Gen-qi WANG; Xi-tao WANG

    2016-01-01

    The nitrogen alloyed ultralow carbon stainless steel is a good candidate material for primary loop pipes of AP1000 nuclear power plant.These pipes are manufactured by hot forging,during which dynamic recrystallization acts as the most important microstructural evolution mechanism.A physically based model was proposed to describe and predict the microstructural evolution in the hot forging process of those pipes.In this model,the coupled effects of dislocation density change,dynamic recovery,dynamic recrystallization and grain orientation function were con-sidered.Besides,physically based simulation experiments were conducted on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical sim-ulator,and the specimens after deformation were observed by optical metallography (OM)and electron back-scat-tered diffraction (EBSD)method.The results confirm that dynamic recrystallization is easy to occur with increasing deformation temperature or strain rate.The grains become much finer after full dynamic recrystallization.The model shows a good agreement with experimental results obtained by OM and EBSD in terms of stress-strain curves,grain size,and recrystallization kinetics.Besides,this model obtains an acceptable accuracy and a wide applying scope for engineering calculation.

  20. An Aspect of Dynamic Human-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    . Focus is on how modal characteristics of the structure, i.e. its frequency and damping, are influenced by the presence of stationary humans. Vertical vibrations are considered, and particular focus is given the influence of human posture on modal characteristics of the supporting structure. Insight......It is known that humans and structures interact. Humans can cause structures to vibrate, and excessive vibrations may occur if the motion frequency of humans coincides with a resonant frequency of the structural system. It is also known that stationary humans (such as humans sitting or standing...... on the structure) influence the dynamic behaviour and modal characteristics of the structure carrying them, whether being a grandstand, an office floor or similar. However, the interaction between the stationary humans and the structure is generally not well understood, and the paper addresses this interaction...

  1. Methodology to Support Dynamic Function Allocation Policies Between Humans and Flight Deck Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Function allocation assigns work functions to all agents in a team, both human and automation. Efforts to guide function allocation systematically have been studied in many fields such as engineering, human factors, team and organization design, management science, cognitive systems engineering. Each field focuses on certain aspects of function allocation, but not all; thus, an independent discussion of each does not address all necessary aspects of function allocation. Four distinctive perspectives have emerged from this comprehensive review of literature on those fields: the technology-centered, human-centered, team-oriented, and work-oriented perspectives. Each perspective focuses on different aspects of function allocation: capabilities and characteristics of agents (automation or human), structure and strategy of a team, and work structure and environment. This report offers eight issues with function allocation that can be used to assess the extent to which each of issues exist on a given function allocation. A modeling framework using formal models and simulation was developed to model work as described by the environment, agents, their inherent dynamics, and relationships among them. Finally, to validate the framework and metrics, a case study modeled four different function allocations between a pilot and flight deck automation during the arrival and approach phases of flight.

  2. Orientation tuning of human face processing estimated by contrast matching in transparency displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Paolo; McKone, Elinor; Nakayama, Ken

    2006-06-01

    Upright images of faces appear more salient than faces of other orientations. We exploited this effect in a titration experiment where faces were superimposed in transparency. By manipulating the physical contrast of the component images, we measured the degree of perceptual dominance as function of the orientation of the face in the image plane. From these measurements, we obtain the orientation tuning of face processing, which is well approximated by a Gaussian function with a SD of about 45 deg and mean centered on upright. Faces predominantly lit from above and from below produced very similar results. However, when presented with scrambled faces observers showed no orientation preference. We argue that these results can be explained by the existence of specialized face processing mechanisms with an orientation tuning with a bandwidth of approximately 90 deg, predominantly centered on the upright orientation and easily disrupted by alterations of the normal facial configuration.

  3. Thinking in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Bjorn Tore

    1997-01-01

    A think-aloud technique, in which 20 orienteers verbalized their exact thoughts during orienteering, was used to examine the phenomenon of cognition during orienteering. Results indicate that orienteering is experienced as a task to be accomplished, a physical movement, and a dynamic process, and that thinking involves attuning perceptions to…

  4. Stochastic estimation of dynamically changing object orientation parameters using satellite measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lukasevich, V. I.; Kramarov, S. O.; Sokolov, Sergey V.

    2015-01-01

    It is solved a problem of a posteriori estimation of dynamically modified parameters of angular movement of the object by satellite measurements. There are shown advantages of application of the methods of stochastic non-linear dynamic filtration before single-stage measurements. It is represented an example, showing efficiency of proposed approach.

  5. Photo-Pictures and Dynamic Software or about the Motivation of the Art-Oriented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehlarova, Toni; Chehlarova, Koya

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with ideas about dynamic presentation of photo-pictures by means of dynamic software GeoGebra in order to motivate art students to get acquainted with some specific mathematical functions. The results of the experiment include deeper understanding of the functions' nature, search of new functions for dealing with a practical…

  6. Orientational order on surfaces - the coupling of topology, geometry and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Nestler, Michael; Praetorius, Simon; Voigt, Axel

    2016-01-01

    We consider the numerical investigation of surface bound orientational order using unit tangential vector fields by means of a gradient-flow equation of a weak surface Frank-Oseen energy. The energy is composed of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions, as well as a penalization term to enforce the unity of the vector field. Four different numerical discretizations, namely a discrete exterior calculus approach, a method based on vector spherical harmonics, a surface finite-element method, and an approach utilizing an implicit surface description, the diffuse interface method, are described and compared with each other for surfaces with Euler characteristic 2. We demonstrate the influence of geometric properties on realizations of the Poincare-Hopf theorem and show examples where the energy is decreased by introducing additional orientational defects.

  7. Orientational Order on Surfaces: The Coupling of Topology, Geometry, and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, M.; Nitschke, I.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2017-07-01

    We consider the numerical investigation of surface bound orientational order using unit tangential vector fields by means of a gradient flow equation of a weak surface Frank-Oseen energy. The energy is composed of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions, as well as a penalization term to enforce the unity of the vector field. Four different numerical discretizations, namely a discrete exterior calculus approach, a method based on vector spherical harmonics, a surface finite element method, and an approach utilizing an implicit surface description, the diffuse interface method, are described and compared with each other for surfaces with Euler characteristic 2. We demonstrate the influence of geometric properties on realizations of the Poincaré-Hopf theorem and show examples where the energy is decreased by introducing additional orientational defects.

  8. Complex Human Dynamics From Mind to Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Winkowska-Nowak, Katarzyna; Brée, David

    2013-01-01

    This book, edited and authored by a closely collaborating network of social scientists and psychologists, recasts typical research topics in these fields into the language of nonlinear, dynamic and complex systems. The aim is to provide scientists with different backgrounds - physics, applied mathematics and computer sciences - with the opportunity to apply the tools of their trade to an altogether new range of possible applications. At the same time, this book will serve as a first reference for a new generation of social scientists and psychologists wishing to familiarize themselves with the new methodology and the "thinking in complexity".

  9. Dynamics of supercritical methanol of varying density from first principles simulations: hydrogen bond fluctuations, vibrational spectral diffusion, and orientational relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu

    2013-06-14

    A first principles study of the dynamics of supercritical methanol is carried out by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, the fluctuation dynamics of hydroxyl stretch frequencies, hydrogen bonds, dangling hydroxyl groups, and orientation of methanol molecules are investigated for three different densities at 523 K. Apart from the dynamical properties, various equilibrium properties of supercritical methanol such as the local density distributions and structural correlations, hydrogen bonding aspects, frequency-structure correlations, and dipole distributions of methanol molecules are also investigated. In addition to the density dependence of various equilibrium and dynamical properties, their dependencies on dispersion interactions are also studied by carrying out additional simulations using a dispersion corrected density functional for all the systems. It is found that the hydrogen bonding between methanol molecules decreases significantly as we move to the supercritical state from the ambient one. The inclusion of dispersion interactions is found to increase the number of hydrogen bonds to some extent. Calculations of the frequency-structure correlation coefficient reveal that a statistical correlation between the hydroxyl stretch frequency and the nearest hydrogen-oxygen distance continues to exist even at supercritical states of methanol, although it is weakened with increase of temperature and decrease of density. In the supercritical state, the frequency time correlation function is found to decay with two time scales: One around or less than 100 fs and the other in the region of 250-700 fs. It is found that, for supercritical methanol, the times scales of vibrational spectral diffusion are determined by an interplay between the dynamics of hydrogen bonds, dangling OD groups, and inertial rotation of methanol molecules and the roles of these various components are found to vary with density of the supercritical solvent. Effects

  10. The Affective Dimension and Human Oriented Management of the Human Capital%人力资本的情感维度与人本管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓峰

    2011-01-01

    现代管理正以前所未有的力度从物性向人性回归,组织员工越来越重视自身的情感满足,情感作为分析人力资本的一个重要维度,与体力维度、智力维度三者相互重叠、交互作用,构成人力资本的三重结构。随着情感在组织发展中的地位提升,情感维度对于开发与利用人力资本日渐重要,体现在战略管理上的意义就是人本管理。包含情感维度的人本管理是提升组织人力资本优势的重要途径之一。全面的人力资本与人本管理是组织实现绩效的有力管理工具,是组织挖掘潜在人力资源,提升核心竞争力的根本保证。在人力资本开发利用方面,情感维度能比体力、智力维度发挥更大作用,其协同效应将能创造更为显著的基于人本的竞争优势。%Modem management is more human oriented than physical property oriented. The stuff of any organization is attaching more and more importance to its own emotional satisfaction. The affection, an aspect of analyzing human capital, together with physical strength and intelligence, three of which overlap and interact with each other form the three structure of the human capital. With the role promotion of the affection in the development of the organization, its function is becoming more and more important in exploiting and using human capital, strategically, it is human oriented manage- ment. Affective human oriented management is one of the ways to promote the human capital advantage of the organization. The all-round human capital and human oriented management is an effective tool in the implementation of performance evaluation in the organization, and the basic guarantee of promoting its competitiveness through exploiting the human recourse potential. The function of affection is more significant than that of the physical strength and intelligence, its coordinating function can create more significant human oriented competitive

  11. Composition and Dynamics of Human Mitochondrial Nucleoids

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, Nuria; Griparic, Lorena; Jokitalo, Eija; Wartiovaara, Jorma; van der Bliek, Alexander M.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2003-01-01

    The organization of multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecules in discrete protein-DNA complexes called nucleoids is well studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Similar structures have recently been observed in human cells by the colocalization of a Twinkle-GFP fusion protein with mtDNA. However, nucleoids in mammalian cells are poorly characterized and are often thought of as relatively simple structures, despite the yeast paradigm. In this article we have used immunocytochemistry and bioche...

  12. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Christian; Zignani, Matteo; Capra, Lorenzo; Gaito, Sabrina; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages). Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process.

  13. Multidimensional human dynamics in mobile phone communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Quadri

    Full Text Available In today's technology-assisted society, social interactions may be expressed through a variety of techno-communication channels, including online social networks, email and mobile phones (calls, text messages. Consequently, a clear grasp of human behavior through the diverse communication media is considered a key factor in understanding the formation of the today's information society. So far, all previous research on user communication behavior has focused on a sole communication activity. In this paper we move forward another step on this research path by performing a multidimensional study of human sociality as an expression of the use of mobile phones. The paper focuses on user temporal communication behavior in the interplay between the two complementary communication media, text messages and phone calls, that represent the bi-dimensional scenario of analysis. Our study provides a theoretical framework for analyzing multidimensional bursts as the most general burst category, that includes one-dimensional bursts as the simplest case, and offers empirical evidence of their nature by following the combined phone call/text message communication patterns of approximately one million people over three-month period. This quantitative approach enables the design of a generative model rooted in the three most significant features of the multidimensional burst - the number of dimensions, prevalence and interleaving degree - able to reproduce the main media usage attitude. The other findings of the paper include a novel multidimensional burst detection algorithm and an insight analysis of the human media selection process.

  14. Empirical analysis of online human dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Patterns of human activities have attracted increasing academic interests, since the quantitative understanding of human behavior is helpful to uncover the origins of many socioeconomic phenomena. This paper focuses on behaviors of Internet users. Six large-scale systems are studied in our experiments, including the movie-watching in Netflix and MovieLens, the transaction in Ebay, the bookmark-collecting in Delicious, and the posting in FreindFeed and Twitter. Empirical analysis reveals some common statistical features of online human behavior: (1) The total number of user's actions, the user's activity, and the interevent time all follow heavy-tailed distributions. (2) There exists a strongly positive correlation between user's activity and the total number of user's actions, and a significantly negative correlation between the user's activity and the width of the interevent time distribution. We further study the rescaling method and show that this method could to some extent eliminate the different statistics among users caused by the different activities, yet the effectiveness depends on the data sets.

  15. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated networks of spiking neurons: effect of single neuron properties and network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  16. Density dependence of hydrogen bonding and the translational-orientational structural order in supercritical water: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haibo; Ma, Jing

    2011-08-07

    Molecular dynamics simulation have been performed with a wide range of densities along a near critical isotherm of supercritical water (SCW) in order to study the density dependence of the structure order and hydrogen bonding (HB). It is revealed that the translational structure order is nearly invariant while the orientational tetrahedral structure order is very sensitive to the bulk density under supercritical conditions. Meanwhile, some energetically unfavorable intermediate water dimer structures are found to appear under supercritical conditions due to the reduced energy difference and the enhanced energy fluctuation. As a consequence, a general geometrical criterion or the inclusion of a energy-based criterion instead of currently widely adopted pure r(OH)-based geometric criterion is suggested to be used in the HB statistics under supercritical conditions. It is found that the average HB number per H(2)O molecule (n(HB)) reduces with the decreasing SCW bulk density although a given pair of H(2)O molecules are shown to have a stronger ability to form a hydrogen bond under lower SCW bulk densities. Accordingly, the orientational tetrahedral structure order q decreases with the reducing bulk density under supercritical conditions. However, when the fluid is dilute with ρ ≤ 0.19ρ(c) (ρ(c) = 0.322 g/cm(3)), the energy fluctuation increases sharply and the short-range order is destroyed, signifying the supercritical fluid (SCF)-gas state transition. Accordingly, the orientational tetrahedral structure order q gets reversal around ρ = 0.19ρ(c) and approaches zero under very dilute conditions. The sensitivity of the orientational order to the density implies the microscopic origin of the significant dependence of SCF's physicochemical properties on the pressure.

  17. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated networks of spiking neurons: effect of single neuron properties and network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadra Sadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are

  18. Effects of confinement, surface-induced orientations and strain on dynamical behaviors of bacteria in thin liquid crystalline films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushenheim, Peter C; Trivedi, Rishi R; Roy, Susmit Singha; Arnold, Michael S; Weibel, Douglas B; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-09-14

    We report on the organization and dynamics of bacteria (Proteus mirabilis) dispersed within lyotropic liquid crystal (LC) films confined by pairs of surfaces that induce homeotropic (perpendicular) or hybrid (homeotropic and parallel orientations at each surface) anchoring of the LC. By using motile vegetative bacteria (3 µm in length) and homeotropically aligned LC films with thicknesses that exceed the length of the rod-shaped cells, a key finding reported in this paper is that elastic torques generated by the LC are sufficiently large to overcome wall-induced hydrodynamic torques acting on the cells, thus leading to LC-guided bacterial motion near surfaces that orient LCs. This result extends to bacteria within LC films with hybrid anchoring, and leads to the observation that asymmetric strain within a hybrid aligned LC rectifies motions of motile cells. In contrast, when the LC film thickness is sufficiently small that confinement prevents alignment of the bacteria cells along a homeotropically aligned LC director (achieved using swarm cells of length 10-60 µm), the bacterial cells propel in directions orthogonal to the director, generating transient distortions in the LC that have striking "comet-like" optical signatures. In this limit, for hybrid LC films, we find LC elastic stresses deform the bodies of swarm cells into bent configurations that follow the LC director, thus unmasking a coupling between bacterial shape and LC strain. Overall, these results provide new insight into the influence of surface-oriented LCs on dynamical bacterial behaviors and hint at novel ways to manipulate bacteria using confined LC phases that are not possible in isotropic solutions.

  19. Modeling human dynamics of face-to-face interaction networks

    CERN Document Server

    Starnini, Michele; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interaction networks describe social interactions in human gatherings, and are the substrate for processes such as epidemic spreading and gossip propagation. The bursty nature of human behavior characterizes many aspects of empirical data, such as the distribution of conversation lengths, of conversations per person, or of inter-conversation times. Despite several recent attempts, a general theoretical understanding of the global picture emerging from data is still lacking. Here we present a simple model that reproduces quantitatively most of the relevant features of empirical face-to-face interaction networks. The model describes agents which perform a random walk in a two dimensional space and are characterized by an attractiveness whose effect is to slow down the motion of people around them. The proposed framework sheds light on the dynamics of human interactions and can improve the modeling of dynamical processes taking place on the ensuing dynamical social networks.

  20. Cellular Proteome Dynamics during Differentiation of Human Primary Myoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Barrio, Inigo; Mortensen, Tenna Pavia;

    2015-01-01

    and the complex temporal protein dynamics accompanying the differentiation of primary human muscle cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of applying a MS-based quantitative approach, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), for studying human myogenesis...... dynamic expression profiles during the course of myogenic differentiation and quantified 2240 proteins, 243 of which were regulated. These changes in protein expression occurred in sequential waves and underlined vast reprogramming in key processes governing cell fate decisions, i.e., cell cycle...

  1. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  2. A dynamic model of human physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melissa; Kaplan, Carolyn; Oran, Elaine; Boris, Jay

    2010-11-01

    To study the systems-level transport in the human body, we develop the Computational Man (CMAN): a set of one-dimensional unsteady elastic flow simulations created to model a variety of coupled physiological systems including the circulatory, respiratory, excretory, and lymphatic systems. The model systems are collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To model the actions of a beating heart or expanding lungs, the flow is driven by user-defined changes to the equilibrium areas of the elastic vessels. The equations are then iteratively solved for pressure, area, and average velocity. The model is augmented with valves and contractions to resemble the biological structure of the different systems. CMAN will be used to track material transport throughout the human body for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Parameters will be adjustable to match those of individual patients. Validation of CMAN has used both higher-dimensional simulations of similar geometries and benchmark measurement from medical literature.

  3. Human adipose dynamics and metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Zhang, Tracy; Xu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    The two types of adipose tissue in humans, white and brown, have distinct developmental origins and functions. Human white adipose tissue plays a pivotal role in maintaining whole-body energy homeostasis by storing triglycerides when energy is in surplus, releasing free fatty acids as a fuel during energy shortage, and secreting adipokines that are important for regulating lipid and glucose metabolism. The size of white adipose mass needs to be kept at a proper set point. Dramatic expansion of white fat mass causes obesity--now become a global epidemic disease--and increases the risk for the development of many life-threatening diseases. The absence of white adipose tissue or abnormal white adipose tissue redistribution leads to lipodystrophy, a condition often associated with metabolic disorders. Brown adipose tissue is a thermogenic organ whose mass is inversely correlated with body mass index and age. Therapeutic approaches targeting adipose tissue have been proven to be effective in improving obesity-related metabolic disorders, and promising new therapies could be developed in the near future. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Design and Dynamic Characterization of an Orientation Insensitive Microwave Water-Cut Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Karimi, Muhammad Akram

    2017-06-12

    Modern reservoir management in oil and gas industry relies on accurate water fraction measurement which is produced as a by-product with oil. This paper presents a novel and contactless water fraction (also known as water-cut) measurement technique which is independent of geometric distribution of oil and water inside the pipe. The sensor is based on a modified T-resonator implemented directly on the pipe\\'s outer surface and whose resonance frequency decreases by increasing the water content in oil. The E-fields have been made to rotate and distribute well inside the pipe, despite having narrow and curved ground plane. It makes the sensor\\'s reading dependent only on the water fraction and not on the mixture distribution inside the pipe. That is why, the presented design does not require any flow conditioner to homogenize the oil/water mixture unlike many commercial water-cut (WC) sensors. The presented sensor has been realized by using extremely low-cost methods of screen printing and reusable 3-D printed mask. Complete characterization of the proposed WC sensor, both in horizontal and vertical orientations, has been carried out in an industrial flow loop. Excellent repeatability of the sensor\\'s response has been observed in \\'dispersed bubble\\' as well as in \\'stratified wavy\\' flow regimes. The performance test of the sensor confirms that the water fraction measurement is independent of the flow pattern, flow rate or orientation. The measured performance results of the sensor show full range accuracy of $± $2%-3% while tested under random orientations and wide range of flow rates.

  5. Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis: Benefits and Challenges of Simulating Human Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. L. Boring

    2007-06-01

    To date, there has been considerable work on dynamic event trees and other areas related to dynamic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The counterpart to these efforts in human reliability analysis (HRA) has centered on the development of specific methods to account for the dynamic nature of human performance. In this paper, the author posits that the key to dynamic HRA is not in the development of specific methods but in the utilization of cognitive modeling and simulation to produce a framework of data that may be used in quantifying the likelihood of human error. This paper provides an overview of simulation approaches to HRA; reviews differences between first, second, and dynamic generation HRA; and outlines potential benefits and challenges of this approach.

  6. Isotropy of an Upper Limb Exoskeleton and the Kinematics and Dynamics of the Human Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C. Perry

    2009-01-01

    shoulder and elbow, and nearly half of the total torque at the wrist. These results suggest that the majority of human arm joint torques are devoted to supporting the human arm position in space while compensating gravitational loads whereas a minor portion of the joint torques is dedicated to arm motion itself. A unique axial orientation at the base of the exoskeleton allowed the singular configuration of the shoulder joint to be moved towards the boundary of the human arm workspace while supporting 95% of the arm's workspace. At the same time, this orientation allowed the best exoskeleton manipulability at the most commonly used human arm configuration during ADLs. One of the potential implications of these results might be the need to compensate gravitational load during robotic-assistive rehabilitation treatment. Moreover, results of a manipulability analysis of the exoskeleton system indicate that the singular configuration of the exoskeleton system may be moved out of the human arm physiological workspace while maximising the overlap between the human arm and the exoskeleton workspaces. The collected database along with kinematic and dynamic analyses may provide a fundamental basis towards the development of assistive technologies for the human arm.

  7. Dynamics of human respiratory system mycoflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Biedunkiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determing the prevalence of individual species of fungi in the respiratory systems of women and men, analysis of the dynamics of the fungi in individual sections of the respiratory system as concerns their quantity and identification of phenology of the isolated fungi coupled with an attempt at identifying their possible preferences for appearing during specific seasons of thc year. During 10 years of studies (1989- 1998. 29 species of fungi belonging: Candida, Geolrichum, Saccharomyces, Saccharomycopsis, Schizosaccharomyces, Torulopsis, Trichosporon and Aspergillus were isolated from the ontocenoses of the respiratory systems of patients at the Independent Public Center for Pulmonology and Oncology in Olsztyn. Candida albicans was a clearly dominating fungus. Individual species appeared individually, in twos or threes in a single patient, they were isolated more frequently in the spring and autumn, less frequently during the winter and summer. The largest number of fungi species were isolated from sputum (29 species, bronchoscopic material (23 species and pharyngeal swabs (15 species. Sacchoromycopsis capsularis and Trichosporon beigelii should be treated as new for the respiratory system. Biodiversity of fungi, their numbers and continous fluctuations in frequency indicate that the respiratory system ontocenose offers the optimum conditions for growth and development of the majority of the majority of yeasts - like fungi.

  8. The dynamic of lipid oxidation in human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Both endogenous and exogenous lipid levels may be regulators of total lipid oxidation in skeletal muscles. We studied the dynamics of lipid oxidation in human myotubes established from healthy, lean subjects exposed to acutely and chronically increased palmitate concentrations. The intramyocellul...... oxidation in human myotubes. A reduced exogenous lipid oxidation, secondary to increased triacylglycerol levels, may redirect free fatty acids into esterification and oxidation from intracellular stores, thereby protecting myotubes from FFA lipotoxic effects....

  9. Dynamics of the two process model of human sleep regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenngott, Max; McKay, Cavendish

    2011-04-01

    We examine the dynamics of the two process model of human sleep regulation. In this model, sleep propensity is governed by the interaction between a periodic threshold (process C) and a saturating growth/decay (process S). We find that the parameter space of this model admits sleep cycles with a wide variety of characteristics, many of which are not observed in normal human sleepers. We also examine the effects of phase dependent feedback on this model.

  10. Tactile orientation perception: an ideal observer analysis of human psychophysical performance in relation to macaque area 3b receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ryan M; Staibano, Phillip; Goldreich, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The ability to resolve the orientation of edges is crucial to daily tactile and sensorimotor function, yet the means by which edge perception occurs is not well understood. Primate cortical area 3b neurons have diverse receptive field (RF) spatial structures that may participate in edge orientation perception. We evaluated five candidate RF models for macaque area 3b neurons, previously recorded while an oriented bar contacted the monkey's fingertip. We used a Bayesian classifier to assign each neuron a best-fit RF structure. We generated predictions for human performance by implementing an ideal observer that optimally decoded stimulus-evoked spike counts in the model neurons. The ideal observer predicted a saturating reduction in bar orientation discrimination threshold with increasing bar length. We tested 24 humans on an automated, precision-controlled bar orientation discrimination task and observed performance consistent with that predicted. We next queried the ideal observer to discover the RF structure and number of cortical neurons that best matched each participant's performance. Human perception was matched with a median of 24 model neurons firing throughout a 1-s period. The 10 lowest-performing participants were fit with RFs lacking inhibitory sidebands, whereas 12 of the 14 higher-performing participants were fit with RFs containing inhibitory sidebands. Participants whose discrimination improved as bar length increased to 10 mm were fit with longer RFs; those who performed well on the 2-mm bar, with narrower RFs. These results suggest plausible RF features and computational strategies underlying tactile spatial perception and may have implications for perceptual learning.

  11. Testing Object-Oriented Programs using Dynamic Aspects and Non-Determinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    without parameterization or generation of tests. It also eases modelling naturally non-deterministic program features like IO or multi-threading in integration tests. Dynamic AOP facilitates powerful design adaptations without exposing test features, keeping the scope of these adaptations local to each...... test. We also combine non-determinism and dynamic aspects in a new approach to testing multi-threaded programs using co-routines.......The implementation of unit tests with mock objects and stubs often involves substantial manual work. Stubbed methods return simple default values, therefore variations of these values require separate test cases. The integration of mock objects often requires more infrastructure code and design...

  12. Studying Human Dynamics Through Web Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasco, Jose; Goncalves, Bruno

    2008-03-01

    When Tim Berners Lee, a physicist at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) first conceived the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1990 as a way to facilitate the sharing of scientific information and results among the centers different researchers and groups, even the most ingenious of science fiction writers could not have imagined the role it would come to play in the following decades. The increasing ubiquitousness of Internet access and the frequency with which people interact with it raise the possibility of using it to better observe, understand, and even monitor several aspects of human social behavior. Websites with large numbers of frequently returning users, such as search engines, company or university websites, are ideal for this task. The properly anonymized logs detailing the access history to Emory University's website is studied. We find that a small number of users is responsible for a finite fraction of the total activity. A saturation phenomenon is observed where, certain connections age, becoming less attractive to new activity over time. Finally, by measuring the average activity as a function of the day of the week, we find that productivity seems to be higher on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, with Sundays being the least active day.

  13. Quantifying dynamic characteristics of human walking for comprehensive gait cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummolo, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2013-09-01

    Normal human walking typically consists of phases during which the body is statically unbalanced while maintaining dynamic stability. Quantifying the dynamic characteristics of human walking can provide better understanding of gait principles. We introduce a novel quantitative index, the dynamic gait measure (DGM), for comprehensive gait cycle. The DGM quantifies the effects of inertia and the static balance instability in terms of zero-moment point and ground projection of center of mass and incorporates the time-varying foot support region (FSR) and the threshold between static and dynamic walking. Also, a framework of determining the DGM from experimental data is introduced, in which the gait cycle segmentation is further refined. A multisegmental foot model is integrated into a biped system to reconstruct the walking motion from experiments, which demonstrates the time-varying FSR for different subphases. The proof-of-concept results of the DGM from a gait experiment are demonstrated. The DGM results are analyzed along with other established features and indices of normal human walking. The DGM provides a measure of static balance instability of biped walking during each (sub)phase as well as the entire gait cycle. The DGM of normal human walking has the potential to provide some scientific insights in understanding biped walking principles, which can also be useful for their engineering and clinical applications.

  14. Dynamic Task Allocation for Human-Robot Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giele, T.R.A.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Meyer, J.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial agents, such as robots, are increasingly deployed for teamwork in dynamic, high-demand environments. This paper presents a framework, which applies context information to establish task (re)allocations that improve human-robot team’s performance. Based on the framework, a model for adapti

  15. Collagen fiber orientation in the femoral necks of apes and humans: do their histological structures reflect differences in locomotor loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmey, J K; Lovejoy, C O

    2002-08-01

    Human hip joint anatomy differs substantially from that in other primates. Humans modulate pelvic tilt during walking with a highly developed abductor apparatus, but other primates (such as chimpanzees) clearly lack such an apparatus (they exhibit a Trendelenburg gait during bipedal progression). Because the primate femoral neck is cantilevered whenever it supports body mass, it must be consistently subjected to substantial bending at the neck/shaft interface during stance phase in quadrupedal or bipedal locomotion. It has been argued, however, that the powerful abduction during the single support phase in humans results in almost entirely compressive stress on the human femoral neck. We examined collagen fiber orientation in human and chimpanzee femoral neck cortices using circularly polarized light, which has been shown to be a strong correlate of bone loading patterns. Chimpanzee superior femoral neck cortex was shown to be largely nonbirefringent (dark), but the inferior cortex was strongly birefringent. Human femoral necks showed strong birefringence both superiorly and inferiorly. These results are consistent with loading patterns suggested from anatomical structure, and provide corroborative evidence of bone's ability to preferentially orient collagen fibers during extracellular matrix deposition.

  16. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, L.-E.; Fiddyment, G.; Madsen, J. R.; Eskandar, E. N.; Truccolo, W.; Eden, U. T.; Cash, S. S.; Kramer, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    Epilepsy--the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures--is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms--namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space--that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures--and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms--promises new insights to treat this devastating disease.

  17. Multifractal heart rate dynamics in human cardiovascular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Kiyoshi; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Safonov, Leonid; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-05-01

    Human cardiovascular and/or cardio-respiratory systems are shown to exhibit both multifractal and synchronous dynamics, and we recently developed a nonlinear, physiologically plausible model for the synchronization between heartbeat and respiration (Kotani, et al. Phys. Rev. E 65: 051923, 2002). By using the same model, we now show the multifractality in the heart rate dynamics. We find that beat-to-beat monofractal noise (fractional Brownian motion) added to the brain stem cardiovascular areas results in significantly broader singularity spectra for heart rate through interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. We conclude that the model proposed here would be useful in studying the complex cardiovascular and/or cardio- respiratory dynamics in humans.

  18. A stochastic evolutionary model for capturing human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Trevor; Loizou, George

    2015-01-01

    The recent interest in human dynamics has led researchers to investigate the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in various contexts. Here we propose a generative model to capture the dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials and reliability analysis in engineering. We derive a general solution for the model in the form of a product, and then a continuous approximation to the solution via the renewal equation describing age-structured population dynamics. This enables us to model a wide rage of survival distributions, according to the choice of the mortality distribution. We provide empirical evidence for the validity of the model from a longitudinal data set of popular search engine queries over 114 months, showing that the survival function of these queries is closely matched by the solution for our model with power-law mortality.

  19. Beyond "on" or "with": Questioning Power Dynamics and Knowledge Production in "Child-Oriented" Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunleth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    By taking a reflexive approach to research methodology, this article contributes to discussions on power dynamics and knowledge production in the social studies of children. The author describes and analyzes three research methods that she used with children--drawing, child-led tape-recording and focus group discussions. These methods were carried…

  20. Control-oriented dynamic fuzzy model and predictive control for proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xi; DENG Zhong-hua; CAO Guang-yi; ZHU Xin-jian; WEI Dong

    2006-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack temperature and cathode stoichiometric oxygen are very important control parameters. The performance and lifespan of PEMFC stack are greatly dependent on the parameters. So, in order to improve the performance index, tight control of two parameters within a given range and reducing their fluctuation are indispensable.However, control-oriented models and control strategies are very weak junctures in the PEMFC development. A predictive control algorithm was presented based on their model established by input-output data and operating experiences. It adjusts the operating temperature to 80 ℃. At the same time, the optimized region of stoichiometric oxygen is kept between 1.8-2.2. Furthermore, the control algorithm adjusts the variants quickly to the destination value and makes the fluctuation of the variants the least. According to the test results, compared with traditional fuzzy and PID controllers, the designed controller shows much better performance.

  1. Dynamic behaviour of magneto-acoustic emission in a grain-oriented steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupakov, A.; Perevertov, O.; Landa, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magneto-acoustic emission (MAE) in a grain-oriented electrical steel is measured in a wide range of the magnetizing frequencies fmag = 0.5 - 100 Hz at the controllable sinusoidal/triangular waveforms of the magnetic induction B(t). Magnetic field is measured directly by a Hall sensor positioned on the steel surface. Intensity of the MAE signal (rms value) follows a loss separation formula a√{fmag } +bfmag + c and reveals a linear relationship with the hysteresis loss. Number of the MAE individual pulses drops with the magnetizing frequency hyperbolically. Shape of the induction waveform at the fixed magnetizing amplitude and frequency has no visible impact on the above-mentioned behaviour. However, rms profiles of the MAE signal are driven by the field rate of change dH / dt . Integration of the MAE profiles allows to evaluate the hysteresis coercive field.

  2. A Service-Oriented Approach for Dynamic Chaining of Virtual Network Functions over Multi-Provider Software-Defined Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Martini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging technologies such as Software-Defined Networks (SDN and Network Function Virtualization (NFV promise to address cost reduction and flexibility in network operation while enabling innovative network service delivery models. However, operational network service delivery solutions still need to be developed that actually exploit these technologies, especially at the multi-provider level. Indeed, the implementation of network functions as software running over a virtualized infrastructure and provisioned on a service basis let one envisage an ecosystem of network services that are dynamically and flexibly assembled by orchestrating Virtual Network Functions even across different provider domains, thereby coping with changeable user and service requirements and context conditions. In this paper we propose an approach that adopts Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA technology-agnostic architectural guidelines in the design of a solution for orchestrating and dynamically chaining Virtual Network Functions. We discuss how SOA, NFV, and SDN may complement each other in realizing dynamic network function chaining through service composition specification, service selection, service delivery, and placement tasks. Then, we describe the architecture of a SOA-inspired NFV orchestrator, which leverages SDN-based network control capabilities to address an effective delivery of elastic chains of Virtual Network Functions. Preliminary results of prototype implementation and testing activities are also presented. The benefits for Network Service Providers are also described that derive from the adaptive network service provisioning in a multi-provider environment through the orchestration of computing and networking services to provide end users with an enhanced service experience.

  3. Water Orientation at Ceramide/Water Interfaces Studied by Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Adhikari, Aniruddha

    2016-10-10

    Lipid/water interaction is essential for many biological processes. The water structure at the nonionic lipid interface remains little known, and there is no scope of a priori prediction of water orientation at nonionic interfaces, either. Here, we report our study combining advanced nonlinear spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation on the water orientation at the ceramide/water interface. We measured χ spectrum in the OH stretch region of ceramide/isotopically diluted water interface using heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy and found that the interfacial water prefers an overall hydrogen-up orientation. Molecular dynamics simulation indicates that this preferred hydrogen-up orientation of water is determined by a delicate balance between hydrogen-up and hydrogen-down orientation induced by lipid-water and intralipid hydrogen bonds. This mechanism also suggests that water orientation at neutral lipid interfaces depends highly on the chemical structure of the lipid headgroup, in contrast to the charged lipid interfaces where the net water orientation is determined solely by the charge of the lipid headgroup.

  4. inertial orientation tracker having automatic drift compensation using an at rest sensor for tracking parts of a human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxlin, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A self contained sensor apparatus generates a signal that corresponds to at least two of the three orientational aspects of yaw, pitch and roll of a human-scale body, relative to an external reference frame. A sensor generates first sensor signals that correspond to rotational accelerations or rates of the body about certain body axes. The sensor may be mounted to the body. Coupled to the sensor is a signal processor for generating orientation signals relative to the external reference frame that correspond to the angular rate or acceleration signals. The first sensor signals are impervious to interference from electromagnetic, acoustic, optical and mechanical sources. The sensors may be rate sensors. An integrator may integrate the rate signal over time. A drift compensator is coupled to the rate sensors and the integrator. The drift compensator may include a gravitational tilt sensor or a magnetic field sensor or both. A verifier periodically measures the orientation of the body by a means different from the drift sensitive sate sensors. The verifier may take into account characteristic features of human motion, such as stillness periods. The drift compensator may be, in part, a Kalman filter, which may utilize statistical data about human head motion.

  5. Analyzing, Modeling, and Simulation for Human Dynamics in Social Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the human behavior in the top-one social network system in China (Sina Microblog system. By analyzing real-life data at a large scale, we find that the message releasing interval (intermessage time obeys power law distribution both at individual level and at group level. Statistical analysis also reveals that human behavior in social network is mainly driven by four basic elements: social pressure, social identity, social participation, and social relation between individuals. Empirical results present the four elements' impact on the human behavior and the relation between these elements. To further understand the mechanism of such dynamic phenomena, a hybrid human dynamic model which combines “interest” of individual and “interaction” among people is introduced, incorporating the four elements simultaneously. To provide a solid evaluation, we simulate both two-agent and multiagent interactions with real-life social network topology. We achieve the consistent results between empirical studies and the simulations. The model can provide a good understanding of human dynamics in social network.

  6. Pedestrian-bridge dynamic interaction, including human participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J. W.; Law, S. S.; Yang, Q. S.; Yang, N.

    2013-02-01

    The pedestrian-bridge dynamic interaction problem based on bipedal walking model and damped compliant legs is presented in this work. A time-variant damper is modeled at a given walking speed. A control force is applied by the pedestrian to compensate for energy dissipated with the system damping in walking and to regulate the walking performance of the pedestrian. The effects of stiffness, damping of the leg and the landing angle of attack are investigated in the numerical studies. Simulation results show that the dynamic interaction will increase with a larger vibration level of structure. More external energy must be input to maintain steady walking and uniform dynamic behavior of the pedestrian in the process. The simple bipedal walking model could well describe the human-structure dynamic interaction.

  7. Stability and Membrane Orientation of the Fukutin Transmembrane Domain: A Combined Multiscale Molecular Dynamics and Circular Dichroism Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of fukutin-I has been implicated in the localization of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi Apparatus. It has been proposed to mediate this through its interaction with the thinner lipid bilayers found in these compartments. Here we have employed multiscale molecular dynamics simulations and circular dichroism spectroscopy to explore the structure, stability, and orientation of the short 36-residue N-terminus of fukutin-I (FK1TMD) in lipids with differing tail lengths. Our results show that FK1TMD adopts a stable helical conformation in phosphatidylcholine lipids when oriented with its principal axis perpendicular to the bilayer plane. The stability of the helix is largely insensitive to the lipid tail length, preventing hydrophobic mismatch by virtue of its mobility and ability to tilt within the lipid bilayers. This suggests that changes in FK1TMD tilt in response to bilayer properties may be implicated in the regulation of its trafficking. Coarse-grained simulations of the complex Golgi membrane suggest the N-terminal domain may induce the formation of microdomains in the surrounding membrane through its preferential interaction with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids. PMID:21105749

  8. Another Approach to Measuring Human Development: The Composite Dynamic Human Development Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao-Ubillos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks mainly to contribute to the debate on how the relative degree of development of a country should be measured by proposing an indicator to build on the valuable starting point provided by the Human Development Index (HDI). The indicator proposed is called the "Composite, Dynamic Human Development Index". It incorporates in a simple…

  9. Another Approach to Measuring Human Development: The Composite Dynamic Human Development Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao-Ubillos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks mainly to contribute to the debate on how the relative degree of development of a country should be measured by proposing an indicator to build on the valuable starting point provided by the Human Development Index (HDI). The indicator proposed is called the "Composite, Dynamic Human Development Index". It incorporates in a simple…

  10. Modeling for the Dynamics of Human Innovative Behaviors

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2013-01-01

    How to promote the innovative activities is an important problem for modern society. In this paper, combining with the evolutionary games and information spreading, we propose a lattice model to investigate dynamics of human innovative behaviors based on benefit-driven assumption. Simulations show several properties in agreement with peoples' daily cognition on innovative behaviors, such as slow diffusion of innovative behaviors, gathering of innovative strategy on "innovative centers", and quasi-localized dynamics. Furthermore, our model also emerges rich non-Poisson properties in the temporal-spacial patterns of the innovative status, including the scaling law in the interval time of innovation releases and the bimodal distributions on the spreading range of innovations, which would be universal in human innovative behaviors. Our model provide a basic framework on the study of the issue relevant to the evolution of human innovative behaviors and the promotion measurement of innovative activities.

  11. Dynamic behaviour of human neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Lakshmi; Bershteyn, Marina; Paredes, Mercedes F.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2017-01-01

    To understand how diverse progenitor cells contribute to human neocortex development, we examined forebrain progenitor behaviour using timelapse imaging. Here we find that cell cycle dynamics of human neuroepithelial (NE) cells differ from radial glial (RG) cells in both primary tissue and in stem cell-derived organoids. NE cells undergoing proliferative, symmetric divisions retract their basal processes, and both daughter cells regrow a new process following cytokinesis. The mitotic retraction of the basal process is recapitulated by NE cells in cerebral organoids generated from human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In contrast, RG cells undergoing vertical cleavage retain their basal fibres throughout mitosis, both in primary tissue and in older organoids. Our findings highlight developmentally regulated changes in mitotic behaviour that may relate to the role of RG cells to provide a stable scaffold for neuronal migration, and suggest that the transition in mitotic dynamics can be studied in organoid models. PMID:28139695

  12. Dynamics of the guest-host orientational interaction in dye-doped liquid-crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thai V; Xu, Lei; Shen, Y R

    2005-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the dynamics of laser-induced molecular reorientation in a dye-doped liquid crystalline (LC) medium that exhibits significant enhancement of the optical Kerr nonlinearity due to guest-host interaction. Using various techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photoexcitation and, thus, were able to follow the transient process in which photoexcitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  13. Effect of Fiber Orientation on Dynamic Compressive Properties of an Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Development of UHPCs began in Europe. In France, researchers at Bouygues* formulated reactive powder concrete (RPC). RPC was designed to have a...3(2):131-136. Ju, Y., H. Liu, G. Sheng, and H. Wang. 2010. Experimental study of dynamic mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete under...and M. Cheyrezy. 1995. Composition of reactive powder concretes . Cement and Concrete Research 25(7):1501-1511. Richardson, D. N. 1991. Review of

  14. A Dynamic Multinode Model for Component-Oriented Thermal Analysis of Flat-Plate Solar Collectors

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, Christoph N.; Christoph Trinkl; Wilfried Zörner; Hanby, Vic I.

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of a flat-plate solar collector was developed on the basis of the physical principles of optics and heat transfer in order to determine collector’s component temperatures as well as collector efficiency. In contrast to many available models, the targeted use of this dynamic model is the detailed, theoretical investigation of the thermal behaviour of newly developed or adjusted collector designs on component level, for example, absorber, casing, or transparent cover. The d...

  15. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  16. Dynamic Measurements of the Position, Orientation, and DNA Content of Individual Unlabeled Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfain, Aaron M; Garmann, Rees F; Jin, Yan; Lahini, Yoav; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2016-07-01

    A complete understanding of the cellular pathways involved in viral infections will ultimately require a diverse arsenal of experimental techniques, including methods for tracking individual viruses and their interactions with the host. Here we demonstrate the use of holographic microscopy to track the position, orientation, and DNA content of unlabeled bacteriophages (phages) in solution near a planar, functionalized glass surface. We simultaneously track over 100 individual λ phages at a rate of 100 Hz across a 33 μm × 33 μm portion of the surface. The technique determines the in-plane motion of the phage to nanometer precision, and the height of the phage above the surface to 100 nm precision. Additionally, we track the DNA content of individual phages as they eject their genome following the addition of detergent-solubilized LamB receptor. The technique determines the fraction of DNA remaining in the phage to within 10% of the total 48.5 kilobase pairs. Analysis of the data reveals that under certain conditions, λ phages move along the surface with their heads down and intermittently stick to the surface by their tails, causing them to stand up. Furthermore, we find that in buffer containing high concentrations of both monovalent and divalent salts, λ phages eject their entire DNA in about 7 s. Taken together, these measurements highlight the potential of holographic microscopy to resolve the fast kinetics of the early stages of phage infection.

  17. A study on the design system of human sensibility ergonomics for development of a customer-oriented product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.G.; Yang, S.M.; Park, J.S.; Lee, S.Y. [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-05-01

    The human sense is measured and analyzed by physical design factors and can be applied also for the product design. At this point of view, this paper describes the implementation process of Virtual Modeling system for a customer-oriented product. The first step implementing virtual modeling is to make a human sensibility({sup K}ansei{sup )} database -human sensibility database is constructed with the relational data of Kansei words and design factors-. The next step is extraction the design information from the human sensibility database by fuzzy inference algorithm. This design information is used for the input data for the graphic database. Virtual implementation software compounds 3D shape of product. The final product can be modified according to the customer`s requirement. (author). 13 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Characterizing Pairwise Social Relationships Quantitatively: Interest-Oriented Mobility Modeling for Human Contacts in Delay Tolerant Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxu Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human mobility modeling has increasingly drawn the attention of researchers working on wireless mobile networks such as delay tolerant networks (DTNs in the last few years. So far, a number of human mobility models have been proposed to reproduce people’s social relationships, which strongly affect people’s daily life movement behaviors. However, most of them are based on the granularity of community. This paper presents interest-oriented human contacts (IHC mobility model, which can reproduce social relationships on a pairwise granularity. As well, IHC provides two methods to generate input parameters (interest vectors based on the social interaction matrix of target scenarios. By comparing synthetic data generated by IHC with three different real traces, we validate our model as a good approximation for human mobility. Exhaustive experiments are also conducted to show that IHC can predict well the performance of routing protocols.

  19. A distributed analysis of Human impact on global sediment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.; Kettner, A.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding riverine sediment dynamics is an important undertaking for both socially-relevant issues such as agriculture, water security and infrastructure management and for scientific analysis of landscapes, river ecology, oceanography and other disciplines. Providing good quantitative and predictive tools in therefore timely particularly in light of predicted climate and landuse changes. Ever increasing human activity during the Anthropocene have affected sediment dynamics in two major ways: (1) an increase is hillslope erosion due to agriculture, deforestation and landscape engineering and (2) trapping of sediment in dams and other man-made reservoirs. The intensity and dynamics between these man-made factors vary widely across the globe and in time and are therefore hard to predict. Using sophisticated numerical models is therefore warranted. Here we use a distributed global riverine sediment flux and water discharge model (WBMsed) to compare a pristine (without human input) and disturbed (with human input) simulations. Using these 50 year simulations we will show and discuss the complex spatial and temporal patterns of human effect on riverine sediment flux and water discharge.

  20. Development and applications of single particle orientation and rotational tracking in dynamic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kuangcai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-02-19

    The goal of this study is to help with future data analysis and experiment designs in rotational dynamics research using DIC-based SPORT technique. Most of the current studies using DIC-based SPORT techniques are technical demonstrations. Understanding the mechanisms behind the observed rotational behaviors of the imaging probes should be the focus of the future SPORT studies. More efforts are still needed in the development of new imaging probes, particle tracking methods, instrumentations, and advanced data analysis methods to further extend the potential of DIC-based SPORT technique.

  1. Orientational dynamics in dye-doped organic electro-optic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apitz, D.; Svanberg, C.; Jespersen, K.G.

    2003-01-01

    The time dependent birefringence of polymer-based electro-optic materials is investigated using ellipsometry. We show that the birefringence after switching off the poling field does not depend only on the induced refractive index, but also on how that level was reached. The role of the poling...... voltage and poling time is discussed in turn-on and turn-off experiments and an original curve-fit function is introduced. We also propose a schematic model of the polymer dynamics in the system, which is consistent with complementary dielectric measurements. © 2003 American Institute of Physics. © 2003...

  2. Forward dynamics simulation of human body under tilting perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, D.; Pasha Zanoosi, A. A.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.

    2012-02-01

    Human body uses different strategies to maintain its stability and these strategies vary from fixed-foot strategies to strategies which foot is moved in order to increase the support base. Tilting movement of foot is one type of the perturbations usually is exposed to human body. In the presence of such perturbations human body must employ appropriate reactions to prevent threats like falling. But it is not clear that how human body maintains its stability by central nervous system (CNS). At present study it is tried that by presenting a musculoskeletal model of human lower extremity with four links, three degrees of freedom (DOF) and eight skeletal muscles, the level of muscle activations causes the maintenance of stability, be investigated. Using forward dynamics solution, leads to a more general problem, rather than inverse dynamics. Hence, forward dynamics solution by forward optimization has been used for solving this highly nonlinear problem. To this end, first the system's equations of motion has been derived using lagrangian dynamics. Eight Hill-type muscles as actuators of the system were modeled. Because determination of muscle forces considering their number is an undetermined problem, optimization of an appropriate goal function should be practiced. For optimization problem, the characteristics of genetic algorithms as a method based on direct search, and the direct collocation method, has been profited. Also by considering requirements of problem, some constraints such as conservation of model stability are entered into optimization procedure. Finally to investigate validation of model, the results from optimization and experimental data are compared and good agreements are obtained.

  3. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Thai Viet [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  4. Diversity and dynamics of bacteriocins from human microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinshui; Gänzle, Michael G; Lin, Xiaoxi B; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Human commensal microbiota are an important determinant of health and disease of the host. Different human body sites harbour different bacterial microbiota, bacterial communities that maintain a stable balance. However, many of the factors influencing the stabilities of bacterial communities associated with humans remain unknown. In this study, we identified putative bacteriocins produced by human commensal microbiota. Bacteriocins are peptides or proteins with antimicrobial activity that contribute to the stability and dynamics of microbial communities. We employed bioinformatic analyses to identify putative bacteriocin sequences in metagenomic sequences obtained from different human body sites. Prevailing bacterial taxa of the putative bacteriocins producers matched the most abundant organisms in each human body site. Remarkably, we found that samples from different body sites contain different density of putative bacteriocin genes, with the highest in samples from the vagina, the airway, and the oral cavity and the lowest in those from gut. Inherent differences of different body sites thus influence the density and types of bacteriocins produced by commensal bacteria. Our results suggest that bacteriocins play important roles to allow different bacteria to occupy several human body sites, and to establish a long-term commensal relationship with human hosts.

  5. Dynamic Human Body Modeling Using a Single RGB Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyu Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a novel automatic pipeline to build personalized parametric models of dynamic people using a single RGB camera. Compared to previous approaches that use monocular RGB images, our system can model a 3D human body automatically and incrementally, taking advantage of human motion. Based on coarse 2D and 3D poses estimated from image sequences, we first perform a kinematic classification of human body parts to refine the poses and obtain reconstructed body parts. Next, a personalized parametric human model is generated by driving a general template to fit the body parts and calculating the non-rigid deformation. Experimental results show that our shape estimation method achieves comparable accuracy with reconstructed models using depth cameras, yet requires neither user interaction nor any dedicated devices, leading to the feasibility of using this method on widely available smart phones.

  6. Dynamic Human Body Modeling Using a Single RGB Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiyu; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Du, Sidan

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we present a novel automatic pipeline to build personalized parametric models of dynamic people using a single RGB camera. Compared to previous approaches that use monocular RGB images, our system can model a 3D human body automatically and incrementally, taking advantage of human motion. Based on coarse 2D and 3D poses estimated from image sequences, we first perform a kinematic classification of human body parts to refine the poses and obtain reconstructed body parts. Next, a personalized parametric human model is generated by driving a general template to fit the body parts and calculating the non-rigid deformation. Experimental results show that our shape estimation method achieves comparable accuracy with reconstructed models using depth cameras, yet requires neither user interaction nor any dedicated devices, leading to the feasibility of using this method on widely available smart phones.

  7. Population Dynamics of Early Human Migration in Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahia, Mayank N.; Ladiwala, Uma; Mahathe, Pavan; Mathur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background Early human migration is largely determined by geography and human needs. These are both deterministic parameters when small populations move into unoccupied areas where conflicts and large group dynamics are not important. The early period of human migration into the British Isles provides such a laboratory which, because of its relative geographical isolation, may allow some insights into the complex dynamics of early human migration and interaction. Method and Results We developed a simulation code based on human affinity to habitable land, as defined by availability of water sources, altitude, and flatness of land, in choosing the path of migration. Movement of people on the British island over the prehistoric period from their initial entry points was simulated on the basis of data from the megalithic period. Topographical and hydro-shed data from satellite databases was used to define habitability, based on distance from water bodies, flatness of the terrain, and altitude above sea level. We simulated population movement based on assumptions of affinity for more habitable places, with the rate of movement tempered by existing populations. We compared results of our computer simulations with genetic data and show that our simulation can predict fairly accurately the points of contacts between different migratory paths. Such comparison also provides more detailed information about the path of peoples’ movement over ~2000 years before the present era. Conclusions We demonstrate an accurate method to simulate prehistoric movements of people based upon current topographical satellite data. Our findings are validated by recently-available genetic data. Our method may prove useful in determining early human population dynamics even when no genetic information is available. PMID:27148959

  8. Population Dynamics of Early Human Migration in Britain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank N Vahia

    Full Text Available Early human migration is largely determined by geography and human needs. These are both deterministic parameters when small populations move into unoccupied areas where conflicts and large group dynamics are not important. The early period of human migration into the British Isles provides such a laboratory which, because of its relative geographical isolation, may allow some insights into the complex dynamics of early human migration and interaction.We developed a simulation code based on human affinity to habitable land, as defined by availability of water sources, altitude, and flatness of land, in choosing the path of migration. Movement of people on the British island over the prehistoric period from their initial entry points was simulated on the basis of data from the megalithic period. Topographical and hydro-shed data from satellite databases was used to define habitability, based on distance from water bodies, flatness of the terrain, and altitude above sea level. We simulated population movement based on assumptions of affinity for more habitable places, with the rate of movement tempered by existing populations. We compared results of our computer simulations with genetic data and show that our simulation can predict fairly accurately the points of contacts between different migratory paths. Such comparison also provides more detailed information about the path of peoples' movement over ~2000 years before the present era.We demonstrate an accurate method to simulate prehistoric movements of people based upon current topographical satellite data. Our findings are validated by recently-available genetic data. Our method may prove useful in determining early human population dynamics even when no genetic information is available.

  9. Relative Orientation and Position Detections Based on an RGB-D Sensor and Dynamic Cooperation Strategies for Jumping Sensor Nodes Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents relative orientation and position detection methods for jumping sensor nodes (JSNs recycling. The methods are based on motion captures of the JSNs by an RGB-D sensor mounted on a carrier robot and the dynamic cooperation between the carrier and the JSNs. A disc-like label with two different colored sides is mounted on the top of the JSNs. The RGB-D sensor can detect the motion of the label to calculate the orientations and positions of the JSNs and the carrier relative to each other. After the orientations and positions have been detected, the JSNs jump into a cabin mounted on the carrier in dynamic cooperation with the carrier for recycling. The performances of the proposed methods are tested with a prototype system. The results show that the carrier can detect a JSN from up to 2 m away and sense its relative orientation and position successfully. The errors of the JSN’s orientation and position detections relative to the carrier could be reduced to the values smaller than 1° and 1 cm, respectively, by using the dynamic cooperation strategies. The proposed methods in this paper could also be used for other kinds of mobile sensor nodes and multi-robot systems.

  10. Probing orientation of immobilized humanized anti-lysozyme variable fragment by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, J E; Cheng, Fang; Ratner, Daniel M; Stayton, Patrick S; Castner, David G

    2011-04-01

    As methods to orient proteins are conceived, techniques must also be developed that provide an accurate characterization of immobilized protein orientation. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to probe the orientation of a surface immobilized variant of the humanized anti-lysozyme variable fragment (HuLys Fv, 26 kDa). This protein contained both a hexahistidine tag and a cysteine residue, introduced at opposite ends of the HuLys Fv, for immobilization onto nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and maleimide oligo(ethylene glycol) (MEG)-terminated substrates, respectively. The thiol group on the cysteine residue selectively binds to the MEG groups, while the his-tag selectively binds to the Ni-loaded NTA groups. XPS was used to monitor protein coverage on both surfaces by following the change in the nitrogen atomic %. SPR results showed a 10-fold difference in lysozyme binding between the two different HuLys Fv orientations. The ToF-SIMS data provided a clear differentiation between the two samples due to the intensity differences of secondary ions originating from asymmetrically located amino acids in HuLys Fv (histidine: 81, 82, and 110 m/z; phenylalanine: 120 and 131 m/z). An intensity ratio of the secondary ion peaks from the histidine and phenylalanine residues at either end of the protein was then calculated directly from the ToF-SIMS data. The 45% change in this ratio, observed between the NTA and MEG substrates with similar HuLys Fv surface coverages, indicates that the HuLys Fv fragment has opposite orientations on two different surfaces.

  11. Grcarma: A fully automated task-oriented interface for the analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukos, Panagiotis I; Glykos, Nicholas M

    2013-10-05

    We report the availability of grcarma, a program encoding for a fully automated set of tasks aiming to simplify the analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories of biological macromolecules. It is a cross-platform, Perl/Tk-based front-end to the program carma and is designed to facilitate the needs of the novice as well as those of the expert user, while at the same time maintaining a user-friendly and intuitive design. Particular emphasis was given to the automation of several tedious tasks, such as extraction of clusters of structures based on dihedral and Cartesian principal component analysis, secondary structure analysis, calculation and display of root-meansquare deviation (RMSD) matrices, calculation of entropy, calculation and analysis of variance–covariance matrices, calculation of the fraction of native contacts, etc. The program is free-open source software available immediately for download.

  12. Discrete dynamic system oriented on the formation of prebiotic dipeptides from Rode's experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This work attempts to rationalize the possible prebiotic profile of the first dipeptides of about 4 billion years ago based on a computational discrete dynamic system that uses the final yields of the dipeptides obtained in Rode's experiments of salt-induced peptide formation (Rode et al., 1999, Peptides 20: 773-786). The system built a prebiotic scenario that allowed us to observe that (i) the primordial peptide generation was strongly affected by the abundances of the amino acid monomers, (ii) small variations in the concentration of the monomers have almost no effect on the final distribution pattern of the dipeptides and (iii) the most plausible chemical reaction of prebiotic peptide bond formation can be linked to Rode's hypothesis of a salt-induced scenario. The results of our computational simulations were related to former simulations of the Miller, and Fox & Harada experiments on amino acid monomer and oligomer generation, respectively, offering additional information to our approach.

  13. Limitless capacity: A dynamic object-oriented approach to short-term memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill eMacken

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The notion of capacity-limited processing systems is a core element of cognitive accounts of limited and variable performance, enshrined within the short-term memory construct. We begin with a detailed critical analysis of the conceptual bases of this view and argue that there are fundamental problems – ones that go to the heart of cognitivism more generally – that render it untenable. In place of limited capacity systems, we propose a framework for explaining performance that focuses on the dynamic interplay of three aspects of any given setting: the particular task that must be accomplished, the nature and form of the material upon which the task must be performed, and the repertoire of skills and perceptual-motor functions possessed by the participant. We provide empirical examples of the applications of this framework in areas of performance typically accounted for by reference to capacity-limited short-term memory processes.

  14. Limitless capacity: a dynamic object-oriented approach to short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, Bill; Taylor, John; Jones, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    The notion of capacity-limited processing systems is a core element of cognitive accounts of limited and variable performance, enshrined within the short-term memory construct. We begin with a detailed critical analysis of the conceptual bases of this view and argue that there are fundamental problems - ones that go to the heart of cognitivism more generally - that render it untenable. In place of limited capacity systems, we propose a framework for explaining performance that focuses on the dynamic interplay of three aspects of any given setting: the particular task that must be accomplished, the nature and form of the material upon which the task must be performed, and the repertoire of skills and perceptual-motor functions possessed by the participant. We provide empirical examples of the applications of this framework in areas of performance typically accounted for by reference to capacity-limited short-term memory processes.

  15. Measuring orientation of human body segments using miniature gyroscopes and accelerometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinge, H.J.; Veltink, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    In the medical field, there is a need for small ambulatory sensor systems for measuring the kinematics of body segments. Current methods for ambulatory measurement of body orientation have limited accuracy when the body moves. The aim of the paper was to develop and validate a method for accurate me

  16. Computational study on the interactions and orientation of monoclonal human immunoglobulin G on a polystyrene surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javkhlantugs, Namsrai; Bayar, Hexig; Ganzorig, Chimed; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Having a theoretical understanding of the orientation of immunoglobulin on an immobilized solid surface is important in biomedical pathogen-detecting systems and cellular analysis. Despite the stable adsorption of immunoglobulin on a polystyrene (PS) surface that has been applied in many kinds of immunoassays, there are many uncertainties in antibody-based clinical and biological experimental methods. To understand the binding mechanism and physicochemical interactions between immunoglobulin and the PS surface at the atomic level, we investigated the binding behavior and interactions of the monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) on the PS surface using the computational method. In our docking simulation with the different arrangement of translational and rotational orientation of IgG onto the PS surface, three typical orientation patterns of the immunoglobulin G on the PS surface were found. We precisely analyzed these orientation patterns and clarified how the immunoglobulin G interacts with the PS surface at atomic scale in the beginning of the adsorption process. Major driving forces for the adsorption of IgG onto the PS surface come from serine (Ser), aspartic acid (Asp), and glutamic acid (Glu) residues. PMID:23874096

  17. Measuring orientation of human body segments using miniature gyroscopes and accelerometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinge, Hendrik J.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2005-01-01

    In the medical field, there is a need for small ambulatory sensor systems for measuring the kinematics of body segments. Current methods for ambulatory measurement of body orientation have limited accuracy when the body moves. The aim of the paper was to develop and validate a method for accurate

  18. Sexual differentiation of the human brain in relation to gender identity and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivanka; Garcia-Falgueras, Alicia; Swaab, Dick F

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that during the intrauterine period the fetal brain develops in the male direction through a direct action of testosterone on the developing nerve cells, or in the female direction through the absence of this hormone surge. According to this concept, our gender identity (the conviction of belonging to the male or female gender) and sexual orientation should be programmed into our brain structures when we are still in the womb. However, since sexual differentiation of the genitals takes place in the first two months of pregnancy and sexual differentiation of the brain starts in the second half of pregnancy, these two processes can be influenced independently, which may result in transsexuality. This also means that in the event of ambiguous sex at birth, the degree of masculinization of the genitals may not reflect the degree of masculinization of the brain. There is no proof that social environment after birth has an effect on gender identity or sexual orientation. Data on genetic and hormone independent influence on gender identity are presently divergent and do not provide convincing information about the underlying etiology. To what extent fetal programming may determine sexual orientation is also a matter of discussion. A number of studies show patterns of sex atypical cerebral dimorphism in homosexual subjects. Although the crucial question, namely how such complex functions as sexual orientation and identity are processed in the brain remains unanswered, emerging data point at a key role of specific neuronal circuits involving the hypothalamus.

  19. ORIENTATIONAL MICRO-RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY ON HYDROXYAPATITE SINGLE-CRYSTALS AND HUMAN ENAMEL CRYSTALLITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TSUDA, H; ARENDS, J

    1994-01-01

    Single crystals of synthetic hydroxyapatite have been examined by orientational micro-Raman spectroscopy. The observed Raman bands include the PO43-/OH- internal and external. modes over the spectral range from 180 to 3600 cm(-1). The Raman-active symmetry tensors (A, E(1), and E(2)) of crystal-clas

  20. Emotional Contagion and Proto-Organizing in Human Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hazy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper combines the complexity notions of phase transitions and tipping points with recent advances in cognitive neuroscience to propose a general theory of human proto-organizing. It takes as a premise that a necessary prerequisite for organizing, or proto-organizing, occurs through emotional contagion in subpopulations of human interaction dynamics in complex ecosystems. Emotional contagion is posited to engender emotional understanding and identification with others, a social process that acts as a mechanism that enables (or precludes cooperative responses to opportunities and risks. Propositions are offered and further research is suggested.

  1. Critical dynamics on a large human Open Connectome network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ódor, Géza

    2016-12-01

    Extended numerical simulations of threshold models have been performed on a human brain network with N =836 733 connected nodes available from the Open Connectome Project. While in the case of simple threshold models a sharp discontinuous phase transition without any critical dynamics arises, variable threshold models exhibit extended power-law scaling regions. This is attributed to fact that Griffiths effects, stemming from the topological or interaction heterogeneity of the network, can become relevant if the input sensitivity of nodes is equalized. I have studied the effects of link directness, as well as the consequence of inhibitory connections. Nonuniversal power-law avalanche size and time distributions have been found with exponents agreeing with the values obtained in electrode experiments of the human brain. The dynamical critical region occurs in an extended control parameter space without the assumption of self-organized criticality.

  2. Dynamic material properties of the pregnant human uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoogian, Sarah J; Bisplinghoff, Jill A; Kemper, Andrew R; Duma, Stefan M

    2012-06-01

    Given that automobile crashes are the largest single cause of death for pregnant females, scientists are developing advanced computer models of pregnant occupants. The purpose of this study is to quantify the dynamic material properties of the human uterus in order to increase the biofidelity of these models. A total of 19 dynamic tension tests were performed on pregnant human uterus tissues taken from six separate donors. The tissues were collected during full term Cesarean style deliveries and tested within 36 h of surgery. The tissues were processed into uniform coupon sections and tested at 1.5 strains/s using linear motors. Local stress and strain were determined from load data and optical markers using high speed video. The experiments resulted in a non-linear stress versus strain curves with an overall average peak failure true strain of 0.32±0.112 and a corresponding peak failure true stress of 656.3±483.9 kPa. These are the first data available for the dynamic response of pregnant human uterus tissues, and it is anticipated they will increase the accuracy of future pregnant female computational models.

  3. Multi-dimensional dynamics of human electromagnetic brain activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo eKida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency, which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  4. Multi-Dimensional Dynamics of Human Electromagnetic Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency), which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory) analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  5. Dynamic Task Performance, Cohesion, and Communications in Human Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Luis Felipe; Passino, Kevin M

    2016-10-01

    In the study of the behavior of human groups, it has been observed that there is a strong interaction between the cohesiveness of the group, its performance when the group has to solve a task, and the patterns of communication between the members of the group. Developing mathematical and computational tools for the analysis and design of task-solving groups that are not only cohesive but also perform well is of importance in social sciences, organizational management, and engineering. In this paper, we model a human group as a dynamical system whose behavior is driven by a task optimization process and the interaction between subsystems that represent the members of the group interconnected according to a given communication network. These interactions are described as attractions and repulsions among members. We show that the dynamics characterized by the proposed mathematical model are qualitatively consistent with those observed in real-human groups, where the key aspect is that the attraction patterns in the group and the commitment to solve the task are not static but change over time. Through a theoretical analysis of the system we provide conditions on the parameters that allow the group to have cohesive behaviors, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to study group dynamics for different sets of parameters, communication topologies, and tasks to solve.

  6. Weblog patterns and human dynamics with decreasing interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.-L.; Fan, C.; Guo, Z.-H.

    2011-06-01

    In order to describe the phenomenon that people's interest in doing something always keep high in the beginning while gradually decreases until reaching the balance, a model which describes the attenuation of interest is proposed to reflect the fact that people's interest becomes more stable after a long time. We give a rigorous analysis on this model by non-homogeneous Poisson processes. Our analysis indicates that the interval distribution of arrival-time is a mixed distribution with exponential and power-law feature, which is a power law with an exponential cutoff. After that, we collect blogs in ScienceNet.cn and carry on empirical study on the interarrival time distribution. The empirical results agree well with the theoretical analysis, obeying a special power law with the exponential cutoff, that is, a special kind of Gamma distribution. These empirical results verify the model by providing an evidence for a new class of phenomena in human dynamics. It can be concluded that besides power-law distributions, there are other distributions in human dynamics. These findings demonstrate the variety of human behavior dynamics.

  7. Oriented immobilized anti-LDL antibody carrying poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) cryogel for cholesterol removal from human plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereli, Nilay [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Sener, Guelsu [Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Yavuz, Handan, E-mail: handany@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-07-20

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a major ingredient of the plaque that collects in the coronary arteries and causes coronary heart diseases. Among the methods used for the extracorporeal elimination of LDL from intravasal volume, immunoaffinity technique using anti-LDL antibody as a ligand offers superior selectivity and specificity. Proper orientation of the immobilized antibody is the main issue in immunoaffinity techniques. In this study, anti-human {beta}-lipoprotein antibody (anti-LDL antibody) molecules were immobilized and oriented through protein A onto poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) cryogel in order to remove LDL from hypercholesterolemic human plasma. PHEMA cryogel was prepared by free radical polymerization initiated with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED). PHEMA cryogel with a swelling degree of 8.89 g H{sub 2}O/g and 67% macro-porosity was characterized by swelling studies, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and blood compatibility tests. All the clotting times were increased when compared with control plasma. The maximum immobilized anti-LDL antibody amount was 63.2 mg/g in the case of random antibody immobilization and 19.6 mg/g in the case of oriented antibody immobilization (protein A loading was 57.0 mg/g). Random and oriented anti-LDL antibody immobilized PHEMA cryogels adsorbed 111 and 129 mg LDL/g cryogel from hypercholesterolemic human plasma, respectively. Up to 80% of the adsorbed LDL was desorbed. The adsorption-desorption cycle was repeated 6 times using the same cryogel. There was no significant loss of LDL adsorption capacity. - Research highlights: {yields} LDL cholesterol is a risk factor in the development of coronary heart diseases. {yields} Antibodies against LDL are used for the selective extracorporeal removal of LDL. {yields} Protein A is used for the oriented immobilization of anti LDL onto PHEMA cryogel. {yields} PHEMA cryogels are biocompatible, exhibit a low pressure drop, lack diffusion

  8. Constraining the Absolute Orientation of eta Carinae's Binary Orbit: A 3-D Dynamical Model for the Broad [Fe III] Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamical model for the broad [Fe III] emission observed in Eta Carinae using the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). This model is based on full 3-D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's binary colliding winds. Radiative transfer codes are used to generate synthetic spectro-images of [Fe III] emission line structures at various observed orbital phases and STIS slit position angles (PAs). Through a parameter study that varies the orbital inclination i, the PA(theta) that the orbital plane projection of the line-of-sight makes with the apastron side of the semi-major axis, and the PA on the sky of the orbital axis, we are able, for the first time, to tightly constrain the absolute 3-D orientation of the binary orbit. To simultaneously reproduce the blue-shifted emission arcs observed at orbital phase 0.976, STIS slit PA = +38deg, and the temporal variations in emission seen at negative slit PAs, the binary needs to have an i approx. = 130deg to 145deg, Theta approx. = -15deg to +30deg, and an orbital axis projected on the sky at a P A approx. = 302deg to 327deg east of north. This represents a system with an orbital axis that is closely aligned with the inferred polar axis of the Homunculus nebula, in 3-D. The companion star, Eta(sub B), thus orbits clockwise on the sky and is on the observer's side of the system at apastron. This orientation has important implications for theories for the formation of the Homunculus and helps lay the groundwork for orbital modeling to determine the stellar masses.

  9. Reversal Learning in Humans and Gerbils: Dynamic Control Network Facilitates Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jarvers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biologically plausible modeling of behavioral reinforcement learning tasks has seen great improvements over the past decades. Less work has been dedicated to tasks involving contingency reversals, i.e. tasks in which the original behavioral goal is reversed one or multiple times. The ability to adjust to such reversals is a key element of behavioral flexibility. Here, we investigate the neural mechanisms underlying contingency-reversal tasks. We first conduct experiments with humans and gerbils to demonstrate memory effects, including multiple reversals in which subjects (humans and animals show a faster learning rate when a previously learned contingency re-appears. Motivated by recurrent mechanisms of learning and memory for object categories, we propose a network architecture which involves reinforcement learning to steer an orienting system that monitors the success in reward acquisition. We suggest that a model sensory system provides feature representations which are further processed by category-related subnetworks which constitute a neural analog of expert networks. Categories are selected dynamically in a competitive field and predict the expected reward. Learning occurs in sequentialized phases to selectively focus the weight adaptation to synapses in the hierarchical network and modulate their weight changes by a global modulator signal. The orienting subsystem itself learns to bias the competition in the presence of continuous monotonic reward accumulation. In case of sudden changes in the discrepancy of predicted and acquired reward the activated motor category can be switched. We suggest that this subsystem is composed of a hierarchically organized network of dis-inhibitory mechanisms, dubbed a dynamic control network (DCN, which resembles components of the basal ganglia. The DCN selectively activates an expert network, corresponding to the current behavioral strategy. The trace of the accumulated reward is monitored such that

  10. Reversal Learning in Humans and Gerbils: Dynamic Control Network Facilitates Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvers, Christian; Brosch, Tobias; Brechmann, André; Woldeit, Marie L.; Schulz, Andreas L.; Ohl, Frank W.; Lommerzheim, Marcel; Neumann, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Biologically plausible modeling of behavioral reinforcement learning tasks has seen great improvements over the past decades. Less work has been dedicated to tasks involving contingency reversals, i.e., tasks in which the original behavioral goal is reversed one or multiple times. The ability to adjust to such reversals is a key element of behavioral flexibility. Here, we investigate the neural mechanisms underlying contingency-reversal tasks. We first conduct experiments with humans and gerbils to demonstrate memory effects, including multiple reversals in which subjects (humans and animals) show a faster learning rate when a previously learned contingency re-appears. Motivated by recurrent mechanisms of learning and memory for object categories, we propose a network architecture which involves reinforcement learning to steer an orienting system that monitors the success in reward acquisition. We suggest that a model sensory system provides feature representations which are further processed by category-related subnetworks which constitute a neural analog of expert networks. Categories are selected dynamically in a competitive field and predict the expected reward. Learning occurs in sequentialized phases to selectively focus the weight adaptation to synapses in the hierarchical network and modulate their weight changes by a global modulator signal. The orienting subsystem itself learns to bias the competition in the presence of continuous monotonic reward accumulation. In case of sudden changes in the discrepancy of predicted and acquired reward the activated motor category can be switched. We suggest that this subsystem is composed of a hierarchically organized network of dis-inhibitory mechanisms, dubbed a dynamic control network (DCN), which resembles components of the basal ganglia. The DCN selectively activates an expert network, corresponding to the current behavioral strategy. The trace of the accumulated reward is monitored such that large sudden

  11. Human dynamics scaling characteristics for aerial inbound logistics operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Guo, Jin-Li

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, the study of power-law scaling characteristics of real-life networks has attracted much interest from scholars; it deviates from the Poisson process. In this paper, we take the whole process of aerial inbound operation in a logistics company as the empirical object. The main aim of this work is to study the statistical scaling characteristics of the task-restricted work patterns. We found that the statistical variables have the scaling characteristics of unimodal distribution with a power-law tail in five statistical distributions - that is to say, there obviously exists a peak in each distribution, the shape of the left part closes to a Poisson distribution, and the right part has a heavy-tailed scaling statistics. Furthermore, to our surprise, there is only one distribution where the right parts can be approximated by the power-law form with exponent α=1.50. Others are bigger than 1.50 (three of four are about 2.50, one of four is about 3.00). We then obtain two inferences based on these empirical results: first, the human behaviors probably both close to the Poisson statistics and power-law distributions on certain levels, and the human-computer interaction behaviors may be the most common in the logistics operational areas, even in the whole task-restricted work pattern areas. Second, the hypothesis in Vázquez et al. (2006) [A. Vázquez, J. G. Oliveira, Z. Dezsö, K.-I. Goh, I. Kondor, A.-L. Barabási. Modeling burst and heavy tails in human dynamics, Phys. Rev. E 73 (2006) 036127] is probably not sufficient; it claimed that human dynamics can be classified as two discrete university classes. There may be a new human dynamics mechanism that is different from the classical Barabási models.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Crystal Orientation and Temperature Influences in the Hardness on Monocrystalline Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A nanoindentation simulation using molecular dynamic (MD method was carried out to investigate the hardness behavior of monocrystalline silicon with a spherical diamond indenter. In this study, Tersoff potential was used to model the interaction of silicon atoms in the specimen, and Morse potential was used to model the interaction between silicon atoms in the specimen and carbon atoms in the indenter. Simulation results indicate that the silicon in the indentation zone undergoes phase transformation from diamond cubic structure to body-centred tetragonal and amorphous structure upon loading of the diamond indenter. After the unloading of the indenter, the crystal lattice reconstructs, and the indented surface with a residual dimple forms due to unrecoverable plastic deformation. Comparison of the hardness of three different crystal surfaces of monocrystalline silicon shows that the (0 0 1 surface behaves the hardest, and the (1 1 1 surface behaves the softest. As for the influence of the indentation temperature, simulation results show that the silicon material softens and adhesiveness of silicon increases at higher indentation temperatures.

  13. A Dynamic Multinode Model for Component-Oriented Thermal Analysis of Flat-Plate Solar Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph N. Reiter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of a flat-plate solar collector was developed on the basis of the physical principles of optics and heat transfer in order to determine collector’s component temperatures as well as collector efficiency. In contrast to many available models, the targeted use of this dynamic model is the detailed, theoretical investigation of the thermal behaviour of newly developed or adjusted collector designs on component level, for example, absorber, casing, or transparent cover. The defined model is based on a multinode network (absorber, fluid, glazing, and backside insulation containing the relevant physical equations to transfer the energy. The heat transfer network covers heat conduction, convection, and radiation. Furthermore, the collector optics is defined for the plane glazing and the absorber surface and also considers interactions between them. The model enables the variation of physical properties considering the geometric parameters and materials. Finally, the model was validated using measurement data and existing efficiency curve models. Both comparisons proved high accuracy of the developed model with deviation of up to 3% in collector efficiency and 1 K in component temperatures.

  14. Business-oriented modeling and Simulation: Dynamic Scorecard method Applied the Formularization of Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Vitor

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to application the “Scorecard Dinâmico” method onstrategic formulation process in a small business. This method incorporate qualitative andsimulation tools from System Dynamics in the strategic map provided by Balanced Scorecardmaking the strategic management flexible in accordance with the organizational realitycomplexity. The research method adopted was the “research-action” and it was possible,with participating observation, the construction of strategic models on interaction with thecompany directors. During this process, it could be assessed organizing points thatinterfering in formulation of strategy of a small business during the research. Through thisprocess, company members mental models were explained in strategic map and qualitativemodels resulting on a simulation tool for control the results and alternative prospection offuture strategies and a higher level of learning organizational. As a result, it could be pointedthe method difficult implantation in virtue of the absence quantitative data and a higherunderstanding by the research participants of the problem resulting from the systemicstructural behavior in the small business.

  15. Two dynamic regimes in the human gut microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, Chris S.; Alm, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiome is a dynamic system that changes with host development, health, behavior, diet, and microbe-microbe interactions. Prior work on gut microbial time series has largely focused on autoregressive models (e.g. Lotka-Volterra). However, we show that most of the variance in microbial time series is non-autoregressive. In addition, we show how community state-clustering is flawed when it comes to characterizing within-host dynamics and that more continuous methods are required. Most organisms exhibited stable, mean-reverting behavior suggestive of fixed carrying capacities and abundant taxa were largely shared across individuals. This mean-reverting behavior allowed us to apply sparse vector autoregression (sVAR)—a multivariate method developed for econometrics—to model the autoregressive component of gut community dynamics. We find a strong phylogenetic signal in the non-autoregressive co-variance from our sVAR model residuals, which suggests niche filtering. We show how changes in diet are also non-autoregressive and that Operational Taxonomic Units strongly correlated with dietary variables have much less of an autoregressive component to their variance, which suggests that diet is a major driver of microbial dynamics. Autoregressive variance appears to be driven by multi-day recovery from frequent facultative anaerobe blooms, which may be driven by fluctuations in luminal redox. Overall, we identify two dynamic regimes within the human gut microbiota: one likely driven by external environmental fluctuations, and the other by internal processes. PMID:28222117

  16. Influence of dynamical equatorial flattening and orientation of a triaxial core on prograde diurnal polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rong; Shen, WenBin

    2016-04-01

    The noise floor of empirical models of diurnal Earth Rotation could reach as low as 1μas as shown by several recent studies. In another aspect, the differences between these empirical models with the theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) for certain diurnal frequencies are more than 10 μas (e.g. K1). The traxiality of the core is ignored in the theoretical model given by IERS Convention (2010) because it is highly uncertain. To explain the difference between the empirical model and theoretical model, we consider the possible influence of a triaxial core. We use the difference between empirical models and theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) as input to invert the traxiality parameter of the core. In the inversion, we assume the ocean tide response obeys the admittance theory. So extra six admittance parameters are introduced to model the difference between smooth responses inferred from empirical models and that given by theoretical model predictions from IERS Convention (2010). The results show that adding core triaxiality into the theoretical model could narrow the difference between empirical model and theoretical model at diurnal frequencies. The residual of amplitude becomes smaller. For a set of tide components consisting of seven diurnal frequencies (Q1, O1, M1, P1, K1, J1, Oo1), the root mean square of the residual of this set have decreased from more than 10μas to 2˜3μas for most of the empirical models. As for the dynamical equatorial flattening of the core, estimates inverted based on different empirical models are consistent within standard deviation. The results also suggest that the principal axes of the triaxial core does not coincidence with the principal axes of the whole Earth. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41504019).

  17. A single theoretical framework for circular features processing in humans: orientation and direction of motion compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvetomir eTzvetanov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Common computational principles underly processing of various visual features in the cortex. They are considered to create similar patterns of contextual modulations in behavioral studies for different features as orientation and direction of motion. Here, I studied the possibility that a single theoretical framework, implemented in different visual areas, of circular feature coding and processing could explain these similarities in observations. Stimuli were created that allowed direct comparison of the contextual effects on orientation and motion direction with two different psychophysical probes: changes in weak and strong signal perception. One unique simplified theoretical model of circular feature coding including only inhibitory interactions, and decoding through standard vector average, successfully predicted the similarities in the two domains, while different feature population characteristics explained well the differences in modulation on both experimental probes. These results demonstrate how a single computational principle underlies processing of various features across the cortices.

  18. Computational study on the interactions and orientation of monoclonal human immunoglobulin G on a polystyrene surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javkhlantugs N

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Namsrai Javkhlantugs,1,2 Hexig Bayar,3 Chimed Ganzorig,1 Kazuyoshi Ueda2 1Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Department of Chemical Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 2Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Japan; 3The Key Laboratory of Mammalian Reproductive Biology and Biotechnology of the Ministry of Education, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China Abstract: Having a theoretical understanding of the orientation of immunoglobulin on an immobilized solid surface is important in biomedical pathogen-detecting systems and cellular analysis. Despite the stable adsorption of immunoglobulin on a polystyrene (PS surface that has been applied in many kinds of immunoassays, there are many uncertainties in antibody-based clinical and biological experimental methods. To understand the binding mechanism and physicochemical interactions between immunoglobulin and the PS surface at the atomic level, we investigated the binding behavior and interactions of the monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG on the PS surface using the computational method. In our docking simulation with the different arrangement of translational and rotational orientation of IgG onto the PS surface, three typical orientation patterns of the immunoglobulin G on the PS surface were found. We precisely analyzed these orientation patterns and clarified how the immunoglobulin G interacts with the PS surface at atomic scale in the beginning of the adsorption process. Major driving forces for the adsorption of IgG onto the PS surface come from serine (Ser, aspartic acid (Asp, and glutamic acid (Glu residues. Keywords: bionano interface, immunoassay, polystyrene, IgG, physical adsorption, simulation

  19. Microfibril orientation dominates the microelastic properties of human bone tissue at the lamellar length scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Granke

    Full Text Available The elastic properties of bone tissue determine the biomechanical behavior of bone at the organ level. It is now widely accepted that the nanoscale structure of bone plays an important role to determine the elastic properties at the tissue level. Hence, in addition to the mineral density, the structure and organization of the mineral nanoparticles and of the collagen microfibrils appear as potential key factors governing the elasticity. Many studies exist on the role of the organization of collagen microfibril and mineral nanocrystals in strongly remodeled bone. However, there is no direct experimental proof to support the theoretical calculations. Here, we provide such evidence through a novel approach combining several high resolution imaging techniques: scanning acoustic microscopy, quantitative scanning small-Angle X-ray scattering imaging and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography. We find that the periodic modulations of elasticity across osteonal bone are essentially determined by the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and to a lesser extent only by the particle size and density. Based on the strong correlation between the orientation of the mineral nanoparticles and the collagen molecules, we conclude that the microfibril orientation is the main determinant of the observed undulations of microelastic properties in regions of constant mineralization in osteonal lamellar bone. This multimodal approach could be applied to a much broader range of fibrous biological materials for the purpose of biomimetic technologies.

  20. A need for orientation: The WMA statement on natural variations of human sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Lieselotte; Mundle, Goetz

    2015-01-01

    An alarming stigmatization and discrimination of homosexual people persists despite the formal depathologization of homosexuality, which occurred through the removal of the diagnosis from the DSM- (1973) and classification from the ICD (1991). The adoption of an expedited Statement on sexual orientation by the majority at the 64th General Assembly of the WMA is therefore an important and overdue measure. The Statement clearly asserts, among other things, that homosexuality is not an illness and therefore requires no cure. It also suggests that direct and indirect discrimination and stigmatization of people due their sexual orientation often leads to psychological and physical illnesses. Furthermore, delegates of the WMA condemned so-called reparative or conversion "therapies", which strive to induce heterosexual or asexual behavior. These are not only ineffective and unethical, but are strongly associated with serious negative impacts on health. Such a statement from the World Medical Association (WMA) is of particular importance as ambivalence and uncertainty in regards to homosexuality exists even within the medical and therapeutic professions. The latent or manifest attribution of homosexuality as an illness or developmental disorder is still widespread. One possible explanation for this may be the disruption of an open and sustainable discourse on causes, effects and definitions of sexual orientation following the "official depathologization". Especially those working in the medical and therapeutic contexts should be aware of their special responsibility not to pathologize homosexuality.

  1. Home-based telecommuting and quality of life: further evidence on an employee-oriented human resource practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Severin; Glaser, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    Building on previous research, further evidence for the potential of home-based telecommuting as an employee-oriented human resource practice is provided from a study in the German public administration. Survey data from 1,008 public employees were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Mean age of the sample was 43.6 yr. (SD = 8.8 yr.), and 27.5% (277) of the participants were women. Analysis supported the roles of higher Autonomy and lower Work-Family Conflict as psychological mediators between Telecommunication Intensity and both Job Satisfaction and Quality of Life. Implications for the design of flexible working arrangements are discussed.

  2. Superresolution imaging captures carbohydrate utilization dynamics in human gut symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S; Cameron, Elizabeth A; Martens, Eric C; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Biteen, Julie S

    2014-11-11

    Gut microbes play a key role in human health and nutrition by catabolizing a wide variety of glycans via enzymatic activities that are not encoded in the human genome. The ability to recognize and process carbohydrates strongly influences the structure of the gut microbial community. While the effects of diet on the microbiota are well documented, little is known about the molecular processes driving metabolism. To provide mechanistic insight into carbohydrate catabolism in gut symbionts, we studied starch processing in real time in the model Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron starch utilization system (Sus) by single-molecule fluorescence. Although previous studies have explored Sus protein structure and function, the transient interactions, assembly, and collaboration of these outer membrane proteins have not yet been elucidated in live cells. Our live-cell superresolution imaging reveals that the polymeric starch substrate dynamically recruits Sus proteins, serving as an external scaffold for bacterial membrane assembly of the Sus complex, which may promote efficient capturing and degradation of starch. Furthermore, by simultaneously localizing multiple Sus outer membrane proteins on the B. thetaiotaomicron cell surface, we have characterized the dynamics and stoichiometry of starch-induced Sus complex assembly on the molecular scale. Finally, based on Sus protein knockout strains, we have discerned the mechanism of starch-induced Sus complex assembly in live anaerobic cells with nanometer-scale resolution. Our insights into the starch-induced outer membrane protein assembly central to this conserved nutrient uptake mechanism pave the way for the development of dietary or pharmaceutical therapies to control Bacteroidetes in the intestinal tract to enhance human health and treat disease. In this study, we used nanometer-scale superresolution imaging to reveal dynamic interactions between the proteins involved in starch processing by the prominent human gut symbiont

  3. Impact of Sensor Misplacement on Dynamic Time Warping Based Human Activity Recognition using Wearable Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Nimish; Lee, Jaeseong; Lotfian, Reza; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2012-10-01

    Daily living activity monitoring is important for early detection of the onset of many diseases and for improving quality of life especially in elderly. A wireless wearable network of inertial sensor nodes can be used to observe daily motions. Continuous stream of data generated by these sensor networks can be used to recognize the movements of interest. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) is a widely used signal processing method for time-series pattern matching because of its robustness to variations in time and speed as opposed to other template matching methods. Despite this flexibility, for the application of activity recognition, DTW can only find the similarity between the template of a movement and the incoming samples, when the location and orientation of the sensor remains unchanged. Due to this restriction, small sensor misplacements can lead to a decrease in the classification accuracy. In this work, we adopt DTW distance as a feature for real-time detection of human daily activities like sit to stand in the presence of sensor misplacement. To measure this performance of DTW, we need to create a large number of sensor configurations while the sensors are rotated or misplaced. Creating a large number of closely spaced sensors is impractical. To address this problem, we use the marker based optical motion capture system and generate simulated inertial sensor data for different locations and orientations on the body. We study the performance of the DTW under these conditions to determine the worst-case sensor location variations that the algorithm can accommodate.

  4. Authoritarian dynamics and unethical decision making: high social dominance orientation leaders and high right-wing authoritarianism followers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son Hing, Leanne S; Bobocel, D Ramona; Zanna, Mark P; McBride, Maxine V

    2007-01-01

    When dilemmas require trade-offs between profits and ethics, do leaders high in social dominance orientation (SDO) and followers high in right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) make decisions that are more unethical than those made by others? This issue was explored in 4 studies with female participants performing managerial role-playing tasks. First, dyads comprising a person who was either low or high in SDO and a person who was either low or high in RWA negotiated for a leadership position. People high in SDO were more likely to obtain leader positions than to obtain follower positions. No other effects were significant. Second, leaders high in SDO partnered with an agreeable (confederate) follower made decisions that were more unethical than those of leaders low in SDO. Third, followers high in RWA were more acquiescent to and supportive of an unethical (confederate) leader than were followers low in RWA. Fourth, high SDO leader-high RWA follower dyads made decisions that were more unethical than those made in role-reversed dyads because leaders had more influence. Implications of these results for conceptualizing SDO, RWA, and authoritarian dynamics are discussed.

  5. Geophysical astrophysical spectral-element adaptive refinement (GASpAR): Object-oriented h-adaptive fluid dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Duane; Fournier, Aimé; Fischer, Paul; Pouquet, Annick

    2006-06-01

    An object-oriented geophysical and astrophysical spectral-element adaptive refinement (GASpAR) code is introduced. Like most spectral-element codes, GASpAR combines finite-element efficiency with spectral-method accuracy. It is also designed to be flexible enough for a range of geophysics and astrophysics applications where turbulence or other complex multiscale problems arise. The formalism accommodates both conforming and non-conforming elements. Several aspects of this code derive from existing methods, but here are synthesized into a new formulation of dynamic adaptive refinement (DARe) of non-conforming h-type. As a demonstration of the code, several new 2D test cases are introduced that have time-dependent analytic solutions and exhibit localized flow features, including the 2D Burgers equation with straight, curved-radial and oblique-colliding fronts. These are proposed as standard test problems for comparable DARe codes. Quantitative errors are reported for 2D spatial and temporal convergence of DARe.

  6. Dynamic Stability Improvement of Grid Connected DFIG Using Enhanced Field Oriented Control Technique for High Voltage Ride Through

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Ananth Duggirala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doubly fed induction generator (DFIG is a better alternative to increased power demand. Modern grid regulations force DFIG to operate without losing synchronism during overvoltages called high voltage ride through (HVRT during grid faults. Enhanced field oriented control technique (EFOC was proposed in Rotor Side Control of DFIG converter to improve power flow transfer and to improve dynamic and transient stability. Further electromagnetic oscillations are damped, improved voltage mitigation and limit surge currents for sustained operation of DFIG during voltage swells. The proposed strategy has advantages such as improved reactive power control, better damping of electromagnetic torque oscillations, and improved continuity of voltage and current from stator and rotor to grid during disturbance. In EFOC technique, rotor flux reference changes its value from synchronous speed to zero during fault for injecting current at the rotor slip frequency. In this process, DC-Offset component of stator flux is controlled so that decomposition during overvoltage faults can be minimized. The offset decomposition of flux will be oscillatory in a conventional FOC, whereas in EFOC it is aimed to be quick damping. The system performance with overvoltage of 1.3 times, 1.62 times, and 2 times the rated voltage occurring is analyzed by using simulation studies.

  7. Constraining the Absolute Orientation of Eta Carinae's Binary Orbit: A 3-D Dynamical Model for the Broad [Fe III] Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P; Groh, Jose H; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Russell, Christopher M P

    2011-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamical model for the broad [Fe III] emission observed in Eta Carinae using the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). This model is based on full 3-D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's binary colliding winds. Radiative transfer codes are used to generate synthetic spectro-images of [Fe III] emission line structures at various observed orbital phases and STIS slit position angles (PAs). Through a parameter study that varies the orbital inclination i, the PA {\\theta} that the orbital plane projection of the line-of-sight makes with the apastron side of the semi-major axis, and the PA on the sky of the orbital axis, we are able, for the first time, to tightly constrain the absolute 3-D orientation of the binary orbit. To simultaneously reproduce the blue-shifted emission arcs observed at orbital phase 0.976, STIS slit PA = +38 degrees, and the temporal variations in emission seen at negative slit PAs, the binary ...

  8. Tele-operated search robot for human detection using histogram of oriented objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Febus Reidj G.; Avendaño, Glenn O.; Manlises, Cyrel O.; Avellanosa, James Jason G.; Abina, Jyacinth Camille F.; Masaquel, Albert M.; Siapno, Michael Lance O.; Chung, Wen-Yaw

    2017-02-01

    Disasters such as typhoons, tornadoes, and earthquakes are inevitable. Aftermaths of these disasters include the missing people. Using robots with human detection capabilities to locate the missing people, can dramatically reduce the harm and risk to those who work in such circumstances. This study aims to: design and build a tele-operated robot; implement in MATLAB an algorithm for the detection of humans; and create a database of human identification based on various positions, angles, light intensity, as well as distances from which humans will be identified. Different light intensities were made by using Photoshop to simulate smoke, dust and water drops conditions. After processing the image, the system can indicate either a human is detected or not detected. Testing with bodies covered was also conducted to test the algorithm's robustness. Based on the results, the algorithm can detect humans with full body shown. For upright and lying positions, detection can happen from 8 feet to 20 feet. For sitting position, detection can happen from 2 feet to 20 feet with slight variances in results because of different lighting conditions. The distances greater than 20 feet, no humans can be processed or false negatives can occur. For bodies covered, the algorithm can detect humans in cases made under given circumstances. On three positions, humans can be detected from 0 degrees to 180 degrees under normal, with smoke, with dust, and with water droplet conditions. This study was able to design and build a tele-operated robot with MATLAB algorithm that can detect humans with an overall precision of 88.30%, from which a database was created for human identification based on various conditions, where humans will be identified.

  9. Picosecond to Millisecond Structural Dynamics in Human Ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Maragakis, Paul; Piana, Stefano; Shaw, David E

    2016-08-25

    Human ubiquitin has been extensively characterized using a variety of experimental and computational methods and has become an important model for studying protein dynamics. Nevertheless, it has proven difficult to characterize the microsecond time scale dynamics of this protein with atomistic resolution. Here we use an unbiased computer simulation to describe the structural dynamics of ubiquitin on the picosecond to millisecond time scale. In the simulation, ubiquitin interconverts between a small number of distinct states on the microsecond to millisecond time scale. We find that the conformations visited by free ubiquitin in solution are very similar to those found various crystal structures of ubiquitin in complex with other proteins, a finding in line with previous experimental studies. We also observe weak but statistically significant correlated motions throughout the protein, including long-range concerted movement across the entire β sheet, consistent with recent experimental observations. We expect that the detailed atomistic description of ubiquitin dynamics provided by this unbiased simulation may be useful in interpreting current and future experiments on this protein.

  10. Relative Orientation and Position Detections Based on an RGB-D Sensor and Dynamic Cooperation Strategies for Jumping Sensor Nodes Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents relative orientation and position detection methods for jumping sensor nodes (JSNs) recycling. The methods are based on motion captures of the JSNs by an RGB-D sensor mounted on a carrier robot and the dynamic cooperation between the carrier and the JSNs. A disc-like label with two different colored sides is mounted on the top of the JSNs. The RGB-D sensor can detect the motion of the label to calculate the orientations and positions of the JSNs and the carrier relative to...

  11. Dynamic simulation of universal spacer in Dynesys dynamic stabilization system for human vertebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Min KIM; In-Chul YANG; Seung-Yeol LEE; Sung-Youn CHO

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the simulated behavior of universal spacer in Dynesys dynamic stabilization system inserted in human vertebra. Dynesys, so-called "Dynamic neutralization system for the spine", dynamic stabilization system is a new concept in the surgical treatment of lower back pain recently. Universal spacer used as flexible material is to stabilize the spine and the material property of universal spacer is polycarbonate urethane. Universal spacer may apply different kinematic behaviors at implanted level in vertebra. Spinal range of motion(SROM) of inter-vertebra with installed Dynesys dynamic stabilization system was studied using Adams+LifeMOD as simulation software package. The vertebra model was set up to closely resemble the in-vivo conditions. Inter-vertebra rotations were measured by post processor of Adams and compared with the intact values. SROMs of the flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation of human virtual models were measured, where three spinal fixation systems such as rigid system, Dynesys system, and fused system were installed. As a result, the value of SROM is decreased in flexion-extension and lateral bending when the spinal fixation system is implanted. The movement of Dynesys system is similar to that of intact model by allowing the movement of lumbar. This means that the Dynesys system is proved to be safe and effective in the treatment of unstable spinal condition.

  12. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  13. Transcriptome dynamics during human erythroid differentiation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yadong; Wang, Hai; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Qu, Hongzhu; Zhang, Zhaojun; Xiong, Qian; Qi, Heyuan; Cui, Peng; Lin, Qiang; Ruan, Xiuyan; Yang, Yaran; Li, Yajuan; Shu, Chang; Li, Quanzhen; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Jiangwei; Hu, Songnian; Fang, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms controlling erythroid differentiation and development, we analyzed the genome-wide transcription dynamics occurring during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) into the erythroid lineage and development of embryonic to adult erythropoiesis using high throughput sequencing technology. HESCs and erythroid cells at three developmental stages: ESER (embryonic), FLER (fetal), and PBER (adult) were analyzed. Our findings revealed that the number of expressed genes decreased during differentiation, whereas the total expression intensity increased. At each of the three transitions (HESCs-ESERs, ESERs-FLERs, and FLERs-PBERs), many differentially expressed genes were observed, which were involved in maintaining pluripotency, early erythroid specification, rapid cell growth, and cell-cell adhesion and interaction. We also discovered dynamic networks and their central nodes in each transition. Our study provides a fundamental basis for further investigation of erythroid differentiation and development, and has implications in using ESERs for transfusion product in clinical settings.

  14. Human Dynamics: The Correspondence Patterns of Darwin and Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, J G

    2005-01-01

    While living in different historical era, Charles Darwin (1809-1882) and Albert Einstein (1879-1955) were both prolific correspondents: Darwin sent (received) at least 7,591 (6,530) letters during his lifetime while Einstein sent (received) over 14,500 (16,200). Before email scientists were part of an extensive university of letters, the main venue for exchanging new ideas and results. But were the communication patterns of the pre-email times any different from the current era of instant access? Here we show that while the means have changed, the communication dynamics has not: Darwin's and Einstein's pattern of correspondence and today's electronic exchanges follow the same scaling laws. Their communication belongs, however, to a different universality class from email communication, providing evidence for a new class of phenomena capturing human dynamics.

  15. Monitoring RNA release from human rhinovirus by dynamic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Zhu, Rong; Moser, Rosita; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Human rhinoviruses were imaged under physiological conditions by dynamic force microscopy. Topographical images revealed various polygonal areas on the surfaces of the 30-nm viral particles. RNA release was initiated by exposure to a low-pH buffer. The lengths of the RNAs that were released but still connected to the virus capsid varied between 40 and 330 nm, whereas RNA molecules that were completely released from the virus were observed with lengths up to 1 micro m. Fork-like structure elements with 30-nm extensions were sometimes resolved at one end of the RNA molecules. They possibly correspond to the characteristic multi-stem-loop conformation, the internal ribosomal entry site, located at the 5' region of the genome. This study demonstrates that dynamic force microscopy can be used to study viral RNA release in situ under physiological conditions.

  16. Human-like Three-dimensional Walking with Natural Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Natural dynamics can be exploited in the control of biped walking robots: the swing leg can swing passively, the compliant ankle can naturally transfer the center of pressure along the foot and help in toe off.These mechanisms simplify control and result in motion that is smooth and natural looking.Imitated human being's behavior, we presented a control strategy for HIT-III biped robot, in which active and passive motions were combined.The experiment result shows that robot walked at a faster speed (approximately 0.25m/s) than previous and had a natural and smooth looking gait.

  17. Sampling Based Trajectory Planning for Robots in Dynamic Human Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Open-ended human environments, such as pedestrian streets, hospital corridors, train stations etc., are places where robots start to emerge. Hence, being able to plan safe and natural trajectories in these dynamic environments is an important skill for future generations of robots. In this work...... method for selecting the best trajectory in the RRT, according to the cost of traversing a potential field. Furthermore the RRT expansion is enhanced to direct the search and account for the kinodynamic robot constraints. A model predictive control (MPC) approach is taken to accommodate...

  18. Dynamic stability of locomotor respiratory coupling during cycling in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, Sébastien; Casties, Jean-François; Mottet, Denis

    2005-08-05

    We explored the locomotor respiratory coupling (LRC) during a 50-min constant-load submaximal cycling exercise. A 4-week recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) treatment improved participants' aerobic capabilities, but did not elicit significant changes in LRC. The distributions of the respiratory frequency over pedalling frequency ratios were systematically bimodal, with a preferred use of 1/3 and 1/2, and a progressive shift of the higher mode from 1/3 towards 1/2 with exercise duration. These results are interpreted in the framework of the sine circle map as the result of coordination dynamics between the physiological subsystems involved in the breathing pedalling cooperation.

  19. Large-scale hydropower system optimization using dynamic programming and object-oriented programming: the case of the Northeast China Power Grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Shan; Ji, Chang-Ming; Wang, Ai-Jing; Lund, Jay R

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines long-term optimal operation using dynamic programming for a large hydropower system of 10 reservoirs in Northeast China. Besides considering flow and hydraulic head, the optimization explicitly includes time-varying electricity market prices to maximize benefit. Two techniques are used to reduce the 'curse of dimensionality' of dynamic programming with many reservoirs. Discrete differential dynamic programming (DDDP) reduces the search space and computer memory needed. Object-oriented programming (OOP) and the ability to dynamically allocate and release memory with the C++ language greatly reduces the cumulative effect of computer memory for solving multi-dimensional dynamic programming models. The case study shows that the model can reduce the 'curse of dimensionality' and achieve satisfactory results.

  20. Human Machine Interaction by Simulation of Dynamics of Construction Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Thomas Heegaard

    This industrial Ph.D. project concerns whole-body vibrations in human operated construction machinery. The emissions of these vibrations is closely related to the subjective experience of comfort and in some cases these vibrations can occur in a level which can cause the operator back disorders...... on long term basis. Whole-body vibrations are potential damaging for the human operator in a frequency range for which the dynamics of the machines are dominated by the inputs of the operator. The objective of this project is to reduce the amount of potential damaging wholebody vibrations for two...... different kinds of machinery; an articulated backhoe loader and an articulated dump truck. In this work a standardized procedure containing a set of duty cycles for measuring and declaring whole-body vibrations has been proposed for both of these machines. The result of the measuring is important...

  1. Time-varying priority queuing models for human dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Pan, Raj Kumar; Kaski, Kimmo

    2012-06-01

    Queuing models provide insight into the temporal inhomogeneity of human dynamics, characterized by the broad distribution of waiting times of individuals performing tasks. We theoretically study the queuing model of an agent trying to execute a task of interest, the priority of which may vary with time due to the agent's "state of mind." However, its execution is disrupted by other tasks of random priorities. By considering the priority of the task of interest either decreasing or increasing algebraically in time, we analytically obtain and numerically confirm the bimodal and unimodal waiting time distributions with power-law decaying tails, respectively. These results are also compared to the updating time distribution of papers in arXiv.org and the processing time distribution of papers in Physical Review journals. Our analysis helps to understand human task execution in a more realistic scenario.

  2. Dynamics of energy harvesting backpack with human being interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Zuo, Lei

    2016-04-01

    In last ten years, a lot of researchers have begun to look into obtaining electricity from the movement between human and their backpack that occurs during walking. In this paper, an innovative, elastically-suspended backpack with mechanical motion rectifier (MMR) based energy harvester is developed to generate electricity with high efficiency and reliability. Up to 28 Watts peak electrical power can be produced by the MMR based backpack energy harvester. A dynamic model for the system is presented along with experimental results. Three dual mass models for different distinct harvesters: pure viscous, non MMR, and MMR, are proposed, and a comparison in the output power and human comfort between the three models is discussed.

  3. Time-Varying Priority Queuing Models for Human Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kaski, Kimmo

    2011-01-01

    Queuing models provide insight into the temporal inhomogeneity of human dynamics, characterized by the broad distribution of waiting times of individuals performing tasks. We study the queuing model of an agent trying to execute a task of interest, the priority of which may vary with time due to the agent's "state of mind." However, its execution can be disrupted by other tasks of random priorities. By considering the priority of the task of interest either decreasing or increasing algebraically in time, we analytically obtain and numerically confirm the bimodal and unimodal waiting time distributions with power-law decaying tails, respectively. These results are also compared to the updating time distribution of papers in the arXiv and the processing time distribution of papers in Physical Review journals. Our analysis helps to understand the human task execution behavior in a more realistic scenario.

  4. Understanding the Heavy Tailed Dynamics in Human Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Gordon J

    2015-01-01

    The recent availability of electronic datasets containing large volumes of communication data has made it possible to study human behavior on a larger scale than ever before. From this, it has been discovered that across a diverse range of data sets, the inter-event times between consecutive communication events obey heavy tailed power law dynamics. Explaining this has proved controversial, and two distinct hypotheses have emerged. The first holds that these power laws are fundamental, and arise from the mechanisms such as priority queuing that humans use to schedule tasks. The second holds that they are a statistical artifact which only occur in aggregated data when features such as circadian rhythms and burstiness are ignored. We use a large social media data set to test these hypotheses, and find that although models that incorporate circadian rhythms and burstiness do explain part of the observed heavy tails, there is residual unexplained heavy tail behavior which suggests a more fundamental cause. Based ...

  5. Using virtual human for an interactive customer-oriented constrained environment design

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Liang; Chablat, Damien; Bennis, Fouad

    2010-01-01

    For industrial product design, it is very important to take into account assembly/disassembly and maintenance operations during the conceptual and prototype design stage. For these operations or other similar operations in a constrained environment, trajectory planning is always a critical and difficult issue for evaluating the design or for the users' convenience. In this paper, a customer-oriented approach is proposed to partially solve ergonomic issues encountered during the design stage of a constrained environment. A single objective optimization based method is taken from the literature to generate the trajectory in a constrained environment automatically. A motion capture based method assists to guide the trajectory planning interactively if a local minimum is encountered within the single objective optimization. At last, a multi-objective evaluation method is proposed to evaluate the operations generated by the algorithm

  6. Jointly Learning Multiple Sequential Dynamics for Human Action Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-An Liu

    Full Text Available Discovering visual dynamics during human actions is a challenging task for human action recognition. To deal with this problem, we theoretically propose the multi-task conditional random fields model and explore its application on human action recognition. For visual representation, we propose the part-induced spatiotemporal action unit sequence to represent each action sample with multiple partwise sequential feature subspaces. For model learning, we propose the multi-task conditional random fields (MTCRFs model to discover the sequence-specific structure and the sequence-shared relationship. Specifically, the multi-chain graph structure and the corresponding probabilistic model are designed to represent the interaction among multiple part-induced action unit sequences. Moreover we propose the model learning and inference methods to discover temporal context within individual action unit sequence and the latent correlation among different body parts. Extensive experiments are implemented to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method on two popular RGB human action datasets, KTH & TJU, and the depth dataset in MSR Daily Activity 3D.

  7. Understanding the heavy-tailed dynamics in human behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Gordon J.; Jones, Tim

    2015-06-01

    The recent availability of electronic data sets containing large volumes of communication data has made it possible to study human behavior on a larger scale than ever before. From this, it has been discovered that across a diverse range of data sets, the interevent times between consecutive communication events obey heavy-tailed power law dynamics. Explaining this has proved controversial, and two distinct hypotheses have emerged. The first holds that these power laws are fundamental, and arise from the mechanisms such as priority queuing that humans use to schedule tasks. The second holds that they are statistical artifacts which only occur in aggregated data when features such as circadian rhythms and burstiness are ignored. We use a large social media data set to test these hypotheses, and find that although models that incorporate circadian rhythms and burstiness do explain part of the observed heavy tails, there is residual unexplained heavy-tail behavior which suggests a more fundamental cause. Based on this, we develop a quantitative model of human behavior which improves on existing approaches and gives insight into the mechanisms underlying human interactions.

  8. Integrating digital human modeling into virtual environment for ergonomic oriented design

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Liang; Bennis, Fouad; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Virtual human simulation integrated into virtual reality applications is mainly used for virtual representation of the user in virtual environment or for interactions between the user and the virtual avatar for cognitive tasks. In this paper, in order to prevent musculoskeletal disorders, the integration of virtual human simulation and VR application is presented to facilitate physical ergonomic evaluation, especially for physical fatigue evaluation of a given population. Immersive working environments are created to avoid expensive physical mock-up in conventional evaluation methods. Peripheral motion capture systems are used to capture natural movements and then to simulate the physical operations in virtual human simulation. Physical aspects of human's movement are then analyzed to determine the effort level of each key joint using inverse kinematics. The physical fatigue level of each joint is further analyzed by integrating a fatigue and recovery model on the basis of physical task parameters. All the pr...

  9. Inciting the Metric Oriented Humanist: Teaching Bibliometrics in a Faculty of Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuccala, Alesia Ann

    2016-01-01

    principles and practices associated with teaching bibliometrics to humanists, with the aim of encouraging students to reflect upon new indicators relevant to scholarly research outputs across the humanities. Emphasis is placed on the “biblio” in bibliometrics (i.e., books), digital record-keeping across...... the humanities, the work of humanists who have sought to explain the development of new knowledge through objective pattern-seeking, and the complementary value of alternative versus traditional indicators of scholarly research performance....

  10. A Dynamic Approach to Modeling Dependence Between Human Failure Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    In practice, most HRA methods use direct dependence from THERP—the notion that error be- gets error, and one human failure event (HFE) may increase the likelihood of subsequent HFEs. In this paper, we approach dependence from a simulation perspective in which the effects of human errors are dynamically modeled. There are three key concepts that play into this modeling: (1) Errors are driven by performance shaping factors (PSFs). In this context, the error propagation is not a result of the presence of an HFE yielding overall increases in subsequent HFEs. Rather, it is shared PSFs that cause dependence. (2) PSFs have qualities of lag and latency. These two qualities are not currently considered in HRA methods that use PSFs. Yet, to model the effects of PSFs, it is not simply a matter of identifying the discrete effects of a particular PSF on performance. The effects of PSFs must be considered temporally, as the PSFs will have a range of effects across the event sequence. (3) Finally, there is the concept of error spilling. When PSFs are activated, they not only have temporal effects but also lateral effects on other PSFs, leading to emergent errors. This paper presents the framework for tying together these dynamic dependence concepts.

  11. Learning dynamics explains human behaviour in prisoner's dilemma on networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Giulio; Sánchez, Angel

    2014-05-06

    Cooperative behaviour lies at the very basis of human societies, yet its evolutionary origin remains a key unsolved puzzle. Whereas reciprocity or conditional cooperation is one of the most prominent mechanisms proposed to explain the emergence of cooperation in social dilemmas, recent experimental findings on networked Prisoner's Dilemma games suggest that conditional cooperation also depends on the previous action of the player-namely on the 'mood' in which the player is currently in. Roughly, a majority of people behave as conditional cooperators if they cooperated in the past, whereas they ignore the context and free ride with high probability if they did not. However, the ultimate origin of this behaviour represents a conundrum itself. Here, we aim specifically to provide an evolutionary explanation of moody conditional cooperation (MCC). To this end, we perform an extensive analysis of different evolutionary dynamics for players' behavioural traits-ranging from standard processes used in game theory based on pay-off comparison to others that include non-economic or social factors. Our results show that only a dynamic built upon reinforcement learning is able to give rise to evolutionarily stable MCC, and at the end to reproduce the human behaviours observed in the experiments.

  12. Human growth and body weight dynamics: an integrative systems model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and capturing changes in body weight, composition and height. Integrating previous empirical and modeling findings and validated against several additional empirical studies, the model replicates key trends in human growth including A) Changes in energy requirements from birth to old ages. B) Short and long-term dynamics of body weight and composition. C) Stunted growth with chronic malnutrition and potential for catch up growth. From obesity policy analysis to treating malnutrition and tracking growth trajectories, the model can address diverse policy questions. For example I find that even without further rise in obesity, the gap between healthy and actual Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) has embedded, for different population groups, a surplus of 14%-24% in energy intake which will be a source of significant inertia in obesity trends. In another analysis, energy deficit percentage needed to reduce BMI by one unit is found to be relatively constant across ages. Accompanying documented and freely available simulation model facilitates diverse applications customized to different sub-populations.

  13. Weblog patterns and modeling human dynamics with decaying interest

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jin-Li

    2010-01-01

    Web log is the fourth network exchange way following Email, BBS and MSN. Most bloggers began to write blogs with great interest, over time their interest gradually achieves a balance. In order to describe the phenomenon that people's interest in something gradually decays and achieves the balance, we first propose a model and give a rigorous analysis on it. This model describes interested in attenuation, and it reflects that people's interest in something is getting more stable after a long period of time. Our analysis indicates that the arrival-time interval distribution of the model is a mixed distribution with exponential and power-law feature. Secondly, we collect blogs in ScienceNet.cn and present an empirical study of blog arrival-time interval distribution. These empirical results verify the model, providing evidence for a new class of phenomena in human dynamics. The empirical results agree with the analytical result well, obeying an approximately mixed form. In human dynamics there are other distribu...

  14. Characterization of chaotic dynamics in the human menstrual cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Gregory; Derry, Paula

    2010-03-01

    The human menstrual cycle exhibits much unexplained variability, which is typically dismissed as random variation. Given the many delayed nonlinear feedbacks in the reproductive endocrine system, however, the menstrual cycle might well be a nonlinear dynamical system in a chaotic trajectory, and that this instead accounts for the observed variability. Here, we test this hypothesis by performing a time series analysis on data for 7438 menstrual cycles from 38 women in the 20-40 year age range, using the database maintained by the Tremin Research Program on Women's Health. Using phase space reconstruction techniques with a maximum embedding dimension of 6, we find appropriate scaling behavior in the correlation sums for this data, indicating low dimensional deterministic dynamics. A correlation dimension of 2.6 is measured in this scaling regime, and this result is confirmed by recalculation using the Takens estimator. These results may be interpreted as offering an approximation to the fractal dimension of a strange attractor governing the chaotic dynamics of the menstrual cycle.

  15. Population dynamics of the oriental fruit fly in Nanao County,Guangdong%广东海岛南澳县桔小实蝇种群动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈其生; 吴剑光; 柯松林; 李小健; 郑少波; 陈捷先; 刘晓莹; 鄞杰平; 黄锦炎

    2012-01-01

    Annual monitoring was conducted on the population dynamics of the oriental fruit fly,Bactrocera dorsalis(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae) through methyl eugenol-baited traps in Nanao County of Shantou City,Guangdong from 2009 to 2011.The results indicated the oriental fruit fly damages seriourly in Nanao County and the oriental fruit fly occurred all year round.Usually,its peak was from June to September of every year.Influenced by factors as temperature,rainfall and ecological environment around monitoring stations,number of population dynamics of the oriental fruit fly at the same monitoring stations obviously differed every year.%2009~2011年在广东省汕头市南澳县使用桔小实蝇诱剂监测桔小实蝇种群动态数量。研究结果表明:南澳县桔小实蝇为害极为严重,南澳县一年四季均有桔小实蝇的发生为害,一般情况下,高峰期在每年6~9月;受温度、雨量和监测点周围生态环境等因素的影响,同一监测点每年桔小实蝇种群出现高峰的数量有明显差异。

  16. Sexual orientation identity disparities in human papillomavirus vaccination initiation and completion among young adult US women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; Gordon, Allegra R; Charlton, Brittany M; Haneuse, Sebastien; Potter, Jennifer; Austin, S Bryn

    2016-10-01

    To examine the association between sexual orientation identity and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination initiation and completion among both women and men. Using data from the 2013 and 2014 National Health Interview Survey, we estimated logistic regression models for the association between sexual orientation identity and HPV vaccination initiation (≥1 dose) and completion (≥3 doses) among US women and men in relation to sociodemographic and healthcare factors. Analyses were restricted to individuals for whom the HPV vaccine was recommended at some point in their lives, namely women aged 18-34 years (n = 9,734) and men aged 18-31 years (n = 6,812). Among all women, bisexual women had higher adjusted odds of HPV vaccination initiation [(odds ratio) 1.71; (95 % confidence interval) 1.20-2.45] and completion (1.59; 1.05-2.42) than heterosexual women. No difference was observed in the odds of HPV vaccination initiation or completion between lesbian and heterosexual women. Among women who had initiated HPV vaccination, lesbians had lower adjusted odds of completion than heterosexual women (0.41; 0.19-0.90). Among all men, gay men had higher adjusted odds of initiating (2.07; 1.17-3.52) and completing (3.90; 1.68-9.06) HPV vaccination than heterosexual men. No difference was observed in the odds of HPV vaccination initiation or completion between bisexual and heterosexual men. Among men who had initiated HPV vaccination, gay (4.36; 1.28-14.83) and bisexual (20.92; 2.34-186.73) men had higher adjusted odds of completion than heterosexual men, although these results are unreliable and should be interpreted with caution. Interventions are needed to promote HPV vaccination among all US women and men, regardless of sexual orientation identity.

  17. Fluxon dynamics and field induced microwave absorption in c-axis oriented thin films of Y sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M.X.; Bhagat, S.M.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Venkatesan, T. (Dept. of Physics and Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland (United States)); Manheimer, M.A. (Lab. for Physical Science, College Park, MD (United States)); Tyagi, S. (Dept. of Physics and Atmosphere Science, Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-04-15

    We report on the temperature and DC magnetic field dependence of microwave absorption in c-axis oriented Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films. Whereas the zero-field transition curves are by no means ideal, the field dependence is well represented by conventional fluxon dynamics and yields the first determination of the ratio of restoring to viscous forces. (orig.).

  18. Olfaction in Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus: flight orientation response to certain saturated carboxylic acids in human skin emanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seenivasagan, T; Guha, Lopamudra; Parashar, B D; Agrawal, O P; Sukumaran, D

    2014-05-01

    The flight orientation response of nonblood-fed and hungry Aedes albopictus females was studied in a Y-tube olfactometer at 10(-6) to 10(-2) g odor plumes of saturated carboxylic acids (C1-C20), in which C2-C18 were the main constituents of human skin emanations. Thirteen acids viz C1, C2, C3, C5, C6, C8 C9, C10, C12, C14, C16, C18, and C20 showed attractance at odor plumes ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-3) g doses, while five acids viz C4, C7, C11, C15, and C19 showed repellence at 10(-4) to 10(-2) g to test mosquitoes. Tridecanoic acid (C13) showed attractance only at 10(-4) g dose while higher doses caused repellence. Dose-dependent reversal of orientation behavior from attractance to repellence was observed at 10(-2) g plumes of C5, C9, C10, C13, C17, C19, and C20 acids. The outcome of the study will help in the identification of odoriferous acids as potential attractants, repellents, or attraction inhibitors, which may find their application in the repellent formulations and odor-baited traps for surveillance and control of mosquitoes.

  19. Quantification of collagen fiber orientation in human tendons with the coefficient of variation of echogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Tomonobu; Kouno, Masahiro; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro; Kubo, Keitaro

    2016-12-08

    The grayscale distribution on the ultrasonic images of tendons may be reduced with alignment of collagen fibers, because ultrasound signal intensity changes with alterations in tendon collagen fiber orientation due to acoustic anisotropy in the tendons. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in the coefficient of variation (CV) of echogenicity in the Achilles tendon during passive dorsiflexion (the angle task) and isometric plantar flexion (the contraction task). Achilles tendon transverse ultrasonic images were collected from 14 healthy individuals every 10° from 20° to -20° (positive values for plantar flexion) in the angle task and every 10% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) from 0% to 70% MVC in the contraction task. The CV of echogenicity was measured in each image. In addition, relative changes in the measured variables between the former half (20-0° in the angle task, 0% to 30% MVC in the contraction task) and the latter half (0° to -20° in the angle task, 40% to 70% MVC in the contraction task) of each task were compared. The CV of echogenicity decreased with increases in the dorsiflexion angle and intensity of isometric contractions. Furthermore, relative changes in the CV of echogenicity were greater at more dorsiflexed positions in the angle task and at lower torque levels in the contraction task. These results suggested that decreases in the CV of echogenicity were partially related to the alignment of the tendon collagen fibers with tendon stretching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consciousness and Reality in Western and Oriental Tradition. Relationship between Human and Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly P. Suprun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stating the main principles of Buddhist philosophy and psychology is usually going with help of ancient categories and metaphors, which had been developed since the fifth century B.C. till the tenth century A.C That means they were worked out by quite different kind of mentality (culture, language, traditions.... That makes those categories and metaphors almost untranslatable on European languages properly and unequivocally. In its turn, that situation makes difficult any kind of modern scientific research of the phenomena, discovered inside Buddhism, as well as ideas, developed in it. In this article we set a question of possibility to select such basic concepts of modern natural science, which can effectively translate main oriental ideas about Reality into modern scientific paradigm and discover the meaning of psychological phenomena from the transpersonal psychology sphere of interest. We take a look on some comparisons between pictures of Reality in modern physics and in Buddhist paradigm, allocating two sides of Reality, called Nirvana and Samsara.

  1. Effects of the hallucinogen psilocybin on covert orienting of visual attention in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E; Thelen, B; Maier, S; Heekeren, K; Kovar, K-A; Sass, H; Spitzer, M

    2002-01-01

    Hallucinogenic drug-induced states are considered as models for acute schizophrenic disorders (experimental psychoses). In a double-blind study with healthy volunteers we investigated the influence of the serotonergic hallucinogen psilocybin, the ecstasy-like drug 3,4-methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDE), the stimulant d- methamphetamine and placebo on covert orienting of spatial attention (n = 8 in each group). Reaction times were prolonged after ingestion of psilocybin > MDE, but not after d-methamphetamine. In addition, subjects on psilocybin exhibited particularly slow reaction times in invalid trials at short cue target intervals and failure of response inhibition in valid trials at long cue target intervals for right visual field targets. Despite some methodological limitations, these results are in line with both bilateral impairment of disengagement of attention and a lateralized impairment of inhibition of return (IOR) in productive psychotic states. Additional investigations with larger samples, different hallucinogenic substances (serotonergic agonists vs. NMDA antagonists) and different dose regimens are needed in order to further explore the suggested relationship between visuospatial attentional dysfunction and acute psychotic conditions.

  2. Inciting the Metric Oriented Humanist: Teaching Bibliometrics in a Faculty of Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuccala, Alesia Ann

    2016-01-01

    principles and practices associated with teaching bibliometrics to humanists, with the aim of encouraging students to reflect upon new indicators relevant to scholarly research outputs across the humanities. Emphasis is placed on the “biblio” in bibliometrics (i.e., books), digital record-keeping across...

  3. Future Challenges for Human Resource Development Professionals in European Learning-Oriented Organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyens, Dirk; Wouters, Karen; Dewettinck, Koen

    2001-01-01

    A survey of human resource professionals in 165 European companies revealed a lack of innovative practices characteristic of learning organizations. However, respondents indicated that strategies to stimulate learning and knowledge sharing are increasingly important, so barriers such as lack of time, lack of goal clarity, and insufficient learning…

  4. Sexual differentiation of the human brain: relevance for gender identity, transsexualism and sexual orientation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaab, D.F.

    2004-01-01

    Male sexual differentiation of the brain and behavior are thought, on the basis of experiments in rodents, to be caused by androgens, following conversion to estrogens. However, observations in human subjects with genetic and other disorders show that direct effects of testosterone on the developing

  5. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-03

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models.

  6. Dynamic association of NUP98 with the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liang

    Full Text Available Faithful execution of developmental gene expression programs occurs at multiple levels and involves many different components such as transcription factors, histone-modification enzymes, and mRNA processing proteins. Recent evidence suggests that nucleoporins, well known components that control nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking, have wide-ranging functions in developmental gene regulation that potentially extend beyond their role in nuclear transport. Whether the unexpected role of nuclear pore proteins in transcription regulation, which initially has been described in fungi and flies, also applies to human cells is unknown. Here we show at a genome-wide level that the nuclear pore protein NUP98 associates with developmentally regulated genes active during human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Overexpression of a dominant negative fragment of NUP98 levels decreases expression levels of NUP98-bound genes. In addition, we identify two modes of developmental gene regulation by NUP98 that are differentiated by the spatial localization of NUP98 target genes. Genes in the initial stage of developmental induction can associate with NUP98 that is embedded in the nuclear pores at the nuclear periphery. Alternatively, genes that are highly induced can interact with NUP98 in the nuclear interior, away from the nuclear pores. This work demonstrates for the first time that NUP98 dynamically associates with the human genome during differentiation, revealing a role of a nuclear pore protein in regulating developmental gene expression programs.

  7. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed.

  8. The gating mechanism of the human aquaporin 5 revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorant Janosi

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are protein channels located across the cell membrane with the role of conducting water or other small sugar alcohol molecules (aquaglyceroporins. The high-resolution X-ray structure of the human aquaporin 5 (HsAQP5 shows that HsAQP5, as all the other known aquaporins, exhibits tetrameric structure. By means of molecular dynamics simulations we analyzed the role of spontaneous fluctuations on the structural behavior of the human AQP5. We found that different conformations within the tetramer lead to a distribution of monomeric channel structures, which can be characterized as open or closed. The switch between the two states of a channel is a tap-like mechanism at the cytoplasmic end which regulates the water passage through the pore. The channel is closed by a translation of the His67 residue inside the pore. Moreover, water permeation rate calculations revealed that the selectivity filter, located at the other end of the channel, regulates the flow rate of water molecules when the channel is open, by locally modifying the orientation of His173. Furthermore, the calculated permeation rates of a fully open channel are in good agreement with the reported experimental value.

  9. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms on human N-acetyltransferase 2 structure and dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rajasekaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 is an important catalytic enzyme that metabolizes the carcinogenic arylamines, hydrazine drugs and chemicals. This enzyme is highly polymorphic in different human populations. Several polymorphisms of NAT2, including the single amino acid substitutions R64Q, I114T, D122N, L137F, Q145P, R197Q, and G286E, are classified as slow acetylators, whereas the wild-type NAT2 is classified as a fast acetylator. The slow acetylators are often associated with drug toxicity and efficacy as well as cancer susceptibility. The biological functions of these 7 mutations have previously been characterized, but the structural basis behind the reduced catalytic activity and reduced protein level is not clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed multiple molecular dynamics simulations of these mutants as well as NAT2 to investigate the structural and dynamical effects throughout the protein structure, specifically the catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and the substrate binding pocket. None of these mutations induced unfolding; instead, their effects were confined to the inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region, where the flexibility was significantly reduced relative to the wild-type. Structural effects of these mutations propagate through space and cause a change in catalytic triad conformation, cofactor binding site, substrate binding pocket size/shape and electrostatic potential. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the dynamical properties of all the mutant structures, especially in inter-domain, domain 3 and 17-residue insert region were affected in the same manner. Similarly, the electrostatic potential of all the mutants were altered and also the functionally important regions such as catalytic triad, cofactor binding site, and substrate binding pocket adopted different orientation and/or conformation relative to the wild-type that may affect the functions of the mutants

  10. Effect of Loading Rate and Orientation on the Compressive Response of Human Cortical Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Biomechanics 1975, 8, 27–40. 11. Ntim, M. M.; Bembey, A. K.; Ferguson, V. I.; Bushby, A. J. Hydration Effects on the Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen. MRS...Determination of Mechanical Properties of Human Femoral Cortical Bone by the Hopkinson Bar Stress Technique. Journal of Biomechanics 1990, 23 (11...Science and Technology 2011, 25 (9), 2211–2215. 18. Chen, W.; Song, B. Split Hopkinson (Kolsky) Bar; Springer : New York, 2010; pp 29–77. 19. Kulin, R

  11. Dynamic determinants of the uncontrolled manifold during human quiet stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suzuki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human postural sway during stance arises from coordinated multi-joint movements. Thus, a sway trajectory represented by a time-varying postural vector in the multiple-joint-angle-space tends to be constrained to a low-dimensional subspace. It has been proposed that the subspace corresponds to a manifold defined by a kinematic constraint, such that the position of the center of mass (CoM of the whole body is constant in time, referred to as the kinematic uncontrolled manifold (kinematic-UCM. A control strategy related to this hypothesis (CoM-control-strategy claims that the central nervous system (CNS aims to keep the posture close to the kinematic-UCM using a continuous feedback controller, leading to sway patterns that mostly occur within the kinematic-UCM, where no corrective control is exerted. An alternative strategy proposed by the authors (intermittent control-strategy claims that the CNS stabilizes posture by intermittently suspending the active feedback controller, in such a way to allow the CNS to exploit a stable manifold of the saddle-type upright equilibrium in the state-space of the system, referred to as the dynamic-UCM, when the state point is on or near the manifold. Although the mathematical definitions of the kinematic- and dynamic-UCM are completely different, both UCMs play similar roles in the stabilization of multi-joint upright posture. The purpose of this study was to compare the dynamic performance of the two control strategies. In particular, we considered a double-inverted-pendulum-model of postural control, and analyzed the two UCMs defined above. We first showed that the geometric configurations of the two UCMs are almost identical. We then investigated whether the UCM-component of experimental sway could be considered as passive dynamics with no active control, and showed that such UCM-component mainly consists of high frequency oscillations above 1 Hz, corresponding to anti-phase coordination between the ankle and

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Human Glucose Transporter GLUT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Sun Park

    Full Text Available Glucose transporters (GLUTs provide a pathway for glucose transport across membranes. Human GLUTs are implicated in devastating diseases such as heart disease, hyper- and hypo-glycemia, type 2 diabetes and cancer. The human GLUT1 has been recently crystalized in the inward-facing open conformation. However, there is no other structural information for other conformations. The X-ray structures of E. coli Xylose permease (XylE, a glucose transporter homolog, are available in multiple conformations with and without the substrates D-xylose and D-glucose. XylE has high sequence homology to human GLUT1 and key residues in the sugar-binding pocket are conserved. Here we construct a homology model for human GLUT1 based on the available XylE crystal structure in the partially occluded outward-facing conformation. A long unbiased all atom molecular dynamics simulation starting from the model can capture a new fully opened outward-facing conformation. Our investigation of molecular interactions at the interface between the transmembrane (TM domains and the intracellular helices (ICH domain in the outward- and inward-facing conformation supports that the ICH domain likely stabilizes the outward-facing conformation in GLUT1. Furthermore, inducing a conformational transition, our simulations manifest a global asymmetric rocker switch motion and detailed molecular interactions between the substrate and residues through the water-filled selective pore along a pathway from the extracellular to the intracellular side. The results presented here are consistent with previously published biochemical, mutagenesis and functional studies. Together, this study shed light on the structure and functional relationships of GLUT1 in multiple conformational states.

  13. Dynamic Spatial Hearing by Human and Robot Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xuan

    This study consisted of several related projects on dynamic spatial hearing by both human and robot listeners. The first experiment investigated the maximum number of sound sources that human listeners could localize at the same time. Speech stimuli were presented simultaneously from different loudspeakers at multiple time intervals. The maximum of perceived sound sources was close to four. The second experiment asked whether the amplitude modulation of multiple static sound sources could lead to the perception of auditory motion. On the horizontal and vertical planes, four independent noise sound sources with 60° spacing were amplitude modulated with consecutively larger phase delay. At lower modulation rates, motion could be perceived by human listeners in both cases. The third experiment asked whether several sources at static positions could serve as "acoustic landmarks" to improve the localization of other sources. Four continuous speech sound sources were placed on the horizontal plane with 90° spacing and served as the landmarks. The task was to localize a noise that was played for only three seconds when the listener was passively rotated in a chair in the middle of the loudspeaker array. The human listeners were better able to localize the sound sources with landmarks than without. The other experiments were with the aid of an acoustic manikin in an attempt to fuse binaural recording and motion data to localize sounds sources. A dummy head with recording devices was mounted on top of a rotating chair and motion data was collected. The fourth experiment showed that an Extended Kalman Filter could be used to localize sound sources in a recursive manner. The fifth experiment demonstrated the use of a fitting method for separating multiple sounds sources.

  14. Learning dynamics explains human behavior in Prisoner's Dilemma on networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cimini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative behavior lies at the very basis of human societies, yet its evolutionary origin remains a key unsolved puzzle. Whereas reciprocity or conditional cooperation is one of the most prominent mechanisms proposed to explain the emergence of cooperation in social dilemmas, recent experimental findings on networked Prisoner's Dilemma games suggest that conditional cooperation also depends on the previous action of the player---namely on the `mood' in which the player currently is. Roughly, a majority of people behaves as conditional cooperators if they cooperated in the past, while they ignore the context and free-ride with high probability if they did not. However, the ultimate origin of this behavior represents a conundrum itself. Here we aim specifically at providing an evolutionary explanation of moody conditional cooperation. To this end, we perform an extensive analysis of different evolutionary dynamics for players' behavioral traits---ranging from standard processes used in game theory based on pa...

  15. Trajectory Planning for Robots in Dynamic Human Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Mikael; Bak, Thomas; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    This paper present a trajectory planning algorithm for a robot operating in dynamic human environments. Environments such as pedestrian streets, hospital corridors and train stations. We formulate the problem as planning a minimal cost trajectory through a potential field, defined from...... the perceived position and motion of persons in the environment. A Rapidly-exploring Random Tree (RRT) algorithm is proposed as a solution to the planning problem. A new method for selecting the best trajectory in the RRT, according to the cost of traversing a potential field, is presented. The RRT expansion...... vertex to the tree. Instead of executing a whole trajectory, when planned, the algorithm uses an Model Predictive Control (MPC) approach, where only a short segment of the trajectory is executed while a new iteration of the RRT is done. The planning algorithm is demonstrated in a simulated pedestrian...

  16. Activation of the insular cortex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Nobrega, A C; McColl, R

    1997-01-01

    role as a site for regulation of autonomic activity. 2. Eight subjects were studied during voluntary active cycling and passively induced cycling. Additionally, four of the subjects underwent passive movement combined with electrical stimulation of the legs. 3. Increases in regional cerebral blood flow...... during active, but not passive cycling. There were no significant changes in rCBF for the right insula. Also, the magnitude of rCBF increase for leg primary motor areas was significantly greater for both active cycling and passive cycling combined with electrical stimulation compared with passive cycling...... alone. 5. These findings provide the first evidence of insular activation during dynamic exercise in humans, suggesting that the left insular cortex may serve as a site for cortical regulation of cardiac autonomic (parasympathetic) activity. Additionally, findings during passive cycling with electrical...

  17. Activity clocks: spreading dynamics on temporal networks of human contact

    CERN Document Server

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical processes on time-varying complex networks are key to un- derstanding and modeling a broad variety of processes in socio-technical systems. Here we focus on empirical temporal networks of human proxim- ity and we aim at understanding the factors that, in simulation, shape the arrival time distribution of simple spreading processes. Abandoning the notion of wall-clock time in favour of node-specific clocks based on activ- ity exposes robust statistical patterns in the arrival times across different social contexts. Using randomization strategies and generative models constrained by data, we show that these patterns can be understood in terms of heterogeneous inter-event time distributions coupled with hetero- geneous numbers of events per edge. We also show, both empirically and by using a synthetic dataset, that significant deviations from the above behavior can be caused by the presence of edge classes with strong activity correlations.

  18. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: Statistical behavior and its modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  19. Human turnover dynamics during sleep: statistical behavior and its modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Turnover is a typical intermittent body movement while asleep. Exploring its behavior may provide insights into the mechanisms and management of sleep. However, little is understood about the dynamic nature of turnover in healthy humans and how it can be modified in disease. Here we present a detailed analysis of turnover signals that are collected by accelerometry from healthy elderly subjects and age-matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects, the time intervals between consecutive turnover events exhibit a well-separated bimodal distribution with one mode at ⩽10 s and the other at ⩾100 s, whereas such bimodality tends to disappear in neurodegenerative patients. The discovery of bimodality and fine temporal structures (⩽10 s) is a contribution that is not revealed by conventional sleep recordings with less time resolution (≈30 s). Moreover, we estimate the scaling exponent of the interval fluctuations, which also shows a clear difference between healthy subjects and patients. We incorporate these experimental results into a computational model of human decision making. A decision is to be made at each simulation step between two choices: to keep on sleeping or to make a turnover, the selection of which is determined dynamically by comparing a pair of random numbers assigned to each choice. This decision is weighted by a single parameter that reflects the depth of sleep. The resulting simulated behavior accurately replicates many aspects of observed turnover patterns, including the appearance or disappearance of bimodality and leads to several predictions, suggesting that the depth parameter may be useful as a quantitative measure for differentiating between normal and pathological sleep. These findings have significant clinical implications and may pave the way for the development of practical sleep assessment technologies.

  20. Ammonia metabolism during intense dynamic exercise and recovery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, T; Bangsbo, Jens; Gollnick, PD

    1990-01-01

     declined immediately on cessation of exercise. Recovery was complete in approximately 20 min. Arterial [NH3] increased less rapidly and reached itsmaximum 2-3 min into recovery. These data demonstrate that NH3 clearance is more sensitive to the cessation of exercise than is NH3 release from skeletal muscle. Muscle [NH......This study examined the dynamics for ammonia (NH3) metabolism in human skeletal muscle during and after intense one-legged exercise. Subjects (n = 8) performed dynamic leg extensor exercise to exhaustion (3.2 min). MuscleNH3 release increased rapidly to a maximum of 314 +/- 42 mumol/min and......3] increased three to fourfold during exercise and represented 74 +/- 8% of the total net NH3 formation. Thus the change in muscle [NH3] alone underestimates the NH3 production. There was no evidence that the muscle-to-venous blood NH3 ratio shifts in accordance with the H+ data. Thus other factors...

  1. Population dynamics of oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis(Diptera:Tephritidae)in Xishuangbanna,Yunnan Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Hui; LIU Jianhong

    2007-01-01

    Annual monitoring of the population dynamics of the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis(Hendel)(Diptera:Tephritidae)in Xishuangbanna,southern Yunnan,was conducted by using methyl eugenol-baited traps in 1997,2000,and 2003,and factors including temperature,rainfall,and host species with respect to the population fluctuation were analyzed systematically.The results showed that the fruit fly was present all year round in Xishuangbanna.Its population remained at a lower level from November to February,and increased from March until it reached a peak in June or July,depending on the rainfall that year.Afterward,the fly population declined remarkably until October.Temperature,rainfall,and host fruits were major factors comprehensively influencing the population fluctuation.The monthly mean temperature was in a range of temperatures suitable for development and reproduction of the fly.But the monthly mean minimum temperature from December to February was lower than the suitable temperature range,which was suggested a possible reason for the lower populations in winter months.Rainfall was another essential factor influencing the population fluctuations.The population was depressed when the monthly rainfall amount was lower than 50 mm,but increased when rainfall ranged from 100 mm to 200 mm.When the monthly rainfall amount was higher than 250 mm,the fruit fly population was reduced remarkably.The heavy rain in July and August explained the decreasing population.Mango,orange,pear,longan,and peach were found to be the main host species of the fly in Xishuangbanna.Among them,mango and longan were most preferred by the fly.Therefore,the planted areas,fruiting period,and production exerted essential effects on the fly population fluctuations,which were regarded as another major factor influencing the fly population in that area.Briefly,temperature,monthly rainfall,and the host species,through the way of their functions,the influence strength,as well as the period that they

  2. Sex differences in orienting to pictures with and without humans: evidence from the cardiac evoked response (ECR and the cortical long latency parietal positivity (LPP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Althaus

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effect of social relevance in affective pictures on two orienting responses, i.e. the evoked cardiac response (ECR, and a long latency cortical evoked potential (LPP and whether this effect would differ between males and females. Assuming that orienting to affective social information is fundamental to experiencing affective empathy, associations between self-report measures of empathy and the two orienting responses were investigated. METHOD: ECRs were obtained from 34 female and 30 male students, and LPPs from 25 female and 27 male students viewing 414 pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Pictures portrayed pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. RESULTS: Both the ECR and LPP showed the largest response to pictures with humans in unpleasant situations. For both measures, the responses to pictures with humans correlated with self-report measures of empathy. While we found a greater male than female responsiveness to the pictures without humans in the ECR, a greater female than male responsiveness was observed in the LPP response to pictures with humans. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: The sensitivity of these orienting responses to social relevance and their differential contribution to the prediction of individual differences underline the validity of their combined use in clinical studies investigating individuals with social disabilities.

  3. Sex differences in orienting to pictures with and without humans: evidence from the cardiac evoked response (ECR) and the cortical long latency parietal positivity (LPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, Monika; Groen, Yvonne; van der Schaft, Lutske; Minderaa, Ruud B; Tucha, Oliver; Mulder, Lambertus J M; Wijers, Albertus A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of social relevance in affective pictures on two orienting responses, i.e. the evoked cardiac response (ECR), and a long latency cortical evoked potential (LPP) and whether this effect would differ between males and females. Assuming that orienting to affective social information is fundamental to experiencing affective empathy, associations between self-report measures of empathy and the two orienting responses were investigated. ECRs were obtained from 34 female and 30 male students, and LPPs from 25 female and 27 male students viewing 414 pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Pictures portrayed pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. Both the ECR and LPP showed the largest response to pictures with humans in unpleasant situations. For both measures, the responses to pictures with humans correlated with self-report measures of empathy. While we found a greater male than female responsiveness to the pictures without humans in the ECR, a greater female than male responsiveness was observed in the LPP response to pictures with humans. The sensitivity of these orienting responses to social relevance and their differential contribution to the prediction of individual differences underline the validity of their combined use in clinical studies investigating individuals with social disabilities.

  4. A computational model for dynamic analysis of the human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimieiro, Claysson; Andrada, Emanuel; Witte, Hartmut; Pinotti, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical models are important tools in the study of human motion. This work proposes a computational model to analyse the dynamics of lower limb motion using a kinematic chain to represent the body segments and rotational joints linked by viscoelastic elements. The model uses anthropometric parameters, ground reaction forces and joint Cardan angles from subjects to analyse lower limb motion during the gait. The model allows evaluating these data in each body plane. Six healthy subjects walked on a treadmill to record the kinematic and kinetic data. In addition, anthropometric parameters were recorded to construct the model. The viscoelastic parameter values were fitted for the model joints (hip, knee and ankle). The proposed model demonstrated that manipulating the viscoelastic parameters between the body segments could fit the amplitudes and frequencies of motion. The data collected in this work have viscoelastic parameter values that follow a normal distribution, indicating that these values are directly related to the gait pattern. To validate the model, we used the values of the joint angles to perform a comparison between the model results and previously published data. The model results show a same pattern and range of values found in the literature for the human gait motion.

  5. Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Freire

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Disaster risk is not fully characterized without taking into account vulnerability and population exposure. Assessment of earthquake risk in urban areas would benefit from considering the variation of population distribution at more detailed spatial and temporal scales, and from a more explicit integration of this improved demographic data with existing seismic hazard maps. In the present work, "intelligent" dasymetric mapping is used to model population dynamics at high spatial resolution in order to benefit the analysis of spatio-temporal exposure to earthquake hazard in a metropolitan area. These night- and daytime-specific population densities are then classified and combined with seismic intensity levels to derive new spatially-explicit four-class-composite maps of human exposure. The presented approach enables a more thorough assessment of population exposure to earthquake hazard. Results show that there are significantly more people potentially at risk in the daytime period, demonstrating the shifting nature of population exposure in the daily cycle and the need to move beyond conventional residence-based demographic data sources to improve risk analyses. The proposed fine-scale maps of human exposure to seismic intensity are mainly aimed at benefiting visualization and communication of earthquake risk, but can be valuable in all phases of the disaster management process where knowledge of population densities is relevant for decision-making.

  6. Sexual Orientation, Human Rights, and Corporate Sponsorship of the Sochi Olympic Games: Rethinking the Voluntary Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Van Detta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multi-national enterprises (MNEs have provided substantial sponsorship for the Sochi Winter Olympic Games despite a host-country government that has recently enacted stunningly harsh legislation aimed at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex (LGBTI communities within Russia. This is a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR problem. Should Europe address it through voluntary corporate compliance, Europe’s historically preferred mode of promoting CSR? Or should Europe reconsider whether it can more effectively promote CSR compliance legislatively – and if so, by what kind of legislation? To honor the explicit and increased protections of human rights against sexual orientation discrimination in the Treaty of Amsterdam and the Charter of Fundamental Human Rights, more than voluntary, good intentions are needed. Particularly since the United States has effectively bowed out of enforcing CSR through the American federal courts, there now exists a regulatory lacuna that the European Commission is best situated to fill through the precision offered by judicious rulemaking. The article ultimately proposes an approach that combines the public-pressure engine that fuels voluntary CSR with public disclosures mandated by law to optimize the information and mobilization of public opinion and pressure – factors particularly noteworthy given the powerful “branding” benefits that MNEs seek through Olympic sponsorship.

  7. Prescriptive Oriented Drug Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Disease by LC-UV in Whole Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneetha, A; Rajeswari, Raja K

    2016-02-01

    As a polytherapy treatment, multiple sclerosis disease demands prescriptions with more than one drug. Polytherapy is sometimes rational for drug combinations chosen to minimize adverse effects. Estimation of drugs that are concomitantly administered in polytherapy is acceptable as it shortens the analytical timepoints and also the usage of biological matrices. In clinical phase trials, the withdrawal of biofluids is a critical issue for each analysis. Estimating all the coadminsitered drugs in a single shot will be more effective and economical for pharmaceuticals. A single, simple, rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography assay method has been developed with UV detection and fully validated for the quantification of 14 drugs (at random combinations) used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis disease. The set of combinations was based on prescriptions to patients. Separations were achieved on an X-Terra MS C18 (100 × 3.9 mm, 5 µm) column. The analytes were extracted from 50 µL aliquots of whole human blood with protein precipitation using acetonitrile. All the drugs were sufficiently stable during storage for 24 h at room temperature and for 23 days at 2-8°C. The percentage recoveries of all drugs were between 90 and 115%, with RSD values drug interaction studies.

  8. Dynamics of physical and functional status of students in the experiment on approvals personality oriented physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belykh S.I.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of the testing of personality-oriented physical education. In the experiment involved 640 students. Found that the greatest increase in indicators of physical fitness in young men in the experimental group revealed a flexibility test (6.67% and flexion extension Hand-ups (5.75. The girls showed improvement in the flexibility test (7.09% flexion and extension of hand-ups (6.14%. Clarified the nature and content of the personal-oriented physical education, especially its use in physical education students. Pedagogical conditions of effective application of personal-oriented physical education students in self-movement towards a healthy lifestyle. The data on the importance of physical culture for the prevention of self destructive behavior (drug addiction, alcoholism, smoking.

  9. Danish orientalism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zerlang, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Orientalism became an important current in nineteenth-century Danish culture, but although it was contemporaneous with the orientalism of the leading European nations - Great Britain, France, Germany...

  10. Integrating human and robot decision-making dynamics with feedback : Models and convergence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Ming; Stewart, Andrew; Leonard, Naomi Ehrich

    2008-01-01

    Leveraging research by psychologists on human decision-making, we present a human-robot decision-making problem associated with a complex task and study the corresponding joint decision-making dynamics. The collaborative task is designed so that the human makes decisions just as human subjects make

  11. RELIABILITY OF THE DYNAMIC OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY COGNITIVE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN (DOTCA-CH: THAI VERSION OF ORIENTATION, SPATIAL PERCEPTION, AND THINKING OPERATIONS SUBTESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchitporn Lersilp

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dynamic Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment for Children (DOTCA-Ch is a tool for finding out about cognitive problems in school-aged children. However, the DOTCA-Ch was developed in English for Western children. For this reason, it’s not appropriate for Thai children because of the differences of culture and language. The objectives of this study were aimed at translating the DOTCA-Ch in Orientation, Spatial Perception, and Thinking Operations subtests to a Thai version with a World Health Organization back-translation process, and to examine its internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and test-retest reliability. The participants consisted of 38 intellectually impaired and learning disabled individuals between the ages of 6–12. Results from this study revealed high internal consistency in the Orientation subtest (α=.83 Spatial Perception subtest (α=.82 and Thinking Operations subtest (α=.82, high inter-rater reliability in the Orientation subtest (ICC =.83, Spatial Perception subtest (ICC =.84 and Thinking Operations subtest (ICC =.74 and high test-retest reliability in the Orientation subtest (ICC =.84 Spatial Perception subtest (ICC =.86 and Thinking Operations subtest (ICC =.85. These results indicate that the Thai version of the DOTCA-Ch in Orientation, Spatial Perception, and Thinking Operations subtests  might be used as an appropriate assessment tool for Thai children, based on psychometric evidence including internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and test-retest reliability. However, additional study of other psychometric properties, including, predictive validity, concurrent reliability, and inter-rater reliability during the mediation process of this assessment tool needs to be carried out.

  12. Structural Dynamics of Human Telomeric G-Quadruplex Loops Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Xiao, Shiyan; Liang, Haojun

    2013-01-01

    Loops which are linkers connecting G-strands and supporting the G-tetrad core in G-quadruplex are important for biological roles of G-quadruplexes. TTA loop is a common sequence which mainly resides in human telomeric DNA (hTel) G-quadruplex. A series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to investigate the structural dynamics of TTA loops. We found that (1) the TA base pair formed in TTA loops are very stable, the occupied of all hydrogen bonds are more than 0.95. (2) The TA base pair makes the adjacent G-quartet more stable than others. (3) For the edgewise loop and the diagonal loop, most loop bases are stacking with others, only few bases have considerable freedom. (4) The stabilities of these stacking structures are distinct. Part of the loops, especially TA base pairs, and bases stacking with the G-quartet, maintain certain stable conformations in the simulation, but other parts, like TT and TA stacking structures, are not stable enough. For the first time, spontaneous conformational switches of TTA edgewise loops were observed in our long time MD simulations. (5) For double chain reversal loop, it is really hard to maintain a stable conformation in the long time simulation under present force fields (parm99 and parmbsc0), as it has multiple conformations with similar free energies. PMID:23951152

  13. Structural dynamics of human telomeric G-quadruplex loops studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhu

    Full Text Available Loops which are linkers connecting G-strands and supporting the G-tetrad core in G-quadruplex are important for biological roles of G-quadruplexes. TTA loop is a common sequence which mainly resides in human telomeric DNA (hTel G-quadruplex. A series of molecular dynamics (MD simulations were carried out to investigate the structural dynamics of TTA loops. We found that (1 the TA base pair formed in TTA loops are very stable, the occupied of all hydrogen bonds are more than 0.95. (2 The TA base pair makes the adjacent G-quartet more stable than others. (3 For the edgewise loop and the diagonal loop, most loop bases are stacking with others, only few bases have considerable freedom. (4 The stabilities of these stacking structures are distinct. Part of the loops, especially TA base pairs, and bases stacking with the G-quartet, maintain certain stable conformations in the simulation, but other parts, like TT and TA stacking structures, are not stable enough. For the first time, spontaneous conformational switches of TTA edgewise loops were observed in our long time MD simulations. (5 For double chain reversal loop, it is really hard to maintain a stable conformation in the long time simulation under present force fields (parm99 and parmbsc0, as it has multiple conformations with similar free energies.

  14. Land use and land cover dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon: understanding human-environmental interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza Soler, de L.

    2014-01-01

    Land use and land cover dynamics are a result of the interactions between human activities and the environment. The objective of this thesis is to analyze Amazonian land use and land cover pattern dynamics in order to identify the underlying system dynamics. By combining empirical statistical models

  15. Product-Oriented Integrated CAPP System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凤岐; 王磊; 郭伟; 白峰

    2003-01-01

    The necessity of product-oriented integrated computer aided process planning (CAPP) is analyzed,and the system architecture and the main functions are described in detail. The key issues of the system, such as the product-oriented process planning method, the human-machine cooperation in process planning, the generation of manufacture bill of material (MBOM) and the dynamic data exchanging technology between CAPP and enterprise resource planning (ERP), are discussed. The CAPP system has been applied at a CIMS environment corporation successfully.

  16. Themes of Theosophy of Blavatsky and "Living Ethics" of Helena Roerich in Human Sciences: Between Religion and Oriental Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Leshchynski, Anton

    2014-01-01

    This article is dedicated to the theme of Theosophy and Living Ethics Teaching in modern Religion and Oriental Studies. So, in the article, the author surveys problems, which concerned with this theme and describes her condition in Religion and Oriental Studies and academic achievements, which was done for this theme. Essentially, discourse of the article focused on the contexts this theme in post-Soviet Religion Studies and Oriental Studies.According the author's review, the problems for mod...

  17. Dynamic Propagation Channel Characterization and Modeling for Human Body Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC. In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000 were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = −10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of −4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks.

  18. Dynamic propagation channel characterization and modeling for human body communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zedong; Ma, Jingjing; Li, Zhicheng; Chen, Hong; Wang, Lei

    2012-12-18

    This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC). In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000) were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = -10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of -4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks.

  19. Dynamic Principles of Center of Mass in Human Walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Li, Zhiyu; Lv, Changsheng

    2010-01-01

    We present results of an analytic and numerical calculation that studies the relationship between the time of initial foot contact and the ground reaction force of human gait and explores the dynamic principle of center of mass. Assuming the ground reaction force of both feet to be the same in the same phase of a stride cycle, we establish the relationships between the time of initial foot contact and the ground reaction force, acceleration, velocity, displacement and average kinetic energy of center of mass. We employ the dispersion to analyze the effect of the time of the initial foot contact that imposes upon these physical quantities. Our study reveals that when the time of one foot's initial contact falls right in the middle of the other foot's stride cycle, these physical quantities reach extrema. An action function has been identified as the dispersion of the physical quantities and optimized analysis used to prove the least-action principle in gait. In addition to being very significant to the researc...

  20. Human aquaporin 4 gating dynamics under and after nanosecond-scale static and alternating electric-field impulses: a molecular dynamics study of field effects and relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Riccardo; English, Niall J; Garate, José-Antonio; Marracino, Paolo; Liberti, Micaela; Apollonio, Francesca

    2013-11-28

    Water self-diffusion and the dipolar response of the selectivity filter within human aquaporin 4 have been studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the absence and presence of pulses of external static and alternating electric fields. The pulses were approximately 50 and 100 ns in duration and 0.0065 V/Å in (r.m.s.) intensity and were either static or else 2.45 or 100 GHz in frequency and applied both along and perpendicular to the channels. In addition, the relaxation of the aquaporin, water self-diffusion and gating dynamics following cessation of the impulses was studied. In previous work it was determined that switches in the dihedral angle of the selectivity filter led to boosting of water permeation events within the channels, in the presence of identical external static and alternating electric fields, although applied continuously. Here the application of field impulses (and subsequently, upon removal) has shown that it is the dipolar orientation of the histidine-201 residue in the selectivity filter which governs the dihedral angle, and hence influences water self-diffusion; this constitutes an appropriate order parameter. The dipolar response of this residue to the applied field leads to the adoption of four distinct states, which we modelled as time-homogeneous Markov jump processes, and may be distinguished in the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of the dipolar orientation of histidine-201. The observations of enhanced "dipolar flipping" of H201 serve to explain increased levels of water self-diffusion within aquaporin channels during, and immediately following, field impulses, although the level of statistical certainty here is lower. Given the appreciable size of the energy barriers evident in PMFs computed directly from deterministic MD (whether in the absence or presence of external fields), metadynamics calculations were undertaken to explore the free-energy landscape of histidine-201 orientation with greater accuracy and

  1. Dynamics of human foveal development after premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Ramiro S; O'Connell, Rachelle V; Sarin, Neeru; Freedman, Sharon F; Wallace, David K; Cotten, C Michael; Winter, Katrina P; Stinnett, Sandra; Chiu, Stephanie J; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A

    2011-12-01

    To determine the dynamic morphologic development of the human fovea in vivo using portable spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Prospective, observational case series. Thirty-one prematurely born neonates, 9 children, and 9 adults. Sixty-two neonates were enrolled in this study. After examination for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), SD-OCT imaging was performed at the bedside in nonsedated infants aged 31 to 41 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) (= gestational age in weeks + chronologic age) and at outpatient follow-up ophthalmic examinations. Thirty-one neonates met eligibility criteria. Nine children and nine adults without ocular pathology served as control groups. Semiautomatic retinal layer segmentation was performed. Central foveal thickness, foveal to parafoveal (FP) ratio (central foveal thickness divided by thickness 1000 μm from the foveal center), and 3-dimensional thickness maps were analyzed. In vivo determination of foveal morphology, layer segmentation, analysis of subcellular changes, and spatiotemporal layer shifting. In contrast with the adult fovea, several signs of immaturity were observed in the neonates: a shallow foveal pit, persistence of inner retinal layers (IRLs), and a thin photoreceptor layer (PRL) that was thinnest at the foveal center. Three-dimensional mapping showed displacement of retinal layers out of the foveal center as the fovea matured and the progressive formation of the inner/outer segment band in the opposite direction. The FP-IRL ratios decreased as IRL migrated before term and minimally after that, whereas FP-PRL ratios increased as PRL subcellular elements formed closer to term and into childhood. A surprising finding was the presence of cystoid macular edema in 58% of premature neonates that appeared to affect inner foveal maturation. This study provides the first view into the development of living cellular layers of the human retina and of subcellular specialization at the fovea in premature infant eyes

  2. Rapid oriented fibril formation of fish scale collagen facilitates early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Rena; Uemura, Toshimasa; Xu, Zhefeng; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of fibril formation of fish scale collagen on the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We found that hMSCs adhered easily to tilapia scale collagen, which remarkably accelerated the early stage of osteoblastic differentiation in hMSCs during in vitro cell culture. Osteoblastic markers such as ALP activity, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 were markedly upregulated when the hMSCs were cultured on a tilapia collagen surface, especially in the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. We hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to specific fibril formation of tilapia collagen. Thus, we examined the time course of collagen fibril formation using high-speed atomic force microscopy. Moreover, to elucidate the effect of the orientation of fibril formation on the differentiation of hMSCs, we measured ALP activity of hMSCs cultured on two types of tilapia scale collagen membranes with different degrees of fibril formation. The ALP activity in hMSCs cultured on a fibrous collagen membrane was significantly higher than on a non-fibrous collagen membrane even before adding osteoblastic differentiation medium. These results showed that the degree of the fibril formation of tilapia collagen was essential for the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs.

  3. The interstitial nuclei of the human anterior hypothalamus: an investigation of variation with sex, sexual orientation, and HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byne, W; Tobet, S; Mattiace, L A; Lasco, M S; Kemether, E; Edgar, M A; Morgello, S; Buchsbaum, M S; Jones, L B

    2001-09-01

    The interstitial nuclei of the human anterior hypothalamus (INAH1-4) have been considered candidates for homology with the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area of the rat. Volumetric sexual dimorphism has been described for three of these nuclei (INAH1-3), and INAH3 has been reported to be smaller in homosexual than heterosexual men. The current study measured the INAH in Nissl-stained coronal sections in autopsy material from 34 presumed heterosexual men (24 HIV- and 10 HIV+), 34 presumed heterosexual women (25 HIV- and 9 HIV+), and 14 HIV+ homosexual men. HIV status significantly influenced the volume of INAH1 (8% larger in HIV+ heterosexual men and women relative to HIV- individuals), but no other INAH. INAH3 contained significantly more neurons and occupied a greater volume in presumed heterosexual males than females. No sex difference in volume was detected for any other INAH. No sexual variation in neuronal size or density was observed in any INAH. Although there was a trend for INAH3 to occupy a smaller volume in homosexual men than in heterosexual men, there was no difference in the number of neurons within the nucleus based on sexual orientation.

  4. The Molecular Structure of Human Red Blood Cell Membranes from Highly Oriented, Solid Supported Multi-Lamellar Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himbert, Sebastian; Alsop, Richard J.; Rose, Markus; Hertz, Laura; Dhaliwal, Alexander; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Verschoor, Chris P.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.; Kaestner, Lars; Wagner, Christian; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2017-01-01

    We prepared highly oriented, multi-lamellar stacks of human red blood cell (RBC) membranes applied on silicon wafers. RBC ghosts were prepared by hemolysis and applied onto functionalized silicon chips and annealed into multi-lamellar RBC membranes. High resolution X-ray diffraction was used to determine the molecular structure of the stacked membranes. We present direct experimental evidence that these RBC membranes consist of nanometer sized domains of integral coiled-coil peptides, as well as liquid ordered (lo) and liquid disordered (ld) lipids. Lamellar spacings, membrane and hydration water layer thicknesses, areas per lipid tail and domain sizes were determined. The common drug aspirin was added to the RBC membranes and found to interact with RBC membranes and preferably partition in the head group region of the lo domain leading to a fluidification of the membranes, i.e., a thinning of the bilayers and an increase in lipid tail spacing. Our results further support current models of RBC membranes as patchy structures and provide unprecedented structural details of the molecular organization in the different domains.

  5. Effects of nasal drug delivery device and its orientation on sprayed particle deposition in a realistic human nasal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xuwen; Dong, Jingliang; Shang, Yidan; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effects of nasal drug delivery device and the spray nozzle orientation on sprayed droplets deposition in a realistic human nasal cavity were numerically studied. Prior to performing the numerical investigation, an in-house designed automated actuation system representing mean adults actuation force was developed to produce realistic spray plume. Then, the spray plume development was filmed by high speed photography system, and spray characteristics such as spray cone angle, break-up length, and average droplet velocity were obtained through off-line image analysis. Continuing studies utilizing those experimental data as boundary conditions were applied in the following numerical spray simulations using a commercially available nasal spray device, which was inserted into a realistic adult nasal passage with external facial features. Through varying the particle releasing direction, the deposition fractions of selected particle sizes on the main nasal passage for targeted drug delivery were compared. The results demonstrated that the middle spray direction showed superior spray efficiency compared with upper or lower directions, and the 10µm agents were the most suitable particle size as the majority of sprayed agents can be delivered to the targeted area, the main passage. This study elaborates a comprehensive approach to better understand nasal spray mechanism and evaluate its performance for existing nasal delivery practices. Results of this study can assist the pharmaceutical industry to improve the current design of nasal drug delivery device and ultimately benefit more patients through optimized medications delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human induced hepatic lineage-oriented stem cells: autonomous specification of human iPS cells toward hepatocyte-like cells without any exogenous differentiation factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Preparing targeted cells for medical applications from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs using growth factors, compounds, or gene transfer has been challenging. Here, we report that human induced hepatic lineage-oriented stem cells (hiHSCs were generated and expanded as a new type of hiPSC under non-typical coculture with feeder cells in a chemically defined hiPSC medium at a very high density. Self-renewing hiHSCs expressed markers of both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and hepatocytes. Those cells were highly expandable, markedly enhancing gene expression of serum hepatic proteins and cytochrome P450 enzymes with the omission of FGF-2 from an undefined hiPSC medium. The hepatic specification of hiHSCs was not attributable to the genetic and epigenetic backgrounds of the starting cells, as they were established from distinct donors and different types of cells. Approximately 90% of hiHSCs autonomously differentiated to hepatocyte-like cells, even in a defined minimum medium without any of the exogenous growth factors necessary for hepatic specification. After 12 days of this culture, the differentiated cells significantly enhanced gene expression of serum hepatic proteins (ALB, SERPINA1, TTR, TF, FABP1, FGG, AGT, RBP4, and AHSG, conjugating enzymes (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, GSTA2, and GSTA5, transporters (SULT2A1, SLC13A5, and SLCO2B1, and urea cycle-related enzymes (ARG1 and CPS1. In addition, the hepatocyte-like cells performed key functions of urea synthesis, albumin secretion, glycogen storage, indocyanine green uptake, and low-density lipoprotein uptake. The autonomous hepatic specification of hiHSCs was due to their culture conditions (coculture with feeder cells in a defined hiPSC medium at a very high density in self-renewal rather than in differentiation. These results suggest the feasibility of preparing large quantities of hepatocytes as a convenient and inexpensive hiPSC differentiation. Our study also suggests the

  7. Comparisons of Interfacial Phe, Tyr, and Trp Residues as Determinants of Orientation and Dynamics for GWALP Transmembrane Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Sparks, Kelsey A.; Gleason, Nicholas J.; Gist, Renetra; Langston, Rebekah; Greathouse, Denise V.; Koeppe, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic amino acids often flank the transmembrane alpha helices of integral membrane proteins. By favoring locations within the membrane–water interface of the lipid bilayer, aromatic residues Trp, Tyr, and sometimes Phe may serve as anchors to help stabilize a transmembrane orientation. In this work, we compare the influence of interfacial Trp, Tyr, or Phe residues upon the properties of tilted helical transmembrane peptides. For such comparisons, it has been critical to start with no more ...

  8. Vortex dynamics as a function of field orientation in BaFe1.9Ni0.1As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem-Sugui, S., Jr.; Ghivelder, L.; Alvarenga, A. D.; Cohen, L. F.; Luo, Huiqian; Lu, Xingye

    2013-02-01

    Vortex dynamics in a multiband anisotropic superconductor, such as the Fe based superconductors, is interesting and potentially important for applications. In this study we examine flux-creep data for fields along the second magnetization peak observed in M(H) curves of BaFe1.9Ni0.1As2 for H ‖ c-axis, H ‖ ab-planes and H forming a 45° angle with ab-planes. We find that the M-H loops taken from the different field directions can be collapsed onto a single universal curve at all temperatures with a simple scaling factor equivalent to the superconducting anisotropy, showing that the vortex pinning is not only isotropic and three-dimensional but most likely related to point-like defects. The resulting critical currents, however, taken from the Bean model appear to show enhanced low field pinning for H ‖ c. The features in the vortex dynamics also differ in different field orientations and show no direct correlation with the second magnetization peak Hp as is the case with a direct crossover in pinning regimes. Isofield plots of the scaled activation energy obtained from flux-creep data are found to be a smooth function of temperature as the Hp(T) line is crossed, consistent with a single type of pinning regime operating at this field, independent of field orientation. The functional form of the Hp(T) lines in the resulting phase diagrams also support this view.

  9. High-density lipoprotein proteome dynamics in human endotoxemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroes Erik SG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large variety of proteins involved in inflammation, coagulation, lipid-oxidation and lipid metabolism have been associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL and it is anticipated that changes in the HDL proteome have implications for the multiple functions of HDL. Here, SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS was used to study the dynamic changes of HDL protein composition in a human experimental low-dose endotoxemia model. Ten healthy men with low HDL cholesterol (0.7+/-0.1 mmol/L and 10 men with high HDL cholesterol levels (1.9+/-0.4 mmol/L were challenged with endotoxin (LPS intravenously (1 ng/kg bodyweight. We previously showed that subjects with low HDL cholesterol are more susceptible to an inflammatory challenge. The current study tested the hypothesis that this discrepancy may be related to differences in the HDL proteome. Results Plasma drawn at 7 time-points over a 24 hour time period after LPS challenge was used for direct capture of HDL using antibodies against apolipoprotein A-I followed by subsequent SELDI-TOF MS profiling. Upon LPS administration, profound changes in 21 markers (adjusted p-value Conclusions This study shows that the semi-quantitative differences in the HDL proteome as assessed by SELDI-TOF MS cannot explain why subjects with low HDL cholesterol are more susceptible to a challenge with LPS than those with high HDL cholesterol. Instead the results indicate that hierarchical clustering could be useful to predict HDL functionality in acute phase responses towards LPS.

  10. Active site conformational dynamics in human uridine phosphorylase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo P Roosild

    Full Text Available Uridine phosphorylase (UPP is a central enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzing the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose-1-phosphate. Human UPP activity has been a focus of cancer research due to its role in activating fluoropyrimidine nucleoside chemotherapeutic agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and capecitabine. Additionally, specific molecular inhibitors of this enzyme have been found to raise endogenous uridine concentrations, which can produce a cytoprotective effect on normal tissues exposed to these drugs. Here we report the structure of hUPP1 bound to 5-FU at 2.3 A resolution. Analysis of this structure reveals new insights as to the conformational motions the enzyme undergoes in the course of substrate binding and catalysis. The dimeric enzyme is capable of a large hinge motion between its two domains, facilitating ligand exchange and explaining observed cooperativity between the two active sites in binding phosphate-bearing substrates. Further, a loop toward the back end of the uracil binding pocket is shown to flexibly adjust to the varying chemistry of different compounds through an "induced-fit" association mechanism that was not observed in earlier hUPP1 structures. The details surrounding these dynamic aspects of hUPP1 structure and function provide unexplored avenues to develop novel inhibitors of this protein with improved specificity and increased affinity. Given the recent emergence of new roles for uridine as a neuron protective compound in ischemia and degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, inhibitors of hUPP1 with greater efficacy, which are able to boost cellular uridine levels without adverse side-effects, may have a wide range of therapeutic applications.

  11. A Human-Needs-Based Dynamics to Simulate Technology Policy and Its Effects on Both Business Success and Human Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Yeon Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on how human needs are reflected in the market and how several technological and political policies affect the market share of government-supported industries, as well as the satisfaction of human desires and consequent happiness. In this paper, we seek to understand the dynamics of consumer decision-making processes in relation to technology products in the market. In this study, we present a new marketing model based on human needs, wants, and demands, and focus on both holistic and social perspectives. We have shown that human-based policy dynamics and sustainable human happiness can be realized by stimulating national policies for consumer happiness in the human-needs-based sector, e.g., the healthcare industry.

  12. 以企业文化为导向的人力资源培训研究%Research on Human Resources Training Oriented with Corporate Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘羚先; 王相平; 张权林

    2011-01-01

    以企业文化为导向的人力资源培训重在发挥企业文化的作用,让企业文化引领战略培训建立以企业文化为导向的人力资源培训体系是一项重要的工作,该体系包括培训需求分析、培训计划制订、培训实施、培训评估四个板块。以企业文化为导向进行人力资源培训,能为培训打下更为坚实的基础,促进培训在人力资源管理中的作用。%Corporate culture plays an important role in human resources training oriented with corporate culture,and leads the strategic training.It is an important work for us to establish a corporate culture-oriented human resources training system that includes training needs analysis,training planning,training implementation and training evaluation.Human resources training oriented with corporate culture can lay a solider foundation for training and promote the role of training in human resource management.

  13. Effect of Transducer Orientation on Errors in Ultrasound Image-Based Measurements of Human Medial Gastrocnemius Muscle Fascicle Length and Pennation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsterlee, Bart; Gandevia, Simon C; Herbert, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is often used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles in human muscles in vivo. Theoretically the most accurate measurements are made when the transducer is oriented so that the image plane aligns with muscle fascicles and, for measurements of pennation, when the image plane also intersects the aponeuroses perpendicularly. However this orientation is difficult to achieve and usually there is some degree of misalignment. Here, we used simulated ultrasound images based on three-dimensional models of the human medial gastrocnemius, derived from magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor images, to describe the relationship between transducer orientation and measurement errors. With the transducer oriented perpendicular to the surface of the leg, the error in measurement of fascicle lengths was about 0.4 mm per degree of misalignment of the ultrasound image with the muscle fascicles. If the transducer is then tipped by 20°, the error increases to 1.1 mm per degree of misalignment. For a given degree of misalignment of muscle fascicles with the image plane, the smallest absolute error in fascicle length measurements occurs when the transducer is held perpendicular to the surface of the leg. Misalignment of the transducer with the fascicles may cause fascicle length measurements to be underestimated or overestimated. Contrary to widely held beliefs, it is shown that pennation angles are always overestimated if the image is not perpendicular to the aponeurosis, even when the image is perfectly aligned with the fascicles. An analytical explanation is provided for this finding.

  14. Peptide backbone orientation and dynamics in spider dragline silk and two-photon excitation in nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eles, P.T

    2005-07-01

    In the first part of the dissertation, spider dragline silk is studied by solid state NMR techniques. The dependence of NMR frequency on molecular orientation is exploited using the DECODER experiment to determine the orientation of the protein backbone within the silk fibre. Practical experimental considerations require that the silk fibres be wound about a cylindrical axis perpendicular to the external magnetic field, complicating the reconstruction of the underlying orientation distribution and necessitating the development of numerical techniques for this purpose. A two-component model of silk incorporating static b-sheets and polyglycine II helices adequately fits the NMR data and suggests that the b-sheets are well aligned along the silk axis (20 FWHM) while the helices are poorly aligned (68 FWHM). The effects of fibre strain, draw rate and hydration on orientation are measured. Measurements of the time-scale for peptide backbone motion indicate that when wet, a strain-dependent fraction of the poorly aligned component becomes mobile. This suggests a mechanism for the supercontraction of silk involving latent entropic springs that undergo a local strain-dependent phase transition, driving supercontraction. In the second part of this dissertation a novel method is developed for exciting NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) by rf irradiation at multiple frequencies that sum to (or differ by) the resonance frequency. This is fundamentally different than traditional NMR experiments where irradiation is applied on-resonance. With excitation outside the detection bandwidth, two-photon excitation allows for detection of free induction signals during excitation, completely eliminating receiver dead-time. A theoretical approach to describing two-photon excitation is developed based on average Hamiltonian theory. An intuition for two-photon excitation is gained by analogy to the coherent absorption of multiple photons requiring conservation of total energy and

  15. Behaviour of humans and behaviour of models in dynamic space

    OpenAIRE

    Nijkamp, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses new trends in quantitative geography research. Modern social science research - including economic and social geography - has in the past decades shown an increasing interest in micro-oriented behaviour of actors. This is inter alia clearly reflected in spatial interaction models (SIMs), where discrete choice approaches have assumed a powerful position. This paper aims to provide in particular a concise review of micro-based research, with the aim to review the potential ...

  16. Brain Prostheses as a Dynamic System (Immortalizing the Human Brain?)

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, Vadim

    2007-01-01

    Interest in development of brain prostheses, which might be proposed to recover mental functions lost due to neuron-degenerative disease or trauma, requires new methods in molecular engineering and nanotechnology to build artificial brain tissues. We develop a Dynamic Core model to analyze complexity of damaged biological neural network as well as transition and recovery of the system functionality due to changes in the system environment. We provide a method to model complexity of physical systems which might be proposed as an artificial tissue or prosthesis. Delocalization of Dynamic Core model is developed to analyze migration of mental functions in dynamic bio-systems which undergo architecture transition induced by trauma. Term Dynamic Core is used to define a set of causally related functions and Delocalization is used to describe the process of migration. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. A holographic model is proposed to construct dynamic e...

  17. Mean cell size and collagen orientation from 2D Fourier analysis on confocal laser scanning microscopy and two-photon fluorescence microscopy on human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Gerald W.; Bakker, Bernard L.; Neerken, Sieglinde; Hendriks, Rob F. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present results from 2D Fourier analysis on 3D stacks of images obtained by confocal laser scanning reflectance microscopy (CLSM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM) on human skin in vivo. CLSM images were obtained with a modified commercial system (Vivascope1000, Lucid Inc, excitation wavelength 830 nm) equipped with a piezo-focusing element (350 μm range) for depth positioning of the objective lens. 2PM was performed with a specially designed set-up with excitation wavelength 730 nm. Mean cell size in the epidermal layer and structural orientation in the dermal layer have been determined as a function of depth by 2D Fourier analysis. Fourier analysis on microscopic images enables automatic non-invasive quantitative structural analysis (mean cell size and orientation) of living human skin.

  18. Brief analysis on human-oriented construction project management%浅析以人为本的工程建设项目管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建军

    2011-01-01

    文中理论联系实际地分析了以人为本的工程建设的项目管理理念,并较深入地探讨了有关做法.诸如:以人为本的管理观念的树立,管理制度的建设,人才队伍建设等.%On the basis of integrating theory with practice, the concept of human-oriented construction project management is analyzed herein, and then the relevant methods, such as establishment of the concept of the human-oriented management, construction of the management system, construction of related talent team, etc.

  19. Trans-saccadic interactions in human parietal and occipital cortex during the retention and comparison of object orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkley, Benjamin T; Baltaretu, Bianca; Crawford, J Douglas

    2016-09-01

    The cortical sites for the trans-saccadic storage and integration of visual object features are unknown. Here, we used a variant of fMRI-Adaptation where subjects fixated to the left or right of a briefly presented visual grating, maintained fixation or saccaded to the opposite side, then judged whether a re-presented grating had the same or different orientation. fMRI analysis revealed trans-saccadic interactions (different > same orientation) in a visual field-insensitive cluster within right supramarginal gyrus. This cluster was located at the anterolateral pole of the parietal eye field (identified in a localizer task). We also observed gaze centered, field-specific interactions (same > different orientation) in an extrastriate cluster overlapping with putative 'V4'. Based on these data and our literature review, we conclude that these supramarginal and extrastriate areas are involved in the retention, spatial updating, and evaluation of object orientation information across saccades.

  20. Dynamic neuronal ensembles: Issues in representing structure change in object-oriented, biologically-based brain models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahie, S.; Zeigler, B.P.; Cho, H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the structure of dynamic neuronal ensembles (DNEs). DNEs represent a new paradigm for learning, based on biological neural networks that use variable structures. We present a computational neural element that demonstrates biological neuron functionality such as neurotransmitter feedback absolute refractory period and multiple output potentials. More specifically, we will develop a network of neural elements that have the ability to dynamically strengthen, weaken, add and remove interconnections. We demonstrate that the DNE is capable of performing dynamic modifications to neuron connections and exhibiting biological neuron functionality. In addition to its applications for learning, DNEs provide an excellent environment for testing and analysis of biological neural systems. An example of habituation and hyper-sensitization in biological systems, using a neural circuit from a snail is presented and discussed. This paper provides an insight into the DNE paradigm using models developed and simulated in DEVS.

  1. Comparison of N and C dynamics in two Norway spruce stands using a process oriented simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersten, H.; Beier, C.

    1998-01-01

    ) was located in south-west Sweden (Skogaby) growing on a loamy sand soil. The old stand (70 years old) was growing on a sandy soil in western Denmark (Klosterhede). Differences in specific rates of processes between the two sites were estimated in terms of parameter values derived by calibration of the model......Nitrogen and carbon dynamics of two Norway spruce stands were compared using a dynamic soil-plant simulation model (SOILN). The objectives were to evaluate differences in properties between the two stands and to explore the consequences on C and N dynamics. The young stand (25 years old...... whereas growth was more similar. The soil carbon balance was positive and soil CIN ratio increased for the young stand. For the old stand the soil carbon balance was negative and the C/N ratio decreased. The soil mineral N levels were much lower in the younger stand which was explained by a higher plant...

  2. Human factors in a dynamic information society: where are we heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, J

    2000-07-01

    Society is becoming increasingly dynamic and integrated owing to the extensive use of information technology. This has several implications that pose new challenges to the human factors profession. In an integrated society, changes and disturbances propagate rapidly and widely and the increasing scale of operations requires also that rare events and circumstances are considered during systems design. In this situation, human factors contributions should be increasingly proactive, not only responding to observed problems, but also, they should be based on models of adaptive human behaviour in complex, dynamic systems. The paper suggests some methodological issues to consider for human factors analyses by designers, evaluators and teachers.

  3. Cortical depth-dependent temporal dynamics of the BOLD response in the human brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siero, Jeroen CW; Petridou, Natalia; Hoogduin, Hans; Luijten, Peter R; Ramsey, Nick F

    2011-01-01

    .... In this study, we characterize the temporal dynamics of the hemodynamic response (HDR) across cortical depth in the human primary motor and visual cortex, at 7T and using very short stimuli and with high spatial and temporal resolution...

  4. Land use change and human systems dynamics: Cotacachi Ecuador 1963-2000

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation reports on a study to analyze land-use change over 40 years in Cotacachi, Ecuador, link land-use change to human system dynamics, and discuss implications for sustainability. BA-2 (SANREM-Andes Research)

  5. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Ziv

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  6. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Omer; Zaritsky, Assaf; Yaffe, Yakey; Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  7. Participants' dynamic orientation to folder navigation when using a VOCA with a touch screen in talk-in-interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norén, Niklas; Svensson, Eva; Telford, Jeanette

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on a conversation-analysis case study of interaction between a child with cerebral palsy and an adult using a computer-based voice output communication aid (VOCA) device with a touch-sensitive screen-input system. Data was collected from video recordings of everyday activities at school. The public nature of the VOCA-mediated turn construction process (hand movements towards the screen, on-screen folder navigation, synthetic speech) displays the projection of the turn under way and its possible continuations. The adult interlocutor orients to such projections when contributing to the topic of the ongoing turn and when initiating repair on its topical development. Contributing may activate the AAC user's further involvement in the ongoing turn, while repair may restrict the AAC user's influence on the topical progression. The findings are relevant for clinical assessment and intervention.

  8. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, Alison; Morris, Lucy; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Depreter, Marianne; Vaidya, Harsh; Stenhouse, Frances; Tomlinson, Simon; Anderson, Richard,; Cupedo, Tom; Cornelissen, Jan; Clare, Blackburn

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genetic mechanisms known to regulate mouse thymus organogenesis are conserved in humans. In addition, we provide molecular evidence that the human thymic epithelium derives solely from the third pharyng...

  9. The sedimentary dynamics in natural and human-influenced delta channel belts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobo, N.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the increased anthropogenic influence on the within-channel belt sedimentary dynamics in the Rhine delta. To make this investigation, the sedimentary dynamics within the life-cycle of a single channel belt were reconstructed for three key periods of increasing human impact, w

  10. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was folded according to the M

  11. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach by virtual microscopy the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was fold

  12. The dynamics of adult neurogenesis in human hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihunwo, Amadi O; Tembo, Lackson H; Dzamalala, Charles

    2016-12-01

    The phenomenon of adult neurogenesis is now an accepted occurrence in mammals and also in humans. At least two discrete places house stem cells for generation of neurons in adult brain. These are olfactory system and the hippocampus. In animals, newly generated neurons have been directly or indirectly demonstrated to generate a significant amount of new neurons to have a functional role. However, the data in humans on the extent of this process is still scanty and such as difficult to comprehend its functional role in humans. This paper explores the available data on as extent of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and makes comparison to animal data.

  13. Human body capacitance: static or dynamic concept? [ESD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Niels M

    1998-01-01

    A standing human body insulated from ground by footwear and/or floor covering is in principle an insulated conductor and has, as such, a capacitance, i.e. the ability to store a charge and possibly discharge the stored energy in a spark discharge. In the human body, the human body capacitance (HBC...... when a substantial part of the flux extends itself through badly defined stray fields. Since the concept of human body capacitance is normally used in a static (electric) context, it is suggested that the HBC be determined by a static method. No theoretical explanation of the observed differences...

  14. Relating dynamic brain states to dynamic machine states: Human and machine solutions to the speech recognition problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Cai; Su, Li; Liu, Xunying; Zhang, Chao; Woodland, Phil; Thwaites, Andrew; Fonteneau, Elisabeth; Marslen-Wilson, William D

    2017-09-01

    There is widespread interest in the relationship between the neurobiological systems supporting human cognition and emerging computational systems capable of emulating these capacities. Human speech comprehension, poorly understood as a neurobiological process, is an important case in point. Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) systems with near-human levels of performance are now available, which provide a computationally explicit solution for the recognition of words in continuous speech. This research aims to bridge the gap between speech recognition processes in humans and machines, using novel multivariate techniques to compare incremental 'machine states', generated as the ASR analysis progresses over time, to the incremental 'brain states', measured using combined electro- and magneto-encephalography (EMEG), generated as the same inputs are heard by human listeners. This direct comparison of dynamic human and machine internal states, as they respond to the same incrementally delivered sensory input, revealed a significant correspondence between neural response patterns in human superior temporal cortex and the structural properties of ASR-derived phonetic models. Spatially coherent patches in human temporal cortex responded selectively to individual phonetic features defined on the basis of machine-extracted regularities in the speech to lexicon mapping process. These results demonstrate the feasibility of relating human and ASR solutions to the problem of speech recognition, and suggest the potential for further studies relating complex neural computations in human speech comprehension to the rapidly evolving ASR systems that address the same problem domain.

  15. Trabecular orientation in the human femur and tibia and the relationship with lower-limb alignment for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Shameem A; Lewis, Sandra; Fosco, Matteo; Tigani, Domenico

    2015-04-13

    Wolff׳s Law suggests that the orientation of trabeculae in human bone changes in response to altered loading patterns. The aim of this study was to investigate trabecular orientation in both the femur and tibia and to compare this with the mechanical axis of the leg. The study involved analysis of radiographs from patients with osteoarthritis of the knee (n=91). For each patient, the trabecular orientation in both the distal femur and proximal tibia was measured from a standard anteroposterior radiograph of the knee and the mechanical axis of the leg was calculated from a long leg view taken while weight bearing. There was a significant correlation between the mechanical axis and the trabecular orientation in each of the regions considered in the femur (r=-0.41, -0.30, 0.52, and 0.23) and tibia (r=-0.27 and 0.31). Multiple regression analysis, with mechanical axis as the dependent variable, produced an R(2) of 0.62. Greater trabecular anisotropy (i.e. greater alignment) was observed in the medial femur and tibia compared to the lateral side (ptibia will reflect the angle of mechanical loading through the knee.

  16. Microbiome dynamics of human epidermis following skin barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Boekhorst, te J.; Bogaard, van den E.H.; Koning, de H.D.; Kerkhof, van de P.M.; Saulnier, D.M.; Swam, van I.I.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Kleerebezem, M.; Schalkwijk, J.; Timmerman, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled metagenomic analyses of many human body sites. Several studies have catalogued the composition of bacterial communities of the surface of human skin, mostly under static conditions in healthy volunteers. Skin injury will disturb th

  17. Modeling Leadership Styles in Human-Robot Team Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Gerardo E.

    2005-01-01

    The recent proliferation of robotic systems in our society has placed questions regarding interaction between humans and intelligent machines at the forefront of robotics research. In response, our research attempts to understand the context in which particular types of interaction optimize efficiency in tasks undertaken by human-robot teams. It is our conjecture that applying previous research results regarding leadership paradigms in human organizations will lead us to a greater understanding of the human-robot interaction space. In doing so, we adapt four leadership styles prevalent in human organizations to human-robot teams. By noting which leadership style is more appropriately suited to what situation, as given by previous research, a mapping is created between the adapted leadership styles and human-robot interaction scenarios-a mapping which will presumably maximize efficiency in task completion for a human-robot team. In this research we test this mapping with two adapted leadership styles: directive and transactional. For testing, we have taken a virtual 3D interface and integrated it with a genetic algorithm for use in &le-operation of a physical robot. By developing team efficiency metrics, we can determine whether this mapping indeed prescribes interaction styles that will maximize efficiency in the teleoperation of a robot.

  18. Modeling Leadership Styles in Human-Robot Team Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Gerardo E.

    2005-01-01

    The recent proliferation of robotic systems in our society has placed questions regarding interaction between humans and intelligent machines at the forefront of robotics research. In response, our research attempts to understand the context in which particular types of interaction optimize efficiency in tasks undertaken by human-robot teams. It is our conjecture that applying previous research results regarding leadership paradigms in human organizations will lead us to a greater understanding of the human-robot interaction space. In doing so, we adapt four leadership styles prevalent in human organizations to human-robot teams. By noting which leadership style is more appropriately suited to what situation, as given by previous research, a mapping is created between the adapted leadership styles and human-robot interaction scenarios-a mapping which will presumably maximize efficiency in task completion for a human-robot team. In this research we test this mapping with two adapted leadership styles: directive and transactional. For testing, we have taken a virtual 3D interface and integrated it with a genetic algorithm for use in &le-operation of a physical robot. By developing team efficiency metrics, we can determine whether this mapping indeed prescribes interaction styles that will maximize efficiency in the teleoperation of a robot.

  19. Microbiome dynamics of human epidermis following skin barrier disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.; Boekhorst, te J.; Bogaard, van den E.H.; Koning, de H.D.; Kerkhof, van de P.M.; Saulnier, D.M.; Swam, van I.I.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Kleerebezem, M.; Schalkwijk, J.; Timmerman, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled metagenomic analyses of many human body sites. Several studies have catalogued the composition of bacterial communities of the surface of human skin, mostly under static conditions in healthy volunteers. Skin injury will disturb

  20. Electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cells performance in donor/acceptor copolymers and fullerene: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Basabe, Y.; Borges, B. G. A. L.; Rocco, M. L. M., E-mail: lsroman@fisica.ufpr.br, E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-909 (Brazil); Marchiori, C. F. N.; Yamamoto, N. A. D.; Koehler, M.; Roman, L. S., E-mail: lsroman@fisica.ufpr.br, E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br [Departament of Physics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba 81531-990 (Brazil); Macedo, A. G. [Departament of Physics, Technological Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba 80230-901 (Brazil)

    2014-04-07

    By combining experimental and theoretical approaches, the electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cell performance in donor/acceptor copolymer poly[2,7-(9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-dibenzosilole)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl) benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PSiF-DBT) films and blended with 6,6.-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (PSiF-DBT:PCBM) were investigated. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical PSiF-DBT UV-Vis absorption spectrum is observed and the main molecular orbitals contributing to the spectrum were determined using DFT single point calculations. Non-coplanar configuration was determined by geometric optimization calculation in isolated PSiF-DBT pentamer and corroborated by angular variation of the sulphur 1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. Edge-on and plane-on molecular orientations were obtained for thiophene and benzothiadiazole units, respectively. A power conversion efficiency up to 1.58%, open circuit voltage of 0.51 V, short circuit current of 8.71 mA/cm{sup 2} and a fill factor of 35% was obtained using blended PSiF-DBT:PCBM as active layer in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Ultrafast electron dynamics in the low-femtosecond regime was evaluated by resonant Auger spectroscopy using the core-hole clock methodology around sulphur 1s absorption edge. Electron delocalization times for PSiF-DBT and PSiF-DBT:PCBM polymeric films were derived for selected excitation energies corresponding to the main transitions in the sulphur 1s NEXAFS spectra. The mixture of PSiF-DBT with PCBM improves the charge transfer process involving the π* molecular orbital of the thiophene units.

  1. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Alison M; Morris, Lucy X; Vroegindeweij, Eric; Depreter, Marianne L G; Vaidya, Harsh; Stenhouse, Frances H; Tomlinson, Simon R; Anderson, Richard A; Cupedo, Tom; Cornelissen, Jan J; Blackburn, C Clare

    2013-05-01

    The thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genetic mechanisms known to regulate mouse thymus organogenesis are conserved in humans. In addition, we provide molecular evidence that the human thymic epithelium derives solely from the third pharyngeal pouch, as in the mouse, in contrast to previous suggestions. Finally, we define the timing of onset of hematopoietic cell colonization and epithelial cell differentiation in the human thymic primordium, showing, unexpectedly, that the first colonizing hematopoietic cells are CD45(+)CD34(int/-). Collectively, our data provide essential information for translation of principles established in the mouse to the human, and are of particular relevance to development of improved strategies for enhancing immune reconstitution in patients.

  2. MANAGING DYNAMIC RISKS IN GLOBAL IT PROJECTS: AGILE RISK-MANAGEMENT USING THE PRINCIPLES OF SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE

    OpenAIRE

    O.-K. D. LEE; D. V. BABY

    2013-01-01

    Risk management in global information technology (IT) projects is becoming a critical area of concern for practitioners. Global IT projects usually span multiple locations involving various culturally diverse groups that use multiple standards and technologies. These multiplicities cause dynamic risks through interactions among internal (i.e., people, process, and technology) and external elements (i.e., business and natural environments) of global IT projects. This study proposes an agile ri...

  3. Dynamic Dislocation Mechanisms For the Anomalous Slip in a Single-Crystal BCC Metal Oriented for "Single Slip"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, L; La Cruz, C

    2007-01-11

    Dislocation substructures of high-purity Mo single crystals deformed under uniaxial compression at room temperature to an axial strain of 0.6% were investigated in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for the {l_brace}0{bar 1}1{r_brace} anomalous slip in bcc metals [1], which is also known as the violation of Schmid law [2]. The test sample was oriented with the stress axis parallel to a nominal ''single-slip'' orientation of [{bar 2} 9 20], in which ({bar 1}01) [111] is the primary slip system that has a maximum Schmid factor (m = 0.5), which requires the lowest stress to operate among the twelve {l_brace}{bar 1}10{r_brace} <111> slip systems. Nevertheless, the recorded stress-strain curve reveals no easy-glide or single-slip stage; work hardening starts immediately after yielding. Moreover, the result of slip trace analysis indicates the occurrence of anomalous slip on both the (011) and (0{bar 1}1) planes, which according to the Schmid law requires relatively higher stresses to operate. TEM examinations of dislocation structures formed on the (101) primary slip plane reveal that in addition to the ({bar 1}01) [111] slip system, the coplanar ({bar 1}01) [1{bar 1}1] slip system which has a much smaller Schmid factor (m = 0.167) is also operative. Similarly, (0{bar 1}1) [111] (m = 0.25) is cooperative with the coplanar (0{bar 1}1) [{bar 1}11] slip system (m = 0.287) on the (0{bar 1}1) slip plane, and (011) [1{bar 1}1] (m = 0.222) is cooperative with the coplanar (011) [11{bar 1}] slip system (m = 0.32) on the (011) plane. The occurrence of {l_brace}0{bar 1}1{r_brace} anomalous slip is accordingly proposed to be originated from the cooperative dislocation motion of the {+-} 1/2 [111] and {+-} 1/2 [1{bar 1}1] dislocations on the ({bar 1}01) slip plane; the mutual interaction and blocking of {+-} 1/2 [111] and {+-} 1/2 [1{bar 1}1] dislocations not only cause an increase of glide resistance to the dislocation motion on the ({bar 1}01) plane

  4. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  5. Mutation of Gly717Phe in human topoisomerase 1B has an effect on enzymatic function, reactivity to the camptothecin anticancer drug and on the linker domain orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenxing; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    –DNA covalent adduct. In this work the role of the Gly717 residue, located in a α-helix structure bridging the active site and the linker domain, has been investigated mutating it in Phe. The mutation gives rise to drug resistance in vivo as observed through a viability assay of yeast cells. In vitro activity...... assays show that the mutant is characterized by a fast religation rate, only partially reduced by the presence of the drug. Comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the native and mutant proteins indicate that the mutation of Gly717 affects the motion orientation of the linker domain, changing its...

  6. Goal-oriented space-time adaptivity for transient dynamics using a modal description of the adjoint solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Francesc; Parés, Núria; Díez, Pedro

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a space-time adaptive strategy for transient elastodynamics. The method aims at computing an optimal space-time discretization such that the computed solution has an error in the quantity of interest below a user-defined tolerance. The methodology is based on a goal-oriented error estimate that requires accounting for an auxiliary adjoint problem. The major novelty of this paper is using modal analysis to obtain a proper approximation of the adjoint solution. The idea of using a modal-based description was introduced in a previous work for error estimation purposes. Here this approach is used for the first time in the context of adaptivity. With respect to the standard direct time-integration methods, the modal solution of the adjoint problem is highly competitive in terms of computational effort and memory requirements. The performance of the proposed strategy is tested in two numerical examples. The two examples are selected to be representative of different wave propagation phenomena, one being a 2D bulky continuum and the second a 2D domain representing a structural frame.

  7. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H

    1996-01-01

    (muscle spindles). The rCBF increased only during dynamic hand contraction; contralateral MS1 (OM +9) by 15% to 64 +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P ... +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P muscle spindles or metabolically sensitive nerve fibers, although the involvement of mechanoreceptors (group III or Ib) cannot be excluded....

  8. Cerebral reorganisation of human hand movement following dynamic immobilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, BM; Coert, JH; Stenekes, MW; Leenders, KL; Paans, AMJ; Nicolai, JRA

    2003-01-01

    Surgical treatment of a flexor tendon lesion of the hand is followed by a 6-week period of dynamic immobilisation. This is achieved by the elastic strings of a Kleinert splint, enabling only passive and no active flexor movements. After such immobilisation, the appearance of a temporary clumsy hand

  9. Population Receptive Field Dynamics in Human Visual Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haak, Koen V.; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Morland, Antony B.

    2012-01-01

    Seminal work in the early nineties revealed that the visual receptive field of neurons in cat primary visual cortex can change in location and size when artificial scotomas are applied. Recent work now suggests that these single neuron receptive field dynamics also pertain to the neuronal population

  10. Comparative biogeochemistry–ecosystem–human interactions on dynamic continental margins..

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Levin, L.A.; Liu, K-K.; Emeis, K.-C.; Breitburg, D.L.; Cloern, J.; Deutsch, C.; Giani, M.; Goffart, A.; Hofmann, E.E.; Lachkar, Z.; Limburg, K.; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, E.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ragueneau, O.; Rabouille, C.; Sarkar, S.K.; Swaney, D.P.; Wassman, P.; Wishner, K.F.

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1...

  11. Towards a Fast Dynamic Model of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    4.5m for the pulmonary vascular tree. According to Guyton & Hall (2000), about 5 L is considered normal for an adult human, and the area distribution...decreases further, and even falls below the equilibrium pressure. Guyton & Hall (2000) reports that normal mean pressures are 100 mmHg in the arteries, 20...the order of 100 times faster than realtime. Five liters is considered a normal volume for an adult human circulatory system ( Guyton & Hall, 2000

  12. Scanning electron microscopy of collagen fiber orientation in the bone lamellar system in non-decalcified human samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannarale, L; Braidotti, P; d'Alba, L; Gaudio, E

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies on collagen fiber orientation have led to different interpretations and theories about the fiber arrangement in the lamellar compact bone. The purpose of this investigation was to provide new and more in-depth data on fiber arrangement in the lamellar bone system in order to explain the orientation of the fiber bundles. This was carried out by applying a simple method of preparation which permitted observation of non-decalcified samples. A previously isolated Haversian system was subjected to slow bending up to reaching the fracture point. Hence, the fracture surface was observed by SEM. The same samples were also observed by polarized light microscopy. A significant alternation of fiber orientation in the adjacent lamellae was observed. Different domains of differently oriented fibers were present within the same lamella; conjugating fibers connecting adjacent lamellae were also shown. This method avoided most of the artifacts due to chemical treatment of bone samples. The results can be easily interpreted by means of the same criteria applied in mechanics for the studying of composite materials.

  13. Design and implementation of a user-oriented speech recognition interface: the synergy of technology and human factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Sietse H.

    1994-01-01

    The design and implementation of a user-oriented speech recognition interface are described. The interface enables the use of speech recognition in so-called interactive voice response systems which can be accessed via a telephone connection. In the design of the interface a synergy of technology

  14. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A USER-ORIENTED SPEECH RECOGNITION INTERFACE - THE SYNERGY OF TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN-FACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLOOSTERMAN, SH

    The design and implementation of a user-oriented speech recognition interface are described. The interface enables the use of speech recognition in so-called interactive voice response systems which can be accessed via a telephone connection. In the design of the interface a synergy of technology

  15. Social neuroendocrinology of human aggression: examining the role of competition-induced testosterone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, J M; Olmstead, N A

    2015-02-12

    A large body of evidence indicates that individual differences in baseline concentrations of testosterone (T) are only weakly correlated with human aggression. Importantly, T concentrations are not static, but rather fluctuate rapidly in the context of competitive interactions, suggesting that acute fluctuations in T may be more relevant for our understanding of the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying variability in human aggression. In this paper, we provide an overview of the literature on T and human competition, with a primary focus on the role of competition-induced T dynamics in the modulation of human aggression. In addition, we discuss potential neural mechanisms underlying the effect of T dynamics on human aggression. Finally, we highlight several challenges for the field of social neuroendocrinology and discuss areas of research that may enhance our understanding of the complex bi-directional relationship between T and human social behavior.

  16. Human Security Analysis as a Framework for Value-Oriented Governance – the example of climate change.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ ‘Good governance’ may be viewed as governance which effectively promotes human rights, human security and human development. The paper discusses human security analysis, which in certain ways offers an integration of these ‘human’ perspectives and also a ‘social’

  17. Dynamics of climate-based malaria transmission model with age-structured human population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addawe, Joel; Pajimola, Aprimelle Kris

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed to study the dynamics of malaria transmission with periodic birth rate of the vector and an age-structure for the human population. The human population is divided into two compartments: pre-school (0-5 years) and the rest of the human population. We showed the existence of a disease-free equilibrium point. Using published epidemiological parameters, we use numerical simulations to show potential effect of climate change in the dynamics of age-structured malaria transmission. Numerical simulations suggest that there exists an asymptotically attractive solution that is positive and periodic.

  18. Vision-based navigation in a dynamic environment for virtual human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Sun, Ji-Zhou; Zhang, Jia-Wan; Li, Ming-Chu

    2004-06-01

    Intelligent virtual human is widely required in computer games, ergonomics software, virtual environment and so on. We present a vision-based behavior modeling method to realize smart navigation in a dynamic environment. This behavior model can be divided into three modules: vision, global planning and local planning. Vision is the only channel for smart virtual actor to get information from the outside world. Then, the global and local planning module use A* and D* algorithm to find a way for virtual human in a dynamic environment. Finally, the experiments on our test platform (Smart Human System) verify the feasibility of this behavior model.

  19. Assessing Socioeconomic Impacts of Cascading Infrastructure Disruptions in a Dynamic Human-Infrastructure Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    directional impacts from system failure to population response, the impacts of human activities on physical system performances should also be considered...ER D C TR -1 6- 11 Human Infrastructure System Assessment for Military Operations Assessing Socioeconomic Impacts of Cascading...Infrastructure Disruptions in a Dynamic Human -Infrastructure Network Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc h La bo ra to ry Liqun Lu, Xin

  20. Constraint Study for a Hand Exoskeleton: Human Hand Kinematics and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fai Chen Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, the number of projects studying the human hand from the robotic point of view has increased rapidly, due to the growing interest in academic and industrial applications. Nevertheless, the complexity of the human hand given its large number of degrees of freedom (DoF within a significantly reduced space requires an exhaustive analysis, before proposing any applications. The aim of this paper is to provide a complete summary of the kinematic and dynamic characteristics of the human hand as a preliminary step towards the development of hand devices such as prosthetic/robotic hands and exoskeletons imitating the human hand shape and functionality. A collection of data and constraints relevant to hand movements is presented, and the direct and inverse kinematics are solved for all the fingers as well as the dynamics; anthropometric data and dynamics equations allow performing simulations to understand the behavior of the finger.

  1. 面向业务的动态任务分配工作模型定义%Definition for business-oriented dynamic task allocation work model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春芳; 徐建军

    2014-01-01

    To solve the deficiency of the complete business-oriented dynamic task allocation work model and the unclarity of working relationships among the model’s constitutions ,a strategy-first dynamic task allocation work model S-DTAWM was pro-posed .Using the mathematical set theory , the components , relationships and executing algorithms of the work model S-DTAWM were formalized ,and a foundation for the research and the practice of the universal task allocation system was built . Then cases used in the approving and examining process for the bank credit were provided to illustrate the use of the work model .%为解决面向业务的完整动态任务分配工作模型缺失以及组成内容之间工作关系语义不清晰的问题,提出策略优先的动态任务分配工作模型S-DTAWM。利用集合论的描述语言,形式化定义S-DTAWM 各构件内容、工作关系及执行算法,为面向业务的通用动态任务分配系统构建奠定基础。通过相应模型在银行信贷审批过程的具体案例表明其应用方法。

  2. An Estimation of Human Error Probability of Filtered Containment Venting System Using Dynamic HRA Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seunghyun; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The human failure events (HFEs) are considered in the development of system fault trees as well as accident sequence event trees in part of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). As a method for analyzing the human error, several methods, such as Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP), Human Cognitive Reliability (HCR), and Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) are used and new methods for human reliability analysis (HRA) are under developing at this time. This paper presents a dynamic HRA method for assessing the human failure events and estimation of human error probability for filtered containment venting system (FCVS) is performed. The action associated with implementation of the containment venting during a station blackout sequence is used as an example. In this report, dynamic HRA method was used to analyze FCVS-related operator action. The distributions of the required time and the available time were developed by MAAP code and LHS sampling. Though the numerical calculations given here are only for illustrative purpose, the dynamic HRA method can be useful tools to estimate the human error estimation and it can be applied to any kind of the operator actions, including the severe accident management strategy.

  3. Dynamic systems and inferential information processing in human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Karl; Fink, Bernhard; Renninger, LeeAnn

    2002-12-01

    Research in human communication on an ethological basis is almost obsolete. The reasons for this are manifold and lie partially in methodological problems connected to the observation and description of behavior, as well as the nature of human behavior itself. In this chapter, we present a new, non-intrusive, technical approach to the analysis of human non-verbal behavior, which could help to solve the problem of categorization that plagues the traditional approaches. We utilize evolutionary theory to propose a new theory-driven methodological approach to the 'multi-unit multi-channel modulation' problem of human nonverbal communication. Within this concept, communication is seen as context-dependent (the meaning of a signal is adapted to the situation), as a multi-channel and a multi-unit process (a string of many events interrelated in 'communicative' space and time), and as related to the function it serves. Such an approach can be utilized to successfully bridge the gap between evolutionary psychological research, which focuses on social cognition adaptations, and human ethology, which describes every day behavior in an objective, systematic way.

  4. Telomere dynamics in human cells reprogrammed to pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Suhr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs have enormous potential in the development of cellular models of human disease and represent a potential source of autologous cells and tissues for therapeutic use. A question remains as to the biological age of IPSCs, in particular when isolated from older subjects. Studies of cloned animals indicate that somatic cells reprogrammed to pluripotency variably display telomere elongation, a common indicator of cell "rejuvenation." METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined telomere lengths in human skin fibroblasts isolated from younger and older subjects, fibroblasts converted to IPSCs, and IPSCs redifferentiated through teratoma formation and explant culture. In IPSCs analyzed at passage five (P5, telomeres were significantly elongated in 6/7 lines by >40% and approximated telomere lengths in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. In cell lines derived from three IPSC-teratoma explants cultured to P5, two displayed telomeres shortened to lengths similar to input fibroblasts while the third line retained elongated telomeres. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While these results reveal some heterogeneity in the reprogramming process with respect to telomere length, human somatic cells reprogrammed to pluripotency generally displayed elongated telomeres that suggest that they will not age prematurely when isolated from subjects of essentially any age.

  5. Anisotropic dynamics of water ultraconfined in macroscopically oriented channels of single-crystal beryl: a multifrequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M; Mamontov, Eugene; ben Ishai, Paul; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2013-11-01

    The properties of fluids can be significantly altered by the geometry of their confining environments. While there has been significant work on the properties of such confined fluids, the properties of fluids under ultraconfinement, environments where, at least in one plane, the dimensions of the confining environment are similar to that of the confined molecule, have not been investigated. This paper investigates the dynamic properties of water in beryl (Be(3)Al(2)Si(6)O(18)), the structure of which contains approximately 5-Å-diam channels parallel to the c axis. Three techniques, inelastic neutron scattering, quasielastic neutron scattering, and dielectric spectroscopy, have been used to quantify these properties over a dynamic range covering approximately 16 orders of magnitude. Because beryl can be obtained in large single crystals we were able to quantify directional variations, perpendicular and parallel to the channel directions, in the dynamics of the confined fluid. These are significantly anisotropic and, somewhat counterintuitively, show that vibrations parallel to the c-axis channels are significantly more hindered than those perpendicular to the channels. The effective potential for vibrations in the c direction is harder than the potential in directions perpendicular to it. There is evidence of single-file diffusion of water molecules along the channels at higher temperatures, but below 150 K this diffusion is strongly suppressed. No such suppression, however, has been observed in the channel-perpendicular direction. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra include an intramolecular stretching O-H peak at ~465 meV. As this is nearly coincident with that known for free water molecules and approximately 30 meV higher than that in liquid water or ice, this suggests that there is no hydrogen bonding constraining vibrations between the channel water and the beryl structure. However, dielectric spectroscopic measurements at higher temperatures and lower

  6. Cell diversity and network dynamics in photosensitive human brain organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadrato, Giorgia; Nguyen, Tuan; Macosko, Evan Z; Sherwood, John L; Min Yang, Sung; Berger, Daniel R; Maria, Natalie; Scholvin, Jorg; Goldman, Melissa; Kinney, Justin P; Boyden, Edward S; Lichtman, Jeff W; Williams, Ziv M; McCarroll, Steven A; Arlotta, Paola

    2017-05-04

    In vitro models of the developing brain such as three-dimensional brain organoids offer an unprecedented opportunity to study aspects of human brain development and disease. However, the cells generated within organoids and the extent to which they recapitulate the regional complexity, cellular diversity and circuit functionality of the brain remain undefined. Here we analyse gene expression in over 80,000 individual cells isolated from 31 human brain organoids. We find that organoids can generate a broad diversity of cells, which are related to endogenous classes, including cells from the cerebral cortex and the retina. Organoids could be developed over extended periods (more than 9 months), allowing for the establishment of relatively mature features, including the formation of dendritic spines and spontaneously active neuronal networks. Finally, neuronal activity within organoids could be controlled using light stimulation of photosensitive cells, which may offer a way to probe the functionality of human neuronal circuits using physiological sensory stimuli.

  7. Unfolding large-scale online collaborative human dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Yilong; Zhou, Changsong

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale interacting human activities underlie all social and economic phenomena, but quantitative understanding of regular patterns and mechanism is very challenging and still rare. Self-organized online collaborative activities with precise record of event timing provide unprecedented opportunity. Our empirical analysis of the history of millions of updates in Wikipedia shows a universal double power-law distribution of time intervals between consecutive updates of an article. We then propose a generic model to unfold collaborative human activities into three modules: (i) individual behavior characterized by Poissonian initiation of an action, (ii) human interaction captured by a cascading response to others with a power-law waiting time, and (iii) population growth due to increasing number of interacting individuals. This unfolding allows us to obtain analytical formula that is fully supported by the universal patterns in empirical data. Our modeling approaches reveal "simplicity" beyond complex interac...

  8. CO2 fluxes and ecosystem dynamics at five European treeless peatlands – merging data and process oriented modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Metzger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The carbon dioxide (CO2 exchange of five different peatland systems across Europe with a wide gradient in landuse intensity, water table depth, soil fertility and climate was simulated with the process oriented CoupModel. The aim of the study was to find out to what extent CO2 fluxes measured at different sites, can be explained by common processes and parameters implemented in the model. The CoupModel was calibrated to fit measured CO2 fluxes, soil temperature, snow depth and leaf area index (LAI and resulting differences in model parameters were analysed. Finding site independent model parameters would mean that differences in the measured fluxes could be explained solely by model input data: water table, meteorological data, management and soil inventory data. The model, utilizing a site independent configuration for most of the parameters, captured seasonal variability in the major fluxes well. Parameters that differed between sites included the rate of soil organic decomposition, photosynthetic efficiency, and regulation of the mobile carbon (C pool from senescence to shooting in the next year. The largest difference between sites was the rate coefficient for heterotrophic respiration. Setting it to a common value would lead to underestimation of mean total respiration by a factor of 2.8 up to an overestimation by a factor of 4. Despite testing a wide range of different responses to soil water and temperature, heterotrophic respiration rates were consistently lowest on formerly drained sites and highest on the managed sites. Substrate decomposability, pH and vegetation characteristics are possible explanations for the differences in decomposition rates. Applying common parameter values for the timing of plant shooting and senescence, and a minimum temperature for photosynthesis, had only a minor effect on model performance, even though the gradient in site latitude ranged from 48° N (South-Germany to 68° N (northern Finland. This was also

  9. Orienteering injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering.

  10. Control Oriented System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The research goals for this grant were to obtain algorithms for control oriented system identification is to construct dynamical models of systems...and measured information. Algorithms for this type of nonlinear system identification have been given that produce models suitable for gain scheduled

  11. Molecular orientation via a dynamically induced pulse-train: Wave packet dynamics of NaI in a static electric field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquetand, P.; Materny, A.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2004-01-01

    We regard the rovibrational wave packet dynamics of NaI in a static electric field after femtosecond excitation to its first electronically excited state. The following quasibound nuclear wave packet motion is accompanied by a bonding situation changing from covalent to ionic. At times when...... the charge separation is present, i.e., when the bond-length is large, a strong dipole moment exists and rotational excitation takes place. Upon bond contraction, the then covalently bound molecule does not experience the external field. This scenario repeats itself periodically. Thus, the vibrational...

  12. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, D.; Munoz, J.; Braam, S.R.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Linding, R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during

  13. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in

  14. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, D.; Munoz, J.; Braam, S.R.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Linding, R.; Heck, A.J.R.; Mummery, C.L.; Krijgsveld, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during different

  15. Recent human history governs global ant invasion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleo Bertelsmeier; Sébastien Ollier; Andrew Liebhold; Laurent Keller

    2017-01-01

    Human trade and travel are breaking down biogeographic barriers, resulting in shifts in the geographical distribution of organisms, yet it remains largely unknown whether different alien species generally follow similar spatiotemporal colonization patterns and how such patterns are driven by trends in global trade. Here, we analyse the global distribution of 241 alien...

  16. Dynamics of thymus organogenesis and colonization in early human development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Farley (Alison); L.X. Morris (Lucy); E.M. Vroegindeweij (Eric); M.L.G. Depreter (Marianne); H. Vaidya (Harsh); F.H. Stenhouse (Frances); S.R. Tomlinson (Simon); R.A. Anderson (Richard); T. Cupedo (Tom); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); B.C. Clare (Blackburn)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe thymus is the central site of T-cell development and thus is of fundamental importance to the immune system, but little information exists regarding molecular regulation of thymus development in humans. Here we demonstrate, via spatial and temporal expression analyses, that the genet

  17. Human strategic reasoning in dynamic games: Experiments, logics, cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Sujata; Halder, Tamoghna; Sharma, Khyati; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.This article provides a three-way interaction between experiments, logic and cognitive modelling so as to bring out a shared perspective among these diverse areas, aiming towards better understanding and better modelling of human strategic reasoning in dynami

  18. Phosphorylation dynamics during early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Muñoz, Javier; Braam, Stefan R

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells self-renew indefinitely and possess characteristic protein-protein networks that remodel during differentiation. How this occurs is poorly understood. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we analyzed the (phospho)proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) during...

  19. Spontaneous Functional Network Dynamics and Associated Structural Substrates in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhong eLiao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent imaging connectomics studies have demonstrated that the spontaneous human brain functional networks derived from resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI include many non-trivial topological properties, such as highly efficient small-world architecture and densely connected hub regions. However, very little is known about dynamic functional connectivity (D-FC patterns of spontaneous human brain networks during rest and about how these spontaneous brain dynamics are constrained by the underlying structural connectivity. Here, we combined sub-second multiband R-fMRI data with graph-theoretical approaches to comprehensively investigate the dynamic characteristics of the topological organization of human whole-brain functional networks, and then employed diffusion imaging data in the same participants to further explore the associated structural substrates. At the connection level, we found that human whole-brain D-FC patterns spontaneously fluctuated over time, while homotopic D-FC exhibited high connectivity strength and low temporal variability. At the network level, dynamic functional networks exhibited time-varying but evident small-world and assortativity architecture, with several regions (e.g., insula, sensorimotor cortex and medial prefrontal cortex emerging as functionally persistent hubs (i.e., highly connected regions while possessing large temporal variability in their degree centrality. Finally, the temporal characteristics (i.e., strength and variability of the connectional and nodal properties of the dynamic brain networks were significantly associated with their structural counterparts. Collectively, we demonstrate the economical, efficient and flexible characteristics of dynamic functional coordination in large-scale human brain networks during rest, and highlight their relationship with underlying structural connectivity, which deepens our understandings of spontaneous brain network dynamics in humans.

  20. Market Orientation Capabilities: A Study of Learning Processes in Market-Oriented Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Silkoset, Ragnhild

    2009-01-01

    The literature operates with three perspectives on market orientation. These include market orientation as behavior (Kohli and Jaworski 1990; Narver and Slater 1990), market orientation as a unique resource (Hunt and Morgan 1995) and market orientation as a dynamic learning capability (Sinkula 1994; Day 1994b). A company's level of market orientation will vary with regard to the perspectives, including factors affecting a company’s degree of market orientation and the effect...