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Sample records for human drugs interactions

  1. Drug interactions at the human placenta: what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eRubinchik-Stern

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women (and their fetuses are treated with a significant number of prescription and nonprescription medications. Interactions among those drugs may affect their efficacy and toxicity in both mother and fetus. Whereas interactions that result in altered drug concentrations in maternal plasma are detectable, those involving modulation of placental transfer mechanisms are rarely reflected by altered drug concentrations in maternal plasma. Therefore, they are often overlooked. Placental-mediated interactions are possible because the placenta is not only a passive diffusional barrier, but also expresses a variety of influx and efflux transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes. Current data on placental-mediated drug interactions are limited. In rodents, pharmacological or genetic manipulations of placental transporters significantly affect fetal drug exposure. In contrast, studies in human placentae suggest that the magnitude of such interactions is modest in most cases. Nevertheless, under certain circumstances, such interactions may be of clinical significance. This review describes currently known mechanisms of placental-mediated drug interactions and the potential implications of such interactions in humans. Better understanding of those mechanisms is important for minimizing fetal toxicity from drugs while improving their efficacy when directed to treat the fetus.

  2. Drug Interaction API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Interaction API is a web service for accessing drug-drug interactions. No license is needed to use the Interaction API. Currently, the API uses DrugBank for its...

  3. Investigation of interaction of human platelet membrane components with anticoagulant drugs Abciximab and Eptifibatide.

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    Anna Sankiewicz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abciximab (Abci and eptifibatide (Epti are antiaggregate drugs which may reduce thrombotic complications in acute coronary syndromes. The aim of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and Abci or Epti, and the influence of these drugs on the phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane. The interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and antiaggregate drugs were investigated using the Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging technique (SPRI. Phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylserine (PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM were first immobilized onto the gold chip surface. The phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane was determined by the HPLC. Only PI, PS, PE and PC were determined. Human platelets treated 'in vitro' with Abci or Epti exhibit changes in the phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane. The ratio of PS decreases and PC rises. The SPRI distinctly shows interactions between phospholipids and glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa, and between the phospholipid-glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa complex and Abci or Epti. The interaction between phospholipids and glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa is growing in the sequence: PIinteraction between phospholipid-glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa complex and Abci/Epti is growing in the sequence: PSinteractions.

  4. Human hepatoma cell lines on gas foaming templated alginate scaffolds for in vitro drug-drug interaction and metabolism studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampella, A; Rizzitelli, G; Donati, F; Mazzarino, M; de la Torre, X; Botrè, F; Giardi, M F; Dentini, M; Barbetta, A; Massimi, M

    2015-12-25

    Liver in vitro systems that allow reliable prediction of major human in vivo metabolic pathways have a significant impact in drug screening and drug metabolism research. In the present study, a novel porous scaffold composed of alginate was prepared by employing a gas-in-liquid foaming approach. Galactose residues were introduced on scaffold surfaces to promote cell adhesion and to enhance liver specific functions of the entrapped HepG2/C3A cells. Hepatoma cells in the gal-alginate scaffold showed higher levels of liver specific products (albumin and urea) and were more responsive to specific inducers (e.g. dexamethasone) and inhibitors (e.g. ketoconazole) of the CYP3A4 system than in conventional monolayer culture. HepG2/C3A cells were also more efficient in terms of rapid elimination of testosterone, used as a model substance, at rates comparable to those of in vivo excretion. In addition, an improvement in metabolism of testosterone, in terms of phase II metabolite formation, was also observed when the more differentiated HepaRG cells were used. Together the data suggest that hepatocyte/gas templated alginate-systems provide an innovative high throughput platform for in vitro drug metabolism and drug-drug interaction studies, with broad fields of application, and might provide a valid tool for minimizing animal use in preclinical testing of human relevance.

  5. Herbal drugs and drug interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Gül Dülger

    2014-01-01

    Herbal drugs are defined as any form of a plant or plant product that contains a single herb or combinations of herbs that are believed to have complementary effects. Although they are considered to be safe, because they are natural, they may have various adverse effects, and may interact with other herbal products or conventional drugs. These interactions are especially important for drugs with narrow therapeutic indices.In the present study, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions ...

  6. Investigation of interaction of human platelet membrane components with anticoagulant drugs Abciximab and Eptifibatide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gorodkiewicz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abciximab (Abci and eptifibatide (Epti are antiaggregate drugs which may reduce thrombotic complications inacute coronary syndromes. The aim of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and Abci or Epti, and the influence of these drugs on the phospholipid ratio in the plateletmembrane. The interaction between the phospholipid-GPIIb/IIIa glycoprotein complex and antiaggregate drugs were investigatedusing the Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging technique (SPRI. Phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI, phosphatidylserine(PS, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin (SM were first immobilizedonto the gold chip surface. The phospholipid ratio in the platelet membrane was determined by the HPLC. Only PI,PS, PE and PC were determined. Human platelets treated 'in vitro' with Abci or Epti exhibit changes in the phospholipidratio in the platelet membrane. The ratio of PS decreases and PC rises. The SPRI distinctly shows interactions between phospholipidsand glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa, and between the phospholipid-glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa complex and Abci or Epti.The interaction between phospholipids and glycoprotein GPIIb/IIIa is growing in the sequence: PI<interactions.

  7. Study the interactions between human serum albumin and two antifungal drugs: fluconazole and its analogue DTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Lin; Yao, Huankai; Wang, Chenyin; Tam, Kin Y

    2014-11-01

    Binding affinities of fluconazole and its analogue 2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,3-di(1H-1,2,4-triazol-yl)-2-propanol (DTP) to human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated under approximately human physiological conditions. The obtained result indicated that HSA could generate fluorescent quenching by fluconazole and DTP because of the formation of non-fluorescent ground-state complexes. Binding parameters calculated from the Stern-Volmer and the Scatchard equations showed that fluconazole and DTP bind to HSA with binding affinities of the order 10(4)L/mol. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that the binding was characterized by negative enthalpy and positive entropy changes, suggesting that the binding reaction was exothermic. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction were found to be the predominant intermolecular forces stabilizing the drug-protein. The effect of metal ions on the binding constants of fluconazole-HSA complex suggested that the presence of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) ions could decrease the free drug level and extend the half-life in the systematic circulation. Docking experiments revealed that fluconazole and DTP binds in HSA mainly by hydrophobic interaction with the possibility of hydrogen bonds formation between the drugs and the residues Arg 222, Lys 199 and Lys 195 in HSA.

  8. Data on overlapping brain disorders and emerging drug targets in human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network

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    Avijit Podder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intercommunication of Dopamine Receptors (DRs with their associate protein partners is crucial to maintain regular brain function in human. Majority of the brain disorders arise due to malfunctioning of such communication process. Hence, contributions of genetic factors, as well as phenotypic indications for various neurological and psychiatric disorders are often attributed as sharing in nature. In our earlier research article entitled “Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN: a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network” (Podder et al., 2014 [1], we had depicted a holistic interaction map of human Dopamine Receptors. Given emphasis on the topological parameters, we had characterized the functionality along with the vulnerable properties of the network. In support of this, we hereby provide an additional data highlighting the genetic overlapping of various brain disorders in the network. The data indicates the sharing nature of disease genes for various neurological and psychiatric disorders in dopamine receptors connecting protein-protein interactions network. The data also indicates toward an alternative approach to prioritize proteins for overlapping brain disorders as valuable drug targets in the network.

  9. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  10. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-05-03

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as "indispensable," "neutral," or "dispensable," which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network's control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets.

  11. Food-Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Yar Khan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction, food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction. A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least fooddrug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient.

  12. Herbal drugs and drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Dülger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal drugs are defined as any form of a plant or plant product that contains a single herb or combinations of herbs that are believed to have complementary effects. Although they are considered to be safe, because they are natural, they may have various adverse effects, and may interact with other herbal products or conventional drugs. These interactions are especially important for drugs with narrow therapeutic indices.In the present study, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of some most commanly used herbals (St John's wort, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, ginger, garlic, echinacea, ephedra and valerian with the conventional drugs were reviewed. Pharmacokinetic interactions involve mainly induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoproteins by the herbal medicine, thus changing the absorption and/or elimination rate and consequently the efficacy of the concommitantly used drugs. St John's wort, a well known enzyme inducer, decreases the efficacy of most of the other drugs that are known to be the substrates of these enzymes.Pharmacodynamic interactions may be due to additive or synergistic effects which results in enhanced effect or toxicity, or herbal medicines with antagonistic properties reduce drug efficacy and result in therapeutic failure. For exampla, St John's wort may have synergistic effects with other antidepressant drugs used by the patient, resulting in increased CNS effects.Herbals like ginseng, ginkgo, garlic, ginger were reported to increase bleeding time, thus potentiating the effect of anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents. In conclusion, patients should be warned against the interaction between the herbal products and conventional medicines.

  13. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies on the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keswani, Neelam [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Kishore, Nand, E-mail: nandk@chem.iitb.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Human serum albumin exhibits two binding sites for mitoxantrone. > Discrepancies in calorimetric and spectroscopic results clarify binding sites. > Effect of ionic strength on binding permitted detailed analysis of interactions. > Electrostatic interactions predominate in binding. > One binding site on protein does not have tryptophan in immediate vicinity. - Abstract: Binding of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone with the protein human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), in combination with fluorescence, UV-visible, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The thermodynamic parameters of binding have been evaluated from ITC and spectroscopic results and compared. The ITC results demonstrate that the binding of mitoxantrone with HSA occurs according to two sets of binding sites on the protein as opposed to the fluorescence and UV-visible spectroscopic results. Blockage of one binding site on HSA for mitoxantrone in the presence of NaCl indicates strong involvement of electrostatic interactions in the binding of the drug with the protein. An insignificant temperature dependence of the association constant observed in fluorescence measurements suggests a very low enthalpy of binding which is in close agreement with the results obtained from ITC measurements. Fluorescence life time measurements suggest formation of a static complex between mitoxantrone and HSA. The discrepancies in the ITC and fluorescence results suggest that one of the binding sites on the protein for mitoxantrone does not contain tryptophan residue in its immediate vicinity. The calorimetric and spectroscopic results have provided quantitative information on the binding of mitoxantrone with HSA and suggest that the binding is dominated by electrostatic interactions.

  14. CONCEPT OF DRUG INTERACTION

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    Singh Nidhi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug interaction is an increasingly important cause of adverse reactions (ADR, and is the modification of the effect of one drug (object by the prior or concomitant administration of another drug (precipitant drug. Drug interaction may either enhance or diminish the intended effect of one or both drugs. For example severe haemorrhage may occur if warfarin and salicylates (asprin are combined. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. The aim of present review is to throw light on the concept of drug interaction.

  15. Interactions Between Sirolimus and Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: Competitive Binding for Human Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaei, Arash; Bolandnazar, Soheila; Valizadeh, Hadi; Hasani, Leila; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was investigating the effects of three anti-inflammatory drugs, on Sirolimus protein biding. The binding site of Sirolimus on human serum albumin (HSA) was also determined. Methods: Six different concentrations of Sirolimus were separately exposed to HSA at pH 7.4 and 37°C. Ultrafiltration method was used for separating free drug; then free drug concentrations were measured by HPLC. Finally, Sirolimus protein binding parameters was calculated using Scatchard plots. The same processes were conducted in the presence of NSAIDs at lower concentration of albumin and different pH conditions. To characterize the binding site of Sirolimus on albumin, the free concentration of warfarin sodium and Diazepam, site I and II specific probes, bound to albumin were measured upon the addition of increasing Sirolimus concentrations. Results: Based on the obtained results presence of Diclofenac, Piroxicam and Naproxen, could significantly decrease the percentage of Sirolimus protein binding. The Binding reduction was the most in the presence of Piroxicam. Sirolimus-NSAIDs interactions were increased in higher pH values and also in lower albumin concentrations. Probe displacement study showed that Sirolimus may mainly bind to site I on albumin molecule. Conclusion: More considerations in co-administration of NSAIDs and Sirolimus is recommended. PMID:27478785

  16. Drug-drug interactions: antiretroviral drugs and recreational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staltari, Orietta; Leporini, Christian; Caroleo, Benedetto; Russo, Emilio; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are living longer, however, some patients encounter co- morbidities which sometimes require treatment. Therefore, during the treatment with ARV drugs these patients could take several recreational drugs (e.g. amphetamines, hallucinogenes, opiates, or alcohol) with a possible development of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In particular, Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) are mainly excreted through the kidney and are not substrates of the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein, therefore the DDIs during this treatment are minimal. In contrast, the other ARV drugs (i.e. non-nucleoside reversetranscriptase inhibitors, Protease inhibitors, Integrase inhibitors, chemokine receptor 5 antagonists and HIV-fusion inhibitors) are an important class of antiretroviral medications that are frequent components of HAART regimens but show several DDIs related to interaction with the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein. In this paper we will review data concerning the possibility of DDI in HIV patients treated with ARV and taking recreational drugs.

  17. Drug-nutrient interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander

    2013-07-01

    Drug-nutrient interactions are defined as physical, chemical, physiologic, or pathophysiologic relationships between a drug and a nutrient. The causes of most clinically significant drug-nutrient interactions are usually multifactorial. Failure to identify and properly manage drug-nutrient interactions can lead to very serious consequences and have a negative impact on patient outcomes. Nevertheless, with thorough review and assessment of the patient's history and treatment regimens and a carefully executed management strategy, adverse events associated with drug-nutrient interactions can be prevented. Based on the physiologic sequence of events after a drug or a nutrient has entered the body and the mechanism of interactions, drug-nutrient interactions can be categorized into 4 main types. Each type of interaction can be managed using similar strategies. The existing data that guide the clinical management of most drug-nutrient interactions are mostly anecdotal experience, uncontrolled observations, and opinions, whereas the science in understanding the mechanism of drug-nutrient interactions remains limited. The challenge for researchers and clinicians is to increase both basic and higher level clinical research in this field to bridge the gap between the science and practice. The research should aim to establish a better understanding of the function, regulation, and substrate specificity of the nutrient-related enzymes and transport proteins present in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as assess how the incidence and management of drug-nutrient interactions can be affected by sex, ethnicity, environmental factors, and genetic polymorphisms. This knowledge can help us develop a true personalized medicine approach in the prevention and management of drug-nutrient interactions.

  18. Control Strategy for Anaesthetic Drug Dosage with Interaction Among Human Physiological Organs Using Optimal Fractional Order PID Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Saptarshi; Maharatna, Koushik

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an efficient control strategy for physiological interaction based anaesthetic drug infusion model is explored using the fractional order (FO) proportional integral derivative (PID) controllers. The dynamic model is composed of several human organs by considering the brain response to the anaesthetic drug as output and the drug infusion rate as the control input. Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) is employed to obtain the optimal set of parameters for PID/FOPID controller structures. With the proposed FOPID control scheme much less amount of drug-infusion system can be designed to attain a specific anaesthetic target and also shows high robustness for +/-50% parametric uncertainty in the patient's brain model.

  19. [Fluoroquinolones. Drug interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, G; Dănilă, G

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes clinically relevant drug-drug interactions for fluoroquinolones: antiacids containing aluminum and magnesium salts, iron or zinc preparations, sucralfate, cimetidine, ranitidine, warfarina, cyclosporin, rifampin, oral contraceptive steroids, benzodiazepine, probenecid, beta-lactam antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, metronidazole, theophylline, caffeine.

  20. Allosteric drugs: the interaction of antitumor compound MKT-077 with human Hsp70 chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousaki, Aikaterini; Miyata, Yoshinari; Jinwal, Umesh K; Dickey, Chad A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-08-19

    Hsp70 (heat shock protein 70 kDa) chaperones are key to cellular protein homeostasis. However, they also have the ability to inhibit tumor apoptosis and contribute to aberrant accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neuronal cells affected by tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Hence, Hsp70 chaperones are increasingly becoming identified as targets for therapeutic intervention in these widely abundant diseases. Hsp70 proteins are allosteric machines and offer, besides classical active-site targets, also opportunities to target the mechanism of allostery. In this work, it is demonstrated that the action of the potent anticancer compound MKT-077 (1-ethyl-2-[[3-ethyl-5-(3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-yliden)]-4-oxothiazolidin-2-ylidenemethyl] pyridinium chloride) occurs through a differential interaction with Hsp70 allosteric states. MKT-077 is therefore an "allosteric drug." Using NMR spectroscopy, we identify the compound's binding site on human HSPA8 (Hsc70). The binding pose is obtained from NMR-restrained docking calculations, subsequently scored by molecular-dynamics-based energy and solvation computations. Suggestions for the improvement of the compound's properties are made on the basis of the binding location and pose.

  1. Molecular modeling and multispectroscopic studies of the interaction of hepatitis B drug, adefovir dipivoxil with human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabadi, Nahid, E-mail: nahidshahabadi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Medical Biology Research Center (MBRC) Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Falsafi, Monireh [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadidi, Saba [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Medical Biology Research Center (MBRC) Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The interaction of hepatitis B drug, adefovir dipivoxil with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by using UV–vis, fluorometric, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking techniques. The results indicated that the binding of the drug to HSA caused fluorescence quenching through static quenching mechanism with binding constant of 1.3×103 M{sup −1}. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the hydrophobic force contacts are the major forces in the stability of protein-drug complex (ΔH>0 and ΔS>0). The displacement experiments using the site probes viz., warfarin and ibuprofen showed that adefovir dipivoxil could bind to the site III of HSA. The results of CD and UV–vis spectroscopy indicated that the binding of the drug induced some conformational changes in HSA. Furthermore, the study of molecular docking also confirmed binding of adefovir dipivoxil to the site III of HSA by hydrophobic interaction. - Highlights: • The interaction of adefovir dipivoxil, drug for the treatment of HIV and HBV with human serum albumin (HSA) is investigated. • The drug bound to HSA by hydrophobic force and induced some conformational changes in HSA. • The study of molecular docking showed that adefovir dipivoxil could bind to the site III of HSA mainly.

  2. [Drug interactions and their management in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarcos Ortíz de Barrón, A; Martínez Vázquez, J M; Lorenzo Zúñiga, V; Barrio Gómez, E

    1998-03-01

    In fact patients with human immune deficiency virus infection are in treatment with multidrugs regimen, also in antiretrovirical therapy as profilaxis and treatment opportunist infections and other problems, in other fact the high tase of intravenous drugs users in meta-done programming (one of the principal transmission cause). Consequently is necessary an rational approximation to this problem also in the deepth knowledgment of his mechanisms and his management in the daily clinical practice.

  3. Herb-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugh-Berman, A

    2000-01-08

    Concurrent use of herbs may mimic, magnify, or oppose the effect of drugs. Plausible cases of herb-drug interactions include: bleeding when warfarin is combined with ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), garlic (Allium sativum), dong quai (Angelica sinensis), or danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza); mild serotonin syndrome in patients who mix St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) with serotonin-reuptake inhibitors; decreased bioavailability of digoxin, theophylline, cyclosporin, and phenprocoumon when these drugs are combined with St John's wort; induction of mania in depressed patients who mix antidepressants and Panax ginseng; exacerbation of extrapyramidal effects with neuroleptic drugs and betel nut (Areca catechu); increased risk of hypertension when tricyclic antidepressants are combined with yohimbine (Pausinystalia yohimbe); potentiation of oral and topical corticosteroids by liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra); decreased blood concentrations of prednisolone when taken with the Chinese herbal product xaio chai hu tang (sho-salko-to); and decreased concentrations of phenytoin when combined with the Ayurvedic syrup shankhapushpi. Anthranoid-containing plants (including senna [Cassia senna] and cascara [Rhamnus purshiana]) and soluble fibres (including guar gum and psyllium) can decrease the absorption of drugs. Many reports of herb-drug interactions are sketchy and lack laboratory analysis of suspect preparations. Health-care practitioners should caution patients against mixing herbs and pharmaceutical drugs.

  4. Quantitative Prediction of Human Renal Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions of Organic Anion Transporter Substrates Using In Vitro Transport Data: A Relative Activity Factor Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathialagan, Sumathy; Piotrowski, Mary A; Tess, David A; Feng, Bo; Litchfield, John; Varma, Manthena V

    2017-04-01

    Organic anion transporters (OATs) are important in the renal secretion, and thus, the clearance, of many drugs; and their functional change can result in pharmacokinetic variability. In this study, we applied transport rates measured in vitro using OAT-transfected human embryonic kidney cells to predict human renal secretory and total renal clearance of 31 diverse drugs. Selective substrates to OAT1 (tenofovir), OAT2 (acyclovir and ganciclovir), and OAT3 (benzylpenicillin, oseltamivir acid) were used to obtain relative activity factors (RAFs) for these individual transporters by relating in vitro transport clearance (after physiologic scaling) to in vivo secretory clearance. Using the estimated RAFs (0.64, 7.3, and 4.1, respectively, for OAT1, OAT2, and OAT3, respectively) and the in vitro active clearances, renal secretory clearance and total renal clearance were predicted with average fold errors (AFEs) of 1.89 and 1.40, respectively. The results show that OAT3-mediated transport play a predominant role in renal secretion for 22 of the 31 drugs evaluated. This mechanistic static approach was further applied to quantitatively predict renal drug-drug interactions (AFE ∼1.6) of the substrate drugs with probenecid, a clinical probe OAT inhibitor. In conclusion, the proposed in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach is the first comprehensive attempt toward mechanistic modeling of renal secretory clearance based on routinely employed in vitro cell models.

  5. Thermodynamic study on the interaction between anti-tumor drug tegafur and human serum albumin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The changes of thermodynamic properties of the system on interaction between tegafur and human serum albumin (HSA) and the changes of secondary structure units of HSA in the system at 298.15 K have been investigated by the Nano-Watt-Scale isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), the Langmuirs binding model and the circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry.(C) 2007 Lin Wei Li. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro profiling of the metabolism and drug-drug interaction of tofogliflozin, a potent and highly specific sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, using human liver microsomes, human hepatocytes, and recombinant human CYP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Mizuki; Kawashima, Kosuke; Yamaguchi, Koji; Nagao, Shunsuke; Sato, Mika; Suzuki, Masayuki; Honda, Kiyofumi; Hagita, Hitoshi; Kuhlmann, Olaf; Poirier, Agnes; Fowler, Stephen; Funk, Christoph; Simon, Sandrine; Aso, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Sachiya; Ishigai, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    Abstract 1. The metabolism and drug-drug interaction (DDI) risk of tofogliflozin, a potent and highly specific sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, were evaluated by in vitro studies using human liver microsomes, human hepatocytes, and recombinant human CYPs. 2. The main metabolite of tofogliflozin was the carboxylated derivative (M1) in human hepatocytes, which was the same as in vivo. The metabolic pathway of tofogliflozin to M1 was considered to be as follows: first, tofogliflozin was catalyzed to the primary hydroxylated derivative (M4) by CYP2C18, CYP4A11 and CYP4F3B, then M4 was oxidized to M1. 3. Tofogliflozin had no induction potential on CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. Neither tofogliflozin nor M1 had inhibition potential on CYPs, with the exception of a weak CYP2C19 inhibition by M1. 4. Not only are multiple metabolic enzymes involved in the tofogliflozin metabolism, but the drug is also excreted into urine after oral administration, indicating that tofogliflozin is eliminated through multiple pathways. Thus, the exposure of tofogliflozin would not be significantly altered by DDI caused by any co-administered drugs. Also, tofogliflozin seems not to cause significant DDI of co-administered drugs because tofogliflozin has no CYP induction or inhibition potency, and the main metabolite M1 has no clinically relevant CYP inhibition potency.

  7. DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH DIAZEPAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazepam is a benzodiazepine derivative with anxyolitic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant, antitremor, and amnestic activity. It is metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P (CYP 450 enzyme system. Diazepam is N-demethylated by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 to the active metabolite N-desmethyldiazepam, and is hydroxylated by CYP3A4 to the active metabolite temazepam. N-desmethyl-diazepam and temazepam are both further metabolized to oxazepam. Concomitant intake of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isozymes involved in the biotransformation of diazepam may alter plasma concentrations of this drug, although this effect is unlikely to be associated with clinically relevant interactions.The goal of this article was to review the current literature on clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions with diazepam.A search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted for original research and review articles published in English between January 1971. and May 2011. Among the search terms were drug interactions, diazepam, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, and cytochrome P450. Only articles published in peer-reviewed journals were included, and meeting abstracts were excluded. The reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional publications.Diazepam is substantially sorbed by the plastics in flexible containers, volume control set chambers, and tubings of intravenous administration sets. Manufacturers recommend not mixing with any other drug or solution in syringe or solution, although diazepam is compatible in syringe with cimetidine and ranitidine, and in Y-site with cisatracurium, dobutamine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, nafcillin, quinidine gluconate, remifentanil, and sufentanil. Diazepam is compatible with: dextrose 5% in water, Ringers injection, Ringers injection lactated and sodium chloride 0.9%. Emulsified diazepam is compatible with Intralipid and Nutralipid.Diazepam has low potential

  8. Interactions between Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Selective Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Velkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs act as intracellular shuttles for fatty acids as well as lipophilic xenobiotics to the nucleus, where these ligands are released to a group of nuclear receptors called the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. PPAR mediated gene activation is ultimately involved in maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the transcriptional regulation of metabolic enzymes and transporters that target the activating ligand. Here we show that liver- (L- FABP displays a high binding affinity for PPAR subtype selective drugs. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping and proteolytic protection experiments show that the binding of the PPAR subtype selective drugs produces conformational changes that stabilize the portal region of L-FABP. NMR chemical shift perturbation studies also revealed that L-FABP can form a complex with the PPAR ligand binding domain (LBD of PPARα. This protein-protein interaction may represent a mechanism for facilitating the activation of PPAR transcriptional activity via the direct channeling of ligands between the binding pocket of L-FABP and the PPARαLBD. The role of L-FABP in the delivery of ligands directly to PPARα via this channeling mechanism has important implications for regulatory pathways that mediate xenobiotic responses and host protection in tissues such as the small intestine and the liver where L-FABP is highly expressed.

  9. Study on the interaction of antiviral drug 'Tenofovir' with human serum albumin by spectral and molecular modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hadidi, Saba; Feizi, Foroozan

    2015-03-01

    This study was designed to examine the interaction of Tenofovir (Ten) with human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions. The binding of drugs with human serum albumin is a crucial factor influencing the distribution and bioactivity of drugs in the body. To understand the action mechanisms between Ten and HSA, the binding of Ten with HSA was investigated by a combined experimental and computational approach. UV-vis results confirmed that Ten interacted with HSA to form a ground-state complex and values of the Stern-Volmer quenching constant indicate the presence of a static component in the quenching mechanism. As indicated by the thermodynamic parameters (positive ΔH and ΔS values), hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in the Ten-HSA complex. Through the site marker competitive experiment, Ten was confirmed to be located in site I of HSA. Furthermore, UV-vis absorption spectra, synchronous fluorescence spectrum and CD data were used to investigate the structural change of HSA molecules with addition of Ten, the results indicate that the secondary structure of HSA molecules was changed in the presence of Ten. The experimental results were in agreement with the results obtained via molecular docking study.

  10. Interaction of an antiepileptic drug, lamotrigine with human serum albumin (HSA): Application of spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureshghi, Fatemeh; Ghandforoushan, Parisa; Safarnejad, Azam; Soltani, Somaieh

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine (an epileptic drug) interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence, UV-Vis, FTIR, CD spectroscopic techniques, and molecular modeling methods. Binding constant (Kb) of 5.74×10(3) and number of binding site of 0.97 showed that there is a slight interaction between lamotrigine and HSA. Thermodynamic studies was constructed using the flourimetric titrations in three different temperatures and the resulted data used to calculate the parameters using Vant Hoff equation. Decreased Stern Volmer quenching constant by enhanced temperature revealed the static quenching mechanism. Negative standard enthalpy (ΔH) and standard entropy (ΔS) changes indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were dominant forces which facilitate the binding of Lamotrigine to HSA, the results were confirmed by molecular docking studies which showed no hydrogen binding. The FRET studies showed that there is a possibility of energy transfer between Trp214 and lamotrigine. Also the binding of lamotrigine to HSA in the studied concentrations was not as much as many other drugs, but the secondary structure of the HSA was significantly changed following the interaction in a way that α-helix percentage was reduced from 67% to 57% after the addition of lamotrigine in the molar ratio of 4:1 to HSA. According to the docking studies, lamotrigine binds to IB site preferably.

  11. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs, and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0 and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III. Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs, i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor, and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR, due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse

  12. Drug-drug Interaction between Losartan and Paclitaxel in Human Liver Microsomes with Different CYP2C8 Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Yuji; Senda, Asuna; Toda, Takaki; Hayakawa, Toru; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2015-06-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C8*3 allele is associated with reduced metabolic activity of paclitaxel. This study was aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of losartan on paclitaxel metabolism in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and to determine the impact of the CYP2C8*3 polymorphism. HLMs that contained the CYP2C8*1 homozygote (HL60) or CYP2C8*3 heterozygote (HL54) genotype were used for the inhibition study. Losartan, at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, significantly inhibited paclitaxel metabolism by 29% and 57% in the HL60 (p losartan and the CYP3A4-selective inhibitors, erythromycin and ketoconazole, caused a greater inhibition of the paclitaxel metabolism than quercetin, a CYP2C8-selective inhibitor. This demonstrated that the paclitaxel metabolism was mainly catalysed by CYP3A4 in HL60. There were no significant differences found for the inhibitory effects caused by the four inhibitors of the paclitaxel metabolism in HL54, indicating that both CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 play important roles in paclitaxel metabolism in HL54. These findings suggest that 50 μmol/L of losartan inhibits both CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 in HLMs. In summary, losartan inhibited paclitaxel metabolism, with concentrations over 50 μmol/L in HLMs. The CYP2C8*3 allele carriers are likely susceptible to the interactions of losartan and CYP3A4 inhibitors to paclitaxel metabolism.

  13. Study on the interaction of the epilepsy drug, zonisamide with human serum albumin (HSA) by spectroscopic and molecular docking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khorshidi, Aref; Moghadam, Neda Hossinpour

    2013-10-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of zonisamide (ZNS) with the transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA) employing UV-Vis, fluorometric, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking techniques. The results indicated that binding of ZNS to HSA caused strong fluorescence quenching of HSA through static quenching mechanism, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts are the major forces in the stability of protein ZNS complex and the process of the binding of ZNS with HSA was driven by enthalpy (ΔH = -193.442 kJ mol-1). The results of CD and UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that the binding of this drug to HSA induced conformational changes in HSA. Furthermore, the study of molecular docking also indicated that zonisamide could strongly bind to the site I (subdomain IIA) of HSA mainly by hydrophobic interaction and there were hydrogen bond interactions between this drug and HSA, also known as the warfarin binding site.

  14. Searching for unwanted drug interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ognjenović, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are interweaving effects between two or more drugs that can have desirable or harmful effects on patients health. In this thesis we for searched harmful drug interactions. Our approach is based on two machine learning algorithms for association rule mining. We use two given hierarchies, one for drugs (ATC), the other for diseases (ICD), and one proprietary interaction database LexiComp. A generalized association rule algorithm tries to find rules that contain basic ...

  15. Drug interactions with oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J M; Christensen, L K

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs may be influenced by a large number of other drugs. Some of these combinations (e.g. phenylbutazone, sulphaphenazole) may result in cases of severe hypoglycaemic collapse. Tolbutamide and chlorpropamide should never be given to a patient without a prior careful check of which medicaments are already being given. Similarly, no drug should be given to a diabetic treated with tolbutamide and chlorpropamide without consideration of the possibility of interaction phenomena.

  16. Prediction of drug-drug interactions from chemogenomic and gene-gene interactions and analysis of drug-drug interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between multiple drugs administered to an organism concurrently, whether in the form of synergy or antagonism, are of clinical relevance. Moreover, un-derstanding the mechanisms and nature of drug-drug interactions is of great practical and theoretical interest. Work has previously been done on gene-gene and gene-drug interactions, but the prediction and rationalization of drug-drug interactions from this data is not straightforward. We present a strategy for attacking this p...

  17. A Comprehensive Review of Drug-Drug Interactions with Metformin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Brøsen, Kim; Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is the world's most commonly used oral glucose-lowering drug for type 2 diabetes, and this is mainly because it protects against diabetes-related mortality and all-cause mortality. Although it is an old drug, its mechanism of action has not yet been clarified and its pharmacokinetic...... pathway is still not fully understood. There is considerable inter-individual variability in the response to metformin, and this has led to many drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies of metformin. In this review, we describe both in vitro and human interaction studies of metformin both as a victim...

  18. Interaction of human organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2) and sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) with antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marada, Venkata V V R; Flörl, Saskia; Kühne, Annett; Müller, Judith; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Hagos, Yohannes

    2015-01-01

    The ability of an antineoplastic drug to exert its cytostatic effect depends largely on the balance between its uptake into and extrusion from the cancer cells. ATP driven efflux transporter proteins drive the export of antineoplastic drugs and play a pivotal role in the development of chemoresistance. As regards uptake transporters, comparably less is known on their impact in drug action. In the current study, we characterized the interactions of two uptake transporter proteins, expressed mainly in the liver; the organic anion transporter 2 (OAT2, encoded by the SLC22A7 gene) and the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP, encoded by the SLC10A1 gene), stably transfected in human embryonic kidney cells, with some antineoplastic agents that are routinely being used in cancer chemotherapy. Whereas NTCP did not show any strong interactions with the cytostatics tested, we observed a very strong inhibition of OAT2 mediated [(3)H] cGMP uptake in the presence of bendamustine, irinotecan and paclitaxel. The Ki values of OAT2 for bendamustine, irinotecan and paclitaxel were determined to be 43.3±4.33μM, 26.4±2.34μM and 10.4±0.45μM, respectively. Incubation of bendamustine with OAT2 expressing cells increased the caspase-3 activity, and this increase was inhibited by simultaneous incubation with bendamustine and probenecid, a well-known inhibitor of OATs, suggesting that bendamustine is a substrate of OAT2. A higher accumulation of irinotecan was observed in OAT2 expressing cells compared to control pcDNA cells by HPLC analysis of cell lysates. The accumulation was diminished in the presence of cGMP, the substrate we used to functionally characterize OAT2, suggesting specificity of this uptake and the fact that OAT2 mediates uptake of irinotecan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The interaction of the chemotherapeutic drug chlorambucil with human glutathione transferase A1-1: kinetic and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpusas, Michael; Axarli, Irine; Chiniadis, Lykourgos; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Bethanis, Kostas; Scopelitou, Katholiki; Clonis, Yannis D; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes that contribute to cellular detoxification by catalysing the nucleophilic attack of glutathione (GSH) on the electrophilic centre of a number of xenobiotic compounds, including several chemotherapeutic drugs. In the present work we investigated the interaction of the chemotherapeutic drug chlorambucil (CBL) with human GSTA1-1 (hGSTA1-1) using kinetic analysis, protein crystallography and molecular dynamics. In the presence of GSH, CBL behaves as an efficient substrate for hGSTA1-1. The rate-limiting step of the catalytic reaction between CBL and GSH is viscosity-dependent and kinetic data suggest that product release is rate-limiting. The crystal structure of the hGSTA1-1/CBL-GSH complex was solved at 2.1 Å resolution by molecular replacement. CBL is bound at the H-site attached to the thiol group of GSH, is partially ordered and exposed to the solvent, making specific interactions with the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations based on the crystal structure indicated high mobility of the CBL moiety and stabilization of the C-terminal helix due to the presence of the adduct. In the absence of GSH, CBL is shown to be an alkylating irreversible inhibitor for hGSTA1-1. Inactivation of the enzyme by CBL followed a biphasic pseudo-first-order saturation kinetics with approximately 1 mol of CBL per mol of dimeric enzyme being incorporated. Structural analysis suggested that the modifying residue is Cys112 which is located at the entrance of the H-site. The results are indicative of a structural communication between the subunits on the basis of mutually exclusive modification of Cys112, indicating that the two enzyme active sites are presumably coordinated.

  20. The interaction of the chemotherapeutic drug chlorambucil with human glutathione transferase A1-1: kinetic and structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Karpusas

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs are enzymes that contribute to cellular detoxification by catalysing the nucleophilic attack of glutathione (GSH on the electrophilic centre of a number of xenobiotic compounds, including several chemotherapeutic drugs. In the present work we investigated the interaction of the chemotherapeutic drug chlorambucil (CBL with human GSTA1-1 (hGSTA1-1 using kinetic analysis, protein crystallography and molecular dynamics. In the presence of GSH, CBL behaves as an efficient substrate for hGSTA1-1. The rate-limiting step of the catalytic reaction between CBL and GSH is viscosity-dependent and kinetic data suggest that product release is rate-limiting. The crystal structure of the hGSTA1-1/CBL-GSH complex was solved at 2.1 Å resolution by molecular replacement. CBL is bound at the H-site attached to the thiol group of GSH, is partially ordered and exposed to the solvent, making specific interactions with the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations based on the crystal structure indicated high mobility of the CBL moiety and stabilization of the C-terminal helix due to the presence of the adduct. In the absence of GSH, CBL is shown to be an alkylating irreversible inhibitor for hGSTA1-1. Inactivation of the enzyme by CBL followed a biphasic pseudo-first-order saturation kinetics with approximately 1 mol of CBL per mol of dimeric enzyme being incorporated. Structural analysis suggested that the modifying residue is Cys112 which is located at the entrance of the H-site. The results are indicative of a structural communication between the subunits on the basis of mutually exclusive modification of Cys112, indicating that the two enzyme active sites are presumably coordinated.

  1. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine.

  2. Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t stir medicine into your food or take capsules apart (unless your doctor tells you to) because this may change the way the drug works.Don’t take vitamin pills at the same time you take medicine ...

  3. Drug-mineral interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of drugs such as glucocorticoids and thyroid extract on calcium metabolism is unknown. However, several other medications affect the excretion and intestinal absorption of calcium. A controlled study was carried out to investigate these aspects. Urinary calcium was determined for 3 months during the long-term intake of the antituberculous drug isoniazid (INH) and of the antibiotic tetracycline. The effect of the diuretics furosemide and hydrochlorothiazide, of several aluminum-containing antacids, of thyroid extract and of corticosteroids was also studied. Metabolic balances of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc were determined, as well as the intestinal absorption of calcium using Ca 47. Plasma levels, urinary and fecal excretions of Ca 47 were determined. All drugs tested increased urinary calcium except for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. Regarding the effect of corticosteroids: the intestinal absorption of calcium was unchanged after the short-term use and was very high after long-term use. The studies have shown that several commonly used drugs induce an increase in urinary calcium excretion which may contribute to calcium loss, if this increase persists for prolonged periods of time. Urinary excretions of phosphorus, magnesium and zinc increased in some of the studies.

  4. Interactions of human P-glycoprotein transport substrates and inhibitors at the drug binding domain: Functional and molecular docking analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Onat; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Valoti, Massimo; Frosini, Maria; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Rhodamine 123 (R123) transport substrate sensitizes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to inhibition by compound 2c (cis-cis) N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl ester isomer in a concentration-dependent manner in human MDR1-gene transfected mouse T-lymphoma L5178 cells as shown previously. By contrast, epirubicin (EPI) concentration changes left unaltered 2c IC50 values of EPI efflux. To clarify this discrepancy, defined molecular docking (DMD) analyses of 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters, the highly flexible aryl ester analog 4, and several P-gp substrate/non-substrate inhibitors were performed on human P-gp drug- or nucleotide-binding domains (DBD or NBD). DMD measurements yielded lowest binding energy (LBE, kcal/mol) values (mean ± SD) ranging from -11.8 ± 0.54 (valspodar) to -3.98 ± 0.01 (4). Lys234, Ser952 and Tyr953 residues formed H-bonds with most of the compounds. Only 2c docked also at ATP binding site (LBE value of -6.9 ± 0.30 kcal/mol). Inhibition of P-gp-mediated R123 efflux by 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters and 4 significantly correlated with LBE values. DMD analysis of EPI, (3)H-1EPI, (3)H-2EPI, (14)C-1EPI, (14)C-2EPI, R123 and 2c before and after previous docking of each of them indicated that pre-docking of either 2c or EPI significantly reduced LBE of both EPI and R123, and that of both (3)H-2EPI and (14)C-2EPI, respectively. Since the clusters of DBD amino acid residues interacting with EPI were different, if EPI docked alone or after pre-docking of EPI or 2c, the existence of alternative secondary binding site for EPI on P-gp is credible. In conclusion, 2c may allocate the drug-binding pocket and reduce strong binding of EPI and R123 in agreement with P-gp inhibition experiments, where 2c reduced efflux of EPI and R123.

  5. Identification of clinically significant drug-drug interactions in cardiac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions in cardiac intensive care units of two tertiary care ... Keywords: Pharmacy service, Drug interactions, Critical/intensive care, Adverse outcomes. Tropical .... Standard error.

  6. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  7. Virtual-screening targeting Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 integrase-lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75 interaction for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wan-Gang; Liu, Bai-Nan; Yuan, Jun-Fa

    2015-02-01

    Three integrase (IN) inhibitors have been approved by FDA for clinical treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. This stimulates more researchers to focus their studies on this target for anti-HIV drug development. Three steps regarding of IN activity have been validated for inhibitor discovery: strand transfer, 3'-terminal processing, and IN-lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 interaction. Among them, IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction is a new target validated in recent years. Emergence of drug-resistant virus strains makes this target appealing to pharmacologists. Compared with the traditional screening methods such as AlphaScreen and cell-based screening developed for IN inhibitor discovery, virtual screening is a powerful technique in modern drug discovery. Here we summarized the recent advances of virtual-screening targeting IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction. The combined application of virtual screening and experiments in drug discovery against IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction sheds light on anti-HIV research and drug discovery.

  8. Interaction of the recently approved anticancer drug nintedanib with human acute phase reactant α 1-acid glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Ponnusamy, Kalaiarasan; Subbarao, Naidu; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the interaction of the newly approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Nintedanib (NTB) and Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein (AAG) has been carried out by utilizing UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking techniques. The obtained results showed enhancement of the UV-Vis peak of the protein upon binding to NTB with the fluorescence intensity of AAG is being quenched by NTB via the formation of ground state complex (i.e. Static quenching). Forster distance (Ro) obtained from fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is found to be 2.3 nm. The calculated binding parameters from the modified Stern-Volmer equation showed that NTB binds to AAG with a binding constant in the order of 103. Conformational alteration of the protein upon its binding to NTB was confirmed by the circular dichroism. Dynamic light scattering results showed that the binding interaction of NTB leads to the reduction in hydrodynamic radii of AAG. Dynamic molecular docking results showed that the NTB fits into the central binding cavity in AAG and hydrophobic interaction played the key role in the binding process also the docking studies were performed with methotrexate and clofarabine drugs to look into the common binding regions of these drugs on AAG molecule, it was found that five amino acid residues namely Phe 113, Arg 89, Tyr 126, Phe 48 and Glu 63 were common among the binding regions of three studied drugs this phenomenon of overlapping binding regions may influence the drug transport by the carrier molecule in turn affecting the metabolism of the drug and treatment outcome.

  9. P-glycoprotein-Based Loperamide-Cyclosporine Drug Interaction at the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier: Prediction from In Vitro Studies and Extrapolation to Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Peng; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that the rat can quantitatively predict the verapamil-cyclopsorine A (CsA) drug-drug interaction (DDI) at the human blood-brain barrier (BBB). In addition, the potency (EC50) of CsA to inhibit rat BBB P-gp can be predicted from in vitro studies in MDRI-transfected cells. To assess if these excellent agreements extend to other substrates, we determined the magnitude of P-gp-based DDI at the rat BBB between loperamide (Lop) or its metabolite, N-desmethyl Lop (dLop), and escalating...

  10. Incidence of potential drug-drug interactions with antidiabetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzic, I; Bacic-Vrca, V

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to achieve normoglycemia more than one antidiabetic agent is usually needed. Diabetes is associated with several comorbidities and patients with diabetes are often treated with multiple medications. Therefore, patients with diabetes are especially exposed to drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence and type of potential DDIs of antidiabetic drugs in patients with diabetes. This retrospective study analyzed pharmacy record data of 225 patients with diabetes mellitus. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients who were taking at least one antidiabetic agent during the period of six months were included. We investigated associated therapy in that period in order to identify potential DDIs with antidiabetic therapy. Potential interactions were identified by Lexicomp Lexi-Interat Online (Lexi-Comp, Inc., Hudson, USA) software which categorizes potential DDIs according to clinical significance in five types (A, B, C, D and X). Categories C, D and X are of clinical concern and always require medical attention (therapy monitoring, therapy modification or avoiding combination). We found that 80.9% of patients had at least one potential category C interaction while there were no D and X interactions. Most frequently encountered potential DDI (n = 176) included antidiabetic drugs and thiazide or thiazide like diuretics. Patients with diabetes are exposed to a large number of potential clinically significant DDIs that may require appropriate monitoring. Using databases of DDIs could be helpful in reducing the risk of potential clinically significant DDIs.

  11. Mechanisms and Consequences of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David J

    2017-03-01

    Medications used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections present a special challenge with respect to the management of potential and actual drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The HIV and HCV treatments may interact with each other, and also interact with drugs of abuse and/or with medications used to treat substance abuse. Possible mechanisms of these DDIs generally include induction or inhibition of activity/expression of human cytochromes P450, glucuronosyl transferases, or energy-dependent transport proteins. These DDIs can be complex and time-dependent in nature. Because time and resources available for new drug development are necessarily limited, not all potential DDIs can be evaluated via clinical pharmacokinetic studies in the course of development of HIV, HCV, and substance abuse treatments. Strategies are needed to refine existing in vitro models and screening techniques to allow more efficient targeting of resources to those clinical studies having the highest impact in terms of enhancing medication effectiveness and patient safety.

  12. Food and drug interactions: a general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ötles, Semih; Senturk, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well known and identified that drug-drug interactions exist, the recognition of importance of food and drug interactions to practice has been growing much slower. On the other hand, drug-food/nutrient interactions continue to grow with the common use of medications. Beside the awareness of this type of interactions, food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. Drug-food interactions take place mechanistically due to altered intestinal transport and metabolism, or systemic distribution, metabolism and excretion. In addition, some people have greater risk of food and drug interactions who have a poor diet, have serious health problems, childrens and pregnant women. In this article, basic informations about importance, classifications, transporters and enzymes of drug and nutrient interaction are given and some specific examples of both drug and nutrients and influences on each other are included.

  13. Human breast cancer resistance protein : Interactions with steroid drugs, hormones, the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine, and transport of cimetidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavek, P; Merino, G; Wagenaar, E; Bolscher, E; Novotna, M; Jonker, JW; Schinkel, AH

    2005-01-01

    The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is an ATP-binding cassette drug efflux transporter that extrudes xenotoxins from cells, mediating drug resistance and affecting the pharmacological behavior of many compounds. To study the interaction of human wild-type BCRP with steroid drugs, hormo

  14. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem C. Alffenaar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs.

  15. A Prediction Method for P-glycoprotein-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions at the Human Blood-Brain Barrier From Blood Concentration-Time Profiles, Validated With PET Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Akihiro; Karch, Rudolf; Bauer, Martin; Traxl, Alexander; Zeitlinger, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish physiologically based pharmacokinetic models to predict in humans the brain concentration-time profiles and P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated brain drug-drug interactions between the model Pgp substrate (R)-[(11)C]verapamil (VPM), the model dual Pgp/breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) substrate [(11)C]tariquidar (TQD), and the Pgp inhibitor tariquidar. The model predictions were validated with results from positron emission tomography studies in humans. Using these physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, the differences between predicted and observed areas under the concentration-time curves (AUC) of VPM and TQD in the brain were within a 1.2-fold and 2.5-fold range, respectively. Also, brain AUC increases of VPM and TQD after Pgp inhibitor administration were predicted with 2.5-fold accuracy when in vitro inhibition constant or half-maximum inhibitory concentration values of tariquidar were used. The predicted rank order of the magnitude of AUC increases reflected the results of the clinical positron emission tomography studies. Our results suggest that the established models can predict brain exposure from the respective blood concentration-time profiles and rank the magnitude of the Pgp-mediated brain drug-drug interaction potential for both Pgp and Pgp/BCRP substrates in humans. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Data-driven prediction of adverse drug reactions induced by drug drug interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-08

    AbdulHameed, Kamal Kumar, Xueping Yuˆ, Anders Wallqvist* and Jaques Reifman Abstract Background: The expanded use of multiple drugs has increased the...induced effects in humans, we can also apply this method to predict ADRs caused by individual drugs. In the present study, we expanded this method to...drug-drug interactions. Trends Pharmacol Sci . 2013;34(3):178–84. doi:10.1016/j.tips.2013.01.006. 7. Vilar S, Harpaz R, Uriarte E, Santana L, Rabadan R

  17. HIV Treatment: What is a Drug Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV Treatment What is a Drug Interaction? (Last updated ... Are drug interactions a problem for people with HIV? Treatment with HIV medicines (called antiretroviral therapy or ...

  18. Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements and Other Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements and Other Drugs Updated:Oct ... celebrations when eating habits tend to change. Common Medication Interactions Drugs with Food and Beverages Food and ...

  19. Drug interaction studies on new drug applications: current situations and regulatory views in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Drug interaction studies on new drug applications (NDAs) for new molecular entities (NMEs) approved in Japan between 1997 and 2008 are examined in the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA). The situations of drug interaction studies in NDAs have changed over the past 12 years, especially in metabolizing enzyme and transporter-based drug interactions. Materials and approaches to study drug-metabolizing enzyme-based drug interactions have improved, and become more rational based on mechanistic theory and new technologies. On the basis of incremental evidence of transporter roles in human pharmacokinetics, transporter-based drug interactions have been increasingly studied during drug development and submitted in recent NDAs. Some recently approved NMEs include transporter-based drug interaction information in their package inserts (PIs). The regulatory document "Methods of Drug Interaction Studies," in addition to recent advances in science and technology, has also contributed to plan and evaluation of drug interaction studies in recent new drug development. This review summarizes current situations and further discussion points on drug interaction studies in NDAs in Japan.

  20. Drug-pyridoxal phosphate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, M; Gessert, C F; Al-Sayegh, A

    1982-01-01

    In this review it has been pointed out that vitamin B6 and its vitamers can be involved in many interactions with a number of drugs, as well as with the actions of various endocrines and neurotransmitters. Nutritional deficiencies, especially of vitamins and proteins, can affect the manner in which drugs undergo biotransformation, and thereby may also modify the therapeutic efficacy of certain drugs. The differences between nutritional vitamin B6 deficiency and the hereditary disorder producing pyridoxine dependency are discussed. In addition to a pyridoxine deficiency being able to adversely affect drug actions, the improper supplementation with vitamin B6 can in some instances also adversely affect drug efficacy. A decrease by pyridoxine in the efficacy of levodopa used in the treatment of Parkinsonism is an example. The interrelationships and enzymatic interconversions among pyridoxine vitamers, both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated, are briefly discussed, particularly regarding their pharmacokinetic properties. The ways in which the normal biochemical functions of vitamin B6 may be interfered with by various drugs are reviewed. (1) The chronic administration of isoniazid for the prevention or treatment of tuberculosis can produce peripheral neuropathy which can be prevented by the concurrent administration of pyridoxine. An acute toxic overdose of isoniazid causes generalized convulsions, and the intravenous administration of pyridoxine hydrochloride will prevent or stop these seizures. (2) The acute ingestion of excessive monosodium glutamate will, in some individuals, cause a group of symptoms including among others headache, weakness, stiffness, and heartburn, collectively known as the 'Chinese Restaurant Syndrome.' These symptoms can be prevented by prior supplementation with vitamin B6. The beneficial effect is ascribed to the correction of a deficiency in the activity of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, an enzyme that is dependent on pyridoxal

  1. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

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    Min JS

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jee Sun Min,1 Doyun Kim,1 Jung Bae Park,1 Hyunjin Heo,1 Soo Hyeon Bae,2 Jae Hong Seo,1 Euichaul Oh,1 Soo Kyung Bae1 1Integrated Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, Seoul, South Korea Background: Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs is clinically important. Objective: To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenylethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino-2-propanol (M-1, in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods: The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results: The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol

  2. Clinically relevant drug interactions with anti-Alzheimer's drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraci, Filippo; Sultana, Janet; Drago, Filippo; Spina, Edoardo

    2017-03-03

    The aging world population had led to an increase in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The drugs used to slow down the onset of AD, galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine and memantine, are generally well-tolerated. However, drug interactions between these drugs and other drugs are an important aspect of patient safety that should be borne in mind, particularly given the high burden of polypharmacy in the elderly. The aim of this review is to provide an updated review of clinically significant drug-drug interactions concerning drugs approved for AD. PubMed was searched for relevant keywords. No time limit was imposed but only articles in English published in peer-reviewed journals were selected. Relevant literature was also identified from the references of identified articles. Further information was obtained from drug summary of product characteristics. The major pharmacokinetic interactions identified concerned fluoxetine, paroxetine and ketoconazole when used with galantamine or donepezil. On the other hand, the major potential pharmacodynamic interactions concerned anti-dementia drugs and general anesthesia agents, anti-cholinergic drugs, conventional antipsychotics and bradycardia-inducing drugs. In clinical practice memantine shows a lower potential for pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) compared to other drug classes. In conclusion, the concomitant use of anti-dementia drugs with other drugs can have variable clinical effects, making appropriate prescribing of these drugs very challenging. A simple and coherent way of presenting evidence on complex drug interaction information from heterogenous sources to clinicians is needed in order for the voluminous data available to have an impact on clinical practice.

  3. Modeling of human prokineticin receptors: interactions with novel small-molecule binders and potential off-target drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Levit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION: The Prokineticin receptor (PKR 1 and 2 subtypes are novel members of family A GPCRs, which exhibit an unusually high degree of sequence similarity. Prokineticins (PKs, their cognate ligands, are small secreted proteins of ∼80 amino acids; however, non-peptidic low-molecular weight antagonists have also been identified. PKs and their receptors play important roles under various physiological conditions such as maintaining circadian rhythm and pain perception, as well as regulating angiogenesis and modulating immunity. Identifying binding sites for known antagonists and for additional potential binders will facilitate studying and regulating these novel receptors. Blocking PKRs may serve as a therapeutic tool for various diseases, including acute pain, inflammation and cancer. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ligand-based pharmacophore models were derived from known antagonists, and virtual screening performed on the DrugBank dataset identified potential human PKR (hPKR ligands with novel scaffolds. Interestingly, these included several HIV protease inhibitors for which endothelial cell dysfunction is a documented side effect. Our results suggest that the side effects might be due to inhibition of the PKR signaling pathway. Docking of known binders to a 3D homology model of hPKR1 is in agreement with the well-established canonical TM-bundle binding site of family A GPCRs. Furthermore, the docking results highlight residues that may form specific contacts with the ligands. These contacts provide structural explanation for the importance of several chemical features that were obtained from the structure-activity analysis of known binders. With the exception of a single loop residue that might be perused in the future for obtaining subtype-specific regulation, the results suggest an identical TM-bundle binding site for hPKR1 and hPKR2. In addition, analysis of the intracellular regions highlights variable regions that may provide

  4. Use of Spectroscopic, Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamic Techniques to Study the Interaction between Human Holo-Transferrin and Two Antagonist Drugs: Comparison of Binary and Ternary Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Saberi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the binding of ropinirole hydrochloride (ROP and aspirin (ASA to human holo-transferrin (hTf has been investigated by spectroscopic approaches (fluorescence quenching, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism, resonance light scattering, as well as zeta potential and molecular modeling techniques, under simulated physiological conditions. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of the ROP and ASA drugs on the fluorescence of hTf as well as to define the binding and quenching properties of binary and ternary complexes. The synchronized fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrated some micro-environmental and conformational changes around the Trp and Tyr residues with a faint red shift. Thermodynamic analysis displayed the van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds interactions are the major acting forces in stabilizing the complexes. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of complexes are static mechanism. The effect of the drugs aggregating on the hTf resulted in an enhancement of the resonance light scattering (RLS intensity. The average binding distance between were computed according to the forster non-radiation energy transfer theory. The circular dichroism (CD spectral examinations indicated that the binding of the drugs induced a conformational change of hTf. Measurements of the zeta potential indicated that the combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between ROP, ASA and hTf formed micelle-like clusters. The molecular modeling confirmed the experimental results. This study is expected to provide important insight into the interaction of hTf with ROP and ASA to use in various toxicological and therapeutic processes.

  5. STUDY OF IDENTIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT OF DRUG - DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Drugdrug interactions can be defined as pharmacological or clinical respons e to the administration of drug combination s that is different from its known effects of two or more than two medicines. It frequently conjures images of a sudden catastrophic and even fatal outcome. While such an event can occur and it is important to prevent in the clinical set up. Drug interactio ns can occur by pharmacokinetic & pharmacodynamic interactions. The antipsychotics are known to have more drug interactions compared to any other class of drugs hence we aimed for the identification of drug interactions of psychiatric drugs. METHODOLOGY : T he data was collected from medication chart of inpatients in the psychiatric department and analyzed the interactions using Stockley’s drug interactions , Dipiro etc. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION : The study includes 508 samples out of which 368 case were found to have interactions. The cobalamine and panto prazole interactions were found to be 36.14% and the combination of antipsychotics , anticonvulsants with anxiolytics and anticonvulsants were 10.22 %

  6. Application of Mice Humanized for CYP2D6 to the Study of Tamoxifen Metabolism and Drug–Drug Interaction with Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, A. Kenneth; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.

    2017-01-01

    Tamoxifen is an estrogen receptor antagonist used in the treatment of breast cancer. It is a prodrug that is converted by several cytochrome P450 enzymes to a primary metabolite, N-desmethyltamoxifen (NDT), which is then further modified by CYP2D6 to a pharmacologically potent secondary metabolite, 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyltamoxifen (endoxifen). Antidepressants (ADs), which are often coprescribed to patients receiving tamoxifen, are also metabolized by CYP2D6 and evidence suggests that a drug–drug interaction between these agents adversely affects the outcome of tamoxifen therapy by inhibiting endoxifen formation. We evaluated this potentially important drug–drug interaction in vivo in mice humanized for CYP2D6 (hCYP2D6). The rate of conversion of NDT to endoxifen by hCYP2D6 mouse liver microsomes (MLMs) in vitro was similar to that of the most active members of a panel of 13 individual human liver microsomes. Coincubation with quinidine, a CYP2D6 inhibitor, ablated endoxifen generation by hCYP2D6 MLMs. The NDT-hydroxylation activity of wild-type MLMs was 7.4 times higher than that of hCYP2D6, whereas MLMs from Cyp2d knockout animals were inactive. Hydroxylation of NDT correlated with that of bufuralol, a CYP2D6 probe substrate, in the human liver microsome panel. In vitro, ADs of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class were, by an order of magnitude, more potent inhibitors of NDT hydroxylation by hCYP2D6 MLMs than were compounds of the tricyclic class. At a clinically relevant dose, paroxetine pretreatment inhibited the generation of endoxifen from NDT in hCYP2D6 mice in vivo. These data demonstrate the potential of ADs to affect endoxifen generation and, thereby, the outcome of tamoxifen therapy. PMID:27756789

  7. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  8. Clinically relevant drug interactions between anticancer drugs and psychotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, K Y-L; Tay, W L; Chui, W K; Chan, A

    2011-01-01

    Drug interactions are commonly seen in the treatment of cancer patients. Psychotropics are often indicated for these patients since they may also suffer from pre-existing psychological disorders or experience insomnia and anxiety associated with cancer therapy. Thus, the risk of anticancer drug (ACD)-psychotropic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is high. Drug interactions were compiled from the British National Formulary (53rd edn), Lexi-Comp's Drug Information Handbook (15th edn), Micromedex (v5.1), Hansten & Horn's Drug Interactions (2000) and Drug Interaction Facts (2008 edn). Product information of the individual drugs, as well as documented literature on ACD-psychotropic interactions from PubMed and other databases was also incorporated. This paper identifies clinically important ACD-psychotropic DDIs that are frequently observed. Pharmacokinetic DDIs were observed for tyrosine kinase inhibitors, corticosteroids and antimicrotubule agents due to their inhibitory or inductive effects on cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. Pharmacodynamic DDIs were identified for thalidomide with central nervous system depressants, procarbazine with antidepressants, myelosuppressive ACDs with clozapine and anthracyclines with QT-prolonging psychotropics. Clinicians should be vigilant when psychotropics are prescribed concurrently with ACDs. Close monitoring of plasma drug levels should be carried out to avoid toxicity in the patient, as well as to ensure adequate chemotherapeutic and psychotropic coverage.

  9. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID frame-work, and a sample of 54 papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009-2014. We group the papers into six topical groups, and then ...

  10. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID framework, and a sample of 54 HWID related papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009–2014. We group the papers into six topical group...

  11. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes, Arminda; Ørngreen, Rikke

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the Third IFIP WG 13.6 Working Conference on Human Work Interaction Design, HWID 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in December 2012. The 16 revised papers presented were carefully selected for inclusion in this volume...

  12. The 44 kDa Pim-1 kinase directly interacts with tyrosine kinase Etk/BMX and protects human prostate cancer cells from apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y; Xu, K; Dai, B; Guo, Z; Jiang, T; Chen, H; Qiu, Y

    2006-01-05

    Protein kinase Pim-1 has been implicated in the development of hematopoietic and prostatic malignancies. Here, we present the evidence that two isoforms, the 44 and 33 kDa Pim-1, are expressed in all human prostate cancer cell lines examined. The subcellular localization of human 44 kDa Pim-1 is primarily on the plasma membrane, while the 33 kDa isoform is present in both the cytosol and nucleus in PCA cells. The 44 kDa Pim-1 contains the proline-rich motif at the N-terminus and directly binds to the SH3 domain of tyrosine kinase Etk. Such interaction leads to the activation of Etk kinase activity possibly by competing with the tumor suppressor p53. This is corroborated by the fact that overexpression of the 44 kDa Pim-1 in prostate cancer cells confers the resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results suggest that these two isoforms of Pim-1 kinase may regulate distinct substrates and the 44 kDa Pim-1 may play a more prominent role in drug resistance in prostate cancer cells.

  13. Clopidogrel paclitaxel drug-drug interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, K; Mau-Sørensen, M; Bjerregaard Stage, T

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is mainly eliminated by CYP2C8 in the liver. CYP2C8 is strongly inhibited by the clopidogrel metabolite acyl-β-D-glucuronide. To determine if this interaction has clinical relevance, we identified 48 patients treated with clopidogrel and paclitaxel using databases and a prescription re...

  14. [Interactions of cytostatic agents with other drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, C

    1991-08-31

    With the degree of polypharmacy currently practiced in the field of oncology, there are undoubtedly many drug interactions. In the present study the influence of "non-cytotoxic" drugs on anticancer drugs is discussed, but not the reverse. Not only is the augmentation (reversal of multidrug resistance) or the reduction of antitumor properties of cytotoxic drugs observed, but also cytostatic activities of "non-cytotoxic" drugs themselves. Examples are calmodulin inhibitors such as phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants. Interactions may also increase side effects of cytostatic drugs or even neutralize the antitumoral activity. To ensure that interactions are not overlooked, all medicaments being administered should be listed. It is, however, not feasible yet to determine serum concentrations of all the drugs given to the patient. The antitumor activity of supportive care could be evaluated in randomized studies (e.g. cytostatic drugs +/- antidepressants).

  15. Method development and validation of liquid chromatography-tandem/mass spectrometry for aldosterone in human plasma: Application to drug interaction study of atorvastatin and olmesartan combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, a simple and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS method was developed for the quantification of aldosterone (ALD a hormone responsible for blood pressure in human plasma. The developed method was validated and extended for application on human subjects to study drug interaction of atorvastatin (ATSV and olmesartan (OLM on levels of ALD. The ALD in plasma was extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with 5 mL dichloromethane/ethyl ether (60/40% v/v. The chromatographic separation of ALD was carried on Xterra, RP-Column C18 (150 mm× 4.6 mm × 3.5 μm at 30°C followed by four-step gradient program composed of methanol and water. Step 1 started with 35% methanol for first 1 min and changed linearly to 90% in next 1.5 min in Step 2. Step 3 lasted for next 2 min with 90% methanol. The method finally concluded with Step 4 to achieve initial concentration of methanol that is, 35% thus contributing the total method run time of 17.5 min. The flow rate was 0.25 mL/min throughout the process. The developed method was validated for specificity, accuracy, precision, stability, linearity, sensitivity, and recovery. The method was linear and found to be acceptable over the range of 50-800 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied for the drug interaction study of ATSV + OLM in combination against OLM treatment on blood pressure by quantifying changes in levels of ALD in hypertensive patients. The study revealed levels of ALD were significantly higher in ATSV + OLM treatment condition when compared to OLM as single treated condition. This reflects the reason of low effectiveness of ATSV + OLM in combination instead of synergistic activity.

  16. The consequence of regional gradients of P-gp and CYP3A4 for drug-drug interactions by P-gp inhibitors and the P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay in the human intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; van de Steeg, Evita; de Jager, Marina H; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal P-gp and CYP3A4 work coordinately to reduce the intracellular concentration of drugs, and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) based on this interplay are of clinical importance and require pre-clinical investigation. Using precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) of human jejunum, ileum and colon, we investigated the P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay and related DDIs with P-gp inhibitors at the different regions of the human intestine with quinidine (Qi), dual substrate of P-gp and CYP3A4, as probe. All the P-gp inhibitors increased the intracellular concentrations of Qi by 2.1-2.6 fold in jejunum, 2.6-3.8 fold in ileum but only 1.2-1.3 fold in colon, in line with the different P-gp expression in these intestinal regions. The selective P-gp inhibitors (CP100356 and PSC833) enhanced 3-hydroxy-quinidine (3OH-Qi) in jejunum and ileum, while dual inhibitors of P-gp and CYP3A4 (verapamil and ketoconazole) decreased the 3OH-Qi production, despite of the increased intracellular Qi concentration, due to inhibition of CYP3A4. The outcome of DDIs based on P-gp/CYP3A4 interplay, shown as remarkable changes in the intracellular concentration of both the parent drug and the metabolite, varied among the intestinal regions, probably due to the different expression of P-gp and CYP3A4, and were different from those found in rat PCIS, which may have important implications for the disposition and toxicity of drugs and their metabolites.

  17. Profile of drug interactions in hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinbiancho J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The expected therapeutic response may be affected by the presence of drug interactions. With the high number of reports on new drug interactions, it has been difficult for health professionals to keep constantly updated. For this reason, computer systems have helped identify such interactions.Objectives: To verify the rate and profile of drug interactions in medical prescriptions to hospitalized pediatric patients.Methods: A descriptive study investigated prescriptions to hospitalized pediatric patients. The study included patients between 0 and 12 years old, containing 4 or more drugs in their prescriptions. The analysis of interaction and incompatibility possibilities in prescribed drugs used Micromedex / Drug-Reax® program.Results: From 2005 to 2006, 3,170 patients were investigated, and 11,181 prescriptions were analyzed, a mean value of 3.5 prescriptions/patient. In total, 6,857 drug interactions were found, which corresponds to 1.9 interaction/prescription. Among them, relevance to ampicillin and gentamicin, found in 220 (3.2% prescriptions. In total, 2,411 drug incompatibilities in via y were found, a mean value of 0.5/prescription, with emphasis on vancomycin and cefepime, found in 243 (10.0% prescriptions.Conclusion: The presence of drug interactions is a permanent risk in hospitals. This way, the utilization of computer programs, pharmacotherapy monitoring of patients and the pharmacist presence in the multidisciplinary team are some manners of contributing to hospitalized patients’ treatment.

  18. Ivermectin interacts with human ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Márton; Makai, Ildikó; Kis, Emese; Szabó, Pál; Nagy, Tünde; Krajcsi, Péter; Lespine, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Ivermectin is an antiparasitic drug frequently administered to humans. It has a limited brain exposure that is attributed to the efflux activity of ABCB1/Abcb1. ABCG2/Abcg2 is also a major transporter present in most pharmacologically important barriers. However, interaction of ivermectin with Abcg2 shows species specificity and in many studies was confounded by the masking effect of ABCB1/Abcb1. In this study using cellular and membrane assays we show that ivermectin displays a high-affinity interaction with human ABCG2 with IC(50) values in the 1-1.5  µM range. This interaction may have implications in human ABCG2-mediated drug-drug interactions of ivermectin.

  19. Interaction of immunosuppressive drugs with human organic anion transporter (OAT) 1 and OAT3, and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 and MRP4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Sheikh, A.A.K.; Greupink, R.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Heuvel, J.J.M.W. van den; Schreurs, M.; Koenderink, J.B.; Masereeuw, R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Renal proximal tubule transporters can play a key role in excretion, pharmacokinetic interactions, and toxicity of immunosuppressant drugs. Basolateral organic anion transporters (OATs) and apical multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) contribute to the active tubular uptake and urinary eff

  20. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing

    OpenAIRE

    Lucreţia Udrescu; Laura Sbârcea; Alexandru Topîrceanu; Alexandru Iovanovici; Ludovic Kurunczi; Paul Bogdan; Mihai Udrescu

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection...

  1. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, E. Vincent, II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2015-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces affect the human's ability to perform tasks effectively and efficiently when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. For efficient and effective remote navigation of a rover, a human operator needs to be aware of the robot's environment. However, during teleoperation, operators may get information about the environment only through a robot's front-mounted camera causing a keyhole effect. The keyhole effect reduces situation awareness which may manifest in navigation issues such as higher number of collisions, missing critical aspects of the environment, or reduced speed. One way to compensate for the keyhole effect and the ambiguities operators experience when they teleoperate a robot is adding multiple cameras and including the robot chassis in the camera view. Augmented reality, such as overlays, can also enhance the way a person sees objects in the environment or in camera views by making them more visible. Scenes can be augmented with integrated telemetry, procedures, or map information. Furthermore, the addition of an exocentric (i.e., third-person) field of view from a camera placed in the robot's environment may provide operators with the additional information needed to gain spatial awareness of the robot. Two research studies investigated possible mitigation approaches to address the keyhole effect: 1) combining the inclusion of the robot chassis in the camera view with augmented reality overlays, and 2) modifying the camera

  2. P-glycoprotein-based loperamide-cyclosporine drug interaction at the rat blood-brain barrier: prediction from in vitro studies and extrapolation to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Peng; Unadkat, Jashvant D

    2012-03-05

    We have shown that the rat can quantitatively predict the verapamil-cyclopsorine A (CsA) drug-drug interaction (DDI) at the human blood-brain barrier (BBB). In addition, the potency (EC(50)) of CsA to inhibit rat BBB P-gp can be predicted from in vitro studies in MDRI-transfected cells. To assess if these excellent agreements extend to other substrates, we determined the magnitude of P-gp-based DDI at the rat BBB between loperamide (Lop) or its metabolite, N-desmethyl Lop (dLop), and escalating CsA blood concentrations. The percent increase in the brain:blood Lop concentration ratio was described by the Hill equation, E(max) = 2000%, EC(50) = 7.1 μM and γ = 3.7. The potency (EC(50)) of CsA to inhibit P-gp at the rat BBB was independent of the substrate used (verapamil, Lop, or dLop). Like the verapamil-CsA DDI, the potency (EC(50)) of CsA to inhibit rat BBB P-gp could be predicted from studies in MDRI-transfected cells. When (11)C-Lop was coadministered with a 10 mg/kg iv infusion of CsA (1) yielding ~5.6 uM CsA blood concentration to healthy volunteers, the brain distribution of (11)C-radioactivity was increased by 110%. (1) When corrected for diffusible Lop metabolite(s), this translates into an increase in (11)C-Lop brain distribution of 457%. Based on our rat data, we estimated a similar value at 5.6 μM blood CsA concentration, 588% increase in Lop brain distribution. These data support our conclusion that the rat is a promising model to predict P-gp based DDI at the human BBB.

  3. A useful tool for drug interaction evaluation: The University of Washington Metabolism and Transport Drug Interaction Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hachad Houda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Metabolism and Transport Drug Interaction Database (http://www.druginteractioninfo.org is a web-based research and analysis tool developed in the Department of Pharmaceutics at the University of Washington. The database has the largest manually curated collection of data related to drug interactions in humans. The tool integrates information from the literature, public repositories, reference textbooks, guideline documents, product prescribing labels and clinical review sections of new drug approval (NDA packages. The database's easy-to-use web portal offers tools for visualisation, reporting and filtering of information. The database helps scientists to mine kinetics information for drug-metabolising enzymes and transporters, to assess the extent of in vivo drug interaction studies, as well as case reports for drugs, therapeutic proteins, food products and herbal derivatives. This review provides a brief description of the database organisation, its search functionalities and examples of use.

  4. Antiepleptic drug interactions: a clinical case demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Hundie; Klapková, Eva; Tesfayeová, Alena; Komárek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious health disorder affecting both paediatric and adult population worldwide. Due to difficulties in identifying its aetiology, initial management is often guided by empiric therapy measures. Symptomatic control requires the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), many of which have the potential for adverse drug interactions. Children are especially susceptible to drug interactions and frequently exhibit atypical adverse events, which may require special care. Aim. To demonstrate a case of a 15 year old girl suffering from refractory epilepsy with underlying focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), whose seizure deterioration was most probably associated with drug-drug interactions between prescribed common antiepileptic drugs, namely valproic acid, phenobarbital or the prodrug primidon and carbamazepine.

  5. Drug interaction presenting as acute abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh; Pendlimari; Rajeswari; Anaparthy; Aravind; Sugumar

    2010-01-01

    Warfarin is the most common oral anticoagulant prescribed around the world. Adverse drug interactions with warfarin are a huge problem especially in the elderly and in patients who take multiple medications. Most adverse drug interactions involve concomitantly prescribed oral or intravenous medications. Occasionally, topical or mucosally absorbed drugs can interact, leading to fluctuations in warfarin levels with adverse consequences. In this case report, we describe a case of intestinal intramural hematoma, a rare but known consequence of a supra therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR). The supra therapeutic INR was a consequence of mucosally absorbed miconazole, prescribed for vaginal candidiasis. We wish to highlight this rare and potentially fatal drug interaction, along with the need for frequent INR monitoring when new drugs are added or removed in patients taking warfarin.

  6. Chitosan drug binding by ionic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsongrit, Yaowalak; Mitrevej, Ampol; Mueller, Bernd W

    2006-04-01

    Three model drugs (insulin, diclofenac sodium, and salicylic acid) with different pI or pKa were used to prepare drug-chitosan micro/nanoparticles by ionic interaction. Physicochemical properties and entrapment efficiencies were determined. The amount of drug entrapped in the formulation influences zeta potential and surface charge of the micro/nanoparticles. A high entrapment efficiency of the micro/nanoparticles could be obtained by careful control of formulation pH. The maximum entrapment efficiency did not occur in the highest ionization range of the model drugs. The high burst release of drugs from chitosan micro/nanoparticles was observed regardless of the pH of dissolution media. It can be concluded that the ionic interaction between drug and chitosan is low and too weak to control the drug release.

  7. Risk of drug interaction: combination of antidepressants and other drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyasaka Lincoln Sakiara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of combination of antidepressants with other drugs and risk of drug interactions in the setting public hospital units in Brazil. METHODS: Prescriptions of all patients admitted to a public hospital from November 1996 to February 1997 were surveyed from the hospital's data processing center in São Paulo, Brazil. A manual search of case notes of all patients admitted to the psychiatric unit from January 1993 to December 1995 and all patients registered in the affective disorders outpatient clinic in December 1996 was carried out. Patients taking any antidepressant were identified and concomitant use of drugs was checked. By means of a software program (Micromedex® drug interactions were identified. RESULTS: Out of 6,844 patients admitted to the hospital, 63 (0.9% used antidepressants and 16 (25.3% were at risk of drug interaction. Out of 311 patients in the psychiatric unit, 63 (20.2% used antidepressants and 13 of them (20.6% were at risk. Out of 87 patients in the affective disorders outpatient clinic, 43 (49.4% took antidepressants and 7 (16.2% were at risk. In general, the use of antidepressants was recorded in 169 patients and 36 (21.3% were at risk of drug interactions. Twenty different forms of combinations at risk of drug interactions were identified: four were classified as mild, 15 moderate and one severe interaction. CONCLUSION: In the hospital general units the number of drug interactions per patient was higher than in the psychiatric unit; and prescription for depression was lower than expected.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of antiretrovirals: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Laura; Khoo, Saye; Back, David

    2010-01-01

    Current antiretroviral treatment has allowed HIV infection to become a chronic manageable condition with many HIV patients living longer. However, available antiretrovirals are not without limitations, for example the development of resistance and adverse effects. Consequently, new drugs in existing and novel classes are urgently required to provide viable treatment options to patients with few remaining choices. Darunavir, etravirine, maraviroc and raltegravir have been recently approved for treatment-experienced patients and other agents such as rilpivirine, vicriviroc and elvitegravir are currently under phase III study. Clinical studies are necessary to optimise potential treatment combinations and to manage drug-drug interactions to help avoid toxicity or therapy failure. This review aims to summarise the pharmacokinetics and key drug-drug interaction studies for newly available antiretrovirals and those in development. Further information regarding drug-drug interactions of well established antiretrovirals and those recently approved are readily available online at sites such as http://www.hiv-druginteractions.org, http://www.clinicaloptions.com/hiv, http://hivinsite.ucsf.edu. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, Vol 85, issue 1, 2010.

  9. [Comparison of four drug interaction screening programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing Lorenzini, K; Reutemann, B; Samer, C F; Guignard, B; Bonnabry, P; Dayer, P; Perrier, A; Desmeules, J

    2012-10-17

    Adverse drug events (ADE) are a major public health issue, with drug-drug interactions (DDI) being one of well-recognized causes of ADE that could be preventable by the use of DDI screening software. We compared the ability of four programs to detect clinically important DDI. We tested 62 drug pairs with and 12 drug pairs without clinically important DDI. Lexi-Interact and Epocrates were the most sensitive (95%) compared to the Compendium and Theriaque (80 and 73%, respectively). The Compendium and Theriaque also showed the lowest negative predictive value. All programs showed high specificity and positive predictive value. The qualitative assessment showed the best performances for Compendium and Lexi-Interact. The last one seems to be the best screening program, but the Compendium is in French and is freely available.

  10. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiara Benevides Moreira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. METHOD Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. RESULTS The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole, increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. CONCLUSION A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences.

  11. DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH QUINOLONE ANTIBACTERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ

    1992-01-01

    The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result. Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts,

  12. DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH QUINOLONE ANTIBACTERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ

    1992-01-01

    The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result. Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts,

  13. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  14. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  15. Evaluation of resources for analyzing drug interactions*†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Risha I.; Beckett, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research sought to evaluate seven drug information resources, specifically designed for analyzing drug interactions for scope, completeness, and ease of use, and determine the consistency of content among the seven resources. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted where 100 drug-drug and drug-dietary supplement interactions were analyzed using 7 drug information resources: Lexicomp Interactions module, Micromedex Drug Interactions, Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report, Facts & Comparisons eAnswers, Stockley's Drug Interactions (10th edition), Drug Interactions Analysis and Management (2014), and Drug Interaction Facts (2015). The interaction sample was developed based on published resources and peer input. Two independent reviewers gathered data for each interaction from each of the 7 resources using a common form. Results Eighty-two drug-drug and 18 drug-dietary supplement interactions were analyzed. Scope scores were higher for Lexicomp Interactions (97.0%), Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report (97.0%), and Micromedex Drug Interactions (93.0%) compared to all other resources (pMicromedex Drug Interactions (median 5, interquartile range [IQR] 4 to 5) compared to all other resources (pMicromedex (pMicromedex (69.9%) compared to all other resources (pMicromedex Drug Interactions scored highest in scope. Micromedex Drug Interactions and Lexicomp Interactions scored highest in completeness. Consistency scores were overall low, but Micromedex Drug Interactions was the highest. PMID:27822150

  16. Interactions between physicians and drug industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begul Yagci Kupeli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethical issues involving drug industry physician relationship have resulted in an ongoing debate about its appropriateness for many years in medical World. The most familiar marketing strategies of drug companies include individual gifts for physicians and sponsorship for educational and social activities. This interaction begins during medical school years of doctors and types of interactions are modified according to factors such as physician's position, title and number of patients. Although data reveal the opposite, most doctors deny or underestimate the influence of drug companies on their drug prescription. Both sides have common interests such as effective drug usage and observation, conduction of creative scientific studies. However, they have conflict of interests in some aspects. Physicians mostly care about patients' well-being and scientific improvement while drug companies are mostly involved in commercial benefit. Furthermore, some of the marketing strategies may have significant consequences on health of society such as rising drug costs, wrong or excessive usage of drugs. Regulations and guidelines have been designed in order to overcome these issues. However, the most important role in modelling of physician-drug industry interaction belongs to physicians. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 777-781

  17. [Pharmacokinetic interactions of telaprevir with other drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer Berenguer, Juan; González-García, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Telaprevir is a new direct-acting antiviral drug for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is both a substrate and an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes. With the introduction of this new drug, assessment of drug-drug interactions has become a key factor in the evaluation of patients under treatment for HCV infection. During the treatment of this infection, many patients require other drugs to mitigate the adverse effects of anti-HCV drugs and to control other comorbidities. Moreover, most patients coinfected with HIV and HCV require antiretroviral therapy during treatment for HCV. Physicians should therefore be familiar with the pharmacokinetic properties of direct-acting antivirals for HCV treatment and their potential drug-drug interactions. The present article reviews the available information to date on the interactions of telaprevir with other drugs and provides recommendations for daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. HUMAN INTERACTION WITH MOBILE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Alin Zamfiroiu; Emanuel Herteliu; Bogdan Vintila

    2012-01-01

    Computing - human interaction is a very important paradigm because informatics applications are created to be used by people via human interaction. Nowadays mobile applications are more used so is necessarily to talk about mobile - human interaction. In this paper types of mobile devices are presented. Citizen oriented character of mobile application and his utility are described. Different means of interactions with mobile devices are analyzed and in the end of the paper direction of mobile ...

  19. Human Work Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review research in the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID). We present a HWID frame-work, and a sample of 54 papers from workshops, conferences and journals from the period 2009-2014. We group the papers into six topical groups, and then at......-tempt to map these groups to the framework to find research gaps for future re-search. We find that the groups of papers cover all areas of the framework well for a variety of work and leisure domains. The area in strongest need for more research papers is the development of the holistic framework itself....... Furthermore, much focus has been on studying design sketching or implemented systems-in-use, while little attention has been paid to mature design (prototypes) or early implementation (content templates). In conclusion, we recommend an update to the framework so that it can be also useful for research...

  20. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors (gliptins): focus on drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2010-09-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are generally treated with many pharmacological compounds and are exposed to a high risk of drug-drug interactions. Indeed, blood glucose control usually requires a combination of various glucose-lowering agents, and the recommended global approach to reduce overall cardiovascular risk generally implies administration of several protective compounds, including HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), antihypertensive compounds and antiplatelet agents. New compounds have been developed to improve glucose-induced beta-cell secretion and glucose control, without inducing hypoglycaemia or weight gain, in patients with T2DM. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are novel oral glucose-lowering agents, which may be used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic compounds, metformin, thiazolidinediones or even sulfonylureas. Sitagliptin, vildagliptin and saxagliptin are already on the market, either as single agents or in fixed-dose combined formulations with metformin. Other compounds, such as alogliptin and linagliptin, are in a late phase of development. This review summarizes the available data on drug-drug interactions reported in the literature for these five DDP-4 inhibitors: sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, alogliptin and linagliptin. Possible pharmacokinetic interferences have been investigated between each of these compounds and various pharmacological agents, which were selected because there are other glucose-lowering agents (metformin, glibenclamide [glyburide], pioglitazone/rosiglitazone) that may be prescribed in combination with DPP-4 inhibitors, other drugs that are currently used in patients with T2DM (statins, antihypertensive agents), compounds that are known to interfere with the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system (ketoconazole, diltiazem, rifampicin [rifampin]) or with P-glycoprotein transport (ciclosporin), or agents with a narrow therapeutic safety window (warfarin, digoxin). Generally

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals drug interactions: a critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Oliveira, Ralph [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/CRCN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares. Servico de Controle de Qualidade]. E-mail: roliveira@cnen.gov.br; Smith, Sheila W. [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MF (United States). School of Pharmacy and Medicine. Dept. of Pharmaceutical Health Service Research; Carneiro-Leao, Ana Maria A. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Morfologia e Fisiologia Animal

    2008-12-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals play a critical role in modern medicine primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. As the use of image has been increased, so has the use of prescription medications. These trends increase the risk of interactions between medications and radiopharmaceuticals. These interactions which have an impact on image by competing with the radiopharmaceutical for binding sites for example can lead to false negative results. Drugs that accelerate the metabolism of the radiopharmaceutical can have a positive impact (i.e. speeding its clearance) or, if repeating image is needed, a negative impact. In some cases, for example in cardiac image among patients taking doxirubacin, these interactions may have a therapeutic benefit. The incidence of drug-radiopharmaceuticals adverse reactions is unknown, since they may not be reported or even recognized. Here, we compiled the medical literature, using the criteria of a systematic review established by the Cochrane Collaboration, on pharmaceutical-drug interactions to provide a summary of documented interactions by organ system and radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose is to provide a reference on drug interactions that could inform the nuclear medicine staff in their daily routine. Efforts to increase adverse event reporting, and ideally consolidate reports worldwide, can provide a critically needed resource for prevention of drug-radiopharmaceuticals interactions. (author)

  2. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system.

  3. Drug interaction databases in medical literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsholm, Gertrud Gansmo; Nielsen, Anna Katrine Toft; Damkier, Per

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is well documented that drug-drug interaction databases (DIDs) differ substantially with respect to classification of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The aim of this study was to study online available transparency of ownership, funding, information, classifications, staff training...... and the three most commonly used subscription DIDs in the medical literature. The following parameters were assessed for each of the databases: Ownership, classification of interactions, primary information sources, and staff qualification. We compared the overall proportion of yes/no answers from open access...... databases and subscription databases by Fisher's exact test-both prior to and after requesting missing information. RESULTS: Among open access DIDs, 20/60 items could be verified from the webpage directly compared to 24/36 for the subscription DIDs (p = 0.0028). Following personal request, these numbers...

  4. Pharmacokinetic interactions between contraceptives and antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabers, A.

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of bi-directional drug interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and combined oral contraceptives (M) pose potential risks of unintended pregnancy and as well as seizure deterioration. It is well established that several of the older AEDs (carbamazepine, phenytoin...... AEDs, which undergoes glucuronidation processes, such as valproate and oxcarbazepine, may be affected by OCs. The magnitude of the drug-drug interactions show in general wide inter-individual variability and the change in the elimination rate is often unpredictable and can be influenced by a number...... of co-variants such as co-medication of other drugs, as well as genetic and environmental factors. It is therefore recommended that change in OC use is assisted by AED monitoring whenever possible. (C) 2007 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  5. Drug-drug interactions that interfere with statin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Takeshi; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, especially hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), are widely used in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic diseases. The benefits of statins are well documented. However, myotoxic side effects, which can sometimes be severe, including myopathy or rhabdomyolysis, have been associated with the use of statins. In some cases, this toxicity is associated with pharmacokinetic alterations. Potent inhibitors of CYP 3A4 significantly increase plasma concentrations of the active forms of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin. Fluvastatin is metabolized by CYP2C9, while pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin are not susceptible to inhibition by any CYP. This review discusses the pharmacokinetic aspects of the drug-drug interaction with statins and genetic polymorphisms in CYPs, which are involved in the metabolism of statins, and highlights the importance of establishing a system utilizing electronic medical information practically to avoid adverse drug reactions. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying statin interactions will help to minimize drug interactions and develop statins that are less prone to adverse interactions. Quantitatively analyzed information for the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering effects of statin based on electronic medical records may be useful for avoiding the adverse effect of statins.

  6. Important drug interactions in patients with rheumatic disorders: interactions of glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants and antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromadkova, L; Soukup, T; Vlcek, J

    2012-08-01

    Despite the fact that biological treatments are very promising, classical immunosuppressants, antimalarial drugs and glucocorticosteroids are still very important and widely used in practice. Although drug interactions can have fatal consequences, few studies have reviewed drug interactions of these classical drugs used in rheumatology, and very few guidelines are available on this subject. Therefore, this report summarizes important interactions of immunosuppressants, antimalarial drugs and glucocorticosteroids with drugs commonly used in internal medicine. In the present study, more than 300 interactions were retrieved from the Micromedex ® database. The selection was reduced to the interactions rated as moderate, major or contraindicated. The selected interactions were further checked against PubMed ®, MEDLINE ®, InfoPharm Compendium of Drug Interactions and Summaries of Product Characteristics. For each interaction, its nature, mechanism, onset and clinical severity were indicated, documentation quality was rated and recommendations for clinical practice were formulated. Twenty significant interactions that we rated as moderate, severe and very severe were identified. Interacting drugs were warfarin, fluoroquinolones, azole antifungals, co-trimoxazole, proton pump inhibitors, amiodarone, cholestyramine, activated carbon, allopurinol, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, statins, digoxin, iron, aluminium and magnesium salts, and hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic agents.

  7. Application of liquid pre-column capillary electrophoresis technique to the study of interaction between drug enantiomers and human serum albumin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁永生; 朱晓蜂; 林炳承

    1999-01-01

    Based on the chiral separation of several basie drugs, dimetindene, tetryzoline, theodrenaline and verapamil, the liquid pre-colunm capillary electrophoresis (LPC-CE) technique was established. It was used to determine free concentrations of drug enantiomers in mixed solutions with human serum albumin (HSA). To prevent HSA entering the CE chiral separation zone, the mobility differences between HSA and drugs under a specific pH condition were employed in the LPC. Thus, the detection confusion caused by protein was totally avoided. Further study of binding constants determination and protein binding competitions was carried out. The study proves that the LPC technique could be used for complex media, particularly the matrix of protein coexisting with a variety of drugs.

  8. Clinical herbal interactions with conventional drugs: from molecules to maladies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X-W; Serag, E S; Sneed, K B; Liang, J; Chew, H; Pan, S-Y; Zhou, S-F

    2011-01-01

    Clinical studies and case reports have identified a number of herb-drug interactions potentiated by the concurrent use of herbal medicines with prescription drugs. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the mechanisms and clinical implications of such herb-drug interactions by reviewing published human studies. Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic components may be involved in herbdrug interactions, although metabolic induction or inhibition is a common underlying mechanism for many herb-drug interactions. Drugs that have a high potential to interact with herbal medicines usually have a narrow therapeutic index, including warfarin, digoxin, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, amitriptyline, midazolam, indinavir, and irinotecan. Many of them are substrates of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and/or P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Herbal medicines that are reported to interact with drugs include garlic (Allium sativum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax ginseng), and St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum). For example, garlic has been shown to increase the clotting time and international normalized ratio (INR) of warfarin, cause hypoglycaemia when taken with chlorpropamide, and reduce the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum concentration of saquinavir in humans. Similarly, case reports have demonstrated that ginkgo may potentiate bleeding when combined with warfarin or aspirin, increases blood pressure when combined with thiazide diuretics, and has even led to a coma when combined with trazodone, a serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor used to treat depression. Furthermore, ginseng reduced the blood levels of warfarin and alcohol as well as induced mania if taken concomitantly with phenelzine, a non-selective and irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor used as an antidepressant and anxiolytic agent. Lastly, multiple herb-drug interactions have been identified with St. John's wort that involve significantly reduced AUC

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Prevalence of drug-drug interactions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-02-02

    Feb 2, 2008 ... in the private health care sector in South Africa. N L Katende-Kyenda ... them by dose adjustments and patient education, so that they are not life .... risk of drug interactions and statin-induced hepatotoxicity and myopathy.1 ...

  10. Large-scale prediction of drug-target interactions using protein sequences and drug topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Dongsheng [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu Shao [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Xu Qingsong [School of Mathematical Sciences and Computing Technology, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Lu Hongmei; Huang Jianhua [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu Qiannan [Key Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Wuhan University), Ministry of Education, and Wuhan University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liang Yizeng, E-mail: yizeng_liang@263.net [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2012-11-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Drug-target interactions are predicted using an extended SAR methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A drug-target interaction is regarded as an event triggered by many factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular fingerprint and CTD descriptors are used to represent drugs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our approach shows compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR methodology. - Abstract: The identification of interactions between drugs and target proteins plays a key role in the process of genomic drug discovery. It is both consuming and costly to determine drug-target interactions by experiments alone. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new in silico prediction approaches capable of identifying these potential drug-target interactions in a timely manner. In this article, we aim at extending current structure-activity relationship (SAR) methodology to fulfill such requirements. In some sense, a drug-target interaction can be regarded as an event or property triggered by many influence factors from drugs and target proteins. Thus, each interaction pair can be represented theoretically by using these factors which are based on the structural and physicochemical properties simultaneously from drugs and proteins. To realize this, drug molecules are encoded with MACCS substructure fingerings representing existence of certain functional groups or fragments; and proteins are encoded with some biochemical and physicochemical properties. Four classes of drug-target interaction networks in humans involving enzymes, ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM models gave prediction accuracy of 90.31%, 88.91%, 84.68% and 83.74% for four datasets, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to predict the drug

  11. Gynecomastia: An ADR due to drug interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Umme

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynecomastia results from conditions that cause an imbalance of estrogenic and androgenic effects on the breast, resulting in an increased or unopposed estrogen action on breast tissue. Approximately 4 to 10% cases of gynecomastia are due to drugs. Both Digoxin and Furosemide are also reported to cause the same condition. Although, chances of gynecomastia could be more if these two drugs are coadministered, but no case report of this adverse effect is ever reported when both are prescribed concurrently. Here we report a case of gynecomastia suspected to have resulted from the coadministation of both the drugs. Probability of the adverse effect due to drug interaction was evaluated by DIPS, which suggests that the adverse drug reaction (ADR due to DI is "Possible."

  12. Molecular interactions between some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) and bovine (BSA) or human (HSA) serum albumin estimated by means of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and frontal analysis capillary electrophoresis (FA/CE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ràfols, Clara; Zarza, Sílvia; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs, (naproxen, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen) and bovine (BSA) or human (HSA) serum albumin have been examined by means of two complementary techniques, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and frontal analysis/capillary electrophoresis (FA/CE). It can be concluded that ITC is able to measure with high precision the strongest drug-albumin interactions but the higher order interactions can be better determined by means of FA/CE. Then, the combination of both techniques leads to a complete evaluation of the binding profiles between the selected NSAIDs and both kind of albumin proteins. When BSA is the binding protein, the NSAIDs show a strong primary interaction (binding constants: 1.5 × 10(7), 8 × 10(5) and 2 × 10(6) M(-1) for naproxen, ibuprofen and flurbiprofen, respectively), and also lower affinity interactions of the same order for the three anti-inflammatories (about 1.7 × 10(4) M(-1)). By contrast, when HSA is the binding protein two consecutive interactions can be observed by ITC for naproxen (9 × 10(5) and 7 × 10(4) M(-1)) and flurbiprofen (5 × 10(6) and 6 × 10(4) M(-1)) whereas only one is shown for ibuprofen (9 × 10(5) M(-1)). Measurements by FA/CE show a single interaction for each drug being the ones of naproxen and flurbiprofen the same that those evaluated by ITC as the second interaction events. Then, the ability of both techniques as suitable complementary tools to establish the whole interaction NSAIDs-albumin profile is experimentally demonstrated and allows foreseeing suitable strategies to establish the complete drug-protein binding profile. In addition, for the interactions analyzed by means of ITC, the thermodynamic signature is established and the relative contributions of the enthalpic and entropic terms discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reactions and interactions in handling anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, P F

    1983-01-01

    The clinical toxicity of anticancer drugs has been well documented with regard to the adverse effects of treatment in patients. However, many of these drugs have a direct irritant effect on the skin, eyes, mucous membranes, and other tissues. Handled without due care, especially when being prepared for injection, most cytotoxic drugs can cause local toxic or allergic reactions; they also present hazards of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. This spectrum of potential risk should be kept in mind by personnel administering or handling these drugs, especially in oncology units where just a few individuals may routinely and frequently reconstitute many doses of cytotoxic agents. This is work in which the hospital pharmacist should and must be involved; indeed, many of the techniques and skills required are identical with those used in standard aseptic procedures for preparing pharmaceutical products. Pharmacy departments should take the initiative in making hospital staff aware of the potential risks of handling neoplastic agents, and they should spearhead a multidisciplinary assessment for producing local guidelines for working with these drugs. This article warns practitioners about the inherent dangers of these practitioner-drug interactions and suggests ways in which they may be reduced. Information is given in tabular form regarding recommended procedures for reconstituting 24 anticancer drugs and precautions to protect the personnel handling them, especially when there is spillage of powdered or liquid drugs. Also, guidelines are given about incompatibilities with admixtures of such drugs, and the literature is reviewed relative to recent developments in hospital pharmacy departments where reconstitution of anticancer drugs has been incorporated into existing intravenous fluid preparation/admixture units. Not only has this been shown to be safer and more effective in terms of time and labor, but also it has cut the cost of injectable cytotoxic drugs by an

  14. Gene-Drug Interaction in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Amici

    2011-01-01

    Several polymorphisms have been studied and some have been associated with positive drug-gene interaction on stroke, but the superiority of the genotype-guided approach over the clinical approach has not been proved yet; for this reason, it is not routinely recommended.

  15. Drug-Nutrition Interactions in Older People

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orten-Luiten, van A.C.; Janse, A.; Witkamp, R.

    2016-01-01

    Although both malnutrition and polypharmacy in elderly populations are relevant clinical issues, relatively little is known about their mutual relationship through drug-nutrition interactions (DNIs). To address this knowledge gap, DNIs are discussed, captured in a framework of five classes: the impa

  16. [Rhabdomyolysis and severe hepatotoxicity due to a drug-drug interaction between ritonavir and simvastatin. Could we use the most cost-effective statin in all human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida, Carla; Also, Maria Antonia; Pericas, Juan Manuel; Letang, Emili; Tuset, Montse; Miró, Josep Maria

    2014-11-01

    Drugs like statins may induce rhabdomyolysis. Simvastatin and lovastatin have a high hepatic metabolism and their potential toxicity could be increased by interactions with other drugs that reduce their metabolism. A case-report is presented of an HIV-infected patient treated with antiretroviral drugs who developed a rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure and liver toxicity when simvastatin was substituted for atorvastatin. A literature review is also presented. The patient required hospital admission and showed a favorable response after hydration and urine alkalinization. There were 4 additional cases published of which there was one death. Drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of statin induced rhabdomyolysis. In order to evaluate them properly, physicians at all levels of clinical care should be aware of all drugs prescribed to their patients and the contraindicated combinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Reaction phenotyping to assess victim drug-drug interaction risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li

    2017-08-18

    Reaction phenotyping provides critical information regarding the fraction metabolized (fm) of drug candidates. It has become increasingly important in drug discovery and development as it can be used to assess victim drug-drug interaction potential, guide structural modification to reduce fm, inform clinical study design, predict individual variability in pharmacokinetics, and evaluate the impact of genetic polymorphisms. Areas covered: The currently available in vitro and in vivo methods for reaction phenotyping are summarized along with their advantages, limitations and timings for application during the different stages of drug discovery and development. Challenges of reaction phenotyping for low clearance compounds, non-Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, extrahepatic contribution and atypical kinetics are highlighted and various approaches are discussed. Expert opinion: Certain areas of reaction phenotyping remain challenging with the current state of the science. In order to better define fm in this challenging space, there needs to be future advances in selective inhibitors and specific substrate reactions for non-CYP enzymes, availability of high quality and low cost recombinant enzymes, tissue distribution and in vitro-in vivo correlation, scaling factors for extrahepatic enzymes and the next generation of low clearance tools.

  18. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling study on the separate and simultaneous bindings of alprazolam and fluoxetine hydrochloride to human serum albumin (HSA): With the aim of the drug interactions probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangkoob, Faeze; Housaindokht, Mohmmad Reza; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Rajabi, Omid; Rouhbakhsh Zaeri, Zeinab; Verdian Doghaei, Asma

    2015-02-01

    The objective of the present research is to study the interaction of separate and simultaneous of alprazolam (ALP) and fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX) with human serum albumin (HSA) in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) using different kinds of spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetry and molecular modeling techniques. The absorbance spectra of protein, drugs and protein-drug showed complex formation between the drugs and HSA. Fluorescence analysis demonstrated that ALP and FLX could quench the fluorescence spectrum of HSA and demonstrated the conformational change of HSA in the presence of both drugs. Also, fluorescence quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes both separately and simultaneously was suggested as static quenching. The analysis of UV absorption data and the fluorescence quenching of HSA in the binary and ternary systems showed that FLX decreased the binding affinity between ALP and HSA. On the contrary, ALP increased the binding affinity of FLX and HSA. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated that the binding of drugs to HSA would modify the microenvironment around the Trp and Tyr residues and the conformation of HSA. The distances between Trp residue and the binding sites of the drugs were estimated according to the Förster theory, and it was demonstrated that non-radiative energy transfer from HSA to the drugs occurred with a high probability. Moreover, according to CV measurements, the decrease of peak current in the cyclic voltammogram of the both drugs in the presence of HSA revealed that they interacted with albumin and binding constants were calculated for binary systems which were in agreement with the binding constants obtained from UV absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The prediction of the best binding sites of ALP and FLX in binary and ternary systems in molecular modeling approach was done using of Gibbs free energy.

  19. Proapoptotic and Antiproliferative Effects of Thymus caramanicus on Human Breast Cancer Cell Line (MCF-7 and Its Interaction with Anticancer Drug Vincristine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Esmaeili-Mahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymus caramanicus Jalas is one of the species of thymus that grows in the wild in different regions of Iran. Traditionally, leaves of this plant are used in the treatment of diabetes, arthritis, and cancerous situation. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the selective cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties of Thymus caramanicus extract (TCE. MCF-7 human breast cancer cells were used in this study. Cytotoxicity of the extract was determined using MTT and neutral red assays. Biochemical markers of apoptosis (caspase 3, Bax, and Bcl-2 and cell proliferation (cyclin D1 were evaluated by immunoblotting. Vincristine was used as anticancer control drug in extract combination therapy. The data showed that incubation of cells with TCE (200 and 250 μg/mL significantly increased cell damage, activated caspase 3 and Bax/Bcl2 ratio. In addition, cyclin D1 was significantly decreased in TCE-treated cells. Furthermore, concomitant treatment of cells with extract and anticancer drug produced a significant cytotoxic effect as compared to extract or drugs alone. In conclusion, thymus extract has a potential proapoptotic/antiproliferative property against human breast cancer cells and its combination with chemotherapeutic agent vincristine may induce cell death effectively and be a potent modality to treat this type of cancer.

  20. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3.

  1. Drug-Drug Interactions and Diagnostics for Drug Users With HIV and HIV/HCV Coinfections: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Jag H; Talal, Andrew H; Morse, Gene

    2017-03-01

    Substance use and pharmacologic treatment of co-occurring infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are associated with many adverse consequences including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The National Institute on Drug Abuse sponsored a 2-day conference on DDIs at which clinicians/scientists from government, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry presented the most current research findings to formulate a comprehensive overview of DDIs. Specific topics discussed included drug metabolism; drug interactions between medications used in the treatment of HIV, HCV, and substance use disorders; intrahepatic concentrations and methods of assessment of drugs in liver disease of varying etiologies and degrees of impairment; and minimally invasive sampling techniques for the assessment of intrahepatic drug concentrations, viral replication, and changes in gene expression in response to treatment. Finally, the speakers identified research targets and priorities on DDIs. Areas of emphasis included development of diagnostic assays for drug concentration assessment in different organs, an enhanced understanding of factors responsible for alterations in drug metabolism and excretion, and establishment of clinical trials and work groups to study DDIs. Our long-term objective is to broaden investigation in the field of DDIs in substance users.

  2. Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  3. 77 FR 43337 - Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study Implementation; Certain Prescription Drugs Offered for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ..., functional diarrhea, drug- induced diarrhea, ulcerative colitis, urinary bladder spasm, and urethral spasm... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket Nos. FDA-1975-N-0336 (Formerly 75N-0184), FDA-1975-N... Hydrocortisone Acetate and Pramoxine Hydrochloride] Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study...

  4. Assessment tool for pharmacy drug-drug interaction software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warholak, Terri L; Hines, Lisa E; Saverno, Kim R; Grizzle, Amy J; Malone, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    To assess the performance of pharmacy clinical decision support (CDS) systems for drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection and to identify approaches for improving the ability to recognize important DDIs. Pharmacists rely on CDS systems to assist in the identification of DDIs, and research suggests that these systems perform suboptimally. The software evaluation tool described here may be used in all pharmacy settings that use electronic decision support to detect potential DDIs, including large and small community chain pharmacies, community independent pharmacies, hospital pharmacies, and governmental facility pharmacies. A tool is provided to determine the ability of pharmacy CDS systems to identify established DDIs. It can be adapted to evaluate potential DDIs that reflect local practice patterns and patient safety priorities. Beyond assessing software performance, going through the evaluation processes creates the opportunity to evaluate inadequacies in policies, procedures, workflow, and training of all pharmacy staff relating to pharmacy information systems and DDIs. The DDI evaluation tool can be used to assess pharmacy information systems' ability to recognize relevant DDIs. Suggestions for improvement include determining whether the software allows for customization, creating standard policies for handling specific interactions, and ensuring that drug knowledge database updates occur frequently.

  5. Ivermectin Interacts With Human ABCG2

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Ivermectin is an antiparasitic drug frequently administered to humans. It has alimited brain exposure that is attributed to the efflux activity of ABCB1/Abcb1. ABCG2/Abcg2 isalso a major transporter present in most pharmacologically important barriers. However,interaction of ivermectin with Abcg2 shows species specificity and in many studies wasconfounded by the masking effect of ABCB1/Abcb1. In this study using cellular and membraneassays we show that ivermectin displays a high-affinity inte...

  6. Antiplatelet drug interactions with proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-aspirin antiplatelet agents (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) are commonly prescribed for the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In addition, combination therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is often recommended to attenuate gastrointestinal bleeding risk, particularly during dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin. Importantly, a pharmacological interaction between clopidogrel and some PPIs has been proposed based on mutual CYP450-dependent metabolism, but available evidence is inconsistent. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the currently approved antiplatelet agents and PPIs, including their metabolic pathways. Additionally, the CYP450 isoenzyme at the center of the drug interaction, CYP2C19, is described in detail, and the available evidence on both the potential pharmacological interaction and influence on clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Expert opinion Although concomitant DAPT and PPI use reduces clopidogrel active metabolite levels and ex vivo-measured platelet inhibition, the influence of the drug interaction on clinical outcomes has been conflicting and largely reported from non-randomized observational studies. Despite this inconsistency, a clinically important interaction cannot be definitively excluded, particularly among patient subgroups with higher overall cardiovascular risk and potentially among CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele carriers. PMID:24205916

  7. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interaction (DDI extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN, a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%.

  8. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP) has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM) with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN), a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%.

  9. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3: a novel candidate for food-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwai, Yuichi; Ozeki, Yukihiro; Isaka, Tomonori; Honjo, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Kikuo

    2011-01-01

    Several kinds of food have been shown to influence the absorption and metabolism of drugs, although there is little information about their effect on the renal excretion of drugs. In this study, we performed uptake experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and quinic acid, which are contained in coffee, fruits and vegetables, on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3; these transporters mediate renal tubular uptake of anionic drugs from blood. Injection of hOAT1 and hOAT3 cRNA into oocytes stimulated uptake of typical substrates of hOAT1 and hOAT3 (p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, respectively); among the three compounds tested, caffeic acid most strongly inhibited these transporters. The apparent 50% inhibitory concentrations of caffeic acid were estimated to be 16.6 µM for hOAT1 and 5.4 µM for hOAT3. Eadie-Hofstee plot analysis showed that caffeic acid inhibited both transporters in a competitive manner. In addition to the transport of p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, that of antifolates and antivirals was inhibited by caffeic acid. These findings show that caffeic acid has inhibitory potential against hOAT1 and hOAT3, suggesting that renal excretion of their substrates could be affected in patients consuming a diet including caffeic acid.

  10. Detection of drug-drug interactions by modeling interaction profile fingerprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Vilar

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs constitute an important problem in postmarketing pharmacovigilance and in the development of new drugs. The effectiveness or toxicity of a medication could be affected by the co-administration of other drugs that share pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. For this reason, a great effort is being made to develop new methodologies to detect and assess DDIs. In this article, we present a novel method based on drug interaction profile fingerprints (IPFs with successful application to DDI detection. IPFs were generated based on the DrugBank database, which provided 9,454 well-established DDIs as a primary source of interaction data. The model uses IPFs to measure the similarity of pairs of drugs and generates new putative DDIs from the non-intersecting interactions of a pair. We described as part of our analysis the pharmacological and biological effects associated with the putative interactions; for example, the interaction between haloperidol and dicyclomine can cause increased risk of psychosis and tardive dyskinesia. First, we evaluated the method through hold-out validation and then by using four independent test sets that did not overlap with DrugBank. Precision for the test sets ranged from 0.4-0.5 with more than two fold enrichment factor enhancement. In conclusion, we demonstrated the usefulness of the method in pharmacovigilance as a DDI predictor, and created a dataset of potential DDIs, highlighting the etiology or pharmacological effect of the DDI, and providing an exploratory tool to facilitate decision support in DDI detection and patient safety.

  11. Predicting Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Signaling Propagation Interference on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghyun Park

    Full Text Available As pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (PD DDIs could lead to severe adverse effects in patients, it is important to identify potential PD DDIs in drug development. The signaling starting from drug targets is propagated through protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. PD DDIs could occur by close interference on the same targets or within the same pathways as well as distant interference through cross-talking pathways. However, most of the previous approaches have considered only close interference by measuring distances between drug targets or comparing target neighbors. We have applied a random walk with restart algorithm to simulate signaling propagation from drug targets in order to capture the possibility of their distant interference. Cross validation with DrugBank and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG shows that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods significantly. We also provide a web service with which PD DDIs for drug pairs can be analyzed at http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/targetrw.

  12. Interactions between drugs and occupied receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    This review has 2 parts. Part I deals with isobolographic procedures that are traditionally applied to the joint action of agonists that individually produce overtly similar effects. Special attention is directed to newer computational procedures that apply to agonists with dissimilar concentration-effect curves. These newer procedures are consistent with the isobolographic methods introduced and used by Loewe, however, the present communications provides the needed graphical and mathematical detail. A major aim is distinguishing super and sub-addictive interactions from those that are simply additive. The detection and measurement of an interaction is an important step in exploring drug mechanism and is also important clinically. Part II discusses a new use of isoboles that is applicable to a single drug or chemical whose effect is mediated by 2 or more receptor subtypes. This application produces a metric that characterizes the interaction between the receptor subtypes. The expansion of traditional isobolographic theory to this multi-receptor situation follows from the newer approaches for 2-drug combination analysis in Part I. This topic leads naturally to a re-examination of competitive antagonism and the classic Schild plot. In particular, it is shown here that the Schild plot in the multi-receptor case is not necessarily linear with unit slope. Both parts of this review emphasize the quantitative aspects rather than the many drugs that have been analyzed with isobolographic methods. The mathematical exposition is rather elementary and is further aided by several graphs. An appendix is included for the reader interested in the mathematical details.

  13. Drug-drug interaction between diclofenac, cetirizine and ranitidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenawi, Ihsan M; Barsoum, Barsoum N; Youssef, Maha A

    2005-04-01

    The interactions between diclofenac (1), cetirizine (2) and ranitidine (3) were investigated by thermal analyses and UV, IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies. In aqueous solution interaction occurred only between 1 and 2, yielding a high molecular weight (1:1), water insoluble ionic salt. Weak charge transfer (CT) interaction exists between the doubly charged piperazine moiety in 2, acting as an electron acceptor and (1). This CT interaction originates from the aromatic groups in 1. The CT band observed at approximately 315 nm exhibits very low absorbance as a result of the partial neutralization of the two positive charges present in the ionic salt. The IR bands of the mixture have wave numbers at nu 3323.1, 1695.3, and delta 1321.1-1210 cm(-1) indicating the presence of the NH group and the neutralized carbonyl group of 1, as well as the carboxylic group of 2. The 1,2,3-substitutions in the benzene ring of 1 in the mixture appear at 1161.1 cm(-1). The (1)H NMR of the mixed drugs shows singlet, triplet and multiplet proton signals due to the same effect.

  14. MDR- and CYP3A4-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2006-09-01

    , and sparfloxacin are potent inhibitors of P-gp-mediated efflux of 14C erythromycin and (3)H cyclosporin. Simultaneous administration of fluoroquinolones and macrolides could minimize the efflux and metabolism of both of the drugs. Effects of erythromycin and ketoconazole on carbamazepine metabolism were examined. Formation of 10,11-epoxy carbamazepine, a major CBZ metabolite, was significantly inhibited by these agents. Therefore, drug efflux proteins (P-gp, MRPs) and metabolizing enzyme (CYP450) are major factors in drug interactions. Overlapping substrate specificities of these proteins result in complex and sometimes perplexing pharmacokinetic profiles of multidrug regimens. Drug-drug interactions with PIs and other coadministered agents for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive population have been discussed in light of efflux transporters and metabolizing enzymes. This article provides an insight into low and variable oral bioavailability and related complications leading to loss of therapeutic activity of MDR and CYP 450 substrates.

  15. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  16. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  17. Drug-target interaction prediction by random walk on the heterogeneous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Liu, Ming-Xi; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Predicting potential drug-target interactions from heterogeneous biological data is critical not only for better understanding of the various interactions and biological processes, but also for the development of novel drugs and the improvement of human medicines. In this paper, the method of Network-based Random Walk with Restart on the Heterogeneous network (NRWRH) is developed to predict potential drug-target interactions on a large scale under the hypothesis that similar drugs often target similar target proteins and the framework of Random Walk. Compared with traditional supervised or semi-supervised methods, NRWRH makes full use of the tool of the network for data integration to predict drug-target associations. It integrates three different networks (protein-protein similarity network, drug-drug similarity network, and known drug-target interaction networks) into a heterogeneous network by known drug-target interactions and implements the random walk on this heterogeneous network. When applied to four classes of important drug-target interactions including enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors, NRWRH significantly improves previous methods in terms of cross-validation and potential drug-target interaction prediction. Excellent performance enables us to suggest a number of new potential drug-target interactions for drug development.

  18. How Older People Can Head Off Dangerous Drug Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161150.html How Older People Can Head Off Dangerous Drug Interactions Taking multiple ... serious drug interactions are a daily threat to older people who take multiple medications and supplements, according to ...

  19. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  20. A pocket aide-memoire on drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, I H

    1975-04-01

    A pocket size "slide-rule" type device designed to be used by physicians, pharmacists and nurses as a memory aid on potential drug-drug interactions is described. Color-coded symbols on the device indicate both the type and clinical significance of the potential interactions involving 56 drugs or groups of drugs.

  1. [Food-drug interactions: an underestimated risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönnichsen, A C; Donner-Banzhoff, N; Baum, E

    2005-11-03

    With only few exceptions, administration of medicaments should, in principle, be independent of food intake (at least half an hour before or two hours after eating). This ensures uniform and assessable bioavailability. However, it also entails the risk that the patient is more likely to forget to take medication postponed to 2 hours after a meal, than when it is directly coupled to a meal. Certain foodstuffs or food constituents, such as, for example, grapefruit, Seville orange juice, red wine, alcoholic drinks in general, or large quantities of caffeine and garlic should be avoided during drug treatment. In addition, specific interactions with certain drugs must also be taken into account (e.g. MAO inhibitors and tyramine, curamine and vitamin K).

  2. Medsebojno delovanje zdravil pri starostnikih: Drug drug interactions in the elderly:

    OpenAIRE

    Trontelj, Jurij

    2010-01-01

    Elderly patients commonly suffer from comorbidities and often take 4 or more drugs simultaneously. Polypharmacy poses a significant risk for drug-drug interactions. Elderly patients tend to eliminate drugs more slowly and they are more sensitive to drugsć adverse effects at the same time. The most important consequences of drug drug interactions that often require hospitalization are gastrointestinal bleeding, acute bradicardia, hypotension,arrhythmias and falls associated with use of psychot...

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals drug interactions: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals play a critical role in modern medicine primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. As the use of image has been increased, so has the use of prescription medications. These trends increase the risk of interactions between medications and radiopharmaceuticals. These interactions which have an impact on image by competing with the radiopharmaceutical for binding sites for example can lead to false negative results. Drugs that accelerate the metabolism of the radiopharmaceutical can have a positive impact (i.e. speeding its clearance or, if repeating image is needed, a negative impact. In some cases, for example in cardiac image among patients taking doxirubacin, these interactions may have a therapeutic benefit. The incidence of drug-radiopharmaceuticals adverse reactions is unknown, since they may not be reported or even recognized. Here,we compiled the medical literature, using the criteria of a systematic review established by the Cochrane Collaboration, on pharmaceutical-drug interactions to provide a summary of documented interactions by organ system and radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose is to provide a reference on drug interactions that could inform the nuclear medicine staff in their daily routine. Efforts to increase adverse event reporting, and ideally consolidate reports worldwide, can provide a critically needed resource for prevention of drug-radiopharmaceuticals interactions.Os radiofármacos desempenham função crítica na medicina moderna, primariamente para fins diagnósticos, mas também no monitoramento da progressão de doenças assim como na avaliação de respostas ao tratamento. O uso da tecnologia por imagem tem crescido e conseqüentemente as prescrições de medicamentos (radiofármacos em especial com esse propósito. Este fato, aumenta o risco de interações entre medicamentos e radiofármacos. Interações que podem ter um impacto na

  4. [Interactions between herbal medicines and drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůmová, L

    2000-07-01

    At present the use of medicaments of plant origin is on the increase. It is therefore necessary to take into consideration that there exist known as well as potential interactions between the medicament of the medicinal plant. The problematic plants include Echinacea, Allium cepa, Gingko biloba, Panax ginseng, as well as Hypericum perforatum, Valeriana officinalis, or Glycyrrhiza glabra. Its use should be limited, or completely excluded in the cases of simultaneous therapy with, e.g., warfarin, hepatotoxically acting medicaments, MAOI inhibitors, phenelzin sulphate, or phenytoin, as they may decrease of completely eliminate the therapeutic effect of the administered drugs, or they may cause a toxic damage to the organism.

  5. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment.

  6. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe (n=64 and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent (n=117. Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5% and 124 women (68.5% with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1% patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81% were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%, clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%, and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%. Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population.

  7. A network inference method for large-scale unsupervised identification of novel drug-drug interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Guimerà

    Full Text Available Characterizing interactions between drugs is important to avoid potentially harmful combinations, to reduce off-target effects of treatments and to fight antibiotic resistant pathogens, among others. Here we present a network inference algorithm to predict uncharacterized drug-drug interactions. Our algorithm takes, as its only input, sets of previously reported interactions, and does not require any pharmacological or biochemical information about the drugs, their targets or their mechanisms of action. Because the models we use are abstract, our approach can deal with adverse interactions, synergistic/antagonistic/suppressing interactions, or any other type of drug interaction. We show that our method is able to accurately predict interactions, both in exhaustive pairwise interaction data between small sets of drugs, and in large-scale databases. We also demonstrate that our algorithm can be used efficiently to discover interactions of new drugs as part of the drug discovery process.

  8. Clinically important drug-drug interactions in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabali, A A H; Awang, R; Zyoud, S H

    2012-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide and may lead to hospital admission. Sophisticated computerized drug information and monitoring systems, more recently established in many of the emerging economies, including Malaysia, are capturing useful information on prescribing. Our aim is to report on an investigation of potentially serious DDIs, using a university primary care-based system capturing prescription records from its primary care services. We retrospectively collected data from two academic years over 20 months from computerized databases at the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) from users of the USM primary care services. Three hundred and eighty-six DDI events were observed in a cohort of 208 exposed patients from a total of 23,733 patients, representing a 2-year period prevalence of 876·4 per 100,000 patients. Of the 208 exposed patients, 138 (66·3%) were exposed to one DDI event, 29 (13·9%) to two DDI events, 15 (7·2%) to three DDI events, 6 (2·9%) to four DDI events and 20 (9·6%) to more than five DDI events. Overall, an increasing mean number of episodes of DDIs was noted among exposed patients within the age category ≥70 years (P=0·01), an increasing trend in the number of medications prescribed (P<0·001) and an increasing trend in the number of long-term therapeutic groups (P<0·001). We describe the prevalence of clinically important DDIs in an emerging economy setting and identify the more common potentially serious DDIs. In line with the observations in developed economies, a higher number of episodes of DDIs were seen in patients aged ≥70 years and with more medications prescribed. The easiest method to reduce the frequency of DDIs is to reduce the number of medications prescribed. Therapeutic alternatives should be selected cautiously. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Minimal mobile human computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Ali, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the widespread adoption of personal, mobile computing devices in everyday life, has allowed entry into a new technological era in Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The constant change of the physical and social context in a user's situation made possible by the portability of m

  10. Interactions between Humans and Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    introduce a generic model for comparing and contrasting robots (CCM), aiming to provide a common platform for robot designers, developers and users. The framework for HRI we propose stems mainly from the vagueness and the lack of clarity that has been observed in the definitions of both Direct and Indirect......Combining multiple scientific disciplines, robotic technology has made significant progress the last decade, and so did the interactions between humans and robots. This article updates the agenda for robotic research by highlighting the factors that affect Human – Robot Interaction (HRI......), and explains the relationships and dependencies that exist between them. The four main factors that define the properties of a robot, and therefore the interaction, are distributed in two dimensions: (1) Intelligence (Control - Autonomy), and (2) Perspective (Tool - Medium). Based on these factors, we...

  11. Interactions between Humans and Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachos, Evgenios; Schärfe, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Combining multiple scientific disciplines, robotic technology has made significant progress the last decade, and so did the interactions between humans and robots. This article updates the agenda for robotic research by highlighting the factors that affect Human – Robot Interaction (HRI......), and explains the relationships and dependencies that exist between them. The four main factors that define the properties of a robot, and therefore the interaction, are distributed in two dimensions: (1) Intelligence (Control - Autonomy), and (2) Perspective (Tool - Medium). Based on these factors, we...... introduce a generic model for comparing and contrasting robots (CCM), aiming to provide a common platform for robot designers, developers and users. The framework for HRI we propose stems mainly from the vagueness and the lack of clarity that has been observed in the definitions of both Direct and Indirect...

  12. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... drug or human biological product is eligible for extension, the term shall be extended by the time as... term of the patent for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product will be extended...

  13. Clinical relevance of drug-drug interactions - A structured assessment procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, EN; Flikweert, S; le Comte, M; Langendijk, PNJ; Kwee-Zuiderwijk, WJM; Smits, P; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Computerised drug interaction surveillance systems (CIS) may be helpful in detecting clinically significant drug interactions. Experience with CIS C, reveals that they often yield alerts with questionable clinical significance, fail to provide relevant information on risk factors for t

  14. Clinical relevance of drug-drug interactions : a structured assessment procedure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roon, E.N. van; Flikweert, S.; Comte, M. le; Langendijk, P.N.; Kwee-Zuiderwijk, W.J.; Smits, P.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Computerised drug interaction surveillance systems (CIS) may be helpful in detecting clinically significant drug interactions. Experience with CIS reveals that they often yield alerts with questionable clinical significance, fail to provide relevant information on risk factors for the

  15. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  16. Clinical risk management in Dutch community pharmacies: the case of drug-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevention of drug-drug interactions requires a systematic approach for which the concept of clinical risk management can be used. The objective of our study was to measure the frequency, nature and management of drug-drug interaction alerts as these occur in daily practice of Dutch

  17. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique.

  18. Interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Chiat; Ong, Charlene Li Ching; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah; Wong, Tin Wui

    2008-02-01

    The effectiveness of an interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system is compared with that of a solid dispersion. The influences of drug load, particle size, and crystallinity of these test systems are investigated. The interactive mixtures and solid dispersions were prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydrophobic nifedipine drug by means of physical mixing and melting methods, respectively. The formed products were subjected to drug particle size and crystallinity analyses, and dissolution tests. In comparison with the interactive mixtures, the solid dispersions with low drug load were more effective as a rapid drug delivery system, as the size of a given batch of drug particles was markedly reduced by the molten PEG 3350. The rate and extent of drug dissolution were mainly promoted by decreasing effective drug particle size. However, these were lower in the solid dispersions than in the interactive mixtures when a high load of fine drug particles was used as the starting material. This was attributed to drug coarsening during the preparation of the solid dispersion. Unlike solid dispersions, the interactive mixtures could accommodate a high load of fine drug particles without compromising its capacity to enhance the rate and extent of drug dissolution. The interactive mixture is appropriate for use to deliver a fine hydrophobic drug in a formulation requiring a high drug load.

  19. Lichenoid drug eruption after human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Mary E; Schleichert, Rachel A; Green, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions have been linked to a long and growing list of medications, most of which are used mainly in adults, making these reactions exceedingly rare in children. To the best of our knowledge, this case report is the first of a lichenoid drug eruption in a child after human papillomavirus vaccination.

  20. Interaction of Citrinin with Human Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Poór

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrinin (CIT is a mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus species. CIT occurs worldwide in different foods and drinks and causes health problems for humans and animals. Human serum albumin (HSA is the most abundant plasma protein in human circulation. Albumin forms stable complexes with many drugs and xenobiotics; therefore, HSA commonly plays important role in the pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of numerous compounds. However, the interaction of CIT with HSA is poorly characterized yet. In this study, the complex formation of CIT with HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration techniques. For the deeper understanding of the interaction, thermodynamic, and molecular modeling studies were performed as well. Our results suggest that CIT forms stable complex with HSA (logK ~ 5.3 and its primary binding site is located in subdomain IIA (Sudlow’s Site I. In vitro cell experiments also recommend that CIT-HSA interaction may have biological relevance. Finally, the complex formations of CIT with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumin were investigated, in order to test the potential species differences of CIT-albumin interactions.

  1. Drug-drug and food-drug pharmacokinetic interactions with new insulinotropic agents repaglinide and nateglinide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for improving insulin secretion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are increasingly used either in monotherapy or in combination with other oral antihyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Compared with sulfonylureas, glinides have been shown to (i) provide a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, (ii) overcome some adverse effects, such as hypoglycaemia, and (iii) have a more favourable safety profile, especially in patients with renal failure. The meal-related timing of administration of glinides and the potential influence of food and meal composition on their bioavailability may be important. In addition, some food components (e.g. grapefruit juice) may cause pharmacokinetic interactions. Because glinides are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme, they are indeed exposed to pharmacokinetic interactions. In addition to CYP3A4, repaglinide is metabolised via CYP2C8, while nateglinide metabolism also involves CYP2C9. Furthermore, both compounds and their metabolites may undergo specialised transport/uptake in the intestine, another source of pharmacokinetic interactions. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are those that occur when glinides are administered together with other glucose-lowering agents or compounds widely coadministered to diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents), with drugs that are known to induce (risk of lower glinide plasma levels and thus of deterioration of glucose control) or inhibit (risk of higher glinide plasma levels leading to hypoglycaemia) CYP isoenzymes concerned in their metabolism, or with drugs that have a narrow efficacy : toxicity ratio. Pharmacokinetic interactions reported in the literature appear to be more frequent and more important with repaglinide than with

  2. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi Zakia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events.

  3. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-10-18

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events.

  4. Drug interactions in controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, S

    1982-12-01

    As much information as possible should be obtained in clinical trials to assess possible interactions between test drugs and concomitant medications prescribed for other medical indications. Side effect profiles were compared in patients taking buspirone, mean = 20 mg/day; diazepam, 20 mg/day; clorazepate, 23 mg/day; and placebo, with or without concomitant medications. Approximately 1,000 anxious patients were included in the analysis; 700 received buspirone. The use of a variety of common medications did not affect the side effect profile in the buspirone, clorazepate, and placebo groups, but did increase the incidence of side effects in the diazepam group. The increased incidence of sedation noted with diazepam and clorazepate, however, was not due to concomitant medication.

  5. Development and trial of the drug interaction database system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The drug interaction database system was originally developed at Songklanagarind Hospital. Data sets of drugs available in Songklanagarind Hospital comprising standard drug names, trade names, group names, and drug interactions were set up using Microsoft® Access 2000. The computer used was a Pentium III processor running at 450 MHz with 128 MB SDRAM operated by Microsoft® Windows 98. A robust structured query language algorithm was chosen for detecting interactions. The functioning of this database system, including speed and accuracy of detection, was tested at Songklanagarind Hospital and Naratiwatrachanagarind Hospital using hypothetical prescriptions. Its use in determining the incidence of drug interactions was also evaluated using a retrospective prescription data file. This study has shown that the database system correctly detected drug interactions from prescriptions. Speed of detection was approximately 1 to 2 seconds depending on the size of prescription. The database system was of benefit in determining of incidence rate of drug interaction in a hospital.

  6. Pharmacoepidemiological assessment of drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Christensen, Rene dePont; Wang, Shirley V

    2014-01-01

    PurposeWe present a database of prescription drugs and international normalized ratio (INR) data and the applied methodology for its use to assess drug-drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We use the putative interaction between VKAs and tramadol as a case study. MethodsWe used...

  7. Development of Human Membrane Transporters: Drug Disposition and Pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Miriam G; Nies, Anne T; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Schaeffeler, Elke; Tibboel, Dick; Schwab, Matthias; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2016-05-01

    Membrane transporters play an essential role in the transport of endogenous and exogenous compounds, and consequently they mediate the uptake, distribution, and excretion of many drugs. The clinical relevance of transporters in drug disposition and their effect in adults have been shown in drug-drug interaction and pharmacogenomic studies. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of human membrane transporters and their roles in pediatric pharmacotherapy. As they are involved in the transport of endogenous substrates, growth and development may be important determinants of their expression and activity. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge on human membrane transporters in pediatric drug disposition and effect. Existing pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic data on membrane substrate drugs frequently used in children are presented and related, where possible, to existing ex vivo data, providing a basis for developmental patterns for individual human membrane transporters. As data for individual transporters are currently still scarce, there is a striking information gap regarding the role of human membrane transporters in drug therapy in children.

  8. On the interaction between drugs of abuse and adolescent social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezza, Viviana; Baarendse, Petra J J; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2014-04-01

    Social factors influence drug abuse. Conversely, drugs of abuse alter social behavior. This is especially pertinent during post-weaning development, when there are profound changes in the social repertoire, and the sensitivity to the positive and negative effects of drugs of abuse is altered. This study aimed to provide an overview of our current understanding of the interaction between drugs of abuse and juvenile/adolescent social behavior. We first provide evidence that a characteristic form of juvenile and adolescent social behavior, i.e., social play behavior, has reinforcing properties and is affected by drugs of abuse. Next, social risk factors for drug use and addiction are described, including antisocial personality traits and early social insults. Last, we discuss research that investigates social influences on drug use, as well as the consequences of perinatal drug exposure on later social interactions. Social play behavior is highly rewarding in laboratory animals, and it is affected by low doses of opioids, cannabinoids, ethanol, nicotine, and psychostimulants. In humans, antisocial personality traits, most prominently in the form of conduct disorder, are a prominent risk factor for drug addiction. Preclinical studies have consistently shown altered sensitivity to drugs as a result of social isolation during post-weaning development. The social environment of an individual has a profound, but complex, influence on drug use, and perinatal drug exposure markedly alters later social interactions. The studies reviewed here provide a framework to understand the interaction between drugs of abuse and adolescent social interaction, at the preclinical and the clinical level.

  9. Drug interactions associated with HAART: focus on treatments for addiction and recreational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faragon, John J; Piliero, Peter J

    2003-09-01

    The advent of HAART has improved survival in patients infected with HIV; however, treatment is complicated by potential drug interactions. The risk of drug interactions is compounded by the use of additional therapies for comorbid conditions, such as substance abuse, and by the use of recreational drugs. HIV health care providers should be aware of the potential interaction of recreational drugs and addiction treatments with HAART because of the potential for significant adverse effects for their HIV-infected patients. This article provides a review of the literature on drug interactions among addiction therapies, recreational drugs, and HAART.

  10. Drug-drug interactions with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Sander; de Vries, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In their Review, Roelof van Leeuwen and colleagues1 recommend various dose adjustments during concomitant use of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and drugs that inhibit or induce cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4).1 Most information is taken from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s drug label or the Eur

  11. Investigations with spectroscopy, zeta potential and molecular modeling of the non-cooperative behaviour between cyclophosphamide hydrochloride and aspirin upon interaction with human serum albumin: binary and ternary systems from multi-drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvar, Zahra; Parivar, Kazem; Sanee, Hamideh; Amiri-Tehranizadeh, Zeinab; Baratian, Ali; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Chamani, Jamshidkhan

    2011-08-01

    The interaction between cyclophosphamide hydrochloride (CYC) and aspirin (ASA) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by various kind of spectroscopic, ζ potential and molecular modeling under physiological conditions. The fluorescence data showed that the binding of drugs to proteins caused strong static fluorescence quenching. The analysis of the fluorescence quenching of HSA in the binary and ternary systems displayed that ASA was affected by the complex formed between CYC and HSA. Moreover, CYC was influenced by the HSA-ASA complex. The inherent binding information, including the quenching mechanism, binding constants, number of binding sites, effective quenching constant, fraction of the initial fluorescence and thermodynamic parameters were measured by the fluorescence quenching technique at various temperatures. In addition, according to the synchronous fluorescence spectra of HSA, the results showed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA originated from the Trp and Tyr residues, and indicated a conformational change of HSA with the addition of the drugs. Far-UV CD spectra of HSA were recorded before and after the addition of ASA and CYC as binary and ternary systems. An increase in intensity of the positive CD peak of HSA was observed in the presence of the drugs. The results were interpreted by excited interactions between the aromatic residues of the HSA binding sites and the drugs bound to them. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained by the Forster energy according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and found to be 2.35 nm and 1.78 nm for CYC and ASA, respectively. This confirmed the existence of static quenching for proteins in the presence of CYC and ASA. Furthermore, docking studies pointed at a reduction of the affinity of each of the drug compounds to the protein in the presence of the other in meaningful amounts. Pre-binding of any of the said compounds forced the second to bind in a non-optimized location and

  12. Potential drug-drug interactions in intensive care units of a hospital in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Henrique Oliveira-Paula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions are important causes of adverse reactions in health units. The high consumption of medicines in intensive care units predisposes patients to potential drug-drug interactions. This study aimed at examining the frequency and the characteristics of drug-drug interactions in intensive care units of Hospital Universitario of Universidade Estadual de Londrina. We analyzed the prescriptions of patients over 18 years, admitted from January to May 2010, who remained hospitalized for at least four days. The analysis of drug-drug interactions was carried out using the Micromedex Drug-Reax® system. The interactions were classified by severity, time required for the onset of adverse effects, mechanism of action and quality of scientific evidence. Moreover, the possible adverse events were analyzed, as well as the recommended strategies of management and monitoring. Altogether, 198 different potential drug-drug interactions were identified with the occurrence of 1242 episodes. Of these, 43% were characterized by moderate interactions, 35% major, 16% minor and 6% contraindicated. The therapeutic inefficacy was the most frequent possible adverse event (18% and the main recommended strategy of management was the dose adjustment (35.6%. The most frequent interactions were: fentanyl + midazolam (8.6%, phenytoin + ranitidine (5.5% and midazolam + ranitidine (4.8%. These results demonstrate the importance of drug-drug interactions as a significant adverse event in intensive care units and thus, preventive measures are required to minimize this problem.

  13. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendel Mombaque dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r. Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000 and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00. The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

  14. Drug interactions in female oncologic inpatients: differences among databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Moriel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to quantify drug interactions in prescriptions for women undergoing supportive therapy in an oncology setting at a women’s hospital in Brazil and compare the information provided by different databases regarding these drug interactions. A convenience sample was selected of prescriptions for patients diagnosed with breast or gynecological tumors hospitalized in the clinical oncology and surgery wards from April to June 2009. DRUGDEX/Micromedex (Thomson Micromedex was the main database used for the identification of drug interactions and was compared with two other databases: Drugs.com and Lexicomp. The search was performed by inputting all drug combinations found in the prescriptions in Micromedex and Drugs.com. All interactions identified and classified by Micromedex and/or Drugs.com as of major severity were then checked in Lexicomp. A total of 152 interactions were identified by Micromedex (61 major, 69 moderate and 22 minor. In Drugs.com, 614 interactions were identified (85 major, 464 moderate and 65 minor. Forty-four were classified as major drug interactions in at least one of the databases: 30 in Micromedex, 26 in Drugs. com and 14 in Lexicomp. The present findings reveal discrepancies among the three databases analyzed. Thus, standardization should be proposed. Moreover, both the pharmacist and multidisciplinary team should perform a critical analysis of prescriptions to promote safe practices in the use of medications and minimize potential complications caused by drug interactions.

  15. Evaluation of drug-drug interactions with fesoterodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Bimal; Sachse, Richard; Wood, Nolan

    2009-06-01

    To assess drug-drug interactions of fesoterodine with cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inhibitor (ketoconazole), inducer (rifampicin), and substrates (ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel). Effects of ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily and rifampicin 600 mg twice daily on fesoterodine 8 mg once daily were investigated in CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers (EMs) and poor metabolizers (PMs) based on 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT) pharmacokinetics (principal active fesoterodine metabolite and CYP3A4 substrate). Effects of fesoterodine 8 mg versus placebo once daily on ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel were investigated based on oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics and on pharmacodynamic effects on progesterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol plasma levels. Compared with fesoterodine alone, coadministration of fesoterodine with ketoconazole resulted in increases in mean 5-HMT maximum concentration in plasma (C(max); from 3.0 to 6.0 ng/mL in EMs and from 6.4 to 13.4 ng/mL in PMs) and mean area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC; from 38.2 to 88.3 ng h/mL in EMs and 88.3 to 217.2 ng h/mL in PMs). Coadministration of festerodine with rifampicin resulted in decreases in mean 5-HMT C(max) (from 5.2 to 1.5 ng/mL in EMs and from 6.8 to 1.9 ng/mL in PMs) and mean AUC (from 62.4 to 14.4 ng h/mL in EMs and from 87.8 to 19.6 ng h/mL in PMs). Fesoterodine did not affect oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics or the suppression of ovulation. Fesoterodine dosage should not exceed 4 mg once daily when taken concomitantly with potent CYP3A4 inhibitors. Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with fesoterodine may produce subtherapeutic 5-HMT exposures. No dose adjustment is necessary for concomitant use of fesoterodine with oral contraceptives.

  16. Quantitative bioassay to identify antimicrobial drugs through drug interaction fingerprint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Zohar B; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2017-02-16

    Drug interaction analysis, which reports the extent to which the presence of one drug affects the efficacy of another, is a powerful tool to select potent combinatorial therapies and predict connectivity between cellular components. Combinatorial effects of drug pairs often vary even for drugs with similar mechanism of actions. Therefore, drug interaction fingerprinting may be harnessed to differentiate drug identities. We developed a method to analyze drug interactions for the application of identifying active pharmaceutical ingredients, an essential step to assess drug quality. We developed a novel approach towards the identification of active pharmaceutical ingredients by comparing drug interaction fingerprint similarity metrics such as correlation and Euclidean distance. To expedite this method, we used bioluminescent E. coli in a simplified checkerboard assay to generate unique drug interaction fingerprints of antimicrobial drugs. Of 30 antibiotics studied, 29 could be identified based on their drug interaction fingerprints. We present drug interaction fingerprint analysis as a cheap, sensitive and quantitative method towards substandard and counterfeit drug detection.

  17. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  18. Detecting drug-drug interactions using a database for spontaneous adverse drug reactions : an example with diuretics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Egberts, A C; Heerdink, E R; Leufkens, H G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Drug-drug interactions are relatively rarely reported to spontaneous reporting systems (SRSs) for adverse drug reactions. For this reason, the traditional approach for analysing SRS has major limitations for the detection of drug-drug interactions. We developed a method that may enable si

  19. Potential Drug-drug Interactions in Post-CCU of a Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Aghajani, Mohammad; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Abbasinazari, Mohammad; Abiar Ghamsari, Mahdieh; Ayazkhoo, Ladan; Safi, Olia; Kazemi, Katayoon; Kouchek, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can lead to increased toxicity or reduction in therapeutic efficacy. This study was designed to assess the incidence of potential drug interactions (PDI) and rank their clinical value in post coronary care unit (Post-CCU) of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. In this prospective study, three pharmacists with supervision of a clinical pharmacist actively gathered necessary information for detection of DDIs. Data were tabulated according to the combinations of drugs in treatment chart. Verification of potential drug interactions was carried out using the online Lexi-Interact™ 2011. A total of 203 patients (113 males and 90 females) were enrolled in the study. The mean age of patients was 61 ± 12.55 years (range = 26-93). A total of 90 drugs were prescribed to 203 patients and most prescribed drugs were atorvastatin, clopidogrel and metoprolol. Mean of drugs was 11.22 per patient. A total of 3166 potential drug interactions have been identified by Lexi- Interact™, 149 (4.71%) and 55 (1.73%) of which were categorized as D and X, respectively. The most serious interactions were clopidogrel+omeprazole and metoprolol+salbutamol. Drug interactions leading to serious adverse effects are to be cautiously watched for when multiple drugs are used simultaneously. In settings with multiple drug use attendance of a pharmacist or clinical pharmacist, taking the responsibility for monitoring drug interactions and notifying the physician about potential problems could decrease the harm in patient and increase the patient safety.

  20. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  1. Notion of Mediators in Human Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Josip Stepanic

    2003-01-01

    Many types of human interaction are mediated processes. However, regarding the details of human description, the mediating unit structure and dynamics is not developed appropriately. The explicit concentration on mediators contributes to understanding of interplay between value sets governing interaction, interaction roles in regular activities and interaction design for purpose. This article is a contribution to development of a concept of mediated human interaction through structuring of me...

  2. P-glycoprotein interaction with risperidone and 9-OH-risperidone studied in vitro, in knock-out mice and in drug-drug interaction experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Thomas B.; Pedersen, Anne D.; Linnet, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, risperidone, nortriptyline, cyclosporine A, drug-drug interaction, blood-brain barrier, knock-out mice......P-glycoprotein, risperidone, nortriptyline, cyclosporine A, drug-drug interaction, blood-brain barrier, knock-out mice...

  3. Metabotropic glutamate receptors and interacting proteins: evolving drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The correct targeting, localization, regulation and signaling of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) represent major mechanisms underlying the complex function of neuronal networks. These tasks are accomplished by the formation of synaptic signal complexes that integrate functionally related proteins such as neurotransmitter receptors, enzymes and scaffold proteins. By these means, proteins interacting with mGluRs are important regulators of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Most described mGluR interaction partners bind to the intracellular C-termini of the receptors. These domains are extensively spliced and phosphorylated, resulting in a high variability of binding surfaces offered to interacting proteins. Malfunction of mGluRs and associated proteins are linked to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction, depression, epilepsy, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's disease. MGluR associated signal complexes are dynamic structures that assemble and disassemble in response to the neuronal fate. This, in principle, allows therapeutic intervention, defining mGluRs and interacting proteins as promising drug targets. In the last years, several studies elucidated the geometry of mGluRs in contact with regulatory proteins, providing a solid fundament for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, I will give an overview of human disorders directly associated with mGluR malfunction, provide an up-to-date summary of mGluR interacting proteins and highlight recently described structures of mGluR domains in contact with binding partners.

  4. The potential drug-drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors and warfarin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard; Hansen, Morten Rix

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been suggested to increase the effect of warfarin, and clinical guidelines recommend careful monitoring of international normalized ratio (INR) when initiating PPI among warfarin users. However, this drug-drug interaction is sparsely investigated...

  5. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  6. Rxpert: An Intelligent Computer System For Drug Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Brian G.; Dankel, Douglas D.

    1986-03-01

    Drug interactions have become very prevalent in modern medicine. With the increasing numbers of techniques for disease diagnosis and marketed medications for disease treatment, multiple drug patient care has become a customary practice. Consequently, the potential of harmful drug induced effects has become, and will continue to be, an enormous problem in providing patient care. A computer reference aid, knowledgeable about drug interactions, would be of great value to medical personnel in eliminating untoward drug effects in patient care. This research involved the development of such a system called RxPERT. RxPERT is an intelligent, easy to use, interactive computer system with expert level knowledge of drug interactions, implemented for use on an IBM-PC microcomputer. The microcomputer implementation allows the program to be highly accessible, and its information promptly retrievable for office as well as institutional settings. The system requires input of a patient history and patient drug requirements. Throughout the user/computer interactive session the user can review explanations of the possible interactions. Ultimately a listing of drug interactions and overall rating of the drug regimen instituted is displayed.

  7. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Bogetti-Salazar; Cesar González-González; Teresa Juárez-Cedillo; Sergio Sánchez-García; Oscar Rosas-Carrasco

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug inte...

  8. Time-dependent drug-drug interaction alerts in care provider order entry: software may inhibit medication error reductions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H. van der Sijs (Heleen); L.A. Lammers (Laureen); A. van den Tweel (Annemieke); J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos); M. Berg (Marc); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); T. van Gelder (Teun)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTime-dependent drug-drug interactions (TDDIs) are drug combinations that result in a decreased drug effect due to coadministration of a second drug. Such interactions can be prevented by separately administering the drugs. This study attempted to reduce drug administration errors due to

  9. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions.

  10. Identifying Drug–Drug Interactions by Data Mining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Wæde; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Sehested, Thomas S.G.

    2016-01-01

    Background—Knowledge about drug–drug interactions commonly arises from preclinical trials, from adverse drug reports, or based on knowledge of mechanisms of action. Our aim was to investigate whether drug–drug interactions were discoverable without prior hypotheses using data mining. We focused...... registries. Additionally, we discovered a few potentially novel interactions. This opens up for the use of data mining to discover unknown drug–drug interactions in cardiovascular medicine....... on warfarin–drug interactions as the prototype. Methods and Results—We analyzed altered prothrombin time (measured as international normalized ratio [INR]) after initiation of a novel prescription in previously INR-stable warfarin-treated patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Data sets were retrieved...

  11. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-03-13

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  12. [Cytochrome P450 enzymes and their role in drug interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp-Jámbor, C; Jaschinski, U; Forst, H

    2002-01-01

    One of the factors that can alter the response to drugs is the concurrent administration of other drugs. There are several mechanisms by which drugs may interact, but most can be categorised as pharmacokinetic (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion), pharmacodynamic, or combined toxicity. Knowledge of the mechanism by which a given drug interaction occurs is often clinically useful and may help to avoid serious adverse events and perioperative morbidity. Although every tissue has some ability to metabolise drugs, the liver is the principal organ of drug metabolism and at the subcellular level the cytochrome P450 enzyme system is the main source of drug interaction. This article reviews the basic principles of drug metabolism and the role of cytochrome P450 in this scenario. Drugs frequently used in anaesthesia and critical care medicine such as benzodiazepines, opioid analgesics, antihypertensive and antiarrhythmic agents, antibiotics and antifungal drugs, antiemetics, histamine-receptor-antagonists, theopylline and paracetamol will be considered. The development of methods and tools which are practical and also economic, are of utmost importance since drug interaction is predictable if the metabolic pathway and the activity (genetic polymorphism) of the enzyme is known.

  13. PHARMACOKINETIC-PHARMACODYNAMIC DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ; DESMET, PAGM

    1994-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are very commonly prescribed, especially in the elderly population. In many countries more than 10 different NSAIDs are available. As the older pyrazole compounds like phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone and azapropazone are most prone to pharmacokinetic

  14. Drug Interaction Alert Override Rates in the Meaningful Use Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, A.D.; Fletcher, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Interruptive drug interaction alerts may reduce adverse drug events and are required for Stage I Meaningful Use attestation. For the last decade override rates have been very high. Despite their widespread use in commercial EHR systems, previously described interventions to improve alert frequency and acceptance have not been well studied. Objectives (1) To measure override rates of inpatient medication alerts within a commercial clinical decision support system, and assess the impact of local customization efforts. (2) To compare override rates between drug-drug interaction and drug-allergy interaction alerts, between attending and resident physicians, and between public and academic hospitals. (3) To measure the correlation between physicians’ individual alert quantities and override rates as an indicator of potential alert fatigue. Methods We retrospectively analyzed physician responses to drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction alerts, as generated by a common decision support product in a large teaching hospital system. Results (1) Over four days, 461 different physicians entered 18,354 medication orders, resulting in 2,455 visible alerts; 2,280 alerts (93%) were overridden. (2) The drug-drug alert override rate was 95.1%, statistically higher than the rate for drug-allergy alerts (90.9%) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in override rates between attendings and residents, or between hospitals. (3) Physicians saw a mean of 1.3 alerts per day, and the number of alerts per physician was not significantly correlated with override rate (R2 = 0.03, p = 0.41). Conclusions Despite intensive efforts to improve a commercial drug interaction alert system and to reduce alerting, override rates remain as high as reported over a decade ago. Alert fatigue does not seem to contribute. The results suggest the need to fundamentally question the premises of drug interaction alert systems. PMID:25298818

  15. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research: Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public meeting and an opportunity for public comment on...

  16. Pharmacokinetic interactions between herbal medicines and prescribed drugs: focus on drug metabolic enzymes and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Liu, Kexin

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been widely used for thousands of years, and now are gaining continued popularity worldwide as a complementary or alternative treatment for a variety of diseases, rehabilitation and health care. Since herbal medicines contain more than one pharmacologically active ingredient and are commonly used with many prescribed drugs, there are potential herb-drug interactions. A variety of reported herb-drug interactions are of pharmacokinetic origin, arising from the effects of herbal medicines on metabolic enzymes and/or transporters. Such an alteration in metabolism or transport can result in changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (e.g., induction or inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and modulation of uptake and efflux transporters), leading to changed pharmacokinetics of the concomitantly prescribed drugs. Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions have more clinical significance as pharmacokinetic parameters such as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) or the elimination half-life (t1/2) of the concomitant drug alter. This review summarizes the mechanism underlying herb-drug interactions and the approaches to identify the interactions, and discusses pharmacokinetic interactions of eight widely used herbal medicines (Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, garlic, black cohosh, Echinacea, milk thistle, kava, and St. John's wort) with conventional drugs, using various in vitro, animal in vivo, and clinical studies. The increasing understanding of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions will make health care professionals and patients pay more attention to the potential interactions.

  17. Drug Interactions: What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This information is brought to you by the Council on Family Health in cooperation with the National Consumers League and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Back to top More in Resources for You ...

  18. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Soares Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI and adverse drug reactions (ADR in older adults polymedicated. Methods: an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. Results: forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years were analyzed: 24 (51.1% concerning ADR, 14 (29.8% DDI, and 9 studies (19.1% investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. Conclusions: DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps.

  19. pH dependence of drug-membrane interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Uttam Kumar; Datta, Alokmay

    2014-04-01

    Langmuir monolayer technique has been used to understand the interaction of piroxicam, a NSAID of oxicam class with the DMPC half membrane. It has been found that drug-membrane interaction is dependent on the pH of the environment. The interaction slightly increases with pH in the range 2.5-6.5 whereas the interaction becomes stronger in the pH range 6.6-8.5. The mechanism of interaction has been explained considering the pH dependent molecular conformation and ionic state of drug and lipid molecules.

  20. In Silico Identification of Proteins Associated with Drug-induced Liver Injury Based on the Prediction of Drug-target Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey; Semin, Maxim; Lagunin, Alexey; Filimonov, Dmitry; Poroikov, Vladimir

    2017-07-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure as well as one of the major reasons for drug withdrawal from clinical trials and the market. Elucidation of molecular interactions associated with DILI may help to detect potentially hazardous pharmacological agents at the early stages of drug development. The purpose of our study is to investigate which interactions with specific human protein targets may cause DILI. Prediction of interactions with 1534 human proteins was performed for the dataset with information about 699 drugs, which were divided into three categories of DILI: severe (178 drugs), moderate (310 drugs) and without DILI (211 drugs). Based on the comparison of drug-target interactions predicted for different drugs' categories and interpretation of those results using clustering, Gene Ontology, pathway and gene expression analysis, we identified 61 protein targets associated with DILI. Most of the revealed proteins were linked with hepatocytes' death caused by disruption of vital cellular processes, as well as the emergence of inflammation in the liver. It was found that interaction of a drug with the identified targets is the essential molecular mechanism of the severe DILI for the most of the considered pharmaceuticals. Thus, pharmaceutical agents interacting with many of the identified targets may be considered as candidates for filtering out at the early stages of drug research. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Risk factors for potential drug interactions in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Lars; Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz; Petersen, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacoepidemiologic Database, OPED) covering prescriptions to all inhabitants in the county of Funen, Denmark. All individuals exposed to concurrent use of two or more drugs (polypharmacy) were identified. Combinations of drugs with potential interactions were registered and classified as major, moderate, or minor......, depending on the severity of outcome and the quality of documentation. A two-level random coefficient logistic regression model was used to investigate factors related to potential drug interactions. Results: One-third of the population was exposed to polypharmacy, and 6% were exposed to potential drug...

  2. Transporter-Mediated Drug–Drug Interactions with Oral Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg König

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Uptake transporters (e.g., members of the SLC superfamily of solute carriers and export proteins (e.g., members of the ABC transporter superfamily are important determinants for the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Alterations of drug transport due to concomitantly administered drugs that interfere with drug transport may alter the kinetics of drug substrates. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that many drugs used for the treatment of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases (e.g., oral antidiabetic drugs, statins are substrates for uptake transporters and export proteins expressed in the intestine, the liver and the kidney. Since most patients with type 2 diabetes receive more than one drug, transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions are important molecular mechanisms leading to alterations in oral antidiabetic drug pharmacokinetics with the risk of adverse drug reactions. This review focuses on uptake transporters of the SLCO/SLC21 (OATP and SLC22 (OCT/OAT family of solute carriers and export pumps of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily (especially P-glycoprotein as well as the export proteins of the SLC47 (MATE family and their role for transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions with oral antidiabetic drugs.

  3. Using linked data for mining drug-drug interactions in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard C; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    By nature, healthcare data is highly complex and voluminous. While on one hand, it provides unprecedented opportunities to identify hidden and unknown relationships between patients and treatment outcomes, or drugs and allergic reactions for given individuals, representing and querying large network datasets poses significant technical challenges. In this research, we study the use of Semantic Web and Linked Data technologies for identifying drug-drug interaction (DDI) information from publicly available resources, and determining if such interactions were observed using real patient data. Specifically, we apply Linked Data principles and technologies for representing patient data from electronic health records (EHRs) at Mayo Clinic as Resource Description Framework (RDF), and identify potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) for widely prescribed cardiovascular and gastroenterology drugs. Our results from the proof-of-concept study demonstrate the potential of applying such a methodology to study patient health outcomes as well as enabling genome-guided drug therapies and treatment interventions.

  4. Extracting drug-drug interaction from text using negation features

    OpenAIRE

    Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Díaz Esteban, Alberto; Ballesteros Martínez, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    La extracción de relaciones entre entidades es una tarea muy importante dentro del procesamiento de textos biomédicos. Se han desarrollado muchos algoritmos para este propósito aunque sólo unos pocos han estudiado el tema de las interacciones entre fármacos. En este trabajo se ha estudiado el efecto de la negación para esta tarea. En primer lugar, se describe cómo se ha extendido el corpus DrugDDI con anotaciones sobre negaciones y, en segundo lugar, se muestran una serie de experimentos en l...

  5. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  6. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms.

  7. The Self-Organization of Human Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, Rick; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Duran, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    We describe a “centipede’s dilemma” that faces the sciences of human interaction. Research on human interaction has been involved in extensive theoretical debate, although the vast majority of research tends to focus on a small set of human behaviors, cognitive processes, and interactive contexts....... The problem is that naturalistic human interaction must integrate all of these factors simultaneously, and grander theoretical mitigation cannot come only from focused experimental or computational agendas. We look to dynamical systems theory as a framework for thinking about how these multiple behaviors...

  8. Pantomimic gestures for human-robot interaction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available -1 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS 1 Pantomimic Gestures for Human-Robot Interaction Michael Burke, Student Member, IEEE, and Joan Lasenby Abstract This work introduces a pantomimic gesture interface, which classifies human hand gestures using...

  9. Epidemiology of Polypharmacy and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions Among Pediatric Patients in ICUs of U.S. Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Dingwei; Feinstein, James A; Morrison, Wynne; Zuppa, Athena F; Feudtner, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Polypharmacy is common in hospitalized children in the United States and has been identified as a major risk factor for exposure to potential drug-drug interactions. Little is known about the characteristics and prevalence of exposure of pediatric patients to polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions in PICUs. Retrospective cohort study using the Pediatric Health Information System database. Forty-two freestanding children's hospitals throughout the United States. A total of 54,549 patients less than 18 years old cared for in PICUs in 2011. Patients in neonatal ICUs were not included. PICU patients were on average exposed to 10 distinct drugs each hospital day and to 20 drugs cumulatively during their hospitalization. Seventy-five percent of patients were exposed to greater than or equal to one potential drug-drug interaction regardless of severity level, 6% to greater than or equal to one contraindicated potential drug-drug interaction, 69% to greater than or equal to one major potential drug-drug interaction, 57% to greater than or equal to one moderate potential drug-drug interaction, 19% to greater than or equal to one minor potential drug-drug interaction. Potential drug-drug interaction exposures were significantly associated with specific diagnoses (p risk of adverse drug events following specific potential drug-drug interaction exposures, especially the risk of adverse drug events due to multiple potential drug-drug interaction exposures, and determine the probability and magnitude of the actual harm (if any) for each specific potential drug-drug interaction, especially for multiple potential drug-drug interaction exposures.

  10. Interactions between hormonal contraception and antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Arne; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Sabers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraceptives may affect each other's metabolism and clinical efficacy. Loss of seizure control and unplanned pregnancy may occur when these compounds are used concomitantly. Although a large number of available preparations yield a plethora of possible dr...

  11. [Potential drug-drug interactions among elderly using antihypertensives from the Brazilian List of Essential Medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mibielli, Pablo; Rozenfeld, Suely; Matos, Guacira Corrêa de; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of potential interactions between antihypertensives and other drugs. A household survey was conducted with individuals 60 years or older residing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Potential moderately or very severe drug-drug interactions with antihypertensives, documented as suspected, probable or established, were identified. A total of 577 elderly were interviewed (mean age = 72 years), 45.2% of whom were using antihypertensives, of which 31.0% were subject to potential drug-drug interactions. Most of the interactions were moderately severe. Compared to the other elderly, those with potential drug-drug interactions showed more than fourfold odds of using five or more medicines and more than twofold odds of having been hospitalized in the previous year. Among the most frequent pairs of interactions, 75% cause a reduction in the hypotensive effect (65/87), which can result in low effectiveness of blood pressure control, prescribing of more drugs, and risk of other adverse events and interactions.

  12. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Drug-drug Interactions in the Regional Hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Driton; Tahiri, Zejdush; Bara, Petrit; Hudhra, Klejda; Malaj, Ledian; Jucja, Besnik; Bozalia, Adnan; Burazeri, Genc

    2014-08-01

    Our aim was to assess the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the adult population of transitional Kosovo. A cross-sectional study was conducted including a representative sample of 1921 patients aged ≥18 years (mean age: 57.8±11.2 years; 50.3% women; overall response: 96%) from the regional hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo, during 2011-2013. Potential drug-drug-interactions were assessed and clinical data as well as demographic and socioeconomic information were collected. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the correlates of drug-drug interactions. Upon multivariable adjustment for all the demographic and socioeconomic factors as well as the clinical characteristics, drug-drug interactions were positively and significantly related to older age (OR=2.1, 95%CI=1.3-2.8), a lower educational attainment (OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.1-1.9), a longer hospitalization period (OR=2.7, 95%CI=2.1-3.6), presence of three groups of diseases [infectious diseases (OR=1.7, 95%CI=1.3-2.4), cardiovascular diseases (OR=1.8, 95%CI=1.4-2.6), respiratory diseases (OR=1.6, 95%CI=1.2-2.5)], presence of comorbid conditions (OR=3.2, 95%CI=2.3-4.4) and an intake of at least four drugs (OR=5.9, 95%CI=4.6-7.1). Our study provides important evidence on the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the hospitalized patients in the regional hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo. Findings from our study should raise the awareness of decision-makers and policy makers about the prevalence and determinants of drug-drug interactions in the adult population of post-war Kosovo.

  14. Therapeutic approach in patients with concomitant disease/drug--drug interactions (roxatidine acetate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J D

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of drug interactions with H2-antagonists are outlined. The mode of action of roxatidine acetate on hepatic microsomal enzymes is contrasted with those of cimetidine and ranitidine, and their differing structure-activity relationships are discussed. In the light of the mechanisms of drug interactions with H2-antagonists, clinical studies with roxatidine acetate are contrasted with published interaction data of cimetidine and ranitidine. The therapeutic consequences of these data are considered.

  15. Screening for the drug-phospholipid interaction: correlation to phospholipidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alakoskela, Juha-Matti; Vitovic, Pavol; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayers represent a complex, anisotropic environment fundamentally different from bulk oil or octanol, for instance. Even "simple" drug association to phospholipid bilayers can only be fully understood if the slab-of-hydrocarbon approach is abandoned and the complex, anisotropic pro...... of these interactions in PLD in particular. We also focus on a potential causal connection between drug-induced PLD and steatohepatitis, which is induced by some cationic amphiphilic drugs....

  16. Drug interactions in female oncologic inpatients: differences among databases

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Moriel; Jorge Augusto Siqueira; Renata Cavalcanti Carnevale; Caroline de Godoi Rezende Costa; Aline Aparecida da Cruz; Nice Maria Oliveira da Silva; Adélia Corina Bernardes; Roberta Paro Carvalho; Priscila Gava Mazzola

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify drug interactions in prescriptions for women undergoing supportive therapy in an oncology setting at a women’s hospital in Brazil and compare the information provided by different databases regarding these drug interactions. A convenience sample was selected of prescriptions for patients diagnosed with breast or gynecological tumors hospitalized in the clinical oncology and surgery wards from April to June 2009. DRUGDEX/M...

  17. Interactive evolutionary algorithms and data mining for drug design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameijer, Eric Marcel Wubbo

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems of drug design is that it is quite hard to discover compounds that have all the required properties to become a drug (efficacy against the disease, good biological availability, low toxicity). This thesis describes the use of data mining and interactive evolutionary algorith

  18. Vaccine-Drug Interactions: Cytokines, Cytochromes, and Molecular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Perrotta, Cristiana; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to reduce the risk of vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Vaccines are often administered in patients with chronic diseases who are likely to be treated with several drugs. A growing number of clinical observations have indicated the possibility of interactions between vaccines and drugs, leading to changes in drug metabolism after vaccination. These interactions represent a significant concern because of the increasing use of vaccines in older patients who are likely to be treated with several drugs. Because of the possible implications of adverse reactions in terms of public health, several studies were performed to verify the risk posed by these interactions and to clarify the biologic mechanisms that drive these events. Of the several mechanisms proposed to be at the basis of vaccine-drug interactions, the most convincing evidence suggests a role of inflammatory cytokines on the regulation of specific cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver. Differences in the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of these drugs could explain these contrasting results and provide important insights to fully understand the clinical importance of these events. Further studies are required to verify whether vaccine-drug interactions may occur in other clinical settings, especially the ones for which patients are required to be vaccinated against specific diseases.

  19. Interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalheim, Sigrid; Sveberg, Line; Mochol, Monika; Taubøll, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are known to have endocrine side effects in both men and women. These can affect fertility, sexuality, thyroid function, and bone health, all functions of major importance for well-being and quality of life. The liver enzyme inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs), like phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine, and also valproate (VPA), a non-EIAED, are most likely to cause such side effects. AED treatment can alter the levels of different sex hormones. EIAEDs increase sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations in both men and women. Over time, this elevation can lead to lower levels of bioactive testosterone and estradiol, which may cause menstrual disturbances, sexual problems, and eventually reduced fertility. VPA can cause weight gain in both men and women. In women, VPA can also lead to androgenization with increased serum testosterone concentrations, menstrual disturbances, and polycystic ovaries. Lamotrigine has not been shown to result in endocrine side effects. The newer AEDs have not yet been thoroughly studied, but case reports indicate that some of these drugs could also be suspected to cause such effects if endocrine changes commence after treatment initiation. It is important to be aware of possible endocrine side effects of AEDs as they can have a major impact on quality of life, and are, at least partly, reversible after AED discontinuation.

  20. Themes in human work interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. This paper raises themes that are seen as some of the challenges facing the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design. The paper has its offset in the discussions and writings that have been dominant within the IFIP Working Group on Human Work Interaction...

  1. Impact of Participatory Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts. A Comparison Study Between Two Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Risk, Marcelo; Stanziola, Enrique; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems for alert drug-drug interactions have been shown as valid strategy to reduce medical error. Even so the use of these systems has not been as expected, probably due to the lack of a suitable design. This study compares two interfaces, one of them developed using participatory design techniques (based on user centered design processes). This work showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction with the system.

  2. Themes in human work interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. This paper raises themes that are seen as some of the challenges facing the emerging practice and research field of Human Work Interaction Design. The paper has its offset in the discussions and writings that have been dominant within the IFIP Working Group on Human Work Interaction...... Design (name HWID) through the last two and half years since the commencement of this Working Group. The paper thus provides an introduction to the theory and empirical evidence that lie behind the combination of empirical work studies and interaction design. It also recommends key topics for future...... research in Human Work Interaction Design....

  3. Potential drug-drug interactions in cardiothoracic intensive care unit of a pulmonary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanegan, Behrooz; Alehashem, Maryam; Bastani, Marjan; Baniasadi, Shadi

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in respiratory settings. DDIs are more likely to occur in critically ill patients due to complex pharmacotherapy regimens and organ dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of potential DDIs (pDDIs) occurring in cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) of a pulmonary hospital. A prospective observational study was conducted for 6 months. All pDDIs for admitted patients in cardiothoracic ICU were identified with Lexi-Interact program and assessed by a clinical pharmacologist. The interacting drugs, reliability, mechanisms, potential outcomes, and clinical management were evaluated for severe and contraindicated interactions. The study included 195 patients. Lung cancer (14.9%) was the most common diagnosis followed by tracheal stenosis (14.3%). The rate of pDDIs was 720.5/100 patients. Interactions were more commonly observed in transplant patients. 17.7% of pDDIs were considered as severe and contraindicated interactions. Metabolism (54.8%) and additive (24.2%) interactions were the most frequent mechanisms leading to pDDIs, and azole antifungals and fluoroquinolones were the main drug classes involved. The pattern of pDDIs in cardiothoracic ICU differs from other ICU settings. Specialized epidemiological knowledge of drug interactions may help clinical practitioners to reduce the risk of adverse drug events.

  4. Clinical risk management of herb-drug interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, P.A.G.M. de

    2007-01-01

    The concomitant use of conventional and herbal medicines can lead to clinically relevant herb-drug interactions. Clinical risk management offers a systematic approach to minimize the untoward consequences of these interactions by paying attention to: (i) risk identification and assessment; (ii) deve

  5. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs : a systematic review on oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and Beta-lactams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Panday, Prashant N; Pranger, Arianna D; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactio

  6. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs : a systematic review on oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and Beta-lactams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Panday, Prashant N; Pranger, Arianna D; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactio

  7. Semantic resources in pharmacovigilance: a corpus and an ontology for drug-drug interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero Zazo, María

    2015-01-01

    Mención Internacional en el título de doctor Nowadays, with the increasing use of several drugs for the treatment of one or more different diseases (polytherapy) in large populations, the risk for drugs combinations that have not been studied in pre-authorization clinical trials has increased. This provides a favourable setting for the occurrence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs), a common adverse drug reaction (ADR) representing an important risk to patients safety, and an increase in heal...

  8. STABLE DRUG DESIGNING BY MINIMIZING DRUG PROTEIN INTERACTION ENERGY USING PSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Ghosh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Each and every biological function in living organism happens as a result of protein-protein interactions. The diseases are no exception to this. Identifying one or more proteins for a particular disease and then designing a suitable chemical compound (known as drug to destroy these proteins has been an interesting topic of research in bio-informatics. In previous methods, drugs were designed using only seven chemical components and were represented as a fixedlength tree. But in reality, a drug contains many chemical groups collectively known as pharmacophore. Moreover, the chemical length of the drug cannot be determined before designing the drug.

  9. Two Invariants of Human-Swarm Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-15

    2002). Humans and automation: System design and research issues. John Wiley and Sons. 29 Brown et al., Two Invariants of Human Swarm Interaction...Daniel S. Brown AFRL Information Directorate and Michael A. Goodrich, Shin-Young Jung, and Sean Kerman Brigham Young University The search for...publication in this journal. Journal of Human-Robot Interaction, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2012, Pages 78-95. DOI 10.5898/JHRI.1.1.Tanaka Brown et al., Two Invariants

  10. 21 CFR 310.305 - Records and reports concerning adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human use without approved new drug applications. 310.305 Section 310.305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human use without approved new drug...

  11. Drug-drug interactions between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and antiviral protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Benoit; Drouot, Sylvain; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Taburet, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are a class of drugs also known as statins. These drugs are effective and widely prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Seven statins are currently available: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin. Although these drugs are generally well tolerated, skeletal muscle abnormalities from myalgia to severe lethal rhabdomyolysis can occur. Factors that increase statin concentrations such as drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of these adverse events. Drug-drug interactions are dependent on statins' pharmacokinetic profile: simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin are metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A, while the metabolism of the other statins is independent of this CYP. All statins are substrate of organic anion transporter polypeptide 1B1, an uptake transporter expressed in hepatocyte membrane that may also explain some drug-drug interactions. Many HIV-infected patients have dyslipidemia and comorbidities that may require statin treatment. HIV-protease inhibitors (HIV PIs) are part of recommended antiretroviral treatment in combination with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors. All HIV PIs except nelfinavir are coadministered with a low dose of ritonavir, a potent CYP3A inhibitor to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Cobicistat is a new potent CYP3A inhibitor that is combined with elvitegravir and will be combined with HIV-PIs in the future. The HCV-PIs boceprevir and telaprevir are both, to different extents, inhibitors of CYP3A. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic properties of statins and PIs with emphasis on their metabolic pathways explaining clinically important drug-drug interactions. Simvastatin and lovastatin metabolized through CYP3A have the highest potency for drug-drug interaction with potent CYP3A inhibitors such as ritonavir- or cobicistat-boosted HIV-PI or the

  12. [Progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanhuan; Lu, Yayao; Peng, Bo; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes and uridine 5-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes are critical enzymes for drug metabolism. Both chemical drugs and traditional Chinese medicines are converted to more readily excreted compounds by drug metabolizing enzymes in human livers. Because of the disparate expression of CYP and UGT enzymes among different individuals, accurate quantification of these enzymes is essential for drug pharmacology, drug-drug interactions and drug clinical applications. The research progress in quantitative methods based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for drug metabolizing enzymes in human liver microsomes in the recent decade is reviewed.

  13. [Drug interactions in the elderly with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrychová, T; Vlček, J

    2012-04-01

    The elderly with diabetes mellitus are usually treated with many types of drugs. This, together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes connected with aging, can lead to an occurrence of drug interactions. They are often manifested as hypoglycaemia, decompensation of diabetes or an increase of frequency of adverse effects of drugs used together. It is important to pay an attention especially to hypoglycaemia, which brings many risks in the elderly. An article is focused on probable drug interactions when combination of various antidiabetics, antidiabetics with antihypertensives or hypolipidemics is used. Despite ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers can influence the compensation of diabetics, their use is not contraindicated in these patients, because of their huge benefit in the prevention of cardiovascular events. An article brings an overview of antidiabetics metabolised by means of the system of cytochrome P 450 and resulting drug interactions with inhibitors and inductors of these enzymes. These drug interactions are not usually important in clinical practice and it is possible to prevent them with careful monitoring of glycaemia, instruction of patients and alternatively modification of the doses of hypoglycaemic medication after a termination of the treatment of responsible inductor or inhibitor.

  14. Soft Interaction in Liposome Nanocarriers for Therapeutic Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lombardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of smart nanocarriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs has experienced considerable expansion in recent decades, with the development of new medicines devoted to cancer treatment. In this respect a wide range of strategies can be developed by employing liposome nanocarriers with desired physico-chemical properties that, by exploiting a combination of a number of suitable soft interactions, can facilitate the transit through the biological barriers from the point of administration up to the site of drug action. As a result, the materials engineer has generated through the bottom up approach a variety of supramolecular nanocarriers for the encapsulation and controlled delivery of therapeutics which have revealed beneficial developments for stabilizing drug compounds, overcoming impediments to cellular and tissue uptake, and improving biodistribution of therapeutic compounds to target sites. Herein we present recent advances in liposome drug delivery by analyzing the main structural features of liposome nanocarriers which strongly influence their interaction in solution. More specifically, we will focus on the analysis of the relevant soft interactions involved in drug delivery processes which are responsible of main behaviour of soft nanocarriers in complex physiological fluids. Investigation of the interaction between liposomes at the molecular level can be considered an important platform for the modeling of the molecular recognition processes occurring between cells. Some relevant strategies to overcome the biological barriers during the drug delivery of the nanocarriers are presented which outline the main structure-properties relationships as well as their advantages (and drawbacks in therapeutic and biomedical applications.

  15. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS IN PATIENTS DISTRESS FROM HYPERTENSION IN TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Sowmya Boreda , Sagarika Addetla, Asha Sara Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is an important issue and now it is also realized that many of them can be explained by change in the enzymes, which involve in metabolism that are present in and out of liver. Co-administration of some drugs act as enzyme inducers, whereas some are inhibitors of enzyme which results undesirable effects. Hypertension (HTN) is a most common cardiovascular disease which can be defined as “consistently elevated blood pressure (arterial) or average systol...

  16. Drug-drug interactions in patients treated for cancer : a prospective study on clinical interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Jansman, F. G. A.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.; de Man, F.; Piran, F.; Vincenten, I.; Jager, A.; Rijneveld, A. W.; Brugma, J. D.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; van Gelder, T.

    Background: Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are of major concern in oncology, since cancer patients typically take many concomitant medications. Retrospective studies have been conducted to determine the prevalence of DDIs. However, prospective studies on DDIs needing interventions in cancer patients

  17. Drug-drug interactions as a determinant of elevated lithium serum levels in daily clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, [No Value; Movig, KL; Moolenaar, M; Hekster, YA; Brouwers, [No Value; Heerdink, ER; Nolen, WA; Egberts, AC

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Lithium is a drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Concomitantly used medication is a potentially influencing factor of lithium serum concentrations. We conducted a multicentre retrospective case-control study with the aim of investigating lithium-related drug interactions as determinant

  18. Prevalence and Correlates of Drug-drug Interactions in the Regional Hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shabani, D.; Tahiri, Z.; Bara, P.; Hudhra, K.; Malaj, L.; Jucja, B.; Bozalia, A.; Burazeri, G.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Our aim was to assess the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the adult population of transitional Kosovo. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted including a representative sample of 1921 patients aged >/=18 years (mean age: 57.8+/-11.2 y

  19. Drug-drug interactions as a determinant of elevated lithium serum levels in daily clinical practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilting, I.; Movig, K.L.L.; Moolenaar, M.; Hekster, Y.A.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; Heerdink, E.R.; Nolen, W.A.; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lithium is a drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Concomitantly used medication is a potentially influencing factor of lithium serum concentrations. We conducted a multicentre retrospective case-control study with the aim of investigating lithium-related drug interactions as determinant

  20. Prevalence and Correlates of Drug-drug Interactions in the Regional Hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shabani, D.; Tahiri, Z.; Bara, P.; Hudhra, K.; Malaj, L.; Jucja, B.; Bozalia, A.; Burazeri, G.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Our aim was to assess the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the adult population of transitional Kosovo. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted including a representative sample of 1921 patients aged >/=18 years (mean age: 57.8+/-11.2

  1. Clinically relevant QTc prolongation due to overridden drug-drug interaction alerts: A retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H. van der Sijs (Heleen); R. Kowlesar (Ravi); A.P.J. Klootwijk (Peter); S.P. Nelwan (Stefan); A.G. Vulto (Arnold); T. van Gelder (Teun)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: To investigate whether, in patients in whom drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts on QTc prolongation were overridden, the physician had requested an electrocardiogram (ECG), and if these ECGs showed clinically relevant QTc prolongation. METHODS: For all patients with overridden DDI a

  2. Polypharmacy and the risk of drug-drug interactions among Danish elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, J U; Bjerrum, L; Hallas, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the use of all subsidized prescription drugs with special attention to the elderly (> or = 70 years of age), including their use of drug combination generally accepted as carrying a risk of severe interactions. DESIGN: Descriptive prevalence study. SETTING: Odense Pharmacoep...

  3. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  4. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V

    2016-01-01

    of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along...

  5. Drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Moura, Egberto Gaspar de; Maiworm, Adalgisa Ieda; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Brito, Lavinia de Carvalho [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria; Orlando, Margarida Maria de Camoes [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto. Setor de Medicina Nuclear; Penas, Maria Exposito [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho. Setor de Medicina Nuclear; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Lab. de Radioisotopos

    2005-10-15

    Clinical images are worthwhile in Health Sciences and their analysis and correct interpretation aid the professionals,such as physicians, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, to make decisions and take subsequent therapeutic and/or rehabilitation measures. Other factors, besides the state of the disease, may interfere and affect the bioavailability of the radiopharmaceuticals (radiobiocomplexes) and the quality of the SPECT and PET images. Furthermore, the labeling of some of these radiobiocomplexes, such as plasma proteins, white blood cells and red blood cells, with 99m T, can also be modified. These factors include drugs (synthetic and natural) and dietary conditions, as well as some medical procedures (invasive or non-invasive), such as radiation therapy, surgical procedures, prostheses, cardioversion, intubation, chemo perfusion, external massage, immunotherapy, blood transfusion and hemodialysis. In conclusion, the knowledge about these factors capable of interfering with the bioavailability of the radiobiocomplexes is worthwhile for secure diagnosis. Moreover, the development of biological models to study these phenomena is highly relevant and desirable.(author)

  6. Clinical drugs that interact with St. John's wort and implication in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Yuan Ming; Li, Chun Guang; Xue, Charlie Changli; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2008-01-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) is one of the most commonly used herbal antidepressants for the treatment of minor to moderate depression. A major safety concern about SJW is its ability to alter the pharmacokinetics and/or clinical response of a variety of clinically important drugs that have distinctive chemical structure, mechanism of action and metabolic pathways. This review highlights and updates the knowledge on clinical interactions of prescribed drugs with SJW and the implication in drug development. A number of clinically significant interactions of SJW have been identified with conventional drugs, including anticancer agents (imatinib and irinotecan), anti-HIV agents (e.g. indinavir, lamivudine and nevirapine), anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. ibuprofen and fexofenadine), antimicrobial agents (e.g. erythromycin and voriconazole), cardiovascular drugs (e.g. digoxin, ivabradine, warfarin, verapamil, nifedipine and talinolol), central nervous system agents (e.g. amitriptyline, buspirone, phenytoin, methadone, midazolam, alprazolam, and sertraline), hypoglycaemic agents (e.g. tolbutamide and gliclazide), immuno-modulating agents (e.g. cyclosporine and tacrolimus), oral contraceptives, proton pump inhibitor (e.g. omeprazole), respiratory system agent (e.g. theophylline), statins (e.g. atorvastatin and pravastatin). Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic components may play a role in the interactions of drugs with SJW. For pharmacokinetic changes of drugs by SJW, induction of cytochrome P450s (e.g. CYP2C9 and 3A4) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are considered the major mechanism. Thus, it is not a surprise that many drugs that interact with SJW are substrates of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and P-gp. A comprehensive understanding of clinical drugs that interact with SJW has important implications in drug development. New drugs may be designed to minimize interactions with SJW; and new SJW formulations may be designed to avoid drug interactions. Further clinical and

  7. Human genome-guided identification of memory-modulating drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Gerhards, Christiane; Heck, Angela; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Schicktanz, Nathalie; Auschra, Bianca; Demougin, Philippe; Mumme, Eva; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hanser, Edveena; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Jessen, Frank; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Milnik, Annette; Paganetti, Paolo; Spalek, Klara; Vogler, Christian; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2013-11-12

    In the last decade there has been an exponential increase in knowledge about the genetic basis of complex human traits, including neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not clear, however, to what extent this knowledge can be used as a starting point for drug identification, one of the central hopes of the human genome project. The aim of the present study was to identify memory-modulating compounds through the use of human genetic information. We performed a multinational collaborative study, which included assessment of aversive memory--a trait central to posttraumatic stress disorder--and a gene-set analysis in healthy individuals. We identified 20 potential drug target genes in two genomewide-corrected gene sets: the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction and the long-term depression gene set. In a subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers, we aimed at providing a proof of concept for the genome-guided identification of memory modulating compounds. Pharmacological intervention at the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction gene set led to significant reduction of aversive memory. The findings demonstrate that genome information, along with appropriate data mining methodology, can be used as a starting point for the identification of memory-modulating compounds.

  8. Absence of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction of pertuzumab with trastuzumab and docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Javier; Swain, Sandra M; Kudaba, Iveta; Hauschild, Maik; Patel, Taral; Grincuka, Elza; Masuda, Norikazu; McNally, Virginia; Ross, Graham; Brewster, Mike; Marier, Jean-François; Trinh, My My; Garg, Amit; Nijem, Ihsan; Visich, Jennifer; Lum, Bert L; Baselga, José

    2013-11-01

    Pertuzumab is a novel antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) humanized monoclonal antibody. Combined with trastuzumab plus docetaxel, pertuzumab improved progression-free and overall survival versus trastuzumab plus docetaxel in the phase III CLEOPATRA trial (NCT00567190) in first-line HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-seven patients participated in a pharmacokinetic (PK)/corrected QT interval substudy of CLEOPATRA, which evaluated potential PK drug-drug interaction (DDI). PK parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods, and DDI analyses were carried out. In the presence of trastuzumab and docetaxel, the mean pertuzumab Cmin and Cmax in cycle 3 were 63.6 and 183 µg/ml, respectively. The pertuzumab concentrations observed were consistent with simulations from a validated population PK model, indicating that trastuzumab and docetaxel did not alter pertuzumab PK. Comparison of geometric least-squares mean PK parameters between arms showed no impact of pertuzumab on the PK of trastuzumab or docetaxel. In conclusion, no PK DDI was observed when pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel were combined for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

  9. Mixed reality and human-robot interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2011-01-01

    MR technologies play an increasing role in different aspects of human-robot interactions. The visual combination of digital contents with real working spaces creates a simulated environment that is set out to enhance these aspects. This book presents and discusses fundamental scientific issues, technical implementations, lab testing, and industrial applications and case studies of Mixed Reality in Human-Robot Interaction. It is a reference book that not only acts as meta-book in the field that defines and frames Mixed Reality use in Human-Robot Interaction, but also addresses up-coming trends

  10. Benchmarking human protein complexes to investigate drug-related systems and evaluate predicted protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are key entities to perform cellular functions. Human diseases are also revealed to associate with some specific human protein complexes. In fact, human protein complexes are widely used for protein function annotation, inference of human protein interactome, disease gene prediction, and so on. Therefore, it is highly desired to build an up-to-date catalogue of human complexes to support the research in these applications. Protein complexes from different databases are as expected to be highly redundant. In this paper, we designed a set of concise operations to compile these redundant human complexes and built a comprehensive catalogue called CHPC2012 (Catalogue of Human Protein Complexes. CHPC2012 achieves a higher coverage for proteins and protein complexes than those individual databases. It is also verified to be a set of complexes with high quality as its co-complex protein associations have a high overlap with protein-protein interactions (PPI in various existing PPI databases. We demonstrated two distinct applications of CHPC2012, that is, investigating the relationship between protein complexes and drug-related systems and evaluating the quality of predicted protein complexes. In particular, CHPC2012 provides more insights into drug development. For instance, proteins involved in multiple complexes (the overlapping proteins are potential drug targets; the drug-complex network is utilized to investigate multi-target drugs and drug-drug interactions; and the disease-specific complex-drug networks will provide new clues for drug repositioning. With this up-to-date reference set of human protein complexes, we believe that the CHPC2012 catalogue is able to enhance the studies for protein interactions, protein functions, human diseases, drugs, and related fields of research. CHPC2012 complexes can be downloaded from http://www1.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/xlli/CHPC2012/CHPC2012.htm.

  11. Pharmacoepidemiological assessment of drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Christensen, R. D.; Wang, S. V.;

    2014-01-01

    PurposeWe present a database of prescription drugs and international normalized ratio (INR) data and the applied methodology for its use to assess drug-drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We use the putative interaction between VKAs and tramadol as a case study. MethodsWe used...... a self-controlled case series to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) comparing the rate of INR measurements of 4.0 in concomitant tramadol and VKA-exposed periods to VKA-only-exposed periods. Secondary analyses considered specific subgroups, alternative exposure criteria, alternative outcome...... definitions, and other drugs. ResultsWe identified 513 VKA users with at least 1 INR measurement 4.0 and concomitant tramadol and VKA exposure during the observation period. The overall IRR was 1.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-2.10), with a stronger association among users of phenprocoumon compared...

  12. Anticancer drug sensitivity by human tumor clonogenic assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraki,Shunkichi

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers was tested by the human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA. Of 152 human cancer specimens tested, 63 (41% formed more than 30 tumor cell colonies in control plates and could be used to evaluate the drug sensitivity of tumor cells. In 42 (93% of 45 clinical trials in 24 patients, a parallel correlation was observed between the in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity measured by the HTCA and the clinical response of tumors to anticancer drugs. These results suggest that the HTCA is a good technique for the in vitro test of the anticancer drug sensitivity of human cancers.

  13. Clinically significant interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs for HIV-infected children: profiling and comparison of two drug databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya KA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kazeem A Oshikoya,1 Ibrahim A Oreagba,2 Olayinka O Ogunleye,1 Saheed Lawal,2 Idowu O Senbanjo3 1Department of Pharmacology, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria; 2Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos, Nigeria; 3Department of Paediatric and Child Health, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria Background: Drug–drug interactions are an important therapeutic challenge among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Early recognition of drug–drug interactions is important, but conflicts do exist among drug compendia on drug interaction information. We aimed to evaluate the consistencies of two drug information resources with regards to the severity rating and categorization of the potential interactions between antiretroviral and co-prescribed drugs. Methods: We reviewed the case files of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children who were receiving treatment at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi Araba, between January 2005 and December 2010. All of the co-prescribed and antiretroviral drug pairs were screened for potential interactions using the Medscape Drug Interaction Checker and the Monthly Index of Medical Specialties Interaction Checker. Drug–drug interaction (DDI severity and categorization were rated on a scale of A (no known interaction; B (minor/no action needed; C (moderate/monitor therapy; D (major/therapy modification; and X (contraindicated/avoid combination. Results: A total of 280 patients were at risk of 596 potential DDIs. The databases showed discrepancies, with Medscape database identifying 504 (84.6% and USA MIMS database identifying 302 (50.7% potential DDIs. Simultaneous identification of DDIs by both databases occurred for only 275 (46.1% listed interactions. Both databases have a weak correlation on the severity rating (rs = 0.45; P < 0.001. The

  14. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Cure Research; Reopening of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug... Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal...

  15. Application of Caco-2 Cell Line in Herb-Drug Interaction Studies: Current Approaches and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awortwe, C.; Fasinu, P.S.; Rosenkranz, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Caco-2 model is employed in pre-clinical investigations to predict the likely gastrointestinal permeability of drugs because it expresses cytochrome P450 enzymes, transporters, microvilli and enterocytes of identical characteristics to the human small intestine. The FDA recommends this model as integral component of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Most dedicated laboratories use the Caco-2 cell line to screen new chemical entities through prediction of its solubility, bioavailability and the possibility of drug-drug or herb-drug interactions in the gut lumen. However, challenges in the inherent characteristics of Caco-2 cell and inter-laboratory protocol variations have resulted to generation of irreproducible data. These limitations affect the extrapolation of data from pre-clinical research to clinical studies involving drug-drug and herb-drug interactions. This review addresses some of these caveats and enumerates the plausible current and future approaches to reduce the anomalies associated with Caco-2 cell line investigations focusing on its application in herb-drug interactions. PMID:24735758

  16. Drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bernardo-Filho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical images are worthwhile in Health Sciences and their analysis and correct interpretation aid the professionals,such as physicians, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, to make decisions and take subsequent therapeutic and/or rehabilitation measures. Other factors, besides the state of the disease, may interfere and affect the bioavailability of the radiopharmaceuticals (radiobiocomplexes and the quality of the SPECT and PET images. Furthermore, the labeling of some of these radiobiocomplexes, such as plasma proteins, white blood cells and red blood cells, with 99mT, can also be modified. These factors include drugs (synthetic and natural and dietary conditions, as well as some medical procedures (invasive or non-invasive, such as radiation therapy, surgical procedures, prostheses, cardioversion, intubation, chemoperfusion, external massage, immunotherapy, blood transfusion and hemodialysis. In conclusion, the knowledge about these factors capable of interfering with the bioavailability of the radiobiocomplexes is worthwhile for secure diagnosis. Moreover, the development of biological models to study these phenomena is highly relevant and desirable.Imagens clínicas são valiosas em Ciências da Saúde e a análise e a interpretação correta das mesmas auxiliam os profissionais, como médico, fisioterapeuta, terapeuta ocupacional, na tomada de decisões e subseqüentes ações terapêuticas e/ou de reabilitação. Além das doenças outros fatores podem interferir e afetar a biodisponibilidade dos radiofármacos (radiobiocomplexos e a qualidade das imagens (SPECT e PET. Além disso, a marcação de alguns desses radiobiocomplexos com Tc-99m, como proteínas plasmáticas, leucócitos e hemácias, também pode ser modificada. Entre esses fatores, estão drogas (sintéticas e naturais e condições alimentares, assim como alguns procedimentos médicos (invasivos e não invasivos, como a radioterapia, processos cirúrgicos, pr

  17. Interactive evolutionary algorithms and data mining for drug design

    OpenAIRE

    Lameijer, Eric Marcel Wubbo

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems of drug design is that it is quite hard to discover compounds that have all the required properties to become a drug (efficacy against the disease, good biological availability, low toxicity). This thesis describes the use of data mining and interactive evolutionary algorithms to design novel classes of molecules. Using data mining, we split a 250,000 compound database into ring systems, substituents and linkers. We then counted the occurrence of the different fragmen...

  18. Drug Target Protein-Protein Interaction Networks: A Systematic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghe Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and validation of drug targets are crucial in biomedical research and many studies have been conducted on analyzing drug target features for getting a better understanding on principles of their mechanisms. But most of them are based on either strong biological hypotheses or the chemical and physical properties of those targets separately. In this paper, we investigated three main ways to understand the functional biomolecules based on the topological features of drug targets. There are no significant differences between targets and common proteins in the protein-protein interactions network, indicating the drug targets are neither hub proteins which are dominant nor the bridge proteins. According to some special topological structures of the drug targets, there are significant differences between known targets and other proteins. Furthermore, the drug targets mainly belong to three typical communities based on their modularity. These topological features are helpful to understand how the drug targets work in the PPI network. Particularly, it is an alternative way to predict potential targets or extract nontargets to test a new drug target efficiently and economically. By this way, a drug target’s homologue set containing 102 potential target proteins is predicted in the paper.

  19. Interactions between drugs and drug-nutrient in enteral nutrition: a review based on evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ferreira Silva

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enteral nutrition (EN provides calories, macronutrients and micronutrients in adequate quantity and quality to meet the patient's needs. Some drugs when crushed and diluted may have their properties altered, including the reduction of bioavailability causing the reduction of the serum concentration of the drug; tube obstruction; drug-drug interaction or drug-nutrient interaction. Methods: The study was conducted through review of submitted articles in the databases of the Virtual Health Library (VHL: MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine, USA, Lilacs (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences PUBMED - NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information and COCHRANE. Results: For this survey, 42 articles were identified during database searching. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 08 articles were selected, obtained from the MEDLINE and Lilacs. Discussion: Some interactions were found such as the aluminium hydroxide and lactulose with the enteral nutrition, which may result in a precipitation and reduction of drug bioavailability. Mineral oil will alter the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and reduces the tube light. Others results were found as phenytoin, warfarin, captopril and furosemide with enteral nutrition may reduce the maximum serum concentration. Conclusion: Drug interactions are more common in day-to-day activities than health professionals may suppose. Knowledge on the matter may also assist in reducing cases of obstruction of tubes, through which enteral nutrition and medications are administered. Thus, the multidisciplinary team, acting together, may have more beneficial effects to the patient.

  20. Systematic review on safety and drug interaction of herbal therapy in hyperlipidemia: a guide for internist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi-Boroujeni, Hamid; Rouhi-Boroujeni, Hojjat; Gharipour, Mojgan; Mohammadizadeh, Fereshteh; Ahmadi, Saeed; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-09-14

    Because of reporting high side effects related to biosynthetic drugs, recent attention has been paid to the use of herbs instead of chemical drugs to balance serum lipids. The present systematic review aimed to evaluate the safety of herbal medicines and also to assess drug interaction in herbal therapy in treating hyperlipidemia. The international research databases including MEDLINE; Google scholar, Web of Science SciVerse Scopus (SCOPUS); EBSCO Academic Search; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); and a Chinese database (China Network Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI]) were searched from their respective inceptions up to September 2014 with the search terms of "hyperlipidemia", "herbal medicine", "medicine traditional", "extract plant", "Traditional Medicine" and "Chinese Herbal Medicine" without narrowing or limiting search elements. A total of 85 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) studies were finally assessed on human subjects. A notable number of herbal drugs that are commonly used as an anti-hyperlipidemia agent may be interacted with a variety of biosynthetic drugs. In this regard, the most common reported herb-drug reactions were related to anticoagulants, antidepressants, anti-epileptic, anti-inflammatory, and/or even antihypertension and anti-lipidemic drugs. Also, a considerable number of anti-lipidemic drugs of plants origin may be accompanied with metabolic disturbances and serious complications within pregnancy and breast feeding. The main fundamental principles for administration of these drugs include physicians' complete awareness of the effects and interactions of these drugs, educating people not taking these drugs arbitrarily, and closely monitoring the verification and distribution of the drugs in the society.

  1. Drug-drug interactions among recently hospitalised patients--frequent but mostly clinically insignificant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Dalhoff, Kim

    2005-01-01

    involved over-the-counter products (aspirin and ginkgo biloba). Of the 52 drugs involved in potential class 2 interactions, 50 had been used for more than 1 month. According to the hospital case notes, none of the potential class 2 interactions had actually caused adverse effects. CONCLUSION: Although...

  2. Posaconazole: A Review of Drug Interactions with HIV Antiretroviral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Poulakos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to examine the literature for reports of clinically significant interactions noted amongst HIV antiretroviral medications when coadministered with posaconazole. A literature search was conducted to identify studies addressing drug interactions between posaconazole and HIV antiretroviral medications. Two pharmacokinetic studies and three clinical trials involving the administration of posaconazole to HIV-infected patients were identified. The pharmacokinetic studies involved concomitant administration of either a protease inhibitor (PI or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI. Both studies showed alterations in systemic concentrations of either posaconazole or the HIV antiretroviral when administered together. Of the three clinical trials, all patients were on HIV antiretrovirals. However, their potential interaction with posaconazole was not explored. To date, there is no published literature regarding the interaction between maraviroc or elvitegravir and posaconazole. Dose adjustments for each are recommended when coadministered with strong CYP 3A4 inhibitors or inducers. Currently available literature points to the potential for clinically significant drug interactions when posaconazole is coadministered with HIV antiretrovirals, specifically NNRTIs and PIs. More studies are needed involving a wider range of HIV antiretrovirals to determine the significance of the interaction. Clinicians should be aware of this potentially significant interaction and avoid concomitant administration when possible. When available, consideration should be given to therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral serum concentrations in select patients.

  3. Are human interactivity times lognormal?

    CERN Document Server

    Blenn, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we are analyzing the interactivity time, defined as the duration between two consecutive tasks such as sending emails, collecting friends and followers and writing comments in online social networks (OSNs). The distributions of these times are heavy tailed and often described by a power-law distribution. However, power-law distributions usually only fit the heavy tail of empirical data and ignore the information in the smaller value range. Here, we argue that the durations between writing emails or comments, adding friends and receiving followers are likely to follow a lognormal distribution. We discuss the similarities between power-law and lognormal distributions, show that binning of data can deform a lognormal to a power-law distribution and propose an explanation for the appearance of lognormal interactivity times. The historical debate of similarities between lognormal and power-law distributions is reviewed by illustrating the resemblance of measurements in this paper with the historical...

  4. Acaricide, fungicide and drug interactions in honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed M Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17 while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15. The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication

  5. Acaricide, fungicide and drug interactions in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed M; Dahlgren, Lizette; Siegfried, Blair D; Ellis, Marion D

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17) while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15). The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication appears to play an important role. Evidence of non-transivity, year-to-year variation

  6. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001), hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001) and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001). We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  7. Study of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in Prescriptions of University- Based Pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs are adverse reactions caused by a combination of drugs; they are often predictable and therefore avoidable or manageable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nature, type and prevalence of potential DDIs in prescriptions dispensed in university-based community pharmacies in Tehran, Iran.Methods: From July 2012 to February 2014, sample of 1260 prescriptions were collected from community and outpatient hospital pharmacies affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran. The prescriptions were assessed using the reference text “drug interaction facts”. The identified DDIs were categorized according to their level of significance into three classes (minor, moderate, major.Results: At least one drug-drug interaction was present in 339 (26.9% of prescriptions and a total of 751 cases of interactions were found in prescriptions. Major DDIs represented 7.3% of all DDIs detected, whereas moderate DDIs were 75% of all DDIs. The mean number of drugs per prescriptions was 3.2, with a median of 4 (range, 2-10.There was a positive association between number of prescribed drugs and occurrence of DDIs (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.9-2.4. The prescriptions of medical specialist had greater risk of occurrence of moderate severity DDIs than general practitioners (OR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.08-2.15.Conclusion: Despite the prescriptions were collected from university-based pharmacies, but the overall prevalence of potential DDIs were high among patients. Physicians should be aware of potentially harmful DDIs. Meanwhile Pharmacists can contribute to the detection and prevention of drug-related injuries. Appropriate education, collaborating drug selection and pharmaceutical care are strongly recommended for physicians and pharmacists.

  8. Concomitant therapy in people with epilepsy: potential drug-drug interactions and patient awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Sara; Rasaby, Sivan; Ekstein, Dana

    2014-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) may use prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for the treatment of concomitant diseases. Combinations of these drugs, as well as dietary supplements, with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to reduced control of seizures and of coexisting medical conditions and increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aims of this study were to obtain comprehensive lists of medications, dietary supplements, botanicals, and specific food components used by adult PWE and to evaluate the potential for interactions involving AEDs and patients' awareness of such potential interactions. We conducted a prospective, questionnaire-based study of PWE attending the Hadassah-Hebrew University Epilepsy Clinic over a period of 7months. The questionnaire interview included the listing of medications, medicinal herbs, dietary supplements, and specific food components consumed and the knowledge of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and it was conducted by a pharmacist. Drug-drug interactions were analyzed via the Micromedex online database. Out of 179 patients who attended the clinic over the study period, we interviewed 73 PWE, of which 71 were included in our final analysis. The mean number of AEDs consumed per subject was 1.7 (SD: 0.8, range: 1-4). Forty (56%) subjects were also treated with other prescription and/or OTC medications, and thirty-four (48%) took dietary supplements. Drug families most prone to DDIs involving AEDs included antipsychotic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and statins. Two-thirds of study participants (67%) knew that DDIs may lead to ADRs, but only half (56%) were aware of the potential for reduced seizure control. Only 44% always reported treatment with AEDs to medical professionals. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive picture of prescription and OTC drugs and food supplements used by PWE. Despite a considerable potential for DDIs involving AEDs, patient awareness is limited

  9. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprouse, Alyssa A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug-botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug-botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug-botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism.

  10. The RAS-Effector Interaction as a Drug Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeton, Adam B; Salter, E Alan; Piazza, Gary A

    2017-01-15

    About a third of all human cancers harbor mutations in one of the K-, N-, or HRAS genes that encode an abnormal RAS protein locked in a constitutively activated state to drive malignant transformation and tumor growth. Despite more than three decades of intensive research aimed at the discovery of RAS-directed therapeutics, there are no FDA-approved drugs that are broadly effective against RAS-driven cancers. Although RAS proteins are often said to be "undruggable," there is mounting evidence suggesting it may be feasible to develop direct inhibitors of RAS proteins. Here, we review this evidence with a focus on compounds capable of inhibiting the interaction of RAS proteins with their effectors that transduce the signals of RAS and that drive and sustain malignant transformation and tumor growth. These reports of direct-acting RAS inhibitors provide valuable insight for further discovery and development of clinical candidates for RAS-driven cancers involving mutations in RAS genes or otherwise activated RAS proteins. Cancer Res; 77(2); 221-6. ©2017 AACR.

  11. Interaction of metaiodobenzylguanidine with cardioactive drugs: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, F. [INSERM, Tours Univ. Hospital (France)]|[Inst. of Xenobiotic Studies, Poitiers Univ. Hospital (France); Fagret, D. [URA, CNRS, Grenoble Univ. Hospital (France); Caillet, M. [INSERM, Tours Univ. Hospital (France); Piriou, A. [Inst. of Xenobiotic Studies, Poitiers Univ. Hospital (France); Besnard, J.C. [INSERM, Tours Univ. Hospital (France); Guilloteau, D. [INSERM, Tours Univ. Hospital (France)

    1996-05-01

    Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of noradrenaline, is used to explore the functional integrity of sympathetic nerve endings in the human heart. Various drugs inhibit noradrenaline transport systems and may block the uptake of MIBG. As in vivo studies of the effect of these drugs on myocardial [{sup 123}]MIBG uptake are often difficult to perform, we used an in vitro human blood platelet model for this purpose. A platelet preparation from healthy volunteers was incubated with [{sup 125}I]MIBG alone or different concentrations of drugs currently used in cardiology. Labetalol and propranolol inhibited [{sup 125}I]MIGB uptake, whereas all other drugs tested (other {beta}-blockers, calcium inhibitors, digoxin and amiodarone) had no effecft even at doses exceeding 50 {mu}M. The labetalol dose inhibiting 50% of [{sup 125}I]MIBG uptake was lower than the plasma concentration of this drug in treated patients, whereas the propranolol dose was higher. This in vitro study of the effect of drugs on MIBG uptake by human blood platelets is predictive of their in vivo effect on myocardial uptake of [{sup 123}I]MIBG in treated patients, provided that plasma concentration is taken into account. (orig.)

  12. Human Work Interaction Design Meets International Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, Pedro; Clemmensen, Torkil; Barricelli, Barbara Rita

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, empirical relationships between work domain analysis and HCI design have been identified by much research in the field of Human Work Interaction Design (HWID) across five continents. Since this workshop takes place at the Interact Conference in Mumbai, there is a unique oppo...

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  14. Interactively human: Sharing time, constructing materiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Predictive processing models of cognition are promising an elegant way to unite action, perception, and learning. However, in the current formulations, they are species-unspecific and have very little particularly human about them. I propose to examine how, in this framework, humans can be able to massively interact and to build shared worlds that are both material and symbolic.

  15. Problem spotting in human-machine interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahmer, Emiel; Swerts, Marc; Theune, Mariët; Weegels, Mieke

    1999-01-01

    In human-human communication, dialogue participants are con-tinuously sending and receiving signals on the status of the inform-ation being exchanged. We claim that if spoken dialogue systems were able to detect such cues and change their strategy accordingly, the interaction between user and system

  16. Problem spotting in human-machine interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahmer, Emiel; Swerts, Marc; Theune, Mariet; Weegels, Mieke

    In human-human communication, dialogue participants are con-tinuously sending and receiving signals on the status of the inform-ation being exchanged. We claim that if spoken dialogue systems were able to detect such cues and change their strategy accordingly, the interaction between user and

  17. The Science of Human Interaction and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    There is a missing link between our understanding of teaching as high-level social phenomenon and teaching as a physiological phenomenon of brain activity. We suggest that the science of human interaction is the missing link. Using over one-million days of human-behavior data, we have discovered that "collective activenes" (CA), which indicates…

  18. Deep architectures for Human Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noulas, A.K.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present the application of Conditional Restricted Boltzmann Machines in Human Computer Interaction. These provide a well suited framework to model the complex temporal patterns produced from humans in the audio and video modalities. They can be trained in a semisupervised fashion and

  19. Evaluation of the transporter-mediated herb-drug interaction potential of DA-9801, a standardized dioscorea extract for diabetic neuropathy, in human in vitro and rat in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug transporters play important roles in the absorption, distribution, and elimination of drugs and thereby, modulate drug efficacy and toxicity. With a growing use of poly pharmacy, concurrent administration of herbal extracts that modulate transporter activities with drugs can cause serious adverse reactions. Therefore, prediction and evaluation of drug-drug interaction potential is important in the clinic and in the drug development process. DA-9801, comprising a mixed extract of Dioscoreae rhizoma and Dioscorea nipponica Makino, is a new standardized extract currently being evaluated for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in a phase II clinical study. Method The inhibitory effects of DA-9801 on the transport functions of organic cation transporter (OCT)1, OCT2, organic anion transporter (OAT)1, OAT3, organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1, OATP1B3, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) were investigated in HEK293 or LLC-PK1 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on the pharmacokinetics of relevant substrate drugs of these transporters were also examined in vivo in rats. Results DA-9801 inhibited the in vitro transport activities of OCT1, OCT2, OAT3, and OATP1B1, with IC50 values of 106, 174, 48.1, and 273 μg/mL, respectively, while the other transporters were not inhibited by 300 μg/mL DA-9801. To investigate whether this inhibitory effect of DA-9801 on OCT1, OCT2, and OAT3 could change the pharmacokinetics of their substrates in vivo, we measured the pharmacokinetics of cimetidine, a substrate for OCT1, OCT2, and OAT3, and of furosemide, a substrate for OAT1 and OAT3, by co-administration of DA-9801 at a single oral dose of 1,000 mg/kg. Pre-dose of DA-9801 5 min or 2 h prior to cimetidine administration decreased the Cmax of cimetidine in rats. However, DA-9801 did not affect the elimination parameters such as half-life, clearance, or amount excreted in the urine, suggesting that it did not inhibit elimination

  20. [Identifying potential drug interactions in chronic kidney disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquito, Alessandra Batista; Fernandes, Natália Maria da Silva; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions (DIs) are common in clinical practice and are directly related to factors such as polypharmacy, aging, hepatic metabolism and decreased renal function. Individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require multiple classes of drugs being at important risk for the development of DIs. Identify potential interactions among drugs prescribed to patients with CKD on conservative treatment, and factors associated with their occurrence. Observational cross-sectional study, with analysis of 558 prescriptions. Potential DIs were identified by the database MICROMEDEX®, software that provides an internationally known pharmacopoeia. There was a predominance of males (54.7%), seniors (69.4%), stage 3 CKD (47.5%), overweight and obese patients (66.7%). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (68.5%) and diabetes mellitus (31.9%). Potential DIs were detected in 74.9% of prescriptions. Among the 1364 DIs diagnosed, 5 (0.4%) were contraindicated and 229 (16.8%) of greater severity, which need immediate intervention. Interactions of moderate and low severity were identified in 1049 (76.9%) and 81 (5.9%) prescriptions, respectively. The probability of one DI increased by 2.5 times for each additional drug (CI = 2.18 to 3.03). Obesity, hypertension, diabetes as well as advanced stage of CKD were risk factors strongly associated with DI occurrence. Drug associations in individuals with CKD were related to high prevalence of serious DIs, especially in the later stages of the disease.

  1. Incidence of Potential Drug-Drug Interaction and Related Factors in Hospitalized Neurological Patients in two Iranian Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Namazi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reciprocal drug interactions are among the most common causes of adverse drug reactions. We investigated the incidence and related risk factors associated with mutual drug interactions in relation to prescriptions written in the neurology wards of two major teaching hospitals in Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Data was collected from hand-written prescriptions on a daily basis. Mutual drug interactions were identified using Lexi-Comp 2012 version 1.9.1. Type D and X drug interactions were considered as potential drug-drug interactions. The potential risk factors associated with drug-drug interactions included the patient’s age and gender, number of medications and orders, length of hospitalization and the type of neurological disorder. To determine potential drug-drug interactions, relevant interventions were suggested to the physicians or nurses and the outcome of the interventions were documented. Results: The study comprised 589 patients, of which 53% were males and 47% females, with a mean age of 56.65±18.19 SD years. A total of 4942 drug orders and 3784 medications were prescribed among which 4539 drug-drug interactions were detected, including 4118 type C, 403 type D, and 18 type X. Using a logistic regression model, the number of medications, length of hospitalization and non-vascular type of the neurological disorder were found to be significantly associated with potential drug-drug interactions. From the total interventions, 74.24% were accepted by physicians and nurses. Conclusion: Potentially hazardous reciprocal drug interactions are common among patients in neurology wards. Clinical pharmacists can play a critical role in the prevention of drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients.

  2. Cooperative binding of drugs on human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, L. M.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.; García, M.

    In order to explain the adsorption isotherms of the amphiphilic penicillins nafcillin and cloxacillin onto human serum albumin (HSA), a cooperative multilayer adsorption model is introduced, combining the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) adsorption isotherm with an amphiphilic ionic adsorbate, whose chemical potential is derived from Guggenheim's theory. The non-cooperative model has been previously proved to qualitatively predict the measured adsorption maxima of these drugs [Varela, L. M., García, M., Pérez-Rodríguez, M., Taboada, P., Ruso, J. M., and Mosquera, V., 2001, J. chem. Phys., 114, 7682]. The surface interactions among adsorbed drug molecules are modelled in a mean-field fashion, so the chemical potential of the adsorbate is assumed to include a term proportional to the surface coverage, the constant of proportionality being the lateral interaction energy between bound molecules. The interaction energies obtained from the empirical binding isotherms are of the order of tenths of the thermal energy, therefore suggesting the principal role of van der Waals forces in the binding process.

  3. The interaction index: a measure of drug synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, Ronald J

    2002-07-01

    Two drugs used in combination may produce enhanced or reduced effects. The degree of enhancement or reduction is measured from the interaction index (gamma), a quantity that indicates the changed potency of the combination. The index is therefore a quantitative marker for the drug combination and effect metric used. Methodology for measuring the interaction index utilizes the combination and individual drug dose-effect data suitably modeled by regression techniques that most often produce linear plots of effect on log dose from which isobolar analysis is employed. The isobologram provides a simple and convenient graphical assessment of the interaction index but an independent statistical analysis is needed to assess its precision. In some cases, the relative potency of the constituent drugs is the same at all effect levels. When this is so, it is shown that the interaction index can be measured by either an isobolar or an alternate method that is illustrated here. These calculations demonstrate that these different methods of analysis yield the same value of gamma, and do so with comparable precision.

  4. Drug interactions between inhaled corticosteroids and enzymatic inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Daveluy, Amélie; Raignoux, Cécile; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Moore, Nicholas; Haramburu, Françoise; Molimard, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Drug interactions between inhaled corticosteroids and enzymatic inhibitors phone: +33-557-571561 (Daveluy, Amelie) (Daveluy, Amelie) Centre Regional de Pharmacovigilance, Hopital Pellegrin - 33076 - Bordeaux Cedex - FRANCE (Daveluy, Amelie) Unite 657, INSERM - Bordeaux - FRANCE (Daveluy, Amelie) Departement de Pharmacologie, CHU de Bordeaux - Bordeaux - FRANCE (Daveluy, Amelie) Centre Regional de Pharmacovigilance, Hopital Pellegrin - 33076...

  5. iNR-Drug: Predicting the Interaction of Drugs with Nuclear Receptors in Cellular Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Nong Fan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are closely associated with various major diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, and osteoporosis. Therefore, NRs have become a frequent target for drug development. During the process of developing drugs against these diseases by targeting NRs, we are often facing a problem: Given a NR and chemical compound, can we identify whether they are really in interaction with each other in a cell? To address this problem, a predictor called “iNR-Drug” was developed. In the predictor, the drug compound concerned was formulated by a 256-D (dimensional vector derived from its molecular fingerprint, and the NR by a 500-D vector formed by incorporating its sequential evolution information and physicochemical features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition, and the prediction engine was operated by the SVM (support vector machine algorithm. Compared with the existing prediction methods in this area, iNR-Drug not only can yield a higher success rate, but is also featured by a user-friendly web-server established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iNR-Drug/, which is particularly useful for most experimental scientists to obtain their desired data in a timely manner. It is anticipated that the iNR-Drug server may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the current approach may be easily extended to study the interactions of drug with other targets as well.

  6. Identifying the structural discontinuities of human interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Grauwin, Sebastian; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Hövel, Philipp; Simini, Filippo; Vanhoof, Maarten; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo; Ratti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The idea of a hierarchical spatial organization of society lies at the core of seminal theories in human geography that have strongly influenced our understanding of social organization. In the same line, the recent availability of large-scale human mobility and communication data has offered novel quantitative insights hinting at a strong geographical confinement of human interactions within neighboring regions, extending to local levels within countries. However, models of human interaction largely ignore this effect. Here, we analyze several country-wide networks of telephone calls and uncover a systematic decrease of communication induced by borders which we identify as the missing variable in state-of-the-art models. Using this empirical evidence, we propose an alternative modeling framework that naturally stylize the damping effect of borders. We show that this new notion substantially improves the predictive power of widely used interaction models, thus increasing our ability to predict social activiti...

  7. Human-Robot Interaction: Status and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Thomas B

    2016-06-01

    The current status of human-robot interaction (HRI) is reviewed, and key current research challenges for the human factors community are described. Robots have evolved from continuous human-controlled master-slave servomechanisms for handling nuclear waste to a broad range of robots incorporating artificial intelligence for many applications and under human supervisory control. This mini-review describes HRI developments in four application areas and what are the challenges for human factors research. In addition to a plethora of research papers, evidence of success is manifest in live demonstrations of robot capability under various forms of human control. HRI is a rapidly evolving field. Specialized robots under human teleoperation have proven successful in hazardous environments and medical application, as have specialized telerobots under human supervisory control for space and repetitive industrial tasks. Research in areas of self-driving cars, intimate collaboration with humans in manipulation tasks, human control of humanoid robots for hazardous environments, and social interaction with robots is at initial stages. The efficacy of humanoid general-purpose robots has yet to be proven. HRI is now applied in almost all robot tasks, including manufacturing, space, aviation, undersea, surgery, rehabilitation, agriculture, education, package fetch and delivery, policing, and military operations. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  8. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  9. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com.

  10. Systems pharmacology to investigate the interaction of berberine and other drugs in treating polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Fu, Xin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common multifactorial endocrine disorder among women of childbearing age. PCOS has various and heterogeneous clinical features apart from its indefinite pathogenesis and mechanism. Clinical drugs for PCOS are multifarious because it only treats separate symptoms. Berberine is an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities, and it was testified to improve some diseases related to PCOS in animal models and in humans. Systems pharmacology was utilized to predict the potential targets of berberine related to PCOS and the potential drug-drug interaction base on the disease network. In conclusion, berberine is a promising polypharmacological drug for treating PCOS, and for enhancing the efficacy of clinical drugs. PMID:27306862

  11. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  12. In vitro interaction between psychotropic drugs and alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, M G; Bello, F; Burguillo, F J; Cachaza, J M; Kennedy, J F

    1991-03-01

    A series of CNS-stimulating and -depressant drugs have been studied for their in vitro interaction with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity. The depressant drugs studied included barbital, phenobarbital, thiopental, nitrazepam, chlorpromazine, sulpiride, clomethiazole, Li2CO3, diazepam, phenytoin, ethosuximide, morphine, and codeine. The stimulant drugs were theophylline, caffeine, amphetamine, imipramine, chlorimipramine, amitriptyline, and tranylcypromine. The results were as follows. First, ADH activity was inhibited by the action of chlorpromazine, tranylcypromine, imipramine, chlorimipramine, amitriptyline, sulpiride, amphetamine, codeine, ethosuximide, morphine, clomethiazole, nitrazepam, Li2CO3, theophylline, and phenobarbital, in descending order of inhibitory effect. Second, inhibition followed by activation of ADH activity was observed for imipramine and chlorimipramine. Third, activation of ADH activity was observed for phenytoin. Finally, the following drugs were not seen to exert any effect on ADH activity: barbital, thiopental, diazepam, and caffeine.

  13. Drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on pharmacokinetics in vivo in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lifei; Liu, Jiajun; Yu, Xin; Shi, Lei; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Heping; Huang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Moxifloxacin and rifampicin are all the first-line options for the treatment of active tuberculosis, which are often combined for the treatment of multidrug resistance pulmonary tuberculosis in clinic. However, the potential drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin were unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the drug-drug interactions between moxifloxacin and rifampicin based on their pharmacokinetics in vivo after oral administration of the single drug and both drugs, and reveal their mutual effects on their pharmacokinetics. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: moxifloxacin group, rifampicin group and moxifloxacin + rifampicin group. Plasma concentrations of moxifloxacin and rifampicin were determined using LC-MS at the designated time points after drug administration, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. In addition, effects of moxifloxacin and rifampicin on their metabolic rate and absorption were investigated using rat liver microsome incubation systems and Caco-2 cell transwell model. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of moxifloxacin including Tmax , Cmax , t1/2 and AUC(0-t) increased more in the moxifloxacin + rifampicin group than in the moxifloxacin group, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). However, the pharmacokinetic parameters of rifampicin, including peak concentration, area under the concentration-time curve, half-life and the area under the first moment plasma concentration-time curve, increased significantly (p 0.05). The rat liver microsome incubation experiment indicated that moxifloxacin could increase the metabolic rate of rifampicin from 23.7 to 38.7 min. However, the Caco-2 cell transwell experiment showed that moxifloxacin could not affect the absorption rate of rifampicin. These changes could enhance the drug efficacy, but they could also cause drug accumulation, which might induce adverse effect, so it was suggested that the drug dosage

  14. Role of protein-protein interactions in cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Sylvie E; Lampe, Jed N

    2014-09-15

    Through their unique oxidative chemistry, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) catalyze the elimination of most drugs and toxins from the human body. Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in this process. Historically, the study of CYP-protein interactions has focused on their electron transfer partners and allosteric mediators, cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5. However, CYPs can bind other proteins that also affect CYP function. Some examples include the progesterone receptor membrane component 1, damage resistance protein 1, human and bovine serum albumin, and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, in addition to other CYP isoforms. Furthermore, disruption of these interactions can lead to altered paths of metabolism and the production of toxic metabolites. In this review, we summarize the available evidence for CYP protein-protein interactions from the literature and offer a discussion of the potential impact of future studies aimed at characterizing noncanonical protein-protein interactions with CYP enzymes.

  15. Drug-Drug Interaction Analysis of Pyronaridine/Artesunate and Ritonavir in Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Carrie A.; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Jung, Donald; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Pokorny, Rolf; Shin, Chang-Sik; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    A multiple dose, parallel group study was conducted to assess for a drug-drug interaction between the pyronaridine/artesunate (PA) combination antimalarial and ritonavir. Thirty-four healthy adults were randomized (1:1) to receive PA for 3 days or PA with ritonavir (100 mg twice daily for 17 days, PA administered on Days 8–10). Pharmacokinetic parameters for pyronaridine, artesunate, and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) were obtained after the last PA dose and for ritonavir on D...

  16. Language evolution and human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudin, Jonathan; Norman, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the issues that confront designers of interactive computer systems also appear in natural language evolution. Natural languages and human-computer interfaces share as their primary mission the support of extended 'dialogues' between responsive entities. Because in each case one participant is a human being, some of the pressures operating on natural languages, causing them to evolve in order to better support such dialogue, also operate on human-computer 'languages' or interfaces. This does not necessarily push interfaces in the direction of natural language - since one entity in this dialogue is not a human, this is not to be expected. Nonetheless, by discerning where the pressures that guide natural language evolution also appear in human-computer interaction, we can contribute to the design of computer systems and obtain a new perspective on natural languages.

  17. Language evolution and human-computer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudin, Jonathan; Norman, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Many of the issues that confront designers of interactive computer systems also appear in natural language evolution. Natural languages and human-computer interfaces share as their primary mission the support of extended 'dialogues' between responsive entities. Because in each case one participant is a human being, some of the pressures operating on natural languages, causing them to evolve in order to better support such dialogue, also operate on human-computer 'languages' or interfaces. This does not necessarily push interfaces in the direction of natural language - since one entity in this dialogue is not a human, this is not to be expected. Nonetheless, by discerning where the pressures that guide natural language evolution also appear in human-computer interaction, we can contribute to the design of computer systems and obtain a new perspective on natural languages.

  18. Prediction of drug-target interactions for drug repositioning only based on genomic expression similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI. However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap. Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1 some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2 in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects.

  19. Multimodal interaction for human-robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Dustin; Schurr, Nathan; Ayers, Jeanine; Rousseau, Jeff; Fertitta, John; Carlin, Alan; Dumond, Danielle

    2013-05-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles have the potential for supporting small dismounted teams in mapping facilities, maintaining security in cleared buildings, and extending the team's reconnaissance and persistent surveillance capability. In order for such autonomous systems to integrate with the team, we must move beyond current interaction methods using heads-down teleoperation which require intensive human attention and affect the human operator's ability to maintain local situational awareness and ensure their own safety. This paper focuses on the design, development and demonstration of a multimodal interaction system that incorporates naturalistic human gestures, voice commands, and a tablet interface. By providing multiple, partially redundant interaction modes, our system degrades gracefully in complex environments and enables the human operator to robustly select the most suitable interaction method given the situational demands. For instance, the human can silently use arm and hand gestures for commanding a team of robots when it is important to maintain stealth. The tablet interface provides an overhead situational map allowing waypoint-based navigation for multiple ground robots in beyond-line-of-sight conditions. Using lightweight, wearable motion sensing hardware either worn comfortably beneath the operator's clothing or integrated within their uniform, our non-vision-based approach enables an accurate, continuous gesture recognition capability without line-of-sight constraints. To reduce the training necessary to operate the system, we designed the interactions around familiar arm and hand gestures.

  20. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, David; Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-06-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  1. The role of human carboxylesterases in drug metabolism: have we overlooked their importance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laizure, S Casey; Herring, Vanessa; Hu, Zheyi; Witbrodt, Kevin; Parker, Robert B

    2013-02-01

    Carboxylesterases are a multigene family of mammalian enzymes widely distributed throughout the body that catalyze the hydrolysis of esters, amides, thioesters, and carbamates. In humans, two carboxylesterases, hCE1 and hCE2, are important mediators of drug metabolism. Both are expressed in the liver, but hCE1 greatly exceeds hCE2. In the intestine, only hCE2 is present and highly expressed. The most common drug substrates of these enzymes are ester prodrugs specifically designed to enhance oral bioavailability by hydrolysis to the active carboxylic acid after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Carboxylesterases also play an important role in the hydrolysis of some drugs to inactive metabolites. It has been widely believed that drugs undergoing hydrolysis by hCE1 and hCE2 are not subject to clinically significant alterations in their disposition, but evidence exists that genetic polymorphisms, drug-drug interactions, drug-disease interactions and other factors are important determinants of the variability in the therapeutic response to carboxylesterase-substrate drugs. The implications for drug therapy are far-reaching, as substrate drugs include numerous examples from widely prescribed therapeutic classes. Representative drugs include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, antiplatelet drugs, statins, antivirals, and central nervous system agents. As research interest increases in the carboxylesterases, evidence is accumulating of their important role in drug metabolism and, therefore, the outcomes of pharmacotherapy.

  2. Equality: A Principle of Human Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjördís Hákonardóttir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on equality as a primary principle of human interaction. Human beings have basic needs, physical and mental, the fulfilment of which is necessary for a flourishing life. These needs transfer into so-called fundamental rights. Humans are entitled to a life as conscious, autonomous actors in respect to those needs. In this respect all humans are equal. It is proposed here that equality in this sense promotes a situation from which fundamental rights are derived. Thus equality is primary to and the reason why recognition of fundamental rights cannot be left to the chance of social development.

  3. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral. Houve uma associação entre o uso de cinco ou mais medicamentos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p = 0.000), e entre o período de tempo de terapia antirretroviral acima de seis anos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p VIH que reciben terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles

  4. The interaction of encapsulated pharmaceutical drugs with a silica matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Everton C; Correa, Gabriel G; Brambilla, Rodrigo; Radtke, Claudio; Baibich, Ione Maluf; dos Santos, João Henrique Z

    2013-03-01

    A series of seven drugs, namely, fluoxetine, gentamicin, lidocaine, morphine, nifedipine, paracetamol and tetracycline, were encapsulated. The encapsulated systems were characterized using a series of complementary techniques: Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffusive reflectance spectroscopy in the UV-vis region (DRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). According to the DRS spectra, most of the encapsulated systems showed a band shift of the maximum absorption when compared with the corresponding bare pharmaceutical. Additionally, after encapsulation, the drugs exhibited infrared band shifts toward higher wavenumbers, which in turn provided insight into potential sites for interaction with the silica framework. The amine group showed a band shift in the spectra of almost all the drugs (except nifedipine and tetracycline). This finding indicates the possibility of a hydrogen bonding interaction between the drug and the silica via electron donation from the amine group to the silica framework. XPS confirmed this interaction between the pharmaceuticals and the silica through the amine group. A correlation was observed between the textural characteristics of the solids and the spectroscopic data, suggesting that the amine groups from the pharmaceuticals were more perturbed upon encapsulation.

  5. Scrub typhus, myocarditis and a possible drug interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kohli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus, caused by O. Tsutsugamushi is a re-emerging disease which is being increasingly reported from different parts of India. This disease has a wide spectrum of presentation which can range from uncomplicated febrile illness to life-threatening sepsis with multi-organ dysfunction. Myocarditis has been described as one of the rare manifestations of this infection and very few cases have been reported. Myocarditis in scrub typhus is usually subclinical and therefore many times ignored. Here, we report of a case of scrub typhus presenting without the typical rash and eschar with features of myocarditis requiring treatment. We highlight a possible drug interaction between ivabradine and doxycycline which were used in this patient. We also highlight the possibility of other drug interactions between the various drugs used in the treatment of scrub typhus and its complications and stress the need to be vigilant when prescribing multiple drugs, especially in a disease with such a varied presentation and multiple complications that require the use of a number of drugs. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(6.000: 2703-2705

  6. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; Oliveira, Cesar de

    2016-09-01

    to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. identificar e sintetizar estudos que examinam as interações medicamentosas (IM) e reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM) em idosos polimedicados. revisão integrativa de estudos publicados de janeiro de 2008 a dezembro de 2013, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão, nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE e EMBASE. foram analisados 47 estudos de texto completo, incluindo 14,624,492 idosos (≥ 60 anos): 24 (51,1%) sobre RAM, 14 (29,8%) sobre IM e 9 estudos (19,1%) que investigaram tanto IM como RAM. Encontramos uma variedade de desenhos metodológicos. Os estudos revisados reforçaram que a polifarmácia é um processo multifatorial, e os preditores e a prescrição inadequada estão associados a

  7. Human-Robot Interaction and Human Self-Realization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The ethical debate on robots has become a cutting edge issue in many countries. It is, however, most often approached through an us-versus-them perspective—as if we were watching a soccer game and taking one side. Informed by Eastern as well as Western thought, the meta-ethical aim of this paper...... is to test the basis for this type of discrimination when it comes to human-robot interaction. Furthermore, the paper will take Heidegger's warning concerning technology as a vantage point and explore the possibility of human-robot interaction forming a praxis that might help humans to be with robots beyond...

  8. Hypericum perforatum: pharmacokinetic, mechanism of action, tolerability, and clinical drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emilio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Whalley, Benjamin J; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Esposito, Stefania; Patanè, Marinella; Upton, Roy; Pugliese, Michela; Chimirri, Serafina; Mammì, Maria; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2014-05-01

    Hypericum perforatum (HP) belongs to the Hypericaceae family and is one of the oldest used and most extensively investigated medicinal herbs. The medicinal form comprises the leaves and flowering tops of which the primary ingredients of interest are naphthodianthrones, xanthones, flavonoids, phloroglucinols (e.g. hyperforin), and hypericin. Although several constituents elicit pharmacological effects that are consistent with HP's antidepressant activity, no single mechanism of action underlying these effects has thus far been found. Various clinical trials have shown that HP has a comparable antidepressant efficacy as some currently used antidepressant drugs in the treatment of mild/moderate depression. Interestingly, low-hyperforin-content preparations are effective in the treatment of depression. Moreover, HP is also used to treat certain forms of anxiety. However, HP can induce various cytochrome P450s isozymes and/or P-glycoprotein, of which many drugs are substrates and which are the main origin of HP-drug interactions. Here, we analyse the existing evidence describing the clinical consequence of HP-drug interactions. Although some of the reported interactions are based on findings from in vitro studies, the clinical importance of which remain to be demonstrated, others are based on case reports where causality can, in some cases, be determined to reveal clinically significant interactions that suggest caution, consideration, and disclosure of potential interactions prior to informed use of HP.

  9. Analysis of human emotion in human-robot interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blar, Noraidah; Jafar, Fairul Azni; Abdullah, Nurhidayu; Muhammad, Mohd Nazrin; Kassim, Anuar Muhamed

    2015-05-01

    There is vast application of robots in human's works such as in industry, hospital, etc. Therefore, it is believed that human and robot can have a good collaboration to achieve an optimum result of work. The objectives of this project is to analyze human-robot collaboration and to understand humans feeling (kansei factors) when dealing with robot that robot should adapt to understand the humans' feeling. Researches currently are exploring in the area of human-robot interaction with the intention to reduce problems that subsist in today's civilization. Study had found that to make a good interaction between human and robot, first it is need to understand the abilities of each. Kansei Engineering in robotic was used to undergo the project. The project experiments were held by distributing questionnaire to students and technician. After that, the questionnaire results were analyzed by using SPSS analysis. Results from the analysis shown that there are five feelings which significant to the human in the human-robot interaction; anxious, fatigue, relaxed, peaceful, and impressed.

  10. Human Computer Interaction: An intellectual approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuntal Saroha

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the research that has been done in thefield of Human Computer Interaction (HCI relating tohuman psychology. Human-computer interaction (HCI isthe study of how people design, implement, and useinteractive computer systems and how computers affectindividuals, organizations, and society. This encompassesnot only ease of use but also new interaction techniques forsupporting user tasks, providing better access toinformation, and creating more powerful forms ofcommunication. It involves input and output devices andthe interaction techniques that use them; how information ispresented and requested; how the computer’s actions arecontrolled and monitored; all forms of help, documentation,and training; the tools used to design, build, test, andevaluate user interfaces; and the processes that developersfollow when creating Interfaces.

  11. Assessing Natural Product-Drug Interactions: An End-to-End Safety Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Amy L; Paine, Mary F; Gurley, Bill J; Brouwer, Kenneth R; Jordan, Scott; Griffiths, James C

    2016-04-01

    The use of natural products (NPs), including herbal medicines and other dietary supplements, by North Americans continues to increase across all age groups. This population has access to conventional medications, with significant polypharmacy observed in older adults. Thus, the safety of the interactions between multi-ingredient NPs and drugs is a topic of paramount importance. Considerations such as history of safe use, literature data from animal toxicity and human clinical studies, and NP constituent characterization would provide guidance on whether to assess NP-drug interactions experimentally. The literature is replete with reports of various NP extracts and constituents as potent inhibitors of drug metabolizing enzymes, and transporters. However, without standard methods for NP characterization or in vitro testing, extrapolating these reports to clinically-relevant NP-drug interactions is difficult. This lack of a clear definition of risk precludes clinicians and consumers from making informed decisions about the safety of taking NPs with conventional medications. A framework is needed that describes an integrated robust approach for assessing NP-drug interactions; and, translation of the data into formulation alterations, dose adjustment, labelling, and/or post-marketing surveillance strategies. A session was held at the 41st Annual Summer Meeting of the Toxicology Forum in Colorado Springs, CO, to highlight the challenges and critical components that should be included in a framework approach.

  12. Fundamentals of human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Monk, Andrew F

    1985-01-01

    Fundamentals of Human-Computer Interaction aims to sensitize the systems designer to the problems faced by the user of an interactive system. The book grew out of a course entitled """"The User Interface: Human Factors for Computer-based Systems"""" which has been run annually at the University of York since 1981. This course has been attended primarily by systems managers from the computer industry. The book is organized into three parts. Part One focuses on the user as processor of information with studies on visual perception; extracting information from printed and electronically presented

  13. Drug metabolism and liver disease: a drug-gene-environment interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, Nathalie K; Branch, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    Despite the central role of the liver in drug metabolism, surprisingly there is lack of certainty in anticipating the extent of modification of the clearance of a given drug in a given patient. The intent of this review is to provide a conceptual framework in considering the impact of liver disease on drug disposition and reciprocally the impact of drug disposition on liver disease. It is proposed that improved understanding of the situation is gained by considering the issue as a special example of a drug-gene-environment interaction. This requires an integration of knowledge of the drug's properties, knowledge of the gene products involved in its metabolism, and knowledge of the pathophysiology of its disposition. This will enhance the level of predictability of drug disposition and toxicity for a drug of interest in an individual patient. It is our contention that advances in pharmacology, pharmacogenomics, and hepatology, together with concerted interests in the academic, regulatory, and pharmaceutical industry communities provide an ideal immediate environment to move from a qualitative reactive approach to quantitative proactive approach in individualizing patient therapy in liver disease.

  14. Drug-nutrient Interaction: A Review [interação Fármaco-nutriente: Uma Revisão

    OpenAIRE

    Moura M.R.L.; Reyes F.G.R.

    2002-01-01

    Diet influences the whole life cycle, supplying nutrients required to maintain the human body. Functional and/or structural alterations, caused by diseases and acute or chronic infections, lead to the use of drugs in order to restore the health. The oral route is preferred for drug administration, owing to safety and convenience, among other reasons. The drug-nutrient interaction phenomenon can occur before or during gastrointestinal absorption, during distribution and storage in the tissues,...

  15. Modulation of trichloroethylene in vitro metabolism by different drugs in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh Rouhou, Mouna; Haddad, Sami

    2014-08-01

    Toxicological interactions with drugs have the potential to modulate the toxicity of trichloroethylene (TCE). Our objective is to identify metabolic interactions between TCE and 14 widely used drugs in human suspended hepatocytes and characterize the strongest using microsomal assays. Changes in concentrations of TCE and its metabolites were measured by headspace GC-MS. Results with hepatocytes show that amoxicillin, cimetidine, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and ranitidine caused no significant interactions. Naproxen and salicylic acid showed to increase both TCE metabolites levels, whereas acetaminophen, carbamazepine and erythromycin rather decreased them. Finally, diclofenac, gliclazide, sulphasalazine and valproic acid had an impact on the levels of only one metabolite. Among the 14 tested drugs, 5 presented the most potent interactions and were selected for confirmation with microsomes, namely naproxen, salicylic acid, acetaminophen, carbamazepine and valproic acid. Characterization in human microsomes confirmed interaction with naproxen by competitively inhibiting trichloroethanol (TCOH) glucuronidation (Ki=2.329 mM). Inhibition of TCOH formation was also confirmed for carbamazepine (partial non-competitive with Ki=70 μM). Interactions with human microsomes were not observed with salicylic acid and acetaminophen, similar to prior results in rat material. For valproic acid, interactions with microsomes were observed in rat but not in human. Inhibition patterns were shown to be similar in human and rat hepatocytes, but some differences in mechanisms were noted in microsomal material between species. Next research efforts will focus on determining the adequacy between in vitro observations and the in vivo situation.

  16. Simulating human behavior for national security human interactions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis; Hart, Dereck H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Glickman, Matthew R.; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2007-01-01

    This 3-year research and development effort focused on what we believe is a significant technical gap in existing modeling and simulation capabilities: the representation of plausible human cognition and behaviors within a dynamic, simulated environment. Specifically, the intent of the ''Simulating Human Behavior for National Security Human Interactions'' project was to demonstrate initial simulated human modeling capability that realistically represents intra- and inter-group interaction behaviors between simulated humans and human-controlled avatars as they respond to their environment. Significant process was made towards simulating human behaviors through the development of a framework that produces realistic characteristics and movement. The simulated humans were created from models designed to be psychologically plausible by being based on robust psychological research and theory. Progress was also made towards enhancing Sandia National Laboratories existing cognitive models to support culturally plausible behaviors that are important in representing group interactions. These models were implemented in the modular, interoperable, and commercially supported Umbra{reg_sign} simulation framework.

  17. Drug-drug interaction and doping, part 1: an in vitro study on the effect of non-prohibited drugs on the phase I metabolic profile of toremifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Fiacco, Ilaria; Palermo, Amelia; Botrè, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to provide preliminary information on the potential impact of metabolic drug-drug interaction on the effectiveness of doping control strategies currently followed by the anti-doping laboratories to detect the intake of banned agents. In vitro assays based on the use of human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP isoforms were designed and performed to characterize the phase I metabolic profile of the prohibited agent toremifene, selected as a prototype drug of the class of selective oestrogen receptor modulators, both in the absence and in the presence of medicaments (fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, cimetidine, ranitidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, nefazodone) not included in the World Anti-Doping Agency list of prohibited substances and methods and frequently administered to athletes. The results show that the in vitro model developed in this study was adequate to simulate the in vivo metabolism of toremifene, confirming the results obtained in previous studies. Furthermore, our data also show that ketoconazole, itraconazole, miconazole and nefazodone cause a marked modification in the production of the metabolic products (i.e. hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites) normally selected by the anti-doping laboratories as target analytes to detect toremifene intake; moderate variations were registered in the presence of fluconazole, paroxetine and fluoxetine; while no significant modifications were measured in the presence of ranitidine and cimetidine. This evidence imposes that the potential effect of drug-drug interactions is duly taken into account in anti-doping analysis, also for a broader significance of the analytical results.

  18. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  19. Human-Computer Interaction in Smart Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Paravati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we provide an overview of the content of the Special Issue on “Human-computer interaction in smart environments”. The aim of this Special Issue is to highlight technologies and solutions encompassing the use of mass-market sensors in current and emerging applications for interacting with Smart Environments. Selected papers address this topic by analyzing different interaction modalities, including hand/body gestures, face recognition, gaze/eye tracking, biosignal analysis, speech and activity recognition, and related issues.

  20. Predicting Drugs Side Effects Based on Chemical-Chemical Interactions and Protein-Chemical Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine.

  1. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1 chemical interaction between drugs, (2 protein interactions between drugs’ targets, and (3 target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations.

  2. Antidepressants and local anesthetics: drug interactions of interest to dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Rosa Chioca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since there is a vast variety of pharmacological treatments for mental conditions, it has been increasingly more common that patients seeking dentistry treatment are continually using psychoactive drugs as antidepressants. The number of people taking antidepressants is increasing; consequently, dentists should update their knowledge on the interaction between this drug class and those used in dental daily practice, such as local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors. Objective: To conduct a literature review on this subject. Literature review and conclusion: Literature data suggest that sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and phenylephrine associated with local anesthetics may potentiate the side effects of antidepressants, particularly tricyclics and MAO inhibitors, on the cardiovascular system. There are few clinical trials and preclinical studies on this subject, and most of them were carried out between the 60s and 80s. Current studies are needed, since many new antidepressant drugs with different mechanisms of action are currently marketed and being used.

  3. EXPLORING THE PATTERN OF POLYPHARMACY AND PROPORTION OF DRUG TO DRUG INTERACTIONS AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS IN THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree Thyagaraj

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The geriatric population is increasing as a result of advanced medical facilities. This population also faces a number of medical health challenges. They tend to receive multiple medications often leading to Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs and other clinical consequences, which compromises their quality of life if not endangering it as well. There are few Indian studies focusing on this problem. Hence, this study was undertaken with the aim to assess the polypharmacy pattern, proportion of DDIs and adverse drug reactions in the geriatric population in a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study wherein data from 201 geriatric inpatient’s prescriptions were collected. The prescriptions were assessed for demographic details such as age, gender, comorbidities and drugs prescribed. All prescriptions were evaluated for polypharmacy, DDIs and ADRs. DDIs were assessed using Micromedex software. Patients were stratified into groups and DDIs were compared between the groups, gender and also with number of drugs used. RESULTS There were 201 patients with a mean age of approximately 70 years. Polypharmacy occurred in 73.63% of them with mean number of drugs being 6.23. The number of drugs used increased significantly with age (p=0.0001. Hypertension was the most common comorbidity. Polypharmacy was strongly associated with hypertension and dyslipidaemia. A total of 129 (64.17% patients accounted for 425 potential DDIs. The most common drug involved in DDIs was aspirin. A subset analysis of ADRs showed an occurrence of 50.68% with 10.81% being definitely avoidable. CONCLUSION Elderly individuals are at increased risk of being on polypharmacy. This comes with the risk of several potential DDIs, which in turn may lead to adverse drug reactions, which results in morbidity. Doctors involved in the care of the elderly should be aware of these facts and exercise caution while adding any

  4. Metabolic drug interactions - the impact of prescribed drug regimens on the medication safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fialova, D.; Vrbensky, K.; Topinkova, E.; Vlcek, J.; Soerbye, L.W.; Wagner, C.; Bernabei, R.

    2005-01-01

    Background and objective: Risk/benefit profile of prescribed drug regimens is unkown. Over 60% of commonly used medications interact on metabolic pathways (cytochrom P450 (CYP450), uridyl-glucuronyl tranferasis (UGT I, II) and P-glycoprotein (PGP) transport). Using an up-to-date knowledge on metabo

  5. Interaction of rocuronium with human liver cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzenbacherova, Eva; Spicakova, Alena; Jourova, Lenka; Ulrichova, Jitka; Adamus, Milan; Bachleda, Petr; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    Rocuronium is a neuromuscular blocking agent acting as a competitive antagonist of acetylcholine. Results of an inhibition of eight individual liver microsomal cytochromes P450 (CYP) are presented. As the patients are routinely premedicated with diazepam, possible interaction of diazepam with rocuronium has been also studied. Results indicated that rocuronium interacts with human liver microsomal CYPs by binding to the substrate site. Next, concentration dependent inhibition of liver microsomal CYP3A4 down to 42% (at rocuronium concentration 189 μM) was found. This effect has been confirmed with two CYP3A4 substrates, testosterone (formation of 6β-hydroxytestosterone) and diazepam (temazepam formation). CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 activities were inhibited down to 75-80% (at the same rocuronium concentration). Activities of other microsomal CYPs have not been inhibited by rocuronium. To prove the possibility of rocuronium interaction with other drugs (diazepam), the effect of rocuronium on formation of main diazepam metabolites, temazepam (by CYP3A4) and desmethyldiazepam, (also known as nordiazepam; formed by CYP2C19) in primary culture of human hepatocytes has been examined. Rocuronium has caused inhibition of both reactions by 20 and 15%, respectively. The results open a possibility that interactions of rocuronium with drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 (and possibly also CYP2C19) may be observed. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Solubilization and Interaction Studies of Bile Salts with Surfactants and Drugs: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    In this review, bile salt, bile salt-surfactant, and bile salt-drug interactions and their solubilization studies are mainly focused. Usefulness of bile salts in digestion, absorption, and excretion of various compounds and their rare properties in ordering the shape and size of the micelles owing to the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces are taken into consideration while compiling this review. Bile salts as potential bio-surfactants to solubilize drugs of interest are also highlighted. This review will give an insight into the selection of drugs in different applications as their properties get modified by interaction with bile salts, thus influencing their solution behavior which, in turn, modifies the phase-forming behavior, microemulsion, and clouding phenomenon, besides solubilization. Finally, their future perspectives are taken into consideration to assess their possible uses as bio-surfactants without side effects to human beings.

  7. Exposure-response relationships and drug interactions of sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, James J

    2004-10-15

    Sirolimus (rapamycin, RAPAMUNE, RAPA) is an immunosuppressive agent used for the prophylaxis of renal allograft rejection and exhibits an immunosuppressive mechanism that is distinct from that for cyclosporine and tacrolimus. The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss the exposure-response relationships and drug interactions of sirolimus. The various factors affecting sirolimus whole blood exposure included first-pass extraction, formulation, food, demographics, liver disease, assay method, and interacting drugs. Clinically significant effects caused by food, pediatric age, hepatic impairment, and interacting drugs require recommendations for the safe and efficacious use of sirolimus in renal allograft patients. An exposure-response model based on multivariate logistic regression was developed using the interstudy data from 1832 renal allograft patients. The analysis revealed an increased probability of acute rejection for sirolimus troughs or =4, and females. The outcomes suggested that individualization of sirolimus doses immediately after transplantation, based on HLA mismatch and sex, would likely decrease the probability of acute rejections in renal allograft recipients who receive concomitant sirolimus, cyclosporine (full-dose), and corticosteroid therapy. Sirolimus is a substrate for both Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and undergoes extensive first-pass extraction. Drugs that are known to inhibit or induce these proteins may potentially affect sirolimus whole blood exposure. In healthy volunteers, cyclosporine, diltiazem, erythromycin, ketoconazole, and verapamil significantly increased sirolimus whole blood exposure, and rifampin significantly decreased sirolimus exposure. However, sirolimus whole blood exposure was not affected by acyclovir, atorvastatin, digoxin, ethinyl estradiol/norgestrel, glyburide, nifedipine, or tacrolimus. Among the 15 drugs studied, sirolimus significantly increased the exposures of only erythromycin and S-(-)verapamil.

  8. Interactions between modern and Chinese medicinal drugs: a general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K F; Leung, K S; Leung, P C

    2003-01-01

    While the use of health food and over-the-counter drugs for health promotion and adjuvant therapy is becoming increasingly popular, the concern about adverse effects is mounting. The possible adverse effects that may arise from drug interactions between these herbal preparations and standard modem therapy are equally worrying. Herbal toxicity and adverse effects are well documented in classical Chinese medicinal volumes. Interactions between herbal preparations and standard modem therapy are known. Extensive work needs to be done before useful guidelines can be established. However, based on available reports and clinical observations, some commonly used herbs and Chinese medicines have already demonstrated the need for special attention when used together with modern therapy. This paper analyzes the important material already available, and would serve as a preliminary checklist for patients who are taking herbal preparations, while at the same time receiving treatment from modern medicine.

  9. Can agricultural fungicides accelerate the discovery of human antifungal drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Kyung; Klittich, Carla J R

    2015-01-01

    Twelve drugs from four chemical classes are currently available for treatment of systemic fungal infections in humans. By contrast, more than 100 structurally distinct compounds from over 30 chemical classes have been developed as agricultural fungicides, and these fungicides target many modes of action not represented among human antifungal drugs. In this article we introduce the diverse aspects of agricultural fungicides and compare them with human antifungal drugs. We propose that the information gained from the development of agricultural fungicides can be applied to the discovery of new mechanisms of action and new antifungal agents for the management of human fungal infections.

  10. Timing and Duration of Drug Exposure Affects Outcomes of a Drug-Nutrient Interaction During Ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Alcorn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Significant drug-nutrient interactions are possible when drugs and nutrients share the same absorption and disposition mechanisms. During postnatal development, the outcomes of drug-nutrient interactions may change with postnatal age since these processes undergo ontogenesis through the postnatal period. Our study investigated the dependence of a significant drug-nutrient interaction (cefepime-carnitine on the timing and duration of drug exposure relative to postnatal age. Rat pups were administered cefepime (5 mg/kg twice daily subcutaneously according to different dosing schedules (postnatal day 1-4, 1-8, 8-11, 8-20, or 1-20. Cefepime significantly reduced serum and heart L-carnitine levels in postnatal day 1-4, 1-8 and 8-11 groups and caused severe degenerative changes in ventricular myocardium in these groups. Cefepime also altered the ontogeny of several key L-carnitine homeostasis pathways. The qualitative and quantitative changes in levels of hepatic γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase mRNA and activity, hepatic trimethyllysine hydroxlase mRNA, intestinal organic cation/carnitine transporter (Octn mRNA, and renal Octn2 mRNA depended on when during postnatal development the cefepime exposure occurred and duration of exposure. Despite lower levels of heart L-carnitine in earlier postnatal groups, levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase mRNA and activity, heart Octn2 mRNA and ATP levels in all treatment groups remained unchanged with cefepime exposure. However, changes in other high energy phosphate substrates were noted and reductions in the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio were found in rat pups with normal serum L-carnitine levels. In summary, our data suggest a significant drug-nutrient transport interaction in developing neonates, the nature of which depends on the timing and duration of exposure relative to postnatal age.

  11. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  12. Drug/protein interactions studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Vayá, Ignacio; Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. C.; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2014-09-01

    We report here on a recent time-resolved fluorescence study [1] of the interaction between flurbiprofen (FBP), a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and human serum albumin (HSA), the main transport protein in the human body. We compare the results obtained for the drug-protein complex with those of various covalently linked flurbiprofentryptophan dyads having well-defined geometries. In all cases stereoselective dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed, varying greatly from one system to another. In addition, the fluorescence anisotropy decays also display a clear stereoselectivity. For the drug-protein complexes, this can be interpreted in terms of the protein microenvironment playing a significant role in the conformational relaxation of FBP, which is more restricted in the case of the (R)- enantiomer.

  13. Glucuronidation of drugs in humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 mice: Similarity with glucuronidation in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuno, Yuki; Sumida, Kyohei; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2013-10-01

    Uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze glucuronidation of various endogenous and exogenous substrates. Among 19 functional human UGTs, UGT1A family enzymes largely contribute to the metabolism of clinically used drugs. While the UGT1A locus is conserved in mammals such as humans, mice, and rats, species differences in drug glucuronidation have been reported. Recently, humanized UGT1 mice in which the original Ugt1 locus was disrupted and replaced with the human UGT1 locus (hUGT1 mice) have been developed. To evaluate the usefulness of hUGT1 mice to predict human glucuronidation of drugs, UGT activities, and inhibitory effects on UGTs were examined in liver microsomes of hUGT1 mice as well as in those of wild-type mice and humans. Furosemide acyl-glucuronidation was sigmoidal and best fitted to the Hill equation in hUGT1 mice and human liver microsomes, while it was fitted to the substrate inhibition equation in mouse liver microsomes. Kinetic parameters of furosemide glucuronidation were very similar between hUGT1 mice and human liver microsomes. The kinetics of S-naproxen acyl-glucuronidation and inhibitory effects of compounds on furosemide glucuronidation in hUGT1 liver microsomes were also slightly, but similar to those in human liver microsomes, rather than in wild-type mice. While wild-type mice lack imipramine and trifluoperazine N-glucuronidation potential, hUGT1 mice showed comparable N-glucuronidation activity to that of humans. Our data indicate that hUGT1 mice are promising tools to predict not only in vivo human drug glucuronidation but also potential drug-drug interactions.

  14. Metabolic interactions of agrochemicals in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Ernest; Rose, Randy L

    2008-06-01

    Agrochemicals and other xenobiotics are metabolized by xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) to products that may be more or less toxic than the parent chemical. In this regard, phase-I XMEs such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are of primary importance. Interactions at the level of metabolism may take place via either inhibition or induction of XMEs. Such interactions have often been investigated, in vitro, in experimental animals, using subcellular fractions such as liver microsomes, but seldom in humans or at the level of individual XME isoforms. The authors have been investigating the metabolism of a number of agrochemicals by human liver microsomes and recombinant CYP isoforms and have recently embarked on studies of the induction of XMEs in human hepatocytes. The insecticides chlorpyrifos, carbaryl, carbofuran and fipronil, as well as the repellant DEET, are all extensively metabolized by human liver microsomes and, although a number of CYP isoforms may be involved, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 are usually the most important. Permethrin is hydrolyzed by esterase(s) present in both human liver microsomes and cytosol. A number of metabolic interactions have been observed. Chlorpyrifos and other phosphorothioates are potent inhibitors of the CYP-dependent metabolism of both endogenous substrates, such as testosterone and estradiol, and exogenous substrates, such as carbaryl, presumably as a result of the interaction of highly reactive sulfur, released during the oxidative desulfuration reaction, with the heme iron of CYP. The hydrolysis of permethrin in human liver can be inhibited by chlorpyrifos oxon and by carbaryl. Fipronil can inhibit testosterone metabolism by CYP3A4 and is an effective inducer of CYP isoforms in human hepatocytes.

  15. Quantification of human-structure interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caprani Colin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In lightweight structural systems there is increasing evidence that the presence of humans influences the dynamics characteristics of the system. In the past, most effort on determining the footfall-induced vertical force to the walking surface has been conducted using rigid or non-flexible surfaces such as treadmills. However, should the walking surface be vibrating, the characteristics of human walking could change to maximize comfort. This interaction between the structure and human may account for the discrepancy between the levels of vibration predicted by theory and those observed in practice. Indeed, many design rules can be seen to be conservative, perhaps partly because knowledge of this human-structure interaction is limited. This work aims to address this problem by quantifying the magnitude of human-structure interaction through a comprehensive experimental programme. Novel experimental techniques are used to measure the human-imparted force on the walking surface. Both rigid and flexible (vibrating surfaces are used, and we measure the imparted vibration response on a lively footbridge (the Warwick Bridge which acts as the flexible surface. A range of test subjects is considered, walking at a range of pacing frequencies. Comparison is made between a notional vibration response from the footfall force imparted to the rigid surface and the actual vibration response caused by the footfall force imparted to the flexible surface. Key aspects of the experimental regime are also explained. Finally, some comparisons are made using footfall force models from the literature. It is concluded that human-structure interaction is a key phenomenon that should be taken into account in the design and assessment of vibration-sensitive structures.

  16. CREDO: a protein-ligand interaction database for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Adrian; Blundell, Tom

    2009-02-01

    Harnessing data from the growing number of protein-ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank is an important task in drug discovery. In order to benefit from the abundance of three-dimensional structures, structural data must be integrated with sequence as well as chemical data and the protein-small molecule interactions characterized structurally at the inter-atomic level. In this study, we present CREDO, a new publicly available database of protein-ligand interactions, which represents contacts as structural interaction fingerprints, implements novel features and is completely scriptable through its application programming interface. Features of CREDO include implementation of molecular shape descriptors with ultrafast shape recognition, fragmentation of ligands in the Protein Data Bank, sequence-to-structure mapping and the identification of approved drugs. Selected analyses of these key features are presented to highlight a range of potential applications of CREDO. The CREDO dataset has been released into the public domain together with the application programming interface under a Creative Commons license at http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/credo. We believe that the free availability and numerous features of CREDO database will be useful not only for commercial but also for academia-driven drug discovery programmes.

  17. Drug-Drug Interactions with the NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor Simeprevir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, Sivi; Snoeys, Jan; Peeters, Monika; Beumont-Mauviel, Maria; Simion, Alexandru

    2016-02-01

    Simeprevir is an NS3/4A protease inhibitor approved for the treatment of hepatitis C infection, as a component of combination therapy. Simeprevir is metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, primarily CYP3A, and is a substrate for several drug transporters, including the organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs). It is susceptible to metabolic drug-drug interactions with drugs that are moderate or strong CYP3A inhibitors (e.g. ritonavir and erythromycin) or CYP3A inducers (e.g. rifampin and efavirenz); coadministration of these drugs may increase or decrease plasma concentrations of simeprevir, respectively, and should be avoided. Clinical studies have shown that simeprevir is a mild inhibitor of CYP1A2 and intestinal CYP3A but does not inhibit hepatic CYP3A. The effects of simeprevir on these enzymes are of clinical relevance only for narrow-therapeutic-index drugs that are metabolized solely by these enzymes (e.g. oral midazolam). Simeprevir does not have a clinically relevant effect on the pharmacokinetics of rilpivirine, tacrolimus, oral contraceptives and several other drugs metabolized by CYP enzymes. Simeprevir is a substrate and inhibitor of the transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and OATP1B1/3. Cyclosporine is an inhibitor of OATP1B1/3, BCRP and P-gp, and a mild inhibitor of CYP3A; cyclosporine causes a significant increase in simeprevir plasma concentrations, and coadministration is not recommended. Clinical studies have demonstrated increases in coadministered drug concentrations for drugs that are substrates of the OATP1B1/3, BRCP (e.g. rosuvastatin) and P-gp (e.g. digoxin) transporters; these drugs should be administered with dose titration and or/close monitoring.

  18. A facile drug delivery system preparation through the interaction between drug and iron ion of transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lin [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Liu, Jihua [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Wei, Shaohua; Ge, Xuefeng; Zhou, Jiahong, E-mail: zhoujiahong@njnu.edu.cn [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Yu, Boyang, E-mail: boyangyu59@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Department of Complex Prescription of TCM (China); Shen, Jian [Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Key Laboratory Biofunctional Materials, Key Laboratory of Applied Photochemistry, Analysis and Testing Center, College of Chemistry and Materials Science (China)

    2013-09-15

    Many anticancer drugs have the capability to form stable complex with metal ions. Based on such property, a simple method to combine these drugs with transferrin, through the interaction between drug and Fe ion of transferrin, to improve their anticancer activity, is proposed. To demonstrate this technique, the complex of photosensitive anticancer drug hypocrellin A and transferrin was prepared by such facile method. The results indicated that the complex of hypocrellin A and transferrin can stabilize in aqueous solution. In vitro studies have demonstrated the superior cancer cell uptake ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin complex to the free hypocrellin A. Significant damage to such drug-impregnated tumor cells was observed upon irradiation and the cancer cells killing ability of hypocrellin A-transferrin was stronger than the free hypocrellin A within a certain range of concentrations. The above results demonstrated the validity and potential of our proposed strategy to prepare the drug delivery system of this type of anti-cancer drugs and transferrin.

  19. A viral-human interactome based on structural motif-domain interactions captures the human infectome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Segura-Cabrera

    Full Text Available Protein interactions between a pathogen and its host are fundamental in the establishment of the pathogen and underline the infection mechanism. In the present work, we developed a single predictive model for building a host-viral interactome based on the identification of structural descriptors from motif-domain interactions of protein complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. The structural descriptors were used for searching, in a database of protein sequences of human and five clinically important viruses; therefore, viral and human proteins sharing a descriptor were predicted as interacting proteins. The analysis of the host-viral interactome allowed to identify a set of new interactions that further explain molecular mechanism associated with viral infections and showed that it was able to capture human proteins already associated to viral infections (human infectome and non-infectious diseases (human diseasome. The analysis of human proteins targeted by viral proteins in the context of a human interactome showed that their neighbors are enriched in proteins reported with differential expression under infection and disease conditions. It is expected that the findings of this work will contribute to the development of systems biology for infectious diseases, and help guide the rational identification and prioritization of novel drug targets.

  20. In Vitro Drug Metabolism by Human Carboxylesterase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ragnar; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Linnet, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) is the major hydrolase in human liver. The enzyme is involved in the metabolism of several important therapeutic agents, drugs of abuse, and endogenous compounds. However, no studies have described the role of human CES1 in the activation of two commonly prescribed...... a panel of therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse to assess their inhibition of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate by recombinant CES1 and human liver microsomes. The screening assay confirmed several known inhibitors of CES1 and identified two previously unreported inhibitors: the dihydropyridine...... calcium antagonist, isradipine, and the immunosuppressive agent, tacrolimus. CES1 plays a role in the metabolism of several drugs used in the treatment of common conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and diabetes mellitus; thus, there is a potential for clinically relevant drug-drug...

  1. Human interactions with sirenians (manatees and dugongs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Robert K.; Flint, Mark

    2017-01-01

    There are three extant sirenian species of the Trichechidae family and one living Dugongidae family member. Given their close ties to coastal and often urbanized habitats, sirenians are exposed to many types of anthropogenic activities that result in challenges to their well-being, poor health, and even death. In the wild, they are exposed to direct and indirect local pressures as well as subject to large-scale stressors such as global climate change acting on regions or entire genetic stocks. In captivity, they are subject to husbandry and management practices based on our collective knowledge, or in some cases lack thereof, of their needs and welfare. It is therefore reasonable to consider that their current imperiled status is very closely linked to our actions. In this chapter, we identify and define human interactions that may impact dugongs and manatees, including hunting, fisheries, boat interactions, negative interactions with man-made structures, disease and contaminants, and global climate change. We examine techniques used to investigate these impacts and the influence of sirenian biology and of changing human behaviors on potential outcomes. We examine how this differs for dugongs and manatees in the wild and for those held in captivity. Finally, we provide possible mitigation strategies and ways to assess the efforts we are making to improve the welfare of individuals and to conserve these species. This chapter identifies how the welfare of these species is intrinsically linked to the human interactions these animals experience, and how the nature of these interactions has changed with societal shifts. We proffer suggested ways to minimize negative impacts. Current knowledge should be used to minimize negative human interactions and impacts, to promote positive impacts, and to protect these animals for the future.

  2. Use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to simulate drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic and antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltó, José; Rajoli, Rajith; Back, David; Valle, Marta; Miranda, Cristina; Owen, Andrew; Clotet, Bonaventura; Siccardi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Co-administration of antineoplastics with ART is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, trials specifically assessing such DDIs are lacking. Our objective was to simulate DDIs between the antineoplastics erlotinib and gefitinib with key antiretroviral drugs and to predict dose adjustments using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. In vitro data describing chemical properties and pharmacokinetic processes of each drug and their effect on cytochrome P450 isoforms were obtained from the literature. Plasma drug-concentration profiles were simulated in a virtual population of 50 individuals receiving erlotinib or gefitinib alone or with darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz or etravirine. Simulated pharmacokinetic parameters and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs (midazolam, maraviroc) were compared with literature values. Erlotinib and gefitinib pharmacokinetics with and without antiretrovirals were compared and dose-adjustment strategies were evaluated. Simulated parameters of each drug and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs were in agreement with reference values. Darunavir/ritonavir increased erlotinib and gefitinib exposure, while efavirenz and etravirine decreased erlotinib and gefitinib concentrations. Based on our predictions, dose-adjustment strategies may consist of once-daily dosing erlotinib at 25 mg and gefitinib at 125 mg with darunavir/ritonavir; or erlotinib at 200 mg and gefitinib at 375 mg with etravirine. The interaction with efavirenz was not overcome even after doubling erlotinib or gefitinib doses. PBPK models predicted the in vivo pharmacokinetics of erlotinib, gefitinib and the antiretrovirals darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz and etravirine, and the DDIs between them. The simulated dose-adjustments may represent valuable strategies to optimize antineoplastic therapy in HIV-infected patients.

  3. Guidance for nuclear medicine staff on radiopharmaceuticals drug interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous drug interactions related to radiopharmaceuticals take place every day in hospitals many of which are not reported or detected. Information concerning this kind of reaction is not abundant, and nuclear medicine staff are usually overwhelmed by this information. To better understand this type of reaction, and to help nuclear medicine staff deal with it, a review of the literature was conducted. The results show that almost all of radiopharmaceuticals marketed around the world present drug interactions with a large variety of compounds. This suggests that a logical framework to make decisions based on reviews incorporating adverse reactions must be created. The review also showed that researchers undertaking a review of literature, or even a systematic review that incorporates drug interactions, must understand the rationale for the suggested methods and be able to implement them in their review. Additionally, a global effort should be made to report as many cases of drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals as possible. With this, a complete picture of drug interactions with radiopharmaceuticals can be drawn.Diversos casos de interações medicamentosas com radiofármacos ocorrem diariamente na rotina hospitalar, contudo muitos deles não são notificados ou mesmo percebidos. Informações a respeito desse tipo de reação não é abundante e os profissionais da medicina nuclear muitas vezes estão assoberbados por essas informações. De modo a entender esse tipo de reação e auxiliar a medicina nuclear a lidar com essa situação uma revisão da literatura foi realizada. Os resultados mostraram que a totalidade dos radiofármacos comercializados no mundo apresentam interação medicamentosa com uma enorme variedade de outros medicamentos. Dessa forma sugere-se que revisões sobre radiofármacos inclua um capítulo sobre efeitos adversos. Além disso, um esforço mundial para notificar efeitos adversos deve ser realizado, pois somente

  4. Stereoselectivity of chiral drug transport: a focus on enantiomer-transporter interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quan; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zeng, Su

    2014-08-01

    Drug transporters and drug metabolism enzymes govern drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination. Many literature works presenting important aspects related to stereochemistry of drug metabolism are available. However, there is very little literature on stereoselectivity of chiral drug transport and enantiomer-transporter interaction. In recent years, the experimental research within this field showed good momentum. Herein, an up-to-date review on this topic was presented. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP), Multidrug Resistance Proteins (MRP), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Organic Anion Transporters (OATs), Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides (OATPs), Organic Cation Transporters (OCTs), Peptide Transport Proteins (PepTs), Human Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter (PCFT) and Multidrug and Toxic Extrusion Proteins (MATEs), have been reported to exhibit either positive or negative enantio-selective substrate recognition. The approaches utilized to study chirality in enantiomer-transporter interaction include inhibition experiments of specific transporters in cell models (e.g. Caco-2 cells), transport study using drug resistance cell lines or transgenic cell lines expressing transporters in wild type or variant, the use of transporter knockout mice, pharmacokinetics association of single nucleotide polymorphism in transporters, pharmacokinetic interaction study of racemate in the presence of specific transporter inhibitor or inducer, molecule cellular membrane affinity chromatography and pharmacophore modeling. Enantiomer-enantiomer interactions exist in chiral transport. The strength and/or enantiomeric preference of stereoselectivity may be species or tissue-specific, concentration-dependent and transporter family member-dependent. Modulation of specific drug transporter by pure enantiomers might exhibit opposite stereoselectivity. Further studies with integrated approaches will open up new horizons in stereochemistry of pharmacokinetics.

  5. Neurologist knowledge about interactions between antiepileptic drugs and contraceptive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Hilda S; Braga, Giordana C; Scarpellini, Giuliano R; Takeuchi, Leandro I; Martins, Ana P; Leite, João P; Vieira, Carolina S

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate neurologists' knowledge of contraceptive counseling for women receiving antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). An interview-based survey was conducted from February 2 to June 30, 2015, among neurologists working in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Direct interviews were conducted using a questionnaire that assessed knowledge of the pharmacological interactions between various contraceptive methods and six AEDs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital, topiramate, phenytoin, lamotrigine, and valproate) on the basis of WHO medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. Among 42 neurologists who participated, 32 (76%) stated that they treated women with epilepsy and provided them with counseling for family planning. Overall, 34 (81%) recommended the use of a copper intrauterine device irrespective of the AED used, and 26 (60%) stated that they co-prescribed AEDs and hormonal contraceptives. Although 39 (93%) neurologists had knowledge that AEDs might contraindicate the use of some contraceptives, their knowledge regarding the specific drug interactions was lacking. Furthermore, 34 (81%) had no knowledge of WHO medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. Although most neurologists interviewed had knowledge of interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraceptives, they did not know which specific AEDs interacted with these agents. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein-protein interactions: principles, techniques, and their potential role in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shagufta H; Ahmad, Faizan; Ahmad, Nihal; Flynn, Daniel C; Kumar, Raj

    2011-06-01

    A vast network of genes is inter-linked through protein-protein interactions and is critical component of almost every biological process under physiological conditions. Any disruption of the biologically essential network leads to pathological conditions resulting into related diseases. Therefore, proper understanding of biological functions warrants a comprehensive knowledge of protein-protein interactions and the molecular mechanisms that govern such processes. The importance of protein-protein interaction process is highlighted by the fact that a number of powerful techniques/methods have been developed to understand how such interactions take place under various physiological and pathological conditions. Many of the key protein-protein interactions are known to participate in disease-associated signaling pathways, and represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Thus, controlling protein-protein interactions offers a rich dividend for the discovery of new drug targets. Availability of various tools to study and the knowledge of human genome have put us in a unique position to understand highly complex biological network, and the mechanisms involved therein. In this review article, we have summarized protein-protein interaction networks, techniques/methods of their binding/kinetic parameters, and the role of these interactions in the development of potential tools for drug designing.

  7. iDrug: a web-accessible and interactive drug discovery and design platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Haipeng; Yang, Feng; Gong, Jiayu; Li, Shiliang; Pei, Jianfeng; Liu, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Hualiang; Lai, Luhua; Li, Honglin

    2014-01-01

    The progress in computer-aided drug design (CADD) approaches over the past decades accelerated the early-stage pharmaceutical research. Many powerful standalone tools for CADD have been developed in academia. As programs are developed by various research groups, a consistent user-friendly online graphical working environment, combining computational techniques such as pharmacophore mapping, similarity calculation, scoring, and target identification is needed. We presented a versatile, user-friendly, and efficient online tool for computer-aided drug design based on pharmacophore and 3D molecular similarity searching. The web interface enables binding sites detection, virtual screening hits identification, and drug targets prediction in an interactive manner through a seamless interface to all adapted packages (e.g., Cavity, PocketV.2, PharmMapper, SHAFTS). Several commercially available compound databases for hit identification and a well-annotated pharmacophore database for drug targets prediction were integrated in iDrug as well. The web interface provides tools for real-time molecular building/editing, converting, displaying, and analyzing. All the customized configurations of the functional modules can be accessed through featured session files provided, which can be saved to the local disk and uploaded to resume or update the history work. iDrug is easy to use, and provides a novel, fast and reliable tool for conducting drug design experiments. By using iDrug, various molecular design processing tasks can be submitted and visualized simply in one browser without installing locally any standalone modeling softwares. iDrug is accessible free of charge at http://lilab.ecust.edu.cn/idrug.

  8. Negative Affect in Human Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Krogsager, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The vision of social robotics sees robots moving more and more into unrestricted social environments, where robots interact closely with users in their everyday activities, maybe even establishing relationships with the user over time. In this paper we present a field trial with a robot in a semi......-public place. Our analysis of the interactions with casual users shows that it is not enough to focus on modeling behavior that is similar to successful human interactions but that we have to take more deviant ways of interaction like abuse and impoliteness into account when we send robots into the users......’ environments. The analysis uses impoliteness theory as an analytical toolbox and exemplifies which strategies are employed by users in unexpected encounters with a humanoid robot....

  9. Effects of drug-carrier interactions on drug dissolution from binary and ternary matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zafar

    For nearly five decades, pharmaceutical researchers have studied solid solutions of drugs in polymers as a potential means to enhance the dissolution of drugs with poor aqueous solubility. This has become of greater importance in recent years because most new potential drug compounds (new chemical entities) exhibit poor water solubility and present great challenges to scientists who must design dosage forms from which the drugs are bioavailable. During the formulation of a solid solution, the drug undergoes physical but not chemical alterations that increase its chemical potential in the formulation relative to that of the pure drug in its stable form. This increased chemical potential is responsible for enhanced dissolution as well as physical instabilities, such as amorphous to crystalline conversions and precipitation within the solid state. The chemical potential is derived from the Gibbs free energy, so it is reasonable to explain the behavior of solid solution systems in terms of thermodynamics. Solid solutions and dispersions have been extensively studied by pharmaceutical scientists, both with regard to manufacturing aspects and the proposal of various models in attempts to explain the physical bases for how these systems work. Recently, Dave and Bellantone proposed a model based on the thermodynamic changes resulting from the formulation of binary solid solutions of a drug in the polymer PVP. Their model introduced a modification of the F-H theory, which was used to quantify the drug-polymer interaction energies and calculate the entropy of mixing of the drug and polymer. In this work, the model of Dave and Bellantone was extended to include three-component systems, consisting of one drug mixed in a carrier matrix consisting of mixture of two polymers or a polymer and a surfactant. For this research, solid solutions were formed using various drug weight fractions in the formulations. The study focused on the following points: (1) Prepare solid solution

  10. Concept of interactions between consumable substances in Ayurveda with special reference to foods and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Chaudhari, Supriyo; Chattopadhyay, Abichal

    2013-01-01

    Ayurvedic medicines are available in the market as over-the-counter products. Today people use prescription and nonprescription medicines along with Ayurvedic medicines for quick relief from ailments. In the ancient texts of Ayurveda, the concept of interactions with various examples of food interactions and food-drug interactions are mentioned. Recent studies and publications reported drug interactions of Ayurveda medicines and modern drugs. In the present review article, the concept of interactions mentioned in the Ayurvedic texts along with the examples of food interactions, food-drug interactions and the recent research work and publications indicating the interactions of the Ayurvedic drugs and drug interactions of Ayurvedic medicines and modern drugs are compiled. This will help the consumer of the prescription and nonprescription medicines with the Ayurvedic medicines to be cautious about the probable interactions.

  11. International Guidelines on Human Rights and Drug Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Discrimination and inequality shape women’s experiences of drug use and in the drug trade and the impact of drug control efforts on them, with disproportionate burdens faced by poor and otherwise marginalized women. In recent years, UN member states and UN drug control and human rights entities have recognized this issue and made commitments to integrate a ‘gender perspective’ into drug control policies, with ‘gender’ limited to those conventionally deemed women. But the concept of gender in international law is broader, rooted in socially constructed and culturally determined norms and expectations around gender roles, sex, and sexuality. Also, drug control policies often fail to meaningfully address the specific needs and circumstances of women (inclusively defined), leaving them at risk of recurrent violations of their rights in the context of drugs. This article explores what it means to ‘mainstream’ this narrower version of gender into drug control efforts, using as examples various women’s experiences as people who use drugs, in the drug trade, and in the criminal justice system. It points to international guidelines on human rights and drug control as an important tool to ensure attention to women’s rights in drug control policy design and implementation. PMID:28630557

  12. Relationship between drug interactions and drug-related negative clinical outcomes in two community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug interactions may represent an iatrogenic risk that should be controlled in community pharmacies at the dispensing level. Aim: We analyzed the association between potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs and negative clinical outcomes.Methods: We used dispensing data from two community pharmacies: instances where drug dispensing was associated with a potential DDI and a comparison group of randomized dispensing operations with no potential DDI. In cases where potential DDIs were detected, we analyzed the underlying negative clinical outcomes. Age and gender data were included in the analysis.Results: During the study period, we registered 417 potential DDIs. The proportion of women and age were higher in the study group than in the comparison group. The average potential DDIs per patient was 1.31 (SD=0.72. The Consejo General de Colegios Oficiales de Farmacéuticos (CGCOF database did not produce an alert in 2.4% of the cases. Over-the-counter medication use was observed in 5% of the potential DDI cases. The drugs most frequently involved in potential DDIs were acenocoumarol, calcium salts, hydrochlorothiazide, and alendronic acid, whereas the most predominant potential DDIs were calcium salts and bisphosphonates, oral antidiabetics and thiazide diuretics, antidiabetics and glucose, and oral anticoagulant and paracetamol. The existence of a drug-related negative clinical outcome was observed only in 0.96% of the potential DDI cases (50% safety cases and 50% effectiveness cases. Conclusions: Only a small proportion of the detected potential DDIs lead to medication negative outcomes. Considering the drug-related negative clinical outcomes encountered, tighter control would be recommended in potential DDIs with NSAIDs or benzodiazepines.

  13. ELASTIC LIPOSOME: DRUG DELIVERY ACROSS HUMAN SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardhan Harsh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery is hardly an old technology, since 1800’s and the technology is no longer just adhesive patches. Due to recent advances in technology and the ability to apply the drug to the site of action without rupturing the skin membrane, transdermal route is becoming a widely accepted route of drug administration. Recently, various strategies have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. Mainly, they include iontophoresis, electrophoresis, sonophoresis, chemical permeation enhancers, micro needles, and vesicular system. Among these strategies elastic liposomes appear promising. Elastic liposomes possess an infrastructure consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties together and as a result can accommodate drug molecules with wide range of solubility. It is an ultra deformable vesicle, elastic in nature which can squeeze itself through a pore which is many times smaller than its size owing to its elasticity. They can deform and pass through narrow constriction (from 5 to 10 times less than their own diameter without measurable loss. This high deformability gives better penetration of intact vesicles. This system is much more efficient at delivering a low and high molecular weight drug to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. The article speaks specifically on various phenomenon associated with the properties of these vesicles and their transport mechanisms. It also throws light on the effectiveness of conventional and deformable vesicles as drug delivery systems as well as their possible mode of action as transdermal drug carriers.

  14. Generation of Bayesian prediction models for OATP-mediated drug-drug interactions based on inhibition screen of OATP1B1, OATP1B1∗15 and OATP1B3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, E. van de; Venhorst, J.; Jansen, H.T.; Nooijen, I.H.G.; Degroot, J.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Vlaming, M.L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Human organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and OATP1B3 are important hepatic uptake transporters. Early assessment of OATP1B1/1B3-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is therefore important for successful drug development. A promising approach for early screening and prediction of

  15. A Model for Predicting the Interindividual Variability of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, M; Bourguignon, L; Bleyzac, N; Goutelle, S

    2017-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are frequently characterized and quantified by an AUC ratio (Rauc). The typical value of the AUC ratio in case of cytochrome-mediated interactions may be predicted by several approaches, based on in vitro or in vivo data. Prediction of the interindividual variability of Rauc would help to anticipate more completely the consequences of a drug-drug interaction. We propose and evaluate a simple approach for predicting the standard deviation (sd) of Ln(Rauc), a metric close to the interindividual coefficient of variation of Rauc. First, a model was derived to link sd(Ln Rauc) with the substrate fraction metabolized by each cytochrome and the potency of the interactors, in case of induction or inhibition. Second, the parameters involved in these equations were estimated by a Bayesian hierarchical model, using the data from 56 interaction studies retrieved from the literature. Third, the model was evaluated by several metrics based on the fold prediction error (PE) of sd(Ln Rauc). The median PE was 0.998 (the ideal value is 1) and the interquartile range was 0.96-1.03. The PE was in the acceptable interval (0.5 to 2) in 52 cases out of 56. Fourth, a surface plot of sd(Ln Rauc) as a function of the characteristics of the substrate and the interactor has been built. The minimal value of sd(Ln Rauc) was about 0.08 (obtained for Rauc = 1) while the maximal value, 0.7, was obtained for interactions involving highly metabolized substrates with strong interactors.

  16. User localization during human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, F; Gorostiza, Javi F; Malfaz, María; Salichs, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a user localization system based on the fusion of visual information and sound source localization, implemented on a social robot called Maggie. One of the main requisites to obtain a natural interaction between human-human and human-robot is an adequate spatial situation between the interlocutors, that is, to be orientated and situated at the right distance during the conversation in order to have a satisfactory communicative process. Our social robot uses a complete multimodal dialog system which manages the user-robot interaction during the communicative process. One of its main components is the presented user localization system. To determine the most suitable allocation of the robot in relation to the user, a proxemic study of the human-robot interaction is required, which is described in this paper. The study has been made with two groups of users: children, aged between 8 and 17, and adults. Finally, at the end of the paper, experimental results with the proposed multimodal dialog system are presented.

  17. User Localization During Human-Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Salichs

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a user localization system based on the fusion of visual information and sound source localization, implemented on a social robot called Maggie. One of the main requisites to obtain a natural interaction between human-human and human-robot is an adequate spatial situation between the interlocutors, that is, to be orientated and situated at the right distance during the conversation in order to have a satisfactory communicative process. Our social robot uses a complete multimodal dialog system which manages the user-robot interaction during the communicative process. One of its main components is the presented user localization system. To determine the most suitable allocation of the robot in relation to the user, a proxemic study of the human-robot interaction is required, which is described in this paper. The study has been made with two groups of users: children, aged between 8 and 17, and adults. Finally, at the end of the paper, experimental results with the proposed multimodal dialog system are presented.

  18. Anti-Viral Drugs for Human Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chor Wing Sing

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many stages in the development of a new drug for viral infection and such processes are even further complicated for adenovirus by the fact that there are at least 51 serotypes, forming six distinct groups (A–F, with different degree of infectivity. This review attempts to address the importance of developing pharmaceuticals for adenovirus and also review recent development in drug discovery for adenovirus, including newer strategies such as microRNA approaches. Different drug screening strategies will also be discussed.

  19. Predicting human genetic interactions from cancer genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Lu

    Full Text Available Synthetic Lethal (SL genetic interactions play a key role in various types of biological research, ranging from understanding genotype-phenotype relationships to identifying drug-targets against cancer. Despite recent advances in empirical measuring SL interactions in human cells, the human genetic interaction map is far from complete. Here, we present a novel approach to predict this map by exploiting patterns in cancer genome evolution. First, we show that empirically determined SL interactions are reflected in various gene presence, absence, and duplication patterns in hundreds of cancer genomes. The most evident pattern that we discovered is that when one member of an SL interaction gene pair is lost, the other gene tends not to be lost, i.e. the absence of co-loss. This observation is in line with expectation, because the loss of an SL interacting pair will be lethal to the cancer cell. SL interactions are also reflected in gene expression profiles, such as an under representation of cases where the genes in an SL pair are both under expressed, and an over representation of cases where one gene of an SL pair is under expressed, while the other one is over expressed. We integrated the various previously unknown cancer genome patterns and the gene expression patterns into a computational model to identify SL pairs. This simple, genome-wide model achieves a high prediction power (AUC = 0.75 for known genetic interactions. It allows us to present for the first time a comprehensive genome-wide list of SL interactions with a high estimated prediction precision, covering up to 591,000 gene pairs. This unique list can potentially be used in various application areas ranging from biotechnology to medical genetics.

  20. Mining severe drug-drug interaction adverse events using Semantic Web technologies: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Liu, Hongfang; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major contributing factor for unexpected adverse drug events (ADEs). However, few of knowledge resources cover the severity information of ADEs that is critical for prioritizing the medical need. The objective of the study is to develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based approach for mining severe DDI-induced ADEs. We utilized a normalized FDA Adverse Event Report System (AERS) dataset and performed a case study of three frequently prescribed cardiovascular drugs: Warfarin, Clopidogrel and Simvastatin. We extracted putative DDI-ADE pairs and their associated outcome codes. We developed a pipeline to filter the associations using ADE datasets from SIDER and PharmGKB. We also performed a signal enrichment using electronic medical records (EMR) data. We leveraged the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) grading system and classified the DDI-induced ADEs into the CTCAE in the Web Ontology Language (OWL). We identified 601 DDI-ADE pairs for the three drugs using the filtering pipeline, of which 61 pairs are in Grade 5, 56 pairs in Grade 4 and 484 pairs in Grade 3. Among 601 pairs, the signals of 59 DDI-ADE pairs were identified from the EMR data. The approach developed could be generalized to detect the signals of putative severe ADEs induced by DDIs in other drug domains and would be useful for supporting translational and pharmacovigilance study of severe ADEs.

  1. Literature based drug interaction prediction with clinical assessment using electronic medical records: novel myopathy associated drug interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon D Duke

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs are a common cause of adverse drug events. In this paper, we combined a literature discovery approach with analysis of a large electronic medical record database method to predict and evaluate novel DDIs. We predicted an initial set of 13197 potential DDIs based on substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP metabolism enzymes identified from published in vitro pharmacology experiments. Using a clinical repository of over 800,000 patients, we narrowed this theoretical set of DDIs to 3670 drug pairs actually taken by patients. Finally, we sought to identify novel combinations that synergistically increased the risk of myopathy. Five pairs were identified with their p-values less than 1E-06: loratadine and simvastatin (relative risk or RR = 1.69; loratadine and alprazolam (RR = 1.86; loratadine and duloxetine (RR = 1.94; loratadine and ropinirole (RR = 3.21; and promethazine and tegaserod (RR = 3.00. When taken together, each drug pair showed a significantly increased risk of myopathy when compared to the expected additive myopathy risk from taking either of the drugs alone. Based on additional literature data on in vitro drug metabolism and inhibition potency, loratadine and simvastatin and tegaserod and promethazine were predicted to have a strong DDI through the CYP3A4 and CYP2D6 enzymes, respectively. This new translational biomedical informatics approach supports not only detection of new clinically significant DDI signals, but also evaluation of their potential molecular mechanisms.

  2. SynSysNet: integration of experimental data on synaptic protein–protein interactions with drug-target relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eichborn, Joachim; Dunkel, Mathias; Gohlke, Björn O.; Preissner, Sarah C.; Hoffmann, Michael F.; Bauer, Jakob M. J.; Armstrong, J. D.; Schaefer, Martin H.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Le Novere, Nicolas; Croning, Michael D. R.; Grant, Seth G. N.; van Nierop, Pim; Smit, August B.; Preissner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We created SynSysNet, available online at http://bioinformatics.charite.de/synsysnet, to provide a platform that creates a comprehensive 4D network of synaptic interactions. Neuronal synapses are fundamental structures linking nerve cells in the brain and they are responsible for neuronal communication and information processing. These processes are dynamically regulated by a network of proteins. New developments in interaction proteomics and yeast two-hybrid methods allow unbiased detection of interactors. The consolidation of data from different resources and methods is important to understand the relation to human behaviour and disease and to identify new therapeutic approaches. To this end, we established SynSysNet from a set of ∼1000 synapse specific proteins, their structures and small-molecule interactions. For two-thirds of these, 3D structures are provided (from Protein Data Bank and homology modelling). Drug-target interactions for 750 approved drugs and 50 000 compounds, as well as 5000 experimentally validated protein–protein interactions, are included. The resulting interaction network and user-selected parts can be viewed interactively and exported in XGMML. Approximately 200 involved pathways can be explored regarding drug-target interactions. Homology-modelled structures are downloadable in Protein Data Bank format, and drugs are available as MOL-files. Protein–protein interactions and drug-target interactions can be viewed as networks; corresponding PubMed IDs or sources are given. PMID:23143269

  3. Humans, computers and wizards human (simulated) computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Norman; McGlashan, Scott; Wooffitt, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Using data taken from a major European Union funded project on speech understanding, the SunDial project, this book considers current perspectives on human computer interaction and argues for the value of an approach taken from sociology which is based on conversation analysis.

  4. Systematic investigation of different formulations for drug delivery through the human nail plate "in vitro"

    OpenAIRE

    Vejnoviċ, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Human nails do not have only protective and decorative role, but can also be considered as an alternative pathway for drug delivery, especially in nail diseases such as onychomycosis or psoriasis. These nail diseases are widely spread in the population, particularly among elderly and immunocompromised patients. Oral therapies are accompanied by systemic side effects and drug interactions, while topical therapies are limited by the low permeation rate through the nail plate. For the successful...

  5. Systematic investigation of different formulations for drug delivery through the human nail plate "in vitro"

    OpenAIRE

    Vejnoviċ, Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Human nails do not have only protective and decorative role, but can also be considered as an alternative pathway for drug delivery, especially in nail diseases such as onychomycosis or psoriasis. These nail diseases are widely spread in the population, particularly among elderly and immunocompromised patients. Oral therapies are accompanied by systemic side effects and drug interactions, while topical therapies are limited by the low permeation rate through the nail plate. For the successful...

  6. The use of in vitro methods to predict in vivo pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K A; Ghosh, R

    2001-09-01

    With the dramatic change underway in the process of drug discovery and development it has become increasingly important to define, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the dispositional features of new chemical entities (NCEs) as early in the process as possible. To that end strategies have emerged that are designed to enable reasonable predictions about a NCE's absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, systemic bioavailability and likelihood for significant pre-systemic clearance, character of metabolic processing both within the gastrointestinal tract and the liver, in vivo pharmacokinetics (PK), and likelihood for clinically significant interactions with other drugs. To some extent these strategies have embraced interspecies allometric scaling in which findings in animals are extrapolated to predict outcomes in humans. However, a greater emphasis in recent years has been placed on predicting human PK and the likelihood of clinically significant drug-drug interactions for NCEs solely from in vitro experiments. These general strategies have been methodologically streamlined so that hundreds or even thousands of experiments on a given NCE can be conducted within several days. Dispositional data from these pre-clinical experiments is useful for rapidly identifying potential marketing advantages for NCEs, and for screening out those substances that should not be placed into more expensive and labor-intensive animal experiments or brought to clinical trial. The key issue in these strategies is the accuracy with which pre-clinical findings predict clinical outcomes. Based largely on retrospective analyses the current state of the art exhibits a high percentage of useful predictions. However, there are many examples in which the prediction of either human PK or clinical drug-drug interactions from pre-clinical data has failed. The reasons for inaccurate predictions are manifold, and may include the actual in vitro methodology used, inappropriate model selection, and

  7. Human sports drug testing by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Since the installation of anti-doping rules and regulations and their international enforcement in the mid-1960s, mass spectrometry has been an integral part of doping control procedures. Although its utility was limited in the first decade, instrumental improvements and method optimizations have made mass spectrometry, in all its facets, an indispensable tool in modern sports drug testing. In this review, milestones in doping control analysis accomplished in Germany and reaching from the early developments to the current use of hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques concerning low- and high molecular mass analytes are presented. The considered drug classes include anabolic agents, peptidic drugs, nucleotide-derived therapeutics, approved and non-approved organic as well as inorganic analytes, and particular focus is put on drug class- and instrument-driven strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 36:16-46, 2017.

  8. Drug interaction between ethanol and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ("ecstasy").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Vijay V; Eddington, Natalie D; Moon, Kwan-Hoon; Song, Byoung-Joon; Lee, Insong J

    2009-07-24

    Alcohol (ethanol) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) are frequently co-abused, but recent findings indicate a harmful drug interaction between these two agents. In our previous study, we showed that MDMA exposure inhibits the activity of the acetaldehyde (ACH) metabolizing enzyme, aldehyde dehydrogenase2 (ALDH2). Based on this finding, we hypothesized that the co-administration of MDMA and ethanol would reduce the metabolism of ACH and result in increased accumulation of ACH. Rats were treated with MDMA or vehicle and then administered a single dose of ethanol. Liver ALDH2 activity decreased by 35% in the MDMA-treated rats compared to control rats. The peak concentration and the area under the concentration versus time curve of plasma ACH were 31% and 59% higher, respectively, in the MDMA-ethanol group compared to the ethanol-only group. In addition, the MDMA-ethanol group had 80% higher plasma transaminase levels than the ethanol-only group, indicating greater hepatocellular damage. Our results not only support a drug interaction between MDMA and ethanol but a novel underlying mechanism for the interaction.

  9. Human metabolic interactions of environmental chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Ernest; Rose, Randy L

    2007-01-01

    Investigations utilizing recombinant human xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes as well as human hepatocytes have revealed a number of interactions not only between different environmental chemicals (ECs) but also between ECs and endogenous metabolites. Organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are potent inhibitors of the human metabolism of carbaryl, carbofuran, DEET and fipronil, as well as the jet fuel components, nonane and naphthalene. OPs are potent irreversible inhibitors of testosterone metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and of estradiol metabolism by CYP3A4 and CYP1A2. All of these CYP inhibitions are believed to be due to the release of reactive sulfur during CYP-catalyzed oxidative desulfuration. It has also been shown that the esterase(s) responsible for the initial step in permethrin metabolism in human liver is inhibited by both chlorpyrifos oxon and carbaryl. A number of pesticides, including chlorpyrifos, fipronil and permethrin, and the repellent, DEET, have been shown to be inducers of CYP isoforms in human hepatocytes, with fipronil being the most potent. Several agrochemicals, including fipronil and the pyrethroids, permethrin and deltamethrin, show toxicity toward human hepatocytes with fipronil being the most potent in this regard. Endosulfan-alpha, which has shown promise as a model substrate for phenotyping CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 in human liver microsomes, is also an inducer of CYP2B6, acting through the PXR receptor.

  10. BaffleText: a Human Interactive Proof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Monica; Baird, Henry S.

    2003-01-01

    Internet services designed for human use are being abused by programs. We present a defense against such attacks in the form of a CAPTCHA (Completely Automatic Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart) that exploits the difference in ability between humans and machines in reading images of text. CAPTCHAs are a special case of 'human interactive proofs,' a broad class of security protocols that allow people to identify themselves over networks as members of given groups. We point out vulnerabilities of reading-based CAPTCHAs to dictionary and computer-vision attacks. We also draw on the literature on the psychophysics of human reading, which suggests fresh defenses available to CAPTCHAs. Motivated by these considerations, we propose BaffleText, a CAPTCHA which uses non-English pronounceable words to defend against dictionary attacks, and Gestalt-motivated image-masking degradations to defend against image restoration attacks. Experiments on human subjects confirm the human legibility and user acceptance of BaffleText images. We have found an image-complexity measure that correlates well with user acceptance and assists in engineering the generation of challenges to fit the ability gap. Recent computer-vision attacks, run independently by Mori and Jitendra, suggest that BaffleText is stronger than two existing CAPTCHAs.

  11. Interactions between carbon nanotubes and bioactives: a drug delivery perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Palakurthi, Srinath

    2016-04-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the biomedical arena have gained increased attention over the past decade. Surface engineering of CNTs by covalent and noncovalent modifications enables site-specific drug delivery and targeting. CNTs are available as single-, double-, triple-, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, DWCNTs, TWCNTs, and MWCNTs, respectively) and have unique physicochemical properties, including a high surface area, high loading efficiency, good biocompatibility, low toxicity, ultra lightweight, rich surface chemistry, non-immunogenicity, and photoluminescence. In this review, we highlight current understanding of the different types of physical and chemical interaction that occur between therapeutics and CNTs, and the potential application of the latter in drug delivery and imaging. Such understanding will aid exploration of the utility of multifunctional CNTs as pharmaceutical nanocarriers, and potential safety and toxicity issues.

  12. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA CARMONA-RIBEIRO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  13. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, A M

    2000-01-01

    Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  14. Pregnane X receptor and natural products: beyond drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, Jeff L; Ding, Xunshan; Lichti, Kristin

    2006-12-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is activated by a myriad of compounds and natural products in clinical use. Activation of PXR represents the basis for several clinically important drug-drug interactions. Although PXR activation has undesirable effects in patients on combination therapy, it also mediates the hepatoprotective effects exhibited by some herbal remedies. This review focuses on PXR activation by natural products and the potential therapeutic opportunities presented. In particular, the biological effects of St. John's Wort, gugulipid, kava kava, Coleus forskolii, Hypoxis, Sutherlandia, qing hao, wu wei zi, gan cao and other natural products are discussed. The impact of these natural products on drug metabolism and hepatoprotection is highlighted in the context of activation and antagonism of PXR.

  15. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palleria Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  16. Potential drug-drug interactions in infant, child, and adolescent patients in children's hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, James; Dai, Dingwei; Zhong, Wenjun; Freedman, Jason; Feudtner, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalized infants, children, and adolescents are typically exposed to numerous distinct medications during inpatient admissions, increasing their risk of potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs). We assessed the prevalence and characteristics of PDDI exposure of pediatric patients treated in children's hospitals. This retrospective cohort study included patients hospitalized in children's hospitals throughout the United States. PDDIs were identified by using the MicroMedex DRUG-REAX system. We calculated the patients exposed to PDDIs, stratified according to the seriousness of the interaction; daily and cumulative counts of PDDI exposures; and characterization of the cited potential adverse effects. Of 498 956 hospitalizations in 2011, 49% were associated with ≥1 PDDI, with a "contraindicated" PDDI occurring in 5% of all hospitalizations, a "major" PDDI present in 41%, a "moderate" PDDI in 28%, and a "minor" PDDI in 11%. Opioids were involved in 25% of all PDDIs, followed by antiinfective agents (17%), neurologic agents (15%), gastrointestinal agents (13%), and cardiovascular agents (13%). One-half of all PDDI exposures were due to specific drug pairs occurring in ≤3% of patients per hospital day. The most common potential adverse drug events included additive respiratory depression (in 21% of PDDIs), bleeding risk (5%), QT interval prolongation (4%), reduced iron absorption/availability (4%), central nervous system depression (4%), hyperkalemia (3%), and altered diuretic effectiveness (3%). Exposure to PDDIs is common among hospitalized children. Empirical data are needed to determine the probability and magnitude of the actual harm for each specific PDDI, particularly for less common drug pairs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Drug-drug Interaction between Pravastatin and Gemfibrozil (Antihyperlipidemic) with Gliclazide (Antidiabetic) in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanpur, Cm; Satyanarayana, S; Reddy, Ns; Kumar, Ke; Kumar, S

    2010-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a condition of increased blood glucose level in the body. Antihyperlipidemic drugs like statins and fibrates are widely used for prophylactic treatment in dyslipideamia and atherosclerosis. Diabetic dislipidemia exists with increased triglycerides, low HDL and high LDL levels. Hence, with oral hypoglycemic drugs, the addition of a lipid-lowering drug is necessary for controlling dislipidemia. In such a situation, there may be chances of drug-drug interactions between antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic drugs. The present study is planned to evaluate the safety of gliclazide (antidiabetic) in the presence of pravastatin and gemfibrozil (antihyperlpidemic) in rats. Studies in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats were conducted with oral doses of gliclazide and their combination with pravastatin and gemfibrozil, with an adequate washout period in between the treatments. Blood samples were collected in rats by retroorbital puncture at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h. All the blood samples were analyzed for glucose by GOD -POD. Gliclazide (½ TD) produced hypoglycemic activity in normal and diabetic rats, with peak activity at 2 and 8 h. Pravastatin (TD) + gemfibrozil (TD) combination treatment increased the hypoglycemic effect of gliclazide in normal rats or diabetic rats when administered together. The interaction observed due to inhibition of both the enzymes (CYP 450 2C9 and CYP 450 3A4) responsible for the metabolism of gliclazide showed increased half-life, which was seen in the present study. Because concomitant administration of gliclazide with provastatin and gemfibrozil in diabetes is associated with atherosclerosis, it should be contraindicated or used with caution.

  18. Methods for Elucidation of DNA-Anticancer Drug Interactions and their Applications in the Development of New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Majus; Mantegazza, Francesco; Beretta, Giovanni L

    2016-01-01

    DNA damaging agents including anthracyclines, camptothecins and platinum drugs are among most frequently used drugs in the chemotherapeutic routine. Due to their relatively low selectivity for cancer cells, administration of these drugs is associated with adverse side effects, inherent genotoxicity with risk of developing secondary cancers. Development of new drugs, which could be spared of these drawbacks and characterize by improved antitumor efficacy, remains challenging yet vitally important task. These properties are in large part dictated by the selectivity of interaction between the drug and DNA and in this way the studies aimed at elucidating the complex interactions between ligand and DNA represent a key step in the drug development. Studies of the drug-DNA interactions encompass determination of DNA sequence specificity and mode of DNA binding as well as kinetic, dynamic and structural parameters of binding. Here, we consider the types of interactions between small molecule ligands and polynucleotides, how they are affected by DNA sequence and structure, and what is their significance for the antitumor activity. Based on this knowledge, we discuss the wide array of experimental techniques available to researchers for studying drug-DNA interactions, which include absorption and emission spectroscopies, NMR, magnetic and optical tweezers or atomic force microscopy. We show, using the clinical and experimental anticancer drugs as examples, how these methods provide various types of information and at the same time complement each other to provide full picture of drug- DNA interaction and aid in the development of new drugs.

  19. Design Features of Drug-Drug Interaction Trials Between Antivirals and Oral Contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Ruben C; Arya, Vikram; Younis, Islam R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the major design features of drug-drug interaction trials between antiviral medications (AVs) and oral contraceptives (OCs). Information on these trials (n = 27) was collected from approved drug labels and clinical pharmacology reviews conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The primary objective of all trials was to evaluate changes in OC exposure following the coadministration of AVs. In addition, an evaluation of potential pharmacodynamic interaction was performed in 10 of these trials. Twenty-two trials were open label with a fixed-sequence design, and 5 trials used a double-blind crossover design. The trials were conducted using one, two, or three 28-day ovulatory cycles in 10, 8, and 9 trials, respectively. Only 1 trial enrolled HIV-infected women. The median number of women in a trial was 20 (range, 12 to 52). Norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol (EE) combination was the most commonly used OC (n = 16, 59%) followed by norgestimate/EE (n = 9, 33%). Labeling recommendations were based on exposure changes in 25 cases and on safety observations in the trial in 2 cases. In conclusion, a wide variety of trial designs was used, and there is no preferred design. The answer to the exposure question can be achieved using multiple designs.

  20. Effects of Shared Electronic Health Record Systems on Drug-Drug Interaction and Duplication Warning Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Rinner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shared electronic health records (EHRs systems can offer a complete medication overview of the prescriptions of different health care providers. We use health claims data of more than 1 million Austrians in 2006 and 2007 with 27 million prescriptions to estimate the effect of shared EHR systems on drug-drug interaction (DDI and duplication warnings detection and prevention. The Austria Codex and the ATC/DDD information were used as a knowledge base to detect possible DDIs. DDIs are categorized as severe, moderate, and minor interactions. In comparison to the current situation where only DDIs between drugs issued by a single health care provider can be checked, the number of warnings increases significantly if all drugs of a patient are checked: severe DDI warnings would be detected for 20% more persons, and the number of severe DDI warnings and duplication warnings would increase by 17%. We show that not only do shared EHR systems help to detect more patients with warnings but DDIs are also detected more frequently. Patient safety can be increased using shared EHR systems.

  1. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Madaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity.

  2. Common Metrics for Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Aaron; Lewis, Michael; Fong, Terrence; Scholtz, Jean; Schultz, Alan; Kaber, David; Goodrich, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to identify common metrics for task-oriented human-robot interaction (HRI). We begin by discussing the need for a toolkit of HRI metrics. We then describe the framework of our work and identify important biasing factors that must be taken into consideration. Finally, we present suggested common metrics for standardization and a case study. Preparation of a larger, more detailed toolkit is in progress.

  3. Drug-vitamin D interactions: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robien, Kim; Oppeneer, Sarah J; Kelly, Julia A; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill M

    2013-04-01

    Extensive media coverage of the potential health benefits of vitamin D supplementation has translated into substantial increases in supplement sales over recent years. Yet, the potential for drug-vitamin D interactions is rarely considered. This systematic review of the literature was conducted to evaluate the extent to which drugs affect vitamin D status or supplementation alters drug effectiveness or toxicity in humans. Electronic databases were used to identify eligible peer-reviewed studies published through September 1, 2010. Study characteristics and findings were abstracted, and quality was assessed for each study. A total of 109 unique reports met the inclusion criteria. The majority of eligible studies were classified as class C (nonrandomized trials, case-control studies, or time series) or D (cross-sectional, trend, case report/series, or before-and-after studies). Only 2 class C and 3 class D studies were of positive quality. Insufficient evidence was available to determine whether lipase inhibitors, antimicrobial agents, antiepileptic drugs, highly active antiretroviral agents, or H2 receptor antagonists alter serum 25(OH)D concentrations. Atorvastatin appears to increase 25(OH)D concentrations, whereas concurrent vitamin D supplementation decreases concentrations of atorvastatin. Use of thiazide diuretics in combination with calcium and vitamin D supplements may cause hypercalcemia in the elderly or those with compromised renal function or hyperparathyroidism. Larger studies with stronger study designs are needed to clarify potential drug-vitamin D interactions, especially for drugs metabolized by cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4). Healthcare providers should be aware of the potential for drug-vitamin D interactions.

  4. Evaluation of the performance of drug-drug interaction screening software in community and hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarca, Jacob; Colon, Lisa R; Wang, Victoria S; Malone, Daniel C; Murphy, John E; Armstrong, Edward P

    2006-06-01

    Computerized drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening is widely used to identify potentially harmful drug combinations in the inpatient and outpatient setting. To evaluate the performance of drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening software in identifying select clinically significant DDIs in pharmacy computer systems in community and hospital pharmacies. Ten community pharmacies and 10 hospital pharmacies in the Tucson metropolitan area were invited to participate in the study in 2004. To test the performance of each of the systems used by the pharmacies, 25 medications were used to create 6 mock patient profiles containing 37 drug-drug pairs, 16 of which are clinically meaningful DDIs that pose a potential risk to patient safety. Each profile was entered into the computer pharmacy system, and the system response in terms of the presence or absence of a DDI alert was recorded for each drug pair. The percentage of correct responses and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of each system to correctly classify each drug pair as a DDI or not was calculated. Summary statistics of these measures were calculated separately for community and hospital pharmacies. Eight community pharmacies and 5 hospital pharmacies in the Tucson metropolitan area agreed to participate in the study. The median sensitivity and median specificity for community pharmacies was 0.88 (range, 0.81-0.94) and 0.91 (range, 0.67-1.00), respectively. For hospital pharmacies, the median sensitivity and median specificity was 0.38 (range, 0.15-0.94) and 0.95 (range, 0.81-0.95), respectively. Based on this convenience sample of 8 community pharmacies and 5 hospital pharmacies in 1 metropolitan area, the performance of community pharmacy computer systems in screening DDIs appears to have improved over the last several years compared with research published previously in 2001. However, significant variation remains in the performance of hospital pharmacy computer

  5. Diabetes in the elderly: drug use and the risk of drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Maria Aparecida Medeiros Barros do; Francisco, Priscila Maria Stolses Bergamo; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to outline the sociodemographic and health profile of elderly persons with reported diabetes, to assess the knowledge and practices regarding treatment options and describe the use of medications and potential risks for drug interactions (DI) in this subgroup. In 2008,a cross-sectional study was conducted of 1,517 elderly citizens in Campinas in which the prevalence of diabetes was estimated and its associations assessed using the Rao-Scott test (p Micromedex® database. Diabetes prevalence was 21.7%, without significant difference between the sexes. A higher percentage of elderly diabetics was found aged over 70, with less schooling, per capita family income of less than 1 minimum wage and no occupational activity. The average drug intake was 3.9 in the previous 3 days. Possible interactions were identified in 413 cases and 53.1%, 7.8% and 7.2% of the subjects presented moderate, minor and serious risk of DI, respectively. The importance of adopting a healthy diet and physical activity for weight reduction, disease and complication control is stressed. The need for attention to the potential for drug interactions and the use of inappropriate medications among the elderly is highlighted.

  6. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pignatello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy.

  7. Drug interaction between rifampicin and sirolimus in transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B T Ngo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of drug interaction between rifampicin and sirolimus in renal trans-plant patients who were diagnosed with tuberculosis after transplantation and induction of immuno-suppressive therapy with sirolimus. The dosage of sirolimus had to be increased, in one case up to six-fold and in the second case up to five-fold, to maintain serum levels after starting the rifampicin. The two patients tolerated the treatment well, with no signs of tuberculosis and good renal function.

  8. Virus-host interactions: new insights and advancements in drug development against viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Minakshi; Ranjan, Koushlesh; Brar, Basanti; Shah, Ikbal; Lalmbe, Upendra; Manimegalai, J; Vashisht, Bhavya; Gaury, Madhusudan; Kumar, Pawan; Khurana, Sandip Kumar; Prasad, Gaya; Rawat, Jagveer; Yadav, Vikas; Kumar, Sunil; Rao, Rekha

    2017-09-24

    Viruses are the most devastating pathogens of almost all life forms including humans and animals. Viruses can replicate very fast and may affect any metabolic and physiological function of the host cell. Therefore, it has been a challenge to develop a universal and common treatment against viral pathogens, in contrast to bacterial pathogens. Virus-host interaction is a complex phenomenon and often is virus- and host cell-specific. Exciting new insights into the molecular pathogenesis and host-virus interactions have been gained over the past few decades. These advances have enabled researchers to design better antiviral drugs. Clinical adequacy of antiviral drugs and their bioavailability are important parameters for effective treatment of viral infections. The problems associated with effective delivery of a drug in a safe and desired quantity have led to the search for (and design of) better drug delivery systems. In recent past, several new antiviral drugs have been developed, which have high therapeutic effectiveness against life-threatening viral diseases such as HIV, hepatitis B virus, herpes virus, dengue virus, and influenza virus infections. The majority of recent advances in antiviral drug discovery were possible due to developments in allied fields such as in vitro virus cultivation technology, molecular biology of viral-genome-encoded enzymes, complete-genome-sequence-based studies of viruses, and identification of suitable targets for antiviral drugs in viral genomes. Recently, several novel drug delivery approaches including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have emerged to aid antiviral therapy. The present review is aimed at providing an update on research and development efforts being made to create effective antiviral chemotherapeutic agents and approaches to their delivery to appropriate cells or tissues. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. St. John's wort and antidepressant drug interactions in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, M S; Buchalter, E; Giambanco, V

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing interest in and use of the herbal preparation St. John's wort. Hypericin, the major active ingredient, has many psychoactive properties. The agent is sold in the US as a nutritional supplement and is recommended for numerous conditions, including depression, anxiety, insomnia, and inflammation. We report a series of five cases of clinically diagnosed central serotonergic syndrome among elderly patients who combined prescription antidepressants with St. John's wort. Older adults are large consumers of both over-the-counter and prescription medications. They are particularly vulnerable to interactions between medications and products sold as nutritional or herbal supplements. St. John's wort requires further evaluation due to potential for drug interactions with central nervous system agents and for more definitive therapeutic indications.

  10. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion...... estimation system uses a single camera to estimate the motion of a human. The results show that inverse kinematics can significantly speed up the estimation process, while retaining a quality comparable to a full pose motion estimation system. Our novelty lies primarily in use of inverse kinematics...... to significantly speed up the particle filtering. It should be stressed that the observation part of the system has not been our focus, and as such is described only from a sense of completeness. With our approach it is possible to construct a robust and computationally efficient system for human motion estimation....

  11. Intestinal transporters for endogenic and pharmaceutical organic anions: The challenges of deriving in-vitro kinetic parameters for the prediction of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandvuinet, Anne Sophie; Vestergaard, Henrik Tang; Rapin, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review provides an overview of intestinal human transporters for organic anions and stresses the need for standardization of the various in-vitro methods presently employed in drug-drug interaction (DDI) investigations. Key findings Current knowledge on the intestinal expression o...... the involvement of other transporters than P-glycoprotein. Moreover, the interplay between various processes that a drug is subject to in-vivo such as translocation by several transporters and dissolution should be considered. © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society....

  12. Prediction of drug-target interaction by label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Song-Yao

    2016-02-01

    The identification of potential drug-target interaction pairs is very important, which is useful not only for providing greater understanding of protein function, but also for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. Recently, numerous machine learning-based algorithms (e.g. kernel-based, matrix factorization-based and network-based inference methods) have been developed for predicting drug-target interactions. All these methods implicitly utilize the assumption that similar drugs tend to target similar proteins and yield better results for predicting interactions between drugs and target proteins. To further improve the accuracy of prediction, a new method of network-based label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous networks, namely LPMIHN, is proposed to infer the potential drug-target interactions. LPMIHN separately performs label propagation on drug and target similarity networks, but the initial label information of the target (or drug) network comes from the drug (or target) label network and the known drug-target interaction bipartite network. The independent label propagation on each similarity network explores the cluster structure in its network, and the label information from the other network is used to capture mutual interactions (bicluster structures) between the nodes in each pair of the similarity networks. As compared to other recent state-of-the-art methods on the four popular benchmark datasets of binary drug-target interactions and two quantitative kinase bioactivity datasets, LPMIHN achieves the best results in terms of AUC and AUPR. In addition, many of the promising drug-target pairs predicted from LPMIHN are also confirmed on the latest publicly available drug-target databases such as ChEMBL, KEGG, SuperTarget and Drugbank. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our LPMIHN method, indicating that LPMIHN has a great potential for predicting drug-target interactions.

  13. Text mining for pharmacovigilance: Using machine learning for drug name recognition and drug-drug interaction extraction and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abacha, Asma; Chowdhury, Md Faisal Mahbub; Karanasiou, Aikaterini; Mrabet, Yassine; Lavelli, Alberto; Zweigenbaum, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacovigilance (PV) is defined by the World Health Organization as the science and activities related to the detection, assessment, understanding and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem. An essential aspect in PV is to acquire knowledge about Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs). The shared tasks on DDI-Extraction organized in 2011 and 2013 have pointed out the importance of this issue and provided benchmarks for: Drug Name Recognition, DDI extraction and DDI classification. In this paper, we present our text mining systems for these tasks and evaluate their results on the DDI-Extraction benchmarks. Our systems rely on machine learning techniques using both feature-based and kernel-based methods. The obtained results for drug name recognition are encouraging. For DDI-Extraction, our hybrid system combining a feature-based method and a kernel-based method was ranked second in the DDI-Extraction-2011 challenge, and our two-step system for DDI detection and classification was ranked first in the DDI-Extraction-2013 task at SemEval. We discuss our methods and results and give pointers to future work.

  14. Optimizing hepatitis C virus treatment through pharmacist interventions: Identification and management of drug-drug interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langness, Jacob A; Nguyen, Matthew; Wieland, Amanda; Everson, Gregory T; Kiser, Jennifer J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To quantify drug-drug-interactions (DDIs) encountered in patients prescribed hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment, the interventions made, and the time spent in this process. METHODS As standard of care, a clinical pharmacist screened for DDIs in patients prescribed direct acting antiviral (DAA) HCV treatment between November 2013 and July 2015 at the University of Colorado Hepatology Clinic. HCV regimens prescribed included ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF), paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir/dasabuvir (OBV/PTV/r + DSV), simeprevir/sofosbuvir (SIM/SOF), and sofosbuvir/ribavirin (SOF/RBV). This retrospective analysis reviewed the work completed by the clinical pharmacist in order to measure the aims identified for the study. The number and type of DDIs identified were summarized with descriptive statistics. RESULTS Six hundred and sixty four patients (83.4% Caucasian, 57% male, average 56.7 years old) were identified; 369 for LDV/SOF, 48 for OBV/PTV/r + DSV, 114 for SIM/SOF, and 133 for SOF/RBV. Fifty-one point five per cent of patients were cirrhotic. Overall, 5217 medications were reviewed (7.86 medications per patient) and 781 interactions identified (1.18 interactions per patient). The number of interactions were fewest for SOF/RBV (0.17 interactions per patient) and highest for OBV/PTV/r + DSV (2.48 interactions per patient). LDV/SOF and SIM/SOF had similar number of interactions (1.28 and 1.48 interactions per patient, respectively). Gastric acid modifiers and vitamin/herbal supplements commonly caused interactions with LDV/SOF. Hypertensive agents, analgesics, and psychiatric medications frequently caused interactions with OBV/PTV/r + DSV and SIM/SOF. To manage these interactions, the pharmacists most often recommended discontinuing the medication (28.9%), increasing monitoring for toxicities (24.1%), or separating administration times (18.2%). The pharmacist chart review for each patient usually took approximately 30 min, with additional time for more complex

  15. Insights into CYP2B6-mediated drug–drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Hedrich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence demonstrates that CYP2B6 plays a much larger role in human drug metabolism than was previously believed. The discovery of multiple important substrates of CYP2B6 as well as polymorphic differences has sparked increasing interest in the genetic and xenobiotic factors contributing to the expression and function of the enzyme. The expression of CYP2B6 is regulated primarily by the xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR and pregnane X receptor (PXR in the liver. In addition to CYP2B6, these receptors also mediate the inductive expression of CYP3A4, and a number of important phase II enzymes and drug transporters. CYP2B6 has been demonstrated to play a role in the metabolism of 2%–10% of clinically used drugs including widely used antineoplastic agents cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide, anesthetics propofol and ketamine, synthetic opioids pethidine and methadone, and the antiretrovirals nevirapine and efavirenz, among others. Significant inter-individual variability in the expression and function of the human CYP2B6 gene exists and can result in altered clinical outcomes in patients receiving treatment with CYP2B6-substrate drugs. These variances arise from a number of sources including genetic polymorphism, and xenobiotic intervention. In this review, we will provide an overview of the key players in CYP2B6 expression and function and highlight recent advances made in assessing clinical ramifications of important CYP2B6-mediated drug–drug interactions.

  16. Overcoming target-mediated quinolone resistance in topoisomerase IV by introducing metal-ion-independent drug-enzyme interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Schwanz, Heidi A; Li, Gangqin; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-12-20

    Quinolones, which target gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are the most widely prescribed antibacterials worldwide. Unfortunately, their use is threatened by the increasing prevalence of target-mediated drug resistance. Greater than 90% of mutations that confer quinolone resistance act by disrupting enzyme-drug interactions coordinated by a critical water-metal ion bridge. Quinazolinediones are quinolone-like drugs but lack the skeletal features necessary to support the bridge interaction. These compounds are of clinical interest, however, because they retain activity against the most common quinolone resistance mutations. We utilized a chemical biology approach to determine how quinazolinediones overcome quinolone resistance in Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV. Quinazolinediones that retain activity against quinolone-resistant topoisomerase IV do so primarily by establishing novel interactions through the C7 substituent, rather than the drug skeleton. Because some quinolones are highly active against human topoisomerase IIα, we also determined how clinically relevant quinolones discriminate between the bacterial and human enzymes. Clinically relevant quinolones display poor activity against topoisomerase IIα because the human enzyme cannot support drug interactions mediated by the water-metal ion bridge. However, the inclusion of substituents that allow quinazolinediones to overcome topoisomerase IV-mediated quinolone resistance can cause cross-reactivity against topoisomerase IIα. Therefore, a major challenge in designing drugs that overcome quinolone resistance lies in the ability to identify substituents that mediate strong interactions with the bacterial, but not the human, enzymes. On the basis of our understanding of quinolone-enzyme interactions, we have identified three compounds that display high activity against quinolone-resistant B. anthracis topoisomerase IV but low activity against human topoisomerase IIα.

  17. Interactions between cannabidiol and commonly used antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Tyler E; Bebin, E Martina; Cutter, Gary R; Liu, Yuliang; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2017-09-01

    To identify potential pharmacokinetic interactions between the pharmaceutical formulation of cannabidiol (CBD; Epidiolex) and the commonly used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) through an open-label safety study. Serum levels were monitored to identify interactions between CBD and AEDs. In 39 adults and 42 children, CBD dose was started at 5 mg/kg/day and increased every 2 weeks by 5 mg/kg/day up to a maximum of 50 mg/kg/day. Serum AED levels were obtained at baseline prior to CBD initiation and at most study visits. AED doses were adjusted if it was determined that a clinical symptom or laboratory result was related to a potential interaction. The Mixed Procedure was used to determine if there was a significant change in the serum level of each of the 19 AEDs with increasing CBD dose. AEDs with interactions seen in initial analysis were plotted for mean change in serum level over time. Subanalyses were performed to determine if the frequency of sedation in participants was related to the mean serum N-desmethylclobazam level, and if aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were different in participants taking concomitant valproate. Increases in topiramate, rufinamide, and N-desmethylclobazam and decrease in clobazam (all p Epilepsy.

  18. Adverse drug reactions and drug–drug interactions with over-the-counter NSAIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore N

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Moore,1 Charles Pollack,2 Paul Butkerait2 1Department of Pharmacology, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; 2Pfizer Consumer Healthcare, Madison, NJ, USA Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as ibuprofen have a long history of safe and effective use as both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC analgesics/antipyretics. The mechanism of action of all NSAIDs is through reversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs including gastrointestinal bleeding as well as cardiovascular and renal effects have been reported with NSAID use. In many cases, ADRs may occur because of drug–drug interactions (DDIs between the NSAID and a concomitant medication. For example, DDIs have been reported when NSAIDs are coadministered with aspirin, alcohol, some antihypertensives, antidepressants, and other commonly used medications. Because of the pharmacologic nature of these interactions, there is a continuum of risk in that the potential for an ADR is dependent on total drug exposure. Therefore, consideration of dose and duration of NSAID use, as well as the type or class of comedication administered, is important when assessing potential risk for ADRs. Safety findings from clinical studies evaluating prescription-strength NSAIDs may not be directly applicable to OTC dosing. Health care providers can be instrumental in educating patients that using OTC NSAIDs at the lowest effective dose for the shortest required duration is vital to balancing efficacy and safety. This review discusses some of the most clinically relevant DDIs reported with NSAIDs based on major sites of ADRs and classes of medication, with a focus on OTC ibuprofen, for which the most data are available. Keywords: adverse effects, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal

  19. Assessment of drug-drug interactions among renal failure patients of nephrology ward in a south Indian tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylapuram Rama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypharmacy is common in drug prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients. A study of the prescription patterns of drugs with potential interactions would be of interest to prevent drug related adverse events. A prospective observational study of six months (Dec 2009-May 2010 was carried out among the chronic kidney disease patients admitted to the nephrology ward of a South Indian tertiary care hospital. The pattern and rates of drug-drug interactions seen in the prescriptions of these patients was studied. Among the 205 prescriptions included, a total of 474 interactions were reported, making 2.7 interactions per prescription with incidence rates of 76.09%. Around 19.62% of interactions were of major severity. Most common interactions were found between ascorbic acid and cyanocobalamine (12.45%, clonidine and metoprolol (3.80% respectively. Hypo or hypertension (31.65%, decreased drug efficacy (29.11% and hypo or hyperglycemia (14.14%, were the most commonly reported clinical outcomes of the drug interactions. Cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers and beta blockers; 52% constitute the major class of drugs involved in interactions. As most of the interactions had a delayed onset, long term follow-up is essential to predict the clinically significant outcomes of these interactions. Hence, drug interactions are commonly seen in the prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients which can lead to serious adverse events if not detected early. Need for collaboration with a clinical pharmacist and electronic surveillance, which are absent in developing countries like India, is emphatic.

  20. Glucuronidation of drugs and drug-induced toxicity in humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuno, Yuki; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-07-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze glucuronidation of various drugs. Although experimental rodents are used in preclinical studies to predict glucuronidation and toxicity of drugs in humans, species differences in glucuronidation and drug-induced toxicity have been reported. Humanized UGT1 mice in which the original Ugt1 locus was disrupted and replaced with the human UGT1 locus (hUGT1 mice) were recently developed. In this study, acyl-glucuronidations of etodolac, diclofenac, and ibuprofen in liver microsomes of hUGT1 mice were examined and compared with those of humans and regular mice. The kinetics of etodolac, diclofenac, and ibuprofen acyl-glucuronidation in hUGT1 mice were almost comparable to those in humans, rather than in mice. We further investigated the hepatotoxicity of ibuprofen in hUGT1 mice and regular mice by measuring serum alanine amino transferase (ALT) levels. Because ALT levels were increased at 6 hours after dosing in hUGT1 mice and at 24 hours after dosing in regular mice, the onset pattern of ibuprofen-induced liver toxicity in hUGT1 mice was different from that in regular mice. These data suggest that hUGT1 mice can be valuable tools for understanding glucuronidations of drugs and drug-induced toxicity in humans.

  1. Mode of Antifungal Drugs Interaction with Cytochrome P- 450

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    M- Mahmodian

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Computer was used to identify the interactions of substrates and antifungal drugs with the enzyme, Cytochrome P-450; and then Molplot.bas computer program was applied to get three dimensional figures of 5-hydroxy camphor.oxidation products of camphor analogues, and antifungal drugs.Cartesian characteristics of atoms building molecules, are taken from Buildz. for program, which can calculate X,Y,Z coordinates of atoms by Zmatrix data. The other program which can calculate X,Y,Z coordinates, using fractional characteristics, is the Coord, for program that, gives our cartesian characteristics of the atoms of molecule, then by using these data, we obtain three dimensional figures and distance between active atoms in compounds under consideration. Results show that distance between two oxygen atoms in 5-exo-hydroxy- camphor and the other compounds obtained from oxidation of camphor analogues, with the distance of two oxygen atoms in antifungal compounds under discussion are equal. Therefore, we can conclude that, the antifungal molecule also interacts with enzyme's active site, by its own sites, in a similar manner to the 5-hydroxy camphor molecule, which is:"n1. Nitrogen atom (N of Imidazole and Triazole ring in antifungal molecule with Iron atom in heam molecule belonging to Cytochrome P-450 enzyme, are coordinated."n2. The other atoms such as : 0,S or N in structure of the antifungal drug are coordinated with hydrogen atom of hydroxyl group belong ing to Tyr-96 in the structure of enzyme, forming hydrogen bonding.

  2. Drug-drug interactions between immunosuppressants and antidiabetic drugs in the treatment of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhove, Thomas; Remijsen, Quinten; Kuypers, Dirk; Gillard, Pieter

    2016-09-14

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus is a frequent complication of solid organ transplantation that generally requires treatment with lifestyle interventions and antidiabetic medication. A number of demonstrated and potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) exist between commonly used immunosuppressants and antidiabetic drugs, which are comprehensively summarized in this review. Cyclosporine (CsA) itself inhibits the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 enzyme and a variety of drug transporters. As a result, it increases exposure to repaglinide and sitagliptin, will likely increase the exposure to nateglinide, glyburide, saxagliptin, vildagliptin and alogliptin, and could theoretically increase the exposure to gliquidone and several sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT)-2 inhibitors. Currently available data, although limited, suggest that these increases are modest and, particularly with regard to gliptins and SGLT-2 inhibitors, unlikely to result in hypoglycemia. The interaction with repaglinide is more pronounced but does not preclude concomitant use if repaglinide dose is gradually titrated. Mycophenolate mofetil and azathioprine do not engage in DDIs with any antidiabetic drug. Although calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) are intrinsically prone to DDIs, their disposition is not influenced by metformin, pioglitazone, sulfonylureas (except possibly glyburide) or insulin. An effect of gliptins on the disposition of CNIs and mTORi is unlikely, but has not been definitively ruled out. Based on their disposition profiles, glyburide and canagliflozin could affect CNI and mTORi disposition although this requires further study. Finally, delayed gastric emptying as a result of glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists seems to have a limited, but not necessarily negligible effect on CNI disposition.

  3. Human-Computer Interaction The Agency Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, José

    2012-01-01

    Agent-centric theories, approaches and technologies are contributing to enrich interactions between users and computers. This book aims at highlighting the influence of the agency perspective in Human-Computer Interaction through a careful selection of research contributions. Split into five sections; Users as Agents, Agents and Accessibility, Agents and Interactions, Agent-centric Paradigms and Approaches, and Collective Agents, the book covers a wealth of novel, original and fully updated material, offering:   ü  To provide a coherent, in depth, and timely material on the agency perspective in HCI ü  To offer an authoritative treatment of the subject matter presented by carefully selected authors ü  To offer a balanced and broad coverage of the subject area, including, human, organizational, social, as well as technological concerns. ü  To offer a hands-on-experience by covering representative case studies and offering essential design guidelines   The book will appeal to a broad audience of resea...

  4. INCIDENCE OF POLYPHARMACY INDUCED DRUG INTERACTION IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimmy N. John*, R.H. Udupi and K.M. Binu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug interaction represents a major problem in day- to- day practice. The incidence of adverse reactions increases almost exponentially as the number of drugs co prescribed rises, and this is in part due to interaction. Critically ill, chronically ill and elderly patients are particularly at risk of drug interactions due to polypharmacy as well as impaired homeostatic mechanisms. The study was aimed to assess polypharmacy and drug interaction in the prescriptions. The study was carried out by taking 200 prescriptions from different departments of our hospital and assessed the drug interaction through Micromedex and Drugs update. Polypharmacy was assessed using Prescribing indicators in WHO drug use indicators. Polypharmacy was observed in 85% of the prescriptions and drug interaction was observed in 58.5% of the prescriptions.

  5. Potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions dispensed in community and hospital pharmacies in East of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Dirin, Mandana Moradi; Mousavi, Sarah; Afshari, Amir Reza; Tabrizian, Kaveh; Ashrafi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aim to evaluate and compare type and prevalence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in prescriptions dispensed in both community and hospital setting in Zabol, Iran. Methods: A total of 2796 prescriptions were collected from community and inpatient and outpatient pharmacy of Amir-al-momenin only current acting hospital in Zabol, Iran. The prescriptions were processed using Lexi-Comp drug interaction software. The identified DDIs were categorized into five classes (A, B, C, ...

  6. A study of potential drug-drug interactions among hospitalized cardiac patients in a teaching hospital in Western Nepal

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    Sushmita Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Drug-drug interaction (DDI is of major concern in patients with complex therapeutic regimens. The involvement of cardiovascular medicines in drug interaction is even higher. However, reports of DDI between these groups of drugs are few. The study aims to identify the potential DDI among hospitalized cardiac patients. Furthermore, we assessed the possible risk factors associated with these interactions. Subjects and Methods: The prospective observational study was conducted from May 2012 to August 2012 among hospitalized cardiac patients. Cardiac patients who were taking at least two drugs and who had a hospital stay of at least 24 h were enrolled. The medications of the patients were analyzed for possible interactions using the standard drug interaction database - Micromedex -2 (Thomson Reuters × 2.0. Results: From a total of 150 enrolled patients, at least one interacting drug combination was identified among 32 patients. The incidence of potential DDI was 21.3%. A total of 48 potentially hazardous drug interactions were identified. Atorvastatin/azithromycin (10.4%, enalapril/metformin (10.4%, enalapril/potassium chloride (10.4%, atorvastatin/clarithromycin (8.3% and furosemide/gentamicin (6.3% were the most common interacting pairs. Drugs most commonly involved were atorvastatin, enalapril, digoxin, furosemide, clopidogrel and warfarin. Majority of interactions were of moderate severity (62.5% and pharmacokinetic (58.3% in nature. Increased number of medicines, prolonged hospital stays and comorbid conditions were the risk factors found associated with the potential DDI. Conclusions: This study highlighted the need of intense monitoring of patients who have identified risk factors to help detect and prevent them from serious health hazards associated with drug interactions.

  7. Roles of rifampicin in drug-drug interactions: underlying molecular mechanisms involving the nuclear pregnane X receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Kenneth

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rifampicin, an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, is used extensively despite its broad effects on drug-drug interactions, creating serious problems. The clinical importance of such interactions includes autoinduction leading to suboptimal or failed treatment. The concomitantly administered effects of rifampicin on other drugs can result in their altered metabolism or transportation that are metabolised by cytochromes P450 or transported by p-glycoprotein in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This review paper summarises recent findings with emphases on the molecular mechanisms used to explain these broad drug-drug interactions. In general, rifampicin can act on a pattern: rifampicin activates the nuclear pregnane X receptor that in turn affects cytochromes P450, glucuronosyltransferases and p-glycoprotein activities. This pattern of action may explain many of the rifampicin inducing drug-drug interactions. However, effects through other mechanisms have also been reported and these make any explanation of such drug-drug interactions more complex.

  8. Life-threatening digoxin toxicity due to drug-drug interactions in an HIV-positive man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganathan, Kathir; Roberts, Beth; Heatley, Martyn K

    2017-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions with corticosteroids, causing Cushing's syndrome with secondary adrenal suppression, are well known in HIV patients. Corticosteroids are widely prescribed in the HIV-positive population. However, digoxin is rarely used in HIV patients; hence, digoxin toxicity due to drug-drug interaction is not widely recognised. Nevertheless, this practice might change in the future as HIV cohorts of patients are ageing, due to the successful treatment of HIV infection with combination antiretroviral therapy. We report a case of digoxin toxicity in an HIV-positive 51-year-old man, due to a combination of drug-drug interaction and renal impairment. The first case report of digoxin toxicity due to drug-drug interaction with ritonavir in an HIV-positive woman was published in 2003. To the best of our knowledge, no similar case report has since been published in the literature. This case alerts the profession to the importance of drug-drug interaction and highlights the clinical features of digoxin toxicity.

  9. Knowledge Integration and Use-Case Analysis for a Customized Drug-Drug Interaction CDS Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Hye Jin; Park, Man Young; Kim, Woojae; Yoon, Duk Yong; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Park, Rae Woong

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are thought to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs) by monitoring drug-drug interactions(DDIs). However, clinically improper or excessive alerts can result in high alert overrides. A tailored CDS service, which is appropriate for clinicians and their ordering situations, is required to increase alert acceptance. In this study, we conducted a 12-week pilot project adopting a tailed CDSS at an emergency department. The new CDSS was conducted via a stepwise integration of additional new rules. The alert status with changes in acceptance rate was analyzed. The most frequent DDI alerts were related to prescriptions of anti-inflammatory drugs. The percentages of alert overrides for each stage were 98.0%, 96.0%, 96.9%, and 98.1%, respectively. 91.5% of overridden alerts were related to discharge medications. To reduce the potential hazards of ADEs, the development of an effective customized DDI CDSS is required, via in-depth analysis on alert patterns and overridden reasons.

  10. [Heterogeneous expression of human CYP and its application in early stage of new drug research and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhangming; Chen, Shuqing

    2013-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 (CYP) has a pivotal role on metabolism of xenobiotics and endogenous substances in clinical practice. Since the CYP from human tissue is very complex, and the human tissue itself is not easy to obtain, investigators begin to use all kinds of expression system to heterogeneously express the CYP. The single CYP expressed was then used for drug metabolism and drug-drug interaction research, to improve the efficiency of high-throughput drug screening greatly. Besides, since the polymorphism of drug-metabolizing enzymes makes efficacy variance for some drugs in different population, the heterogeneous expression and drug metabolizing research of certain CYP mutants will be helpful to guide the optimization of therapeutic regimen and conduct the personalized medication.

  11. Examining human-system interactions: The HSYS (Human SYStem) methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.G.; Harbour, J.L.; Sullivan, C.; Hallbert, B.P. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    HSYS is a model-based methodology developed to examine the many factors which influence Human-SYStem interactions. HSYS is built around a linear model of human performance, called the Input-Action model, which describes five sequential steps: Input Detection, Input Understanding, Action Selection, Action Planning, and Action Execution. HSYS is structured in an hierarchical tree which presents a logical structure for examining potential areas where human performance, hardware or other system components are less than adequate. The HSYS tree consists of five major branches which correspond to the five major components of the Input-Action model. Initial validation was begun by studying accident reports via HSYS and identifying sources of error. The validation process has continued with accident investigations in operational settings. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  12. The interactive evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo; Swoboda, Nik

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares two explanations of the process by which human communication systems evolve: iterated learning and social collaboration. It then reports an experiment testing the social collaboration account. Participants engaged in a graphical communication task either as a member of a community, where they interacted with seven different partners drawn from the same pool, or as a member of an isolated pair, where they interacted with the same partner across the same number of games. Participants' horizontal, pair-wise interactions led "bottom up" to the creation of an effective and efficient shared sign system in the community condition. Furthermore, the community-evolved sign systems were as effective and efficient as the local sign systems developed by isolated pairs. Finally, and as predicted by a social collaboration account, and not by an iterated learning account, interaction was critical to the creation of shared sign systems, with different isolated pairs establishing different local sign systems and different communities establishing different global sign systems.

  13. In vitro metabolism and drug-drug interaction potential of UTL-5g, a novel chemo- and radioprotective agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianmei; Shaw, Jiajiu; Dubaisi, Sarah; Valeriote, Frederick; Li, Jing

    2014-12-01

    N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-1,2-oxazole-3-carboxamide (UTL-5g), a potential chemo- and radioprotective agent, acts as a prodrug requiring bioactivation to the active metabolite 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX). UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) has been identified in porcine and rabbit liver esterases. The purpose of this study was to provide insights on the metabolism and drug interaction potential of UTL-5g in humans. The kinetics of UTL-5g hydrolysis was determined in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human carboxylesterases (hCE1b and hCE2). The potential of UTL-5g and its metabolites for competitive inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) was examined in HLM. UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and DCA in HLM were NADPH-independent, with a maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) of 11.1 nmol/min per mg and substrate affinity (Km) of 41.6 µM. Both hCE1b and hCE2 effectively catalyzed UTL-5g hydrolysis, but hCE2 exhibited ∼30-fold higher catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) than hCE1b. UTL-5g and DCA competitively inhibited microsomal CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19 (IC50 values 5g. Factors influencing carboxylesterase activities may have a significant impact on the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of UTL-5g. UTL-5g has the potential to inhibit P450-mediated metabolism through competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition. Caution is particularly needed for potential drug interactions involving competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2 in the future clinical development of UTL-5g. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Enhancing Extraction of Drug-Drug Interaction from Literature Using Neutral Candidates, Negation, and Clause Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Diaz, Alberto; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Supervised biomedical relation extraction plays an important role in biomedical natural language processing, endeavoring to obtain the relations between biomedical entities. Drug-drug interactions, which are investigated in the present paper, are notably among the critical biomedical relations. Thus far many methods have been developed with the aim of extracting DDI relations. However, unfortunately there has been a scarcity of comprehensive studies on the effects of negation, complex sentences, clause dependency, and neutral candidates in the course of DDI extraction from biomedical articles. Results Our study proposes clause dependency features and a number of features for identifying neutral candidates as well as negation cues and scopes. Furthermore, our experiments indicate that the proposed features significantly improve the performance of the relation extraction task combined with other kernel methods. We characterize the contribution of each category of features and finally conclude that neutral candidate features have the most prominent role among all of the three categories. PMID:27695078

  15. Human membrane transporter database: a Web-accessible relational database for drug transport studies and pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Q; Sadée, W

    2000-01-01

    The human genome contains numerous genes that encode membrane transporters and related proteins. For drug discovery, development, and targeting, one needs to know which transporters play a role in drug disposition and effects. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in human membrane transporters may contribute to interindividual differences in the response to drugs. Pharmacogenetics, and, on a genome-wide basis, pharmacogenomics, address the effect of genetic variants on an individual's response to drugs and xenobiotics. However, our knowledge of the relevant transporters is limited at present. To facilitate the study of drug transporters on a broad scale, including the use of microarray technology, we have constructed a human membrane transporter database (HMTD). Even though it is still largely incomplete, the database contains information on more than 250 human membrane transporters, such as sequence, gene family, structure, function, substrate, tissue distribution, and genetic disorders associated with transporter polymorphisms. Readers are invited to submit additional data. Implemented as a relational database, HMTD supports complex biological queries. Accessible through a Web browser user interface via Common Gateway Interface (CGI) and Java Database Connection (JDBC), HMTD also provides useful links and references, allowing interactive searching and downloading of data. Taking advantage of the features of an electronic journal, this paper serves as an interactive tutorial for using the database, which we expect to develop into a research tool.

  16. Introduction to human-computer interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Originally published in 1989 this title provided a comprehensive and authoritative introduction to the burgeoning discipline of human-computer interaction for students, academics, and those from industry who wished to know more about the subject. Assuming very little knowledge, the book provides an overview of the diverse research areas that were at the time only gradually building into a coherent and well-structured field. It aims to explain the underlying causes of the cognitive, social and organizational problems typically encountered when computer systems are introduced. It is clear and co

  17. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingliang Fang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  18. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Bingliang [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  19. Effects of anticancer drugs on the metabolism of the anticancer drug 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic (DMXAA) by human liver microsomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chin, Rebecca; Kestell, Philip; Tingle, Malcolm D; Paxton, James W

    2001-01-01

    Aims To investigate the effects of various anticancer drugs on the major metabolic pathways (glucuronidation and 6-methylhydroxylation) of DMXAA in human liver microsomes. Methods The effects of various anticancer drugs at 100 and 500 µm on the formation of DMXAA acyl glucuronide (DMXAA-G) and 6-hydroxymethyl-5-methylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (6-OH-MXAA) in human liver microsomes were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). For those anticancer drugs showing significant inhibition of DMXAA metabolism, the inhibition constants (Ki) were determined. The resulting in vitro data were extrapolated to predict in vivo changes in DMXAA pharmacokinetics. Results Vinblastine, vincristine and amsacrine at 500 µm significantly (P drugs such as 5-fluoroucacil, paclitaxel, tirapazamine and methotrexate exhibited little or negligible inhibition of the metabolism of DMXAA. Pre-incubation of microsomes with the anticancer drugs (100 and 500 µm) did not enhance their inhibitory effects on DMXAA metabolism. Prediction of DMXAA–drug interactions in vivo based on these in vitro data indicated that all the anticancer drugs investigated except DACA appear unlikely to alter the pharmacokinetics of DMXAA, whereas DACA may increase the plasma AUC of DMXAA by 6%. Conclusions These results indicate that alteration of the pharmacokinetics of DMXAA appears unlikely when used in combination with other common anticancer drugs. However, this does not rule out the possibility of pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used concurrently with this combination of anticancer drugs. PMID:11488768

  20. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace, health-c

  1. Pumpless microfluidic platform for drug testing on human skin equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Christiano, Angela M.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in bio-mimetic in vitro human skin models increase the efficiency of drug screening studies. In this study, we designed and developed a microfluidic platform that allows for long-term maintenance of full thickness human skin equivalents (HSE) which are comprised of both the epidermal and dermal compartments. The design is based on the physiologically relevant blood residence times in human skin tissue and allows for the establishment of an air-epidermal interface which is crucial for...

  2. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions among outpatients receiving cardiovascular medications at Jimma University specialized hospital, South West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legese Chelkeba

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of pharmacotherapy is highly dependent on the process of choosing a drug in relation to nature of the disease. Several factors should be considered in choosing optimal pharmacotherapeutics strategy including efficacy, safety, availability and cost of the drugs. The objective of this study was to assess potential drug-drug interactions and risk factors in outpatients taking cardiovascular drugs at Jimma University specialized hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from Feb. to April, 2011on patients visiting the cardiac clinic of Jimma University Specialized hospital. A sample of 332 outpatients who were taking cardiovascular medications at study clinic was studied. MicroMedex software was used to screen drug-drug interactions and SPSS for windows software versions-16.0 was used for data analysis. Results: A total of 1249 drugs with average of 3.76 drugs per prescription were prescribed for the 332 patients. The frequency of potential DDIs was found to be 241 (72.6%. Among these 200 (67.3% were of "moderate" severity and 164 (55.2% were delayed in onset. The most common potential DDI observed was between Enalapril and Furosemide (20%. Patients who prescribed many drugs (AOR=4.09; P=0.00 by medical intern had a higher risk of developing potential DDIs (AOR=4.6; P=0.00. Conclusions: Patients with cardiovascular disorders are subjected to high risk of potential drug-drug interactions and the number of drugs prescribed and educational level of the prescribers has a high significantly associated with the occurrence of potential drug-drug interactions. Therefore, it is imperative that further studies need to be conducted to identify reasons for and tackle the problem and provide appropriate mechanisms for management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 144-152

  3. In vitro drug-drug interactions of budesonide: inhibition and induction of transporters and cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nancy; Cui, Donghui; Wang, Qing; Wen, Zhiming; Finkelman, Richard D; Welty, Devin

    2017-07-21

    1. Budesonide is a glucocorticoid used in the treatment of several respiratory and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Glucocorticoids have been demonstrated to induce cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). This study aimed to evaluate the potential of budesonide to act as a perpetrator or a victim of transporter- or CYP-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs). 2. In vitro studies were conducted for P-gp, breast cancer resistance protein and organic anion and cation transporters (OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, OCT2) in transporter-transfected cells. Changes in mRNA expression in human hepatocytes and enzyme activity in human liver microsomes by budesonide were determined for CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A. 3. The data indicated that budesonide is a substrate of P-gp but is not a substrate or an inhibitor of the other transporters investigated. Budesonide is neither an inducer nor an inhibitor of major CYP enzymes. The effect of P-gp on budesonide disposition is anticipated to be low owing to CYP3A-mediated clearance. 4. Collectively, our data indicate there is a low risk of budesonide perpetrating clinical DDIs mediated by the transporters or CYPs studied.

  4. RFDT: A Rotation Forest-based Predictor for Predicting Drug-Target Interactions using Drug Structure and Protein Sequence Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; You, Zhu-Hong; Chen, Xing; Yan, Xin; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-14

    Identification of interaction between drugs and target proteins plays an important role in discovering new drug candidates. However, through the experimental method to identify the drug-target interactions remain to be extremely time-consuming, expensive and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, it is urgent to develop new computational methods to predict potential drug-target interactions (DTI). In this article, a novel computational model is developed for predicting potential drug-target interactions under the theory that each drug-target interaction pair can be represented by the structural properties from drugs and evolutionary information derived from proteins. Specifically, the protein sequences are encoded as Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) descriptor which contains information of biological evolutionary and the drug molecules are encoded as fingerprint feature vector which represents the existence of certain functional groups or fragments. Four benchmark datasets involving enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with Rotation Forest (RF) model. The proposed method achieved the prediction accuracy of 91.3%, 89.1%, 84.1% and 71.1% for four datasets respectively. In order to make our method more persuasive, we compared our classifier with the state-of-the-art Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. We also compared the proposed method with other excellent methods. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in the prediction of DTI, and can provide assistance for new drug research and development.

  5. Interaction of roxatidine acetate with antacids, food and other drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labs, R A

    1988-01-01

    The inhibition of hepatic mixed-function oxidase microsomal enzymes by cimetidine can lead to clinically important drug interactions. The metabolism of antipyrine is used as an index of hepatic enzymatic activity. The pharmacokinetic profiles of salivary antipyrine obtained following treatment with roxatidine acetate 75 mg or placebo twice a day for 7 days showed similar characteristics with no difference in the areas under the plasma concentration-time curves. In addition, roxatidine acetate 75 mg daily did not modify the clearance of propranolol, diazepam, desmethyldiazepam or controlled release theophylline preparations. Furthermore, there was no interference in the bioavailability of roxatidine acetate 150 mg daily when administered alone or in combination with a meal or antacids.

  6. Thioxylated cyclosporin A for studying protein-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weilin; Erdmann, Frank; Quintero, Andres; Fischer, Gunter; Zhang, Yixin

    2016-12-01

    Single atom substitution of cyclosporin A (CsA) through thioxylation has been used to study the structure-activity relationship of the immunosuppressive complex, involving the CsA receptor protein cyclophilin 18 (Cyp18) and the immunological target protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), illustrating the contributions of peptide backbone in protein-drug interaction. Moreover, the subtle difference between thioxylation positions in CsA has led to a remarkable change in the quenching effect on Cyp18 intrinsic fluorescence. Using the thioxylated compound Cs7 as an isosteric derivative of CsA in competition assay, the experiment has led to the determination of koff value in solution. Whereas the conformational heterogeneity of CsA has been found to be associated with its two-phase binding kinetics to Cyp18, the dissociation rate of CsA from complex is independent from the initial ligand structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Novel oral anticancer drugs: a review of adverse drug reactions, interactions and patient adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartal, Alexandra; Mátrai, Zoltán; Szucs, Attila; Belinszkaja, Galina; Langmár, Zoltán; Rosta, András

    2012-01-15

    Each aspect of oncological care is widely affected by the spread of oral anticancer agents, which raises several questions in terms of safe medication use and patient adherence. Over the past decade targeted therapies have appeared in clinical practice and revolutionized the pharmacological treatment of malignancies. Regular patient - doctor visits and proper patient education is crucial in order to comply with the therapy previously agreed upon with the oncologist, to increase patient adherence, to detect and to treat adverse effects in early stages. Since the information on the new medicines in Hungarian language is sparse it is the intention of the authors to give an overview of the basic knowledge, patient safety issues, adverse effects and interactions. Official drug information summaries and data on pharmacokinetics, interactions and adverse effects from the literature are reviewed as the basis for this overview.

  8. The Two Faces of Social Interaction Reward in Animal Models of Drug Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rawas, Rana; Saria, Alois

    2016-03-01

    Drug dependence is a serious health and social problem. Social factors can modify vulnerability to developing drug dependence, acting as risk factors or protective factors. Whereas stress and peer environment that encourage substance use may increase drug taking, strong attachments between family members and peer environment that do not experience drug use may protect against drug taking and, ultimately, drug dependence. The rewarding effects of drug abuse and social interaction can be evaluated using animal models. In this review we focus on evaluating social interaction reward in the conditioned place preference paradigm. We give an overview of how social interaction, if made available within the drug context, may facilitate, promote and interact with the drug's effects. However, social interaction, if offered alternatively outside the drug context, may have pronounced protective effects against drug abuse and relapse. We also address the importance of the weight difference parameter between the social partners in determining the positive or "agonistic" versus the hostile or "antagonistic" social interaction. We conclude that understanding social interaction reward and its subsequent effects on drug reward is sorely needed for therapeutic interventions against drug dependence.

  9. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, Ernest V., II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human's ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. This DRP concentrates on three areas associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI which are applicable to NASA robot systems: 1) Video Overlays, 2) Camera Views, and 3) Command Modalities. The first study focused on video overlays that investigated how Augmented Reality (AR) symbology can be added to the human-robot interface to improve teleoperation performance. Three types of AR symbology were explored in this study, command guidance (CG), situation guidance (SG), and both (SCG). CG symbology gives operators explicit instructions on what commands to input, whereas SG symbology gives operators implicit cues so that operators can infer the input commands. The combination of CG and SG provided operators with explicit and implicit cues allowing the operator to choose which symbology to utilize. The objective of the study was to understand how AR symbology affects the human operator's ability to align a robot arm to a target using a flight stick and the ability to allocate attention between the symbology and external views of the world. The study evaluated the effects type of symbology (CG and SG) has on operator tasks performance and attention allocation during teleoperation of a robot arm. The second study expanded on the first study by evaluating the effects of the type of

  10. Pharmacodynamics Drug Interactions of Metformin with Aspirin and Nifedipine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khidir A. M. Hassan, Mahmoud M. E. Mudawi,Mansour I. Sulaiman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is now being recognized as the standard therapy in T2D patients who are overweight. Metformin has many drug-disease interactions that can increase the risk of metformin-associated lactic acidosis. Therefore this study was conducted to evaluate any possible pharmacodynamic interactions between metformin and drugs used to treat chronic diseases e.g. Hypertension. The rats were fasted overnight before inducing diabetes with streptozotocin. The rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg kg−1 freshly prepared in 0.1M sodium citrate buffer. The diabetic state was confirmed 72 h after streptozotocin injection. Diabetic rats were grouped into seven groups each group of five rats and distributed among the normal control group diabetic control group and the treatment groups. The treatment continued for 10 days. Blood samples were taken before treatment and after 10 days and analyzed for serum glucose, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides. In the diabetic control group which was given STZ alone the blood glucose level decreased significantly (p < 0.05 after 10 days but still above the hyperglycemic level (200mg/dl. The same was observed in the group treated with metformin. The group treated with nifedipine and aspirin showed significant reduction (p < 0.01 in the glucose level below the hyperglycemic level (200mg/dl. While the groups treated with (Metformin + Nifedipine and (Metformin +Aspirin showed highly significant reduction (P<0.001 in blood glucose level. These results conclude that the combination of (metformin +Nifedipine and the combination of (Metformin + Aspirin have highly significant hypoglycemic effect. It also showed that Nifedipine has promising role in reducing blood glucose level, lipid profile especially LDL-cholesterol, and body weight.

  11. Fruit juice inhibition of uptake transport: a new type of food–drug interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, David G

    2010-01-01

    A new type of interaction in which fruit juices diminish oral drug bioavailability through inhibition of uptake transport is the focus of this review. The discovery was based on an opposite to anticipated finding when assessing the possibility of grapefruit juice increasing oral fexofenadine bioavailability in humans through inhibition of intestinal MDR1-mediated efflux transport. In follow-up investigations, grapefruit or orange juice at low concentrations potentially and selectively inhibited in vitro OATP1A2-mediated uptake compared with MDR1-caused efflux substrate transport. These juices at high volume dramatically depressed oral fexofenadine bioavailability. Grapefruit was the representative juice to characterize the interaction subsequently. A volume–effect relationship study using a normal juice amount halved average fexofenadine absorption. Individual variability and reproducibility data indicated the clinical interaction involved direct inhibition of intestinal OATP1A2. Naringin was a major causal component suggesting that other flavonoids in fruits and vegetables might also produce the effect. Duration of juice clinical inhibition of fexofenadine absorption lasted more than 2 h but less than 4 h indicating the interaction was avoidable with appropriate interval of time between juice and drug consumption. Grapefruit juice lowered the oral bioavailability of several medications transported by OATP1A2 (acebutolol, celiprolol, fexofenadine, talinolol, L-thyroxine) while orange juice did the same for others (atenolol, celiprolol, ciprofloxacin, fexofenadine). Juice clinical inhibition of OATP2B1 was unresolved while that of OATP1B1 seemed unlikely. The interaction between grapefruit juice and etoposide also seemed relevant. Knowledge of both affected uptake transporter and drug hydrophilicity assisted prediction of the clinical interaction with grapefruit or orange juice. PMID:21039758

  12. Theoretical and experimental investigation of drug-polymer interaction and miscibility and its impact on drug supersaturation in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-10-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) have the potential to offer higher apparent solubility and bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. Knowledge of the solid state drug-polymer solubility/miscibility and their mutual interaction are fundamental requirements for the effective design and development of such systems. To this end, we have carried out a comprehensive investigation of various ASD systems of dipyridamole and cinnarizine in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) at different drug loadings. Theoretical and experimental examinations (by implementing binary and ternary Flory-Huggins (F-H) theory) related to drug-polymer interaction/miscibility including solubility parameter approach, melting point depression method, phase diagram, drug-polymer interaction in the presence of moisture and the effect of drug loading on interaction parameter were performed. The information obtained from this study was used to predict the stability of ASDs at different drug loadings and under different thermal and moisture conditions. Thermal and moisture sorption analysis not only provided the composition-dependent interaction parameter but also predicted the composition dependent miscibility. DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA systems have shown molecular level mixing over the complete range of drug loading. For CNZ-PVP, the presence of a single Tg at lower drug loadings (10, 20 and 35%w/w) indicates the formation of solid solution. However, drug recrystallization was observed for samples with higher drug weight fractions (50 and 65%w/w). Finally, the role of polymer in maintaining drug supersaturation has also been explored. It has been found that drug-polymer combinations capable of hydrogen-bonding in the solution state (DPM-PVP, DPM-PAA and CNZ-PAA) are more effective in preventing drug crystallization compared to the drug-polymer systems without such interaction (CNZ-PVP). The DPM-PAA system outperformed all other ASDs in various stability conditions (dry-state, in

  13. Herb-drug Interaction: An Emerging Issue of Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hao; CHEN Ke-ji

    2010-01-01

    @@ With the increasing enhancement of people's awareness of self-care, the voice for humans to return to nature is growing louder and louder. Drugs with natural plants as raw materials are increasingly favored by people all over the world for their unique advantages in preventing and curing diseases,rehabilitation and health care, especially in Europe,the United States and many Asian countries.According to statistics, in the United States alone,there are currently more than 15 million people using herbal preparations in varying degrees, including Chinese herbal medicines, as either a therapy or an adjuvant therapy for various diseases at present,with the annual cost of approximately 30 billion U.S.dollars(1).

  14. Personality and social skills in human-dog interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Iben Helene Coakley

    able to form human-dog relationships that are comparable to such interpersonal relationships. Human-dog interaction has been suggested to have various benefits for humans, but obviously the welfare of both humans and dogs depend on such interaction being successful. Unfor-tunately not all human...... developing a social tool set that makes it very successful in interacting and communicating with humans. Human evolution has similarly resulted in the development of complex social cognition in humans. This enables humans to form bonded relationships, besides pair-bonding, and it seems that humans are also......-dog relationships are successful and every year a large number of dogs are relinquished because of failed dog-owner relationships. Therefore more knowledge is needed about the mechanisms of human-dog interaction and about factors related to successful as well as unsuc-cessful human-dog relationships. The aim...

  15. "Not for human consumption": a review of emerging designer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Megan E; Hampton, Jeremy P

    2014-07-01

    Synthetic, or "designer" drugs, are created by manipulating the chemical structures of other psychoactive drugs so that the resulting product is structurally similar but not identical to illegal psychoactive drugs. Originally developed in the 1960s as a way to evade existing drug laws, the use of designer drugs has increased dramatically over the past few years. These drugs are deceptively packaged as "research chemicals," "incense," "bath salts," or "plant food," among other names, with labels that may contain warnings such as "not for human consumption" or "not for sale to minors." The clinical effects of most new designer drugs can be described as either hallucinogenic, stimulant, or opioid-like. They may also have a combination of these effects due to designer side-chain substitutions. The easy accessibility and rapid emergence of new designer drugs have created challenges for health care providers when treating patients presenting with acute toxicity from these substances, many of which can produce significant and/or life-threatening adverse effects. Moreover, the health care provider has no way to verify the contents and/or potency of the agent ingested because it can vary between packages and distributors. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the available designer drugs, common signs and symptoms of toxicity associated with these agents, and potential effective treatment modalities are essential to appropriately manage these patients.

  16. A review of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with the anthelmintic medications albendazole and mebendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, Shane Ashley; Roels, Craig Allan; Wilby, Kyle John; Ensom, Mary H H

    2015-04-01

    Medications indicated for helminthes and other parasitic infections are frequently being used in mass populations in endemic areas. Currently, there is a lack of guidance for clinicians on how to appropriately manage drug interactions when faced with patients requiring short-term anthelmintic therapy with albendazole or mebendazole while concurrently taking other agents. The objective of this review was to systematically summarize and evaluate published literature on the pharmacokinetics of albendazole or mebendazole when taken with other interacting medications. A search of MEDLINE (1946 to October 2014), EMBASE (1974 to October 2014), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to October 2014), Google, and Google Scholar was conducted for articles describing the pharmacokinetics of albendazole or mebendazole when given with other medications (and supplemented by a bibliographic review of all relevant articles). Altogether, 17 articles were included in the review. Studies reported data on pharmacokinetic parameters for albendazole or mebendazole when taken with cimetidine, dexamethasone, ritonavir, phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, ivermectin, praziquantel, diethylcarbamazine, azithromycin, and levamisole. Cimetidine increased the elimination half-life of albendazole and maximum concentration (Cmax) of mebendazole; dexamethasone increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of albendazole; levamisole decreased the Cmax of albendazole; anticonvulsants (phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine) decreased the AUC of albendazole; praziquantel increased the AUC of albendazole; and ritonavir decreased the AUC of both albendazole and mebendazole. No major interactions were found with ivermectin, azithromycin, or diethylcarbamazine. Future research is required to clarify the clinical relevance of the interactions observed.

  17. Leveraging human genetics to guide drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-07-01

    Identifying appropriate molecular targets is a critical step in drug development. Despite many advantages, the traditional tools of observational epidemiology and cellular or animal models of disease can be misleading in identifying causal pathways likely to lead to successful therapeutics. Here, we review some favorable aspects of human genetics studies that have the potential to accelerate drug target discovery. These include using genetic studies to identify pathways relevant to human disease, leveraging human genetics to discern causal relationships between biomarkers and disease, and studying genetic variation in humans to predict the potential efficacy and safety of inhibitory compounds aimed at molecular targets. We present some examples taken from studies of plasma lipids and coronary artery disease to highlight how human genetics can accelerate therapeutics development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using improved serial blood sampling method of mice to study pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ayahisa; Watari, Ryosuke; Ogawa, Keiko; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yukari; Takai, Nozomi; Nezasa, Ken-ichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka

    2015-03-01

    In pharmacokinetic evaluation of mice, using serial sampling methods rather than a terminal blood sampling method could reduce the number of animals needed and lead to more reliable data by excluding individual differences. In addition, using serial sampling methods can be valuable for evaluation of the drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential of drug candidates. In this study, we established an improved method for serially sampling the blood from one mouse by only one incision of the lateral tail vein, and investigated whether our method could be adapted to pharmacokinetic and DDI studies. After intravenous and oral administration of ibuprofen and fexofenadine (BCS class II and III), the plasma concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated by our method and a terminal blood sampling method, with the result that both methods gave comparable results (ibuprofen: 63.8 ± 4.0% and 64.4%, fexofenadine: 6.5 ± 0.7% and 7.9%, respectively, in bioavailability). In addition, our method could be adapted to DDI study for cytochrome P450 and organic anion transporting polypeptide inhibition. These results demonstrate that our method can be useful for pharmacokinetic evaluation from the perspective of reliable data acquisition as well as easy handling and low stress to mice and improve the quality of pharmacokinetic and DDI studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Drug-drug interaction analysis of pyronaridine/artesunate and ritonavir in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carrie A; Lopez-Lazaro, Luis; Jung, Donald; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Pokorny, Rolf; Shin, Chang-Sik; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2012-03-01

    A multiple dose, parallel group study was conducted to assess for a drug-drug interaction between the pyronaridine/artesunate (PA) combination antimalarial and ritonavir. Thirty-four healthy adults were randomized (1:1) to receive PA for 3 days or PA with ritonavir (100 mg twice daily for 17 days, PA administered on Days 8-10). Pharmacokinetic parameters for pyronaridine, artesunate, and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) were obtained after the last PA dose and for ritonavir on Days 1 and 10. Ritonavir coadministration did not markedly change pyronaridine pharmacokinetics but resulted in a 27% increase in artesunate area under the curve (AUC) and a 38% decrease in DHA AUC. Ritonavir exposure was increased 3.2-fold in the presence of PA. The only relevant safety observations were increases in liver enzymes, only reaching a clinically significant grade in the PA + ritonavir arm. It was concluded that coadministered ritonavir and PA interact to alter exposure to artesunate, DHA, and ritonavir itself.

  20. Drug-Drug Interactions between Sofosbuvir and Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir with or without Dasabuvir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jennifer R; Dutta, Sandeep; Cohen, Daniel; Podsadecki, Thomas J; Ding, Bifeng; Awni, Walid M; Menon, Rajeev M

    2016-02-01

    The combination of ombitasvir (an NS5A inhibitor), paritaprevir (an NS3/4A inhibitor) coadministered with ritonavir (r), and dasabuvir (an NS5B nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitor), referred to as the 3D regimen, and the combination of ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, referred to as the 2D regimen, have demonstrated high efficacy with and without ribavirin in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected subjects. These regimens have potential for coadministration with sofosbuvir (nucleoside NS5B inhibitor) in the treatment of HCV. This phase 1, drug-drug interaction, open-label, multiple-dose study enrolled 32 healthy subjects to receive the 3D or 2D regimen in combination with sofosbuvir. Doses of study drugs were as follows: ombitasvir-paritaprevir-r, 25/150/100 mg daily (QD); dasabuvir, 250 mg twice daily (BID); and sofosbuvir, 400 mg QD. Blood samples were collected on study days 7, 14, and 21 for evaluating drug interaction at steady state. The effect of the 3D and 2D regimens on the pharmacokinetics of sofosbuvir and its circulating metabolite GS-331007 and vice versa was assessed by a repeated-measures analysis. Exposures of the 3D and 2D regimens were similar (≤20% change) during coadministration with sofosbuvir and during administration alone. Sofosbuvir exposures were 61% to 112% higher with the 3D regimen and 64% to 93% higher with the 2D regimen than with sofosbuvir alone. GS-331007 total exposures were 27% and 32% higher with the 3D and 2D regimens, respectively, than with sofosbuvir alone. Increases in sofosbuvir and GS-331007 exposures likely resulted from breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and/or P glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter inhibition by paritaprevir and ritonavir. No subjects discontinued the study due to study drug-related adverse events. No dose adjustment is recommended for 3D, 2D, or sofosbuvir in clinical trials exploring the safety and efficacy of the combination. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT

  1. Interaction in Information Systems - Beyond Human-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and analyze the role of interaction in information systems. Interaction represents dynamic relations between actors and other elements in information systems. We introduce a semi-formal notation that we use to describe a set of interaction patterns and we...... illustrate how the notation can be used to describe mediated interaction. We use the interaction patterns to evaluate a set of modeling languages. No single language supports all relevant aspects of interaction modeling. We use the interaction patterns to identify to general and supplementary forms...... of interaction-interaction based on exchange of objects and interaction based on exchange of commands. None of the modeling languages that we analyze support both forms in a rich way....

  2. 75 FR 45130 - Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research Without an Investigational New Drug Application; Availability... the availability of a draft guidance for industry and researchers entitled ``The Radioactive...

  3. Possible drug–drug interaction in dogs and cats resulted from alteration in drug metabolism: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Sasaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions (in particular at metabolism may result in fatal adverse effects in some cases. This basic information, therefore, is needed for drug therapy even in veterinary medicine, as multidrug therapy is not rare in canines and felines. The aim of this review was focused on possible drug–drug interactions in dogs and cats. The interaction includes enzyme induction by phenobarbital, enzyme inhibition by ketoconazole and fluoroquinolones, and down-regulation of enzymes by dexamethasone. A final conclusion based upon the available literatures and author’s experience is given at the end of the review.

  4. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate. PMID:27014725

  5. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate.

  6. The Two Faces of Social Interaction Reward in Animal Models of Drug Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawas, Rana El

    2016-01-01

    Drug dependence is a serious health and social problem. Social factors can modify vulnerability to developing drug dependence, acting as risk factors or protective factors. Whereas stress and peer environment that encourage substance use may increase drug taking, strong attachments between family members and peer environment that do not experience drug use may protect against drug taking and, ultimately, drug dependence. The rewarding effects of drug abuse and social interaction can be evaluated using animal models. In this review we focus on evaluating social interaction reward in the conditioned place preference paradigm. We give an overview of how social interaction, if made available within the drug context, may facilitate, promote and interact with the drug’s effects. However, social interaction, if offered alternatively outside the drug context, may have pronounced protective effects against drug abuse and relapse. We also address the importance of the weight difference parameter between the social partners in determining the positive or “agonistic” versus the hostile or “antagonistic” social interaction. We conclude that understanding social interaction reward and its subsequent effects on drug reward is sorely needed for therapeutic interventions against drug dependence. PMID:26088685

  7. 75 FR 63189 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Investigational New Drug Applications-Determining Whether Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Investigational New Drug... Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Investigational New Drug Applications (INDs)--Determining...

  8. Drug delivery to the human brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howden, L.; Aroussi, A. [Univ. of Nottingham, School of Mechanical, Material, Manufacturing Engineering and Managements, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: eaxljh@nottingham.ac.uk; Vloeberghs, M. [Queens Medical Centre, Dept. of Child Health, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    This Study investigates the flow of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) inside the human ventricular system with particular emphasis on drug path flow for the purpose of medical drug injections. The investigation is conducted using the computational fluid dynamics package FLUENT. The role of the ventricular system is very important in protecting the brain from injury by cushioning it against the cranium during sudden movements. If for any reason the passage of CSF through the ventricular system is blocked (usually by stenosis) then a condition known as Hydrocephalus occurs, where by the blocked CSF causes the Intra Cranial Pressure (ICP) inside the brain to rise. If this is not treated then severe brain damage and death can occur. Previous work conducted by the authors on this subject has focused on the technique of ventriculostomy to treat hydrocephalus. The present study carries on from the previous work but focuses on delivering medical drugs to treat brain tumors that are conventionally not accessible and which require complicated surgical procedures to remove them. The study focuses on the possible paths for delivering drugs to tumors in the human nervous system through conventionally accessible locations without major surgery. The results of the investigation have shown that it is possible to reach over 95% of the ventricular system by injection of drugs however the results also show that there are many factors that can affect the drug flow paths through the ventricular system and thus the areas reachable, by these drugs. (author)

  9. Drug-metabolism mechanism: Knowledge-based population pharmacokinetic approach for characterizing clobazam drug-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Dwain; Bekersky, Ihor; Chu, Hui-May; Ette, Ene I

    2016-03-01

    A metabolic mechanism-based characterization of antiepileptic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) with clobazam in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) was performed using a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) approach. To characterize potential DDIs with clobazam, pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 153 patients with LGS in study OV-1012 (NCT00518713) and 18 healthy participants in bioavailability study OV-1017 were pooled. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were grouped based on their effects on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes responsible for the metabolism of clobazam and its metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB): CYP3A inducers (phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), CYP2C19 inducers (valproic acid, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and carbamazepine), or CYP2C19 inhibitors (felbamate, oxcarbazepine). CYP3A4 inducers-which did not affect the oral clearance of clobazam-significantly increased the formation of N-CLB by 9.4%, while CYP2C19 inducers significantly increased the apparent elimination rate of N-CLB by 10.5%, resulting in a negligible net change in the PK of the active metabolite. CYP2C19 inhibitors did not affect N-CLB elimination. Because concomitant use of AEDs that are either CYP450 inhibitors or inducers with clobazam in the treatment of LGS patients had negligible to no effect on clobazam PK in this study, dosage adjustments may not be required for clobazam in the presence of the AEDs investigated here.

  10. Visualizing the site of drug action in living human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    PET is the only technique available to date to measure molecular interactions in vivo, but the basic mechanism of molecular interaction in vivo is not yet fully understood. However, PET can allow visualization of various phenomena which we can not observe with in vitro techniques. Progress in PET study will provide a new viewpoint for drug development and the study of molecular mechanism in the brain. (J.P.N.)

  11. Drug-drug interaction between clobazam and cannabidiol in children with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffrey, Alexandra L; Pollack, Sarah F; Bruno, Patricia L; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2015-08-01

    Under an expanded access investigational new drug (IND) trial, cannabidiol (CBD) is being studied as a possible adjuvant treatment of refractory epilepsy in children. Of the 25 subjects in the trial, 13 were being treated with clobazam (CLB). Because CLB and CBD are both metabolized in the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway, we predicted a drug-drug interaction, which we evaluate in this article. Thirteen subjects with refractory epilepsy concomitantly taking CLB and CBD under IND 119876 were included in this study. Demographic information was collected for each subject including age, sex, and etiology of seizures, as well as concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). CLB, N-desmethylclobazam (norclobazam; nCLB), and CBD levels were measured over the course of CBD treatment. CLB doses were recorded at baseline and at weeks 4 and 8 of CBD treatment. Side effects were monitored. We report elevated CLB and nCLB levels in these subjects. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) increase in CLB levels was 60 ± 80% (95% confidence interval (CI) [-2-91%] at 4 weeks); the mean increase in nCLB levels was 500 ± 300% (95% CI [+90-610%] at 4 weeks). Nine of 13 subjects had a >50% decrease in seizures, corresponding to a responder rate of 70%. The increased CLB and nCLB levels and decreases in seizure frequency occurred even though, over the course of CBD treatment, CLB doses were reduced for 10 (77%) of the 13 subjects. Side effects were reported in 10 (77%) of the 13 subjects, but were alleviated with CLB dose reduction. Monitoring of CLB and nCLB levels is necessary for clinical care of patients concomitantly on CLB and CBD. Nonetheless, CBD is a safe and effective treatment of refractory epilepsy in patients receiving CLB treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. Exploiting Specific Interactions toward Next-Generation Polymeric Drug Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieczorek, Sebastian; Krause, Eberhard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Roeder, Beate; Hirsch, Anna K. H.; Boerner, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    A generic method describes advanced tailoring of polymer drug carriers based on polymer-block-peptides. Combinatorial means are used to select suitable peptide segments to specifically complex small-molecule drugs. The resulting specific drug formulation agents render insoluble drugs water-soluble a

  13. Impact of excipient interactions on drug bioavailability from solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panakanti, Ravikiran; Narang, Ajit S

    2012-10-01

    Excipients are generally pharmacologically inert, but can interact with drugs in the dosage form and the physiological factors at the site of absorption to affect the bioavailability of a drug product. A general mechanistic understanding of the basis of these interactions is essential to design robust drug products. This paper focuses on drug-excipient interactions in solid dosage forms that impact drug bioavailability, the drug substance and drug product properties affected by excipients, and the impact of excipients on physiologic processes. The extent to which drug bioavailability is affected by these interactions would vary on a case-by-case basis depending upon factors such as the potency and dose of the drug, therapeutic window, site of absorption, rate limiting factor in drug absorption (e.g., permeability or solubility limited), or whether drug metabolism, efflux, complexation, or degradation at the site of absorption play a role in determining its bioavailability. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of drug-excipient interactions and their impact on drug release and absorption can help develop formulations that exhibit optimum drug bioavailability.

  14. Toward a complete dataset of drug-drug interaction information from publicly available sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaz, Serkan; Horn, John; Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Stan, Johann; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Vilar, Santiago; Brochhausen, Mathias; Samwald, Matthias; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Although potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) are a significant source of preventable drug-related harm, there is currently no single complete source of PDDI information. In the current study, all publically available sources of PDDI information that could be identified using a comprehensive and broad search were combined into a single dataset. The combined dataset merged fourteen different sources including 5 clinically-oriented information sources, 4 Natural Language Processing (NLP) Corpora, and 5 Bioinformatics/Pharmacovigilance information sources. As a comprehensive PDDI source, the merged dataset might benefit the pharmacovigilance text mining community by making it possible to compare the representativeness of NLP corpora for PDDI text extraction tasks, and specifying elements that can be useful for future PDDI extraction purposes. An analysis of the overlap between and across the data sources showed that there was little overlap. Even comprehensive PDDI lists such as DrugBank, KEGG, and the NDF-RT had less than 50% overlap with each other. Moreover, all of the comprehensive lists had incomplete coverage of two data sources that focus on PDDIs of interest in most clinical settings. Based on this information, we think that systems that provide access to the comprehensive lists, such as APIs into RxNorm, should be careful to inform users that the lists may be incomplete with respect to PDDIs that drug experts suggest clinicians be aware of. In spite of the low degree of overlap, several dozen cases were identified where PDDI information provided in drug product labeling might be augmented by the merged dataset. Moreover, the combined dataset was also shown to improve the performance of an existing PDDI NLP pipeline and a recently published PDDI pharmacovigilance protocol. Future work will focus on improvement of the methods for mapping between PDDI information sources, identifying methods to improve the use of the merged dataset in PDDI NLP algorithms

  15. Loving Machines: Theorizing Human and Sociable-Technology Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Garlock, Glenda

    Today, human and sociable-technology interaction is a contested site of inquiry. Some regard social robots as an innovative medium of communication that offer new avenues for expression, communication, and interaction. Other others question the moral veracity of human-robot relationships, suggesting that such associations risk psychological impoverishment. What seems clear is that the emergence of social robots in everyday life will alter the nature of social interaction, bringing with it a need for new theories to understand the shifting terrain between humans and machines. This work provides a historical context for human and sociable robot interaction. Current research related to human-sociable-technology interaction is considered in relation to arguments that confront a humanist view that confine 'technological things' to the nonhuman side of the human/nonhuman binary relation. Finally, it recommends a theoretical approach for the study of human and sociable-technology interaction that accommodates increasingly personal relations between human and nonhuman technologies.

  16. Analysis and prediction of drug-drug interaction by minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lili; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Wei, Lai; Cheng, Shiwen; Kong, Xiangyin; Zheng, Mingyue; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) defines a situation in which one drug affects the activity of another when both are administered together. DDI is a common cause of adverse drug reactions and sometimes also leads to improved therapeutic effects. Therefore, it is of great interest to discover novel DDIs according to their molecular properties and mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective DDIs using the following properties: (1) chemical interaction between drugs; (2) protein interactions between the targets of drugs; and (3) target enrichment of KEGG pathways. The data consisted of 7323 pairs of DDIs collected from the DrugBank and 36,615 pairs of drugs constructed by randomly combining two drugs. Each drug pair was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three categories of properties. The random forest algorithm was adopted to train the prediction model. Some feature selection techniques, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were used to extract key features as the optimal input for the prediction model. The extracted key features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of DDIs and provide some guidelines for the relevant clinical medication developments, and the prediction model can give new clues for identification of novel DDIs.

  17. Human computer interaction using hand gestures

    CERN Document Server

    Premaratne, Prashan

    2014-01-01

    Human computer interaction (HCI) plays a vital role in bridging the 'Digital Divide', bringing people closer to consumer electronics control in the 'lounge'. Keyboards and mouse or remotes do alienate old and new generations alike from control interfaces. Hand Gesture Recognition systems bring hope of connecting people with machines in a natural way. This will lead to consumers being able to use their hands naturally to communicate with any electronic equipment in their 'lounge.' This monograph will include the state of the art hand gesture recognition approaches and how they evolved from their inception. The author would also detail his research in this area for the past 8 years and how the future might turn out to be using HCI. This monograph will serve as a valuable guide for researchers (who would endeavour into) in the world of HCI.

  18. Effects of interactions between humans and domesticated animals

    OpenAIRE

    Bokkers, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Humans have many kinds of relationships with domesticated animals. To maintain relationships interactions are needed. Interactions with animals may be beneficial for humans but may also be risky. Scientific literature on effects of human¿animal relationships and interactions in a workplace, health-care and residential context has been reviewed to develop ideas about the effects farm animals can have on humans. Although there are quite a few studies, the variety of methods, the complexity of t...

  19. Predicting Drug Extraction in the Human Gut Wall: Assessing Contributions from Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporter Proteins using Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Jones, Christopher R; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Hatley, Oliver J D

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal metabolism can limit oral bioavailability of drugs and increase the risk of drug interactions. It is therefore important to be able to predict and quantify it in drug discovery and early development. In recent years, a plethora of models-in vivo, in situ and in vitro-have been discussed in the literature. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge in the quantitative prediction of gut-wall metabolism. As well as discussing the successes of current models for intestinal metabolism, the challenges in the establishment of good preclinical models are highlighted, including species differences in the isoforms; regional abundances and activities of drug metabolizing enzymes; the interplay of enzyme-transporter proteins; and lack of knowledge on enzyme abundances and availability of empirical scaling factors. Due to its broad specificity and high abundance in the intestine, CYP3A is the enzyme that is frequently implicated in human gut metabolism and is therefore the major focus of this review. A strategy to assess the impact of gut wall metabolism on oral bioavailability during drug discovery and early development phases is presented. Current gaps in the mechanistic understanding and the prediction of gut metabolism are highlighted, with suggestions on how they can be overcome in the future.

  20. New activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formentin, Marco; Lovison, Alberto; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent’s contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We furthermore show that this new behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one’s environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns might be universal, being present in other general interactive environments, and constrain future models of communication and interaction networks, affecting their architecture and evolution.

  1. Potency of Drugs Interaction among Geriatric Patients Prescribing: Retrospective Study in Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Annisa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Geriatric age is an age group that vulnerable to the problems which associated with drug use, one of them is the incidence of drug-drug interactions. This research, conducted to determine potential drug-drug interactions. Data processed through www.drugs.comdatabase. This evaluation explain the prevalence and classify types of potential interactions based on the level of interactions and medical specialities. Based on the total of 29.839 prescriptions from seven pharmacies in the Bandung city obtained 334 prescription sheet of geriatrics (1.12% and from that geriatric prescriptions, there are 4 prescriptions sheets (1.20 % that contain 1 R/, which means that in this prescriptions is do not have any potential for interaction. The number of R/ on prescription sheets which contain more than 1 R / is 1.136 with an average number of R/ on each sheet prescriptions is 3.40. Total of 131 (39.22% sheets of prescriptions contain potential drug-drug interaction. Total potential interactions that occur are 210 interactions. The moderate interaction potential is 187 (89.05%, while severe as much as 23 (10.95%. The incidence of moderate and severe potential interaction in the group of medical specialities are 85.50% interactions in general practitioners, 8.40% in internist, 2.30% in cardiologist, 2.30% in ENT, 0.76% in neurologists and 0.76% in dentist.

  2. Antiviral drugs for viruses other than human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-10-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M(2) protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M(2) inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects.

  3. Transport of dicationic drugs pentamidine and furamidine by human organic cation transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xin; Ju, Wujian; Wu, Huali; Tidwell, Richard R; Hall, James E; Thakker, Dhiren R

    2009-02-01

    The antiparasitic activity of aromatic diamidine drugs, pentamidine and furamidine, depends on their entry into the pathogenic protozoa via membrane transporters. However, no such diamidine transporter has been identified in mammalian cells. The goal of this study is to investigate whether these dicationic drugs are substrates for human organic cation transporters (hOCTs, solute carrier family 22A1-3) and whether hOCTs play a role in their tissue distribution, elimination, and toxicity. Inhibitory and substrate activities of pentamidine and furamidine were studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The results of [(3)H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium uptake study showed that pentamidine is a potent inhibitor for all three OCT isoforms (IC50 pentamidine and furamidine was 4.4- and 9.3-fold greater, respectively, in CHO-hOCT1 cells compared with the mock cells. Ranitidine, an hOCT1 inhibitor, reversed this hOCT1-mediated potentiation of cytotoxicity. This is the first finding that dicationic drugs, such as pentamidine and furamidine, are substrates for hOCT1. In humans, aromatic diamidines are primarily eliminated in the bile but are distributed and cause toxicity in both liver and kidney. These transporters may play important roles in the disposition of aromatic diamidines in humans, as well as resultant drug-drug interactions and toxicity involving diamidine drugs.

  4. Entecavir interacts with influx transporters hOAT1, hCNT2, hCNT3, but not with hOCT2: the potential for renal transporter-mediated cytotoxicity and drug-drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František eTrejtnar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Entecavir (ETV is one of the most potent agents for the treatment of the hepatitis B viral infection. The drug is principally eliminated by the kidney. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of ETV to interact in vitro with the renal SLC transporters hOAT1, hOCT2, hCNT2 and hCNT3. Potential drug-drug interactions of ETV at the renal transporters with antiviral drugs known to be excreted by the kidney (adefovir, tenofovir, cidofovir as well as transporter-dependent cytotoxicity were also examined. Interactions with the selected transporters along with cytotoxicity were studied in several transiently-transfected cellular models using specific substrates and inhibitors. ETV was found to be both a substrate and inhibitor of hOAT1 (IC50 = 175.3 µM, hCNT2 (IC50 = 241.9 µM and hCNT3 (IC50 = 278.4 µM transporters, although it interacted with the transporters with relatively low affinities. ETV inhibited the cellular uptake of adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir by hOAT1; however, effective inhibition was shown at ETV concentrations exceeding therapeutic levels. In comparison with adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir, ETV displayed no transporter-mediated cytotoxicity in cells transfected with hOAT1, hCNT2, and hCNT3. No significant interaction of ETV with hOCT2 was detected. The study demonstrates interactions of ETV with several human renal transporters. For the first time, an interaction of ETV with the hCNTs was proved. We show that the potency of ETV to cause nephrotoxicity and/or clinically significant drug-drug interactions related to the tested transporters is considerably lower than that of adefovir, tenofovir and cidofovir.

  5. Interactions between antihypertensive drugs and food Interacciones entre fármacos antihipertensivos y alimentos

    OpenAIRE

    B. Jáuregui-Garrido; I. Jáuregui-Lobera

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A drug interaction is defined as any alteration, pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics, produced by different substances, other drug treatments, dietary factors and habits such as drinking and smoking. These interactions can affect the antihypertensive drugs, altering their therapeutic efficacy and causing toxic effects. The aim of this study was to conduct a review of available data about interactions between antihypertensive agents and food. Methods: The purpose of this review...

  6. Optoelectronic investigation of nanodiamond interactions with human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Wróbel, M. S.; Wasowicz, M.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present optoelectronic investigation of in vitro interactions of whole human blood with different nanodiamond biomarkers. Plasmo-chemical modifications of detonation nanodiamond particles gives the possibility for controlling their surface for biological applications. Optical investigations reveal the biological activity of nanodiamonds in blood dependent on its surface termination. We compare different types of nanodiamonds: commercial non-modified detonation nanodiamonds, and nanodiamonds modified by MW PACVD method with H2-termination, and chemically modified nanodiamond with O2-termination. The absorption spectra, and optical microscope investigations were conducted. The results indicate haemocompatibility of non-modified detonation nanodiamond as well as modified nanodiamonds, which enables their application for drug delivery, as well as sensing applications.

  7. Interaction of aloe-emodin with human serum albumin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU JinFeng; LI Ying; ZHANG Qi; YAO XiaoJun

    2007-01-01

    The presence of several high affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HAS) makes it a possible target for many drugs. This study is designed to examine the effect of aloe-emodin on HAS by fluorescence, CD spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The results of fluorescence measurements suggested that the hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force stabilizing the AE-HAS complex, which was in good agreement with the result of molecular modeling study. And the enthalpy change ΔH0 and the entropy change ΔS0 were calculated to be -7.041 kJ·mol-1 and 76.619 J·mol-1·K-1 according to the Van't Hoff equation. The alterations of protein secondary structure in the presence of AE in aqueous solution were quantitatively calculated from CD spectra, and the content of α-helices obviously increased.

  8. Potential drug development candidates for human soil-transmitted helminthiases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Olliaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Few drugs are available for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH; the benzimidazoles albendazole and mebendazole are the only drugs being used for preventive chemotherapy as they can be given in one single dose with no weight adjustment. While generally safe and effective in reducing intensity of infection, they are contra-indicated in first-trimester pregnancy and have suboptimal efficacy against Trichuris trichiura. In addition, drug resistance is a threat. It is therefore important to find alternatives.We searched the literature and the animal health marketed products and pipeline for potential drug development candidates. Recently registered veterinary products offer advantages in that they have undergone extensive and rigorous animal testing, thus reducing the risk, cost and time to approval for human trials. For selected compounds, we retrieved and summarised publicly available information (through US Freedom of Information (FoI statements, European Public Assessment Reports (EPAR and published literature. Concomitantly, we developed a target product profile (TPP against which the products were compared.The paper summarizes the general findings including various classes of compounds, and more specific information on two veterinary anthelmintics (monepantel, emodepside and nitazoxanide, an antiprotozoal drug, compiled from the EMA EPAR and FDA registration files.Few of the compounds already approved for use in human or animal medicine qualify for development track decision. Fast-tracking to approval for human studies may be possible for veterinary compounds like emodepside and monepantel, but additional information remains to be acquired before an informed decision can be made.

  9. The mechanisms responsible for garlic - drug interactions and their in vivo relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berginc, Katja; Kristl, Albin

    2013-01-01

    Garlic phytochemicals and garlic supplements influence the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior of concomitantly ingested drugs. In this paper we have summarized the mechanisms responsible for first-pass intestinal pharmacokinetic interactions by investigating the intestinal permeability of some cardiovascular, antiviral drugs, their transport with hepatic transporters and CYP3A4 metabolism. Transporter-enzyme interplay was studied with several in vitro models of varying complexity: rat small intestine and Caco-2 cell monolayers were used in studies of intestinal processes, and hepatic pharmacokinetics was monitored in HepG2 cells, isolated rat hepatocytes and rat liver slices. Garlic phytochemicals from aged garlic extract modified the activities of secretory and absorptive transporters in both intestine and liver and competitively inhibited CYP3A4 enzyme. The increased activities of the most important intestinal efflux (P-glycoprotein - Pgp, Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein 2 - MRP-2, Breast Cancer Resistance Protein - BCRP) and uptake (MonoCarboxylate Transporter 1 - MCT1, Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide - OATP, Peptide transporter 1 - PepT1) transporters were caused by changes in electrophysiological membrane properties and by allosteric modifications. Because clinical studies investigating interactions between garlic and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors saquinavir and ritonavir have already been performed, we used these in vivo data to evaluate the in vitro results and the reliability of the models employed as screening tools for forecasting the potential of first-pass intestinal metabolism changes. We also assessed the probability of pharmacokinetic interactions with garlic of the novel drug darunavir and other cardiovascular drugs. Finally, selected garlic phytochemicals were tested for their ability to influence P-glycoprotein and CYP3A4 activities.

  10. Interplay of Multiple Interaction Forces: Binding of Norfloxacin to Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2015-10-15

    Herein, the binding interaction of a potential chemotherapeutic antibacterial drug norfloxacin (NOF) with a serum transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA), is investigated. The prototropic transformation of the drug (NOF) is found to be remarkably modified following interaction with the protein as manifested through significant modulations of the photophysics of the drug. The predominant zwitterionic form of NOF in aqueous buffer phase undergoes transformation to the cationic form within the protein-encapsulated state. This implies the possible role of electrostatic interaction force in NOF-HSA binding. This postulate is further substantiated from the effect of ionic strength on the interaction process. To this end, the detailed study of the thermodynamics of the drug-protein interaction process from isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) experiments is found to unfold the signature of electrostatic as well as hydrophobic interaction forces underlying the binding process. Thus, interplay of more than one interaction forces is argued to be responsible for the overall drug-protein binding. The ITC results reveal an important finding in terms of enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) characterizing the NOF-HSA binding. The effect of drug-binding on the native protein conformation has also been evaluated from circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy which unveils partial rupture of the protein secondary structure. In conjunction to this, the functionality of the native protein (in terms of esterase-like activity) is found to be lowered as a result of binding with NOF. The AutoDock-based docking simulation unravels the probable binding location of NOF within the hydrophilic subdomain IA of HSA. The present program also focuses on exploring the dynamical aspects of the drug-protein interaction scenario. The rotational-relaxation dynamics of the protein-bound drug reveals the not-so-common "dip-and-rise" pattern.

  11. On the Rhetorical Contract in Human-Computer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    An exploration of the rhetorical contract--i.e., the expectations for appropriate interaction--as it develops in human-computer interaction revealed that direct manipulation interfaces were more likely to establish social expectations. Study results suggest that the social nature of human-computer interactions can be examined with reference to the…

  12. HIV-1, human interaction database: current status and new features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako-Adjei, Danso; Fu, William; Wallin, Craig; Katz, Kenneth S; Song, Guangfeng; Darji, Dakshesh; Brister, J Rodney; Ptak, Roger G; Pruitt, Kim D

    2015-01-01

    The 'Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), Human Interaction Database', available through the National Library of Medicine at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/retroviruses/hiv-1/interactions, serves the scientific community exploring the discovery of novel HIV vaccine candidates and therapeutic targets. Each HIV-1 human protein interaction can be retrieved without restriction by web-based downloads and ftp protocols and includes: Reference Sequence (RefSeq) protein accession numbers, National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene identification numbers, brief descriptions of the interactions, searchable keywords for interactions and PubMed identification numbers (PMIDs) of journal articles describing the interactions. In addition to specific HIV-1 protein-human protein interactions, included are interaction effects upon HIV-1 replication resulting when individual human gene expression is blocked using siRNA. A total of 3142 human genes are described participating in 12,786 protein-protein interactions, along with 1316 replication interactions described for each of 1250 human genes identified using small interfering RNA (siRNA). Together the data identifies 4006 human genes involved in 14,102 interactions. With the inclusion of siRNA interactions we introduce a redesigned web interface to enhance viewing, filtering and downloading of the combined data set.

  13. Soil and Human Interactions in Maya Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Timothy; Luzzadder-Beach, Sheryl

    2013-04-01

    Since the early 1990s, we have studied Maya interaction with soils in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, and elsewhere. We studied upland and lowland soils, but here we focus on seasonal or 'Bajo' wetlands and perennial wetlands for different reasons. Around the bajos, the ancient Maya focused on intensive agriculture and habitation despite the difficulties their Vertisol soils posed. For the perennial wetlands, small populations spread diffusely through Mollisol and Histisol landscapes with large scale, intensive agro-ecosystems. These wetlands also represent important repositories for both environmental change and how humans responded in situ to environmental changes. Work analyzing bajo soils has recorded significant diversity but the soil and sediment record shows two main eras of soil instability: the Pleistocene-Holocene transition as rainfall fluctuated and increased and tropical forest pulsed through the region, and the Maya Preclassic to Classic 3000 to 1000 BP as deforestation, land use intensity, and drying waxed and waned. The ancient Maya adapted their bajo soil ecosystems successfully through agro-engineering but they also withdrew in many important places in the Late Preclassic about 2000 BP and Terminal Classic about 1200 BP. We continue to study and debate the importance of perennial wetland agro-ecosystems, but it is now clear that Maya interaction with these soil landscapes was significant and multifaceted. Based on soil excavation and coring with a broad toolkit of soil stratigraphy, chemistry, and paleoecology from 2001 to 2013, our results show the ancient Maya interacted with their wetland soils to maintain cropland for maize, tree crops, arrow root, and cassava against relative sea level rise, increased flooding, and aggradation by gypsum precipitation and sedimentation. We have studied these interactions across an area of 2000 km2 in Northern Belize to understand how Maya response varied and how these soil environments varied over time and distance

  14. Integral membrane pyrophosphatases: a novel drug target for human pathogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Xhaard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-integral pyrophosphatases (mPPases are found in several human pathogens, including Plasmodium species, the protozoan parasites that cause malaria. These enzymes hydrolyze pyrophosphate and couple this to the pumping of ions (H+ and/or Na+ across a membrane to generate an electrochemical gradient. mPPases play an important role in stress tolerance in plants, protozoan parasites, and bacteria. The solved structures of mPPases from Vigna radiata and Thermotoga maritima open the possibility of using structure-based drug design to generate novel molecules or repurpose known molecules against this enzyme. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding mPPases, focusing on their structure, the proposed mechanism of action, and their role in human pathogens. We also summarize different methodologies in structure-based drug design and propose an example region on the mPPase structure that can be exploited by these structure-based methods for drug targeting. Since mPPases are not found in animals and humans, this enzyme is a promising potential drug target against livestock and human pathogens.

  15. Stabilization of Protein-Protein Interactions in chemical biology and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Thiel, Philipp; Briels, Jeroen; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    More than 300,000 Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) can be found in human cells. This number is significantly larger than the number of single proteins, which are the classical targets for pharmacological intervention. Hence, specific and potent modulation of PPIs by small, drug-like molecules would tremendously enlarge the "druggable genome" enabling novel ways of drug discovery for essentially every human disease. This strategy is especially promising in diseases with difficult targets like intrinsically disordered proteins or transcription factors, for example neurodegeneration or metabolic diseases. Whereas the potential of PPI modulation has been recognized in terms of the development of inhibitors that disrupt or prevent a binary protein complex, the opposite (or complementary) strategy to stabilize PPIs has not yet been realized in a systematic manner. This fact is rather surprising given the number of impressive natural product examples that confer their activity by stabilizing specific PPIs. In addition, in recent years more and more examples of synthetic molecules are being published that work as PPI stabilizers, despite the fact that in the majority they initially have not been designed as such. Here, we describe examples from both the natural products as well as the synthetic molecules advocating for a stronger consideration of the PPI stabilization approach in chemical biology and drug discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coupling Data Mining and Laboratory Experiments to Discover Drug Interactions Causing QT Prolongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorberbaum, Tal; Sampson, Kevin J; Chang, Jeremy B; Iyer, Vivek; Woosley, Raymond L; Kass, Robert S; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2016-10-18

    QT interval-prolonging drug-drug interactions (QT-DDIs) may increase the risk of life-threatening arrhythmia. Despite guidelines for testing from regulatory agencies, these interactions are usually discovered after drugs are marketed and may go undiscovered for years. Using a combination of adverse event reports, electronic health records (EHR), and laboratory experiments, the goal of this study was to develop a data-driven pipeline for discovering QT-DDIs. 1.8 million adverse event reports were mined for signals indicating a QT-DDI. Using 1.6 million electrocardiogram results from 380,000 patients in our institutional EHR, these putative interactions were either refuted or corroborated. In the laboratory, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology to measure the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel block (the primary mechanism by which drugs prolong the QT interval) to evaluate our top candidate. Both direct and indirect signals in the adverse event reports provided evidence that the combination of ceftriaxone (a cephalosporin antibiotic) and lansoprazole (a proton-pump inhibitor) will prolong the QT interval. In the EHR, we found that patients taking both ceftriaxone and lansoprazole had significantly longer QTc intervals (up to 12 ms in white men) and were 1.4 times more likely to have a QTc interval above 500 ms. In the laboratory, we found that, in combination and at clinically relevant concentrations, these drugs blocked the hERG channel. As a negative control, we evaluated the combination of lansoprazole and cefuroxime (another cephalosporin), which lacked evidence of an interaction in the adverse event reports. We found no significant effect of this pair in either the EHR or in the electrophysiology experiments. Class effect analyses suggested this interaction was specific to lansoprazole combined with ceftriaxone but not with other cephalosporins. Coupling data mining and laboratory experiments is an efficient method for identifying QT

  17. Rhabdomyolysis secondary to drug interaction between atorvastatin, omeprazole, and dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elazzazy S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Shereen Elazzazy,1 Saad S Eziada,2 Manal Zaidan11Pharmacy Department, 2Oncology Hematology Department, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, QatarAbstract: Concomitant administration of atorvastatin, omeprazole, and dexamethasone has been shown to increase the serum concentration of serum hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A which can be associated with elevation of creatine kinase and an increased risk of severe myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. In this paper, we report a case of a 60-year-old female patient with stage IV colon cancer and compromised hepatic function receiving palliative care who developed rhabdomyolysis while taking atorvastatin, omeprazole, and dexamethasone. Atorvastatin was stopped, and the dexamethasone dose was decreased. Her case was complicated by urosepsis cultures revealing an extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain of Escherichia coli, and she died on the second day after admission. Physicians should evaluate the risk/benefit ratio of continuing statins in palliative care patients, and pay special attention to the monitoring of patients on statins and P-glycoprotein inhibitors regardless of hepatic function.Keywords: statins, rhabdomyolysis, drug–drug interaction, P-glycoprotein inhibitors

  18. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of morphine, codeine, and their derivatives: theory and clinical reality, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Scott C; Cozza, Kelly L

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, and buprenorphine are reviewed in this column. These compounds have a very similar chemical structure to morphine. Unlike morphine, which is metabolized chiefly through conjugation reactions with uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes, these five drugs are metabolized both through oxidative reactions by the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme and conjugation by UGT enzymes. There is controversy as to whether codeine, dihydrocodeine, and hydrocodone are actually prodrugs requiring activation by the CYP450 2D6 enzyme or UGT enzymes. Oxycodone and buprenorphine, however, are clearly not prodrugs and are metabolized by the CYP450 2D6 and 3A4 enzymes, respectively. Knowledge of this metabolism assists in the understanding for the potential of drug-drug interactions with these drugs. This understanding is important so that clinicians can choose the proper dosages for analgesia and anticipate potential drug-drug interactions.

  19. Construction of a cancer-perturbed protein-protein interaction network for discovery of apoptosis drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is caused by genetic abnormalities, such as mutations of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, which alter downstream signal transduction pathways and protein-protein interactions. Comparisons of the interactions of proteins in cancerous and normal cells can shed light on the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Results We constructed initial networks of protein-protein interactions involved in the apoptosis of cancerous and normal cells by use of two human yeast two-hybrid data sets and four online databases. Next, we applied a nonlinear stochastic model, maximum likelihood parameter estimation, and Akaike Information Criteria (AIC to eliminate false-positive protein-protein interactions in our initial protein interaction networks by use of microarray data. Comparisons of the networks of apoptosis in HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cells and in normal primary lung fibroblasts provided insight into the mechanism of apoptosis and allowed identification of potential drug targets. The potential targets include BCL2, caspase-3 and TP53. Our comparison of cancerous and normal cells also allowed derivation of several party hubs and date hubs in the human protein-protein interaction networks involved in caspase activation. Conclusion Our method allows identification of cancer-perturbed protein-protein interactions involved in apoptosis and identification of potential molecular targets for development of anti-cancer drugs.

  20. [Drug-food interactions in internal medicine: What physicians should know?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouly, S; Morgand, M; Lopes, A; Lloret-Linares, C; Bergmann, J-F

    2015-08-01

    Orally administered medications may interact with various fruits, vegetables, herbal medicines, functional foods or dietary supplements. Drug-food interactions, which are mostly unknown from prescribers, including internists, may be responsible for changes in drug plasma concentrations, which may decrease efficacy or led to sometimes life-threatening toxicity. Aging, concomitant medications, transplant recipients, patients with cancer, malnutrition, HIV infection and those receiving enteral or parenteral feeding are at increased risk of drug-food interactions. This review focused on the most clinically relevant drug-food interactions, including those with grapefruit juice, Saint-John's Wort, enteral or parenteral nutrition, their respective consequences in the clinical setting in order to provide thoughtful information for internists in their routine clinical practice. Specific clinical settings are also detailed, such as the Ramadan or multiple medications especially in elderly patients. Drug-food interactions are also presented with respect to the main therapeutic families, including the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, cardiovascular medications, warfarin as well as new oral anticoagulants, anticancer drugs and immunosuppressant medications. Considerable effort has been achieved to a better understanding of food-drug interactions and increase clinicians' ability to anticipate their occurrence and consequences in clinical practice. Describing the frequency of relevant food-drug interactions in internal medicine is paramount in order to optimize patient care and drug dosing on an individual basis as well as to increase patients and doctors information.

  1. Sequence, Stability, Structure of G-Quadruplexes and Their Drug Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuwei; Yang, Danzhou

    2012-01-01

    Although DNA is most widely known to store and pass along genetic information, the discovery of G-quadruplex structures has illuminated a new role of DNA in biology. DNA G-quadruplexes are four-stranded globular nucleic acid secondary structures formed in specific G-rich sequences with biological significance, such as human telomeres and oncogene promoters. This review focuses on the unimolecular DNA G-quadruplexes, which can readily form in solution under physiological conditions and are considered to be most biologically relevant. Available structural data show a great conformational diversity of unimolecular G-quadruplexes, amenable to small molecule drug targeting. The relationship of sequence, structure, and stability of unimolecular DNA G-quadruplexes, as well as the recent progress on interactions with small molecule compounds and insights into rational design of G-quadruplex-interactive molecules, will be discussed. PMID:22956454

  2. Interaction of anticancer drug methotrexate with nucleic acids analyzed by multi-spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang

    2009-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) as an antifolate, which is widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. A high-dose MTX therapy has a direct toxicity influence on the non-germinal cells, especially the liver cells. It is known that the inject dose for adults is 10-30 mg and is half for children for routine use, while our experiments showed that the optimum dosage of MTX which enhanced the RLS intensities to the maximum is 4.54 ng ml -1. The interaction of methotrexate (MTX) with nucleic acids in aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), a kind of cationic surfactant similar to the Human cells, were investigated based on the measurements of resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis, fluorescence and NMR spectra, etc. The interaction has been proved to give a ternary complex of MTX-CTMAB-DNA in BR buffer (pH 9.30), which exhibits strong enhanced RLS signals at 339.5 nm.

  3. Prescriptive Oriented Drug Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Disease by LC-UV in Whole Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneetha, A; Rajeswari, Raja K

    2016-02-01

    As a polytherapy treatment, multiple sclerosis disease demands prescriptions with more than one drug. Polytherapy is sometimes rational for drug combinations chosen to minimize adverse effects. Estimation of drugs that are concomitantly administered in polytherapy is acceptable as it shortens the analytical timepoints and also the usage of biological matrices. In clinical phase trials, the withdrawal of biofluids is a critical issue for each analysis. Estimating all the coadminsitered drugs in a single shot will be more effective and economical for pharmaceuticals. A single, simple, rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography assay method has been developed with UV detection and fully validated for the quantification of 14 drugs (at random combinations) used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis disease. The set of combinations was based on prescriptions to patients. Separations were achieved on an X-Terra MS C18 (100 × 3.9 mm, 5 µm) column. The analytes were extracted from 50 µL aliquots of whole human blood with protein precipitation using acetonitrile. All the drugs were sufficiently stable during storage for 24 h at room temperature and for 23 days at 2-8°C. The percentage recoveries of all drugs were between 90 and 115%, with RSD values drug interaction studies.

  4. Small-world networks of residue interactions in the Abl kinase complexes with cancer drugs: topology of allosteric communication pathways can determine drug resistance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, A; Verkhivker, G M