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Sample records for human dose trial

  1. Human Phase 1 trial of low-dose inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David L; Sajkov, Dimitar; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Wilks, Samuel H; Aban, Malet; Barr, Ian G; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-07-19

    Influenza vaccines are usually non-adjuvanted but addition of adjuvant may improve immunogenicity and permit dose-sparing, critical for vaccine supply in the event of an influenza pandemic. The aim of this first-in-man study was to determine the effect of delta inulin adjuvant on the safety and immunogenicity of a reduced dose seasonal influenza vaccine. Healthy male and female adults aged 18-65years were recruited to participate in a randomized controlled study to compare the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a reduced-dose 2007 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant (LTIV+Adj) when compared to a full-dose of the standard TIV vaccine which does not contain an adjuvant. LTIV+Adj provided equivalent immunogenicity to standard TIV vaccine as assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays against each vaccine strain as well as against a number of heterosubtypic strains. HI responses were sustained at 3months post-immunisation in both groups. Antibody landscapes against a large panel of H3N2 influenza viruses showed distinct age effects whereby subjects over 40years old had a bimodal baseline HI distribution pattern, with the highest HI titers against the very oldest H3N2 isolates and with a second HI peak against influenza isolates from the last 5-10years. By contrast, subjects >40years had a unimodal baseline HI distribution with peak recognition of H3N2 isolates from approximately 20years ago. The reduced dose TIV vaccine containing Advax adjuvant was well tolerated and no safety issues were identified. Hence, delta inulin may be a useful adjuvant for use in seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12607000599471.

  2. Evaluating dose response from flexible dose clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baron David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The true dose effect in flexible-dose clinical trials may be obscured and even reversed because dose and outcome are related. Methods To evaluate dose effect in response on primary efficacy scales from 2 randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose trials of patients with bipolar mania who received olanzapine (N = 234, 5–20 mg/day, or patients with schizophrenia who received olanzapine (N = 172, 10–20 mg/day, we used marginal structural models, inverse probability of treatment weighting (MSM, IPTW methodology. Dose profiles for mean changes from baseline were evaluated using weighted MSM with a repeated measures model. To adjust for selection bias due to non-random dose assignment and dropouts, patient-specific time-dependent weights were determined as products of (i stable weights based on inverse probability of receiving the sequence of dose assignments that was actually received by a patient up to given time multiplied by (ii stable weights based on inverse probability of patient remaining on treatment by that time. Results were compared with those by unweighted analyses. Results While the observed difference in efficacy scores for dose groups for the unweighted analysis strongly favored lower doses, the weighted analyses showed no strong dose effects and, in some cases, reversed the apparent "negative dose effect." Conclusion While naïve comparison of groups by last or modal dose in a flexible-dose trial may result in severely biased efficacy analyses, the MSM with IPTW estimators approach may be a valuable method of removing these biases and evaluating potential dose effect, which may prove useful for planning confirmatory trials.

  3. Derivation of Human Lethal Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-19

    Hardman, JG; Limbird, LE; Goodman Gilman , A, (editors). (2001) Goodman and Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. New York, NY: McGraw... Goodman and Gilman’s N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans; no LD50 for rat or mouse NIOSH N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans; no LD50...Basis of Therapeutics– Goodman and Gilman’s N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans; no LD50 for rat or mouse NIOSH N/A No LDLo, MLD, or lethal

  4. Pharmacokinetics of single oral dose trazodone : a randomized, two-period, cross-over trial in healthy, adult, human volunteers under fed condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRASHANT eKALE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the bioequivalence of single dose trazodone hydrochloride USP 100 mg tablets administered as an oral dose under fed condition. Methods This study was an open-label, balanced, randomized, two-sequence, two-treatment, two-period, single oral dose, crossover bioequivalence study in healthy, adult, human subjects under fed conditions. After an overnight fast of at least 10 hours, the subjects were served a high fat and high calorie vegetarian breakfast, which they were required to consume within 30 minutes. A single oral dose (100 mg of either the test or the reference product was administered to the subjects. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0-t and extrapolated to infinity (AUC0- were compared by an analysis of variance using log-transformed data. Bioequivalence was concluded if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs of the adjusted geometric mean (gMean ratios for Cmax and AUC were within the predetermined range of 80%-125%, in accordance with regulatory requirements. Results For the test formulation, the trazodone gMean Cmax was 1480.9 ng/mL (vs. 1520.2 ng/mL for reference, AUC0-t was 18193.0 ng·h/mL (vs. 18209.8 ng·h/mL and AUC0- was 19346.3 ng·h/mL (vs. 19393.4 ng·h/mL. The 90% CIs for the ratio (test/reference were 93.0-102.0% for Cmax, 96.7-103.2% for AUC0-t and 96.1-103.5% for AUC0-. There were no deaths or serious adverse events during the conduct of the study. Conclusion Test product when compared with the Reference product meets the bioequivalence criteria with respect to the rate and extent of absorption of Trazodone under fed condition.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of single oral dose trazodone: a randomized, two-period, cross-over trial in healthy, adult, human volunteers under fed condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Prashant; Agrawal, Yadvendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the bioequivalence of single dose trazodone hydrochloride USP 100 mg tablets administered as an oral dose under fed condition. Methods:This study was an open-label, balanced, randomized, two-sequence, two-treatment, two-period, single oral dose, crossover bioequivalence study in healthy, adult, human subjects under fed conditions. After an overnight fast of at least 10 h, the subjects were served a high fat and high calorie vegetarian breakfast, which they were required to consume within 30 min. A single oral dose (100 mg) of either the test or the reference product was administered to the subjects. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0−t) and extrapolated to infinity (AUC0−∞) were compared by an analysis of variance using log-transformed data. Bioequivalence was concluded if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the adjusted geometric mean (gMean) ratios for Cmax and AUC were within the predetermined range of 80–125%, in accordance with regulatory requirements. Results:For the test formulation, the trazodone gMean Cmax was 1480.9 ng/mL (vs. 1520.2 ng/mL for reference), AUC0−t was 18193.0 ng·h/mL (vs. 18209.8 ng·h/mL) and AUC0−∞ was 19346.3 ng·h/mL (vs. 19393.4 ng·h/mL). The 90% CIs for the ratio (test/reference) were 93.0–102.0% for Cmax, 96.7–103.2% for AUC0−t and 96.1–103.5% for AUC0−∞. There were no deaths or serious adverse events during the conduct of the study. Conclusion:Test product when compared with the Reference product meets the bioequivalence criteria with respect to the extent of absorption of trazodone under fed condition. PMID:26483693

  6. CLINICAL TRIAL OF LOW DOSE GOSSYPOL REGIMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUZhi-Ping; ZHANGRcn-An; WANGYi-Xin; DANGYong-Zhi; CHENGZhen-Xing; S.J.Scgal

    1989-01-01

    Hypokalemia and irreversible infertility induced by the gossypol treatment have prcvented its clinical use on a large scale as a male contraceptive. In order to avoid these serious side effects, doses of gossypol, both in the loading phase and in the maintenance phase were

  7. The Role of Age on Dose Limiting Toxicities (DLTs) in Phase I Dose-escalation Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, A; Harris, P. J.; Hunsberger, S.; Deleporte, A.; Smith, G. L.; Vulih, D.; Anderson, B. D.; Ivy, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elderly oncology patients are not enrolled in early phase trials in proportion to the numbers of geriatric patients with cancer. There may be concern that elderly patients will not tolerate investigational agents as well as younger patients resulting in a disproportionate number of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). Recent single-institution studies provide conflicting data on the relationship between age and DLT. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed data about patients treated on single-agent, dose-escalation, phase I clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) of the National Cancer Institute. Patients’ dose levels were described as percentage of maximum tolerated dose (%MTD), the highest dose level at which <33% of patients had a DLT, or recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Mixed-effect logistic regression models were used to analyze relationships between the probability of a DLT and age and other explanatory variables. Results Increasing dose, increasing age, and worsening performance status (PS) were significantly related to an increased probability of a DLT in this model (p<0.05). There was no association between dose level administered and age (p=0.57). Conclusions This analysis of phase I dose-escalation trials involving over 500 patients older than 70 years of age, is the largest reported. As age and dose level increased and PS worsened, the probability of a DLT increased. While increasing age was associated with occurrence of DLT, this risk remained within accepted thresholds of risk for phase I trials. There was no evidence of age bias on enrollment of patients on low or high dose levels. PMID:25028396

  8. Dose Titration Algorithm Tuning (DTAT) should supersede 'the' Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) in oncology dose-finding trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, David C

    2017-01-01

    Background. Absent adaptive, individualized dose-finding in early-phase oncology trials, subsequent 'confirmatory' Phase III trials risk suboptimal dosing, with resulting loss of statistical power and reduced probability of technical success for the investigational therapy. While progress has been made toward explicitly adaptive dose-finding and quantitative modeling of dose-response relationships, most such work continues to be organized around a concept of 'the' maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate concretely how the aim of early-phase trials might be conceived, not as 'dose-finding', but as dose titration algorithm (DTA)-finding. Methods. A Phase I dosing study is simulated, for a notional cytotoxic chemotherapy drug, with neutropenia constituting the critical dose-limiting toxicity. The drug's population pharmacokinetics and myelosuppression dynamics are simulated using published parameter estimates for docetaxel. The amenability of this model to linearization is explored empirically. The properties of a simple DTA targeting neutrophil nadir of 500 cells/mm (3) using a Newton-Raphson heuristic are explored through simulation in 25 simulated study subjects. Results. Individual-level myelosuppression dynamics in the simulation model approximately linearize under simple transformations of neutrophil concentration and drug dose. The simulated dose titration exhibits largely satisfactory convergence, with great variance in individualized optimal dosing. Some titration courses exhibit overshooting. Conclusions. The large inter-individual variability in simulated optimal dosing underscores the need to replace 'the' MTD with an individualized concept of MTD i . To illustrate this principle, the simplest possible DTA capable of realizing such a concept is demonstrated. Qualitative phenomena observed in this demonstration support discussion of the notion of tuning such algorithms. Although here illustrated specifically in relation to

  9. Can a nonequivalent choice of dosing regimen bias the results of flexible dose double blind trials? The CATIE schizophrenia trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, Robert A; Davis, Vicki G; Davis, Sonia M; Stroup, Scott; McEvoy, Joseph; Swartz, Marvin; Lieberman, Jeffrey

    2009-08-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of double-blind flexible-dosing clinical trials comparing active drugs is the selection of dosing regimens that are equivalent across drugs. This study uses data from the CATIE schizophrenia trial to evaluate the hypothesis that drugs that were dosed somewhat higher in the trial than in typical practice would show greater efficacy and more side effects, especially at high capsule levels, than drugs that were dosed at lower relative strengths. CATIE was a large (N=1460) randomized trial comparing 5 antipsychotics in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The blind was maintained in CATIE by prescribing identical-looking capsules of each medication. Dosing was flexible, such that PIs could prescribe from one to four capsules per day, and could modify the dose based on a patient's symptoms and side effects. Capsule strengths for olanzapine (7.5 mg) and quetiapine (200 mg) were relatively higher than for risperidone (1.5 mg), perphenazine (8 mg) or ziprasidone (40 mg). Proportional hazards models of time to all cause discontinuation and mixed regression models for continuous measures of symptoms, quality of life and side effects were used to test for interactions between randomly assigned drug and number of capsules prescribed per visit. We hypothesized that if a dosing bias was present, the flex-dosing design would result in a significant interaction such that drugs with higher relative dosing per capsule would be more effective and have more side effects than drugs with lower relative dosing and that this effect would be greatest at the largest prescribed dosing regimen (4 capsules). There were no significant interactions between drug assignment and number of capsules in the proportional hazards analyses of time to all cause discontinuation (p=.77, excluding ziprasidone and .74 in the ziprasidone cohort) or in the mixed model analysis of PANSS symptoms (p=.49), quality of life (p=.45); or measures of tardive dyskinesia (AIMS, p

  10. Randomised community-based trial of annual single-dose diethylcarbamazine with or without ivermectin against Wuchereria bancrofti infection in human beings and mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockarie, M J; Alexander, N D; Hyun, P; Dimber, Z; Bockarie, F; Ibam, E; Alpers, M P; Kazura, J W

    1998-01-17

    WHO has targeted lymphatic filariasis for elimination. Studies of vector-parasite relations of Wuchereria bancrofti suggest that a reduction in the microfilarial reservoir by mass chemotherapy may interrupt transmission and thereby eliminate infection. However, no field data exist on the impact of chemotherapy alone on vector efficiency and transmission intensity of W bancrofti. We compared the impact of an annual community-wide single-dose treatment with diethylcarbamazine alone or with ivermectin on rate and intensity of microfilaraemia, and transmission intensity in an area of Papua New Guinea endemic for intense W bancrofti transmission. We carried out clinical and parasitological surveys in 14 communities in matched pairs. People aged 5 years or older in seven communities received randomly assigned diethylcarbamazine 6 mg/kg and people in the other seven communities received diethylcarbamazine 6 mg/kg plus ivermectin 400 micrograms/kg. We made physical examinations for hydroceles and leg oedema and investigated microfilarial densities by membrane filtration before and after treatment. We selected five communities for monthly entomological surveys between September, 1993, and September, 1995. Mosquitoes were collected in these communities by the all-night landing catch method and were individually dissected to identify rates of infection and infectiveness. 2219 (87.6%) of 2534 eligible people received treatment. Microfilarial rate and density had decreased 1 year after treatment in all 14 communities; this decrease was significantly higher in communities given combined therapy than in those given diethylcarbamazine alone (mean decreases 57.5% and 30.6%, respectively; p = 0.0013). Greater decreases were also seen in community-specific microfilarial intensity with combined therapy (mean reductions 91.1% and 69.8%, respectively; p = 0.0047). The rate of leg oedema was not altered, but the frequency of advanced hydroceles decreased by 47% with combined therapy and

  11. Biological equivalent dose studies for dose escalation in the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y.; Fois, G.; Edouard, M.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Requardt, H.; Esteve, F.; Adam, JF.; Elleaume, H.; Bravin, A., E-mail: prezado@esrf.fr [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2009-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation is an innovative tool for the treatment of brain tumors. In the stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) technique a radiation dose enhancement specific to the tumor is obtained. The tumor is loaded with a high atomic number (Z) element and it is irradiated in stereotactic conditions from several entrance angles. The aim of this work was to assess dosimetric properties of the SSRT for preparing clinical trials at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To estimate the possible risks, the doses received by the tumor and healthy tissues in the future clinical conditions have been calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations (PENELOPE code). The dose enhancement factors have been determined for different iodine concentrations in the tumor, several tumor positions, tumor sizes, and different beam sizes. A scheme for the dose escalation in the various phases of the clinical trials has been proposed. The biological equivalent doses and the normalized total doses received by the skull have been calculated in order to assure that the tolerance values are not reached.

  12. HiLo: Multicentre randomized phase III clinical trial of high vs low dose radioiodine, with or without recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH), for remnant ablation for differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, U. [Freeman Hospital, Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Harmer, C.; Clarke, S.; Moss, L.; Nicol, A.; Clarke, P.; Smellie, J.; McCready, R.; Farnell, K.; Franklyn, J.; John, R.; Nutting, C.; Yap, B.; Lemon, C.; Wadlsey, J.; Gerrard, G.; Roques, T.; Macias, E.; Whitaker, S.; Abdul-Hamid, A.; Alvarez, P.; Kadalayil, L.; Hackshaw, A.

    2012-07-01

    Recommended treatment for most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is surgery followed by radioiodine ablation. Current practice in many centres is to use a high administered activity of 3.7 GBq (100 mCi). However, a lower activity (1.1 GBq or 30 mCi) has advantages including a shorter stay in hospital isolation and lower risk of side effects, including the risk of a second cancer. Also, Thyrogen (rhTSH) allows patients to continue thyroid hormone replacement during ablation, avoiding symptoms of hypothyroidism and also reduces total body radiation dose. We conducted a large randomized factorial multi centre trial to simultaneously address whether ablation success rates are similar using (i) either 1.1 GBq or 3.7 GBq, and (ii) either Thyrogen or thyroid hormone withdrawal. It is the first ever national prospective trial in thyroid cancer in the UK. Final results will be available in 2011

  13. From total empiricism to a rational design of metronomic chemotherapy phase I dosing trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Thomas; Hetherington, John W; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2006-02-01

    'Metronomic chemotherapy' represents a novel anti-angiogenic strategy whereby low-dose chemotherapy is utilized in a continuous fashion in order to target tumor endothelium. There are many potential advantages of this strategy and clinical trials are already underway. However, although the scheduling of metronomic chemotherapy is relatively unequivocal, metronomic dosing principles are at present poorly defined. Arbitrarily, 10-33% of the maximum tolerated dose comprises 'the dose range'. We argue that this is too empirical and propose a set of phase I metronomic chemotherapy dosing strategies based on a principled approach which may help to reduce the problem of empiricism in dosing for metronomic chemotherapy trials.

  14. Direct determination of internal radiation dose in human blood

    OpenAIRE

    Tanır, Ayse Güneş; Güleç, Özge

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the internal radiation dose using a human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of the internal radiation dose received by a person. The luminescence counts from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose and the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes were both measured. The decay and dose-response curves were plotted for the different doses...

  15. Clinical trial in healthy malaria-naïve adults to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and efficacy of MuStDO5, a five-gene, sporozoite/hepatic stage Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine combined with escalating dose human GM-CSF DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Thomas L.; Charoenvit, Yupin; Wang, Ruobing; Epstein, Judith E.; Hedstrom, Richard C.; Kumar, Sanjai; Luke, Thomas C.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Sacci, Jr., John B.; Sedegah, Martha; Nosek, Jr., Ronald A.; De La Vega, Patricia; Berzins, Mara P.; Majam, Victoria F.; Abot, Esteban N.; Ganeshan, Harini; Richie, Nancy O.; Banania, Jo Glenna; Baraceros, Maria Fe B.; Geter, Tanya G.; Mere, Robin; Bebris, Lolita; Limbach, Keith; Hickey, Bradley W.; Lanar, David E.; Ng, Jennifer; Shi, Meng; Hobart, Peter M.; Norman, Jon A.; Soisson, Lorraine A.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Rogers, William O.; Doolan, Denise L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    When introduced in the 1990s, immunization with DNA plasmids was considered potentially revolutionary for vaccine development, particularly for vaccines intended to induce protective CD8 T cell responses against multiple antigens. We conducted, in 1997−1998, the first clinical trial in healthy humans of a DNA vaccine, a single plasmid encoding Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), as an initial step toward developing a multi-antigen malaria vaccine targeting the liver stages of the parasite. As the next step, we conducted in 2000–2001 a clinical trial of a five-plasmid mixture called MuStDO5 encoding pre-erythrocytic antigens PfCSP, PfSSP2/TRAP, PfEXP1, PfLSA1 and PfLSA3. Thirty-two, malaria-naïve, adult volunteers were enrolled sequentially into four cohorts receiving a mixture of 500 μg of each plasmid plus escalating doses (0, 20, 100 or 500 μg) of a sixth plasmid encoding human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF). Three doses of each formulation were administered intramuscularly by needle-less jet injection at 0, 4 and 8 weeks, and each cohort had controlled human malaria infection administered by five mosquito bites 18 d later. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, inducing moderate antigen-specific, MHC-restricted T cell interferon-γ responses but no antibodies. Although no volunteers were protected, T cell responses were boosted post malaria challenge. This trial demonstrated the MuStDO5 DNA and hGM-CSF plasmids to be safe and modestly immunogenic for T cell responses. It also laid the foundation for priming with DNA plasmids and boosting with recombinant viruses, an approach known for nearly 15 y to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:23151451

  16. Effects of exercise dose on endogenous estrogens in postmenopausal women: a randomized trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedenreich, Christine M; Neilson, Heather K; Wang, Qinggang; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Yasui, Yutaka; Duha, Aalo; MacLaughlin, Sarah; Kallal, Ciara; Forbes, Cynthia C; Courneya, Kerry S

    2015-01-01

    Exercise dose comparison trials with biomarker outcomes can identify the amount of exercise required to reduce breast cancer risk and also strengthen the causal inference between physical activity and breast cancer...

  17. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Haugaard, Steen B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than......' treatment of lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients with hGH, 0.7 mg day(-1), increased total and free IGF-I twofold and appeared safe and tolerable. The potential of low-dose hGH in the treatment of HIV-lipodystrophy awaits examination by placebo-controlled, randomized trials....

  18. Novel dose-finding designs and considerations on practical implementations in oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Bycott, Paul; Talukder, Enayet

    2017-01-01

    One of the main objectives in phase I oncology trials is to evaluate safety and tolerability of an experimental treatment by estimating the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) based on the rate of dose-limiting toxicities (DLT). To meet emerging challenges in dose-finding studies, over the past two decades, extensive research has been conducted by statistical and medical researchers to create innovative dose finding designs that perform better than the standard 3 + 3 design, which often exhibits undesirable statistical and operational properties. However, clinical implementation and practical usage of these new designs have been limited. This article begins with a review of the most recent literature and then provides some perspectives on implementing novel adaptive dose finding designs in oncology phase I trials from a pharmaceutical industry perspective. Statistical planning and logistical considerations on how to effectively execute such designs in multi-center clinical trials are discussed using two recent case studies.

  19. Direct determination of internal radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanır, Ayse Güneş

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the internal radiation dose using a human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of the internal radiation dose received by a person. The luminescence counts from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose and the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes were both measured. The decay and dose-response curves were plotted for the different doses. The doses received by the different blood aliquots can be determined by interpolating the luminescence counts to the dose-response curve. This study shows that the dose received by a person can be measured directly, simply and retrospectively by using only a very small amount of blood sample. The results will have important ramifications for the medicine and healthcare fields in particular. This will also be very important in cases of suspicion of radiation poisoning, malpractice and so on.

  20. Direct determination of external radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanir, AG; Sahiner, E; Bolukdemir, MH; Koc, K; Meric, N; Keles, SK; Kucuk, O

    2014-01-01

    In this study it was shown that it is possible to determine radiation doses from external beam therapy both directly and retrospectively from a human blood sample. To the best of our knowledge no other studies exist on the direct measurement of doses received by a person from external beam therapy. Optically stimulated luminescence counts from a healthy blood sample exposed to an external radiation source were measured. Blood aliquots were given 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 50, 100 and 200Gy beta doses and their decay and dose-response curves were plotted. While the luminescence intensities were found to be relatively low for the doses smaller than 10Gy, they were measured considerably higher for doses greater than 10Gy. The dose received by the blood aliquots was determined by interpolating the luminescence counts of 10Gy to the dose-response curve. This study has important ramifications for healthcare, medicine and radiation protection

  1. Comparative trials in registration files of cardiovascular drugs : Comparator drugs and dosing schemes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, NF; Vos, R; de Graeff, PA

    Registration files of 13 cardiovascular drugs were analysed with respect to the number of double-blind phase-III clinical trials, the use of placebo and active comparator drugs and their dosing schemes. Half of the 146 double-blind trials used active comparator drugs. The majority of files included

  2. Comparative trials in registration files of cardiovascular drugs : Comparator drugs and dosing schemes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, NF; Vos, R; de Graeff, PA

    2001-01-01

    Registration files of 13 cardiovascular drugs were analysed with respect to the number of double-blind phase-III clinical trials, the use of placebo and active comparator drugs and their dosing schemes. Half of the 146 double-blind trials used active comparator drugs. The majority of files included

  3. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raises specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009-2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials.

  4. Effects of target-controlled infusion of high-dose naloxone on pain and hyperalgesia in a human thermal injury model: a study protocol: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with an enriched design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborg, Anders D; Jensen, Elisabeth K; Taylor, Bradley K; Werner, Mads U

    2016-11-01

    Mu-opioid-receptor antagonists have been extensively studied in experimental research as pharmacological tools uncovering mechanisms of pain modulation by the endogenous opioid system. In rodents, administration of high doses of mu-opioid-receptor antagonists after the resolution of an inflammatory injury has demonstrated reinstatement of nociceptive hypersensitivity indicating unmasking of latent sensitization. In a recent human study, pain hypersensitivity assessed as secondary hyperalgesia area (SHA), was reinstated 7 days after a mild thermal injury, in 4 out of 12 subjects after a naloxone infusion.The aims of the present study are first, to replicate our previous findings in a larger-sized study; second, to examine if high sensitizers (subjects presenting with large SHA after a thermal injury) develop a higher degree of hypersensitivity after naloxone challenge than low sensitizers (subjects presenting with restricted SHA after a thermal injury); and third to examine a dose-response relationship between 3 stable naloxone concentrations controlled by target-controlled infusion, and the unmasking of latent sensitization.Healthy participants (n = 80) underwent a screening day (day 0) with induction of a thermal skin injury (47°C, 420 seconds, 12.5 cm). Assessment of SHA was performed 1 and 2 hours after the injury. Using an enriched design, only participants belonging to the upper quartile of SHA (Q4, high sensitizers; n = 20) and the lower quartile of SHA (Q1, low sensitizers; n = 20) continued the study, comprising 4 consecutive days-days 1 to 4. Thermal skin injuries were repeated on day 1 and day 3, whereas day 2 and day 4 (7 days after day 1 and day 3, respectively) were target-controlled infusion days in which the subjects were randomly allocated to receive either naloxone (3.25 mg/kg, 4 mg/mL) or placebo (normal saline) intravenous. The primary outcome was SHA assessed by weighted-pin instrument (128 mN) 0, 1, 2, and 165 to 169

  5. Estimation of human dose to radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimo, Michikuni [Gifu Coll. of Medical Technology, Sekiichi, Gifu (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the paper is the estimation of the effective dose due to radon progeny for Japanese population. The estimation was performed by a modified UNSCEAR equation. The equation was needed the radon concentration annual occupancy time and the tidal volume on Japanese people and the dose conversion coefficient are needed. Furthermore, not only these figures but also unattached fraction and aerosol distribution data obtained in Japan and the factor related to the Japanese living style were used in the calculation. We used following figures as representative value in Japan; radon concentration: 13(6 - 25) Bq/m{sup 3} indoors and 6.7(3.5 - 13) Bq/m{sup 3} outdoors; the equilibrium factor: 0.45(0.35 - 0.57) indoors and 0.70(0.50 - 0.90) outdoors; the occupancy factor: 0.87 indoors, 0.09 outdoors and 0.04 in vehicle for male and 0.91 indoors, 0.06 outdoors and 0.03 in vehicle for female; the tidal volume: 7,000 (4,000 - 8,000) m{sup 3} for male, 6,200 (3,500 - 7,500) m{sup 3} for female. The effective doses due to radon progeny were estimated to be 0.45 mSv/y for male and 0.40 mSv/y for female, and the variance was -80 - +130%. These values were 1/2 - 1/3 as small as values shown by UNSCEAR 1993 Report and estimated by ICRP Publication 65. (author)

  6. Microscopic dose to lung from inhaled alpha emitters in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diel, Joseph; Belosokhov, Maxim; Romanov, Sergey [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozersk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Guilmette, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS G761, RP-2, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Because of the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the degree of uniformity of irradiation of the lung varies greatly depending on the form of the inhaled material. Animal studies have shown that the degree of dose uniformity influences the risk of lung cancer. This study investigates the radiation dose distribution of plutonium in human lung. Numerical maps of tissue configuration and target cell locations are obtained from histological sections of human lung tissue stained to enhance the identification of putative cell types for parenchymal lung cancers, i.e. alveolar type II cells and Clara cells. Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain dose distribution around individual particles, and these distributions are used to compute dose distribution in volumes of lung tissue. Lung dose is characterised both by the degree of non-uniformity of irradiation and the relative degree of irradiation of all tissue versus the special cells of interest. (authors)

  7. Low Dose Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Depsipeptide (FR901228), Promotes Adenoviral Transduction in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Navid; Mischen, Blaine T.; Helman, Lee J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Transduction of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells with adenoviral vectors for in vivo and in vitro applications has been limited by the low to absent levels of coxackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). This study investigates the potential use of low doses of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, depsipeptide (FR901228), currently in Phase II human trials, to enhance adenoviral uptake in six rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Methods. Differences in adenoviral uptake in the presence and absence of dep...

  8. Equivalent dose rate by muons to the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Băcioiu, I

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, the relative sensitivity from different human tissues of the human body, at a ground level, from muon cosmic radiation has been studied. The aim of this paper was to provide information on the equivalent dose rates received from atmospheric muons to human body, at the ground level. The calculated value of the effective dose rate by atmospheric muons plus the radiation levels of the natural annual background radiation dose, at the ground level, in the momentum interval of cosmic ray muon (0.2-120.0 GeV/c) is about 2.106±0.001 mSv/y, which is insignificant in comparison with the values of the doses from the top of the atmosphere.

  9. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials......, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay...... sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable...

  10. Research design considerations for single-dose analgesic clinical trials in acute pain: IMMPACT recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Stephen A; Desjardins, Paul J; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Katz, Nathaniel P; Kehlet, Henrik; Ballantyne, Jane C; Burke, Laurie B; Carragee, Eugene; Cowan, Penney; Croll, Scott; Dionne, Raymond A; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Gordon, Debra B; Iyengar, Smriti; Jay, Gary W; Kalso, Eija A; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Royal, Mike A; Segerdahl, Märta; Stauffer, Joseph W; Todd, Knox H; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Wallace, Mark S; West, Christine; White, Richard E; Wu, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a meeting convened by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT) on key considerations and best practices governing the design of acute pain clinical trials. We discuss the role of early phase clinical trials, including pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) trials, and the value of including both placebo and active standards of comparison in acute pain trials. This article focuses on single-dose and short-duration trials with emphasis on the perioperative and study design factors that influence assay sensitivity. Recommendations are presented on assessment measures, study designs, and operational factors. Although most of the methodological advances have come from studies of postoperative pain after dental impaction, bunionectomy, and other surgeries, the design considerations discussed are applicable to many other acute pain studies conducted in different settings.

  11. Dosing study of massage for chronic neck pain: protocol for the dose response evaluation and analysis of massage [DREAM] trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Karen J

    2012-09-01

    was included in this trial. If adherence to any of these doses is poor, those doses will be discontinued. Trial registration This trial is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, with the ID number of NCT01122836

  12. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...

  13. Zinc dosing and glucose tolerance in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenley, S.; Taylor, M.

    1986-03-05

    Animal data suggest the existence of a physiologic relationship between glucoregulatory hormones and zinc metabolism. In order to investigate this proposed relationship in humans, they examined the effect of moderately elevated plasma zinc levels on blood glucose clearance. Eight women (24-37 yrs) served as subjects for the study. Fasted volunteers were tested under two experimental conditions (a) ingestion of 50 g D-glucose (b) ingestion of 25 mg zinc followed 60 min later by ingestion of 50 g D-glucose. Five ml venous blood was drawn into trace-metal-free, fluoride-containing vacutainer tubes prior to and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after glucose ingestion. Plasma was analyzed for glucose and zinc; glycemic responses were quantified by computing areas under the curves and times to peak concentration. Their human data indicate varied glycemic responses to the acute elevation of plasma zinc: 4 subjects showed little apparent effect; 3 subjects marginally increased either the area under the curve or time to peak and 1 subject (classified as suspect diabetic in the non-zinc condition) showed marked improvement in glycemic response following zinc ingestion. Their preliminary results suggest that blood glucose clearance may be affected in some individuals by the acute elevation of plasma zinc.

  14. Haloperidol dose when used as active comparator in randomized controlled trials with atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia : Comparison with officially recommended doses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Gerard W. K.; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Stolker, Joost J.; Meijer, Welmoed E. E.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the doses of haloperidol as a comparator drug in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with atypical antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia and to compare these doses with the officially recommended doses for haloperidol in the United States and the United Kingdom. Data

  15. Haloperidol dose when used as active comparator in randomized controlled trials with atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia: Comparison with officially recommended doses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, Greg; Heerdink, E.R.; Stolker, J.J.; Meijer, W.E.E.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Nolen, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the doses of haloperidol as a comparator drug in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with atypical antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia and to compare these doses with the officially recommended doses for haloperidol in the United States and the United Kingdom. Data

  16. Lessons learned from human HIV vaccine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollara, Justin; Easterhoff, David; Fouda, Genevieve G

    2017-05-01

    The ability to induce broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) responses is likely essential for development of a globally effective HIV vaccine. Unfortunately, human vaccine trials conducted to date have failed to elicit broad plasma neutralization of primary virus isolates. Despite this limitation, in-depth analysis of the vaccine-induced memory B-cell repertoire can provide valuable insights into the presence and function of subdominant B-cell responses, and identify initiation of antibody lineages that may be on a path towards development of neutralization breadth. Characterization of the functional capabilities of monoclonal antibodies isolated from a HIV-1 vaccine trial with modest efficacy has revealed mechanisms by which non-neutralizing antibodies are presumed to have mediated protection. In addition, B-cell repertoire analysis has demonstrated that vaccine boosts shifted the HIV-specific B-cell repertoire, expanding pools of cells with long third heavy chain complementarity determining regions - a characteristic of some bNAb lineages. Detailed analysis of memory B-cell repertoires and evaluating the effector functions of isolated monoclonal antibodies expands what we can learn from human vaccine trails, and may provide knowledge that can enable rational design of novel approaches to drive maturation of subdominant disfavored bNAb lineages.

  17. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer--a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxing Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of high dose rate (HDR and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy in treating early-stage oral cancer. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases, restricted to English language up to June 1, 2012, was performed to identify potentially relevant studies. STUDY SELECTION: Only randomized controlled trials (RCT and controlled trials that compared HDR to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of early-stage oral cancer (stages I, II and III were of interest. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two investigators independently extracted data from retrieved studies and controversies were solved by discussion. Meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. One RCT and five controlled trials (607 patients: 447 for LDR and 160 for HDR met the inclusion criteria. The odds ratio showed no statistically significant difference between LDR group and HDR group in terms of local recurrence (OR = 1.12, CI 95% 0.62-2.01, overall mortality (OR = 1.01, CI 95% 0.61-1.66 and Grade 3/4 complications (OR = 0.86, CI 95% 0.52-1.42. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis indicated that HDR brachytherapy was a comparable alternative to LDR brachytherapy in treatment of oral cancer. HDR brachytherapy might become a routine choice for early-stage oral cancer in the future.

  18. Why clinical trials of vitamin E and cardiovascular diseases may be fatally flawed. Commentary on "The Relationship Between Dose of Vitamin E and Suppression of Oxidative Stress in Humans"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many investigators have pondered the apparent paradox in the conflicting evidence about the cardiovascular benefits of vitamin E suggested by experimental and observational studies versus that reported from randomized clinical trials. In the light of recent evidence, particularly a new clinical tria...

  19. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  20. Direct determination of radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanir, Ayse Gunes; Sahiner, Eren; Bolukdemir, Mustafa Hicabi; Koc, Kemal; Meric, Niyazi; Kelec, Sule Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose is to measure the internal radiation dose (ID) using human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of ID received by a person. This study has shown that it is possible to determine ID in human blood exposed to internal or external ionizing radiation treatment both directly and retrospectively. OSL technique was used to measure the total dose from the blood sample. OSL counts from the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic or treatment purposes and from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose were both used for measurements. The decay and dose-response curves (DRC) were plotted for different doses. The doses received by different blood aliquots have been determined by interpolating the natural luminescence counts to DRC. In addition, OSL counts from a healthy blood sample exposed to an external radiation source were measured. The blood aliquots were given different 0-200Gy beta doses and their ...

  1. Application of PK/PD modeling and simulation to dosing regimen optimization of high-dose human regular U-500 insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Amparo; Ma, Xiaosu; Reddy, Shobha; Ovalle, Fernando; Bergenstal, Richard M; Jackson, Jeffrey A

    2014-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies of human regular U-500 insulin (U-500R) at high doses commonly used in clinical practice (>100 units) have not been performed. The current analysis applied PK/PD modeling/simulation to fit the data and simulate single-dose and steady-state PK/PD of U-500R high-dose regimens. Data from 3 single-dose euglycemic clamp studies in healthy obese and normal-weight patients, and normal-weight patients with type 1 diabetes were used to build the model. The model was sequential (PK inputs fed into PD component). PK was described using a 1-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The model estimated separate absorption rate constants for U-500R and human regular U-100 insulin. The PD component used an effect compartment model, parameterized in terms of maximum pharmacologic effect (E(max)) and concentration to achieve 50% of E(max). The model described the data well. Steady-state PK for once-daily (QD), twice-daily (BID), or thrice-daily (TID) administration appeared to be reached 24 hours after the first dose. At steady-state, QD dosing showed the greatest fluctuations in PK/PD. BID dosing showed a gradual increase in insulin action with each dose and a fairly stable basal insulin effect. For TID dosing, activity was maintained throughout the dosing interval. PK/PD modeling/simulation of high U-500R doses supports BID or TID administration with an extended duration of activity relative to QD. TID dosing may provide slightly better full-day insulin effect. Additional PK/PD studies and randomized controlled trials of U-500R are needed to validate model predictions in patients with insulin-resistant diabetes requiring high-dose insulin.

  2. Safety, Tolerability, and Preliminary Activity of LB-100, an Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A, in Patients with Relapsed Solid Tumors: An Open-Label, Dose Escalation, First-in-Human, Phase I Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Vincent; Mansfield, Aaron S; Braiteh, Fadi; Richards, Donald; Durivage, Henry; Ungerleider, Richard S; Johnson, Francis; Kovach, John S

    2017-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the MTD and to assess the safety, tolerability, and potential activity of LB-100, a first-in-class small-molecule inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in adult patients with progressive solid tumors.Experimental Design: LB-100 was administered intravenously daily for 3 days in 21-day cycles in a 3 + 3 dose escalation design.Results: There were 29 patient entries over 7 dose escalations. One patient stopped treatment after one dose because of an acute infection and was reenrolled after recovery; each course was analyzed as a separate patient entry. Two patients had dose-limiting toxicity (reversible increases in serum creatinine or calculated serum creatinine clearance) at the 3.1 mg/m(2) level. Probable or possible study drug-related grade 3 adverse events occurred in 6 (20.7%) patients [anemia (n = 2), decreased creatinine clearance, dyspnea, hyponatremia, and lymphopenia]. Ten (50%) of 20 response-evaluable patients had stable disease for four or more cycles. One patient with pancreatic adenocarcinoma had a partial response noted after 10 cycles, which was maintained for five additional cycles. The other patients achieving stable disease had one of the following: fibrosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, thymoma, atypical carcinoid of lung, or ovarian, testicular, breast (n = 2), and prostate cancer. The recommended phase II dose of LB-100 is 2.33 mg/m(2) daily for 3 days every 3 weeks.Conclusions: The safety, tolerability, preliminary evidence of antitumor activity, and novel mechanism of action of LB-100 support its continued development alone and in combination with other therapies. Clin Cancer Res; 23(13); 3277-84. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis: results of a phase Ib/IIa randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoilov, Rumen; Wiland, Piotr; Huizinga, Thomas W; Berenfus, Vadym Y; Vladeva, Stoyanka; Rech, Juergen; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Korkosz, Mariusz; Rekalov, Dmitriy; Zupanets, Igor A; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Geiseler, Jens; Fresenius, Julia; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Schottelius, Arndt J; Burkhardt, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial of intravenous MOR103 (0.3, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg) once a week for 4 weeks, with follow-up to 16 weeks. The primary outcome was safety. Results Of the 96 randomised and treated subjects, 85 completed the trial (n=27, 24, 22 and 23 for pooled placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified as serious because of hospitalisation: paronychia in a placebo subject and pleurisy in a MOR103 0.3 mg/kg subject. Both patients recovered fully. In exploratory efficacy analyses, subjects in the MOR103 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg groups showed significant improvements in Disease Activity Score-28 scores and joint counts and significantly higher European League Against Rheumatism response rates than subjects receiving placebo. MOR103 1.0 mg/kg was associated with the largest reductions in disease activity parameters. Conclusions MOR103 was well tolerated and showed preliminary evidence of efficacy in patients with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Trial registration number NCT01023256 PMID:24534756

  4. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, John A.; Porter, Linsey; Smyth, Deborah J.; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Yang, Jennie H.; Bell, Charles J. M.; Schuilenburg, Helen; Challis, Ben; Clarke, Pamela; Coleman, Gillian; Dawson, Sarah; Goymer, Donna; Kennet, Jane; Brown, Judy; Greatorex, Jane; Goodfellow, Ian; Evans, Mark; Mander, Adrian P.; Bond, Simon; Wicker, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs) to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2), which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs. Methods and Findings To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D), a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low) from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39) found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = −0

  5. Transfer of Low Dose Aspirin Into Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Palika; Rewers-Felkins, Kathleen; Kallem, Raja Reddy; Baker, Teresa; Hale, Thomas W

    2017-05-01

    Aspirin has antipyretic and anti-inflammatory properties and is frequently used by pregnant and lactating women. However, its transfer in human milk when administered at low dose has not been reported. Research aim: This study aimed to evaluate the transfer of acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolite, salicylic acid, into human milk following the use of low dose aspirin. In this study, milk samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours from seven breastfeeding women after a steady-state daily dose of 81 mg of aspirin. Milk levels of acetylsalicylic acid and salicylic acid were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Acetylsalicylic acid levels were below the limit of quantification (0.61 ng/ml) in all the milk samples, whereas salicylic acid was detected at very low concentrations. The average concentration of salicylic acid observed was 24 ng/ml and the estimated relative infant dose was 0.4%. Acetylsalicylic acid transfer into milk is so low that it is undetectable even by highly sophisticated methodology. Salicylic acid does appear in the human milk in comparatively low amounts, which are probably subclinical in infants. Thus, the daily use of an 81-mg dose of aspirin should be considered safe during lactation.

  6. A practical Bayesian design to identify the maximum tolerated dose contour for drug combination trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangcai; Yuan, Ying

    2016-11-30

    Drug combination therapy has become the mainstream approach to cancer treatment. One fundamental feature that makes combination trials different from single-agent trials is the existence of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) contour, that is, multiple MTDs. As a result, unlike single-agent phase I trials, which aim to find a single MTD, it is often of interest to find the MTD contour for combination trials. We propose a new dose-finding design, the waterfall design, to find the MTD contour for drug combination trials. Taking the divide-and-conquer strategy, the waterfall design divides the task of finding the MTD contour into a sequence of one-dimensional dose-finding processes, known as subtrials. The subtrials are conducted sequentially in a certain order, such that the results of each subtrial will be used to inform the design of subsequent subtrials. Such information borrowing allows the waterfall design to explore the two-dimensional dose space efficiently using a limited sample size and decreases the chance of overdosing and underdosing patients. To accommodate the consideration that doses on the MTD contour may have very different efficacy or synergistic effects because of drug-drug interaction, we further extend our approach to a phase I/II design with the goal of finding the MTD with the highest efficacy. Simulation studies show that the waterfall design is safer and has higher probability of identifying the true MTD contour than some existing designs. The R package "BOIN" to implement the waterfall design is freely available from CRAN. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Daily rifapentine for treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. A randomized, dose-ranging trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Susan E; Savic, Radojka M; Goldberg, Stefan; Stout, Jason E; Schluger, Neil; Muzanyi, Grace; Johnson, John L; Nahid, Payam; Hecker, Emily J; Heilig, Charles M; Bozeman, Lorna; Feng, Pei-Jean I; Moro, Ruth N; MacKenzie, William; Dooley, Kelly E; Nuermberger, Eric L; Vernon, Andrew; Weiner, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Rifapentine has potent activity in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy but its optimal dose and exposure in humans are unknown. We conducted a randomized, partially blinded dose-ranging study to determine tolerability, safety, and antimicrobial activity of daily rifapentine for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were assigned rifapentine 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg or rifampin 10 mg/kg daily for 8 weeks (intensive phase), with isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. The primary tolerability end point was treatment discontinuation. The primary efficacy end point was negative sputum cultures at completion of intensive phase. A total of 334 participants were enrolled. At completion of intensive phase, cultures on solid media were negative in 81.3% of participants in the rifampin group versus 92.5% (P = 0.097), 89.4% (P = 0.29), and 94.7% (P = 0.049) in the rifapentine 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg groups. Liquid cultures were negative in 56.3% (rifampin group) versus 74.6% (P = 0.042), 69.7% (P = 0.16), and 82.5% (P = 0.004), respectively. Compared with the rifampin group, the proportion negative at the end of intensive phase was higher among rifapentine recipients who had high rifapentine areas under the concentration-time curve. Percentages of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiologic ineligibility were similar across groups (rifampin, 8.2%; rifapentine 10, 15, or 20 mg/kg, 3.4, 2.5, and 7.4%, respectively). Daily rifapentine was well-tolerated and safe. High rifapentine exposures were associated with high levels of sputum sterilization at completion of intensive phase. Further studies are warranted to determine if regimens that deliver high rifapentine exposures can shorten treatment duration to less than 6 months. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00694629).

  8. A systematic review of pediatric clinical trials of high dose vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassr Nama

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to inadequate UV exposure, intake of small quantities of vitamin D is recommended to prevent musculoskeletal disease. Both basic science and observational literature strongly suggest that higher doses may benefit specific populations and have non-musculoskeletal roles. Evaluating the evidence surrounding high dose supplementation can be challenging given a relatively large and growing body of clinical trial evidence spanning time, geography, populations and dosing regimens. Study objectives were to identify and summarize the clinical trial literature, recognize areas with high quality evidence, and develop a resource database that makes the literature more immediately accessible to end users. Methods. Medline (1946 to January 2015, Embase (1974 to January 2015, and Cochrane databases (January 2015, were searched for trials. All pediatric (0–18 years trials administering doses higher than 400 IU (<1 year or 600 IU (≥1 year were included. Data was extracted independently by two of the authors. An online searchable database of trials was developed containing relevant extracted information (http://www.cheori.org/en/pedvitaminddatabaseOverview. Sensitivity and utility were assessed by comparing the trials in the database with those from systematic reviews of vitamin D supplementation including children. Results. A total of 2,579 candidate papers were identified, yielding 169 trials having one or more arms meeting eligibility criteria. The publication rate has increased significantly from 1 per year (1970–1979 to 14 per year (2010–2015. Although 84% of the total trials focused on healthy children or known high risk populations (e.g., renal, prematurity, this proportion has declined in recent years due to the rise in trials evaluating populations and outcomes not directly related to the musculoskeletal actions of vitamin D (27% in 2010s. Beyond healthy children, the only pediatric populations with more than 50 participants from

  9. High Dose Vaginal Misoprostol Versus Concentrated Oxytocin + Low Dose Vaginal Misoprostol for Mid-Trimester Labor Induction: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuthalapaty, Francis S.; Ramsey, Patrick S.; Biggio, Joseph R.; Owen, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and side effects of a high-dose vaginal misoprostol regimen to concentrated intravenous oxytocin plus low-dose vaginal misoprostol for mid-trimester labor induction. Study Design Women at 14-24 weeks, with obstetric or fetal indications for delivery and no prior cesarean, were randomly assigned to receive either vaginal misoprostol 600 μg ×1, then 400 μg q 4 hr × 5 (Group 1) or escalating-dose concentrated oxytocin infusions (277-1667 mU/min) plus vaginal misoprostol 400 μg × 1, then 200 μg q 6 hr × 2, then 100 μg × 1 (Group 2). Analysis was by intent to treat. Primary outcomes were live birth rate and induction-to-delivery interval. Results The intended sample size was 70 women per group; however, the trial was terminated at the initial interim analysis due to a highly significant difference in one of the primary study outcomes. Twenty women were assigned to Group 1 and 18 were assigned to the Group 2. Median induction-to-delivery interval was significantly shorter in Group 1 (12 hr, range 4 - 44 hr) versus Group 2 (18 hr, range 7 - 36 hr; p=0.01). Induction success rate at 12 hours was significantly higher in the Group 1 (60%), compared to Group 2 (22%, p=.02). No significant difference was noted in the live birth rate between Group 1 and 2 (13%, 0%, p = 0.16). The incidence of retained placenta requiring curettage, chorioamnionitis, intrapartum fever, nausea, emesis, and diarrhea were similar between both groups. Conclusion Compared to concentrated oxytocin plus low-dose vaginal misoprostol, high-dose vaginal misoprostol significantly shortens mid-trimester labor inductions. PMID:16157113

  10. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, John A; Evangelou, Marina; Cutler, Antony J; Pekalski, Marcin L; Walker, Neil M; Stevens, Helen E; Porter, Linsey; Smyth, Deborah J; Rainbow, Daniel B; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Esposito, Laura; Hunter, Kara M D; Loudon, Kevin; Irons, Kathryn; Yang, Jennie H; Bell, Charles J M; Schuilenburg, Helen; Heywood, James; Challis, Ben; Neupane, Sankalpa; Clarke, Pamela; Coleman, Gillian; Dawson, Sarah; Goymer, Donna; Anselmiova, Katerina; Kennet, Jane; Brown, Judy; Caddy, Sarah L; Lu, Jia; Greatorex, Jane; Goodfellow, Ian; Wallace, Chris; Tree, Tim I; Evans, Mark; Mander, Adrian P; Bond, Simon; Wicker, Linda S; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs) to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2), which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs. To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D), a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low) from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39) found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = -0.052, 0.254) and 0.497 × 106 IU/m2

  11. Regulatory T Cell Responses in Participants with Type 1 Diabetes after a Single Dose of Interleukin-2: A Non-Randomised, Open Label, Adaptive Dose-Finding Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Todd

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-2 (IL-2 has an essential role in the expansion and function of CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs. Tregs reduce tissue damage by limiting the immune response following infection and regulate autoreactive CD4+ effector T cells (Teffs to prevent autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D. Genetic susceptibility to T1D causes alterations in the IL-2 pathway, a finding that supports Tregs as a cellular therapeutic target. Aldesleukin (Proleukin; recombinant human IL-2, which is administered at high doses to activate the immune system in cancer immunotherapy, is now being repositioned to treat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders at lower doses by targeting Tregs.To define the aldesleukin dose response for Tregs and to find doses that increase Tregs physiologically for treatment of T1D, a statistical and systematic approach was taken by analysing the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single doses of subcutaneous aldesleukin in the Adaptive Study of IL-2 Dose on Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes (DILT1D, a single centre, non-randomised, open label, adaptive dose-finding trial with 40 adult participants with recently diagnosed T1D. The primary endpoint was the maximum percentage increase in Tregs (defined as CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low from the baseline frequency in each participant measured over the 7 d following treatment. There was an initial learning phase with five pairs of participants, each pair receiving one of five pre-assigned single doses from 0.04 × 106 to 1.5 × 106 IU/m2, in order to model the dose-response curve. Results from each participant were then incorporated into interim statistical modelling to target the two doses most likely to induce 10% and 20% increases in Treg frequencies. Primary analysis of the evaluable population (n = 39 found that the optimal doses of aldesleukin to induce 10% and 20% increases in Tregs were 0.101 × 106 IU/m2 (standard error [SE] = 0.078, 95% CI = -0.052, 0.254 and 0.497

  12. An adaptive model switching approach for phase I dose-finding trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Takashi; Zohar, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Model-based phase I dose-finding designs rely on a single model throughout the study for estimating the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Thus, one major concern is about the choice of the most suitable model to be used. This is important because the dose allocation process and the MTD estimation depend on whether or not the model is reliable, or whether or not it gives a better fit to toxicity data. The aim of our work was to propose a method that would remove the need for a model choice prior to the trial onset and then allow it sequentially at each patient's inclusion. In this paper, we described model checking approach based on the posterior predictive check and model comparison approach based on the deviance information criterion, in order to identify a more reliable or better model during the course of a trial and to support clinical decision making. Further, we presented two model switching designs for a phase I cancer trial that were based on the aforementioned approaches, and performed a comparison between designs with or without model switching, through a simulation study. The results showed that the proposed designs had the advantage of decreasing certain risks, such as those of poor dose allocation and failure to find the MTD, which could occur if the model is misspecified. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Massage therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized dose-finding trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam I Perlman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a previous trial of massage for osteoarthritis (OA of the knee, we demonstrated feasibility, safety and possible efficacy, with benefits that persisted at least 8 weeks beyond treatment termination. METHODS: We performed a RCT to identify the optimal dose of massage within an 8-week treatment regimen and to further examine durability of response. Participants were 125 adults with OA of the knee, randomized to one of four 8-week regimens of a standardized Swedish massage regimen (30 or 60 min weekly or biweekly or to a Usual Care control. Outcomes included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC, visual analog pain scale, range of motion, and time to walk 50 feet, assessed at baseline, 8-, 16-, and 24-weeks. RESULTS: WOMAC Global scores improved significantly (24.0 points, 95% CI ranged from 15.3-32.7 in the 60-minute massage groups compared to Usual Care (6.3 points, 95% CI 0.1-12.8 at the primary endpoint of 8-weeks. WOMAC subscales of pain and functionality, as well as the visual analog pain scale also demonstrated significant improvements in the 60-minute doses compared to usual care. No significant differences were seen in range of motion at 8-weeks, and no significant effects were seen in any outcome measure at 24-weeks compared to usual care. A dose-response curve based on WOMAC Global scores shows increasing effect with greater total time of massage, but with a plateau at the 60-minute/week dose. CONCLUSION: Given the superior convenience of a once-weekly protocol, cost savings, and consistency with a typical real-world massage protocol, the 60-minute once weekly dose was determined to be optimal, establishing a standard for future trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00970008.

  14. Massage Therapy for Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Randomized Dose-Finding Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Adam I.; Ali, Ather; Njike, Valentine Yanchou; Hom, David; Davidi, Anna; Gould-Fogerite, Susan; Milak, Carl; Katz, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Background In a previous trial of massage for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, we demonstrated feasibility, safety and possible efficacy, with benefits that persisted at least 8 weeks beyond treatment termination. Methods We performed a RCT to identify the optimal dose of massage within an 8-week treatment regimen and to further examine durability of response. Participants were 125 adults with OA of the knee, randomized to one of four 8-week regimens of a standardized Swedish massage regimen (30 or 60 min weekly or biweekly) or to a Usual Care control. Outcomes included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), visual analog pain scale, range of motion, and time to walk 50 feet, assessed at baseline, 8-, 16-, and 24-weeks. Results WOMAC Global scores improved significantly (24.0 points, 95% CI ranged from 15.3–32.7) in the 60-minute massage groups compared to Usual Care (6.3 points, 95% CI 0.1–12.8) at the primary endpoint of 8-weeks. WOMAC subscales of pain and functionality, as well as the visual analog pain scale also demonstrated significant improvements in the 60-minute doses compared to usual care. No significant differences were seen in range of motion at 8-weeks, and no significant effects were seen in any outcome measure at 24-weeks compared to usual care. A dose-response curve based on WOMAC Global scores shows increasing effect with greater total time of massage, but with a plateau at the 60-minute/week dose. Conclusion Given the superior convenience of a once-weekly protocol, cost savings, and consistency with a typical real-world massage protocol, the 60-minute once weekly dose was determined to be optimal, establishing a standard for future trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00970008 PMID:22347369

  15. Flexible dosing with fesoterodine 4 and 8 mg: a systematic review of data from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndaele, J J; Schneider, T; MacDiarmid, S; Scholfield, D; Arumi, D

    2014-07-01

    To systematically review dose-escalation data from flexible-dose studies of fesoterodine and summarise factors associated with dose-escalation decisions. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms (fesoterodine AND flexible dose), with no limits. Articles were included if they contained fesoterodine dose-escalation data for efficacy or safety outcomes or factors associated with dose-escalation decisions. Of 13 articles identified by the search, 10 articles (six clinical studies) met inclusion criteria. In flexible-dose trials of fesoterodine, 51-63% of subjects initially receiving fesoterodine 4 mg opted for dose escalation to fesoterodine 8 mg. Escalators generally reported significantly more severe overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms, greater OAB symptom bother and worse health-related quality of life at baseline than non-escalators. Escalators demonstrated less treatment benefit with fesoterodine 4 mg than non-escalators. Non-escalators generally had a higher rate of dry mouth and constipation with fesoterodine 4 mg than escalators. The decision to escalate appeared to be determined by the efficacy/tolerability responses; fesoterodine escalators demonstrated a lower sensitivity (less efficacy and fewer adverse events) before their decision to escalate. By study end (8-11 weeks after escalation decision), the efficacy and tolerability profiles were similar in escalators and non-escalators. Data from flexible-dose studies provide strong evidence that fesoterodine provides treatment benefit to individual subjects with OAB because of its true dose-response effect. In clinical practice, it can be worthwhile to escalate to fesoterodine 8 mg in individual subjects who require additional efficacy benefit. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Low or High Fractionation Dose {beta}-Radiotherapy for Pterygium? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda, E-mail: gusviani@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medicine School, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Fendi, Ligia Issa; Fonseca, Ellen Carrara [Department of Ophthalmology, Marilia Medicine School, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Stefano, Eduardo Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medicine School, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Postoperative adjuvant treatment using {beta}-radiotherapy (RT) is a proven technique for reducing the recurrence of pterygium. A randomized trial was conducted to determine whether a low fractionation dose of 2 Gy within 10 fractions would provide local control similar to that after a high fractionation dose of 5 Gy within 7 fractions for surgically resected pterygium. Methods: A randomized trial was conducted in 200 patients (216 pterygia) between February 2006 and July 2007. Only patients with fresh pterygium resected using a bare sclera method and given RT within 3 days were included. Postoperative RT was delivered using a strontium-90 eye applicator. The pterygia were randomly treated using either 5 Gy within 7 fractions (Group 1) or 2 Gy within 10 fractions (Group 2). The local control rate was calculated from the date of surgery. Results: Of the 216 pterygia included, 112 were allocated to Group 1 and 104 to Group 2. The 3-year local control rate for Groups 1 and 2 was 93.8% and 92.3%, respectively (p = .616). A statistically significant difference for cosmetic effect (p = .034), photophobia (p = .02), irritation (p = .001), and scleromalacia (p = .017) was noted in favor of Group 2. Conclusions: No better local control rate for postoperative pterygium was obtained using high-dose fractionation vs. low-dose fractionation. However, a low-dose fractionation schedule produced better cosmetic effects and resulted in fewer symptoms than high-dose fractionation. Moreover, pterygia can be safely treated in terms of local recurrence using RT schedules with a biologic effective dose of 24-52.5 Gy{sub 10.}.

  17. Human coffee drinking: manipulation of concentration and caffeine dose.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A; O'Keeffe, M; O'Leary, D.; Russ, N

    1986-01-01

    In a residential research ward coffee drinking was studied in 9 volunteer human subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. A series of five experiments was undertaken to characterize adlibitum coffee consumption and to investigate the effects of manipulating coffee concentration, caffeine dose per cup, and caffeine preloads prior to coffee drinking. Manipulations were double-blind and scheduled in randomized sequences across days. When cups of coffee were freely available, coffee drink...

  18. Using process evaluation for program improvement in dose, fidelity and reach: the ACT trial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitzman-Ulrich Heather

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how formative program process evaluation was used to improve dose and fidelity of implementation, as well as reach of the intervention into the target population, in the "Active by Choice Today" (ACT randomized school-based trial from years 1 to 3 of implementation. Methods The intervention integrated constructs from Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory to enhance intrinsic motivation and behavioral skills for increasing long-term physical activity (PA behavior in underserved adolescents (low income, minorities. ACT formative process data were examined at the end of each year to provide timely, corrective feedback to keep the intervention "on track". Results Between years 1 and 2 and years 2 and 3, three significant changes were made to attempt to increase dose and fidelity rates in the program delivery and participant attendance (reach. These changes included expanding the staff training, reformatting the intervention manual, and developing a tracking system for contacting parents of students who were not attending the after-school programs regularly. Process outcomes suggest that these efforts resulted in notable improvements in attendance, dose, and fidelity of intervention implementation from years 1 to 2 and 2 to 3 of the ACT trial. Conclusion Process evaluation methods, particularly implementation monitoring, are useful tools to ensure fidelity in intervention trials and for identifying key best practices for intervention delivery.

  19. European Collaboration on Low-dose Aspirin in Polycythemia Vera (ECLAP): a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, R; Marchioli, R

    1997-01-01

    Thrombotic complications characterize the clinical course of polycythemia vera (PV) and represent the main cause of morbidity and mortality. However, uncertainty still exists as to the benefit/risk ratio of aspirin prophylaxis in this setting. In vivo platelet biosynthesis of thromboxane A2 is enhanced and can be suppressed by low-dose aspirin in PV, thus providing a rationale for assessing the efficacy and safety of a low-dose aspirin regimen in these patients. The Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera has recently performed a pilot study on 112 patients randomized to receive aspirin, 40 mg daily, or placebo and followed for 16 +/- 6 months (mean +/- SD). This study showed that low-dose aspirin is well tolerated in PV patients, and that a large-scale efficacy trial is feasible in this setting. In this article we report the protocol of the European Collaboration on Low-dose Aspirin in Polycythemia Vera (ECLAP) study, which is a randomized trial designed to assess the risk/benefit ratio of low-dose aspirin in PV. To estimate the size and the follow-up duration required for the ECLAP trial, a retrospective analysis of the clinical epidemiology of a large PV population has recently been completed by the Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera. On this basis, approximately 3500 patients will be enrolled in the ECLAP study with a follow-up of 3 to 4 years. The uncertainty principle will be used as the main eligibility criterion: Polycythemic patients of any age, having no clear indication for or contraindication to aspirin treatment, will be randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive oral aspirin (100 mg daily) or placebo. According to current therapeutic recommendations, the basic treatment of randomized patients should be aimed at maintaining the hematocrit value 50. Randomization will be stratified by participating center. The study is funded by the European Union BIOMED 2 program.

  20. Is High Dose Therapy Superior to Conventional Dose Therapy as Initial Treatment for Relapsed Germ Cell Tumors? The TIGER Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren R. Feldman, Robert Huddart, Emma Hall, Jörg Beyer, Thomas Powles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic germ cell tumours (GCTs are usually cured with cisplatin based chemotherapy and standard treatment algorithms are established. However when this treatment fails and the disease relapses, standard treatment is much more uncertain. Both conventional dose therapy (CDT and high dose therapy (HDT are widely used, due to the lack of conclusive data supporting one specific approach. A recent retrospective analysis focusing on this population suggested a significant benefit for HDT. Retrospective analyses are prone to bias, and therefore while this data is provocative it is by no mean conclusive. For this reason the international community is supporting a prospective randomised trial in this area comparing CDT(TIP with sequential HDT (TICE. The planned open labelled randomised phase III study (TIGER is due to open in 2011 and will recruit 390 patients to detect a 13% difference in 2 year progression free survival (primary endpoint. It is hoped that this large study will conclusively resolve the uncertainty which currently exists.

  1. bcrm: Bayesian Continual Reassessment Method Designs for Phase I Dose-Finding Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sweeting

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the R package bcrm for conducting and assessing Bayesian continual reassessment method (CRM designs in Phase I dose-escalation trials. CRM designsare a class of adaptive design that select the dose to be given to the next recruited patient based on accumulating toxicity data from patients already recruited into the trial, often using Bayesian methodology. Despite the original CRM design being proposed in 1990, the methodology is still not widely implemented within oncology Phase I trials. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate, through example of the bcrm package, how a variety of possible designs can be easily implemented within the R statistical software, and how properties of the designs can be communicated to trial investigators using simple textual and graphical output obtained from the package. This in turn should facilitate an iterative process to allow a design to be chosen that is suitable to the needs of the investigator. Our bcrm package is the first to offer a large comprehensive choice of CRM designs, priors and escalation procedures, which can be easily compared and contrasted within the package through the assessment of operating characteristics.

  2. Safety and efficacy of single dose versus multiple doses of AmBisome for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in eastern Africa: a randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltahir A G Khalil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-leishmanial drug regimens that include a single dose AmBisome could be suitable for eastern African patients with symptomatic visceral leishmaniasis (VL but the appropriate single dose is unknown. METHODOLOGY: A multi-centre, open-label, non-inferiority, randomized controlled trial with an adaptive design, was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of a single dose and multiple doses of AmBisome for the treatment of VL in eastern Africa. The primary efficacy endpoint was definitive cure (DC at 6 months. Symptomatic patients with parasitologically-confirmed, non-severe VL, received a single dose of AmBisome 7.5 mg/kg body weight or multiple doses, 7 times 3 mg/kg on days 1-5, 14, and 21. If interim analyses, evaluated 30 days after the start of treatment following 40 or 80 patients, showed the single dose gave significantly poorer parasite clearance than multiple doses at the 5% significance level, the single dose was increased by 2·5 mg/kg. In a sub-set of patients, parasite clearance was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT PCR. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The trial was terminated after the third interim analysis because of low efficacy of both regimens. Based on the intention-to-treat population, DC was 85% (95%CI 73-93%, 40% (95%CI 19-64%, and 58% (95%CI 41-73% in patients treated with multiple doses (n = 63, and single doses of 7·5 (n = 21 or 10 mg/kg (n = 40, respectively. qRT-PCR suggested superior parasite clearance with multiple doses as early as day 3. Safety data accorded with the drug label. CONCLUSIONS: The tested AmBisome regimens would not be suitable for VL treatment across eastern Africa. An optimal single dose regimen was not identified. TRIALS REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.govNCT00832208.

  3. Oral cyanocobalamin supplementation in older people with vitamin B12 deficiency: a dose-finding trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eussen, Simone J P M; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Clarke, Robert; Schneede, Jörn; Ueland, Per M; Hoefnagels, Willibrord H L; van Staveren, Wija A

    2005-05-23

    Supplementation with high doses of oral cobalamin is as effective as cobalamin administered by intramuscular injection to correct plasma markers of vitamin B(12) deficiency, but the effects of lower oral doses of cobalamin on such markers are uncertain. We conducted a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, dose-finding trial to determine the lowest oral dose of cyanocobalamin required to normalize biochemical markers of vitamin B(12) deficiency in older people with mild vitamin B(12) deficiency, defined as a serum vitamin B(12) level of 100 to 300 pmol/L (135-406 pg/mL) and a methylmalonic acid level of 0.26 mumol/L or greater. We assessed the effects of daily oral doses of 2.5, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mug of cyanocobalamin administered for 16 weeks on biochemical markers of vitamin B(12) deficiency in 120 people. The main outcome measure was the dose of oral cyanocobalamin that produced 80% to 90% of the estimated maximal reduction in the plasma methylmalonic acid concentration. Supplementation with cyanocobalamin in daily oral doses of 2.5, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mug was associated with mean reductions in plasma methylmalonic acid concentrations of 16%, 16%, 23%, 33%, and 33%, respectively. Daily doses of 647 to 1032 mug of cyanocobalamin were associated with 80% to 90% of the estimated maximum reduction in the plasma methylmalonic acid concentration. The lowest dose of oral cyanocobalamin required to normalize mild vitamin B(12) deficiency is more than 200 times greater than the recommended dietary allowance, which is approximately 3 mug daily.

  4. Multicentre dose audit for clinical trials of radiation therapy in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Fukumura, Akifumi; Nakamura, Yuzuru-Kutsutani; Jianping, Cao; Cho, Chul-Koo; Supriana, Nana; Dung, To Anh; Calaguas, Miriam Joy; Devi, C R Beena; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Banu, Parvin Akhter; Riaz, Masooma; Esentayeva, Surya; Kato, Shingo; Karasawa, Kumiko; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2016-11-17

    A dose audit of 16 facilities in 11 countries has been performed within the framework of the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA) quality assurance program. The quality of radiation dosimetry varies because of the large variation in radiation therapy among the participating countries. One of the most important aspects of international multicentre clinical trials is uniformity of absolute dose between centres. The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan has conducted a dose audit of participating countries since 2006 by using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters (RGDs). RGDs have been successfully applied to a domestic postal dose audit in Japan. The authors used the same audit system to perform a dose audit of the FNCA countries. The average and standard deviation of the relative deviation between the measured and intended dose among 46 beams was 0.4% and 1.5% (k = 1), respectively. This is an excellent level of uniformity for the multicountry data. However, of the 46 beams measured, a single beam exceeded the permitted tolerance level of ±5%. We investigated the cause for this and solved the problem. This event highlights the importance of external audits in radiation therapy.

  5. Analysis of clinical trials with biologics using dose-time-response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Markus R; Schmidli, Heinz

    2015-09-30

    Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies are increasingly and successfully used for the treatment of many chronic diseases. Unlike conventional small drug molecules, which are commonly given as tablets once daily, biologics are typically injected at much longer time intervals, that is, weeks or months. Hence, both the dose and the time interval have to be optimized during the drug development process for biologics. To identify an adequate regimen for the investigated biologic, the dose-time-response relationship must be well characterized, based on clinical trial data. The proposed approach uses semi-mechanistic nonlinear regression models to describe and predict the time-changing response for complex dosing regimens. Both likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for inference and prediction are discussed. The methodology is illustrated with data from a clinical study in an auto-immune disease.

  6. Linearity of dose-response relationships for human carcinogenic exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.H. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    The shape of dose-response relationships is a critical factor in considering cancer risks for the work place and environmental exposure to carcinogens. Markedly different risk estimates result from assumptions of linearity versus sublinear and threshold assumptions. This paper presents evidence that the relationship between the relative risk of development of cancer and the dose rate to carcinogenic exposures is frequently linear with no evidence for thresholds. Dose-response relationships from four studies of asbestos and lung cancer were examined, all of which were consistent with a linear relationship. Analysis of the relationship between the relative risk of lung cancer and exposure to nickel in a smelter study, selected because of relatively good exposure data, demonstrated a close agreement with a linear relationship. The relationship between the level of arsenic in drinking wter and the prevalence of skin cancer also was linear for males in the highest prevalence age group in Taiwan, although there was some evidence of sublinearity for females and younger persons. Also, the relationships between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the relative risk of lung cancer was very close to linear in many studies. The analysis of these and other studies involving human exposure to carcinogens provides empirical evidence for linearity when the response variable is a rate ratio measure, rather than a risk difference measure. Linearity in dose-response is biologically plausible, without invoking a one-hit model. Except in special circumstances. the epidemiological evidence supports linear extrapolation of cancer relative risks.

  7. Aged garlic extract reduces blood pressure in hypertensives: a dose-response trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ried, K; Frank, O R; Stocks, N P

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 30% of adults worldwide. Garlic has blood pressure-lowering properties and the mechanism of action is biologically plausible. Our trial assessed the effect, dose-response, tolerability and acceptability of different doses of aged garlic extract as an adjunct treatment to existing antihypertensive medication in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. A total of 79 general practice patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension participated in a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled dose-response trial of 12 weeks. Participants were allocated to one of three garlic groups with either of one, two or four capsules daily of aged garlic extract (240/480/960 mg containing 0.6/1.2/2.4 mg of S-allylcysteine) or placebo. Blood pressure was assessed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks and compared with baseline using a mixed-model approach. Tolerability was monitored throughout the trial and acceptability was assessed at 12 weeks by questionnaire. Mean systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced by 11.8±5.4 mm Hg in the garlic-2-capsule group over 12 weeks compared with placebo (P=0.006), and reached borderline significant reduction in the garlic-4-capsule group at 8 weeks (-7.4±4.1 mm Hg, P=0.07). Changes in systolic blood pressure in the garlic-1-capsule group and diastolic blood pressure were not significantly different to placebo. Tolerability, compliance and acceptability were high in all garlic groups (93%) and highest in the groups taking one or two capsules daily. Our trial suggests aged garlic extract to be an effective and tolerable treatment in uncontrolled hypertension, and may be considered as a safe adjunct treatment to conventional antihypertensive therapy.

  8. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Angel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Denham, James W. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  9. Bayesian penalized log-likelihood ratio approach for dose response clinical trial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Chunyan; Sun, Liangrui; He, Jianghua

    2017-02-13

    In literature, there are a few unified approaches to test proof of concept and estimate a target dose, including the multiple comparison procedure using modeling approach, and the permutation approach proposed by Klingenberg. We discuss and compare the operating characteristics of these unified approaches and further develop an alternative approach in a Bayesian framework based on the posterior distribution of a penalized log-likelihood ratio test statistic. Our Bayesian approach is much more flexible to handle linear or nonlinear dose-response relationships and is more efficient than the permutation approach. The operating characteristics of our Bayesian approach are comparable to and sometimes better than both approaches in a wide range of dose-response relationships. It yields credible intervals as well as predictive distribution for the response rate at a specific dose level for the target dose estimation. Our Bayesian approach can be easily extended to continuous, categorical, and time-to-event responses. We illustrate the performance of our proposed method with extensive simulations and Phase II clinical trial data examples.

  10. H1N1pdm09 adjuvanted vaccination in HIV-infected adults: a randomized trial of two single versus two double doses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Santini-Oliveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals are at increased risk of severe disease from pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09, vaccination was recommended as a prevention strategy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and persistence of the immune response after vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09 with an adjuvanted vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected adults using two single and two double doses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Open label, randomized trial to evaluate the immune response following H1N1pdm09 vaccination in HIV-infected participants compared to HIV-negative controls (NCT01155037. HIV-infected participants were randomized to receive 2 single (3.75 µg hemagglutinin or 2 double (7.5 µg hemagglutinin doses of the vaccine, 21 days apart. Controls received one dose of the vaccine. The primary endpoint was seroconversion as measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Two hundred fifty six HIV-infected participants (129 and 127 randomized to single and double doses, respectively and 71 HIV-negative controls were enrolled. Among HIV-infected participants, seroconversion increased from 46.7% and 51.7% after the first dose to 77.2% and 83.8% after the second dose of the vaccine using single and double doses, respectively. Participants aged >40 years showed higher seroconversion compared to younger participants. Seroconversion among HIV-infected women and those with nadir CD440 years or with nadir CD4<200 cells/mm(3, to achieve antibody levels that are both higher and more sustained. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01155037.

  11. H1N1pdm09 Adjuvanted Vaccination in HIV-Infected Adults: A Randomized Trial of Two Single versus Two Double Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini-Oliveira, Marilia; Camacho, Luiz A. B.; Souza, Thiago M. L.; Luz, Paula M.; Vasconcellos, Mauricio T. L.; Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem B. W.; Morgado, Mariza G.; Nunes, Estevão P.; Lemos, Alberto S.; Ferreira, Ana C. G.; Moreira, Ronaldo I.; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Siqueira, Marilda M.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Background Since human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk of severe disease from pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09), vaccination was recommended as a prevention strategy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety, immunogenicity and persistence of the immune response after vaccination against pandemic influenza A (H1N1pdm09) with an adjuvanted vaccine in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults using two single and two double doses. Methodology/Principal Findings Open label, randomized trial to evaluate the immune response following H1N1pdm09 vaccination in HIV-infected participants compared to HIV-negative controls (NCT01155037). HIV-infected participants were randomized to receive 2 single (3.75 µg hemagglutinin) or 2 double (7.5 µg hemagglutinin) doses of the vaccine, 21 days apart. Controls received one dose of the vaccine. The primary endpoint was seroconversion as measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay. Two hundred fifty six HIV-infected participants (129 and 127 randomized to single and double doses, respectively) and 71 HIV-negative controls were enrolled. Among HIV-infected participants, seroconversion increased from 46.7% and 51.7% after the first dose to 77.2% and 83.8% after the second dose of the vaccine using single and double doses, respectively. Participants aged >40 years showed higher seroconversion compared to younger participants. Seroconversion among HIV-infected women and those with nadir CD440 years or with nadir CD4<200 cells/mm3, to achieve antibody levels that are both higher and more sustained. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01155037 PMID:22761759

  12. Dose Dependent Reduction of Hazardous Alcohol Use in a Placebo-Controlled Trial of Naltrexone for Smoking Cessation

    OpenAIRE

    O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; McKee, Sherry A.; Leeman, Robert F.; Cooney, Ned L.; Meandzija, Boris; Wu, Ran; Makuch, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    The opiate antagonist naltrexone has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of alcohol dependence and as a component of treatment to reduce heavy drinking. At present, there are no published dose-ranging clinical trials of the oral preparation for treatment of problem drinking. The present study evaluated the effects of naltrexone on alcohol use among the subset of hazardous drinkers (N = 102) who participated in a placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral naltrexone (25 mg, 50 mg and 10...

  13. Different doses of ibuprofen in the treatment of patent ductus arteriosus: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Amini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is a common finding among premature or low-birth-weight infants and it often does not close. Nowadays, drugs used for its treatment include indomethacin and more commonly ibuprofen. Oral ibuprofen was recently shown to be as effective and have several important advantages in preterm infants. Studies performed to find the best dose of ibuprofen for PDA treatment are limited; hence, we compared the effects of two different doses of ibuprofen in this interventional study.Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, we randomly divided 60 patients with echocardiographically confirmed PDA into two groups of 30. This study was done in NICU of Valiasr hospital in 1387-89 years. In the first group, we administered a loading dose of 10 mg/kg ibuprofen on the first day, followed by two doses of 5 mg/kg in the next two days. In the second group, we administered a loading dose of 15 mg/kg ibuprofen on the first day followed by two doses of 7.5 mg/kg in next two days. Eventually, we compared PDA closure rates and complications of therapy between the two groups. Results: Thirty (100% patients in 15-mg/kg group and 23 (76.7% patients in 10 mg/kg group had successful PDA closure with no need for surgery. The two groups had a statistically significant difference (P=0.011 and the highest response to treatment was seen within the first 24 hours of treatment.Conclusion: We may conclude that higher doses of ibuprofen (15 and 2×7.5 mg/kg would offer better outcomes for PDA closure without gastrointestinal or renal complications and less need for surgery.

  14. Effect of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia on the response of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and FFAs to low-dose endotoxemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Møller, Kirsten; Dela, Flemming

    2004-01-01

    Effect of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia on the response of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and FFAs to low-dose endotoxemia in humans.Krogh-Madsen R, Moller K, Dela F, Kronborg G, Jauffred S, Pedersen BK. Professor of Internal Medicine, Dept. of Infectious Diseases 7641, Univ. Hospital Rigshospitalet...... induced an increase in neutrophil count, a decrease in lymphocyte count, and an increase in serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and FFA. There was no difference in the TNF response between the three trials; the IL-6 levels were increased during the late phase of trials B and C compared with trial A....... The endotoxin-induced elevation in FFA in trial A was suppressed during trials B and C. Clamping (trials B and C) caused a reduction in lymphocyte count that persisted after endotoxin injection. We conclude that low-dose endotoxemia triggers a subclinical inflammatory response and an elevation in FFA...

  15. High-Dose Vitamin D3 during Tuberculosis Treatment in Mongolia. A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganmaa, Davaasambuu; Munkhzul, Baatar; Fawzi, Wafaie; Spiegelman, Donna; Willett, Walter C; Bayasgalan, Purev; Baasansuren, Erkhembayar; Buyankhishig, Burneebaatar; Oyun-Erdene, Sereeter; Jolliffe, David A; Xenakis, Theodoros; Bromage, Sabri; Bloom, Barry R; Martineau, Adrian R

    2017-09-01

    Existing trials of adjunctive vitamin D in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) are variously limited by small sample sizes, inadequate dosing regimens, and high baseline vitamin D status among participants. Comprehensive analyses of the effects of genetic variation in the vitamin D pathway on response to vitamin D supplementation are lacking. To determine the effect of high-dose vitamin D3 on response to antimicrobial therapy for PTB and to evaluate the influence of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in vitamin D pathway genes on response to adjunctive vitamin D3. We conducted a clinical trial in 390 adults with PTB in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, who were randomized to receive four biweekly doses of 3.5 mg (140,000 IU) vitamin D3 (n = 190) or placebo (n = 200) during intensive-phase antituberculosis treatment. The intervention elevated 8-week serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (154.5 nmol/L vs. 15.2 nmol/L in active vs. placebo arms, respectively; 95% confidence interval for difference, 125.9-154.7 nmol/L; P vitamin D3 accelerated sputum culture conversion in patients with one or more minor alleles for SNPs in genes encoding the vitamin D receptor (rs4334089, rs11568820) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1: rs4646536) (adjusted hazard ratio ≥ 1.47; P for interaction ≤ 0.02). Vitamin D3 did not influence time to sputum culture conversion in the study population overall. Effects of the intervention were modified by SNPs in VDR and CYP27B1. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01657656).

  16. Parametric Dose Standardization for Optimizing Two-Agent Combinations in a Phase I-II Trial with Ordinal Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thall, Peter F; Nguyen, Hoang Q; Zinner, Ralph G

    2017-01-01

    A Bayesian model and design are described for a phase I-II trial to jointly optimise the doses of a targeted agent and a chemotherapy agent for solid tumors. A challenge in designing the trial was that both the efficacy and toxicity outcomes were defined as four-level ordinal variables. To reflect possibly complex joint effects of the two doses on each of the two outcomes, for each marginal distribution a generalised continuation ratio model was assumed, with each agent's dose parametrically standardised in the linear term. A copula was assumed to obtain a bivariate distribution. Elicited outcome probabilities were used to construct a prior, with variances calibrated to obtain small prior effective sample size. Elicited numerical utilities of the 16 elementary outcomes were used to compute posterior mean utilities as criteria for selecting dose pairs, with adaptive randomisation to reduce the risk of getting stuck at a suboptimal pair. A simulation study showed that parametric dose standardisation with additive dose effects provides a robust, reliable model for dose pair optimisation in this setting, and it compares favourably with designs based on alternative models that include dose-dose interaction terms. The proposed model and method are applicable generally to other clinical trial settings with similar dose and outcome structures.

  17. Quantifying exploratory low dose compounds in humans with AMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, Stephen R; Vuong, Le T; Lohstroh, Peter N; Giacomo, Jason A; Vogel, John S

    2011-06-19

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is an established technology whose essentiality extends beyond simply a better detector for radiolabeled molecules. Attomole sensitivity reduces radioisotope exposures in clinical subjects to the point that no population need be excluded from clinical study. Insights in human physiochemistry are enabled by the quantitative recovery of simplified AMS processes that provide biological concentrations of all labeled metabolites and total compound related material at non-saturating levels. In this paper, we review some of the exploratory applications of AMS (14)C in toxicological, nutritional, and pharmacological research. This body of research addresses the human physiochemistry of important compounds in their own right, but also serves as examples of the analytical methods and clinical practices that are available for studying low dose physiochemistry of candidate therapeutic compounds, helping to broaden the knowledge base of AMS application in pharmaceutical research.

  18. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis: results of a phase Ib/IIa randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoilov, Rumen; Wiland, Piotr; Huizinga, Thomas W; Berenfus, Vadym Y; Vladeva, Stoyanka; Rech, Juergen; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Korkosz, Mariusz; Rekalov, Dmitriy; Zupanets, Igor A; Ejbjerg, Bo J; Geiseler, Jens; Fresenius, Julia; Korolkiewicz, Roman P; Schottelius, Arndt J; Burkhardt, Harald

    2015-06-01

    To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation trial of intravenous MOR103 (0.3, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg) once a week for 4 weeks, with follow-up to 16 weeks. The primary outcome was safety. Of the 96 randomised and treated subjects, 85 completed the trial (n=27, 24, 22 and 23 for pooled placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified as serious because of hospitalisation: paronychia in a placebo subject and pleurisy in a MOR103 0.3 mg/kg subject. Both patients recovered fully. In exploratory efficacy analyses, subjects in the MOR103 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg groups showed significant improvements in Disease Activity Score-28 scores and joint counts and significantly higher European League Against Rheumatism response rates than subjects receiving placebo. MOR103 1.0 mg/kg was associated with the largest reductions in disease activity parameters. MOR103 was well tolerated and showed preliminary evidence of efficacy in patients with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. NCT01023256. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. The optimal dose of vitamin D in growing girls during academic years: a randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    SHAKINBA, Mehrdad; TEFAGH, Samane; NAFEI, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is remarkable during childhood and adolescence throughout the world. Sufficient intake of vitamin D contributes to a number of health outcomes. The aim of this study was to specify the optimal dose of vitamin D in growing girls in a Muslim country during an academic year. Materials and methods: This randomized clinical trial study was carried out in Yazd in the center of Iran in 2007;120 junior high school girls (aged 12-15 years) were randomly divided into...

  20. A double-blind, placebo controlled trial of high-dose lecithin in Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Little, A.; Levy, R.; Chuaqui-Kidd, P; Hand, D

    1985-01-01

    The first long-term double-blind placebo controlled trial of high dose lecithin in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type is reported. Fifty one subjects were given 20-25 g/day of purified soya lecithin (containing 90% phosphatidyl plus lysophosphatidyl choline) for six months and followed up for at least a further six months. Plasma choline levels were monitored throughout the treatment period. There were no differences between the placebo group and the lecithin group but there was an improve...

  1. Prophylactic effect of low dose vitamin D in osteopenia of prematurity: a clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Taheri, Paymaneh; Sajjadian, Negar; Beyrami, Bahram; Shariat, Mamak

    2014-01-01

    Osteopenia of prematurity (OOP) is a preventable disease. Improved survival of premature newborns is associated with an increased incidence of OOP. The purpose of this study was to compare the prophylactic effects of two low doses of vitamin D (200 and 400 IU/Day) on the clinical, biochemical and radiological indices of the rickets of prematurity. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 preterm newborns with birth weight vitamin D in group one and 30 ones received 400 IU/day of vitamin D in group two. On the 6th to 8th weeks of life, serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphates, and 25-hydroxy vitamin D concentrations were measured and x- ray of left wrist and physical examination were performed. Both groups had no difference in biochemical, radiological or clinical presentation of rickets. Current study indicated that low dose vitamin D (200 IU/Day) is enough for prevention of OOP.

  2. Radiotherapy for calcaneodynia. Results of a single center prospective randomized dose optimization trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Jeremias, C.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work was to compare the efficacy of two different dose fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of patients with calcaneodynia. Between February 2006 and April 2010, 457 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients received radiotherapy using the orthovoltage technique. One radiotherapy series consisted of 6 single fractions/3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after radiotherapy using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). The overall response rate for all patients was 87 % directly after and 88 % 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The mean VAS values before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 65.5 {+-} 22.1 and 64.0 {+-} 20.5 (p = 0.188), 34.8 {+-} 24.7 and 39.0 {+-} 26.3 (p = 0.122), and 25.1 {+-} 26.8 and 28.9 {+-} 26.8 (p = 0.156), respectively. The mean CPS before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 10.1 {+-} 2.7 and 10.0 {+-} 3.0 (p = 0.783), 5.6 {+-} 3.7 and 6.0 {+-} 3.9 (p = 0.336), 4.0 {+-} 4.1 and 4.3 {+-} 3.6 (p = 0.257), respectively. No statistically significant differences between the two single dose trial arms for early (p = 0.216) and delayed response (p = 0.080) were found. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for the management of calcaneodynia. For radiation protection reasons, the dose for a radiotherapy series is recommended not to exceed 3-6 Gy. (orig.)

  3. A randomized controlled trial of different buccal misoprostol doses in mifepristone medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Erica; Tsereteli, Tamar; Nguyen, Nhu Ngoc Thi; Winikoff, Beverly

    2012-09-01

    An 800-mcg dose of buccal misoprostol following mifepristone has been shown to be highly effective in terminating pregnancies through 63 days since the last menstrual period (LMP) (B. Winikoff, I.G. Dzuba, M.D. Creinin, et al., Two distinct oral routes of misoprostol in mifepristone medical abortion: a randomized controlled trial. Obstet Gynecol 2008; 112: 1303-1310). However, a two 200-mcg misoprostol pill option would simplify administration, and potentially reduce costs and increase women's satisfaction. This study compares a 400-mcg dose (Group I) to an 800-mcg dose (Group II) of buccal misoprostol. Eligible and consenting women requesting medical termination of early pregnancy (n=1122) were randomized and instructed to take misoprostol 36 to 48 h after taking 200 mg mifepristone. Follow-up visits occurred 12 to 15 days after mifepristone administration. Ninety-six percent of women in both groups had successful abortions. Women in Group I experienced significantly less vomiting and fever/chills than women in Group II. Ninety-six percent of women in both groups found the procedure very satisfactory or satisfactory. Four hundred micrograms of buccal misoprostol is as effective as the standard 800-mcg dose in terminating pregnancies up to 63 days LMP and reduces side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mid-Childhood Bone Mass After Exposure to Repeat Doses of Antenatal Glucocorticoids: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of women at risk for preterm birth with repeat doses of glucocorticoids reduces neonatal morbidity, but could have adverse effects on skeletal development. We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone alters bone mass in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial of Repeat Doses of Corticosteroids. Women were randomized to a single dose of betamethasone or placebo, ≥7 days after an initial course of glucocorticoids, repeated each week that they remained at risk for preterm birth at children underwent whole-body dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry at 6 to 8 years' corrected age. Of 212 eligible childhood survivors, 185 were studied (87%; 91 repeat betamethasone group; 94 placebo [single course] group). Children exposed to repeat antenatal betamethasone and those exposed to placebo had similar whole-body bone mineral content (median repeat betamethasone: 553 g, interquartile range: 442-712 g; placebo: 567 g, interquartile range: 447-750 g; geometric mean ratio: 0.99; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.03, P = .55) and bone area (median repeat betamethasone 832 cm(2), interquartile range: 693-963 cm(2); placebo: 822 cm(2), interquartile range: 710-1020 cm(2); geometric mean ratio: 0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.92-1.07, P = .75). Exposure to repeat doses of antenatal betamethasone compared with a single course of glucocorticoids does not alter bone mass in mid-childhood. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Body Size-Specific Organ and Effective Doses of Chest CT Screening Examinations of the National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Flynn, Michael J; Judy, Phillip F; Cody, Dianna D; Bolch, Wesley E; Kruger, Randell L

    2017-05-01

    We calculated body size-specific organ and effective doses for 23,734 participants in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) using a CT dose calculator. We collected participant-specific technical parameters of 23,734 participants who underwent CT in the clinical trial. For each participant, we calculated two sets of organ doses using two methods. First, we computed body size-specific organ and effective doses using the National Cancer Institute CT (NCICT) dosimetry program, which is based on dose coefficients derived from a library of body size-dependent adult male and female computational phantoms. We then recalculated organ and effective doses using dose coefficients from reference size phantoms for all examinations to investigate potential errors caused by the lack of body size consideration in the dose calculations. The underweight participants (body mass index [BMI; weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters] 30) (3.90 mGy). Thyroid doses were approximately 1.3- to 1.6-fold greater than the lung doses (6.3-6.5 mGy). The reference phantom-based dose calculation underestimates the body size-specific lung dose by up to 50% for the underweight participants and overestimates that value by up to 200% for the overweight participants. The median effective dose ranges from 2.01 mSv in obese participants to 2.80 mSv in underweight participants. Body size-specific organ and effective doses were computed for 23,734 NLST participants who underwent low-dose CT screening. The use of reference size phantoms can lead to significant errors in organ dose estimates when body size is not considered in the dose assessment.

  6. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colvill, Emma; Booth, Jeremy T; O'Brien, Ricky T;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Multileaf...... collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction...

  7. Trial order and retention interval in human predictive judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Steven C; Amundson, Jeffrey C; Miller, Ralph R

    2005-12-01

    The influences of order of trial type and retention interval on human predictive judgments were assessed for a cue that was reinforced on half of its training presentations. Subjects observed 10 cue-outcome presentations (i.e., reinforced trials) and 10 cue-alone presentations (i.e., nonreinforced trials) in one of three different orders: all nonreinforced trials followed by all reinforced trials(latent inhibition), reinforced and nonreinforced trials interspersed (partial reinforcement), or al lreinforced trials followed by all nonreinforced trials (extinction). Ratings were based mainly on the most recent event type (i.e., a recency effect) when the test occurred immediately after training but were based mainly on initial event types (i.e., a primacy effect) when the test occurred after a 48-h delay. The subjects tested both immediately and with a long retention interval did not exhibit this shift to primacy (i.e., the recency effect persisted). These results demonstrate noncatastrophic forgetting and the flexible use of trial order information in predictive judgments.

  8. Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE - CTN 0037: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris David W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse, with direct effects on decreased use and craving. In addition, exercise has the potential to improve other health domains that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight gain, quality of life, and anhedonia, since it has been shown to improve many of these domains in a number of other clinical disorders. Furthermore, neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes. The current manuscript presents the rationale, design considerations, and study design of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA Clinical Trials Network (CTN CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE study. Methods/Design STRIDE is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. This study will evaluate individuals diagnosed with stimulant abuse or dependence who are receiving treatment in a residential setting. Three hundred and thirty eligible and interested participants who provide informed consent will be randomized to one of two treatment arms: Vigorous Intensity High Dose Exercise Augmentation (DEI or Health Education Intervention Augmentation (HEI. Both groups will receive TAU (i.e., usual care. The treatment arms are structured such that the quantity of visits is similar to allow for equivalent contact between groups. In both arms, participants will begin with supervised sessions 3 times per week during the 12-week acute phase of the study. Supervised sessions will be conducted as one-on-one (i.e., individual sessions

  9. Different dose rate-dependent responses of human melanoma cells and fibroblasts to low dose fast neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionet, Claude; Müller-Barthélémy, Melanie; Marceau, Geoffroy; Denis, Jean-Marc; Averbeck, Dietrich; Gueulette, John; Sapin, Vincent; Pereira, Bruno; Tchirkov, Andrei; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    To analyze the dose rate influence in hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) of human melanoma cells to very low doses of fast neutrons and to compare to the behaviour of normal human skin fibroblasts. We explored different neutron dose rates as well as possible implication of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), apoptosis, and energy-provider adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) levels during HRS. HRS in melanoma cells appears only at a very low dose rate (VLDR), while a high dose rate (HDR) induces an initial cell-radioresistance (ICRR). HRS does not seem to be due either to DSB or to apoptosis. Both phenomena (HRS and ICRR) appear to be related to ATP availability for triggering cell repair. Fibroblast survival after neutron irradiation is also dose rate-dependent but without HRS. Melanoma cells or fibroblasts exert their own survival behaviour at very low doses of neutrons, suggesting that in some cases there is a differential between cancer and normal cells radiation responses. Only the survival of fibroblasts at HDR fits the linear no-threshold model. This new insight into human cell responses to very low doses of neutrons, concerns natural radiations, surroundings of accelerators, proton-therapy devices, flights at high altitude. Furthermore, ATP inhibitors could increase HRS during high-linear energy transfer (high-LET) irradiation.

  10. Misoprostol dose and route after mifepristone for early medical abortion: a randomised controlled noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hertzen, H; Huong, N T M; Piaggio, G; Bayalag, M; Cabezas, E; Fang, A H; Gemzell-Danielsson, K; Hinh, N D; Mittal, S; Ng, E H Y; Chaturachinda, K; Pinter, B; Puscasiu, L; Savardekar, L; Shenoy, S; Khomassuridge, A; Tuyet, H T D; Velasco, A; Peregoudov, A

    2010-09-01

    To compare 400 and 800 microg sublingual or vaginal misoprostol 24 hours after 200 mg mifepristone for noninferiority regarding efficacy in achieving complete abortion for pregnancy termination up to 63 days of gestation. Placebo-controlled, randomised, noninferiority factorial trial, stratified by centre and length of gestation. Misoprostol 400 or 800 microg, administered either sublingually or vaginally, with follow up after 2 and 6 weeks. Fifteen obstetrics/gynaecology departments in ten countries. Pregnant women (n = 3005) up to 63 days of gestation requesting medical abortion. Two-sided 95% CI for differences in failure of complete abortion and continuing pregnancy, with a 3% noninferiority margin, were calculated. Proportions of women with adverse effects were recorded. Complete abortion without surgical intervention (main); continuing live pregnancies, induction-to-abortion interval, adverse effects, women's perceptions (secondary). Efficacy outcomes analysed for 2962 women (98.6%): 90.5% had complete abortion after 400 microg misoprostol, 94.2% after 800 microg. Noninferiority of 400 microg misoprostol was not demonstrated for failure of complete abortion (difference: 3.7%; 95% CI 1.8-5.6%). The 400-microg dose showed higher risk of incomplete abortion (P abortion (P = 0.47, difference in sublingual minus vaginal -0.7%, 95% CI -2.6-1.2%). A similar pattern was observed for continuing pregnancies (P = 0.21). Fewer women reported adverse effects with vaginal than sublingual administration and with the 400-microg dose than the 800-microg dose. Of the women, 94% were satisfied or highly satisfied with the regimens, 53% preferred the sublingual route and 47% preferred the vaginal route. A 400-microg dose of misoprostol should not replace the 800-microg dose when administered 24 hours after 200 mg mifepristone for inducing abortion in pregnancies up to 63 days. Sublingual and vaginal misoprostol have similar efficacy, but vaginal administration is associated with

  11. Comparison of two doses of ketoprofen to treat pain: a double-blind, randomized, noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, Bruno; Plaisance, Patrick; Lecomte, François; Soulat, Louis; Orcel, Philippe; Mazoit, Jean-Xavier

    2014-02-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of two doses of ketoprofen (200 mg vs. 300 mg/day) in ambulatory emergency patients with pain related to traumatic and nontraumatic bone and joint diseases. We tested the hypothesis that the efficacy of the lower dose was not lower than that of the higher dose in a double-blind, randomized, noninferiority trial. Patients included in the study were aged 18-65 years with closed benign trauma of the motor system or acute noninfectious rheumatologic conditions, with a resting pain intensity ≥3/10 on a numeric pain scale (NPS), requiring ketoprofen for 5 days. The main end-point was based on two efficacy co-criteria: (i) mean change from baseline of resting pain intensity at the end of the day over 5 days and (ii) total intake of concomitant analgesics. We included 409 patients: 200 in the 200-mg group and 209 in the 300-mg group. The mean change in pain intensity at rest (difference between groups: 0.0, 95% CI -0.4 to 0.4; P = 1.00) and in analgesic consumption (difference between groups: -0.6, 95% CI -1.9 to 0.6; P = 0.33) was not significantly different between the two groups, and the differences were lower than the predefined inferiority margins (0.5 and 1.5, respectively), thus demonstrating noninferiority. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of adverse events (21% vs. 20%, P = 0.71). The efficacy of the 200-mg daily dose of ketoprofen in relieving pain in emergency cases was not inferior to that of the 300-mg dose.

  12. Clinical trials documenting the efficacy of low-dose glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Theodore; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Twelve clinical trials have documented that prednisone or prednisolone in doses of 10 mg/day or less is efficacious to improve function, maintain status and/or slow radiographic progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An early trial reported by de Andrade et al. [Ann Rheum Dis 1964;23:158-162] in 1964 indicated that 5 mg of prednisolone at night was preferred to 5 mg of prednisone in the morning. Harris et al. [J Rheumatol 1983;10:713-721] documented the efficacy of 5 mg/day of prednisone in a non-double-blind trial in 1983. Two important trials in the 1990s by Kirwan [N Engl J Med 1995;333:142-146] using 7.5 mg/day, and the COBRA study by Boers et al. [Lancet 1997;350:309-318] with step-down from 60 mg rapidly tapered to 5 mg/day led to strong advocacy of low-dose glucocorticoids. In 2002, the first Utrecht Study [Ann Intern Med 2002;136:1-12] indicated that 10 mg/day prednisone slowed radiographic progression, a finding confirmed and extended in 2005 by Svensson et al. [Arthritis Rheum 2005;52:3360-3370] with 7.5 mg/day, and Wassenberg et al. [Arthritis Rheum 2005;52:3371-3380] with 5 mg/day of prednisolone. In 2008, Buttgereit et al. [Lancet 2008;371:205-214] reported CAPRA-1, which documented that modified-release prednisone or prednisolone taken at bedtime led to lower morning stiffness and IL-6 levels compared to usual morning prednisone. In 2009, Pincus et al. [Ann Rheum Dis 2009;68:1715-1720] reported a withdrawal clinical trial, in which patients who took 3 mg/day were gradually withdrawn to placebo, and dropped out at a significantly higher rate than control patients who were 'withdrawn' to prednisone. In 2012, a second Utrecht Study [Ann Intern Med 2012;156:329-339], CAMERA-II, documented that 10 mg of prednisone added to a 'treat-to-target' strategy with methotrexate provided incremental slowing of radiographic progression. An Italian study of patients with early RA who received step-up disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy over 2

  13. The Erlangen Dose Optimization trial for low-dose radiotherapy of benign painful elbow syndrome. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Hertel, S.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the long-term efficacy of pain reduction by two dose fractionation schedules used for low-dose radiotherapy of painful elbow syndrome. Between February 2006 and February 2010, 199 evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective trial. All patients received low-dose orthovoltage radiotherapy. One course consisted of 6 fractions in 3 weeks. In the case of insufficient pain remission after 6 weeks, a second course was administered. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups to receive single doses of either 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before radiotherapy, as well as immediately after (early response), 6 weeks after (delayed response) and approximately 3 years after (long-term response) completion of radiotherapy using a questionnaire-based visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Median follow-up was 35 months (range 9-57 months). The overall early, delayed and long-term response rates for all patients were 80, 90 and 94 %, respectively. The mean VAS scores before treatment and those for early, delayed and long-term response in the 0.5- and 1.0-Gy groups were 59.6 ± 20.2 and 55.7 ± 18.0 (p = 0.46); 32.1 ± 24.5 and 34.4 ± 22.5 (p = 0.26); 27.0 ± 27.7 and 23.5 ± 21.6 (p = 0.82) and 10.7 ± 15.0 and 21.5 ± 26.9 (p = 0.12), respectively. The mean CPS values before treatment and those for early, delayed and long-term response were 8.7 ± 2.9 and 8.1 ± 3.1 (p = 0.21); 4.5 ± 3.2 and 5.0 ± 3.4 (p = 0.51); 3.9 ± 3.6 and 2.8 ± 2.8 (p = 0.19) and 1.5 ± 2.3 and 2.4 ± 3.5 (p = 0.27), respectively. No significant differences in the quality of the long-term response were found between the 0.5- and 1.0-Gy arms (p = 0.28). Low-dose radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the management of benign painful elbow syndrome. For radiation protection reasons, the dose for a radiotherapy series should not exceed 3.0 Gy. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der

  14. Effects of exercise dose on endogenous estrogens in postmenopausal women: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenreich, Christine M; Neilson, Heather K; Wang, Qinggang; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Yasui, Yutaka; Duha, Aalo; MacLaughlin, Sarah; Kallal, Ciara; Forbes, Cynthia C; Courneya, Kerry S

    2015-10-01

    Exercise dose comparison trials with biomarker outcomes can identify the amount of exercise required to reduce breast cancer risk and also strengthen the causal inference between physical activity and breast cancer. The Breast Cancer and Exercise Trial in Alberta (BETA) tested whether or not greater changes in estradiol (E2), estrone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations can be achieved in postmenopausal women randomized to 12 months of HIGH (300 min/week) vs MODERATE (150 min/week) volumes of aerobic exercise. BETA included 400 inactive postmenopausal women aged 50-74 years with BMI of 22-40 kg/m(2). Blood was drawn at baseline and 6 and 12 months. Adiposity, physical fitness, diet, and total physical activity were assessed at baseline and 12 months. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed using linear mixed models. At full prescription, women exercised more in the HIGH vs MODERATE group (median min/week (quartiles 1,3): 253 (157 289) vs 137 (111 150); Pestrogens and SHBG were effect ratios (95% CI) from linear mixed models: 1.00 (0.96-1.06), 1.02 (0.98-1.05), 0.99 (0.96-1.02), 1.01 (0.95, 1.06), respectively, representing the HIGH:MODERATE ratio of geometric mean biomarker levels over 12 months; n=382). In per-protocol analyses, borderline significantly greater decreases in total and free E2 occurred in the HIGH group. Overall, no dose effect was observed for women randomized to 300 vs 150 min/week of moderate to vigorous intensity exercise who actually performed a median of 253 vs 137 min/week. For total and free E2, the lack of differential effect may be due to modest adherence in the higher dose group. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Low-dose endotoxemia and human neuropsychological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe, Karen Suárez; Reichenberg, Abraham; Yirmiya, Raz; Smed, Annelise; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Bruunsgaard, Helle

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological data demonstrate an association between systemic low-grade inflammation defined as 2- to 3-fold increases in circulating inflammatory mediators and age-related decline in cognitive function. However, it is not known whether small elevations of circulating cytokine levels cause direct effects on human neuropsychological functions. We investigated changes in emotional, cognitive, and inflammatory parameters in an experimental in vivo model of low-grade inflammation. In a double-blind crossover study, 12 healthy young males completed neuropsychological tests before as well as 1.5, 6, and 24 h after an intravenous injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (0.2 ng/kg) or saline in two experimental sessions. Endotoxin administration had no effect on body temperature, cortisol levels, blood pressure or heart rate, but circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 increased 2- and 7-fold, respectively, reaching peak values at 3 h, whereas soluble TNF-receptors and IL-1 receptor antagonist peaked at 4.5 h. The neutrophil count increased and the lymphocyte count declined. In this model, low-dose endotoxemia did not affect cognitive performance significantly but declarative memory performance was inversely correlated with cytokine increases. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a negative association between circulating IL-6 and memory functions during very low-dose endotoxemia independently of physical stress symptoms, and the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  16. Correlating preclinical animal studies and human clinical trials of a multifunctional, polymeric nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasof, Scott; Lazarus, Douglas; Peters, Christian G; Case, Roy I; Cole, Roderic O; Hwang, Jungyeon; Schluep, Thomas; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Han, Han; Wiley, Devin T; Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Davis, Mark E

    2013-09-10

    Nanoparticles are currently being investigated in a number of human clinical trials. As information on how nanoparticles function in humans is difficult to obtain, animal studies that can be correlative to human behavior are needed to provide guidance for human clinical trials. Here, we report correlative studies on animals and humans for CRLX101, a 20- to 30-nm-diameter, multifunctional, polymeric nanoparticle containing camptothecin (CPT). CRLX101 is currently in phase 2 clinical trials, and human data from several of the clinical investigations are compared with results from multispecies animal studies. The pharmacokinetics of polymer-conjugated CPT (indicative of the CRLX101 nanoparticles) in mice, rats, dogs, and humans reveal that the area under the curve scales linearly with milligrams of CPT per square meter for all species. Plasma concentrations of unconjugated CPT released from CRLX101 in animals and humans are consistent with each other after accounting for differences in serum albumin binding of CPT. Urinary excretion of polymer-conjugated CPT occurs primarily within the initial 24 h after dosing in animals and humans. The urinary excretion dynamics of polymer-conjugated and unconjugated CPT appear similar between animals and humans. CRLX101 accumulates into solid tumors and releases CPT over a period of several days to give inhibition of its target in animal xenograft models of cancer and in the tumors of humans. Taken in total, the evidence provided from animal models on the CRLX101 mechanism of action suggests that the behavior of CRLX101 in animals is translatable to humans.

  17. Human computer interaction issues in Clinical Trials Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starren, Justin B; Payne, Philip R O; Kaufman, David R

    2006-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly rely upon web-based Clinical Trials Management Systems (CTMS). As with clinical care systems, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues can greatly affect the usefulness of such systems. Evaluation of the user interface of one web-based CTMS revealed a number of potential human-computer interaction problems, in particular, increased workflow complexity associated with a web application delivery model and potential usability problems resulting from the use of ambiguous icons. Because these design features are shared by a large fraction of current CTMS, the implications extend beyond this individual system.

  18. Effects of the dose of erythropoiesis stimulating agents on cardiovascular events, quality of life, and health-related costs in hemodialysis patients: the clinical evaluation of the dose of erythropoietins (C.E. DOSE trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strippoli Giovanni FM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anemia is a risk factor for death, adverse cardiovascular outcomes and poor quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Erythropoietin Stimulating Agents (ESA are commonly used to increase hemoglobin levels in this population. In observational studies, higher hemoglobin levels (around 11-13 g/dL are associated with improved survival and quality of life compared to hemoglobin levels around 9-10 g/dL. A systematic review of randomized trials found that targeting higher hemoglobin levels with ESA causes an increased risk of adverse vascular outcomes. It is possible, but has never been formally tested in a randomized trial, that ESA dose rather than targeted hemoglobin concentration itself mediates the increased risk of adverse vascular outcomes. The Clinical Evaluation of the DOSe of Erythropoietins (C.E. DOSE trial will assess the benefits and harms of a high versus a low fixed ESA dose for the management of anemia in patients with end stage kidney disease. Methods/Design This is a randomized, prospective open label blinded end-point (PROBE trial due to enrol 2204 hemodialysis patients in Italy. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to 4000 IU/week versus 18000 IU/week of intravenous epoietin alfa or beta, or any other ESA in equivalent doses. The dose will be adjusted only if hemoglobin levels fall outside the 9.5-12.5 g/dL range. The primary outcome will be a composite of all-cause mortality, non fatal stroke, non fatal myocardial infarction and hospitalization for cardiovascular causes. Quality of life and costs will also be assessed. Discussion The C.E.DOSE study will help inform the optimal therapeutic strategy for the management of anemia of hemodialysis patients, improving clinical outcomes, quality of life and costs, by ascertaining the potential benefits and harms of different fixed ESA doses. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00827021

  19. HALF-DOSE DEPOT TRIPTORELIN COMPARABLE TO REDUCED DAILY BUSERELIN: A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Safdarian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary suppression by depot GnRH agonist may be excessive for ovarian stimulation. This study compares the efficacy of a single half-dose depot triptorelin and reduced-dose daily buserelin in a long protocol ICSI/ET. METHODS: A total of 182 patients were randomized into two groups using sealed envelopes. Pituitary desensitization was obtained in group 1 (91 patients with half-dose (1.87 mg depot triptorelin in the mid-luteal phase of their menstrual cycle, and in group 2 (91 patients with standard daily dose (0.5 mg buserelin, which was then reduced to 0.25 mg at the start of human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG stimulation. RESULTS: No significant differences were found among those who received HCG in terms of clinical pregnancy rate (34.4% in both groups, implantation rate (14.8% in group 1 versus 11.1% in group 2, fertilization rate (93.3 versus 95.6%, poor response rate (11.1 versus 6.7%, and miscarriage rate (11.1 versus 7.8%. No significant differences were seen in number of HMG ampoules used, follicles at HCG administration, and oocytes retrieved. The number of days of stimulation was significantly reduced in group 2 (11.2 +/- 1.8 in group 1 versus 10.6 +/- 1.9, p = 0.030. CONCLUSION: A half-dose of depot triptorelin can be successfully used in ovarian stimulation instead of reduced-dose daily buserelin, with more patient comfort and reduced stress and cost of injections.

  20. Benign painful elbow syndrome. First results of a single center prospective randomized radiotherapy dose optimization trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Hertel, S.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-10-15

    Background and purpose: The goal of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy (RT) of patients with painful elbow syndrome. Patients and methods: Between February 2006 and February 2010, 199 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients received RT in orthovoltage technique. One RT course consisted of 6 single fractions/3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, right after, and 6 weeks after RT by a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Results: The overall response rate for all patients was 80% direct after and 91% 6 weeks after RT. The mean VAS values before, after and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 59.6 {+-} 20.2 and 55.7 {+-} 18.0 (p = 0.463), 32.1 {+-} 24.5 and 34.4 {+-} 22.5 (p = 0.256), and 27.0 {+-} 27.7 and 23.5 {+-} 21.6 (p = 0.818). The mean CPS before, after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 8.7 {+-} 2.9 and 8.1 {+-} 3.1 (p = 0.207), 4.5 {+-} 3.2 and 5.0 {+-} 3.4 (p = 0.507), 3.9 {+-} 3.6 and 2.8 {+-} 2.8 (p = 0.186), respectively. No statistically significant differences between the two single dose trial arms for early (p = 0.103) and delayed response (p = 0.246) were found. Conclusion: RT is an effective treatment option for the management of benign painful elbow syndrome. For radiation protection reasons the dose for a RT series is recommended not to exceed 3.0 Gy. (orig.)

  1. Radiotherapy for achillodynia. Results of a single-center prospective randomized dose-optimization trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Jeremias, C.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-02-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two different dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of patients with achillodynia. Patients and methods: Between February 2006 and February 2010, 112 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients underwent radiotherapy with an orthovoltage technique. One radiotherapy course consisted of 6 single fractions over 3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks, a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. The endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, right after, and 6 weeks after radiotherapy with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Results: The overall response rate for all patients was 84% directly after and 88% 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The mean VAS values before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 55.7 {+-} 21.0 and 58.2 {+-} 23.5 (p = 0.526), 38.0 {+-} 23.2 and 30.4 {+-} 22.6 (p = 0.076), and 35.4 {+-} 25.9 and 30.9 {+-} 25.4 (p = 0.521), respectively. The mean CPS before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 8.2 {+-} 3.0 and 8.9 {+-} 3.3 (p = 0.239), 5.6 {+-} 3.1 and 5.4 {+-} 3.3 (p = 0.756), 4.4 {+-} 2.6 and 5.3 {+-} 3.8 (p = 0.577), respectively. No statistically significant differences were found between the two single-dose trial arms for early (p = 0.366) and delayed response (p = 0.287). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for the management of achillodynia. For radiation protection, the dose of a radiotherapy series is recommended not to exceed 3-6 Gy. (orig.)

  2. Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose versus Conventional-Dose Chemotherapy for Malignant Tumors: a Meta-Analysis of 6 Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianhe; Wu, Yupeng; Luo, Shuimei; Yang, Haitao; Li, Lina; Zhou, Sijing; Shen, Ruifen; Lin, Heng

    2017-02-01

    Low-dose chemotherapy has emerged as a new strategy for control of cancer. However, there is a controversy as to whether low-dose chemotherapy is an effective way to manage many human malignancies. To shed light on this controversy, we performed a meta-analysis of relative merits between low-dose and conventional-dose chemotherapy in different carcinomas. Studies published before February 29, 2016 were reviewed for the meta-analysis and selected according to defined criteria. The effect levels of low-dose chemotherapy regarding overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and severe adverse events (SAEs) (Grade≥3) were calculated as risk ratios (ORs) or adjusted hazard ratios (HRs). Six randomized controlled studies (RCTs) have provided data for low-dose chemotherapy versus conventional-dose chemotherapy for 838 cases and 833 cases, respectively. Interestingly, low-dose chemotherapy achieved the same desired potency as conventional-dose chemotherapy, with no differences in pooled ORR (RR=1.00, 95%CI [0.89, 1.13]; (P=0.97), OS (HR=1.07, 95%CI [0.90, 1.26]; P=0.44) and PFS (HR=1.02, 95%CI [0.84, 1.23]; P=0.87) values. Furthermore, pooled data for common SAEs showed that, compared with conventional-dose chemotherapy regimen, low-dose chemotherapy regimen resulted in significant less mucositis (Plow-dose chemotherapy may play an important role in achieving the same desired potency as conventional-dose chemotherapy in managing malignant tumors. Moreover, low-dose regimen seems to possess positive advantages of lower toxicity which is a particular concern for most patients.

  3. Software to compute and conduct sequential Bayesian phase I or II dose-ranging clinical trials with stopping rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Latouche, Aurelien; Taconnet, Mathieu; Chevret, Sylvie

    2003-10-01

    The aim of dose-ranging phase I (resp. phase II) clinical trials is to rapidly identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) (resp., minimal effective dose (MED)) of a new drug or combination. For the conduct and analysis of such trials, Bayesian approaches such as the Continual Reassessment Method (CRM) have been proposed, based on a sequential design and analysis up to a completed fixed sample size. To optimize sample sizes, Zohar and Chevret have proposed stopping rules (Stat. Med. 20 (2001) 2827), the computation of which is not provided by available softwares. We present in this paper a user-friendly software for the design and analysis of these Bayesian Phase I (resp. phase II) dose-ranging Clinical Trials (BPCT). It allows to carry out the CRM with stopping rules or not, from the planning of the trial, with choice of model parameterization based on its operating characteristics, up to the sequential conduct and analysis of the trial, with estimation at stopping of the MTD (resp. MED) of the new drug or combination.

  4. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in inflammatory myopathies: experience based on controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    2003-10-01

    Controlled clinical trials with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) have been conducted in patients with DM and IBM, but not PM. A double-blind placebo-controlled study in DM patients, resistant or partially responsive to conventional therapies, showed that IVIg is very effective in improving both the muscle strength and the skin rash. The clinical benefit, which was impressive in patients with early disease, was associated with improvement in the muscle cytoarchitecture. Quantitative histological studies in repeated muscle biopsies showed a statistically significant increased in the size of muscle fibers and the number of capillaries with normalization of the capillary diameter. Resolution of the aberrant immunopathological parameters including interception of complement activation products and downregulation of T cells, ICAM-I, VCAM, TGF-beta and MHC-I molecules was also noted. In IBM, IVIg showed marginal, and non statistically significant, improvements in muscle strength. Up to 20% of patients however, demonstrated clinical improvement with increased activities of daily living while certain muscle groups, such as the muscles of swallowing, showed significant improvements compared to placebo implying mild regional benefits. In PM, small uncontrolled series have shown improvements in muscle strength in up to 70% of the IVIg-treated patients. Because PM, as a stand-alone clinical entity, is a very rare disease, completion of controlled trials will be very difficult.

  5. Quality assessment of delineation and dose planning of early breast cancer patients included in the randomized Skagen Trial 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francolini, Giulio; Thomsen, Mette S; Yates, Esben S

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report on a Quality assessment (QA) of Skagen Trial 1, exploring hypofractionation for breast cancer patients with indication for regional nodal radiotherapy. Material and methods: Deviations from protocol regarding target volume delineations and dose parameters (Dmin, ...... coverage in most patients. Inter-observer variability in contouring was low. Dose parameters were in harmony with protocol regardless original or GS segmentation.......Background and purpose: To report on a Quality assessment (QA) of Skagen Trial 1, exploring hypofractionation for breast cancer patients with indication for regional nodal radiotherapy. Material and methods: Deviations from protocol regarding target volume delineations and dose parameters (Dmin......, Dmax, D98%, D95% and D2%) from randomly selected dose plans were assessed. Target volume delineation according to ESTRO guidelines was obtained through atlas based automated segmentation and centrally approved as gold standard (GS). Dice similarity scores (DSC) with original delineations were measured...

  6. Prophylactic effect of low dose vitamin D in osteopenia of prematurity: a clinical trial study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paymaneh Alizadeh Taheri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteopenia of prematurity (OOP is a preventable disease. Improved survival of premature newborns is associated with an increased incidence of OOP. The purpose of this study was to compare the prophylactic effects of two low doses of vitamin D (200 and 400 IU/Day on the clinical, biochemical and radiological indices of the rickets of prematurity. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 preterm newborns with birth weight < 2000 g & gestational age < 37 weeks were randomly divided in two groups. Thirty newborns received 200 IU/d of vitamin D in group one and 30 ones received 400 IU/day of vitamin D in group two. On the 6th to 8th weeks of life, serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphates, and 25-hydroxy vitamin D concentrations were measured and x- ray of left wrist and physical examination were performed. Both groups had no difference in biochemical, radiological or clinical presentation of rickets. Current study indicated that low dose vitamin D (200 IU/Day is enough for prevention of OOP.

  7. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  8. Vitamin D production depends on ultraviolet-B dose but not on dose rate: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogh, Morten K B; Schmedes, Anne V; Philipsen, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation increases serum vitamin D level expressed as 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25(OH)D), but the dose-response relationship and the importance of dose rate is unclear. Of 172 fair-skinned persons screened for 25(OH)D, 55 with insufficient baseline 25(OH)D=50 nm (mean 31.2 nm......-B treatments of 3 SED with 24.8 nm on average and 14.2 nm after four UV-B treatments of just 0.375 SED. In conclusion, the increase in 25(OH)D after UV-B exposure depends on the dose but not on the dose rate (1-20 min). Further, a significant increase in 25(OH)D was achieved with a very low UV-B dose.......) were selected and randomized to one of 11 groups of five participants. Each group was exposed to one of four different UV-B doses: 0.375, 0.75, 1.5 or 3.0 standard erythema dose (SED) for 1, 5, 10 or 20 min. All participants had four UV-B sessions with 2- to 3-day interval with 24% of their skin...

  9. The Erlangen Dose Optimization Trial for radiotherapy of benign painful shoulder syndrome. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Hertel, S.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate the long-term efficacy of pain reduction by two dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of painful shoulder syndrome. Between February 2006 and February 2010, 312 evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective trial. All patients received low-dose orthovoltage radiotherapy. One course consisted of 6 fractions in 3 weeks. In the case of insufficient pain remission after 6 weeks, a second course was administered. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups to receive single doses of either 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before radiotherapy, as well as immediately after (early response), 6 weeks after (delayed response) and approximately 3 years after (long-term response) completion of radiotherapy using a questionnaire-based visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Median follow-up was 35 months (range 11-57). The overall early, delayed and long-term response rates for all patients were 83, 85 and 82%, respectively. The mean VAS scores before treatment and those for early, delayed and long-term response in the 0.5- and 1.0-Gy groups were 56.8±23.7 and 53.2±21.8 (p=0.16); 38.2±36.1 and 34.0±24.5 (p=0.19); 33.0±27.2 and 23.7±22.7 (p=0.04) and 27.9±25.8 and 32.1±26.9 (p=0.25), respectively. The mean CPS values before treatment and those for early, delayed and long-term response were 9.7±3.0 and 9.5±2.7 (p=0.31); 6.1±3.6 and 5.4±3.6 (p=0.10); 5.3±3.7 and 4.1±3.7 (p=0.05) and 4.0±3.9 and 5.3±4.4 (p=0.05), respectively. No significant differences in the quality of the long-term response were found between the 0.5- and 1.0-Gy arms (p=0.28). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the management of benign painful shoulder syndrome. For radiation protection reasons, the dose for a radiotherapy series should not exceed 3.0 Gy. (orig.)

  10. A randomized controlled trial of vitamin D dosing strategies after acute hip fracture: No advantage of loading doses over daily supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrauto Leonardo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There remains uncertainty regarding the appropriate therapeutic management of hip fracture patients. The primary aim of our study was to examine whether large loading doses in addition to daily vitamin D offered any advantage over a simple daily low-dose vitamin D regimen for increasing vitamin D levels. Methods In this randomized controlled study, patients over age 50 with an acute fragility hip fracture were enrolled from two hospital sites in Ontario, Canada. Participants were randomized to one of three loading dose groups: placebo; 50,000 IU vitamin D2; or 100,000 IU D2. Following a placebo/loading dose, all patients received a daily tablet of 1,000 IU vitamin D3 for 90 days. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD was measured at baseline, discharge from acute care (approximately 4-weeks, and 3-months. Results Sixty-five patients were enrolled in the study (44% male. An immediate rise in 25-OHD occurred in the 100,000 group, however there were no significant differences in 25-OHD between the placebo, 50,000 and 100,000 loading dose groups after 4-weeks (69.3, 84.5, 75.6 nmol/L, p = 0.15 and 3-months (86.7, 84.2, 73.3 nmol/L, p = 0.09, respectively. At the end of the study, approximately 75% of the placebo and 50,000 groups had reached the target therapeutic range (75 nmol/L, and 44% of the 100,000 group. Conclusions In correcting vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency in elderly patients with hip fracture, our findings suggest that starting with a lower daily dose of Vitamin D3 achieved similar results as providing an additional large loading dose of Vitamin D2. At the end of the study, all three groups were equally effective in attaining improvement in 25-OHD levels. Given that a daily dose of 1,000 IU vitamin D3 (with or without a loading dose resulted in at least 25% of patients having suboptimal vitamin D status, patients with acute hip fracture may benefit from a higher daily dose of vitamin D. Trial registration Clinical

  11. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  12. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  13. Comparing the effectiveness of a "short-term double-dose" hepatitis B vaccination schedule with the "standard 3-dose" schedule: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahari A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} "nBackground: With respect to the importance of hepatitis B vaccination of high-risk groups such as prisoners, this study was performed to assess the comparability of a short-course double-dose vaccination schedule with the standard 3-dose schedule. "n"nMethods : Within a randomized clinical trial, a short-course vaccination (at months 0 and 1 with 20 microgram (double-dose doses of the vaccine was compared to the standard method of hepatitis B vaccination (at months 0, 1 and 6, with 10-microgram doses in 100 prisoners in Zahedan city in Iran in 2009. We made sure the sera from all the individuals were negative for markers of previous hepatitis B infection. Subsequently serum from all the participants was tested for anti-HBs antibody 1, 2 and 7 months after the first dose of vaccination."n"nResults : Seroconversion rates (HBsAb>10 mIU/ml 1, 2 and 7 months after the first dose of vaccination were similar in the routine (11%, 79% and 94%, respectively relative to the double-dose group (26%, 95% and 93 %, respectively. The mean values of anti-HBs antibody titers were similar in the 1st and 2nd months for the two groups but it was significantly higher (P=0.002 in the routine dose (514 mIU/ml versus the double-dose group (130 mIU/mL, in the 7th month. "n"nConclusion: Demonstrating comparable results with the standard 3-dose schedule, it seems that short-term double-dose vaccination for hepatitis B is a safe and acceptable method for use in high-risk groups such as prisoners.

  14. Statins in hypercholesterolaemia: A dose-specific meta-analysis of lipid changes in randomised, double blind trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore R Andrew

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins alter lipid concentrations. This systematic review determined the efficacy of particular statins, in terms of their ability to alter cholesterol. Review methods PubMed, the Cochrane Library, references lists of reports, and reviews were searched (September 2001 for randomised, double blind trials of statins for cholesterol in trials of 12 weeks or longer. Mean change in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides was calculated using pooled data for particular statins, and for particular doses of a statin. Pre-planned sensitivity analyses were used to determine the effects of initial concentration of total cholesterol, study duration, the effects of major trials, and effects in placebo versus active controlled trials. Information was not collected on adverse events. Results Different statins at a range of doses reduced total cholesterol by 17–35% and LDL-cholesterol by 24–49% from baseline. Lower doses of statins generally produced less cholesterol lowering, though for most statins in trials of 12 weeks or longer there was at best only a weak relationship between dose and cholesterol reduction. Duration of treatment and baseline total cholesterol concentration did not alter the amount of the benefit attained. Conclusions Statins are effective medicines and confer benefit to patients in terms of primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Reductions in total cholesterol of 25% or more and LDL cholesterol of more than 30% were recorded for fixed doses of simvastatin 40 mg, atorvastatin 10 mg, and rosuvastatin 5 mg and 10 mg.

  15. Dose-Dependent Model of Caffeine Effects on Human Vigilance during Total Sleep Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Dose-dependent model of caffeine effects on human vigilance during total sleep deprivation Sridhar Ramakrishnan a, Srinivas Laxminarayan a, Nancy J...We modeled the dose-dependent effects of caffeine on human vigilance. The model predicted the effects of both single and repeated caffeine doses...We developed and validated the model using two laboratory studies. Individual-specific caffeine models outperformed population-average models. a

  16. Analysis of Safety from a Human Clinical Trial with Pterostilbene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Riche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the safety of long-term pterostilbene administration in humans. Methodology. The trial was a prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial enrolling patients with hypercholesterolemia (defined as a baseline total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL and/or baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥100 mg/dL. Eighty subjects were divided equally into one of four groups: (1 pterostilbene 125 mg twice daily, (2 pterostilbene 50 mg twice daily, (3 pterostilbene 50 mg + grape extract (GE 100 mg twice daily, and (4 matching placebo twice daily for 6–8 weeks. Safety markers included biochemical and subjective measures. Linear mixed models were used to estimate primary safety measure treatment effects. Results. The majority of patients completed the trial (91.3%. The average age was 54 years. The majority of patients were females (71% and Caucasians (70%. There were no adverse drug reactions (ADRs on hepatic, renal, or glucose markers based on biochemical analysis. There were no statistically significant self-reported or major ADRs. Conclusion. Pterostilbene is generally safe for use in humans up to 250 mg/day.

  17. Analysis of safety from a human clinical trial with pterostilbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Daniel M; McEwen, Corey L; Riche, Krista D; Sherman, Justin J; Wofford, Marion R; Deschamp, David; Griswold, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the safety of long-term pterostilbene administration in humans. Methodology. The trial was a prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial enrolling patients with hypercholesterolemia (defined as a baseline total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL and/or baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥100 mg/dL). Eighty subjects were divided equally into one of four groups: (1) pterostilbene 125 mg twice daily, (2) pterostilbene 50 mg twice daily, (3) pterostilbene 50 mg + grape extract (GE) 100 mg twice daily, and (4) matching placebo twice daily for 6-8 weeks. Safety markers included biochemical and subjective measures. Linear mixed models were used to estimate primary safety measure treatment effects. Results. The majority of patients completed the trial (91.3%). The average age was 54 years. The majority of patients were females (71%) and Caucasians (70%). There were no adverse drug reactions (ADRs) on hepatic, renal, or glucose markers based on biochemical analysis. There were no statistically significant self-reported or major ADRs. Conclusion. Pterostilbene is generally safe for use in humans up to 250 mg/day.

  18. Dose estimation for repeated phosphorus-32 ingestion in human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, J.H.; Tseng, C.L.; Hsieh, W.A.; Hung, D.Z.; Chang, W.P. E-mail: wpc94@mailsrv.ym.edu.tw

    2001-01-15

    Dose estimation was conducted for internal phosphorus-32 exposure in one young male subject from repeated oral mis-ingestion for >1 year. Since disclosure for previous continuous contamination, a series of urine samples were collected from this individual weekly for a period of >2 months. P-32 radioactivity in urine samples were measured by the acid precipitation method. Estimation for retrospective total effective dose equivalent received by this subject was conducted for cumulative internal dose estimation. A minimum of 9.4 mSv was estimated for an assumed single ingestion. As this was a rare case in radiation protection and internal radiation dosimetry, its implications were of considerable significance.

  19. A phase I dose escalation trial of vaccine replicon particles (VRP) expressing prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in subjects with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, Susan F; Kehoe, Marissa; Durso, Robert; Fernandez, Celina; Olson, William; Gao, Jian P; Israel, Robert; Scher, Howard I; Morris, Stephen

    2013-01-30

    PSMA-VRP is a propagation defective, viral replicon vector system encoding PSMA under phase I evaluation for patients with castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC). The product is derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and incorporates multiple redundant safety features. In this first in human trial, two cohorts of 3 patients with CRPC metastatic to bone were treated with up to five doses of either 0.9×10(7)IU or 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18, followed by an expansion cohort of 6 patients treated with 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18. No toxicities were observed. In the first dose cohort, no PSMA specific cellular immune responses were seen but weak PSMA-specific signals were observed by ELISA. The remaining 9 patients, which included the higher cohort and the extension cohort, had no PSMA specific cellular responses. PSMA-VRP was well-tolerated at both doses. While there did not appear to be clinical benefit nor robust immune signals at the two doses studied, neutralizing antibodies were produced by both cohorts suggesting that dosing was suboptimal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. No benefit from chronic lithium dosing in a sibling-matched, gender balanced, investigator-blinded trial using a standard mouse model of familial ALS.

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    Alan Gill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In any animal model of human disease a positive control therapy that demonstrates efficacy in both the animal model and the human disease can validate the application of that animal model to the discovery of new therapeutics. Such a therapy has recently been reported by Fornai et al. using chronic lithium carbonate treatment and showing therapeutic efficacy in both the high-copy SOD1G93A mouse model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and in human ALS patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seeking to verify this positive control therapy, we tested chronic lithium dosing in a sibling-matched, gender balanced, investigator-blinded trial using the high-copy (average 23 copies SOD1G93A mouse (n = 27-28/group. Lithium-treated mice received single daily 36.9 mg/kg i.p. injections from 50 days of age through death. This dose delivered 1 mEq/kg (6.94 mg/kg/day lithium ions. Neurological disease severity score and body weight were determined daily during the dosing period. Age at onset of definitive disease and survival duration were recorded. Summary measures from individual body weight changes and neurological score progression, age at disease onset, and age at death were compared using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Our study did not show lithium efficacy by any measure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rigorous survival study design that includes sibling matching, gender balancing, investigator blinding, and transgene copy number verification for each experimental subject minimized the likelihood of attaining a false positive therapeutic effect in this standard animal model of familial ALS. Results from this study do not support taking lithium carbonate into human clinical trials for ALS.

  1. Translating dosages from animal models to human clinical trials--revisiting body surface area scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Otis L; Smoliga, James M

    2015-05-01

    Body surface area (BSA) scaling has been used for prescribing individualized dosages of various drugs and has also been recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as one method for using data from animal model species to establish safe starting dosages for first-in-human clinical trials. Although BSA conversion equations have been used in certain clinical applications for decades, recent recommendations to use BSA to derive interspecies equivalents for therapeutic dosages of drug and natural products are inappropriate. A thorough review of the literature reveals that BSA conversions are based on antiquated science and have little justification in current translational medicine compared to more advanced allometric and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. Misunderstood and misinterpreted use of BSA conversions may have disastrous consequences, including underdosing leading to abandonment of potentially efficacious investigational drugs, and unexpected deadly adverse events. We aim to demonstrate that recent recommendations for BSA are not appropriate for animal-to-human dosage conversions and use pharmacokinetic data from resveratrol studies to demonstrate how confusion between the "human equivalent dose" and "pharmacologically active dose" can lead to inappropriate dose recommendations. To optimize drug development, future recommendations for interspecies scaling must be scientifically justified using physiologic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicology data rather than simple BSA conversion.

  2. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical dependence potential of daily tramadol dosing in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Bigelow, George E.; Strain, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Tramadol is an atypical, mixed-mechanism analgesic involving both opioid and catecholamine processes that appears to have low abuse potential and may be useful as a treatment for opioid dependence. Objectives The current study assessed the level of physical dependence and opioid blockade efficacy produced by daily maintenance on oral tramadol. Methods Nine residential opioid-dependent adults were maintained on two doses of daily oral tramadol (200 and 800 mg) for approximately 4-week intervals in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. The acute effects of intramuscular placebo, naloxone (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg), and hydromorphone (1.5, 3.0, and 6.0 mg) were tested under double-blind, randomized conditions. Outcomes included observer- and subject-rated measures and physiologic indices. Results Challenge doses of naloxone resulted in significantly higher mean peak withdrawal scores compared to placebo. Withdrawal intensity from naloxone was generally greater during 800 versus 200 mg/day tramadol maintenance. Mean peak ratings of agonist effects were elevated at higher hydromorphone challenge doses, but did not differ significantly between tramadol doses. Physiologic measures were generally affected by challenge conditions in a dose-dependent manner, with few differences between tramadol maintenance dose conditions. Conclusions Chronic tramadol administration produces dose-related opioid physical dependence, without producing dose-related attenuation of agonist challenge effects. Tramadol may be a useful treatment for patients with low levels of opioid dependence or as a treatment for withdrawal during opioid detoxification, but does not appear to be effective as a maintenance medication due to a lack of opioid cross-tolerance. PMID:20589494

  4. Evaluating the first-in-human clinical trial of a human embryonic stem cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Audrey R; Scala, Courtney C

    2012-09-01

    Phase I clinical trials generally raise greater ethical and human protection challenges than later stage clinical trials, suggesting a need to proceed cautiously. This is particularly the case for Phase I trials with a novel therapy being tested in humans for the first time, usually termed first-in-human (FIH) trials. In January 2009, the Food and Drug Administration approved the Investigational New Drug application of Geron Corporation, a small California-based biopharmaceutical company, to initiate a clinical trial to assess GRNOPC1, a human embryonic stem cell-derived candidate therapy for severe spinal cord injuries. This article evaluates the ethical and human subject protection issues raised by the Geron FIH trial. It identifies problems with the approval process and with the conduct of the trial, and then recommends ways to improve review of future proposed trials with novel and high-risk therapies.

  5. Flexible, Multi-dose GnRH Antagonist versus Long GnRH Agonist Protocol in Poor Responders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh Shahrokh Tehraninejad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To compare a flexible, multi-dose GnRH antagonist protocol with a long GnRH agonist protocol in poor responders.Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial of 70 poor responder patients (35 patients in GnRH antagonist protocol and 35 patients in long GnRH agonist protocol was performed at Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran. Both groups were given a fixed dose of human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG for stimulation and oral contraceptive pre-treatment. Data analyzed by student’s group t-test or Chi square test.Results: Stimulation duration, total gonadotrophins consumption, mean numbers of oocytes retrieved, formed embryos, cycle cancellation rate, and clinical pregnancy rate were similar between both groups. Although the miscarriage rate was higher in the agonist protocol group, the rate of miscarriage was not statistically significant between both groups.Conclusion: A flexible, multi-dose GnRH antagonist protocol appears as effective as the long GnRH agonist protocol in poor responders. More (larger randomized controlled trials for better statistical analysis are recommended.

  6. A randomized controlled trial investigating the use of a predictive nomogram for the selection of the FSH starting dose in IVF/ICSI cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Adolfo; Marino, Angelo; Volpes, Aldo; Coffaro, Francesco; Scaglione, Piero; Gullo, Salvatore; La Marca, Antonio

    2017-01-23

    The number of oocytes retrieved is a relevant intermediate outcome in women undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This trial compared the efficiency of the selection of the FSH starting dose according to a nomogram based on multiple biomarkers (age, day 3 FSH, anti-Müllerian hormone) versus an age-based strategy. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of women with an optimal number of retrieved oocytes defined as 8-14. At their first IVF/ICSI cycle, 191 patients underwent a long gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist protocol and were randomized to receive a starting dose of recombinant (human) FSH, based on their age (150 IU if ≤35 years, 225 IU if >35 years) or based on the nomogram. Optimal response was observed in 58/92 patients (63%) in the nomogram group and in 42/99 (42%) in the control group (+21%, 95% CI = 0.07 to 0.35, P = 0.0037). No significant differences were found in the clinical pregnancy rate or the number of embryos cryopreserved per patient. The study showed that the FSH starting dose selected according to ovarian reserve is associated with an increase in the proportion of patients with an optimal response: large trials are recommended to investigate any possible effect on the live-birth rate.

  7. Simulation for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kazuya; Kayano, Yuichiro; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2007-11-01

    We performed a simulation for the clinical pharmacokinetic study, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral drug administration to subjects. We estimated the approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)) as 2.D/(C(peak).tau+C(trough).tau), where D is the dose, and tau is the dosing interval. The CL/F(approx) value was accurate for drugs with a long-elimination half-life, and the estimation error of the CL/F value was slightly increased for drugs with a shorter elimination half-life. The accuracy of CL/F(approx) in each subject was not affected by the magnitude of the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, but was significantly decreased by the larger measurement error of drug concentrations (or intraindividual pharmacokinetic variability). We further performed several computer simulations to mimic statistical hypothesis testing following the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials. The statistical power to detect the difference of oral clearance between two groups was marginally dependent on the measurement error of drug concentration, but was highly dependent on the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. These findings suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate the CL/F(approx) value is useful for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials, and that the study design and protocol should be evaluated carefully by computer simulation prior to a real clinical trial.

  8. Low dose aspirin in the prevention of recurrent spontaneous preterm labour - the APRIL study: a multicenter randomized placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Laura; de Boer, Marjon A; de Groot, Christianne J M; Nijman, Tobias A J; Hemels, Marieke A C; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M; Bosmans, Judith E; Kok, Marjolein; van Laar, Judith O; Sueters, Marieke; Scheepers, Hubertina; van Drongelen, Joris; Franssen, Maureen T M; Sikkema, J Marko; Duvekot, Hans J J; Bekker, Mireille N; van der Post, Joris A M; Naaktgeboren, Christiana; Mol, Ben W J; Oudijk, Martijn A

    2017-07-14

    Preterm birth (birth before 37 weeks of gestation) is a major problem in obstetrics and affects an estimated 15 million pregnancies worldwide annually. A history of previous preterm birth is the strongest risk factor for preterm birth, and recurrent spontaneous preterm birth affects more than 2.5 million pregnancies each year. A recent meta-analysis showed possible benefits of the use of low dose aspirin in the prevention of recurrent spontaneous preterm birth. We will assess the (cost-)effectiveness of low dose aspirin in comparison with placebo in the prevention of recurrent spontaneous preterm birth in a randomized clinical trial. Women with a singleton pregnancy and a history of spontaneous preterm birth in a singleton pregnancy (22-37 weeks of gestation) will be asked to participate in a multicenter, randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled trial. Women will be randomized to low dose aspirin (80 mg once daily) or placebo, initiated from 8 to 16 weeks up to maximal 36 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome measure will be preterm birth, defined as birth at a gestational age (GA) Preterm birth will be analyzed as a group, as well as separately for spontaneous or indicated onset. Analysis will be performed by intention to treat. In total, 406 pregnant women have to be randomized to show a reduction of 35% in preterm birth from 36 to 23%. If aspirin is effective in preventing preterm birth, we expect that there will be cost savings, because of the low costs of aspirin. To evaluate this, a cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed comparing preventive treatment with aspirin with placebo. This trial will provide evidence as to whether or not low dose aspirin is (cost-) effective in reducing recurrence of spontaneous preterm birth. Clinical trial registration number of the Dutch Trial Register: NTR 5675 . EudraCT-registration number: 2015-003220-31.

  9. Validation and substantiation of 25 kGy as sterilization dose for lyophilized human amnion membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djefal, A; Tahtat, D; Khodja, A Nacer; Bouzid, S Saad; Remane, N

    2007-01-01

    The validation and substantiation of sterilization dose for lyophilized human amnion membrane by gamma irradiation delivered by Co60 source were investigated. The validation experiments were conducted according to ISO 13409 method B. A total of 120 human amnion membranes were collected. Of these, 10 membranes were used for estimation of bioburden and 20 membranes were used for the individual sterility test at verification dose. The average bioburden per product unit with sample item portion (SIP = 1) for lyophilized human amnion membrane was 572 cfu. The verification dose experiments were done at dose of 8.1 kGy and the results of sterility tests showed that human amnion membrane got one positive. Consequently, the sterilization dose of 25 kGy was confirmed and substantiated.

  10. Once-daily dose regimen of ribavirin is interchangeable with a twice-daily dose regimen: randomized open clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balk JM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jiska M Balk,1 Guido RMM Haenen,1 Özgür M Koc,2 Ron Peters,3 Aalt Bast,1 Wim JF van der Vijgh,1 Ger H Koek,4 1Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, 3DSM Resolve, Geleen, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: The combination of ribavirin (RBV and pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN is effective in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection. Reducing the frequency of RBV intake from twice to once a day will improve compliance and opens up the opportunity to combine RBV with new and more specific direct-acting agents in one pill. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of RBV in a once-daily to twice-daily regimen. The secondary aim was to determine tolerability as well as the severity and differences in side effects of both treatment regimens. Methods: In this randomized open-label crossover study, twelve patients with chronic type 1 hepatitis C infection and weighing more than 75 kg were treated with 180 µg of PEG-IFN weekly and 1,200 mg RBV daily for 24 weeks. The patients received RBV dosed as 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks followed by RBV dosed as 600 mg twice-daily for 12 weeks, or vice versa. In addition to the pharmacokinetic profile, the hematological profile and side effects were recorded. The RBV concentrations in plasma were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Eight of twelve patients completed the study. Neither the time taken for RBV to reach peak plasma concentration nor the AUC0-last (adjusted for difference in dose was significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, the once-daily regimen did not give more side effects than the twice-daily regimen (P>0

  11. Long-chain n-3 PUFA against breast and prostate cancer: Which are the appropriate doses for intervention studies in animals and humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Elena; Serini, Simona; Cittadini, Achille; Calviello, Gabriella

    2017-07-24

    The potential antineoplastic effect of the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) remains a highly controversial issue. Numerous animal studies have supported the anticancer role of these dietary fatty acids, whereas conflicting results have been obtained in population studies, and only a few intervention human trials have been so far performed. In view of the possibility that the anticancer effects may be maximally observed within a defined range of EPA and DHA doses, herein we critically review the results and doses used in both animal studies and human clinical trials focusing on the possible n-3 PUFA protective effects against breast and prostate cancer. Our main aim is to identify the EPA and/or DHA ranges of doses needed to obtain clear anticancer effects. This may be of great help in designing future animal studies, and also in understanding the most appropriate dose for further human intervention studies. Moreover, since the healthy effects of these fatty acids have been strictly related to their increased incorporation in plasma and tissue lipids, we also examine and discuss the incorporation changes following the administration of the effective anticancer EPA and/or DHA doses in animals and humans.

  12. Population Pharmacokinetic Modelling of FE 999049, a Recombinant Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone, in Healthy Women After Single Ascending Doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Trine Høyer; Röshammar, Daniel; Erichsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this analysis was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for a novel recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (FE 999049) expressed from a human cell line of foetal retinal origin (PER.C6) developed for controlled ovarian stimulation prior to assisted...... reproductive technologies. Methods: Serum FSH levels were measured following a single subcutaneous FE 999049 injection of 37.5, 75, 150, 225 or 450 IU in 27 pituitary-suppressed healthy female subjects participating in this first-in-human single ascending dose trial. Data was analysed by nonlinear mixed...... effects population pharmacokinetic modelling in NONMEM 7.2.0. Results: A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination rates was found to best describe the data. A transit model was introduced to describe a delay in the absorption process. The apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent...

  13. Co-trial on ESR identification and estimates of. gamma. -ray and electron absorbed doses given to meat and bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrosiers, M.F.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Sheahen, L.A. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NCTL), Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Dodd, N.J.F.; Lea, J.S. (Paterson Inst. for Cancer Research, Manchester (UK)); Evans, J.C.; Rowlands, C.C. (School of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, Cardiff (UK)); Raffi, J.J.; Agnel, J.-P.L. (Laboratoire de Radiochemie des Constituants des Aliments, Cadarache (France))

    1990-01-01

    A multinational co-trial was organized to determine if electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy could be used to monitor foods exposed to ionizing radiation. The bones of chicken legs, frog legs and pork rib bones were prepared and distributed as unknowns to the participating laboratories. In every instance, non-irradiated bones were correctly identified as such. Moreover, irradiated bones were not only correctly identified, but relatively good estimates of the absorbed dose were obtained. An intercomparison of the different approaches used by each laboratory is discussed, and recommendations for future trials are presented. (author).

  14. How to improve drug dosing for patients with renal impairment in primary care - a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erler Antje

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are at increased risk for inappropriate or potentially harmful prescribing. The aim of this study was to examine whether a multifaceted intervention including the use of a software programme for the estimation of creatinine clearance and recommendation of individual dosage requirements may improve correct dosage adjustment of relevant medications for patients with CKD in primary care. Methods A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted between January and December 2007 in small primary care practices in Germany. Practices were randomly allocated to intervention or control groups. In each practice, we included patients with known CKD and elderly patients (≥70 years suffering from hypertension. The practices in the intervention group received interactive training and were provided a software programme to assist with individual dose adjustment. The control group performed usual care. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 months. The outcome measures, analyzed across individual patients, included prescriptions exceeding recommended maximum daily doses, with the primary outcome being prescriptions exceeding recommended standard daily doses by more than 30%. Results Data from 44 general practitioners and 404 patients are included. The intervention was effective in reducing prescriptions exceeding the maximum daily dose per patients, with a trend in reducing prescriptions exceeding the standard daily dose by more than 30%. Conclusions A multifaceted intervention including the use of a software program effectively reduced inappropriately high doses of renally excreted medications in patients with CKD in the setting of small primary care practices. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN02900734

  15. Medium doses of daily vitamin D decrease falls and higher doses of daily vitamin D3 increase falls: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lynette M; Gallagher, J Christopher; Suiter, Corinna

    2017-10-01

    Falls are a serious health problem in the aging population. Because low levels of vitamin D have been associated with increased fall rates, many trials have been performed with vitamin D; two meta-analyses showed either a small effect or no effect of vitamin D on falls. We conducted a study of the effect of vitamin D on serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and data on falls was collected as a secondary outcome. In a 12-month double blind randomized placebo trial, elderly women, mean age 66 years, were randomized to one of seven daily oral doses of vitamin D or placebo. The main inclusion criterion for study was a baseline serum 25OHDdecrease in falls on low vitamin D doses 400, 800 IU, a significant decrease on medium doses 1600, 2400,3200 IU (p=0.020) and no decrease on high doses 4000, 4800 IU compared to placebo (p=0.55). When compared to 12-month serum 25OHD quintiles, the faller rate was 60% in the lowest quintile decrease in falls corresponds to a 12- month serum 25OHD of 32-38ng/ml (80-95nmol/L) and faller rates increase as serum 25OHD exceed 40-45ng/ml (100-112.5nmol/L). The Tolerable upper limit (TUL) recently increased in 2010 from 2000 to 4000 IU/day may need to be reduced in elderly women especially in those with a fall history. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of different dosing regimens (once weekly vs. twice weekly, and once weekly vs. once every two weeks with epoetin delta in patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macdougall Iain C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease and prevalence increases with declining renal function. Renal anaemia has significant implications for the well-being and quality of life of patients and impacts on morbidity and mortality. Anaemia can be well managed by therapy with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs. Previous clinical trials have shown that the only human cell-line-derived ESA, epoetin delta, is well tolerated and effective in maintaining haemoglobin levels in anaemic patients with chronic kidney disease. The half-life of epoetin delta suggests that administration of this agent is feasible once weekly and once every two weeks. We report on the design and rationale of a trial to compare once weekly vs. twice weekly, and once weekly vs. once every two weeks dosing of epoetin delta. Design and methods This is a randomized, open-label, multicentre trial. Patients aged 18 years or above with chronic kidney disease (Stages 3–5 are eligible to enter this trial. Two groups of patients form the trial population, those naïve to ESA therapy and those previously stable on ESA therapy. There are two primary objectives of this trial: 1 to demonstrate non-inferiority between twice weekly and once weekly dosing of epoetin delta in previously naïve patients (assessed by haemoglobin at Week 24; 2 to demonstrate non-inferiority between once weekly and once every two weeks dosing in previously stable patients (assessed by average haemoglobin over Weeks 16–24. Among the secondary analyses will be assessments of haematocrit, number(% of patients meeting predefined targets for haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, and comparisons of average dose. All patients will receive study medication for 24 weeks and dose will be adjusted according to a predefined algorithm to achieve and maintain haemoglobin ≥ 11 g/dL. All patients completing this trial are eligible to enter a 2-year follow-up study to enable monitoring

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids (ῳ-3 fatty acids) in epilepsy: animal models and human clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-10-01

    There is growing interest in alternative and nutritional therapies for drug resistant epilepsy. ῳ-3 fatty acids such as fish or krill oil are widely available supplements used to lower triglycerides and enhance cardiovascular health. ῳ-3 fatty acids have been studied extensively in animal models of epilepsy. Yet, evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials in epilepsy is at an early stage. This report focuses on the key ῳ-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, their incorporation into the lipid bilayer, modulation of ion channels, and mechanisms of action in reducing excitability within the central nervous system. This paper presents pre-clinical evidence from mouse, rat, and canine models, and reports the efficacy of n-3 fatty acids in randomized controlled clinical trials. An English language search of PubMed and Google scholar for the years 1981-2016 was performed for animal studies and human randomized controlled clinical trials. Expert commentary: Basic science and animal models provide a cogent rationale and substantial evidence for a role of ῳ-3 fatty acids in reducing seizures. Results in humans are limited. Recent Phase II RCT evidence suggests that low to moderate dose of ῳ-3 fatty acids reduce seizures; however, larger multicenter randomized trials are needed to confirm or refute the evidence. The safety, health effects, low cost and ease of use make ῳ-3 fatty acids an intriguing alternative therapy for drug resistant epilepsy. Though safety of profile is excellent, the human data is not yet sufficient to support efficacy in drug resistant epilepsy at this time.

  18. Repeated dose pharmacokinetics of pancopride in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salva, P; Costa, J; Pérez-Campos, A; Martínez-Tobed, A

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of pancopride after repeated oral dose administration of 20 mg pancopride in tablet form once a day for 5 d in 12 healthy male volunteers. Plasma levels were measured by HPLC using a solid phase extraction method and automated injection. The minimum quantification limit of pancopride in plasma was 2 ng mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) after the first dose was 92.5 +/- 41.5 ng ML-1 and tmax was 1.7 +/- 0.9 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 14.3 +/- 6.9 h. The area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC) was 997 +/- 396 ng h mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) at steady state (day 5) was 101.8 +/- 36.9 ng mL-1 and tmax was 2.2 +/- 1.2 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 16.3 +/- 2.7 h and the minimum plasma concentration (Cssmin) was 16.6 +/- 6.9 ng mL-1. The area under the concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUCss tau) was 995 +/- 389 ng h mL-1. The average plasma concentration at steady state (Cssav) was 43.3 +/- 16.1 ng mL-1 and the experimental accumulation ratio (RAUC) was 1.34 +/- 0.19, whereas the mean theoretical value (R) was 1.40 +/- 0.29. The results obtained showed a good correlation between the experimental plasma levels and the expected values calculated using a repeated dose two-compartment model assessed by means of the Akaike value. It is concluded that the pharmacokinetics of pancopride are not modified after repeated dose administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The starting dose of Levothyroxine in primary hypothyroidism treatment - A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A; Linn-Rasker, SP; van Domburg, RT; Tijssen, JP; Berghout, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: The treatment of hypothyroidism with levothyroxine is effective and simple; however, recommendations for the starting dose vary considerably. To our knowledge, the levothyroxine starting dose has never been studied prospectively. Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-bl

  20. SINGLE-DOSE VERSUS 3-DAY PROPHYLAXIS WITH CIPROFLOXACIN IN TRANSURETHRAL SURGERY - A CLINICAL-TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BIJL, W; JANKNEGT, RA

    1993-01-01

    in 235 patients who underwent transurethral surgery, perioperative oral ciprofloxacin prophylaxis was given as a single dose 500 mg versus a 3-day regimen. Out of 180 evaluable patients, 84 received a single dose and 96 received a 3-day course. In the single dose prophylaxis group there were 5 failu

  1. SINGLE-DOSE VERSUS 3-DAY PROPHYLAXIS WITH CIPROFLOXACIN IN TRANSURETHRAL SURGERY - A CLINICAL-TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BIJL, W; JANKNEGT, RA

    1993-01-01

    in 235 patients who underwent transurethral surgery, perioperative oral ciprofloxacin prophylaxis was given as a single dose 500 mg versus a 3-day regimen. Out of 180 evaluable patients, 84 received a single dose and 96 received a 3-day course. In the single dose prophylaxis group there were 5

  2. SINGLE-DOSE VERSUS 3-DAY PROPHYLAXIS WITH CIPROFLOXACIN IN TRANSURETHRAL SURGERY - A CLINICAL-TRIAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BIJL, W; JANKNEGT, RA

    1993-01-01

    in 235 patients who underwent transurethral surgery, perioperative oral ciprofloxacin prophylaxis was given as a single dose 500 mg versus a 3-day regimen. Out of 180 evaluable patients, 84 received a single dose and 96 received a 3-day course. In the single dose prophylaxis group there were 5 failu

  3. Proton Dose Assessment to the Human Eye Using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    objective of this project was to develop a simple MCNPX model of the human eye to approximate dose delivered from proton therapy. The calculated dose...computer code MCNPX that approximates dose delivered during proton therapy. The calculations considered proton interactions and secondary interactions...Volume Calculation The MCNPX code has limited ability to compute the volumes of defined cells. The dosimetric volumes in the outer wall of the eye are

  4. Central image archiving and managements system for multicenter clinical studies: Lessons from low-dose CT for appendicitis trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, You Sun; Lee, Kyong Joon; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-03-15

    This special report aimed to document our experiences in implementing the Central Imaging Archiving and Management System (CIAMS) for a multicenter clinical trial, Low-dose CT for Appendicitis Trial (LOCAT), supported by the Korean Society of Radiology and Radiology Imaging Network of Korea for Clinical Research. LOCAT was a randomized controlled trial to determine whether low-dose CT is non-inferior to standard-dose CT with respect to the negative appendectomy rate in patients aged from 15 to 44 years. Site investigators downloaded the CT images from the site picture archiving and communication system servers, and uploaded the anonymized images to the primary server. CIAMS administrators inspected the images routed to the secondary server by a cross-check against image submission worksheets provided by the site investigators. The secondary server was automatically synchronized to the tertiary backup server. Up to June 2016, 2715 patients from 20 sites participated in LOCAT for 30 months. A total of 2539 patients' images (93.5%, 2539/2715) were uploaded to the primary server, 2193 patients' worksheets (80.8%, 2193/2715) were submitted, and 2163 patients' data (79.7%, 2163/2715) were finally monitored. No data error occurred.

  5. Ultrafine Particles in Residential Indoors and Doses Deposited in the Human Respiratory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Manigrasso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Indoor aerosol sources may significantly contribute to the daily dose of particles deposited into the human respiratory system. Therefore, it is important to characterize the aerosols deriving from the operations currently performed in an indoor environment and also to estimate the relevant particle respiratory doses. For this aim, aerosols from indoor combustive and non-combustive sources were characterized in terms of aerosol size distributions, and the relevant deposition doses were estimated as a function of time, particle diameter and deposition site in the respiratory system. Ultrafine particles almost entirely made up the doses estimated. The maximum contribution was due to particles deposited in the alveolar region between the 18th and the 21st airway generation. When cooking operations were performed, respiratory doses per unit time were about ten-fold higher than the relevant indoor background dose. Such doses were even higher than those associated with outdoor traffic aerosol.

  6. Quantitative Methods in Toxicology for Human Dose-Response Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer HJ; Jansen EHJM; Zeilmaker MJ; van Kranen HJ; Kroese ED; TOX; LCM

    1995-01-01

    Het proces van de humane risicoschatting kan verdeeld worden in risico-identificatie, vaststellen van dosis-respons relaties, vaststellen van blootstelling en risico-karakterisering. In de humane risicoschatting worden kwantitatieve methoden en modellen toegepast. Welk model dient te worden toegep

  7. Supporting the recommended paediatric dosing regimen for rufinamide in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome using clinical trial simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, M; Fuseau, E; Critchley, D J

    2010-02-01

    Rufinamide was approved for the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) as adjunctive therapy in patients aged 4 years and older. Rufinamide pharmacokinetics (PK) has been established on pooled data from several clinical studies in epilepsy, including one in LGS patients. Demographic covariates and drug-drug interactions with several antiepileptic drugs have been explored using population PK modelling. Two types of drug-drug interactions models were developed and compared. The PK analysis demonstrated that the coadministration of valproate decreases rufinamide clearance, requiring potential dose adjustment. To explore rufinamide exposure under different dosing regimens in LGS patients, clinical trial simulations were performed. The objective of the simulations was to select the doses giving an exposure shown to be safe and efficacious in larger populations. The concentrations simulated in a subgroup of patients with body weight less than 30 kg presented a larger inter-individual variability than in other patients. Additional simulations demonstrated that this increased variability was due partly to greater valproate concentrations in some of the children treated with rufinamide. Simulations of the rufinamide exposure under different maximum daily dose in presence and in absence of valproate co-administration were used to establish the dosing recommendation. The simulations support the proposal of a lower maximum daily rufinamide dose for patients under 30 kg receiving both drugs: the dose of 600 mg/day was proposed as a maximum daily dose in children also receiving valproate concomitantly, whereas in absence of valproate, the maximum daily dose is 1000 mg/day.

  8. Dose-Related Differences in Effectiveness of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Against Genital Warts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Maria; Dehlendorff, Christian; Sand, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing the number of doses in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination regimen from 3 to 2 could increase coverage rates. In this cohort study, we assessed the risk of genital warts (GWs) according to timing and number of doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine. METHODS: From population...

  9. Low Dose Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Depsipeptide (FR901228), Promotes Adenoviral Transduction in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Fariba; Mischen, Blaine T; Helman, Lee J

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Transduction of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells with adenoviral vectors for in vivo and in vitro applications has been limited by the low to absent levels of coxackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR). This study investigates the potential use of low doses of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, depsipeptide (FR901228), currently in Phase II human trials, to enhance adenoviral uptake in six rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.Methods. Differences in adenoviral uptake in the presence and absence of depsipeptide (FR901228) were assessed using an adenoviral construct tagged with green fluorescent protein. Changes in CAR and alpha(v) integrin expression RMS in response to pretreatment with depsipeptide (FR901128) was determined using RT-PCR.Results. Pretreatment of five of six RMS cell lines with 0.5 ng/ml of depsipeptide (FR901228) for 72 h resulted in increased viral uptake as assessed by green fluorescent protein expression. RT-PCR analysis for CAR showed that in four of these five cell lines, CAR expression was increased 2.8-8.1-fold in cells treated with depsipeptide (FR901228) as compared to control. alpha(v) integrin expression was substantially increased in the one cell line, RH5, which showed increased GFP expression in response to depsipeptide (FR901228) pretreatment but a minimal increase in CAR expression.Conclusions. Depsipeptide (FR901228) can be used as a vehicle to enhance adenoviral transduction in a majority of RMS cells. The mechanism of increased viral uptake appears to mediate via upregulation of CAR.

  10. Quarter-dose quadruple combination therapy for initial treatment of hypertension: placebo-controlled, crossover, randomised trial and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Clara K; Thakkar, Jay; Bennett, Alex; Hillis, Graham; Burke, Michael; Usherwood, Tim; Vo, Kha; Rogers, Kris; Atkins, Emily; Webster, Ruth; Chou, Michael; Dehbi, Hakim-Moulay; Salam, Abdul; Patel, Anushka; Neal, Bruce; Peiris, David; Krum, Henry; Chalmers, John; Nelson, Mark; Reid, Christopher M; Woodward, Mark; Hilmer, Sarah; Thom, Simon; Rodgers, Anthony

    2017-03-11

    Globally, most patients with hypertension are treated with monotherapy, and control rates are poor because monotherapy only reduces blood pressure by around 9/5 mm Hg on average. There is a pressing need for blood pressure-control strategies with improved efficacy and tolerability. We aimed to assess whether ultra-low-dose combination therapy could meet these needs. We did a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial of a quadpill-a single capsule containing four blood pressure-lowering drugs each at quarter-dose (irbesartan 37·5 mg, amlodipine 1·25 mg, hydrochlorothiazide 6·25 mg, and atenolol 12·5 mg). Participants with untreated hypertension were enrolled from four centres in the community of western Sydney, NSW, Australia, mainly by general practitioners. Participants were randomly allocated by computer to either the quadpill or matching placebo for 4 weeks; this treatment was followed by a 2-week washout, then the other study treatment was administered for 4 weeks. Study staff and participants were unaware of treatment allocations, and masking was achieved by use of identical opaque capsules. The primary outcome was placebo-corrected 24-h systolic ambulatory blood pressure reduction after 4 weeks and analysis was by intention to treat. We also did a systematic review of trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of quarter-standard-dose blood pressure-lowering therapy against placebo. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12614001057673. The trial ended after 1 year and this report presents the final analysis. Between November, 2014, and December, 2015, 55 patients were screened for our randomised trial, of whom 21 underwent randomisation. Mean age of participants was 58 years (SD 11) and mean baseline office and 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were 154 (14)/90 (11) mm Hg and 140 (9)/87 (8) mm Hg, respectively. One individual declined participation after

  11. β-Carotene Conversion to Vitamin A Decreases As the Dietary Dose Increases in Humans12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Janet A.; Harrison, Dawn J.; Pawlosky, Robert; Flanagan, Vincent P.; Harrison, Earl H.; Kurilich, Anne C.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that high doses of β-carotene limit its conversion to vitamin A, yet this effect has not been well established in humans. A feeding study was conducted in a randomized crossover design in which volunteers consumed 2 doses of deuterium-labeled β-carotene on 2 occasions, with β-carotene and vitamin A response assessed by plasma area under the concentration time curve (AUC). Seven volunteers (4 men, 3 women) consumed each of 2 doses of β-carotene-d8 and provided serial blood samples for 37 d after each dose. β-Carotene doses were 20 and 40 mg. Plasma β-carotene-d8 was assessed by HPLC-MS. Plasma retinol (ROH)-d4, which was derived from the β-carotene-d8, was evaluated by GC-MS after saponification to convert retinyl esters to ROH prior to the formation of the trimethylsilylether. The plasma AUC for β-carotene-d8 increased 2-fold from the 20-mg dose to the 40-mg dose. The plasma AUC for ROH-d4 increased 36% from the 20-mg dose to the 40-mg dose. These results establish that, in humans, β-carotene conversion to vitamin A decreases as the dietary dose increases. PMID:20237064

  12. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of flexible-dose fesoterodine in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, Roger R; Peters, Kenneth M; Morrow, Jon D; Guan, Zhonghong; Gong, Jason; Sun, Franklin; Siami, Paul; Staskin, David R

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of flexible-dose fesoterodine vs placebo in subjects with overactive bladder (OAB). In a 12-week double-blind trial, subjects were randomized to fesoterodine 4 mg or placebo once daily, taken within 4 hours of bedtime. At week 2, subjects could increase the fesoterodine dose to 8 mg (sham escalation for placebo). Subjects completed 3-day bladder diaries, Patient Perception of Bladder Condition, and Urgency Perception Scale at baseline and weeks 2, 6, and 12 as well as OAB Questionnaire at baseline and week 12. Of 883 subjects, 63% and 73% of the fesoterodine (n = 438) and placebo (n = 445) groups, respectively, opted for dose escalation. Week 12 improvements from baseline in total micturitions, urgency episodes, urgency urinary incontinence episodes, frequency-urgency sum, and all OAB Questionnaire scales and domains, but not nocturnal micturitions or nocturnal urgency episodes, were significantly greater with fesoterodine than placebo (all P fesoterodine had improved Patient Perception of Bladder Condition and Urgency Perception Scale scores at weeks 2, 6, and 12 (P fesoterodine, 26%; placebo, 8%) and constipation (fesoterodine, 11%; placebo, 6%) were the most common adverse events. In both groups, 87% of the subjects completed the trial; 8% and 5% of the fesoterodine and placebo groups, respectively, discontinued because of an adverse event. Flexible-dose fesoterodine was efficacious and generally well tolerated for treatment of OAB symptoms. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy of praziquantel against Schistosoma mekongi and Opisthorchis viverrini: a randomized, single-blinded dose-comparison trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonore Lovis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis and opisthorchiasis are of public health importance in Southeast Asia. Praziquantel (PZQ is the drug of choice for morbidity control but few dose comparisons have been made. METHODOLOGY: Ninety-three schoolchildren were enrolled in an area of Lao PDR where Schistosoma mekongi and Opisthorchis viverrini coexist for a PZQ dose-comparison trial. Prevalence and intensity of infections were determined by a rigorous diagnostic effort (3 stool specimens, each examined with triplicate Kato-Katz before and 28-30 days after treatment. Ninety children with full baseline data were randomized to receive PZQ: the 40 mg/kg standard single dose (n = 45 or a 75 mg/kg total dose (50 mg/kg+25 mg/kg, 4 hours apart; n = 45. Adverse events were assessed at 3 and 24 hours posttreatment. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Baseline infection prevalence of S. mekongi and O. viverrini were 87.8% and 98.9%, respectively. S. mekongi cure rates were 75.0% (95% confidence interval (CI: 56.6-88.5% and 80.8% (95% CI: 60.6-93.4% for 40 mg/kg and 75 mg/kg PZQ, respectively (P = 0.60. O. viverrini cure rates were significantly different at 71.4% (95% CI: 53.4-84.4% and 96.6% (95% CI: not defined, respectively (P = 0.009. Egg reduction rates (ERRs against O. viverrini were very high for both doses (>99%, but slightly lower for S. mekongi at 40 mg/kg (96.4% vs. 98.1% and not influenced by increasing diagnostic effort. O. viverrini cure rates would have been overestimated and no statistical difference between doses found if efficacy was based on a minimum sampling effort (single Kato-Katz before and after treatment. Adverse events were common (96%, mainly mild with no significant differences between the two treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cure rate from the 75 mg/kg PZQ dose was more efficacious than 40 mg/kg against O. viverrini but not against S. mekongi infections, while ERRs were similar for both doses. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials

  14. Low versus high dose erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in hemodialysis patients with anemia: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglimbene, Valeria; Craig, Jonathan C.; Ruospo, Marinella; Nicolucci, Antonio; Tonelli, Marcello; Johnson, David; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Williams, Gabrielle; Valentini, Miriam; D’Alonzo, Daniela; Pellegrini, Fabio; Strippoli, Paolo; Salomone, Mario; Santoro, Antonio; Maffei, Stefano; Hegbrant, Jörgen; Tognoni, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    The increased risks of death and adverse events with erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy targeting a higher hemoglobin level are established. It is uncertain whether the adverse effects of ESA therapy are related to dose and are mitigated when a fixed low ESA dose is used. We conducted a multicenter, prospective randomized open-label, blinded-endpoint (PROBE) trial to evaluate fixed low versus high dose ESA therapy on patient outcomes. We intended to recruit 2104 hemodialysis patients >18 years with anemia or receiving ESA treated at dialysis clinics in Italy. The intervention was fixed low (4000 IU epoetin alfa equivalent weekly) or high (18,000 IU epoetin alfa equivalent weekly) dose ESA for 12 months. Primary outcomes were serum transferrin, ferritin, albumin, C-reactive protein and ESA dose. Secondary outcomes were the composite of death or cardiovascular event, all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular hospitalization, and quality of life. Study recruitment was terminated after inclusion of 656 participants with convergence of ESA dose between groups during follow up. Fixed low dose ESA had uncertain effects on serum ferritin (delta of delta (DD) 3.9 ng/ml, 95% CI -85.0 to 92.8), transferrin (9.2 mg/dl, -6.3 to 24.8), transferrin saturation (3.7%, -5.0 to 12.3), serum albumin (-0.03 g/dl, -0.2 to 0.1), or C-reactive protein (-0.6 mg/l, -3.3 to 2.1). In addition, fixed dose therapy had inconclusive effects on the composite endpoint of mortality and cardiovascular events (hazard ratio [HR] 0.95, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.37), death (0.98, 0.64 to 1.52), nonfatal myocardial infarction (0.52, 0.18 to 1.52), nonfatal stroke (no events), hospital admission for cardiovascular causes (0.93, 0.50 to 1.72) or health-related quality of life. A fixed low ESA dose in hemodialysis patients has uncertain effects on serum parameters, mortality, cardiovascular events, and quality of life. Hemoglobin targets may be so

  15. Phase I trial of dose-escalating metronomic temozolomide plus bevacizumab and bortezomib for patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, D Jay; Celano, Emma C; Voloschin, Alfredo D; Read, William L; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2016-10-01

    The average survival time for patients with recurrent glioblastoma is between 5 and 9 months. Phase I and II trials have shown a modest survival benefit with combination temozolomide and other chemotherapeutics. We conducted a phase I trial of dose-escalating temozolomide with bevacizumab and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib for patients with recurrent disease. Three groups of three patients were scheduled to receive daily doses of temozolomide at 25, 50, and 75 mg/m(2). Fixed doses of bortezomib and bevacizumab were given at standard intervals. Patients were monitored for dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of temozolomide with this regimen. No DLT were seen in the first two groups (25 and 50 mg/m(2) temozolomide). One patient in the 75 mg/m(2) group experienced a grade 4 elevation of ALT and three more patients were accrued for a total of six patients at that dose level. No other DLT occurred, thus making 75 mg/m(2) the MTD. Progression-free survival was 3.27 months for all patients and mean overall survival was 20.75 months. The MTD of temozolomide was 75 mg/m(2) in combination with bevacizumab and bortezomib for recurrent glioblastoma. Only one patient experienced a severe (Grade 4) elevation of ALT. This study will provide the framework for further studies to elicit effectiveness and better determine a safety profile for this drug combination.

  16. Dose Dependent Reduction of Hazardous Alcohol Use in a Placebo-Controlled Trial of Naltrexone for Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; McKee, Sherry A.; Leeman, Robert F.; Cooney, Ned L.; Meandzija, Boris; Wu, Ran; Makuch, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The opiate antagonist naltrexone has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of alcohol dependence and as a component of treatment to reduce heavy drinking. At present, there are no published dose-ranging clinical trials of the oral preparation for treatment of problem drinking. The present study evaluated the effects of naltrexone on alcohol use among the subset of hazardous drinkers (N = 102) who participated in a placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral naltrexone (25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg doses) combined with open-label transdermal nicotine patch for enhancing smoking cessation. On the primary outcome—no hazardous drinking (drinking that exceeded weekly or daily limits) during treatment—25 mg and 50 mg naltrexone were superior to placebo (each p < 0.05). These findings remained after controlling for baseline predictors or smoking abstinence during treatment. Time to remission of hazardous drinking was examined as a secondary outcome with definitions of hazardous drinking based on weekly limits, daily limits and the combination of weekly and daily limits and the results were consistent with the primary findings. In conclusion, the findings suggest that naltrexone can reduce the risk of hazardous drinking in smokers who are not seeking or receiving alcohol treatment, providing strong evidence for the pharmacological effects of naltrexone on drinking. This effect appears to favor lower doses that may be better tolerated and less expensive than the higher 100 mg dose. Given its efficacy and favorable side effect profile, the 25 mg dose should be considered for future studies of combination therapy. PMID:18796184

  17. Dose-dependent reduction of hazardous alcohol use in a placebo-controlled trial of naltrexone for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Stephanie S; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; McKee, Sherry A; Leeman, Robert F; Cooney, Ned L; Meandzija, Boris; Wu, Ran; Makuch, Robert W

    2009-06-01

    The opiate antagonist naltrexone (Ntx) has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of alcohol dependence and as a component of treatment to reduce heavy drinking. At present, there are no published dose-ranging clinical trials of the oral preparation for treatment of problem drinking. The present study evaluated the effects of Ntx on alcohol use among the subset of hazardous drinkers (n=102) who participated in a placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial of oral Ntx (25-mg, 50-mg and 100-mg doses) combined with open-label transdermal nicotine patch for enhancing smoking cessation. On the primary outcome--no hazardous drinking (drinking that exceeded weekly or daily limits) during treatment--25 mg and 50 mg Ntx were superior to placebo (each p<0.05). These findings remained after controlling for baseline predictors or smoking abstinence during treatment. Time to remission of hazardous drinking was examined as a secondary outcome with definitions of hazardous drinking based on weekly limits, daily limits and the combination of weekly and daily limits and the results were consistent with the primary findings. In conclusion, the findings suggest that Ntx can reduce the risk of hazardous drinking in smokers who are not seeking or receiving alcohol treatment, providing strong evidence for the pharmacological effects of Ntx on drinking. This effect appears to favour lower doses that may be better tolerated and less expensive than the higher 100-mg dose. Given its efficacy and favourable side-effect profile, the 25-mg dose should be considered for future studies of combination therapy.

  18. Using a personalized decision support algorithm for dosing in warfarin treatment: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brønnum Nielsen

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: We found no difference between the two trial-arms in a high-quality warfarin treatment setup. However in general, the model performed similarly as to routine patient self-management care. (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT02705976

  19. Single oral doses of (±) 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('Ecstasy') produce lasting serotonergic deficits in non-human primates: relationship to plasma drug and metabolite concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Melanie; Yuan, Jie; McCann, Una D; Hatzidimitriou, George; Ricaurte, George A

    2013-05-01

    Repeated doses of the popular recreational drug methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') are known to produce neurotoxic effects on brain serotonin (5-HT) neurons but it is widely believed that typical single oral doses of MDMA are free of neurotoxic risk. Experimental and therapeutic trials with MDMA in humans are underway. The mechanisms by which MDMA produces neurotoxic effects are not understood but drug metabolites have been implicated. The aim of the present study was to assess the neurotoxic potential of a range of clinically relevant single oral doses of MDMA in a non-human primate species that metabolizes MDMA in a manner similar to humans, the squirrel monkey. A secondary objective was to explore the relationship between plasma MDMA and metabolite concentrations and lasting serotonergic deficits. Single oral doses of MDMA produced lasting dose-related serotonergic neurochemical deficits in the brains of squirrel monkeys. Notably, even the lowest dose of MDMA tested (5.7 mg/kg, estimated to be equivalent to 1.6 mg/kg in humans) produced significant effects in some brain regions. Plasma levels of MDMA engendered by neurotoxic doses of MDMA were on the order of those found in humans. Serotonergic neurochemical markers were inversely correlated with plasma concentrations of MDMA, but not with those of its major metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine. These results suggest that single oral doses of MDMA in the range of those used by humans pose a neurotoxic risk and implicate the parent compound (MDMA), rather than one of its metabolites, in MDMA-induced 5-HT neural injury.

  20. Differential Response and Priming Dose Effect on the Proteome of Human Fibroblast and Stem Cells Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Monika; Haghdoost, Siamak; Gomolka, Maria; Sarioglu, Hakan; Ueffing, Marius; Dietz, Anne; Kulka, Ulrike; Unger, Kristian; Babini, Gabriele; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Hornhardt, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    It has been suggested that a mechanistic understanding of the cellular responses to low dose and dose rate may be valuable in reducing some of the uncertainties involved in current risk estimates for cancer- and non-cancer-related radiation effects that are inherited in the linear no-threshold hypothesis. In this study, the effects of low-dose radiation on the proteome in both human fibroblasts and stem cells were investigated. Particular emphasis was placed on examining: 1. the dose-response relationships for the differential expression of proteins in the low-dose range (40-140 mGy) of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation; and 2. the effect on differential expression of proteins of a priming dose given prior to a challenge dose (adaptive response effects). These studies were performed on cultured human fibroblasts (VH10) and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC). The results from the VH10 cell experiments demonstrated that low-doses of low-LET radiation induced unique patterns of differentially expressed proteins for each dose investigated. In addition, a low priming radiation dose significantly changed the protein expression induced by the subsequent challenge exposure. In the ADSC the number of differentially expressed proteins was markedly less compared to VH10 cells, indicating that ADSC differ in their intrinsic response to low doses of radiation. The proteomic results are further discussed in terms of possible pathways influenced by low-dose irradiation.

  1. Increasing Human Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Dose Alters Oligodendroglial and Neuronal Differentiation after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 (low to 500,000 (very high cells differentiated predominantly into the oligodendroglial lineage. However, while the number of engrafted cells increased linearly in relationship to increasing dose, the proportion of oligodendrocytic cells declined. Increasing dose resulted in a plateau of engraftment, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and increased distal migration caudal to the transplantation sites. Dose had no effect on terminal sensory recovery or open-field locomotor scores. However, total human cell number and decreased oligodendroglial proportion were correlated with hindlimb girdle coupling errors. Conversely, greater oligodendroglial proportion was correlated with increased Ab step pattern, decreased swing speed, and increased paw intensity, consistent with improved recovery. These data suggest that transplant dose, and/or target niche parameters can regulate donor cell engraftment, differentiation/maturation, and lineage-specific migration profiles.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60......, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments...... of sedation and registration of other symptoms. Sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times, was measured at baseline and 120, 180, 300, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Median (IQR) Cmax after the bolus injections of 10 mg and 100 mg of melatonin were 221...

  3. Simulation-based computation of dose to humans in radiological environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breazeal, N.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Davis, K.R.; Watson, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vickers, D.S. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Ford, M.S. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Safety

    1996-03-01

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans working in radiological environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO simulation software. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide radiation exposure information to, and collect radiation dose information from, workcell simulations. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these databases to compute and accumulate dose to programmable human models operating around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. The entire REMS capability can be operated from a single graphical user interface.

  4. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  5. Oral cyanocobalamin supplementation in older people with vitamin B12 deficiency: a dose-finding trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, S.; Groot, L.C. de; Clarke, R.; Schneede, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Hoefnagels, W.H.L.; Staveren, W.A. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Supplementation with high doses of oral cobalamin is as effective as cobalamin administered by intramuscular injection to correct plasma markers of vitamin B(12) deficiency, but the effects of lower oral doses of cobalamin on such markers are uncertain. METHODS: We conducted a randomized

  6. Melatonin for Sleep in Children with Autism: A Controlled Trial Examining Dose, Tolerability, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth; Adkins, Karen W.; McGrew, Susan G.; Wang, Lily; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Fawkes, Diane; Burnette, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Supplemental melatonin has shown promise in treating sleep onset insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-four children, free of psychotropic medications, completed an open-label dose-escalation study to assess dose-response, tolerability, safety, feasibility of collecting actigraphy data, and ability of outcome measures…

  7. Oral cyanocobalamin supplementation in older people with vitamin B12 deficiency: a dose-finding trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, S.; Groot, L.C. de; Clarke, R.; Schneede, J.; Ueland, P.M.; Hoefnagels, W.H.L.; Staveren, W.A. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Supplementation with high doses of oral cobalamin is as effective as cobalamin administered by intramuscular injection to correct plasma markers of vitamin B(12) deficiency, but the effects of lower oral doses of cobalamin on such markers are uncertain. METHODS: We conducted a

  8. High-dose baclofen for the treatment of alcohol dependence (BACLAD study): a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian A; Geisel, Olga; Pelz, Patricia; Higl, Verena; Krüger, Josephine; Stickel, Anna; Beck, Anne; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Hellweg, Rainer; Heinz, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Previous randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of the selective γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonist baclofen in the treatment of alcohol dependence have reported divergent results, possibly related to the low to medium dosages of baclofen used in these studies (30-80mg/d). Based on preclinical observations of a dose-dependent effect and positive case reports in alcohol-dependent patients, the present RCT aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of individually titrated high-dose baclofen for the treatment of alcohol dependence. Out of 93 alcohol-dependent patients initially screened, 56 were randomly assigned to a double-blind treatment with individually titrated baclofen or placebo using dosages of 30-270mg/d. The multiple primary outcome measures were (1) total abstinence and (2) cumulative abstinence duration during a 12-week high-dose phase. More patients of the baclofen group maintained total abstinence during the high-dose phase than those receiving placebo (15/22, 68.2% vs. 5/21, 23.8%, p=0.014). Cumulative abstinence duration was significantly higher in patients given baclofen compared to patients of the placebo group (mean 67.8 (SD 30) vs. 51.8 (SD 29.6) days, p=0.047). No drug-related serious adverse events were observed during the trial. Individually titrated high-dose baclofen effectively supported alcohol-dependent patients in maintaining alcohol abstinence and showed a high tolerability, even in the event of relapse. These results provide further evidence for the potential of baclofen, thereby possibly extending the current pharmacological treatment options in alcohol dependence.

  9. Radiotherapy for benign achillodynia. Long-term results of the Erlangen Dose Optimization Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Jeremias, Carolin; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin; Schmidt, Manfred; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of two dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of achillodynia. Between February 2006 and February 2010, 112 evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective trial. All patients received orthovoltage radiotherapy. One course consisted of 6 fractions/3 weeks. In the case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks, a second series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. The endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, right after (early response), 6 weeks after (delayed response), and approximately 2 years after radiotherapy (long-term response) with a questionnaire-based visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 11-56). The overall early, delayed, and long-term response rates for all patients were 84 %, 88 %, and 95 %, respectively. The mean VAS values before treatment for early, delayed, and long-term responses for the 0.5-Gy and 1.0-Gy groups were 55.7 ± 21.0 and 58.2 ± 23.5 (p = 0.53), 38.0 ± 23.2 and 30.4 ± 22.6 (p = 0.08), 35.5 ± 25.9 and 30.9 ± 25.4 (p = 0.52), and 11.2 ± 16.4 and 15.3 ± 18.9 (p = 0.16), respectively. The mean CPS values before treatment for early, delayed, and long-term responses were 8.2 ± 3.0 and 8.9 ± 3.3 (p = 0.24), 5.6 ± 3.1 and 5.4 ± 3.3 (p = 0.76), 4.4 ± 2.6 and 5.3 ± 3.8 (p = 0.58), and 2.2 ± 2.9 and 2.8 ± 3.3 (p = 0.51), respectively. No significant differences in long-term response quality between the two arms was found (p = 0.73). Radiotherapy is a very effective treatment for the management of benign achillodynia. For radiation protection, the dose for a radiotherapy series should not exceed 3.0 Gy. (orig.) [German] Ziel war die Untersuchung der Langzeiteffektivitaet zweier Dosisfraktionierungskonzepte bei der Strahlentherapie von Patienten mit Achillodynie. Zwischen 2006 und 2010 wurden 112 auswertbare

  10. Radiotherapy for benign calcaneodynia. Long-term results of the Erlangen Dose Optimization (EDO) trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Oliver J.; Jeremias, Carolin; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin; Schmidt, Manfred; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of two dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of calcaneodynia. Between February 2006 and February 2010, 457 evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective trial. All patients received orthovoltage radiotherapy. One course consisted of 6 fractions/3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks a second series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, right after (early response), 6 weeks (delayed response), and approximately 2.5 years after radiotherapy (long-term response) with a questionnaire-based visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). The median follow-up was 32 months (range 9-57 months). The overall early, delayed, and long-term response rates for all patients were 87, 88, and 95 %. The mean VAS values before treatment, for early, delayed, and long-term response for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 65.5 ± 22.1 and 64.0 ± 20.5 (p = 0.19), 34.8 ± 24.7 and 39.0 ± 26.3 (p = 0.12), 25.1 ± 26.8 and 28.9 ± 26.8 (p = 0.16), and 16.3 ± 24.3 and 14.1 ± 19.7 (p = 0.68). The mean CPS values before treatment, for early, delayed, and log-term response were 10.1 ± 2.7 and 10.0 ± 3.0 (p = 0.78), 5.6 ± 3.7 and 6.0 ± 3.9 (p = 0.34), 4.0 ± 4.1 and 4.3 ± 3.6 (p = 0.26), and 2.1 ± 3.3 and 2.3 ± 3.2 (p = 0.34), respectively. No significant differences in long-term response quality between the two arms were found (p = 0.50). Radiotherapy is a very effective treatment for the management of benign calcaneodynia. For radiation protection reasons, the dose for a RT series should not exceed 3.0 Gy. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Langzeiteffektivitaet zweier Dosisfraktionierungskonzepte bei der Strahlentherapie von Patienten mit Calcaneodynie. Zwischen 2006 und 2010 wurden 457 auswertbare Patienten in diese prospektive und randomisierte Phase

  11. Phase I Trial of Escalating-dose Cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Chinese Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao,Yan-Nan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We defined the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD of chemoradiotherapy (cisplatin (CDDP with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and concurrent chemoradiotherapy for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer. Twenty-one previously untreated patients with primary esophageal cancer were entered into this study. Escalating doses of CDDP with 5-FU were administered in a modified Fibonacci sequence, with concurrent conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CFR of 60 Gy or 50 Gy. The starting doses were CDDP 37.5 mg/m2 on day 1, and 5-FU 500 mg/m2 on days 1-5, respectively. The regimen was repeated 4 times every 28 days. If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT was observed, the next dose level was applied. The procedures were repeated until DLT appeared. The MTD was declared to be 1 dose level below the level at which DLT appeared. DLT was grade 3 radiation-induced esophagitis at a dose level of CDDP 60 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 60 Gy CFR. MTD was defined as CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. The MTD of CDDP with 5-FU and in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer is CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 on day 1 and 5FU 700 mg/m2 on days 1-5, repeated 4 times every 28 days, and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. Further evaluation of this regimen in a prospective phase II trial is ongoing.

  12. Phase I trial of escalating-dose cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil and concurrent radiotherapy in Chinese patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Gao, Xian-Shu; Qiao, Xue-Ying; Zhou, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Kun; Zhao, Yan-Nan; Asaumi, Junichi

    2008-02-01

    We defined the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of chemoradiotherapy (cisplatin (CDDP) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and concurrent chemoradiotherapy) for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer. Twenty-one previously untreated patients with primary esophageal cancer were entered into this study. Escalating doses of CDDP with 5-FU were administered in a modified Fibonacci sequence, with concurrent conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CFR) of 60 Gy or 50 Gy. The starting doses were CDDP 37.5 mg/m2 on day 1, and 5-FU 500 mg/m2 on days 1-5, respectively. The regimen was repeated 4 times every 28 days. If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed, the next dose level was applied. The procedures were repeated until DLT appeared. The MTD was declared to be 1 dose level below the level at which DLT appeared. DLT was grade 3 radiation-induced esophagitis at a dose level of CDDP 60 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 60 Gy CFR. MTD was defined as CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. The MTD of CDDP with 5-FU and in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer is CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 on day 1 and 5FU 700 mg/m2 on days 1-5, repeated 4 times every 28 days, and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. Further evaluation of this regimen in a prospective phase II trial is ongoing.

  13. Clinical uses of melatonin: evaluation of human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Barceló, E J; Mediavilla, M D; Tan, D X; Reiter, R J

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, numerous clinical trials have examined the therapeutic usefulness of melatonin in different fields of medicine. The objective of this article is to review, in depth, the science regarding clinical trials performed to date. The efficacy of melatonin has been assessed as a treatment of ocular diseases, blood diseases, gastrointestinal tract diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neurological diseases, sleep disturbances, aging and depression. Melatonin has been also used as a complementary treatment in anaesthesia, hemodialysis, in vitro fertilization and neonatal care. The conclusion of the current review is that the use of melatonin as an adjuvant therapy seems to be well funded for macular degeneration, glaucoma, protection of the gastric mucosa, irritable bowel syndrome, arterial hypertension, diabetes, side effects of chemotherapy and radiation in cancer patients or hemodialysis in patients with renal insufficiency and, especially, for sleep disorders of circadian etiology (jet lag, delayed sleep phase syndrome, sleep deterioration associated with aging, etc.) as well as in those related with neurological degenerative diseases (Alzheimer, etc.,) or Smith-Magenis syndrome. The utility of melatonin in anesthetic procedures has been also confirmed. More clinical studies are required to clarify whether, as the preliminary data suggest, melatonin is useful for treatment of fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infectious diseases, neoplasias or neonatal care. Preliminary data regarding the utility of melatonin in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis are either ambiguous or negative. Although in a few cases melatonin seems to aggravate some conditions, the vast majority of studies document the very low toxicity of melatonin over a wide range of doses.

  14. Massage Therapy for Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Randomized Dose-Finding Trial: e30248

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adam I Perlman; Ather Ali; Valentine Yanchou Njike; David Hom; Anna Davidi; Susan Gould-Fogerite; Carl Milak; David L Katz

    2012-01-01

      Background In a previous trial of massage for osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, we demonstrated feasibility, safety and possible efficacy, with benefits that persisted at least 8 weeks beyond treatment termination...

  15. Low-dose growth hormone and human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Haugaard, S B; Flyvbjerg, A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with high doses (2-6 mg day(-1)) of human growth hormone (hGH) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) has been shown to increase concentrations of total insulin-like growth-factor-I (IGF-I) more than twofold greater than ...

  16. Dose-Response Curve of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma-Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lusiyanti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome aberration is a biomarker to predict the level of cell damage caused by exposure to ionizing radiation on human body. Dicentric chromosome is a specific chromosome aberration caused by ionizing radiation and is used as a gold standard biodosimetry of individuals over exposed to ionizing radiation. In radiation accident the dicentric assays has been applied as biological dosimetry to estimate radiation absorbed dose and also to confirm the radiation dose received to radiation workers.The purpose of this study was to generate a dose response curve of chromosome aberration (dicentric in human lymphocyte induced by gamma radiation. Peripheral blood samples from three non smoking healthy volunteers aged between 25-48 years old with informed consent were irradiated with dose between 0.1-4.0 Gy and a control using gamma teletherapy source. The culture procedure was conducted following the IAEA standard procedures with slight modifications. Analysis of dose-response curves used was LQ model Y = a + αD + βD2. The result showed that α and β values of the curve obtained were 0.018 ± 0.006 and 0.013 ± 0.002, respectively. Dose response calibration curve for dicentric chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by gamma-radiation fitted to linear quadratic model. In order to apply the dose response curve of chromosome aberration disentric for biodosimetry, this standar curve still need to be validated.

  17. Human pharmacology of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) after repeated doses taken 4 h apart Human pharmacology of MDMA after repeated doses taken 4 h apart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Magí; Tomillero, Angels; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Yubero, Samanta; Papaseit, Esther; Roset, Pere-Nolasc; Pujadas, Mitona; Torrens, Marta; Camí, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is a popular psychostimulant, frequently associated with multiple administrations over a short period of time. Repeated administration of MDMA in experimental settings induces tolerance and metabolic inhibition. The aim is to determine the acute pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetics resulting from two consecutive 100mg doses of MDMA separated by 4h. Ten male volunteers participated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial. The four conditions were placebo plus placebo, placebo plus MDMA, MDMA plus placebo, and MDMA plus MDMA. Outcome variables included pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetic parameters. After a second dose of MDMA, most effects were similar to those after a single dose, despite a doubling of MDMA concentrations (except for systolic blood pressure and reaction time). After repeated MDMA administration, a 2-fold increase was observed in MDMA plasma concentrations. For a simple dose accumulation MDMA and MDA concentrations were higher (+23.1% Cmax and +17.1% AUC for MDMA and +14.2% Cmax and +10.3% AUC for MDA) and HMMA and HMA concentrations lower (-43.3% Cmax and -39.9% AUC for HMMA and -33.2% Cmax and -35.1% AUC for HMA) than expected, probably related to MDMA metabolic autoinhibition. Although MDMA concentrations doubled after the second dose, most pharmacological effects were similar or slightly higher in comparison to the single administration, except for systolic blood pressure and reaction time which were greater than predicted. The pharmacokinetic-effects relationship suggests that when MDMA is administered at a 4h interval there exists a phenomenon of acute tolerance to its effects.

  18. Dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of antineoplastic alkylating agents on human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, B.J.S.; Johnson, K.J.; Henner, W.D. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The alkylating agents in clinical use as antineoplastics are strongly implicated as human carcinogens on the basis of animal studies and human epidemiologic studies. However, there is little quantitative information on the extent to which exposure to these drugs is mutagenic for normal (non-malignant) cells and the extent to which such mutagenicity correlates with cytotoxicity of these agents. Human lymphoblastoid cells (WIL2-NS) were exposed to graded doses of eight antineoplastic alkylating agents. Dose-dependent decreases in survival were used to calculate IC{sub 50}s for each of the drugs tested. The mutagenicity of these agents is correlated strongly with cytotoxicity. These results quantitate the dose-dependent cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of these bifunctional alkylating agents on human cells. All are cytotoxic and mutagenic, although their mutagenic efficiency varies.

  19. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants — Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing...... exposure of the adrenal cells by equilibrium partitioning. (3) Hormone production of the adrenal cells was measured as toxicity endpoint. 4-Nonylphenol was used for method development, and the new dosing method was compared to conventional solvent-dosing. The two dosing modes yielded similar dose...

  20. Effects of low-dose versus placebo or conventional-dose postmenopausal hormone therapy on variables related to cardiovascular risk: a systematic review and meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Gislaine; Bossardi Ramos, Ramon; Ziegelmann, Patrícia; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2015-03-01

    Hormone therapy (HT), the most efficient treatment for menopausal symptoms, might have deleterious cardiovascular (CV) effects. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-dose estrogen HT on CV risk factors vs conventional-dose HT and placebo in postmenopausal women with no established CV disease. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central, and EMBASE were searched for trials published in 1990-2013; a hand search of reference lists of selected articles was performed; and ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for unpublished trials. Within randomized controlled trials of healthy postmenopausal women comparing low-dose HT to placebo or conventional-dose HT, 11 418 studies were initially identified. Data were independently extracted by two investigators. Disagreements were resolved by a third author. Twenty-eight trials (3360 patients) were included. Low-dose HT vs placebo or conventional-dose HT did not effect weight, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, C-reactive protein, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Low-dose HT was associated with lower levels of total cholesterol (-12.16 mg/dL, 95% confidence interval [CI], -17.41 - -6.92) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (-12.16 mg/dL; 95% CI, -16.55 - -7.77) vs placebo. Compared with conventional-dose HT, low-dose HT was associated with higher total cholesterol (5.05 mg/dL; 95% CI, 0.88-9.21) and LDL-C (4.49 mg/dL; 95% CI, 0.59-8.39). Low-dose HT was not associated with differences in triglycerides vs placebo. Oral, low-dose HT was associated with lower triglycerides vs conventional-dose HT (-14.09 mg/dL; 95% CI, -24.2 - -3.93). In this population of apparently healthy postmenopausal women, the effect of low-dose HT did not differ from that of placebo or conventional-dose HT regarding weight, BMI, blood pressure, CRP, or HDL-C. In contrast, low-dose HT was associated with better lipid profile vs placebo, and induced higher total and LDL-C and lower triglycerides vs conventional-dose HT.

  1. Dose-ranging pilot randomized trial of amino acid mixture combined with physical activity promotion for reducing abdominal fat in overweight adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasai H

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Sasai,1–3,* Keisuke Ueda,4,5,* Takehiko Tsujimoto,6,7 Hiroyuki Kobayashi,1 Chiaki Sanbongi,4 Shuji Ikegami,4 Yoshio Nakata1 1Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 2Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo, 3Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Meguro, Tokyo, 4Food Science Research Laboratories, Meiji Co., Ltd., Odawara, Kanagawa, 5Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, 6Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 7Faculty of Human Sciences, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effective dose of an amino acid mixture comprising arginine, alanine, and phenylalanine combined with physical activity promotion in reducing abdominal fat among overweight adults.Methods: A 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging, pilot trial was conducted in Mito, Japan, from January through April 2016, and the data were analyzed from May through November 2016. The study participants were 35 overweight adults, aged 20–64 years, with no regular exercise habit. Participants were randomly assigned to high-dose (3,000 mg/d, n=9, medium-dose (1,500 mg/d, n=9, low-dose (750 mg/d, n=8, or placebo (0 mg/d, n=9 groups, and the test beverage containing the amino acid mixture or placebo was administered for 12 weeks. All participants maintained a physically active lifestyle during the study period through monthly physical activity promotion sessions and smartphone-based self-monitoring with wearable trackers. Primary outcomes were changes in abdominal total, subcutaneous, and visceral fat areas, assessed by computed tomography.Results: Of the 35 enrolled participants, 32 completed the 12-week follow-up visit. The intention-to-treat analysis revealed that the changes in abdominal total fat

  2. Quantification of Niacin and Its Metabolite Nicotinuric Acid in Human Plasma by LC-MS/MS: Application to a Clinical Trial of a Fixed Dose Combination Tablet of Niacin Extended-Release/Simvastatin (500 mg/10 mg in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our paper aimed to develop rapid, sensitive, and specific LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of niacin (NA and its metabolite nicotinuric acid (NUA in human plasma. Following protein precipitation with acetonitrile, the NA, NUA, and internal standard (5-fluorouracil were separated on a Zorbax 300SB-C8 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm with a mobile phase consisting of methanol-2 mM ammonium acetate (3 : 97, v/v at a flow rate of 1 mL/min (split 1 : 1. A tandem mass spectrometer equipped with electrospray ionization source was used as the detector and operated in negative ion mode. The linear concentration ranges of the calibration curves were 5–800 ng/mL for NA and NUA. The intra-assay RSD for quality control (QC samples were from 5.0% to 8.7% for NA, and 5.5% to 7.6% for NUA. The interassay RSD for QC samples were from 2.8% to 9.4% for NA, and 3.7% to 5.8% for NUA. The relative errors for QC samples were from −2.2% to 2.3% for NA, and −0.6% to 3.2% for NUA. The method was successfully applied to the investigation of the pharmacokinetic profiles of NA, NUA in human after single dose administration of Niacin extended-release/Simvastatin tablet (500 mg/10 mg.

  3. Controlled trial and dose-finding study of ivermectin for treatment of onchocerciasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A T; Newland, H S; Taylor, H R; Erttmann, K D; Keyvan-Larijani, E; Nara, A; Aziz, M A; D'Anna, S A; Williams, P N; Greene, B M

    1987-09-01

    Ivermectin, given as a single oral dose, has shown considerable promise as a new treatment for onchocerciasis. We assessed the safety and efficacy of ivermectin and tried to determine the optimal dose. Two hundred Liberians received 100, 150, or 200 micrograms of ivermectin/kg or placebo and were followed up for 12 months. Therapy was associated with only minimal systemic and ocular side effects. A 200-micrograms/kg dose was associated with greater systemic reaction than was a 100-micrograms/kg dose. Each treatment group had significant reduction in skin microfilaria counts by day 3 and a decrease of approximately 95% at three months. At three months the proportion of persons with no microfilariae in a specimen of skin was significantly less in the 100-micrograms/kg group than in the 150-micrograms/kg or 200-micrograms/kg groups. At 12 months, the level of microfilariae in skin was still reduced approximately 80%. Significant reduction in ocular involvement was seen in all groups. These results confirm that single-dose ivermectin is effective and well-tolerated and suggest that 150 micrograms of ivermectin/kg may be the optimal dose for initial therapy.

  4. Impact of a daily exercise dose on knee joint cartilage - a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in healthy animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bricca, A; Juhl, C B; Grodzinsky, A J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of a daily exercise dose on cartilage composition and thickness, by conducting a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving healthy animals. METHODS: A narrative synthesis of the effect of a daily exercise dose on knee cartilage aggreca...

  5. A phase 1 study evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of repeat dosing with a human IL-13 antibody (CAT-354 in subjects with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roskos Lorin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IL-13 has been implicated in the development of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. This study investigated the multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety profile of human anti-IL-13 antibody (CAT-354 in adults with asthma. Methods This was a multiple-dose, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 study in asthmatics (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≥ 80% predicted. Subjects were randomised to receive three intravenous infusions of CAT-354 (1 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg or placebo at 28-day intervals. Blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic measurements. Safety was assessed by adverse events, vital signs, ECGs, laboratory and pulmonary function parameters. Results Twenty-three subjects (aged 21-60 years, FEV1 88-95% predicted received ≥ 1 dose of study medication. The half-life of CAT-354 was 12-17 days and was dose-independent. The maximum serum concentration and area under the curve were dose-dependent. Clearance (2.2-2.6 mL/day/kg and volume of distribution (44-57 mL/kg were both low and dose-independent. The observed maximum serum concentration after each dose increased slightly from dose 1 through dose 3 at all dose levels, consistent with an accumulation ratio of 1.4 to 1.7 for area under the curve. Most adverse events were deemed mild to moderate and unrelated to study medication. One SAE was reported and deemed unrelated to study drug. There were no effects of clinical concern for vital signs, ECG, laboratory or pulmonary parameters. Conclusions CAT-354 exhibited linear pharmacokinetics and an acceptable safety profile. These findings suggest that at the doses tested, CAT-354 can be safely administered in multiple doses to patients with asthma. Trial registration NCT00974675.

  6. Effects of exercise dose and type on sleep quality in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a multicenter randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S; Segal, Roanne J; Mackey, John R; Gelmon, Karen; Friedenreich, Christine M; Yasui, Yutaka; Reid, Robert D; Jespersen, Diana; Cook, Diane; Proulx, Carolyn; Trinh, Linda; Dolan, Lianne B; Wooding, Evyanne; Forbes, Cynthia C; McKenzie, Donald C

    2014-04-01

    To examine the effects of different doses and types of exercise on sleep quality in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A multicenter trial in Canada randomized 301 breast cancer patients between 2008 and 2011 to thrice weekly, supervised exercise during chemotherapy consisting of either a standard dose of 25-30 min of aerobic exercise (STAN; n = 96), a higher dose of 50-60 min of aerobic exercise (HIGH; n = 101), or a combined dose of 50-60 min of aerobic and resistance exercise (COMB; n = 104). The secondary sleep outcomes in the trial were assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at baseline, twice during chemotherapy, and postchemotherapy. We analyzed the global PSQI and the component scores. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated that the HIGH group was statistically superior to the STAN group for global sleep quality (mean group difference = -0.90; 95 % CI -0.05 to -1.76; p = 0.039) as well as subjective sleep quality (p = 0.028) and sleep latency (p = 0.049). The COMB group was borderline statistically superior to the STAN group for global sleep quality (mean group difference = -0.76; 95 % CI +0.11 to -1.62; p = 0.085) as well as sleep duration (p = 0.051); and statistically superior for sleep efficiency (p = 0.040), and percentage of poor sleepers (p = 0.045). Compared to a standard volume of aerobic exercise, higher volumes of both aerobic and combined exercise improved some aspects of sleep quality during breast cancer chemotherapy. Exercise may be an attractive option to manage sleep dysfunction in cancer patients during chemotherapy.

  7. Dose-Escalated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Quality of Life Comparison of Two Prospective Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey Charles Quon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe optimal prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT dose-fractionation scheme is controversial. This study compares long-term quality of life (QOL from two prospective trials of prostate SBRT to investigate the effect of increasing dose (NCT01578902 and NCT01146340.Material and MethodsPatients with localized prostate cancer received SBRT 35 or 40 Gy delivered in 5 fractions, once per week. QOL was measured using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC at baseline and every 6 months. Fisher’s exact test and generalized estimating equations were used to analyze proportions of patients with clinically significant change and longitudinal changes in QOL.Results114 patients were included, 84 treated to 35 Gy and 30 treated to 40 Gy. Median QOL follow-up was 56 months (interquartile range [IQR] 46-60 and 38 months (IQR 32-42, respectively. The proportion of patients reporting clinically significant declines in average urinary, bowel, and sexual scores were not significantly different between dose levels, and were 20.5 vs. 24.1% (p=0.60, 26.8 vs. 41.4% (p=0.16, and 42.9 vs. 38.5% (p=0.82, respectively. Similarly, longitudinal analysis did not identify significant differences in QOL between treatment groups.ConclusionDose-escalated prostate SBRT from 35 to 40 Gy in 5 fractions was not associated with significant decline in long-term QOL.

  8. A randomised phase II trial of weekly high-dose 5-fluorouracil with and without folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma: results of the 40955 EORTC trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducreux, M.; Cutsem, E. van; Laethem, J. van; Gress, T.M.; Jeziorski, K.; Rougier, P.; Wagener, T.; Anak, O.; Baron, B.; Nordlinger, B.

    2005-01-01

    Previous small phase II trials have demonstrated that the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cisplatin(CDDP) could have clinical activity in metastatic biliary tract cancer. This randomised phase II trial was designed to assess the activity and safety of a high-dose infusional weekly 5FU alone

  9. A randomised phase II trial of weekly high-dose 5-fluorouracil with and without folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced biliary tract carcinoma : results of the 40955 EORTC trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducreux, M; van Cutsem, E; van Laethern, JL; Gress, TM; Jeziorski, K; Rougier, P; Wagener, T; Anak, O; Baron, B; Nordlinger, B

    2005-01-01

    Previous small phase II trials have demonstrated that the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cisplatin(CDDP) could have clinical activity in metastatic biliary tract cancer. This randomised phase II trial was designed to assess the activity and safety of a high-dose infusional weekly 5FU alone

  10. Quality of life after radiation therapy of cerebral low-grade gliomas of the adult: results of a randomised Phase III trial on dose response (EORTC trial 22844)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiebert, G.M. [MEDTAP International, 27 Gilbert Street, London (United Kingdom); Curran, D. [EORTC Data Centre Brussels (Belgium); Aaronson, N.K. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire, Grenoble (France); Menten, J. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven (Belgium); Rutten, E.H.J.M. [University Hospital St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nordman, E. [Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Silvestre, M.E. [Hospital Santa Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Pierart, M. [EORTC Data Centre, Brussels (Belgium); Karim, A.B.M.F. [Free University Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    In 1985, the EORTC Radiotherapy Co-operative Group launched a randomised phase III study comparing high-dose (59.4 Gy in 6.5 weeks) versus low-dose (45 Gy in 5 weeks) radiotherapy with conventional techniques in patients diagnosed with low-grade cerebral glioma. The primary endpoint of the study was survival. No difference in survival was observed between the two treatment strategies. A quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of 47 items assessing a range of physical, psychological, social, and symptom domains was included in the trial to measure the impact of treatment over time. Patients who received high-dose radiotherapy tended to report lower levels of functioning and more symptom burden following completion of radiotherapy. These group differences were statistically significant for fatigue/malaise and insomnia immediately after radiotherapy and in leisure time and emotional functioning at 7-15 months after randomisation. These findings suggest that for conventional radiotherapy for low-grade cerebral glioma, a schedule of 45 Gy in 5 weeks not only saves valuable resources, but also spares patients a prolonged treatment at no loss of clinical efficacy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Thrombelastography-Based Dosing of Enoxaparin for Thromboprophylaxis in Trauma and Surgical Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Christopher R; Van, Philbert Y; Hart, Kyle D; Louis, Scott G; Fair, Kelly A; Erickson, Anfin S; Rick, Elizabeth A; Simeon, Erika C; Bulger, Eileen M; Arbabi, Saman; Holcomb, John B; Moore, Laura J; Schreiber, Martin A

    2016-10-19

    Prophylactic enoxaparin is used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in surgical and trauma patients. However, VTE remains an important source of morbidity and mortality, potentially exacerbated by antithrombin III or anti-Factor Xa deficiencies and missed enoxaparin doses. Recent data suggest that a difference in reaction time (time to initial fibrin formation) greater than 1 minute between heparinase and standard thrombelastogram (TEG) is associated with a decreased risk of VTE. To evaluate the effectiveness of TEG-adjusted prophylactic enoxaparin dosing among trauma and surgical patients. This randomized clinical trial, conducted from October 2012 to May 2015, compared standard dosing (30 mg twice daily) with TEG-adjusted enoxaparin dosing (35 mg twice daily) for 185 surgical and trauma patients screened for VTE at 3 level I trauma centers in the United States. The incidence of VTE, bleeding complications, anti-Factor Xa deficiency, and antithrombin III deficiency. Of the 185 trial participants, 89 were randomized to the control group (median age, 44.0 years; 55.1% male) and 96 to the intervention group (median age, 48.5 years; 74.0% male). Patients in the intervention group received a higher median enoxaparin dose than control patients (35 mg vs 30 mg twice daily; P  .99) were similar, but the difference in bleeding complications (5 [5.6%] vs 13 [13.5%]; P = .08) was not statistically significant. Antithrombin III and anti-Factor Xa deficiencies and hypercoagulable TEG parameters, including elevated coagulation index (>3), maximum amplitude (>74 mm), and G value (>12.4 dynes/cm2), were prevalent in both groups. Identified risk factors for VTE included older age (61.0 years vs 46.0 years; P = .04), higher body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared; 30.6 vs 27.1; P = .03), increased Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (8.5 vs 7.0; P = .03), and increased percentage of missed

  12. Evaluation of human pharmacokinetics, therapeutic dose and exposure predictions using marketed oral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnity, D F; Collington, J; Austin, R P; Riley, R J

    2007-06-01

    In this article approaches to predict human pharmacokinetics (PK) are discussed and the capability of the exemplified methodologies to estimate individual PK parameters and therapeutic dose for a set of marketed oral drugs has been assessed. For a set of 63 drugs where the minimum efficacious concentration (MEC) and human PK were known, the clinical dose was shown to be well predicted or in some cases over-estimated using a simple one-compartment oral PK model. For a subset of these drugs, in vitro potency against the primary human targets was gathered, and compared to the observed MEC. When corrected for plasma protein binding, the MEC of the majority of compounds was GFR. For approximately 90% of compounds studied, the predicted CL using in vitro-in vivo (IVIV) extrapolation together with a CL(renal) estimate, where appropriate, was within 2-fold of that observed clinically. Encouragingly volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) estimated in preclinical species (rat and dog) when corrected for plasma protein binding, predicted human V(ss) successfully on the majority of occasions--73% of compounds within 2-fold. In this laboratory, absorption estimated from oral rat PK studies was lower than the observed human absorption for most drugs, even when solubility and permeability appeared not to be limiting. Preliminary data indicate absorption in the dog may be more representative of human for compounds absorbed via the transcellular pathway. Using predicted PK and MEC values estimated from in vitro potency assays there was a good correlation between predicted and observed dose. This analysis suggests that for oral therapies, human PK parameters and clinical dose can be estimated from a consideration of data obtained from in vitro screens using human derived material and in vivo animal studies. The benefits and limitations of this holistic approach to PK and dose prediction within the drug discovery process are exemplified and discussed.

  13. Low dose lignocaine + butorphanol vs. low dose bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia in day care urological surgeries: a prospective randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khant, Shahil Rameshbhai; Chaudhari, Rajeev; Kore, Rishikesh Arun; Bhagwat, Shirish; Jakhalekar, Ranjan Purushottam

    2017-06-01

    A local anaesthetic with fast onset, short and reliable duration of anaesthesia may be preferable for day care urological surgeries. Low dose lignocaine is believed to act faster and to have a shorter duration of action than low dose bupivacaine. Use of lignocaine for spinal anesthesia is discouraged now a days because of rare reports of transient neurological symptoms. The purpose of this study was to compare effectiveness and safety of low dose of lignocaine + butorphanol against low dose of bupivacaine for day care urological surgeries. A prospective randomized control trial was conducted between December 2012 to November 2015. After taking ethical committe approval and patient consent, total 990 patients were randomized in two groups. Group A received 0.5 mL of 5% lignocaine (25 mg) + 0.3 mL butorphanol (0.3 mg) and group B received 1 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine (5 mg) for spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia was given at the L3-L4 interspace with the patient in the sitting or lateral position. The criteria for evaluation were time till onset of sensory and motor block, duration of sensory and motor block, time till ambulation, time till fit for discharge and any complications. Both the groups were comparable in terms of age, male to female ratio, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade and duration surgery. Group A and Group B were statistically different in terms of mean time till onset of sensory block (120±22 sec and 274±36 sec), onset of motor block (228±34 sec and 372±41 sec), duration of sensory block (100±21 min and 230±28 min), duration of motor block (60±15 min and 152±23 min), time till ambulation (138±24 min and 292±48 min), time till fit for discharge (256±35 min and 428±46 min) respectively (Spinal anaesthesia is an effective as well as a safe modality to anaesthetize the patient for day care urological procedures. This study shows lignocaine + butorphanol is preferable over bupivacaine for spinal anesthesia for day care

  14. Oral isotretinoin in different dose regimens for acne vulgaris: A randomized comparative trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Shankar Agarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral isotretinoin is recommended for severe nodulocystic acne in the doses of 1-2 mg/kg/day which is usually associated with higher incidence of adverse effects. To reduce the incidence of side-effects and to make it more cost-effective, the lower dose regimen of isotretinoin has been used. Aim: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of oral isotretinoin in daily, alternate, pulse and low-dose regimens in acne of all types and also to assess whether it can be used for mild and moderate acne also. Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with acne were randomized into four different treatment regimens each consisting of 30 patients. Group A was prescribed isotretinoin 1 mg/kg/day, Group B 1 mg/kg alternate day, Group C 1 mg/kg/day for one week/four weeks and Group D 20 mg every alternate day for 16 weeks. Patients were further followed for eight weeks to see any relapse. Side-effects were also recorded. Results: Though the daily high dose treatment Group A performed better initially at eight weeks, at the end of therapy at 16 weeks results were comparable in Group A , B and D. Patients with severe acne did better in Group A than in Group B, C and D. Patients with mild acne had almost similar results in all the groups while patients with moderate acne did better in Group A, B and D. Frequency and severity of treatment-related side-effects were significantly higher in treatment Group A as compared to Group B, C and D. Conclusion: We conclude that for severe acne either conventional high doses of isotretinoin may be used or we can give conventional high dose for initial eight weeks and later maintain on low doses. Use of isotretinoin should be considered in mild to moderate acne also, in low doses; 20 mg, alternate day seems to be an effective and safe treatment option in such cases.

  15. Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain In the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    and Leeann Zarzabal for statistical support. References [1] Todd KH, Ducharme J, Choiniere M, Crandall CS, Fosnocht DE, Homel P, et al. Pain in the...model of acute pain. Am J Emerg Med 2001;19: 531–2. [8] Lester L, Braude DA, Niles C, Crandall CS. Low-dose ketamine for analgesia in the ED: a...retrospective case series. Am J Emerg Med 2010;28:820–7. [9] Lester L, Braude DA, Niles C, Crandall CS. Low-dose ketamine for analgesia in the ED: a

  16. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  17. A Dose of Reality: Radiation Analysis for Realistic Human Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilla, J. E.; Lee, K. T.

    2017-01-01

    racks and components, was simplified to remove holes and volume overlaps. Problematic features within the drawing were also removed or repaired to prevent runtime issues. The cleaned drawing was then run through the DAGMC workflow to prepare for analysis. Pilot tests modeling transport of 1GeV proton and 800MeV/A oxygen sources show that reasonable results are converged upon in an acceptable amount of overall computation time from drawing preparation to data analysis. The FLUKA radiation transport code will next be used to model both a GCR and a trapped radiation source. These results will then be compared with measurements that have been made by the radiation instrumentation deployed inside the US Lab module. DISCUSSION Early analyses have indicated that the DAGMC workflow is a promising toolkit for running vehicle geometries of interest to NASA through multiple radiation transport codes. In addition, recent work has shown that a realistic human phantom, provided via a subcontract with the University of Florida, can be placed inside any vehicle geometry for a combinatorial analysis. This added functionality gives the user the ability to score various parameters at the organ level, and the results can then be used as input for cancer risk models.

  18. Human plantarflexor stiffness to multiple single-stretch trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanpied, P; Smidt, G L

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of different stretch velocities, different rates of pre-stretch force development, and different pre-stretch muscle lengths on the intrinsic stiffness exhibited by the quasi-statically contracting active human plantarflexors during multiple single-stretch trials at 20-60% of maximum isometric contraction. Subjects were positioned prone, with the knee flexed 1.57 rad(90 degrees), shank stabilized, and foot secured in a hard plastic orthotic. Slowly increasing isometric plantarflexion force was produced until the plantarflexors were stretched by a rapid 0.2 rad (12 degrees) dorsiflexion movement. Plantarflexion forces and ankle positions were determined during these stretches as well as during resting stretches when the muscle was inactive. Resting forces were subtracted from the active trials, forces converted to torques, and stiffnesses determined for the first 62 ms of the stretch. The slope of the stiffness vs pre-stretch torque relationship averaged 4.30 +/- 0.34 Nm rad-1 Nm-1. Little difference was found between stiffness determined through the single-stretch method and the results of previous studies employing different mechanical inputs. Differences in stiffnesses with different stretching velocities were caused by computational artifact rather than by differences in intrinsic muscular reaction. Faster rates of pre-stretch force increase prior to the stretch resulted in slightly lower stiffnesses. Different pre-stretch muscle lengths apparently did not result in different stiffnesses. The shape of the torque vs displacement curve was remarkably insensitive to the planned manipulations of the testing conditions, responding in a stereotypical manner.

  19. "EFFECT OF HIGH VERSUS LOW DOSES OF HUMAN RECOMBINANT ERYTHROPOIETIN ON THE ANEMIA OF PREMATURITY"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadzadeh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant human erythropoietin (rh-EPO is known to accelerate erythropoiesis in preterm infants. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of early treatment with two doses of rh-EPO (high vs. low dose in the management of anemia of prematurity. Twenty preterm infants with hematocrit (Hct < 30% when infant’s age was between 2 to 3 weeks after birth or Hct <25% when infant’s age was more than 3 weeks after birth, were divided randomly in two groups, each group including 10 babies. Infants in high dose group received 500 u/kg rh-EPO twice per week and the low dose group received 500 u/kg rh-EPO weekly. All infants were fed human milk supplemented with enteral iron. Hematocrit and reticulocyte counts were determined for each infant at the start of the study, 3 days after start of treatment and one week after the end of treatment. The means of gestational age in high dose and low dose groups were 31.4 ± 2.2 and 31.3±2.0 weeks, respectively. Means of birth weight in high dose and low dose groups were 1366 ± 243 and 1438±249 gr, respectively. The two groups were significantly different in reticulocyte count at 3 days after treatment (P = 0.047 and in hematocrit at the end of study (P < 0.0001. We concluded the early treatment of anemia of prematurity with high dose rh-EPO with supplemental iron significantly increases hematocrit and reticulocyte in preterm infants and reduce the need for blood transfusion in these high risk neonates.

  20. Laser immunotherapy: initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Guerra, Maria C.; Ferrel, Gabriela L.; Lunn, John A.; Adelsteinsson, Orn; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser Immunotherapy is an experimental treatment modality for late-stage, metastatic tumors, which targets solid primary and/or secondary tumors and utilizes an autologous vaccine-like approach to stimulate immune responses. Specifically, laser immunotherapy combines laser-induced in situ tumor devitalization with an immunoadjuvant for local immunostimulation. Here we report the initial results from a human breast cancer pilot trial with laser immunotherapy. Six stage III and IV cancer patients were treated, all of which were considered to be out of all other options, and preliminary data at the three-month examination are presented. The immediate goal of the trial was to determine the patient tolerance and the toxicity of the therapy, the optimal dose for the alteration of the course of the disease, and the reduction of the tumor burden. Each patient was individually evaluated for toxicity tolerance through physical exams and by appropriate supplemental and routine laboratory tests. Observable tumors in patients were followed with physical examination and radiological evaluations. Treatment efficacy was judged by the size and number of local and distant metastases before and after treatment.

  1. Using Facebook™ to Recruit College-Age Men for a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviotta, Jonathan M; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-03-01

    College-age men were recruited using Facebook™ advertisements (ads), as well as traditional recruitment methods, for a randomized controlled trial to compare immunological responses to human papillomavirus vaccine administered in two dosing schedules. This study compares enrollees who were recruited through traditional recruitment methods versus social networking sites (SNSs), including Facebook. Potential participants were recruited using flyers posted on and off campus(es), and distributed at health fairs, classes, sporting, and other campus events; e-mails to students and student organizations; and print advertisements in student newspapers and on city buses. Facebook ads were displayed to users with specific age, geographic, and interest characteristics; ads were monitored daily to make adjustments to improve response. A total of 220 males, aged 18 to 25 years enrolled between October 2010 and May 2011. The majority of participants (51%) reported print advertisements as the method by which they first heard about the study, followed by personal contact (29%) and Facebook or other SNSs (20%). The likelihood of a SNS being the source by which the participant first heard about the study compared with traditional methods was increased if the participant reported (a) being homosexual or bisexual or (b) posting daily updates on SNSs. Facebook and other SNSs are a viable recruitment strategy for reaching potential clinical trial participants among groups who typically use social media to stay connected with their friends and hard-to-reach groups such as young men who self-identify as homosexual or bisexual.

  2. Smoking habits in the randomised Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial with low-dose CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Saghir, Zaigham; Dirksen, Asger

    2014-01-01

    to annual low-dose CT (CT group) and 2052 received no intervention (control group). Participants were current and ex-smokers (≥4 weeks abstinence from smoking) with a tobacco consumption of ≥20 pack years. Smoking habits were determined annually. Missing values for smoking status at the final screening...

  3. Improved control of oral anticoagulant dosing : A randomized controlled trial comparing two computer algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Y; Rombouts, E K; Kruithof, C J; van der Meer, F J M; Rosendaal, F R

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efforts to improve dosing quality in oral anticoagulant control include the use of computer algorithms. As current algorithms are simplistic and give dosage proposals in a small fraction of patients, we developed an algorithm based on principles of system and control engineering that giv

  4. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  5. Dose-response effects of aerobic exercise on energy compensation in postmenopausal women: combined results from two randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, J; Brenner, D R; Courneya, K S; Friedenreich, C M

    2017-08-01

    Despite the clear health benefits of exercise, exercised-induced weight loss is often less than expected. The term 'exercise energy compensation' is used to define the amount of weight loss below what is expected for the amount of exercise energy expenditure. We examined the dose-response effects of exercise volume on energy compensation in postmenopausal women. Data from Alberta Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Prevention (ALPHA) and Breast Cancer and Exercise Trial in Alberta (BETA) were combined for the present analysis. The ALPHA and BETA trials were two-centred, two-armed, 12-month randomized controlled trials. The ALPHA trial included 160 participants randomized to 225 min per week of aerobic exercise, and the BETA trial randomized 200 participants to each 150 and 300 min per week of aerobic exercise. All participants were aged 50-74 years, moderately inactive (compensation was based on changes in body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan) and estimated exercise energy expenditure from completed exercise volume. Associations between Δenergy intake, ΔVO2peak and Δphysical activity time with energy compensation were assessed. No differences in energy compensation were noted between interventions. However, there were large inter-individual differences in energy compensation between participants; 9.4% experienced body composition changes that were greater than expected based on exercise energy expenditure, 64% experienced some degree of energy compensation and 26.6% experienced weight gain based on exercise energy expenditure. Increases in VO2peak were associated with reductions in energy compensation (β=-3.44 ml kg(-1) min(-1), 95% confidence interval for β=-4.71 to -2.17 ml kg(-1) min(-1); P=0.0001). Large inter-individual differences in energy compensation were noted, despite no differences between activity doses. In addition, increases in VO2peak were associated with lower energy compensation. Future studies are needed to

  6. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants — Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing...

  7. Bacteriophage Therapy: Advances in Formulation Strategies and Human Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Lavigne, Rob; Brüssow, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of phage therapy phase I and II safety trials have been concluded, showing no notable safety concerns associated with the use of phage. Though hurdles for efficient treatment remain, these trials hold promise for future phase III clinical trials. Interestingly, most phage formulations used in these clinical trials are straightforward phage suspensions, and not much research has focused on the processing of phage cocktails in specific pharmaceutical dosage forms. Additional research on formulation strategies and the stability of phage-based drugs will be of key importance, especially with phage therapy advancing toward phase III clinical trials.

  8. Treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: a phase I single-dose escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Seza A; Cohen, Steven J; Pennington, Kenneth L; Zuckier, Lionel S; Hauke, Ralph J; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-06-15

    Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of (90)Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan ((90)Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received (111)In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before (90)Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). (111)In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before (90)Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received (90)Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m(2) (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with (90)Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m(2) encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m(2) as the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%-52% tumor diameter shrinkage). (90)Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  9. Randomized controlled trial of Hepatitis B virus vaccine in HIV-1-infected patients comparing two different doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Palacios Guillermo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is not infrequent as both share same route of exposure. The risk of developing chronic hepatitis B virus is 6%, in general population but can reach 10–20% in HBV/HIV co-infected patients. When compared to general population, the response rate to HBV vaccine in HIV-infected patients is diminished, so previous studies have tried to improve this response using variety of schedules, doses and co-administration of immunomodulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two doses of recombinant HBV vaccine (10 or 40 μg, IM at 0, 1 and 6 months. Vaccination response was measured 30–50 days after last dose; titers of >9.9 IU/L were considered positive. Results Seventy-nine patients were included, 48 patients (60.7% serconverted. Thirty-nine patients (49.3% received 10 μg vaccine dose, 24 patients (61.5% seroconverted. Forty patients (50.7% received 40 μg vaccine dose, 24 (60% seroconverted. There were no differences between two doses. A statistically significant higher seroconversion rate was found for patients with CD4 cell counts at vaccination ≥ 200 cel/mm3 (33 of 38 patients, 86.8%, compared with those with CD4 4 count 3 were significantly associated with non serologic response (p = 0.003. None other variables such as gender, age, risk exposure for HIV, viral load, type or duration of HAART or AIDS-defining illness, were asociated with seroconversion. Conclusion In this study, an increase dose of HBV vaccine did not show to increase the rate of response in HIV infected subjects. The only significant findings associated to the response rate was that a CD4 count ≥ 200 cel/mm3, we suggest this threshold at which HIV patients should be vaccinated.

  10. Efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan vs. enalapril at lower than target doses in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: the PARADIGM-HF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Orly; Claggett, Brian; Packer, Milton; Zile, Michael R; Rouleau, Jean; Swedberg, Karl; Teerlink, John R; Desai, Akshay S; Lefkowitz, Martin; Shi, Victor; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2016-10-01

    In this analysis, we utilized data from PARADIGM-HF to test the hypothesis that participants who exhibited any dose reduction during the trial would have similar benefits from lower doses of sacubitril/valsartan relative to lower doses of enalapril. In a post-hoc analysis from PARADIGM-HF, we characterized patients by whether they received the maximal dose (200 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 10 mg enalapril twice daily) throughout the trial or had any dose reduction to lower doses (100/50/0 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 5/2.5/0 mg enalapril twice daily). The treatment effect for the primary outcome was estimated, stratified by dose level using time-updated Cox regression models. In the two treatment arms, participants with a dose reduction (43% of those randomized to enalapril and 42% of those randomized to sacubitril/valsartan) had similar baseline characteristics and similar baseline predictors of the need for dose reduction. In a time-updated analysis, any dose reduction was associated with a higher subsequent risk of the primary event [hazard ratio (HR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-2.7]. However, the treatment benefit of sacubitril/valsartan over enalapril following a dose reduction was similar (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.93, P PARADIGM-HF, study medication dose reduction identified patients at higher risk of a major cardiovascular event. The magnitude of benefit for patients on lower doses of sacubitril/valsartan relative to those on lower doses of enalapril was similar to that of patients who remained on target doses of both drugs. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  11. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  12. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  13. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-22

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  14. Vorinostat and Concurrent Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Clara Y H; Wakelee, Heather A; Neal, Joel W; Pinder-Schenck, Mary C; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael; Chang, Steven D; Adler, John R; Modlin, Leslie A; Harsh, Griffith R; Soltys, Scott G

    2017-09-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, given concurrently with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Secondary objectives were to determine toxicity, local failure, distant intracranial failure, and overall survival rates. In this multicenter study, patients with 1 to 4 NSCLC brain metastases, each ≤2 cm, were enrolled in a phase 1, 3 + 3 dose escalation trial. Vorinostat dose levels were 200, 300, and 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days. Single-fraction SRS was delivered on day 3. A dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 3 to 5 acute nonhematologic adverse event related to vorinostat or SRS occurring within 30 days. From 2009 to 2014, 17 patients were enrolled and 12 patients completed study treatment. Because no DLTs were observed, the MTD was established as 400 mg. Acute adverse events were reported by 10 patients (59%). Five patients discontinued vorinostat early and withdrew from the study. The most common reasons for withdrawal were dyspnea (n=2), nausea (n=1), and fatigue (n=2). With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 1-64 months), Kaplan-Meier overall survival was 13 months. There were no local failures. One patient (8%) at the 400-mg dose level with a 2.0-cm metastasis developed histologically confirmed grade 4 radiation necrosis 2 months after SRS. The MTD of vorinostat with concurrent SRS was established as 400 mg. Although no DLTs were observed, 5 patients withdrew before completing the treatment course, a result that emphasizes the need for supportive care during vorinostat administration. There were no local failures. A larger, randomized trial may evaluate both the tolerability and potential local control benefit of vorinostat concurrent with SRS for brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An adaptive, dose-finding, seamless phase 2/3 study of a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 analog (dulaglutide): trial design and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Mary Jane; Skrivanek, Zachary; Gaydos, Brenda; Chien, Jenny; Berry, Scott; Berry, Donald

    2012-11-01

    Dulaglutide (dula, LY2189265) is a once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 analog in development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. An adaptive, dose-finding, inferentially seamless phase 2/3 study was designed to support the development of this novel diabetes therapeutic. The study is divided into two stages based on two randomization schemes: a Bayesian adaptive scheme (stage 1) and a fixed scheme (stage 2). Stage 1 of the trial employs an adaptive, dose-finding design to lead to a dula dose-selection decision or early study termination due to futility. If dose selection occurs, the study proceeds to stage 2 to allow continued evaluation of the selected dula doses. At completion, the entire study will serve as a confirmatory phase 3 trial. The final study design is discussed, along with specifics pertaining to the actual execution of this study and selected baseline characteristics of the participants.

  16. Absorbed Dose Calculations Using Mesh-based Human Phantoms And Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Health risks attributable to the exposure to ionizing radiation are considered to be a function of the absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues. However, as human tissue cannot express itself in terms of equivalent dose, exposure models have to be used to determine the distribution of equivalent dose throughout the human body. An exposure model, be it physical or computational, consists of a representation of the human body, called phantom, plus a method for transporting ionizing radiation through the phantom and measuring or calculating the equivalent dose to organ and tissues of interest. The FASH2 (Female Adult meSH) and the MASH2 (Male Adult meSH) computational phantoms have been developed at the University of Pernambuco in Recife/Brazil based on polygon mesh surfaces using open source software tools and anatomical atlases. Representing standing adults, FASH2 and MASH2 have organ and tissue masses, body height and body mass adjusted to the anatomical data published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the reference male and female adult. For the purposes of absorbed dose calculations the phantoms have been coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, which can transport photons, electrons and positrons through arbitrary media. This paper reviews the development of the FASH2 and the MASH2 phantoms and presents dosimetric applications for X-ray diagnosis and for prostate brachytherapy.

  17. A threefold dose intensity treatment with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide for patients with small cell lung cancer: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyvraz, Serge; Pampallona, Sandro; Martinelli, Giovanni; Ploner, Ferdinand; Perey, Lucien; Aversa, Savina; Peters, Solange; Brunsvig, Paal; Montes, Ana; Lange, Andrzej; Yilmaz, Ugur; Rosti, Giovanni

    2008-04-16

    The dose intensity of chemotherapy can be increased to the highest possible level by early administration of multiple and sequential high-dose cycles supported by transfusion with peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs). A randomized trial was performed to test the impact of such dose intensification on the long-term survival of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients who had limited or extensive SCLC with no more than two metastatic sites were randomly assigned to high-dose (High, n = 69) or standard-dose (Std, n = 71) chemotherapy with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE). High-ICE cycles were supported by transfusion with PBPCs that were collected after two cycles of treatment with epidoxorubicin at 150 mg/m(2), paclitaxel at 175 mg/m(2), and filgrastim. The primary outcome was 3-year survival. Comparisons between response rates and toxic effects within subgroups (limited or extensive disease, liver metastases or no liver metastases, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, normal or abnormal lactate dehydrogenase levels) were also performed. Median relative dose intensity in the High-ICE arm was 293% (range = 174%-392%) of that in the Std-ICE arm. The 3-year survival rates were 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 10% to 29%) and 19% (95% CI = 11% to 30%) in the High-ICE and Std-ICE arms, respectively. No differences were observed between the High-ICE and Std-ICE arms in overall response (n = 54 [78%, 95% CI = 67% to 87%] and n = 48 [68%, 95% CI = 55% to 78%], respectively) or complete response (n = 27 [39%, 95% CI = 28% to 52%] and n = 24 [34%, 95% CI = 23% to 46%], respectively). Subgroup analyses showed no benefit for any outcome from High-ICE treatment. Hematologic toxicity was substantial in the Std-ICE arm (grade > or = 3 neutropenia, n = 49 [70%]; anemia, n = 17 [25%]; thrombopenia, n = 17 [25%]), and three patients (4%) died from toxicity. High-ICE treatment was predictably associated with severe

  18. 'Omics analysis of low dose acetaminophen intake demonstrates novel response pathways in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetten, Marlon J.A.; Gaj, Stan [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Kok, Theo M. de [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Delft, Joost H.M. van, E-mail: j.vandelft@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Lommen, Arjen [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Someren, Eugene P. van [Research Group Microbiology and Systems Biology, TNO, PO Box 360 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); Jennen, Danyel G.J.; Claessen, Sandra M. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M. [RIKILT, Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen UR, PO Box 230, 6700 AE, Wageningen (Netherlands); Stierum, Rob H. [Research Group Microbiology and Systems Biology, TNO, PO Box 360 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); Kleinjans, Jos C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Universitiessingel 50 6229 ER Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    Acetaminophen is the primary cause of acute liver toxicity in Europe/USA, which led the FDA to reconsider recommendations concerning safe acetaminophen dosage/use. Unfortunately, the current tests for liver toxicity are no ideal predictive markers for liver injury, i.e. they only measure acetaminophen exposure after profound liver toxicity has already occurred. Furthermore, these tests do not provide mechanistic information. Here, 'omics techniques (global analysis of metabolomic/gene-expression responses) may provide additional insight. To better understand acetaminophen-induced responses at low doses, we evaluated the effects of (sub-)therapeutic acetaminophen doses on metabolite formation and global gene-expression changes (including, for the first time, full-genome human miRNA expression changes) in blood/urine samples from healthy human volunteers. Many known and several new acetaminophen-metabolites were detected, in particular in relation to hepatotoxicity-linked, oxidative metabolism of acetaminophen. Transcriptomic changes indicated immune-modulating effects (2 g dose) and oxidative stress responses (4 g dose). For the first time, effects of acetaminophen on full-genome human miRNA expression have been considered and confirmed the findings on mRNA level. 'Omics techniques outperformed clinical chemistry tests and revealed novel response pathways to acetaminophen in humans. Although no definitive conclusion about potential immunotoxic effects of acetaminophen can be drawn from this study, there are clear indications that the immune system is triggered even after intake of low doses of acetaminophen. Also, oxidative stress-related gene responses, similar to those seen after high dose acetaminophen exposure, suggest the occurrence of possible pre-toxic effects of therapeutic acetaminophen doses. Possibly, these effects are related to dose-dependent increases in levels of hepatotoxicity-related metabolites. -- Highlights: ► 'Omics techniques

  19. Trial of high-dose Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Jensen, T G; Hansen, H L

    1988-01-01

    In a randomised study of 558 children in an urban African community, the protective effect of the Edmonston-Zagreb (EZ) measles vaccine given in a dose of 40,000 plaque forming units from the age of 4 months was compared with the effects of a standard dose (6000 tissue culture infectious units......) of Schwarz measles vaccine given from the age of 9 months. During two years of follow-up, all 14 clinical cases of measles occurred in the Schwarz group; 10 of the children contracted measles before vaccination and 4 after measles vaccination. Thus the EZ vaccine provided significant protection against...... measles both before and after the usual age of vaccination. Among the children who were exposed to measles at home, those given EZ vaccine were better protected than either unvaccinated children or those given the Schwarz vaccine....

  20. Dose-tailoring of FEC adjuvant chemotherapy based on leukopenia is feasible and well tolerated. Toxicity and dose intensity in the Scandinavian Breast Group phase 3 adjuvant Trial SBG 2000-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Per; Ahlgren, Johan; Bjerre, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The SBG 2000-1 trial is a randomised study that investigates if dose-tailored adjuvant FEC therapy based on the individual's leukocyte nadir value can improve outcome. The study has included 1535 women with medium and high-risk breast cancer.......The SBG 2000-1 trial is a randomised study that investigates if dose-tailored adjuvant FEC therapy based on the individual's leukocyte nadir value can improve outcome. The study has included 1535 women with medium and high-risk breast cancer....

  1. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  2. A Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Dose-Response Trial of the Melatonin Effect on the Pain Threshold of Healthy Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cadore Stefani

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that melatonin may produce antinociception through peripheral and central mechanisms. Based on the preliminary encouraging results of studies of the effects of melatonin on pain modulation, the important question has been raised of whether there is a dose relationship in humans of melatonin on pain modulation.The objective was to evaluate the analgesic dose response of the effects of melatonin on pressure and heat pain threshold and tolerance and the sedative effects.Sixty-one healthy subjects aged 19 to 47 y were randomized into one of four groups: placebo, 0.05 mg/kg sublingual melatonin, 0.15 mg/kg sublingual melatonin or 0.25 mg/kg sublingual melatonin. We determine the pressure pain threshold (PPT and the pressure pain tolerance (PPTo. Quantitative sensory testing (QST was used to measure the heat pain threshold (HPT and the heat pain tolerance (HPTo. Sedation was assessed with a visual analogue scale and bispectral analysis.Serum plasma melatonin levels were directly proportional to the melatonin doses given to each subject. We observed a significant effect associated with dose group. Post hoc analysis indicated significant differences between the placebo vs. the intermediate (0.15 mg/kg and the highest (0.25 mg/kg melatonin doses for all pain threshold and sedation level tests. A linear regression model indicated a significant association between the serum melatonin concentrations and changes in pain threshold and pain tolerance (R(2  = 0.492 for HPT, R(2  = 0.538 for PPT, R(2  = 0.558 for HPTo and R(2  = 0.584 for PPTo.The present data indicate that sublingual melatonin exerts well-defined dose-dependent antinociceptive activity. There is a correlation between the plasma melatonin drug concentration and acute changes in the pain threshold. These results provide additional support for the investigation of melatonin as an analgesic agent. Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec: (U1111

  3. Randomized trial of exclusive human milk versus preterm formula diets in extremely premature infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to compare the duration of parenteral nutrition, growth, and morbidity in extremely premature infants fed exclusive diets of either bovine milk-based preterm formula (BOV) or donor human milk and human milk-based human milk fortifier (HUM), in a randomized trial of formula vs human...

  4. Dose and effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose and effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats Authors: Gary E. Hatch, John McKee, James Brown, Bill McDonnell, Elston Seal, Joleen Soukup, Ralph Slade, Kay Crissman and Robert Devlin, National Health and Environmental...

  5. The dose-response relation in human volunteers for gastro-intestinal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis PFM; Heijden OG van der; Giessen JWB van der; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1996-01-01

    Published data on infection of human hosts with various protozoa, bacteria, and viruses causing gastro-enteritis are used to establish a quantitative relationship between ingested dose and the risk of infection. For all data sets analysed, this relationship is determined by fitting either an exponen

  6. Low Doses of Ethanol Enhance LTD-like Plasticity in Human Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhl, Anna; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Lücke, Caroline; Toennes, Stefan W; Ziemann, Ulf

    2015-12-01

    Humans liberally use ethanol for its facilitating effects on social interactions but its effects on central nervous system function remain underexplored. We have recently described that very low doses of ethanol abolish long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in human cortex, most likely through enhancement of tonic inhibition [Lücke et al, 2014, Neuropsychopharmacology 39:1508-18]. Here, we studied the effects of low-dose ethanol on long-term depression (LTD)-like plasticity. LTD-like plasticity was induced in human motor cortex by paired associative transcranial magnetic stimulation (PASLTD), and measured as decreases of motor evoked potential input-output curve (IO-curve). In addition, sedation was measured by decreases in saccade peak velocity (SPV). Ethanol in two low doses (EtOHethanol, easily reached during social drinking, enhance LTD-like plasticity in human cortex. This effect is most likely explained by the activation of extrasynaptic α4-subunit containing gamma-aminobutyric type A receptors by low-dose EtOH, resulting in increased tonic inhibition. Findings may stimulate cellular research on the role of tonic inhibition in regulating excitability and plasticity of cortical neuronal networks.

  7. Randomized multicenter follow-up trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar fasciitis (painful heels spur) depending on dose and fractionation – a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Holtmann, Henrik; Niewald, Marcus; Prokein, Benjamin; Graeber, Stefan; Ruebe, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background An actual clinical trial showed the effect of low dose radiotherapy in painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis) with single doses of 1.0 Gy and total doses of 6.0 Gy applied twice weekly. Furthermore, a lot of animal experimental and in vitro data reveals the effect of lower single doses of 0.5 Gy which may be superior in order to ease pain and reduce inflammation in patients with painful heel spur. Our goal is therefore to transfer this experimentally found effect into a randomized m...

  8. A randomized trial of vitamin D₃ supplementation in children: dose-response effects on vitamin D metabolites and calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R D; Laing, E M; Hill Gallant, K M; Hall, D B; McCabe, G P; Hausman, D B; Martin, B R; Warden, S J; Peacock, M; Weaver, C M

    2013-12-01

    Changes in serum vitamin D metabolites and calcium absorption with varying doses of oral vitamin D₃ in healthy children are unknown. Our objective was to examine the dose-response effects of supplemental vitamin D₃ on serum vitamin D metabolites and calcium absorption in children living at two U.S. latitudes. Black and white children (n = 323) participated in a multisite (U.S. latitudes 34° N and 40° N), triple-masked trial. Children were randomized to receive oral vitamin D₃ (0, 400, 1000, 2000, and 4000 IU/d) and were sampled over 12 weeks in winter. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)₂D) were measured using RIA and intact PTH (iPTH) by immunoradiometric assay. Fractional calcium absorption was determined from an oral stable isotope ⁴⁴Ca (5 mg) in a 150-mg calcium meal. Nonlinear and linear regression models were fit for vitamin D metabolites, iPTH, and calcium absorption. The mean baseline 25(OH)D value for the entire sample was 70.0 nmol/L. Increases in 25(OH)D depended on dose with 12-week changes ranging from -10 nmol/L for placebo to 76 nmol/L for 4000 IU. Larger 25(OH)D gains were observed for whites vs blacks at the highest dose (P pill compliance, race, sex, or baseline 25(OH)D. Large increases in serum 25(OH)D with vitamin D₃ supplementation did not increase calcium absorption in healthy children living at 2 different latitudes. Supplementation with 400 IU/d was sufficient to maintain wintertime 25(OH)D concentrations in healthy black, but not white, children.

  9. Systemic treatment of venous leg ulcers with high doses of pentoxifylline: efficacy in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falanga, V; Fujitani, R M; Diaz, C; Hunter, G; Jorizzo, J; Lawrence, P F; Lee, B Y; Menzoian, J O; Tretbar, L L; Holloway, G A; Hoballah, J; Seabrook, G R; McMillan, D E; Wolf, W

    1999-01-01

    Several small studies have indicated that the systemic administration of pentoxifylline may accelerate healing of venous leg ulcers. The goal of this study was to further evaluate these findings in a larger scale placebo controlled trial and to explore the effect of the dose of pentoxifylline on healing. The study used a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel group placebo controlled design in a multicenter outpatient setting. Patients with one or more venous ulcer were enrolled, with all patients receiving standardized compression bandaging for treatment for their ulcers. Patients were also randomized to receive either pentoxifylline 400 mg, pentoxifylline 800 mg (two 400 mg tablets), or placebo tablets three times a day for up to 24 weeks. The main outcome measure was time to complete healing of all leg ulcers, using life table analysis. The study was completed as planned in 131 patients. Patients receiving 800 mg three times a day of pentoxifylline healed faster than placebo (p = 0.043, Wilcoxon test). The median time to complete healing was 100, 83, and 71 days for placebo, pentoxifylline 400 mg, and pentoxifylline 800 mg three times a day, respectively. Over half of all patients were ulcer free at week 16 (placebo) and at week 12 in both pentoxifylline groups. Whereas the placebo group had only achieved complete healing in half of the cases by week 16, all of the subjects remaining in the group receiving the high dose of pentoxifylline had healed completely. Treatment with pentoxifylline was well tolerated with similar drop-out rates in all three treatment groups. Complete wound closure occurred at least 4 weeks earlier in the majority of patients treated with pentoxifylline by comparison to placebo. A higher dose of pentoxifylline (800 mg three times a day) was more effective than the lower dose. We conclude that pentoxifylline is effective in accelerating healing of leg ulcers.

  10. Assessment of effective absorbed dose of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin in human on the basis of biodistribution rat data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahooti, Afsaneh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effective absorbed dose to human organs was estimated, following intra vascular administration of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin using biodistribution data from rats. Rats were sacrificed at exact time intervals of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 24 h post injections. The Medical Internal Radiation Dose formulation was applied to extrapolate from rats to humans and to project the absorbed radiation dose for various human organs. From rat data, it was estimated that a 185-MBq injection of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin into the human might result in an estimated absorbed dose of 24.27 mGy to the total body and the highest effective absorbed dose was in kidneys, 28.39 mSv. The promising results of this study emphasises the importance of absorbed doses in humans estimated from data on rats.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Single Dose Zoledronic Acid for Osteoporosis in Frail Seniors: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Susan L.; Perera, Subashan; Ferchak, Mary Anne; Nace, David A.; Resnick, Neil M.

    2016-01-01

    Importance 85% of institutionalized elderly have osteoporosis, with fracture rates 8–9 fold higher than observed among community-dwelling elderly. Yet most are untreated and excluded from pivotal osteoporosis trials. Objective Determine the efficacy and safety of zoledronic acid in frail elderly women. Design 2-year, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study conducted between December 2007 and March 2012. Setting Nursing home and assisted living facilities. Participants 181 women ≥ age 65 with osteoporosis including those with cognitive impairment, immobility, and multimorbidity. Intervention One 5 mg dose of zoledronic acid or placebo IV and daily calcium and vitamin D. Main Outcomes (1) Hip and spine bone mineral density (BMD) at 12 and 24 months and (2) adverse events. Results There were no baseline differences in age (mean=85.4±0.6 years), BMD, or functional or cognitive status, but the treatment group included more subjects with frailty, falls history, diabetes, and anticonvulsant use. BMD was available for 87% of participants at 12 months and 73% at 24 months. BMD changes were greater in the treatment group (p< 0.01): 3.2 ± 0.7 and 3.9 ± 0.7 percentage point differences (mean ± SE) in the total hip at 12 and 24 months respectively, and 1.8 ± 0.7 and 3.6 ± 0.7 at the spine (p<0.01); adjusted analyses were similar. The treatment and placebo groups’ fracture rates were 20% and 16%, respectively (OR=1.30; 95% CI=0.61–2.78); mortality rates were 16% and 13% (OR=1.24; 95% CI=0.54–2.86). Groups did not differ in the proportion of single fallers (28% vs. 24%; OR=1.24; 95% CI=0.64–2.42; p=0.52) but more subjects in the treatment group had multiple falls (49% vs. 35%; OR=1.83; 95% CI=1.01–3.33; p=0.047); this was no longer significant when adjusted for baseline frailty. Conclusions and Relevance In this group of frail, osteoporotic women, one dose of zoledronic acid improved BMD over 2 years. The clinical importance of nonsignificant

  12. RADIATION DOSE TO HUMAN AND NON-HUMAN BIOTA IN THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA RESULTING FROM THE FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG-KWON KEUM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the radiation doses to human and non-human biota in the Republic of Korea, as a result of the Fukushima nuclear accident. By using the measured airborne activity and ground deposition, the effective and thyroid doses of five human age groups (infant, 5 years, 10 years, 15 years and adult were estimated by the ECOSYS code, and the whole body absorbed dose rate of the eight Korean reference animals and plants (RAPs was estimated by the K-BIOTA (the Korean computer code to assess the risk of radioactivity to wildlife. The first-year effective and thyroid human doses ranged from 5.7E-5 mSv in the infant group to 2.0E-4 mSv in the 5 years group, and from 5.0E-4 mSv in the infant group to 3.4E-3 mSv in the 5 years group, respectively. The life-time (70 years effective and thyroid human doses ranged from 1.5E-4 mSv in the infant group to 3.0E-4 mSv in the 5 years group, and from 6.0E-4 mSv in the infant group to 3.5E-3 mSv in the 5 years group, respectively. The estimated maximum whole body absorbed dose rate to the Korean RAPs was 6.7E-7 mGy/d for a snake living in soil (terrestrial biota, and 2.0E-5 mGy/d for freshwater fish (aquatic biota, both of which were far less than the generic dose criteria to protect biota from ionizing radiation. Also, the screening level assessment for ERICA's (Environmental Risks from Ionizing Contaminants: Assessments and management limiting organisms showed that the risk quotient (RQ for the estimated maximum soil and water activity was significantly less than unity for both the terrestrial and freshwater organisms. Conclusively, the radiological risk of the radioactivity released into the environment by the Fukushima nuclear accident to the public and the non-human biota in the republic of Korea is considered negligible.

  13. Dynamic changes in the proteome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with low dose ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishad, S; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-02-01

    Humans are continually exposed to ionizing radiation from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. Though biological effects of high dose radiation exposures have been well accepted, studies on low-to-moderate dose exposures (in the range of 50-500 mGy) have been strongly debated even as researchers continue to search for elusive 'radiation signatures' in humans. Proteins are considered as dynamic functional players that drive cellular responses. However, there is little proteomic information available in context of human exposure to ionizing radiation. In this study, we determined differential expressed proteins in G0 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals 1h and 4h after 'ex vivo' exposure with two radiation doses (300 mGy and 1 Gy). Twenty-three proteins were found to be significantly altered in irradiated cells when compared to sham irradiated cells with fold change ± 1.5-fold (p ≤ 0.05), with only three proteins showing ≥ 2.5-fold change, either with dose or with time. Mass spectrometry analyses identified redox sensor protein, chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC-1), the antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin-6 and the pro-survival molecular chaperone 78 KDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78) among the 23 modulated proteins. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the twenty-three radiation responsive protein spots was found to be 33.7% for 300 mGy and 48.3% for 1 Gy. We thus, conclude that the radiation proteomic response of G0 human PBMCs, which are in the resting stage of the cell cycle, involves moderate upregulation of protective mechanisms, with low inter-individual variability. This study will help further our understanding of cellular effects of low dose acute radiation in humans and contribute toward differential biomarker discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Phase I dose escalation pharmacokinetic assessment of intravenous humanized anti-MUC1 antibody AS1402 in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Mark D; Borges, Virginia F; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Fuloria, Jyotsna; Shapiro, Charles; Perez, Susan; Wang, Karen; Schaedli Stark, Franziska; Courtenay Luck, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    MUC1 is a cell-surface glycoprotein that establishes a molecular barrier at the epithelial surface and engages in morphogenetic signal transduction. Alterations in MUC1 glycosylation accompany the development of cancer and influence cellular growth, differentiation, transformation, adhesion, invasion, and immune surveillance. A 20-amino-acid tandem repeat that forms the core protein of MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in the majority of epithelial tumors. AS1402 (formerly R1550) is a humanized IgG1k monoclonal antibody that binds to PDTR sequences within this tandem repeat that are not exposed in normal cells. AS1402 is a potent inducer of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), specifically against MUC1-expressing tumor cells. The objective of this study was to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of AS1402 monotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic MUC1-positive breast cancer that had progressed after anthracyclines- and taxane-based therapy. Patients received AS1402 over a 1- to 3-hour intravenous (i.v.) infusion at doses between 1 and 16 mg/kg, with repeated dosing every 1 to 3 weeks (based on patient-individualized PK assessment) until disease progression. Serum AS1402 levels were measured at multiple times after i.v. administration. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) responses were measured to determine the immunogenicity of AS1402. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were determined and were used to assess dose dependency across the dose range studied. Twenty-six patients were treated. AS1402 was generally well tolerated. Two grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events were reported, both at the 3-mg/kg dose. Neither was observed in expanded or subsequent dosing cohorts. No anti-human antibodies were detected. Plasma concentrations of AS1402 appeared to be proportional to dose within the 1- to 16-mg/kg dose range assessed, with a mean terminal half-life of 115.4 +/- 37.1 hours

  15. SU-E-T-110: Development of An Independent, Monte Carlo, Dose Calculation, Quality Assurance Tool for Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faught, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Davidson, S [University of Texas Medical Branch of Galveston, Galveston, TX (United States); Kry, S; Ibbott, G; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fontenot, J [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Etzel, C [Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA), Inc., Southborough, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive end-to-end test for Varian's TrueBeam linear accelerator for head and neck IMRT using a custom phantom designed to utilize multiple dosimetry devices. Purpose: To commission a multiple-source Monte Carlo model of Elekta linear accelerator beams of nominal energies 6MV and 10MV. Methods: A three source, Monte Carlo model of Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams was developed. Energy spectra of two photon sources corresponding to primary photons created in the target and scattered photons originating in the linear accelerator head were determined by an optimization process that fit the relative fluence of 0.25 MeV energy bins to the product of Fatigue-Life and Fermi functions to match calculated percent depth dose (PDD) data with that measured in a water tank for a 10x10cm2 field. Off-axis effects were modeled by a 3rd degree polynomial used to describe the off-axis half-value layer as a function of off-axis angle and fitting the off-axis fluence to a piecewise linear function to match calculated dose profiles with measured dose profiles for a 40×40cm2 field. The model was validated by comparing calculated PDDs and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3×3cm2 to 30×30cm2 to those obtained from measurements. A benchmarking study compared calculated data to measurements for IMRT plans delivered to anthropomorphic phantoms. Results: Along the central axis of the beam 99.6% and 99.7% of all data passed the 2%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. Dose profiles at depths of dmax, through 25cm agreed with measured data for 99.4% and 99.6% of data tested for 6 and 10MV models, respectively. A comparison of calculated dose to film measurement in a head and neck phantom showed an average of 85.3% and 90.5% of pixels passing a 3%/2mm gamma criterion for 6 and 10MV models respectively. Conclusion: A Monte Carlo multiple-source model for Elekta 6 and 10MV therapeutic x-ray beams has been developed as a

  16. Phase I Trial of Pelvic Nodal Dose Escalation With Hypofractionated IMRT for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; McHaffie, Derek R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Patel, Rakesh R.; Khuntia, Deepak [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Petereit, Daniel G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, John T. Vucurevich Regional Cancer Care Institute, Rapid City Regional Hospital, Rapid City, SD (United States); Hong, Theodore S.; Tome, Wolfgang [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Ritter, Mark A., E-mail: ritter@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Toxicity concerns have limited pelvic nodal prescriptions to doses that may be suboptimal for controlling microscopic disease. In a prospective trial, we tested whether image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can safely deliver escalated nodal doses while treating the prostate with hypofractionated radiotherapy in 5 Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half weeks. Methods and Materials: Pelvic nodal and prostatic image-guided IMRT was delivered to 53 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) high-risk patients to a nodal dose of 56 Gy in 2-Gy fractions with concomitant treatment of the prostate to 70 Gy in 28 fractions of 2.5 Gy, and 50 of 53 patients received androgen deprivation for a median duration of 12 months. Results: The median follow-up time was 25.4 months (range, 4.2-57.2). No early Grade 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group or Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3.0 genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were seen. The cumulative actuarial incidence of Grade 2 early GU toxicity (primarily alpha blocker initiation) was 38%. The rate was 32% for Grade 2 early GI toxicity. None of the dose-volume descriptors correlated with GU toxicity, and only the volume of bowel receiving {>=}30 Gy correlated with early GI toxicity (p = 0.029). Maximum late Grades 1, 2, and 3 GU toxicities were seen in 30%, 25%, and 2% of patients, respectively. Maximum late Grades 1 and 2 GI toxicities were seen in 30% and 8% (rectal bleeding requiring cautery) of patients, respectively. The estimated 3-year biochemical control (nadir + 2) was 81.2 {+-} 6.6%. No patient manifested pelvic nodal failure, whereas 2 experienced paraaortic nodal failure outside the field. The six other clinical failures were distant only. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT nodal dose escalation to 56 Gy was delivered concurrently with 70 Gy of hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy in a convenient, resource-efficient, and well-tolerated 28-fraction schedule. Pelvic nodal dose

  17. Benign painful shoulder syndrome. Initial results of a single-center prospective randomized radiotherapy dose-optimization trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Hertel, S.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Department of Radiation Oncology

    2012-12-15

    Background and purpose: To compare the efficacy of two different dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of patients with benign painful shoulder syndrome. Patients and methods: Between February 2006 and February 2010, 312 consecutive evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective randomized trial. All patients received radiotherapy with an orthovoltage technique. One radiotherapy course consisted of 6 single fractions in 3 weeks. In case of insufficient remission of pain after 6 weeks, a second radiation series was performed. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either single doses of 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. The endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before, right after, and 6 weeks after radiotherapy using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Results: The overall response rate for all patients was 83% directly after and 85% 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The mean VAS values before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment for the 0.5 and 1.0 Gy groups were 56.8 {+-} 23.7 and 53.2 {+-} 21.8 (p = 0.158), 38.2 {+-} 26.1 and 34.0 {+-} 24.5 (p = 0.189), and 33.0 {+-} 27.2 and 23.7 {+-} 22.7 (p = 0.044), respectively. The mean CPS before, directly after, and 6 weeks after treatment was 9.7 {+-} 3.0 and 9.5 {+-} 2.7 (p = 0.309), 6.1 {+-} 3.6 and 5.4 {+-} 3.6 (p = 0.096), 5.3 {+-} 3.7 and 4.1 {+-} 3.7 (p = 0.052), respectively. Despite a slight advantage in the VAS analysis for the 1.0 Gy group for delayed response, the CPS analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between the two single-dose trial arms for early (p = 0.652) and delayed response quality (p = 0.380). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for the management of benign painful shoulder syndrome. Concerning radiation protection, the dose for a radiotherapy series is recommended not to exceed 3-6 Gy. (orig.)

  18. A comparison of linaclotide and lubiprostone dosing regimens on ion transport responses in human colonic mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Bum; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Penrose, Harrison; Docherty, Michael J; McCole, Declan F

    2015-03-01

    Linaclotide, a synthetic guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) agonist, and the prostone analog, Lubiprostone, are approved to manage chronic idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Lubiprostone also protects intestinal mucosal barrier function in ischemia. GC-C signaling regulates local fluid balance and other components of intestinal mucosal homeostasis including epithelial barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare if select dosing regimens differentially affect linaclotide and lubiprostone modulation of ion transport and barrier properties of normal human colonic mucosa. Normal sigmoid colon biopsies from healthy subjects were mounted in Ussing chambers. Tissues were treated with linaclotide, lubiprostone, or vehicle to determine effects on short-circuit current (I sc). Subsequent I sc responses to the cAMP agonist, forskolin, and the calcium agonist, carbachol, were also measured to assess if either drug caused desensitization. Barrier properties were assessed by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance. I sc responses to linaclotide and lubiprostone were significantly higher than vehicle control when administered bilaterally or to the mucosal side only. Single versus cumulative concentrations of linaclotide showed differences in efficacy while cumulative but not single dosing caused desensitization to forskolin. Lubiprostone reduced forskolin responses under all conditions. Linaclotide and lubiprostone exerted a positive effect on TER that was dependent on the dosing regimen. Linaclotide and lubiprostone increase ion transport responses across normal human colon but linaclotide displays increased sensitivity to the dosing regimen used. These findings may have implications for dosing protocols of these agents in patients with constipation.

  19. Efficacy and safety of high-dose baclofen for the treatment of alcohol dependence: A multicentre, randomised, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraha, Esther M; Salemink, Elske; Goudriaan, Anna E; Bakker, Abraham; de Jong, David; Smits, Natasha; Zwart, Jan Willem; Geest, Dick van; Bodewits, Pieter; Schiphof, Tom; Defourny, Harma; van Tricht, Mirjam; van den Brink, Wim; Wiers, Reinout W

    2016-12-01

    Previous randomised placebo-controlled trials with low-to-medium doses of baclofen (30-60mg) showed inconsistent results, but case studies suggested a dose-response effect and positive outcomes in patients on high doses of baclofen (up to 270mg). Its prescription was temporary permitted for the treatment of alcohol dependence (AD) in France, and baclofen is now widely prescribed. Recently, a small RCT found a strong effect of a mean dose of 180mg baclofen. In the present study the efficacy and safety of high doses of baclofen was examined in a multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 151 patients were randomly assigned to either six weeks titration and ten weeks high-dose baclofen (N=58; up to 150mg), low-dose baclofen (N=31; 30mg), or placebo (N=62). The primary outcome measure was time to first relapse. Nine of the 58 patients (15.5%) in the high-dose group reached 150mg and the mean baclofen dose in this group was 93.6mg (SD=40.3). No differences between the survival distributions for the three groups were found in the time to first relapse during the ten-weeks high-dose phase (χ(2)=0.41; p=0.813) or the 16-weeks complete medication period (χ(2)=0.04; p=0.982). There were frequent dose-related adverse events in terms of fatigue, sleepiness, and dry mouth. One medication related serious adverse event occurred in the high-dose baclofen group. Neither low nor high doses of baclofen were effective in the treatment of AD. Adverse events were frequent, although generally mild and transient. Therefore, large-scale prescription of baclofen for the treatment of AD seems premature and should be reconsidered.

  20. Value of a single night-time dose of potassium clorazepate in anxiety: a controlled trial comparison with diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J G

    1982-10-01

    A total of 29 patients with anxiety or anxiety/hysteria, participated in a double-blind, cross-over trial of two benzodiazepine anxiolytics, diazepam and potassium clorazepate. The problems of a 'carry-over' effect and a possible order of drug administration effect are discussed in relation to analysis of results. Clorazepate proved the more effective drug, as shown by a reduction in total symptom scale of Kellner Symptom Rating Test and the reduction in sub-scales for anxiety, depression, somatic complaints and general neurotic symptoms with parallel symptom reduction in linear analogue scales. Side effects were infrequent with both drugs and posed no clinical problem. Potassium clorazepate in a single nightly dose of 15 mg proved to be more effective than thrice daily (5 mg) diazepam.

  1. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocke, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  2. Effect of fractionation and rate of radiation dose on human leukemic cells, HL-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, J.G.; Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1985-03-01

    The capacity of HL-60 cells, human acute promyelocytic leukemic cells established in culture, to repair sublethal radiation damage was estimated from the response of the cells to fractionated irradiation or to a single irradiation at difference dose rates. After exposure of cells to a single dose of X rays at a dose rate of 78 rad/min, the survival curve was characterized by n = 2.5, D/sub q/ = 80 rad, and D/sub 0/ = 83.2 rad. Split-dose studies demonstrated that the cells were able to repair a substantial portion of sublethal radiation damage in 2 hr. The response of the cells to irradiation at different dose rates decreased with a decrease in the dose rates, which could be attributed to repair of sublethal radiation damage. The possibility that some of the malignant hemopoietic cells, if not all, may possess a substantial capacity to repair sublethal radiation damage should not be underestimated in planning total-body irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation.

  3. Effective dose measured with a life size human phantom in a low Earth orbit mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    The biggest concern about the health risk to astronauts is how large the stochastic effects (cancers and hereditary effects) of space radiation could be. The practical goal is to determine the "effective dose" precisely, which is difficult for each crew because of the complex transport processes of energetic secondary particles. The author and his colleagues thus attempted to measure an effective dose in space using a life-size human phantom torso in the STS-91 Shuttle-Mir mission, which flew at nearly the same orbit as that of the International Space Station (ISS). The effective dose for about 10-days flight was 4.1 mSv, which is about 90% of the dose equivalent (H) at the skin; the lowest H values were seen in deep, radiation-sensitive organs/tissues such as the bone marrow and colon. Succeeding measurements and model calculations show that the organ dose equivalents and effective dose in the low Earth orbit mission are highly consistent, despite the different dosimetry methodologies used to determine them.

  4. Potato glycoalkaloids and adverse effects in humans: an ascending dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensinga, Tjeert T; Sips, Adrienne J A M; Rompelberg, Cathy J M; van Twillert, Klaas; Meulenbelt, Jan; van den Top, Hester J; van Egmond, Hans P

    2005-02-01

    Glycoalkaloids in potatoes may induce gastro-intestinal and systemic effects, by cell membrane disruption and acetylcholinesterase inhibition, respectively. The present single dose study was designed to evaluate the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of orally administered potato glycoalkaloids (alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine). It is the first published human volunteer study were pharmacokinetic data were obtained for more than 24 h post-dose. Subjects (2-3 per treatment) received one of the following six treatments: (1-3) solutions with total glycoalkaloid (TGA) doses of 0.30, 0.50 or 0.70 mg/kg body weight (BW), or (4-6) mashed potatoes with TGA doses of 0.95, 1.10 or 1.25 mg/kg BW. The mashed potatoes had a TGA concentration of nearly 200 mg/kg fresh weight (the presently recognised upper limit of safety). None of these treatments induced acute systemic effects. One subject who received the highest dose of TGA (1.25 mg/kg BW) became nauseous and started vomiting about 4 h post-dose, possibly due to local glycoalkaloid toxicity (although the dosis is lower than generally reported in the literature to cause gastro-intestinal disturbances). Most relevant, the clearance of glycoalkaloids usually takes more than 24 h, which implicates that the toxicants may accumulate in case of daily consumption.

  5. Quantitative Models of the Dose-Response and Time Course of Inhalational Anthrax in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Wiley A.; Bulmahn, Kenneth; Walton, Thomas E.; Woods, Christopher W.; Coghill, Catherine; Gallegos, Frank; Samore, Matthew H.; Adler, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthrax poses a community health risk due to accidental or intentional aerosol release. Reliable quantitative dose-response analyses are required to estimate the magnitude and timeline of potential consequences and the effect of public health intervention strategies under specific scenarios. Analyses of available data from exposures and infections of humans and non-human primates are often contradictory. We review existing quantitative inhalational anthrax dose-response models in light of criteria we propose for a model to be useful and defensible. To satisfy these criteria, we extend an existing mechanistic competing-risks model to create a novel Exposure–Infection–Symptomatic illness–Death (EISD) model and use experimental non-human primate data and human epidemiological data to optimize parameter values. The best fit to these data leads to estimates of a dose leading to infection in 50% of susceptible humans (ID50) of 11,000 spores (95% confidence interval 7,200–17,000), ID10 of 1,700 (1,100–2,600), and ID1 of 160 (100–250). These estimates suggest that use of a threshold to human infection of 600 spores (as suggested in the literature) underestimates the infectivity of low doses, while an existing estimate of a 1% infection rate for a single spore overestimates low dose infectivity. We estimate the median time from exposure to onset of symptoms (incubation period) among untreated cases to be 9.9 days (7.7–13.1) for exposure to ID50, 11.8 days (9.5–15.0) for ID10, and 12.1 days (9.9–15.3) for ID1. Our model is the first to provide incubation period estimates that are independently consistent with data from the largest known human outbreak. This model refines previous estimates of the distribution of early onset cases after a release and provides support for the recommended 60-day course of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for individuals exposed to low doses. PMID:24058320

  6. Resveratrol and Clinical Trials: The Crossroad from In Vitro Studies to Human Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé-Carneiro, Joao; Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A.; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4’-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a non-flavonoid polyphenol that may be present in a limited number of food-stuffs such as grapes and red wine. Resveratrol has been reported to exert a plethora of health benefits through many different mechanisms of action. This versatility and presence in the human diet have drawn the worldwide attention of many research groups over the past twenty years, which has resulted in a huge output of in vitro and animal (preclinical) studies. In line with this expectation, many resveratrol-based nutraceuticals are consumed all over the world with questionable clinical/scientific support. In fact, the confirmation of these benefits in humans through randomized clinical trials is still very limited. The vast majority of preclinical studies have been performed using assay conditions with a questionable extrapolation to humans, i.e. too high concentrations with potential safety concerns (adverse effects and drug interactions), short-term exposures, in vitro tests carried out with non-physiological metabolites and/or concentrations, etc. Unfortunately, all these hypothesis-generating studies have contributed to increased the number of ‘potential’ benefits and mechanisms of resveratrol but confirmation in humans is very limited. Therefore, there are many issues that should be addressed to avoid an apparent endless loop in resveratrol research. The so-called ‘Resveratrol Paradox’, i.e., low bioavailability but high bioactivity, is a conundrum not yet solved in which the final responsible actor (if any) for the exerted effects has not yet been unequivocally identified. It is becoming evident that resveratrol exerts cardioprotective benefits through the improvement of inflammatory markers, atherogenic profile, glucose metabolism and endothelial function. However, safety concerns remain unsolved regarding chronic consumption of high RES doses, specially in medicated people. This review will focus on the currently

  7. High dose Senna or Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG for elective colonoscopy preparation: a prospective randomized investigator-blinded clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shavakhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of two methods of colon preparation for colon cleansing in a randomized controlled trial. Methods: In this prospective randomized investigator-blinded trial, consecutive outpatients indicated for elective colonoscopy were randomized into two groups. Patients in Senna group took 24 tablets of 11 mg Senna in two divided doses 24 hour before colonoscopy. In Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG group they solved 4 sachets in 4 liters of water the day before the procedure and were asked to drink 250 ml every 15 minutes. The overall quality of colon cleansing was evaluated using the Aronchick scoring scale. Difficulty of the procedure, patients′ tolerance and compliance and adverse events were also evaluated. Results: 322 patients were enrolled in the study. There was no significant difference in the quality of colon cleansing, patients′ tolerance, compliance and the difficulty of the procedure between two groups (p > 0.05. The incidence of adverse effects was similar between two groups except for abdominal pain that was more severe in Senna group (p < 0.05 and nausea and vomiting that was more common in PEG group (p < 0.05 Conclusions: In conclusion we deduce that Senna has the same efficacy and patient′s acceptance as Polyethylene glycol-electrolyte solution (PEG-ES and it could be prescribed as an alternative method for bowel preparation.

  8. A pilot double-blind placebo-controlled trial of low-dose pramipexole in sleep-related eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provini, F; Albani, F; Vetrugno, R; Vignatelli, L; Lombardi, C; Plazzi, G; Montagna, P

    2005-06-01

    Sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) is characterized by recurrent arousals from sleep associated with compulsive ingestion of food. No controlled therapeutic trials are available for SRED. We assessed the safety, tolerability and efficacy of pramipexole, a dopamine D3-receptor agonist, in the treatment of SRED. Eleven consecutive patients with SRED in the absence of concurrent daytime eating disorders underwent actigraphic recording and subjective sleep diary evaluation for a week before and every week for 2 weeks of treatment with pramipexole 0.18-0.36 mg or placebo, administered in a double-blind crossover randomized sequence. The primary outcomes of the trial were actigraphic measures of night sleep parameters (sleep efficiency, motor activity mean and median, number and duration of wake episodes), secondary outcomes were the number of good sleep nights/weekly, number and duration of nocturnal awakenings/night, and visual analogue preference score. Pramipexole was well tolerated without any patient withdrawing from the study. Pramipexole reduced night-time activity median (P = 0.02) and increased the number of nights of good sleep/week (P = 0.02). All other measurements remained unaffected. Pramipexole at low doses was well tolerated, improving some measures of sleep quality and reducing median night activity in SRED. Further studies with higher dosages and for longer time-periods are warranted.

  9. A randomised controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of allopurinol dose escalation to achieve target serum urate in people with gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lisa K; Chapman, Peter T; Barclay, Murray L; Horne, Anne; Frampton, Christopher; Tan, Paul; Drake, Jill; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of allopurinol dose escalation using a treat-to-target serum urate (SU) approach. A randomised, controlled, parallel-group, comparative clinical trial was undertaken. People with gout receiving at least creatinine clearance (CrCL)-based allopurinol dose for ≥1 month and SU ≥6 mg/dL were recruited. Participants were randomised to continue current dose (control) or allopurinol dose escalation for 12 months. In the dose escalation group, allopurinol was increased monthly until SU was treatment target in most people with gout. Allopurinol dose escalation is well tolerated. ANZCTR12611000845932; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling

  11. Effect of reduced dose schedules and intramuscular injection of anthrax vaccine adsorbed on immunological response and safety profile: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jennifer G; Plikaytis, Brian D; Rose, Charles E; Parker, Scott D; Babcock, Janiine; Keitel, Wendy; El Sahly, Hana; Poland, Gregory A; Jacobson, Robert M; Keyserling, Harry L; Semenova, Vera A; Li, Han; Schiffer, Jarad; Dababneh, Hanan; Martin, Sandra K; Martin, Stacey W; Marano, Nina; Messonnier, Nancy E; Quinn, Conrad P

    2014-02-12

    We evaluated an alternative administration route, reduced schedule priming series, and increased intervals between booster doses for anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA). AVA's originally licensed schedule was 6 subcutaneous (SQ) priming injections administered at months (m) 0, 0.5, 1, 6, 12 and 18 with annual boosters; a simpler schedule is desired. Through a multicenter randomized, double blind, non-inferiority Phase IV human clinical trial, the originally licensed schedule was compared to four alternative and two placebo schedules. 8-SQ group participants received 6 SQ injections with m30 and m42 "annual" boosters; participants in the 8-IM group received intramuscular (IM) injections according to the same schedule. Reduced schedule groups (7-IM, 5-IM, 4-IM) received IM injections at m0, m1, m6; at least one of the m0.5, m12, m18, m30 vaccine doses were replaced with saline. All reduced schedule groups received a m42 booster. Post-injection blood draws were taken two to four weeks following injection. Non-inferiority of the alternative schedules was compared to the 8-SQ group at m2, m7, and m43. Reactogenicity outcomes were proportions of injection site and systemic adverse events (AEs). The 8-IM group's m2 response was non-inferior to the 8-SQ group for the three primary endpoints of anti-protective antigen IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC), geometric mean titer, and proportion of responders with a 4-fold rise in titer. At m7 anti-PA IgG GMCs for the three reduced dosage groups were non-inferior to the 8-SQ group GMCs. At m43, 8-IM, 5-IM, and 4-IM group GMCs were superior to the 8-SQ group. Solicited injection site AEs occurred at lower proportions in the IM group compared to SQ. Route of administration did not influence the occurrence of systemic AEs. A 3 dose IM priming schedule with doses administered at m0, m1, and m6 elicited long term immunological responses and robust immunological memory that was efficiently stimulated by a single booster vaccination at

  12. A randomized phase II trial of concurrent chemoradiation with two doses of radiotherapy, 60Gy and 66Gy, concomitant with a fixed dose of oral vinorelbine in locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Knap, Marianne; Khalil, Azza Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In order to test the best performing radiation dose with a convenient chemotherapy schedule of an oral formulation of radio-sensitizing vinorelbine in inoperable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we performed a randomized phase II trial based on a "pick the winner...

  13. Associations of high-dose melphalan pharmacokinetics and outcomes in the setting of a randomized cryotherapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yu Kyoung; Sborov, Douglas W; Lamprecht, Misty; Li, Junan; Wang, Jiang; Hade, Erinn M; Gao, Yue; Tackett, Karen; Williams, Nita; Benson, Don M; Efebera, Yvonne A; Rosko, Ashley E; Devine, Steven M; Poi, Ming; Hofmeister, Craig C; Phelps, Mitch A

    2017-02-04

    High dose melphalan followed by autologous stem cell transplantation remains standard of care for eligible patients with multiple myeloma, but disease response and toxicity, including severe mucositis, varies among patients. Our randomized trial investigated duration of cryotherapy (2 and 6 hours) for reduction of mucositis prevalence and severity and explored factors associated with variability in pharmacokinetics and outcomes from melphalan therapy. The results demonstrate 2-hour is at least as effective as 6-hour cryotherapy in decreasing severe mucositis. From a population pharmacokinetic model, we identified fat free mass, hematocrit, and creatinine clearance were significant covariates, as had been reported previously. Furthermore, we observed the rs4240803 SLC7A5 polymorphism was significantly associated with pharmacokinetic variability, and pharmacokinetics was associated with both mucositis and neutropenia. However, melphalan exposure was not associated with progression-free or overall survival in our dataset. These findings contribute to ongoing efforts to personalize melphalan dosing in transplant patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality assurance of the EORTC trial 22881/10882 : 'assessment of the role of the booster dose in breast conserving therapy'; The Dummy Run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tienhoven, G. van; Bree, N.A.M. van; Mijnheer, B.J.; Bartelink, H. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands) the EORTC Radiotherapy Group)

    1991-12-01

    The EORTC trial 22881/10882 is a randomised trial with the aim to assess the role of the boost dose in breast conserving therapy in stage I and II breast cancer.In order to detect potential protocol deviations concerning irradiation technique and in dose specification procedure of participating institutions before actual patient accrual, a Dummy Run was performed. Three transverse sections of a patient were sent to 16 institutions with a request to make a 3-plane treatment plan according to protocol prescriptions. A treatment chart and beam data were also requested for recalculation of the dose. Additional information was asked in a questionnaire. On evaluation, the techniques differed considerably with respect to photon beam energy, varying between {sup 60}Co gamma-rays and 8MV X-rays, and use of wedge filters. Two institutions did not apply wedges, whereas wedge angles in the other institutions varied between 6deg and 45 deg. Twelve institutions used collimator rotation and/or a table wedge to diminish the amount of irradiated lung volume. The dose was specified in a point according to the protocol prescription in 11 institutions and to the 90, 95 or 100% isodose curve in four. Twelve institutions applied lung density corrections during treatment planning, while nine reported problems with their planning system in off-axis dose distribution calculation and/or the stimulation of collimator rotation. Recalculation of dose at the isocentre showed agreement within 2% compared with stated dose. Dose reported in the tumor excision area varied between 93 and 100%. It can be concluded that good accordance and high quality breast irradiation can be achieved by all institutions participating in the trial, provided a few recommendations are followed. The results of this analysis show the necessity and usefulness of a quality assurance programme at the initial phase of a clinical trial. (author). 27 refs.; 3 figs.; 4 tabs.

  15. Health-related quality-of-life in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in the FIRST trial: lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone versus melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide

    OpenAIRE

    Delforge, Michel; Minuk, Leonard; Eisenmann, Jean-Claude; Arnulf, Bertrand; Canepa, Letizia; Fragasso, Alberto; Leyvraz, Serge; Langer, Christian; Ezaydi, Yousef; Vogl, Dan T; Giraldo-Castellano, Pilar; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Zarnitsky, Charles; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Lemieux, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We compared the health-related quality-of-life of patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma aged over 65 years or transplant-ineligible in the pivotal, phase III FIRST trial. Patients received: i) continuous lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone until disease progression; ii) fixed cycles of lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone for 18 months; or iii) fixed cycles of melphalan, prednisone, thalidomide for 18 months. Data were collected using the validated questionnaires (QLQ-MY20, QL...

  16. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor Initiation and Dose Uptitration in Children With Cardiovascular Disease: A Retrospective Review of Standard Clinical Practice and a Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, S Lucy; Timberlake, Kathryn; Manlhiot, Cedric; Balasingam, Mervin; Wilson, Judith; George, Kristen; McCrindle, Brian W; Kantor, Paul F

    2016-05-20

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are a mainstay of medical management in pediatric cardiology. However, there are no data defining how best to initiate and uptitrate the dose of these medications in children. Retrospective chart review revealed only 24% of our pediatric cardiology inpatients were discharged on predefined optimal doses of ACEIs and few underwent further dose uptitration in the 8 weeks after hospital discharge. Therefore, 2 alternative protocols for initiation of captopril were compared in a prospective randomized clinical trial. A "rapid uptitration" protocol reached an optimal dose on day 3, whereas the alternative, "prolonged uptitration" protocol, reached an optimal dose on day 9. Forty-6 patients (54% male) were recruited to the trial, with a median age of 0.7 year (IQR 0.5-2.3 years). Captopril was initiated while in intensive care in 39% of patients and on the cardiology ward in 61%. There were no differences between the protocols in episodes of hypotension, symptomatic hypotension, or indices of renal function. Patients following the rapid protocol reached higher doses of captopril (0.93±0.24 versus 0.57±0.38 mg/kg per dose, Ppractice or with a more prolonged protocol, rapid ACEI dose uptitration achieves a higher dosage in this population with no evident disadvantages. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT00742040. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. The impact of dose of the angiotensin-receptor blocker valsartan on the post-myocardial infarction ventricular remodeling: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Young-Rak

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and the angiotensin-receptor blocker valsartan ameliorate ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI. Based on previous clinical trials, a maximum clinical dose is recommended in practical guidelines. Yet, has not been clearly demonstrated whether the recommended dose is more efficacious compared to the lower dose that is commonly used in clinical practice. Method/Design Valsartan in post-MI remodeling (VALID is a randomized, open-label, single-blinded multicenter study designed to compare the efficacy of different clinical dose of valsartan on the post-MI ventricular remodeling. This study also aims to assess neurohormone change and clinical parameters of patients during the post-infarct period. A total of 1116 patients with left ventricular dysfunction following the first episode of acute ST-elevation MI are to be enrolled and randomized to a maximal tolerable dose (up to 320 mg/day or usual dose (80 mg/day of valsartan for 12 months in 2:1 ratio. Echocardiographic analysis for quantifying post-MI ventricular remodeling is to be conducted in central core laboratory. Clinical assessment and laboratory test are performed at fixed times. Discussion VALID is a multicenter collaborative study to evaluate the impact of dose of valsartan on the post-MI ventricular remodeling. The results of the study provide information about optimal dosing of the drug in the management of patients after MI. The results will be available by 2012. Trial registration NCT01340326

  18. Low-dose ketamine infusion for labor analgesia: A double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Joel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most primary and secondary level hospitals in developing countries provide inadequate labor analgesia due to various medical, technical and economic reasons. This clinical trial was an effort to study the efficacy, safety and feasibility of intravenous (IV ketamine to provide labor analgesia. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 parturients were consented and randomly assigned to receive either IV ketamine or 0.9% saline. A loading dose of ketamine (0.2 mg/kg was followed-by an infusion (0.2 mg/kg/h until the delivery of the neonate. Similar volume of saline was infused in the placebo-group. Intramuscular meperidine was the rescue analgesic in both groups. The pain score, hemodynamic parameters of mother and fetus and the anticipated side-effects of ketamine were observed for. The newborn was assessed by the Neonatologist. Results: The pain score showed a decreasing trend in the ketamine group and after the 1 st h more than 60% of women in the ketamine group had pain relief, which was statistically significant. There was no significant clinical change in the maternal hemodynamics and fetal heart rate. However, 17 (48.5% of them had transient light headedness in the ketamine group. All the neonates were breast fed and the umbilical cord blood pH was between 7.1 and 7.2. The overall satisfaction was significantly high in the intervention group (P = 0.028. Conclusion: A low-dose ketamine infusion (loading dose of 0.2 mg/kg delivered over 30 min, followed-by an infusion at 0.2 mg/kg/h could provide acceptable analgesia during labor and delivery.

  19. Electronic brachytherapy for superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma: a report of two prospective pilot trials using different doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Ballester-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is a very common cancer in the Caucasian population. Treatment aims to eradicate the tumor with the lowest possible functional and aesthetic impact. Electronic brachytherapy (EBT is a treatment technique currently emerging. This study aims to show the outcomes of two consecutive prospective pilot clinical trials using different radiation doses of EBT with Esteya® EB system for the treatment of superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma. Material and methods : Two prospective, single-center, non-randomized, pilot studies were conducted. Twenty patients were treated in each study with different doses. The first group (1 was treated with 36.6 Gy in 6 fractions of 6.1 Gy, and the second group (2 with 42 Gy in 6 fractions of 7 Gy. Cure rate, acute toxicity, and late toxicity related to cosmesis were analyzed in the two treatment groups. Results: In group 1, a complete response in 90% of cases was observed at the first year of follow-up, whereas in group 2, the complete response was 95%. The differences with reference to acute toxicity and the cosmetic results between the two treatment groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions : Our initial experience with Esteya® EB system to treat superficial and nodular BCC shows that a dose of 36.6 Gy and 42 Gy delivered in 6 fraction of 7 Gy achieves a 90% and 95% clinical cure rate at 1 year, respectively. Both groups had a tolerable toxicity and a very good cosmesis. The role of EBT in the treatment of BCC is still to be defined. It will probably become an established option for selected patients in the near future.

  20. Pretreatment serum human chorionic gonadotropin cutoff value for medical treatment success with single-dose and multi-dose regimen of methotrexate in tubal ectopic pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhwan; Jung, Young Mi; Lee, Da Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate individual pretreatment serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cutoff value for medical treatment success with single-dose and multi-dose regimen of methotrexate in tubal ectopic pregnancy. Methods Eighty-five women who received methotrexate for the treatment of tubal ectopic pregnancy during 2003 to 2015 were selected. Fifty-three women received a single-dose regimen and 32 women received a multi-dose regimen. Medical treatment failure was defined as necessity of surgical treatment. The medical treatment success rate was estimated in both regimens and the pretreatment serum hCG titer to predict the success was assessed by receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. Results Pretreatment clinical and laboratory parameters were similar between group of single-dose regimen and multi-dose regimen. Treatment success rate was 64.2% in the single-dose regimen group and 71.9% in the multi-dose regimen group (P>0.05). Pretreatment serum hCG titer was an independent prognostic factor for treatment success in each regimen. Serum hCG cutoff value to predict the treatment success was 3,026 IU/L in single-dose regimen group and 3,711 IU/L in multi-dose regimen group. Conclusion We recommend use of single-dose regimen when pretreatment serum hCG <3,026 IU/L but multi-dose regimen may be favored when initial serum hCG level between 3,026 and 3,711 IU/L. PMID:28217676

  1. Mean Organ Doses Resulting From Non-Human Primate Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation Prescribed to Mid-Line Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Charlotte; Kazi, Abdul; Bennett, Alexander; MacVittie, Thomas; Prado, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Multi-organ dose evaluations and the effects of heterogeneous tissue dose calculations have been retrospectively evaluated following irradiation to the whole thorax and lung in non-human primates (NHP). A clinical-based approach was established to evaluate actual doses received in the heart and lungs during whole thorax lung irradiation. Anatomical structure and organ densities have been introduced in the calculations to show the effects of dose distribution through heterogeneous tissue. Mean organ doses received by non-human primates undergoing whole thorax lung irradiations were calculated using a treatment planning system that is routinely used in clinical radiation oncology. The doses received by non-human primates irradiated following conventional dose calculations have been retrospectively reconstructed using computerized tomography-based, heterogeneity-corrected dose calculations. The use of dose volume descriptors for irradiation to organs at risk and tissue exposed to radiation is introduced. Mean and partial-volume doses to lung and heart are presented and contrasted. The importance of exact dose definitions is highlighted, and the relevance of precise dosimetry to establish organ-specific dose response relationships in NHP models of acute and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure is emphasized.

  2. Single-dose liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome® for the treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis in East Africa: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Peter G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AmBisome® is an efficacious, safe anti-leishmanial treatment. There is growing interest in its use, either as a single dose or in combination treatments. In East Africa, the minimum optimal single-dosage has not been identified. Methods/Design An open-label, 2-arm, non-inferiority, multi-centre randomised controlled trial is being conducted to determine the optimal single-dose treatment with AmBisome®. Patients in the single-dose arm will receive one infusion on day 1, at a dose depending on body weight. For the first group of patients entered to the trial, the dose will be 7.5 mg/kg, but if this dose is found to be ineffective then in subsequent patient series the dose will be escalated progressively to 10, 12.5 and 15 mg/kg. Patients in the reference arm will receive a multi-dose regimen of AmBisome® (3 mg/kg/day on days 1-5, 14 and 21: total dose 21 mg/kg. Patients will be hospitalised for approximately one month after the start of treatment and then followed up at three and six months. The primary endpoint is the status of patients six months after treatment. A secondary endpoint is assessment at day 30. Treatment success is determined as the absence of parasites on microscopy samples taken from bone marrow, lymph node or splenic aspirates. Interim analyses to assess the comparative efficacy of the single dose are planned after recruitment of 20 and 40 patients per arm. The final non-inferiority analysis will include 120 patients per arm, to determine if the single-dose efficacy 6 months after treatment is not more than 10% inferior to the multi-dose. Discussion An effective, safe single-dose treatment would reduce hospitalization and treatment costs. Results will inform the design of combination treatment studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00832208

  3. Randomized comparison of low-dose versus high-dose interferon-alfa in chronic myeloid leukemia: prospective collaboration of 3 joint trials by the MRC and HOVON groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Buck, Georgina; le Cessie, Saskia; Richards, Sue; Beverloo, H Berna; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Littlewood, Tim; Muus, Petra; Bareford, David; van der Lelie, Hans; Green, Anthony R; Roozendaal, Klaas J; Milne, Alison E; Chapman, Claire S; Shepherd, Patricia

    2004-06-15

    The optimal dose of interferon-alfa (IFN) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. Retrospective analyses suggest that low doses are as effective as high doses, with less toxicity and fewer patients abandoning the drug. The Dutch Hemato-Oncology Association (HOVON) and British Medical Research Council (MRC) cooperative groups jointly performed randomized trials in newly diagnosed CML patients, comparing high-dose IFN (5 MIU/m(2) daily) with low-dose (3 MIU, 5 times a week). Both arms allowed additional hydroxyurea to keep the white blood cell count lower than 5 x 10(9)/L. Quality of life data were collected in a subset of patients. Between 1993 and 2001, 407 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 53 months, there were no significant differences in overall survival (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.46), progression-free survival, and complete hematologic or major cytogenetic responses. Fewer patients in the low-dose group abandoned IFN for reasons other than transplant or progressive disease (P =.002, 58% vs 72% at 5 years). Quality of life data showed comparable results in both arms for most factors. There is no evidence of benefit for high-dose IFN compared with low-dose for the treatment of CML. Therefore, when IFN is combined with other drugs, low-dose IFN is advised, to minimize toxicity and costs.

  4. Phase II/III trial of etoposide and high-dose ifosfamide in newly diagnosed metastatic osteosarcoma: a pediatric oncology group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorin, Allen M; Harris, Michael B; Bernstein, Mark; Ferguson, William; Devidas, Meenakshi; Siegal, Gene P; Gebhardt, Mark C; Schwartz, Cindy L; Link, Michael; Grier, Holcombe E

    2002-01-15

    The objectives of this trial were to estimate the response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival of patients who received therapy with etoposide and high-dose ifosfamide, and to define the toxicity of this combination when provided with standard chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic osteosarcoma. Eligible patients received infusions of 100 mg/m(2) per day of etoposide and 3.5 g/m(2) per day of ifosfamide for 5 days. Therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was begun on day 6. This was repeated 3 weeks after therapy was begun. Response was determined at week 6 by both standard World Health Organization response criteria and by pathologic determination of tumor necrosis of the primary tumor. Forty-three patients were registered; 39 were assessable for response and 41 for toxicity and survival. Twenty-eight (68%) of 41 had metastatic sites only in the lung; 12 (29%) had metastatic sites in other bones with or without lung involvement. Four patients (10%) experienced complete response, and 19 patients (49%) experienced partial response, for an overall response rate of 59% +/- 8%. The projected 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) for the 28 patients with metastases to lungs was 39% +/- 11%. The projected 2-year PFS for the 12 patients with metastases to other bones (with or without pulmonary metastases) was 58% +/- 17%. Two patients died as a result of therapy toxicity. Eighty-three percent of patients had grade 4 neutropenia, and 29% had grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Ten patients (24%) had sepsis. Fanconi's syndrome was observed in five patients. The combination of etoposide and high-dose ifosfamide is effective induction chemotherapy for patients with metastatic osteosarcoma, despite significant associated myelosuppression sometimes complicated by infection and renal toxicity.

  5. Probabilistic assessment of the influence of lake properties in long-term radiation doses to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, Jari; Turunen, Jari; Lipping, Tarmo; Ikonen, Ari T K

    2016-11-01

    The assessment processes concerning the safety of nuclear waste repositories include the modelling of radionuclide transport in biosphere and the evaluation of the doses to the most affected humans. In this paper, a scenario, in which a contaminated lake is the water source for drinking water, irrigation water and watering of livestock, is presented. The objective of the paper is to probabilistically study the influence of lake properties as parameters in the assessment scenario. The properties of the lake are a result of previously conducted probabilistic studies, where the land uplift of the terrain surrounding the repositories and the formation of water bodies were studied in a 10,000-year time span using Monte Carlo simulation. The lake is formed at 3000 years from present day and the changing properties of the lake have been used in the study. The studied radionuclides (36)Cl, (135)Cs, (129)I, (237)Np, (90)Sr, (99)Tc and (238)U enter the lake with a rate of 1 Bq/year. The transport process from the lake water to humans is described and the doses (dose conversion factors) to adult humans are evaluated based on a study on average food consumption. Sensitivity analysis is used for identifying the parameters having the most influence on the outcome of the dose. Based on the results from the sensitivity analysis, the volumetric outflow rate of the lake and the volume of the lake were taken into closer consideration. The results show the influence of probabilistically derived geomorphic lake input parameters on the dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole Animal Experiments Should Be More Like Human Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The quality of reporting of animal studies lags behind that of human randomized controlled trials but a series of additions to the ARRIVE guidelines will help ensure that the standards are comparable.

  7. Beyond the dose-limiting toxicity period: Dermatologic adverse events of patients on phase 1 trials of the Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilon, Alexander; Eaton, Anne A; Schindler, Katja; Gounder, Mrinal M; Spriggs, David R; Harris, Pamela; Ivy, S Percy; Iasonos, Alexia; Lacouture, Mario E; Hyman, David M

    2016-04-15

    Dermatologic adverse events (AEs) can be key determinants of overall drug tolerability and of the maximum tolerated and recommended phase 2 doses in phase 1 trials. The authors present the largest dedicated analysis of dermatologic AEs on phase 1 trials to date. Data from a prospectively maintained database of patients with solid tumors who were enrolled onto Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored phase 1 trials of cytotoxic or molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) from 2000 to 2010 were analyzed. Cumulative incidence, site, and type of drug-related dermatologic AEs were described and compared. The timing of worst drug-related dermatologic AEs was summarized. In total, 3517 patients with solid tumors and 6165 unique, drug-related dermatologic AEs were analyzed, including 1545 patients on MTA-only trials, 671 on cytotoxic-only trials, and 1392 on combination MTA and cytotoxic trials. Of 1270 patients who had drug-related dermatologic events, the timing of the worst AE was as follows: 743 (cycle 1), 303 (cycle 2), and 224 (cycle 3 or later). Although the cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 drug-related AEs increased to 2.4% by cycle 6, it was only 1.6% at the end of cycle 1. The cumulative incidence of drug-related AEs was highest in patients who received MTA-only therapy (P dermatologic AEs occur after the traditional dose-limiting toxicity monitoring period of phase 1 clinical trials. Future designs should account for late toxicities. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  8. Bioactivity, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity assays in preclinical and clinical trials for recombinant human endostatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bi HU; Hao-wen ZHU; Li-ping ZHU; Chen LI; Zhi-gang RONG; Jia-ming XU; Zhi-wei WU; Jian-jun WANG; Gen-xing XU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine the in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin) and to analyze its pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys and patients. Methods: The physical chemical characteristics of rhEndostatin were detected according to Pharmacopoeia of the People's Republic of China (2005 edition, part Ⅲ). Its in vitro and in vivo bioactivities were assayed via proliferation-inhibition on human umbilical vein endothelial cells and their inhibitory effect on tumor-bearing mice models. Serum concentrations of rhEndostatin in monkeys and patients were determined by an enzyme immunoassay method. Results: The corresponding specific in vitro activities of rhEndostatin obtained from the cell counting method, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and lactate dehydrogenase assay, respectively, were 6.4×107, 6.7×107, and 3.8×108 U/mg, and the in vivo antitumoral potency was 4.04×107 U/mg. In rhesus monkeys, there were no gender differences in all pharmacokinetic parameters. Serum anti-rhEndostatin immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies were generated quickly after intravenous (iv) administration and decreased rapidly when therapy was stopped. In phase Ⅰ clinical trials, linearity in the pharmacokinetics of rhEndostatin was indicated by dose-proportionate increases in the area under the curve and the maximum serum concentration. Serum rhEndostatin reached a steady-state level after 7 d of successive administration with the average concentration at a steady state of 272.44±91.98 ng/mL. Neither IgG nor IgM antibodies against rhEndostatin were observed in patients. Conclusion: RhEndostatin exhibited a definite proliferation-inhibition effect on HUVEC, and significant antitumoral activity in mice. The immunoreactivity of rhesus monkeys to rhEndostatin is common, and rhEn-dostatin showed no immunogenicity in patients in this trial. The results provide a basis for further clinical trials.

  9. Long-term dose measurements applying a human anthropomorphic phantom onboard an aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, T. [DLR-German Aerospace Center, Institute for Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology, Linder Hoehe, DE-51147 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: thomas.berger@dlr.de; Meier, M.; Reitz, G. [DLR-German Aerospace Center, Institute for Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology, Linder Hoehe, DE-51147 Cologne (Germany); Schridde, M. [Lufthansa Cargo AG, DE-65441 Kelsterbach (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    The exposure of aircrew personnel to cosmic radiation has been considered as occupational exposure in the European Union since the European Council Directive 96/26/EURATOM became effective on 13th May 1996. In Germany the corresponding safety standards for aircrew are regulated by the German Radiation Protection Ordinance, which implemented the European law in 2001. The radiation exposure of the flight crew of the LUFTHANSA group is calculated by the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine in Cologne, applying the calculation program EPCARD in the framework of the aircrew dose determination system CALculated and Verified Aviation DOSimetry (CALVADOS). Besides the operational dose calculations, DLR performs measurements at airflight altitudes using active (e.g. TEPC, DOSTEL, etc.) and passive (Thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs), bubble detectors) radiation detectors to verify the calculation codes. Within these activities the project BOdy DOsimetry (BODO) comprised a long-term exposure of a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom to measure the skin and the depth dose distribution inside a human torso applying TLDs at aviation altitudes for the first time. The torso was flown onboard a LUFTHANSA Cargo aircraft for 3 months from mid of July to mid of October 2004. Over 800 TLDs were positioned for depth dose measurements in the head, the thorax and the abdomen of the torso. In addition dosemeter packages have been distributed on the surface of the torso to measure the skin dose as well as in the transport container and on the flight deck.

  10. Dose Assessment using Chromosome Aberration Analyses in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The healthy five donors were recruited to establish the dose-response calibration curve for chromosomal aberrations by ionizing radiation exposure. Our cytogenetic results revealed that the mean frequency of chromosome aberration increased with increasing radiation dose. In this study, dicentric assay and CBMN assay were compared considering the sensitivity and accuracy of dose estimation. Therefore, these chromosome aberration analyses will be the foundation for biological dosimetric analysis with additional research methods such as translocation and PCC assay. The conventional analysis of dicentric chromosomes in HPBL was suggested by Bender and Gooch in 1962. This assay has been for many years, the golden standard and the most specific method for ionizing radiation damage. The dicentric assay technique in HPBL has been shown as the most sensitive biological method and reliable bio-indicator of quantifying the radiation dose. In contrast, the micronucleus assay has advantages over the dicentric assay since it is rapid and requires less specialized expertise, and accordingly it can be applied to monitor a big population. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a suitable method for micronuceli measurement in cultured human as well as mammalian cells. The aim of our study was to establish the dose response curve of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in HPBL by analyzing the frequency of dicentrics and micronuclei.

  11. Flexibility of oral cholera vaccine dosing-a randomized controlled trial measuring immune responses following alternative vaccination schedules in a cholera hyper-endemic zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kanungo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bivalent killed whole cell oral cholera vaccine has been found to be safe and efficacious for five years in the cholera endemic setting of Kolkata, India, when given in a two dose schedule, two weeks apart. A randomized controlled trial revealed that the immune response was not significantly increased following the second dose compared to that after the first dose. We aimed to evaluate the impact of an extended four week dosing schedule on vibriocidal response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this double blind randomized controlled non-inferiority trial, 356 Indian, non-pregnant residents aged 1 year or older were randomized to receive two doses of oral cholera vaccine at 14 and 28 day intervals. We compared vibriocidal immune responses between these schedules. Among adults, no significant differences were noted when comparing the rates of seroconversion for V. cholerae O1 Inaba following two dose regimens administered at a 14 day interval (55% vs the 28 day interval (58%. Similarly, no differences in seroconversion were demonstrated in children comparing the 14 (80% and 28 day intervals (77%. Following 14 and 28 day dosing intervals, vibriocidal response rates against V. cholerae O1 Ogawa were 45% and 49% in adults and 73% and 72% in children respectively. Responses were lower for V. cholerae O139, but similar between dosing schedules for adults (20%, 20% and children (28%, 20%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Comparable immune responses and safety profiles between the two dosing schedules support the option for increased flexibility of current OCV dosing. Further operational research using a longer dosing regimen will provide answers to improve implementation and delivery of cholera vaccination in endemic and epidemic outbreak scenarios.

  12. Impact of dose on the bioavailability of coffee chlorogenic acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmach, Angélique; Williamson, Gary; Crozier, Alan

    2014-08-01

    Single servings of coffee beverage containing low (412 μmol), medium (635 μmol) and high (795 μmol) amounts of chlorogenic acids were administered to eleven healthy volunteers in a double-blind randomised controlled trial. Analysis of plasma and urine collected for 24 h revealed the presence of 12 metabolites in plasma and 16 metabolites in urine, principally in the form of sulphates, and to a lesser extent glucuronides of caffeic, ferulic, dihydrocaffeic and dihydroferulic acids, as well as intact feruloylquinic and caffeoylquinic acids, and sulphated caffeoylquinic acid lactones. Median values of peak plasma concentrations after increasing doses of chlorogenic acids were 1088, 1526 and 1352 nM. In urine the median amounts of metabolites excreted after 24 h following consumption of the three coffees were 101, 160 and 125 μmol, accounting for 24%, 25% and 16% of the doses ingested. Peak plasma concentration and urinary excretion values showed trends towards a reduced bioavailability of chlorogenic acids associated with the highest dose ingested, when expressed as percentages of intake. Potential biomarkers of coffee intake were identified as feruloylquinic acids and sulphated caffeoylquinic acid lactones in plasma and urine with positive moderate to strong coefficients of determination for peak plasma concentrations (0.60-0.81) and amounts excreted in urine (0.36-0.73) (P < 0.05).

  13. Effect of graded doses of ionizing radiation on the human testis. [X rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, M J; Leach, D R; Warner, G A; Heller, C G

    1974-01-01

    Sixty-seven human subjects with normal testicular function were subjected to acute testicular irradiation in doses ranging from 8R to 600 R. Post irradiation observations included sperm counts and morphology, and radioimmunoassays for levels of reproductive steroids and hormones in urine (later plasma). Preliminary results and irradiation procedures are tabulated. An overview and analysis of results to date is published in a separate communication. (ERB)

  14. Bupivacaine in microcapsules prolongs analgesia after subcutaneous infiltration in humans: a dose-finding study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Juri L; Lillesø, Jesper; Hammer, Niels A;

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined the onset and duration of local analgesic effects of bupivacaine incorporated into biodegradable microcapsules (extended-duration local anesthetic; EDLA) administered as subcutaneous infiltrations in different doses in humans. In 18 volunteers, the skin on the medial calf...... concentrations were evaluated. No serious side effects were observed for up to 6 mo after administration. In conclusion, bupivacaine incorporated in microcapsules provided analgesia for 96 h after subcutaneous infiltration....

  15. Impact of a daily exercise dose on knee joint cartilage – a systematic review and meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials in healthy animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bricca, Alessio; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Grodzinsky AJ, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of a daily exercise dose on cartilage composition and thickness, by conducting a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving healthy animals. Methods A narrative synthesis of the effect of a daily exercise dose on knee cartilage aggrecan......, collagen and thickness was performed. A subset of studies reporting sufficient data was combined in meta-analysis using a random-effects model. Meta-regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of covariates. Results Twenty-nine RCTs, involving 64 comparisons, were included. In the low dose...... composition in healthy animals....

  16. Dose response of multiple parameters for calyculin A-induced premature chromosome condensation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue; Zhao, Hua; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Many studies have investigated exposure biomarkers for high dose radiation. However, no systematic study on which biomarkers can be used in dose estimation through premature chromosome condensation (PCC) analysis has been conducted. The present study aims to screen the high-dose radiation exposure indicator in calyculin A-induced PCC. The dose response of multiple biological endpoints, including G2/A-PCC (G2/M and M/A-PCC) index, PCC ring (PCC-R), ratio of the longest/shortest length (L/L ratio), and length and width ratio of the longest chromosome (L/B ratio), were investigated in calyculin A-induced G2/A-PCC spreads in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to 0-20Gy (dose-rate of 1Gy/min) cobalt-60 gamma-rays. The G2/A-PCC index was decreased with enhanced absorbed doses of 4-20Gy gamma-rays. The G2/A PCC-R at 0-12Gy gamma-rays conformed to Poisson distribution. Three types of PCC-R were scored according to their shape and their solidity or hollowness. The frequencies of hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including or excluding solid ring in G2/A-PCC spreads were enhanced with increased doses. The length and width of the longest chromosome, as well as the length of the shortest chromosome in each G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread, were measured. All L/L or L/B ratios in G2/M-PCC or M/A-PCC spread increased with enhanced doses. A blind test with two new irradiated doses was conducted to validate which biomarker could be used in dose estimation. Results showed that hollow PCC-R and PCC-R including solid ring can be utilized for accurate dose estimation, and that hollow PCC-R was optimal for practical application.

  17. Shortening Infusion Time for High-Dose Methotrexate Alters Antileukemic Effects: A Randomized Prospective Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Torben S.; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Yinmei; Boyett, James M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Panetta, John C.; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether shortening the infusion duration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX; 1 g/m2) affects the in vivo accumulation of active methotrexate polyglutamates (MTXPG1-7) in leukemia cells and whether this differs among major acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subtypes. Methods From June 2000 through October 2007, 356 children with ALL were randomly assigned to receive initial single-agent treatment with HDMTX (1 g/m2) as either a 24-hour infusion or a 4-hour infusion at two pediatric hospitals in the United States. The primary outcome measures were the accumulation of MTXPG1-7 in leukemia cells and the antileukemic effects (eg, inhibition of de novo purine synthesis in bone marrow ALL cells, and decrease in circulating ALL cells). Results The 24-hour infusion resulted in significantly higher amounts of MTXPG1-7 in bone marrow leukemia cells (median: 1,695 v 1,150 pmol/109 cells, P = .0059), and better antileukemic effects. The 24-hour infusion had the greatest effect on MTXPG1-7 accumulation in hyperdiploid ALL (median: 3,919 v 2,417 pmol/109 cells, P = .0038); T-cell ALL exhibited smaller differences in MTXPG1-7 but greater antileukemic effects with the longer infusion (median decrease in leukemia cells: 88.4% v 51.8%, P = .0075). In contrast, infusion duration had no significant impact on MTXPG1-7 accumulation or antileukemic effects in ALL with the t(12;21)/(ETV6-RUNX1) chromosomal translocation. Conclusion Shortening the infusion time of HDMTX reduces accumulation of active methotrexate in leukemia cells and decreases antileukemic effects, with differing consequences among major ALL subtypes. PMID:21444869

  18. Lansoprazole induces sensitivity to suboptimal doses of paclitaxel in human melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarito, Tommaso; Venturi, Giulietta; Cesolini, Albino; Fais, Stefano

    2015-01-28

    Tumor acidity is now considered an important determinant of drug-resistance and tumor progression, and anti-acidic approaches, such as Proton Pump inhibitors (PPIs), have demonstrated promising antitumor and chemo-sensitizing efficacy. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the possible PPI-induced sensitization of human melanoma cells to Paclitaxel (PTX). Our results show that PTX and the PPI Lansoprazole (LAN) combination was extremely efficient against metastatic melanoma cells, as compared to the single treatments, both in vitro and in vivo. We also showed that acidity plays an important role on the anti-tumor activity of these drugs, being detrimental for PTX activity, while crucial for the synergistic effect of PTX following pretreatment with LAN, due to its nature of pro-drug needing protonation for a full activation. We obtained straightforward results in a human melanoma xenograft model combining well tolerated LAN doses with suboptimal and poorly toxic doses of PTX. With this study we provide a clear evidence that the PPI LAN may be included in new combined therapy of human melanoma together with low doses of PTX.

  19. Single-dose versus multiple-dose ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole prophylaxis in transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhoobin Heidari Bateni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate and compare the infectious and non-infectious complications of single-dose versus multiple-dose antibiotic therapy for trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study that was designed to investigate the effects of single-dose versus multiple-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis regimen mainly on asymptomatic bacteriuria, urinary tract infection (UTI without fever, fever and urinary septicemia. The single-dose group received one ciprofloxacin 500 mg tablet and two metronidazole 250 mg tablets at 2 hours before the biopsy, while the multiple-doses group received those every 12 hours from 3 days before the biopsy. One-hundred and sixty patients were evaluated in two groups and bacteriuria in urinalysis was encountered in 12 patients (15% in the single-dose group and four patients (5% in the multiple-dose group, with a significant difference (P=0.035. UTI without fever occurred in six patients (7.5% in the single-dose group and one patient (1.25% in the multiple-dose group, with no significant difference (borderline P=0.053. After biopsy, three patients (3.75% returned with fever due to UTI and bacteremia in the single-dose group and none in the multiple-dose group, but with no significant difference (P=0.08. Regarding non-infectious complications, there were no significant differences between the two groups. Using prophylactic antibiotics for prostate biopsy in multiple doses, and at least 3 days before the procedure significantly reduces the rate of bacteriuria compared with a single-dose regimen.

  20. Antibiotics for human toxoplasmosis: a systematic review of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Chrishan Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Deepika Fernando, Sumadhya

    2013-06-01

    The efficacy of different treatment regimens in clinical syndromes of toxoplasmosis were assessed by conducting a systematic review of published randomized clinical trials through extensive searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS with no date limits, as well as manual review of journals. Outcome measures varied depending on the clinical entity of toxoplasmosis. Risk of bias was evaluated and quality of evidence was graded. Fourteen randomized trials were included of which one was a non-comparative study. One well-designed trial showed that trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole was more effective than placebo for clinical recovery of toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy in immunocompetent hosts. For toxoplasmic encephalopathy, efficacy of pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine and trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole were similar, whereas pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine versus pyrimathamine+clindamycin showed no difference, irrespective of the outcome. Intravitreal clindamycin+dexamethasone and conventional treatment with oral pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine had similar efficacy with regard to all outcome measures in ocular toxoplasmosis, and intravitreal therapy was found to be safe. Adverse effects seemed more common with pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine. Most trials for encephalitis and ocular manifestations had a high risk of bias and were of poor methodological quality. There were no trials evaluating drugs for toxoplasmosis in pregnancy, or for congenital toxoplasmosis. Pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine is an effective therapy for treatment of toxoplasmic encephalitis; trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole and pyrimethamine+clindamycin are possible alternatives. Treatment with either oral or intravitreal antibiotics seems reasonable for ocular toxoplasmosis. Overall, trial evidence for the efficacy of these drugs for toxoplasmosis is poor, and further well-designed trials are needed.

  1. Antibiotics for human toxoplasmosis: a systematic review of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Chrishan Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Deepika Fernando, Sumadhya

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of different treatment regimens in clinical syndromes of toxoplasmosis were assessed by conducting a systematic review of published randomized clinical trials through extensive searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS with no date limits, as well as manual review of journals. Outcome measures varied depending on the clinical entity of toxoplasmosis. Risk of bias was evaluated and quality of evidence was graded. Fourteen randomized trials were included of which one was a non-comparative study. One well-designed trial showed that trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole was more effective than placebo for clinical recovery of toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy in immunocompetent hosts. For toxoplasmic encephalopathy, efficacy of pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine and trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole were similar, whereas pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine versus pyrimathamine+clindamycin showed no difference, irrespective of the outcome. Intravitreal clindamycin+dexamethasone and conventional treatment with oral pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine had similar efficacy with regard to all outcome measures in ocular toxoplasmosis, and intravitreal therapy was found to be safe. Adverse effects seemed more common with pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine. Most trials for encephalitis and ocular manifestations had a high risk of bias and were of poor methodological quality. There were no trials evaluating drugs for toxoplasmosis in pregnancy, or for congenital toxoplasmosis. Pyrimethamine+sulphadiazine is an effective therapy for treatment of toxoplasmic encephalitis; trimethoprim+sulphamethoxazole and pyrimethamine+clindamycin are possible alternatives. Treatment with either oral or intravitreal antibiotics seems reasonable for ocular toxoplasmosis. Overall, trial evidence for the efficacy of these drugs for toxoplasmosis is poor, and further well-designed trials are needed. PMID:23816507

  2. Low doses of mirtazapine or quetiapine for transient insomnia : A randomised, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsten, Julie; Hagenauw, Loes A.; Kamphuis, Jeanine; Lancel, Marike

    Low doses of the antidepressant mirtazapine or the neuroleptic quetiapine are often prescribed off-label for insomnia. However, studies on the effects on sleep and hangover effects the following day are scarce. In this randomised, double-blind, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial, the influence of

  3. High-Dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Stem-Cell Support As Adjuvant Therapy in Breast Cancer : Overview of 15 Randomized Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berry, Donald A.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Johnson, Marcella M.; Lei, Xiudong; Caputo, Jean; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Peters, William P.; Leonard, Robert C.; Barlow, William E.; Tallman, Martin S.; Bergh, Jonas; Nitz, Ulrike A.; Gianni, Alessandro M.; Basser, Russell L.; Zander, Axel R.; Coombes, R. Charles; Roche, Henri; Tokuda, Yutaka; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Crown, John P.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Bregni, Marco; Demirer, Taner

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (AHST) for high-risk primary breast cancer has not been shown to prolong survival. Individual trials have had limited power to show overall benefit or benefits within subsets. Methods We assembled

  4. DUAL ION EXPOSURE VS. SPLIT-DOSE EXPOSURES IN HUMAN CELL NEOPLASTIC TRANSFORMATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENNETT, P.V.; CUTTER, N.C.; SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2006-06-05

    Since radiation fields of space contain many-fold more protons than high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles, cells in astronaut crews will experience on average several proton hits before an HZE hit. Thus radiation regimes of proton exposure before HZE particle exposure simulate space radiation exposure, and measurement of the frequency of neoplastic transformation of human primary cells to anchorage-independent growth simulates in initial step in cancer induction. Previously our group found that exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n protons followed within about 1 hr by a HZE ion (20 cGy 1 GeV/n Fe or Ti ions) hit gave about a 3-fold increase in transformation frequency ([1]). To provide insight into the H-HZE induced increased transformation frequencies, we asked if split doses of the same ion gave similar increased transformation frequencies. However, the data show that the split dose of 20 cGy plus 20 cGy of either H or HZE ions gave about the same effect as the 40 cGy uninterrupted dose, quite different from the effect of the mixed ion H + HZE irradiation. We also asked if lower proton doses than 20 cGy followed 15 minutes later by 20 cGy of HZE ions gave greater than additive transformation frequencies. Substantial increases in transformation levels were observed for all proton doses tested, including 1 cGy. These results point to the signal importance of protons in affecting the effect of space radiation on human cells.

  5. A kinematic model to estimate effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, S.; Yamada, T.

    2013-05-01

    The great earthquake occurred in the north-east area in Japan in March 11, 2011. Facility system to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was completely destroyed by the following giant tsunami. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive substances had leaked and diffused in the vicinity of this station. Radiological internal exposure became a serious social issue both in Japan and all over the world. The present study provides an easily understandable, kinematic-based model to estimate the effective dose of radioactive substances in a human body by simplifying the complicated mechanism of metabolism. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has developed a sophisticated model, which is well-known as a standard method to calculate the effective dose for radiological protection. However, owing to that ICRP method is fine, it is rather difficult for non-professional people of radiology to gasp the whole images of the movement and the influences of radioactive substances in a human body. Therefore, in the present paper we propose a newly-derived and easily-understandable model to estimate the effective dose. The present method is very similar with the traditional and conventional tank model in hydrology. Ingestion flux of radioactive substances corresponds to rain intensity and the storage of radioactive substances to the water storage in a basin in runoff analysis. The key of the present method is to estimate the energy radiated in the radioactive nuclear disintegration of an atom by using classical theory of β decay and special relativity for various kinds of radioactive atoms. The parameters used in this model are only physical half-time and biological half-time, and there are no operational parameters or coefficients to adjust our theoretical runoff to ICRP. Figure shows the time-varying effective dose with ingestion duration, and we can confirm the validity of our model. The time-varying effective dose with

  6. Two different doses of supplemental vitamin A did not affect mortality of normal-birth-weight neonates in Guinea-Bissau in a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Diness, Birgitte R; Balde, Ibraima

    2014-01-01

    Whether neonatal vitamin A supplementation (NVAS) should be policy in areas with vitamin A deficiency is debated. We observed that a smaller dose of vitamin A may decrease mortality more than a larger dose and conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Guinea-Bissau with th......Whether neonatal vitamin A supplementation (NVAS) should be policy in areas with vitamin A deficiency is debated. We observed that a smaller dose of vitamin A may decrease mortality more than a larger dose and conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Guinea......-Bissau with the primary aim of comparing the effect of 50,000 with 25,000 IU neonatal vitamin A on infant mortality. The secondary aim was to study the effect of NVAS vs. placebo, including a combined analysis of NVAS trials. Between 2004 and 2007, normal-birth-weight neonates were randomly assigned in a 1:1:1 ratio...... to be administered 2 different doses of vitamin A (50,000 or 25,000 IU) or placebo. Infant mortality rates (MRs) were compared in Cox models providing MR ratios (MRRs). Among 6048 children enrolled, there were 160 deaths in 4125 person-years (MR = 39/1000). There was no difference in mortality between the 2 dosage...

  7. Benefits of Fixed Dose Combination of Ramipril/Amlodipine in Hypertensive Diabetic Patients: A Subgroup Analysis of RAMONA Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabor Simonyi

    2016-01-01

    Background:Combination ofangiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium channel blockers has been successfully used in the antihypertensive therapy for many years.Fixed dose combinations of ramipril/amlodipine have a benefit effect for patients to achieve target blood pressure (BP).This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of fixed dose combinations of ramipril and amlodipine (EgiramlonR) in hypertensive diabetic patients.Methods:Hypertensive diabetic patients who were enrolled into the RAMONA trial were included in this open,prospective,Phase Ⅳ observational clinical study.Patients had mild-to-moderate hypertension and failed to reach target BP levels through their previous therapy.During the four months of observation,patients took part in three visits (1 st day =visit 1,1st month =visit 2,and 4th month =visit 3) where they received a fixed dose combination of 5/5,5/10,10/5,or 10/10 mg ramipril/amlodipine,respectively,with the possibly required dose titrations,based on the decision of their attending physician.Target BP for diabetic patients was < 140/85 mmHg.BP levels were measured in all visits,by taking two readings at 2-min interval.Laboratory tests including full blood count,renal function test,electrolytes,blood glucose,serum cholesterol,uric acid,triglycerides,liver function test,creatinine kinase,and midstream urinalysis were performed at visit 1 and visit 3.Results:The 6423 patients completed the study.Among these patients,1276 (19.9%) patients suffered from type 2 diabetes mellitus.The mean age of these diabetic patients was 64.2 ± 10.0 years;707 (55.4%) patients were males.Target BP was achieved by 891 (69.8%) of diabetic patients at visit 3 (primary endpoint).BP decreased from 157.5/91.3 ± 9.6/7.6 mmHg (visit 1) to 130.9/79.6 ± 7.4/5.8 mmHg (visit 3).As for the secondary endpoint of the study,total cholesterol decreased from 5.50 ± 1.13 mmol/L (visit 1) to 5.20 ± 0.95 mmol/L (P =0.000),low-density lipoprotein cholesterol

  8. New insights for identification of doping with recombinant human erythropoietin micro-doses after high hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Ashenden, M; Bejder, J; Hoffmann, M; Nordsborg, N; Karstoft, K; Morkeberg, J; Sharpe, K; Lasne, F; Marchand, A

    2016-11-01

    To minimize the chances of being caught after doping with recombinant human erythropoietins (rhEPO), athletes have turned to new practices using micro-doses and excess fluid ingestion to accelerate elimination and decrease the probability of detection. Our objective was to test the sensitivity of detection by validated methods (IEF: isoelectric focusing; SDS-PAGE: sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) when such practices are used. First, after a three-week rhEPO boost period and 10 days of wash out, detection of a single 900 IU micro-dose of Eprex® was evaluated in healthy male subjects. After an injection in the evening, urine and plasma samples were collected the following morning. Half of the subjects then drank a bolus of water and new samples were collected 80 min later. Interestingly, rhEPO was detected in 100% of the samples even after water ingestion. A second similar protocol was then performed with a single injection of a micro-dose of rhEPO (500 IU or 900 IU), without a prior rhEPO boost. In addition, urine and plasma samples were also collected 15 and 20 h post rhEPO administration. Once again drinking water did not affect the rate of detection. Urine appeared a better matrix to detect micro-doses after 10 h, enabling between 92% and 100% of identification at that time. The rate of identification decreased rapidly thereafter, in particular for the 500 IU micro-dose. However IEF analysis still resulted in 71% identification of rhEPO in urine after 20 h. These results could help to define a better strategy for controlling and identifying athletes using rhEPO micro-doses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Dose-dependent effects of endotoxin on neurobehavioral functions in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Sebastian Grigoleit

    Full Text Available Clinical and experimental evidence document that inflammation and increased peripheral cytokine levels are associated with depression-like symptoms and neuropsychological disturbances in humans. However, it remains unclear whether and to what extent cognitive functions like memory and attention are affected by and related to the dose of the inflammatory stimulus. Thus, in a cross-over, double-blind, experimental approach, healthy male volunteers were administered with either placebo or bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS at doses of 0.4 (n = 18 or 0.8 ng/kg of body weight (n = 16. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, norephinephrine and cortisol concentrations were analyzed before and 1, 1.75, 3, 4, 6, and 24 h after injection. In addition, changes in mood and anxiety levels were determined together with working memory (n-back task and long term memory performance (recall of emotional and neutral pictures of the International Affective Picture System. Endotoxin administration caused a profound transient physiological response with dose-related elevations in body temperature and heart rate, increases in plasma interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra, salivary and plasma cortisol, and plasma norepinephrine. These changes were accompanied by dose-related decreased mood and increased anxiety levels. LPS administration did not affect accuracy in working memory performance but improved reaction time in the high-dose LPS condition compared to the control conditon. In contrast, long-term memory performance was impaired selectively for emotional stimuli after administration of the lower but not of the higher dose of LPS. These data suggest the existence of at least two counter-acting mechanisms, one promoting and one inhibiting cognitive performance during acute systemic inflammation.

  10. Metered-dose inhaler ipratropium bromide in moderate acute asthma in children: A single-blinded randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Emma L; Borland, Meredith L; Doyle, Sarah K; Geelhoed, Gary C

    2015-02-01

    To determine if the addition of ipratropium bromide (IB) by metered-dose inhaler in moderate acute asthma in children affects hospital admission rates when compared with inhaled salbutamol and oral prednisolone alone. A prospective, single-blinded, randomised, controlled, equivalence trial in a tertiary paediatric emergency department. Patients aged 2-15 years with acute, moderate asthma were randomised to two groups, one receiving salbutamol, prednisolone and IB, the other receiving only salbutamol and prednisolone. The managing doctor was blinded to treatment. Admission rates were compared, and less than 15% difference was accepted as statistically equivalent. Recruitment ran from June 2007 until January 2011. Three hundred forty-seven subjects were analysed. The admission rate in the IB group was 70.1% (122/174) compared with 64.2% (111/173) in the non-IB group. The absolute difference of +5.9% (95% confidence interval -4.0% to 15.8%) is not statistically equivalent but does not show a statistically significant decrease in admission rates when IB was given. Adverse effects were more prevalent in the IB group, at 13.2% (23/174), compared with 4.6% (8/173) in the non-IB group, a relative risk of 2.86 (95% confidence interval 1.31-6.21). In children with acute asthma of moderate severity who are treated with adequate doses of salbutamol and prednisolone, the addition of IB is not significantly associated with a reduction in admission rates. There is a significantly higher rate of adverse effects if IB is given. IB should be reserved for children with severe asthma exacerbations. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. Circulating hormones and breast cancer risk in premenopausal women: a randomized trial of low-dose tamoxifen and fenretinide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Harriet; Bonanni, Bernardo; Gandini, Sara; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, Aliana; Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Serrano, Davide; Macis, Debora; Puccio, Antonella; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Gulisano, Marcella; Formelli, Franca; Decensi, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Tamoxifen and fenretinide have been extensively studied and exhibit breast cancer-preventing activity. We aimed to assess their effect on sex hormones, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and retinol, and their association with mammographic density (MD) and breast cancer events. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, premenopausal women at risk for breast cancer were randomized to tamoxifen 5 mg/day, fenretinide, both agents, or placebo for 2 years. We measured MD and circulating concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, androstenedione, dehydro-epiandrosteronesulfate, prolactin, SHBG, and retinol at baseline and on yearly intervals. The associations with breast cancer events were evaluated through competing risk and Cox regression survival models. Low-dose tamoxifen markedly and enduringly increased SHBG, whereas the increases in testosterone, estradiol, and prolactin and reduction in LH weakened after 1 year. Fenretinide increased testosterone and androstenedione and decreased retinol. MD correlated directly with SHBG and inversely with retinol. After a median follow-up of 12 years, the 10-year cumulative incidence of breast cancer events was 37 % in women with SHBG ≤ 59.3 nmol/L, 22 % in women with SHBG between 59.3 and 101 nmol/L, and 19 % in women with SHBG > 101 nmol/L (P = 0.018). The difference among SHBG tertiles remained statistically significant at multivariable analysis: HR = 2.26 (95 % CI 1.04, 4.89) for the lowest versus the highest tertile. We conclude that low-dose tamoxifen or fenretinide exhibits favorable hormonal profiles as single agents, further supporting their administration for prevention of breast cancer in premenopause. Notably, SHBG levels were inversely associated with breast neoplastic events.

  12. Enriched enrollment: definition and effects of enrichment and dose in trials of pregabalin and gabapentin in neuropathic pain. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Sebastian; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Enriched enrollment study designs have been suggested to be useful for proof of concept when only a proportion of the diseased population responds to a treatment intervention. We aim to investigate whether this really is the case in trials of pregabalin and gabapentin in neuropathic pain. We defined 'complete', 'partial' and 'non-enriched' enrollment, and examined pregabalin and gabapentin trials for the extent of enrichment and for effects of enrichment on efficacy and adverse event outcomes. There were no studies using complete enriched enrollment; seven trials used partial enriched enrollment and 14 non-enriched enrollment. In pregabalin trials the maximum extent of enrichment was estimated at about 12%. Partial enriched enrollment did not change estimates of efficacy or harm. Over 150-600 mg maximum daily dose there was strong dose dependence for pregabalin. A benefit of partial over non-enriched enrollment could not be demonstrated because the degree of enrichment was rather small, and possibly because enrichment produced little enhancement of treatment effect. Whether a greater degree of enrichment would result in important differences is unknown. Researchers reporting clinical trials with any enrichment must describe both process and extent of enrichment. As things stand, the effects of enriched enrollment remain unknown for neuropathic pain trials.

  13. DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR INTAKE OF TRITIATED WATER IN HUMANS: ROLE OF TRITIUM INCORPORATION IN ORGANIC MATTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Balonov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tritium is one of the factors of internal exposure of the humans both in occupational and public environments. It enters the body mainly as tritiated water through inhalation, with food, drinks and through the skin; part of tritium gradually transforms into the metabolised organically bound tritium as a result of biochemical reactions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate organically bound tritium contribution to the effective dose of an adult using the biokinetic model and real dosimetric data. The data of long term monitoring from 6 studies with 17 workers or volunteers following single intake of tritiated water in the body were selected from 9 publications (1968-1997. Three two-compartment models of tritium biokinetics were used in this study: recurrent model with gradual transformation of tritium from tritiated water into organically bound tritium and tritiated water excretion; model with instant transformation of tritium into organically bound tritium and tritiated water excretion; model with instant transformation of tritium into organically bound tritium and both tritiated water and organically bound tritium excretion (according to ICRP. The ICRP model doesn’t properly reflect the real tritiated water metabolism in the human body: second exponent of the tritiated water content in the body water and accumulation of the organically bound tritium fraction are absent. The organically bound tritium fraction composes 3% of tritiated water in ICRP model. It is significantly higher compared to two other models (0,4% and 0,8%. According to the first model the contribution of OBT fraction to the mean dose varied from 1,8 to 4,6% for individuals; mean value was 3,0 ± 0,9%. According to the second model the contribution of organically bound tritium fraction was slightly higher: 3,6 ± 1,1%, according to the ICRP model – 9%. The dynamic of excretion of tritium with urine can be described with double-exponential curves and provides the basis

  14. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: reducing the human chorionic gonadotropin trigger dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Sonya; Parker, Kasey; Cedars, Marcelle I; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2010-11-01

    This article reviews the biological plausibility and evidence for the use of a low triggering dose of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). A systematic search of the literature revealed very little published data for or against the use of low-dose hCG in the prevention of OHSS after assisted reproductive technology. We have had success at avoiding OHSS as a result of gentle stimulation and low-dose sliding scale hCG trigger based on estradiol (E₂) levels. We therefore present the biological plausibility for such an approach by reviewing the relationship between OHSS, vascular endothelial growth factor, and hCG; the physiology of hCG; the relationship between risk of OHSS and E₂ at trigger; and the physiology of alternative methods of triggering such as recombinant luteinizing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. We also present the results of a quasi-experimental before and after study of the sliding scale protocol for hCG trigger dose in in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles.

  15. Cancer risk assessment: Optimizing human health through linear dose-response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J; Shamoun, Dima Yazji; Hanekamp, Jaap C

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes that generic cancer risk assessments be based on the integration of the Linear Non-Threshold (LNT) and hormetic dose-responses since optimal hormetic beneficial responses are estimated to occur at the dose associated with a 10(-4) risk level based on the use of a LNT model as applied to animal cancer studies. The adoption of the 10(-4) risk estimate provides a theoretical and practical integration of two competing risk assessment models whose predictions cannot be validated in human population studies or with standard chronic animal bioassay data. This model-integration reveals both substantial protection of the population from cancer effects (i.e. functional utility of the LNT model) while offering the possibility of significant reductions in cancer incidence should the hormetic dose-response model predictions be correct. The dose yielding the 10(-4) cancer risk therefore yields the optimized toxicologically based "regulatory sweet spot". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Double-strand DNA breaks induction and repair in human blood lymphocytes irradiated with adapting dose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, A N; Lizunova, E Iu; Vorob'eva, N Iu; Pelevina, I I

    2009-01-01

    Using a DNA-comet assay was shown that irradiation of human blood lymphocytes at G1 cell cycle with a low conditioning dose (5 cGy) induces an adaptive response (AR) manifested in reduction of the double-strand DNA (DSB) amount induced by challenging dose at 10 Gy. 24 h after conditioning irradiation (48 h after PHA addition) in cells irradiated at both conditioning and challenging doses a relative DBS amount was approximately 24% less in comparison to versus a control irradiated at challenging dose only. 48 h after adapting irradiation this index increased to approximately 35%, while 72 h after was decreased to approximately 29%. AR observed by us during 72 h after its induction did not accompanied by statistically significant changes in DBS repair enhancing. It is possible to assume that basic role in AR forming in lymphocytes under experimental conditions used by us playing the processes preventing radiation-induced DBS formation (antioxidant defense system activation, chromatin conformation changes ets).

  17. Value of recombinant human thyrotropin in high-dose radioiodine therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vika; Bohuslavizki, Karl H; Klutmann, Susanne; Clausen, Malte

    2002-12-01

    We report on a high-dose radioiodine therapy after injection of recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) in a 61-y-old woman with compression of the spinal cord caused by metastasis of a follicular thyroid carcinoma. Fourteen years ago, the patient underwent subtotal thyroidectomy because of multinodular goiter without any histologic evidence for malignant disease, and the patient was put on thyroxine substitution (100 micro g/d). In April 2000, she developed paralysis of the right leg. Morphologic imaging revealed spinal compression caused by a space-occupying lesion within the thoracic spine. Subsequent biopsy and histology demonstrated metastasis of a follicular thyroid carcinoma. Therefore, high-dose radioiodine therapy was scheduled after 4 wk of hormone withdrawal. Within a few days of being off thyroxine, the patient's paralytic symptoms worsened rapidly. The patient was again put on thyroxine, 100 micro g/d, and high-dose radioiodine therapy under stimulation with rhTSH was performed without any side effects. The second high-dose radioiodine therapy 3 mo later, again performed under stimulation with rhTSH, showed significantly less iodine avidity, and thyroglobulin levels fell from 1,024 micro g/L to 361 micro g/L, thereby demonstrating therapeutic efficacy. Thus, rhTSH might be used as a tool not only in the diagnostic application but also in the therapeutic application of (131)I.

  18. Directional sensitivity of "first trial" reactions in human balance control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijhuis, L.B.; Allum, J.H.J.; Borm, G.F.; Honegger, F.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    Support-surface movements are commonly used to examine balance control. Subjects typically receive a series of identical or randomly interspersed multidirectional balance perturbations and the atypical "first trial reaction" (evoked by the first perturbation) is often excluded from further analysis.

  19. Human Rights and the Regulation of Transnational Clinical Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the more worrying trends in globalization today is the growing practice of western companies relocating clinical trials to impoverished countries. This paper starts by providing a comprehensive description of the practice and its current regulatory oversight. It argues that this regulatory

  20. Single-dose fluconazole versus standard 2-week therapy for oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients: a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, O.J.; Matee, M.I.N.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Moshi, M.J.; Simon, E.N.; Mugusi, F.; Mikx, F.H.M.; Lee, H.A.L. van der; Verweij, P.E.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common opportunistic infection affecting patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because of convenience, cost, and reluctance to complicate antiretroviral treatment regimens, single-dose fluconazole may be a favorable regimen for

  1. Standardizing Benchmark Dose Calculations to Improve Science-Based Decisions in Human Health Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wignall, Jessica A.; Shapiro, Andrew J.; Wright, Fred A.; Woodruff, Tracey J.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Benchmark dose (BMD) modeling computes the dose associated with a prespecified response level. While offering advantages over traditional points of departure (PODs), such as no-observed-adverse-effect-levels (NOAELs), BMD methods have lacked consistency and transparency in application, interpretation, and reporting in human health assessments of chemicals. Objectives: We aimed to apply a standardized process for conducting BMD modeling to reduce inconsistencies in model fitting and selection. Methods: We evaluated 880 dose–response data sets for 352 environmental chemicals with existing human health assessments. We calculated benchmark doses and their lower limits [10% extra risk, or change in the mean equal to 1 SD (BMD/L10/1SD)] for each chemical in a standardized way with prespecified criteria for model fit acceptance. We identified study design features associated with acceptable model fits. Results: We derived values for 255 (72%) of the chemicals. Batch-calculated BMD/L10/1SD values were significantly and highly correlated (R2 of 0.95 and 0.83, respectively, n = 42) with PODs previously used in human health assessments, with values similar to reported NOAELs. Specifically, the median ratio of BMDs10/1SD:NOAELs was 1.96, and the median ratio of BMDLs10/1SD:NOAELs was 0.89. We also observed a significant trend of increasing model viability with increasing number of dose groups. Conclusions: BMD/L10/1SD values can be calculated in a standardized way for use in health assessments on a large number of chemicals and critical effects. This facilitates the exploration of health effects across multiple studies of a given chemical or, when chemicals need to be compared, providing greater transparency and efficiency than current approaches. Citation: Wignall JA, Shapiro AJ, Wright FA, Woodruff TJ, Chiu WA, Guyton KZ, Rusyn I. 2014. Standardizing benchmark dose calculations to improve science-based decisions in human health assessments. Environ Health

  2. Strong relationship between oral dose and tenofovir hair levels in a randomized trial: hair as a potential adherence measure for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Y Liu

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP trials using tenofovir-based regimens have demonstrated that high levels of adherence are required to evaluate efficacy; the incorporation of objective biomarkers of adherence in trial design has been essential to interpretation, given the inaccuracy of self-report. Antiretroviral measurements in scalp hair have been useful as a marker of long-term exposure in the HIV treatment setting, and hair samples are relatively easy and inexpensive to collect, transport, and store for analysis. To evaluate the relationship between dose and tenofovir concentrations in hair, we examined the dose proportionality of tenofovir in hair in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults.A phase I, crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed in 24 HIV-negative adults receiving directly-observed oral tenofovir tablets administered 2, 4, and 7 doses/week for 6 weeks, with a ≥3-week break between periods. Small samples of hair were collected after each six-week period and analyzed for tenofovir concentrations. Geometric-mean-ratios compared levels between each pair of dosing conditions. Intensive plasma pharmacokinetic studies were performed during the daily-dosing period to calculate areas-under-the-time-concentration curves (AUCs.Over 90% of doses were observed per protocol. Median tenofovir concentrations in hair increased monotonically with dose. A log-linear relationship was seen between dose and hair levels, with an estimated 76% (95% CI 60-93% increase in hair level per 2-fold dose increase. Tenofovir plasma AUCs modestly predicted drug concentrations in hair.This study found a strong linear relationship between frequency of dosing and tenofovir levels in scalp hair. The analysis of quantitative drug levels in hair has the potential to improve adherence measurement in the PrEP field and may be helpful in determining exposure thresholds for protection and explaining failures in PrEP trials. Hair measures for adherence monitoring may also

  3. Rethinking risk assessment for emerging technology first-in-human trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genske, Anna; Engel-Glatter, Sabrina

    2016-03-01

    Recent progress in synthetic biology (SynBio) has enabled the development of novel therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of human disease. In the near future, first-in-human trials (FIH) will be indicated. FIH trials mark a key milestone in the translation of medical SynBio applications into clinical practice. Fostered by uncertainty of possible adverse events for trial participants, a variety of ethical concerns emerge with regards to SynBio FIH trials, including 'risk' minimization. These concerns are associated with any FIH trial, however, due to the novelty of the approach, they become more pronounced for medical applications of emerging technologies (emTech) like SynBio. To minimize potential harm for trial participants, scholars, guidelines, regulations and policy makers alike suggest using 'risk assessment' as evaluation tool for such trials. Conversely, in the context of emTech FIH trials, we believe it to be at least questionable to contextualize uncertainty of potential adverse events as 'risk' and apply traditional risk assessment methods. Hence, this issue needs to be discussed to enable alterations of the evaluation process before the translational phase of SynBio applications begins. In this paper, we will take the opportunity to start the debate and highlight how a misunderstanding of the concept of risk, and the possibilities and limitations of risk assessment, respectively, might impair decision-making by the relevant regulatory authorities and research ethics committees, and discuss possible solutions to tackle the issue.

  4. Effects of CT dose and nodule characteristics on lung-nodule detectability in a cohort of 90 national lung screening trial patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stefano; Lo, Pechin; Hoffman, John M.; Kim, H. J. Grace; Brown, Matthew S.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening CT is already performed at low dose. There are many techniques to reduce the dose even further, but it is not clear how such techniques will affect nodule detectability. In this work, we used an in-house CAD algorithm to evaluate detectability. 90348 patients and their raw CT data files were drawn from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) database. All scans were acquired at ~2 mGy CTDIvol with fixed tube current, 1 mm slice thickness, and B50 reconstruction kernel on a Sensation 64 scanner (Siemens Healthcare). We used the raw CT data to simulate two additional reduced-dose scans for each patient corresponding to 1 mGy (50%) and 0.5 mGy (25%). Radiologists' findings on the NLST reader forms indicated 65 nodules in the cohort, which we subdivided based on LungRADS criteria. For larger category 4 nodules, median sensitivities were 100% at all three dose levels, and mean sensitivity decreased with dose. For smaller nodules meeting the category 2 or 3 criteria, the dose dependence was less obvious. Overall, mean patient-level sensitivity varied from 38.5% at 100% dose to 40.4% at 50% dose, a difference of only 1.9%. However, the false-positive rate quadrupled from 1 per case at 100% dose to 4 per case at 25% dose. Dose reduction affected lung-nodule detectability differently depending on the LungRADS category, and the false-positive rate was very sensitive at sub-screening dose levels. Thus, care should be taken to adapt CAD for the very challenging noise characteristics of screening.

  5. Single-dose oral fluconazole versus topical clotrimazole in patients with pityriasis versicolor: A double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mohammad; Akbari, Negin; Alborzi, Nazila; Sadani, Somayeh; Keshtkar, Abas A

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to compare the therapeutic effects of topical clotrimazole and systemic fluconazole in pityriasis versicolor. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was carried out in the dermatological clinic of Gorgan, northern Iran, between April 2006 and May 2007. All consecutive patients with pityriasis versicolor were included and randomly divided into two groups. In the first group (G1), patients underwent treatment with a single dose of fluconazole capsule (400 mg) and placebo cream. In the second group (G2), patients underwent treatment with clotrimazole cream (twice daily) and placebo capsule. The course of treatment was 2 weeks. All subjects were re-evaluated 2, 4 and 12 weeks after the end of the therapeutic course. After 2 weeks, the rate of complete resolution of disease was significantly higher in G2 than G1 (49.1% vs 30%). After 4 weeks, 41 patients (81.2%) of G1 and 52 patients (94.9%) of G2 showed complete resolution. After 12 weeks, 46 patients (92%) in G1 and 45 patients (81.8%) in G2 showed complete resolution. Recurrence rate in G1 and G2 were 6% and 18.2%, respectively. No complications were seen in either group. In this study, clinical response at week 4 was greater in the clotrimazole group than the fluconazole group. Recurrence at week 12 after treatment was less with oral fluconazole than clotrimazole cream. So, for better evaluation, more studies need to be done.

  6. Effect of high-dose phenobarbital on oxidative stress in perinatal asphyxia: an open label randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathwala, Geeta; Marwah, Ashish; Gahlaut, Veena; Marwah, Poonam

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of high dose phenobarbital on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in perinatal asphyxia. Open label, Randomized controlled trial. Neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. 72 full term inborn neonates with severe birth asphyxia. Neonates were randomized to Study (phenobarbital) group and Control group. The infants in the study group received phenobarbital infusion (40 mg/kg) within first two hours of life while babies in the control group did not receive any phenobarbital. Rest of the management in both the groups was as per the unit protocol for the management of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. A cerebrospinal fluid examination was done at 12 ± 2 hours of life to determine the levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidise and malonyldialdehyde. 60 neonates were followed up at 1 month of age when a detailed neurological examination was done. Four neonates in the study group and six neonates in the control group died during the study. Two neonates in the study group were lost to follow up. The cerebrospinal fluid lipid peroxides and antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in the phenobarbital group as compared to the control group. The neurological outcome at one month follow up was found to be comparable between the two groups. Phenobarbital (40 mg/kg) given in the first two hours of life in term neonates with perinatal asphyxia led to a decrease in CSF levels of lipid peroxides and antioxidant enzymes at 12 ± 2 hours of life.

  7. Twice-daily, low-dose pramipexole in early Parkinson's disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieburtz, Karl

    2011-01-01

    To compare the safety and efficacy of low dosages of pramipexole given twice daily (bid) in early Parkinson's disease (PD) with those of a standard 3 times daily (tid) regimen in a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial involving 311 early PD patients not receiving dopaminergic treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned and followed on assigned treatment for 12 weeks with pramipexole at dosages of 0.5 mg bid, 0.75 mg bid, or 0.5 mg tid, or matching placebo. All subjects were dosed 3 times daily, with placebo if necessary, to maintain blinding. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to Week 12 in the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total score (Parts I-III). All active dosages had similar antiparkinson efficacy showing reductions of 4-5 UPDRS points relative to placebo (p pramipexole administered twice daily at a total daily dosage of 1.0-1.5 mg daily was of comparable efficacy and tolerability to a dosage of 0.5 mg tid over a 12-week treatment period in early PD.

  8. A randomized trial of everolimus and low-dose cyclosporine in renal transplantation: with or without steroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, C; Carmellini, M; Tisone, G; Sandrini, S; Segoloni, G; Rigotti, P; Colussi, G; Stefoni, S

    2014-12-01

    This multicenter, randomized, prospective, controlled trial (EVIDENCE study) aimed to determine short-term effects of early steroid withdrawal in renal transplant patients initially treated with everolimus, low-dose cyclosporine (CsA), and steroids. Patients were randomized to standard triple therapy with CsA, everolimus twice daily and steroids (group A), steroid-free immunosuppression (group B), or triple therapy once daily (group C). However, since patient enrollment was slower than expected, group C randomization was prematurely discontinued. The primary end point was treatment failure rate (composite end point of death, graft loss, biopsy-proven acute rejection, and loss to follow-up) between randomization and month 12. Patients evaluable for the primary end point included 139 randomized patients. According to intention-to-treat analysis, 2.8% of patients in group A and 14.7% in group B experienced treatment failure (95% upper confidence limit 19.7%). As this was higher than the predefined noninferiority limit of 10%, noninferiority could not be proved. No conclusive statements can be made on noninferiority of the steroid withdrawal regimen vs the standard regimen in these patients. Additional studies with longer follow-up are required to determine the efficacy of steroid-free immunosuppression in renal transplant recipients receiving everolimus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Single Ascending Dose Safety and Pharmacokinetics of CDRI-97/78: First-in-Human Study of a Novel Antimalarial Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shafiq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. CDRI 97/78 has shown efficacy in animal models of falciparum malaria. The present study is the first in-human phase I trial in healthy volunteers. Methods. The study was conducted in 50 healthy volunteers in a single, ascending dose, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind design. The dose ranges evaluated were from 80 mg to 700 mg. Volunteers were assessed for clinical, biochemical, haematological, radiographic, and electrocardiographic parameters for any adverse events in an in-house facility. After evaluation of safety study results, another cohort of 16 participants were administered a single oral dose of 200 mg of the drug and a detailed pharmacokinetic analysis was undertaken. Results. The compound was found to be well tolerated. MTD was not reached. The few adverse events noted were of grade 2 severity, not requiring intervention and not showing any dose response relationship. The laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters showed statistically significant differences, but all were within the predefined normal range. These parameters were not associated with symptoms/signs and hence regarded as clinically irrelevant. Mean values of T1/2, MRT, and AUC0-∞ of the active metabolite 97/63 were 11.85±1.94 h, 13.77±2.05 h, and 878.74±133.15 ng·h/mL, respectively Conclusion. The novel 1,2,4 trioxane CDRI 97/78 is safe and will be an asset in malarial therapy if results are replicated in multiple dose studies and benefit is shown in confirmatory trials.

  10. Combination of Trabectedin and Gemcitabine for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Results of a Phase I Dose Escalating Trial of the German Interdisciplinary Sarcoma Group (GISG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluation of the potential efficacy and safety of combination therapies for advanced soft tissue sarcomas (STS has increased substantially after approval of trabectedin and pazopanib. Trabectedin's introduction in Europe in 2007 depended mainly on its activity in so-called L-sarcomas (liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma; combination of trabectedin with other chemotherapies used in STS seems of particular interest. Methods: We initiated within the German Interdisciplinary Sarcoma Group (GISG a phase I dose escalating trial evaluating the combination of trabectedin and gemcitabine in patients with advanced and/or metastatic L-sarcomas (GISG-02; ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01426633. Patients were treated with increasing doses of trabectedin and gemcitabine. The primary endpoint was to determine the maximum tolerated dose. Results: Five patients were included in the study. Two patients were treated on dose level 1 comprising trabectedin 0.9 mg/m2 on day 1 and gemcitabine 700 mg/m2 on days 1 + 8, every 3 weeks. Due to dose-limiting toxicity (DLT in both patients (elevated transaminases and thrombocytopenia, an additional three patients were treated on dose level −1 with trabectedin 0.7 mg/m2 plus gemcitabine 700 mg/m2. Of these three patients, two demonstrated another DLT; therefore, the trial was stopped and none of the dose levels could be recommended for phase II testing. Conclusion: The GISG-02 phase I study was stopped with the conclusion that the combination of gemcitabine and trabectedin is generally not recommended for the treatment of patients with advanced and/or metastatic leiomyosarcoma or liposarcoma. Also, this phase I study strongly supports the necessity for careful evaluation of combination therapies.

  11. A multi-factorial analysis of human performance during a 9-day sea trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, P.J.L.; Grech, M.R.; Bos, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-national sea trial on the effects of ship motions on human performance was performed on Canadian Forces Auxiliary Vessel Quest, off the coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, in February and March of 2007. The primary goal of these experiments was to obtain subjective and objective measures for human

  12. Human, recombinant interleukin-2 induces in vitro histamine release in a dose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-01-01

    We previously observed that human, recombinant interleukin-2 in a pharmacologic dose (200 u/ml) induced histamine release from monocyte-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Therefore, we studied the role of various pharmacologic doses of rIL-2 on in vitro histamine release......, for 1, 24 and 48 hours under standard conditions. Histamine was analysed in supernatants using the glass fiber method. Simultaneously, total cell-bound histamine was analysed in lysate from 5 x 10(6) mononuclear cells from all patients and volunteers, thus allowing determination of percent histamine...... release. Supernatant histamine concentration from unstimulated cells was 17.2 +/- 1.5 ng/ml in patients compared to 7.9 +/- 1.0 ng/ml in volunteers (#p Histamine concentration increased...

  13. Analysis of dose-LET distribution in the human body irradiated by high energy hadrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Tsuda, S; Sakamoto, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Niita, K

    2003-01-01

    For the purposes of radiological protection, it is important to analyse profiles of the particle field inside a human body irradiated by high energy hadrons, since they can produce a variety of secondary particles which play an important role in the energy deposition process, and characterise their radiation qualities. Therefore Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate dose distributions in terms of the linear energy transfer of ionising particles (dose-LET distribution) using a newly developed particle transport code (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS) for incidences of neutrons, protons and pions with energies from 100 MeV to 200 GeV. Based on these calculations, it was found that more than 80% and 90% of the total deposition energies are attributed to ionisation by particles with LET below 10 keV microm(-1) for the irradiations of neutrons and the charged particles, respectively.

  14. Human, recombinant interleukin-2 induces in vitro histamine release in a dose-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-01-01

    We previously observed that human, recombinant interleukin-2 in a pharmacologic dose (200 u/ml) induced histamine release from monocyte-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Therefore, we studied the role of various pharmacologic doses of rIL-2 on in vitro histamine release....... Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (5 x 10(6) cells/ml), which also contain basophils, from 13 patients scheduled for elective colorectal cancer surgery and 10 age and sex matched healthy volunteers were stimulated with rIL-2 in concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200, 450, 900, 1,800 and 3,600 u/ml, respectively......, for 1, 24 and 48 hours under standard conditions. Histamine was analysed in supernatants using the glass fiber method. Simultaneously, total cell-bound histamine was analysed in lysate from 5 x 10(6) mononuclear cells from all patients and volunteers, thus allowing determination of percent histamine...

  15. The calculation of dose from external photon exposures using reference human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods. Pt. 7. Organ doses due to parallel and environmental exposure geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zankl, M. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Drexler, G. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Petoussi-Henss, N. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Saito, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents a tabulation of organ and tissue equivalent dose as well as effective dose conversion coefficients, normalised to air kerma free in air, for occupational exposures and environmental exposures of the public to external photon radiation. For occupational exposures, whole-body irradiation with idealised geometries, i.e. broad parallel beams and fully isotropic radiation incidence, is considered. The directions of incidence for the parallel beams are anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral and a full 360 rotation around the body`s longitudinal axis. The influence of beam divergence on the body doses is also considered as well as the dependence of effective dose on the angle of radiation incidence. Regarding exposure of the public to environmental sources, three source geometries are considered: exposure from a radioactive cloud, from ground contamination and from the natural radionuclides distributed homogeneously in the ground. The precise angular and energy distributions of the gamma rays incident on the human body were taken into account. The organ dose conversion coefficients given in this catalogue were calculated using a Monte Carlo code simulating the photon transport in mathematical models of an adult male and an adult female, respectively. Conversion coefficients are given for the equivalent dose of 23 organs and tissues as well as for effective dose and the equivalent dose of the so-called `remainder`. The organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given separately for the adult male and female models and - as arithmetic mean of the conversion coefficients of both - for an average adult. Fitted data of the coefficients are presented in tables; the primary raw data as resulting from the Monte Carlo calculation are shown in figures together with the fitted data. (orig.)

  16. A randomized phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccine plus low dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) versus standard dose EMP in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masanori; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Hirao, Yasuhiko; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Matsuoka, Kei; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2010-07-01

    Personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy could be a novel approach for many cancer patients. In this randomized study, we evaluated the anti-tumor effect and safety of PPV plus low-dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) as compared to standard-dose EMP for HLA-A2- or -A24-positive patients with castration resistant prostate cancer. Patients were randomized into groups receiving either PPV plus low-dose EMP (280 mg/day) or standard-dose EMP (560 mg/day). After disease progression, patients were switched to the opposite regime. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). We randomly assigned 28 patients to receive PPV plus low-dose EMP and 29 patients to receive standard-dose EMP. Nineteen events in the PPV group and 20 events in the EMP group occurred during the first treatment. Median PFS for the first treatment was 8.5 months in the PPV group and 2.8 months in the EMP group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.28 (95% CI, 0.14-0.61; log-rank P = 0.0012), while there was no difference for median PFS for the second treatment. The HR for overall survival was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.91) in favor of the PPV plus low-dose EMP group (log-rank, P = 0.0328). The PPV plus low-dose EMP was well tolerated without major adverse effects and with increased levels of IgG and cytotoxic-T cell responses to the vaccinated peptides. PPV plus low-dose EMP was associated with an improvement in PSA-based PFS as compared to the standard-dose EMP alone.

  17. Short-term high dose of quercetin and resveratrol alters aging markers in human kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Abharzanjani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress implicates in etiology of kidney cell aging and diabetic nephropathy. We evaluated the effects of different doses of resveratrol and quercetin and their combination therapy on aging marker in human kidney cell culture under hyperglycemia condition. Methods: Human embryonic kidney cell (HEK-293 was cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM containing 100 mM (18 mg/L for 24 h. The cells were treated with resveratrol (2.5, 5, 10 μm, quercetin (3, 6, 12 μm, and combination of these (R 2.5 μm, Q 3 μm and (R 5 μm, Q 6 μm and (R 10 μm, Q 12 μm for 48 h, and then, cells were lysed to access RNA and lysate. Results: The analysis of data showed that beta-galactosidase enzyme gene expression as an aging marker in all treatment groups has reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression of Sirtuin1 and thioredoxin (Trx in all treated groups in comparison to control group increased in a dose-dependent fashion. Trx interacting protein (TXNIP gene expression decreased in a dose-dependent manner in all treated groups, especially in resveratrol and combination therapy. Conclusions: According to the results of this research, quercetin, resveratrol, and especially combination treatments with increased expression levels of antioxidants, can reduce aging markers in HEK cell line in hyperglycemia conditions. These results lead us to use flavonoids such as resveratrol for anti-aging potential.

  18. Multicenter trial: comparison of two different formulations and application systems of low-dose nasal midazolam for routine magnetic resonance imaging of claustrophobic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirch, Frank T C; Suter, Katja; Froehlich, Johannes M; Studler, Ueli; Nidecker, Andreas; Eckhardt, Boris; Beranek-Chiu, Jan; Surber, Christian; Weishaupt, Dominik

    2008-10-01

    To prospectively assess and compare two formulations and methods of administration of low-dose nasal midazolam for the treatment of claustrophobic patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of a multicenter Phase III trial. In all, 108 consecutive adult claustrophobic patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (multidose group: MDG, unit-dose group: UDG). MDG encompassed 55 patients who received intranasally a 0.5% midazolam formulation into each nostril (total dose, 1.0 mg), whereas the 53 patients in UDG received a 1% midazolam formulation into only one nostril (total dose, 1.0 mg). This initial dose could be repeated once. Patient tolerance and anxiety were assessed using a questionnaire and a visual analog scale immediately before and after MRI. Image quality was evaluated using a five-point scale. In all, 53/55 MR examinations (96%) with MDG and 52/53 (98%) with UDG were completed successfully. The dose of 1 mg had to be repeated significantly less often in UDG compared to MDG (4/53, 8% vs. 13/55, 24%; P = 0.003). The image quality of all MR examinations was rated good to excellent, and slightly better in UDG (P = 0.045). Nasally applied low-dose midazolam is a patient-friendly solution to facilitate MRI of claustrophobic patients. The nasal spray of UDG is superior to that of MDG with a necessity of additional dosing. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Dose-related Effects of Salvinorin A in Humans: Dissociative, Hallucinogenic, and Memory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Katherine A.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Reissig, Chad J.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the plant Salvia divinorum, which has increased in popularity as a recreational drug over the past decade. Few human studies have examined salvinorin A. Objective This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the dose-related effects of inhaled salvinorin A in individuals with histories of hallucinogen use. Methods Eight healthy hallucinogen-using adults inhaled up to 16 doses of salvinorin A (0.375 - 21 μg/kg) in ascending order. Physiological, behavioral, and subjective effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min after administration. Qualitative subjective effects were assessed retrospectively via questionnaires at the end of sessions. Persisting effects were assessed 1 month later. Results Orderly dose-related effects peaked at 2 min and then rapidly dissipated, replicating previous findings. Subjective effects were intense, with maximal drug strength ratings or unresponsiveness frequently observed at high doses. Questionnaires assessing qualitative effects (Hallucinogen Rating Scale, Pharmacological Class Questionnaire) suggested some overlap with serotonergically mediated classic hallucinogens. Salvinorin A also produced dose-related dissociative effects and impairments in recall/recognition memory. At 1-month follow-up, there was no evidence of persisting adverse effects. Participants reported salvinorin A effects were qualitatively different from other drugs. Conclusions Salvinorin A produces a unique profile of subjective and cognitive effects, including strong dissociative effects and memory impairment, which only partially overlap with classic hallucinogen effects. Along with nonhuman studies of salvinorin A, these results are important for understanding the neurobiology of the kappa opioid system and may ultimately have important therapeutic applications. PMID:23135605

  20. A single dose mass balance study of the Hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449) in humans using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Richard A; Lum, Bert L; Morrison, Glenn; Chang, Ilsung; Jorga, Karin; Dean, Brian; Shin, Young G; Yue, Qin; Mulder, Teresa; Malhi, Vikram; Xie, Minli; Low, Jennifer A; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2011-08-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a small-molecule Hedgehog pathway inhibitor, was well tolerated in patients with solid tumors and showed promising efficacy in advanced basal cell carcinoma in a Phase I trial. The purpose of the study presented here was to determine routes of elimination and the extent of vismodegib metabolism, including assessment and identification of metabolites in plasma, urine, and feces. Six healthy female subjects of nonchildbearing potential were enrolled; each received a single 30-ml oral suspension containing 150 mg of vismodegib with 6.5 μg of [(14)C]vismodegib to yield a radioactivity dose of approximately 37 kBq (1000 nCi). Plasma, urine, and feces samples were collected over 56 days to permit sample collection for up to 5 elimination half-lives. Nonradioactive vismodegib was measured in plasma using liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry, and total radioactivity in plasma, urine, and feces was measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. Vismodegib was slowly eliminated by a combination of metabolism and excretion of parent drug, most of which was recovered in feces. The estimated excretion of the administered dose was 86.6% on average, with 82.2 and 4.43% recovered in feces and urine, respectively. Vismodegib was predominant in plasma, with concentrations representing >98% of the total circulating drug-related components. Metabolic pathways of vismodegib in humans included oxidation, glucuronidation, and uncommon pyridine ring cleavage. We conclude that vismodegib and any associated metabolic products are mainly eliminated through feces after oral administration in healthy volunteers.

  1. Effect of a single dose of mesoglycan on the human fibrinolytic system, and the profibrinolytic action of nine daily doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittoria, A; Messa, G L; Frigerio, C; Celasco, G; Auteri, A

    1988-01-01

    The profibrinolytic activity of orally administered Mesoglycan was evaluated in 18 patients affected by impaired plasma fibrinolytic activity. Mesoglycan was administered by a single oral dose of 24, 48 or 72 mg on 1 day, and by repeated doses of 48 mg twice a day for 9 consecutive days. After the single administration all the fibrinolytic parameters were significantly and positively influenced with an order of magnitude and a duration of effects proportional to the dose employed. After the repeated administration, a constant and reproducible activation of the fibrinolytic system was observed without any interference with haemocoagulative parameters. These results confirm that Mesoglycan is endowed with a relevant profibrinolytic activity in man after oral administration. The pharmacological activity of Mesoglycan could possibly involve the liberation of a certain amount of plasminogen tissue activator.

  2. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants--Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing from silicone to the H295R steroidogenesis assay: (1) Measured concentrations of POPs in silicone breast implants were taken from a recent study and silicone disks were loaded according to these measurements. (2) Silicone disks were transferred into H295R cell culture plates in order to control exposure of the adrenal cells by equilibrium partitioning. (3) Hormone production of the adrenal cells was measured as toxicity endpoint. 4-Nonylphenol was used for method development, and the new dosing method was compared to conventional solvent-dosing. The two dosing modes yielded similar dose-dependent hormonal responses of H295R cells. However, with the partitioning-controlled freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree) as dose metrics, dose-response curves were left-shifted by two orders of magnitude relative to spiked concentrations. Partitioning-controlled dosing of POPs resulted in up to 2-fold increases in progestagen and corticosteroid levels at Cfree of individual POPs in or below the femtomolar range. Silicone acted not only as source of the POPs but also as a sorption sink for lipophilic hormones, stimulating the cellular hormone production. Methodologically, the study showed that silicone can be used as reference partitioning phase to transfer in vivo exposure in humans (silicone implants) to in vitro assays (partition-controlled dosing). The main finding was that POPs at the levels at which they are found in humans can interfere with steroidogenesis in a human adrenocortical cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of voluntary dose escalation in a placebo-controlled, flexible-dose trial of fesoterodine in subjects with overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staskin, David; Khullar, Vik; Michel, Martin C; Morrow, Jon D; Sun, Franklin; Guan, Zhonghong; Dmochowski, Roger

    2011-11-01

    To characterize the response to fesoterodine treatment for overactive bladder (OAB) in subjects who did or did not choose to dose escalate in a flexible-dose study. Subjects were randomized to fesoterodine 4  mg or placebo. At week 2, subjects could remain on 4  mg (non-escalators) or choose to increase to 8  mg (escalators) for the remaining 10 weeks (sham escalation for placebo). Subjects completed 3-day bladder diaries at baseline, week 2 and week 12 noting micturitions, urgency episodes, and urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes. Sixty-three per cent of 438 subjects randomized to fesoterodine and 73% of 445 randomized to placebo dose escalated. At baseline, fesoterodine escalators had significantly more micturitions and urgency episodes than fesoterodine non-escalators (P fesoterodine non-escalators versus escalators (P fesoterodine non-escalators and escalators (P > 0.05). The placebo escalator group did not demonstrate a similar response over placebo non-escalators following the dose escalation decision point. A rapid and robust response to fesoterodine 4  mg was demonstrated in non-escalators. Subjects who chose to dose escalate to fesoterodine 8  mg at week 2 showed significant improvement by week 12 versus baseline and week 2 (prior to escalation), as well as versus placebo. Dose escalation to 8  mg fesoterodine provided subjects with efficacy and tolerability similar to those who were satisfied with the 4-mg dose. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A randomized controlled trial of increased dose and frequency of albendazole with standard dose DEC for treatment of Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaremics in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Shantanu Kumar; Dwibedi, Bhagirathi; Kerketa, Anna Salomi; Maharana, Antaryami; Panda, Sudanshu S; Mohanty, Prafulla Chandra; Horton, John; Ramachandran, Cherubala P

    2015-03-01

    Although current programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis have made significant progress it may be necessary to use different approaches to achieve the global goal, especially where compliance has been poor and 'hot spots' of continued infection exist. In the absence of alternative drugs, the use of higher or more frequent dosing with the existing drugs needs to be explored. We examined the effect of higher and/or more frequent dosing with albendazole with a fixed 300 mg dose of diethylcarbamazine in a Wuchereria bancrofti endemic area in Odisha, India. Following screening, 104 consenting adults were randomly assigned to treatment with the standard regimen annually for 24 months (S1), or annually with increased dose (800 mg albendazole)(H1) or with increased frequency (6 monthly) with either standard (S2) or increased (H2) dose. Pre-treatment microfilaria counts (GM) ranged from 348 to 459 mf/ml. Subjects were followed using microfilaria counts, OG4C3 antigen levels and ultrasound scanning for adult worm nests. Microfilarial counts tended to decrease more rapidly with higher or more frequent dosing at all time points. At 12 months, Mf clearance was marginally greater with the high dose regimens, while by 24 months, there was a trend to higher Mf clearance in the arm with increased frequency and 800 mg of albendazole (76.9%) compared to other arms, (S1:64%, S2:69.2% & H1:73.1%). Although higher and/or more frequent dosing showed a trend towards a greater decline in antigenemia and clearance of "nests", all regimens demonstrated the potential macrofilaricidal effect of the combination. The higher doses of albendazole did not result in a greater number or more severe side effects. The alternative regimens could be useful in the later stages of existing elimination programmes or achieving elimination more rapidly in areas where programmes have yet to start.

  5. Directional sensitivity of "first trial" reactions in human balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Nijhuis, Lars B; Allum, John H J; Borm, George F; Honegger, Flurin; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2009-06-01

    Support-surface movements are commonly used to examine balance control. Subjects typically receive a series of identical or randomly interspersed multidirectional balance perturbations and the atypical "first trial reaction" (evoked by the first perturbation) is often excluded from further analysis. However, this procedure may obscure vital information about neurophysiological mechanisms associated with the first perturbation and, by analogy, fully unexpected falls. We studied first trial reactions, aiming to clarify their directional impact on postural control and to characterize the underlying neurophysiological substrate. We instructed 36 subjects to maintain balance following support-surface rotations in six different directions. Perturbations in each direction were delivered in blocks, consisting of 10 serial stimuli. Full body kinematics, surface reactive forces, and electromyographic (EMG) responses were recorded. Regardless of direction, for the very first rotation, displacement of the center of mass was 15% larger compared with the ensuing nine identical rotations (P postural instability, mainly due to increased response amplitudes. Although rapid habituation occurs following presentation of identical stimuli, subjects immediately become unstable again when the perturbation direction suddenly changes. Excessive responses due to a failure to combine proprioceptive and vestibular cues effectively may explain this instability seen with first trials, particularly when falling backward.

  6. Background radiation dose-rates to non-human biota in a high mountain habitat in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.E.; Gelsvik, R.; Kålås, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Determination of background radiation dose-rates is important in the process of assessing risks to the environment from exposure to human activities both in terms of deriving the incremental dose-rate and as a point of reference for evaluating the significance of the exposure level. A consideration...

  7. Evaluation of dose reduction versus standard dosing for maintenance of remission in patients with spondyloarthritis and clinical remission with anti-TNF (REDES-TNF): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Caridad; Gratacós, Jordi; Torres, Ferran; Avendaño, Cristina; Sanz, Jesús; Vallano, Antoni; Juanola, Xavier; de Miguel, Eugenio; Sanmartí, Raimon; Calvo, Gonzalo

    2015-08-20

    Dose reduction schedules of tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNF) as maintenance therapy in patients with spondyloarthritis are used empirically in clinical practice, despite the lack of clinical trials providing evidence for this practice. To address this issue the Spanish Society of Rheumatology (SER) and Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology (SEFC) designed a 3-year multicenter, randomized, open-label, controlled clinical trial (2 years for inclusion and 1 year of follow-up). The study is expected to include 190 patients with axial spondyloarthritis on stable maintenance treatment (≥4 months) with any anti-TNF agent at doses recommended in the summary of product characteristics. Patients will be randomized to either a dose reduction arm or maintenance of the dosing regimen as per the official labelling recommendations. Randomization will be stratified according to the anti-TNF agent received before study inclusion. Patient follow-up, visit schedule, and examinations will be maintained as per normal clinical practice recommendations according to SER guidelines. The study aims to test the hypothesis of noninferiority of the dose reduction strategy compared with standard treatment. The first patients were recruited in July 2012, and study completion is scheduled for the end of April 2015. The REDES-TNF study is a pragmatic clinical trial that aims to provide evidence to support a medical decision now made empirically. The study results may help inform clinical decisions relevant to both patients and healthcare decision makers. EudraCT 2011-005871-18 (21 December 2011).

  8. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to determine the dose of ST-246 to protect against smallpox in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Janet M; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J F; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E; Honeychurch, Kady M; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a "material threat" and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population.

  9. First-in-human trial of an anti-5T4 antibody-monomethylauristatin conjugate, PF-06263507, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Geoffrey I; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; LoRusso, Patricia; Barton, Jeremy; Hua, Steven; Reich, Steven D; Shazer, Ronald; Taylor, Carrie T; Xuan, Dawei; Borghaei, Hossein

    2017-01-09

    Background The antibody-drug conjugate PF-06263507 targets the cell-surface, tumor-associated antigen 5T4 and consists of a humanized IgG1 conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent monomethylauristatin-F by a non-cleavable maleimidocaproyl linker. In this first-in-human, dose-finding trial (NCT01891669), we evaluated safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity of PF-06263507 in pretreated patients with advanced solid tumors, unselected for 5T4 expression. starting at 0.05 mg/kg, with 25, 56, and 95% dose increments, depending on observed dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), applying a modified continual reassessment method. Results Twenty-six patients received PF-06263507 at 0.05 to 6.5 mg/kg. The first DLT, grade 3 photophobia, occurred at 4.34 mg/kg and two additional DLTs, grade 2 keratitis and grade 1 limbal stem cell deficiency (> 2-week dosing delay), at 6.5 mg/kg. The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue (38.5%), photophobia (26.9%), and decreased appetite, dry eye, nausea, and thrombocytopenia (23.1% each). No treatment-related grade 4-5 AEs were reported. Systemic exposure of PF-06263507 increased in a dose-related manner. At the maximum tolerated dose (MTD, 4.34 mg/kg), mean terminal half-life for PF-06263507 and unconjugated payload were ~6 and 3 days, respectively. Payload serum concentrations were substantially lower compared with PF-06263507. No objective responses were observed. Conclusions The MTD and recommended phase II dose were determined to be 4.34 mg/kg. Ocular toxicities accounted for the DLTs observed, as previously reported with monomethylauristatin-F payloads. Further studies are warranted to investigate clinical activity of this agent in patients with 5T4-expressing tumors.Trial registration ID: NCT01891669.

  10. New insights for identification of doping with recombinant human erythropoietin micro-doses after high hydration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, L.; Ashenden, M; Bejder, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    To minimize the chances of being caught after doping with recombinant human erythropoietins (rhEPO), athletes have turned to new practices using micro-doses and excess fluid ingestion to accelerate elimination and decrease the probability of detection. Our objective was to test the sensitivity...... subjects. After an injection in the evening, urine and plasma samples were collected the following morning. Half of the subjects then drank a bolus of water and new samples were collected 80 min later. Interestingly, rhEPO was detected in 100% of the samples even after water ingestion. A second similar...

  11. Crossover versus parallel designs: dose-escalation design comparisons for first-in-human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiwu; Hosmane, Balakrishna; Locke, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We study the statistical efficiency for rising-dose designs in the context of first-in-human studies. Specifically, we identify a class of crossover designs that are appealing in terms of both subject safety and statistical efficiency and, for a three-period, two-panel design in such a class, we compare its A-efficiency relative to the corresponding parallel designs and optimal/efficient crossover designs, respectively, under various plausible models. In the meantime, we also evaluate the impact of inclusion of baseline measurements as a covariate in the statistical analysis, for both crossover and parallel studies.

  12. Bupivacaine in microcapsules prolongs analgesia after subcutaneous infiltration in humans: a dose-finding study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Juri L; Lillesø, Jesper; Hammer, Niels A

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined the onset and duration of local analgesic effects of bupivacaine incorporated into biodegradable microcapsules (extended-duration local anesthetic; EDLA) administered as subcutaneous infiltrations in different doses in humans. In 18 volunteers, the skin on the medial calf...... stimuli and sensory thresholds (touch, warm, and cold detection thresholds) were examined by von Frey hairs and contact thermodes. Assessments were made before and 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 168 h after the injections. Safety evaluations were performed daily for the first week and at 2 wk, 6 wk...

  13. Dose findings of antofloxacin hydrochloride for treating bacterial infections in an early clinical trial using PK-PD parameters in healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-fei LI; Kun WANG; Fang YIN; Ying-chun HE; Ji-han HUANG; Qing-shan ZHENG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To find an appropriate dose regimen of the novel antibacterial agent antofloxacin for a phase Ⅱ clinical trial using a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) study in healthy volunteers and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) as pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters.Methods:Twenty-four healthy volunteers were enrolled in a double-blind crossover study and received antofloxacin (200 or 400 mg/d,po) for consecutive 5 d with 10 d washout between two separate periods.Blood concentrations were analyzed using HPLC with a UV-Vis detector.The values of area under the curve (AUC) with covariates were obtained from a PPK model,and the MlCs came from the previous in vitro studies.The dose regimen was determined for the phase Ⅱ clinical trial according to the ratio (>20) of AUC/MIC,and the efficacy of the dose was evaluated by the trial.Results:A two-compartment model best described the time-concentration data with first-order absorption.The PPK parameter estimates for CL,Vc,Q,Vp and KA are 8.34 L/h,142 L,15.9 L/h,52.2 L and 4.64 1/h,respectively.The covariates sex for KA,weight for CL,weight for Vc and interoccasion variability were included in the final model.The AUC/MIC was calculated based on the PPK model and the MIC of antofloxacin for Escherichia coli,Klebsiella pneumonia,Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis were determined in previous researches.The 400 mg loading dose with 200 mg/d maintenance dose was recommended and confirmed by the phase Ⅱ trial.Conclusion:The ratio of AUC from the PPK model vs MIC as the PD parameter can be applied in a dose-finding trial of antofloxacin in treatment of bacterial infections.The PPK model suggests that sex and body weight may be considerations in regards to individual therapy,which should be investigated in larger clinical trials and serve as a potential reference for clinical therapies.

  14. The effect of continuous low dose methylprednisolone infusion on inflammatory parameters in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a randomized-controlled clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ghiasi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This trial was performed to determine if a continuous low-dose infusion of methylprednisolone is as effective as its bolus of high-dose in reducing inflammatory response. The study was single-center, double-blinded randomized clinical trial and performed in a surgical intensive care unit of an academic hospital. In this study, 72 consecutive patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG were assigned to receive either a methylprednisolone loading dose (1mg/kg followed by continuous infusion (2mg/Kg/24 hours for 1 day (low-dose regime or a single dose of methylprednisolone (15 mg/kg before cardiopulmonary bypass (high dose regime. Serum concentrations of IL-6 and C- reactive protein (CRP were measured preoperatively and 6, 24 and 48 hours after surgery, and serum creatinine was measured before the operation and 24, 48 and 72 hours postoperatively. The measurements were then compared between the groups to evaluate the efficacy of each regimen. The basic characteristics and measurements were not different between the study groups. There was no significant difference in IL-6 and CRP elevation (P=0.52 and P=0.46, respectively. Early outcomes such as the length of stay in the intensive care unit, intubation time, changes in serum creatinine and blood glucose levels, inotropic support, insulin requirements, and rate of infection were also similar in both groups. A continuous low dose infusion of methylprednisolone was as effective as a single high dose methylprednisolone in reducing the inflammatory response after CABG with extracorporeal circulation with no significant difference in the postoperative measurements and outcomes.

  15. Randomized, controlled, assessor-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of single- versus repeated-dose albendazole to treat ascaris lumbricoides, trichuris trichiura, and hookworm infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegnika, Ayola A; Zinsou, Jeannot F; Issifou, Saadou; Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Kassa, Roland F; Feugap, Eliane N; Honkpehedji, Yabo J; Dejon Agobe, Jean-Claude; Kenguele, Hilaire M; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Agnandji, Selidji T; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Ramharter, Michael; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G; Lell, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    In many regions where soil-transmitted helminth infections are endemic, single-dose albendazole is used in mass drug administration programs to control infections. There are little data on the efficacy of the standard single-dose administration compared to that of alternative regimens. We conducted a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to determine the efficacies of standard and extended albendazole treatment against soil-transmitted helminth infection in Gabon. A total of 175 children were included. Adequate cure rates and egg reduction rates above 85% were found with a single dose of albendazole for Ascaris infection, 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73, 96) and 93.8% (CI, 87.6, 100), respectively, while two doses were necessary for hookworm infestation (92% [CI, 78, 100] and 92% [CI, 78, 100], respectively). However, while a 3-day regimen was not sufficient to cure Trichuris (cure rate, 83% [CI, 73, 93]), this regimen reduced the number of eggs up to 90.6% (CI, 83.1, 100). The rate ratios of two- and three-dose regimens compared to a single-dose treatment were 1.7 (CI, 1.1, 2.5) and 2.1 (CI, 1.5, 2.9) for Trichuris and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) for hookworm. Albendazole was safe and well tolerated in all regimens. A single-dose albendazole treatment considerably reduces Ascaris infection but has only a moderate effect on hookworm and Trichuris infections. The single-dose option may still be the preferred regimen because it balances efficacy, safety, and compliance during mass drug administration, keeping in mind that asymptomatic low-level helminth carriage may also have beneficial effects. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01192802.).

  16. Effects of low-dose clonidine on cardiovascular and autonomic variables in adolescents with chronic fatigue: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagermoen, Even; Sulheim, Dag; Winger, Anette; Andersen, Anders M; Gjerstad, Johannes; Godang, Kristin; Rowe, Peter C; Saul, J Philip; Skovlund, Eva; Wyller, Vegard Bruun

    2015-09-10

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a common and disabling condition in adolescence with few treatment options. A central feature of CFS is orthostatic intolerance and abnormal autonomic cardiovascular control characterized by sympathetic predominance. We hypothesized that symptoms as well as the underlying pathophysiology might improve by treatment with the alpha2A-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine. A total of 176 adolescent CFS patients (12-18 years) were assessed for eligibility at a single referral center recruiting nation-wide. Patients were randomized 1:1 by a computer system and started treatment with clonidine capsules (25 μg or 50 μg twice daily, respectively, for body weight below/above 35 kg) or placebo capsules for 9 weeks. Double-blinding was provided. Data were collected from March 2010 until October 2012 as part of The Norwegian Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: Pathophysiology and Intervention Trial (NorCAPITAL). Effect of clonidine intervention was assessed by general linear models in intention-to-treat analyses, including baseline values as covariates in the model. A total of 120 patients (clonidine group n = 60, placebo group n = 60) were enrolled and started treatment. There were 14 drop-outs (5 in the clonidine group, 9 in the placebo group) during the intervention period. At 8 weeks, the clonidine group had lower plasma norepinephrine (difference = 205 pmol/L, p = 0.05) and urine norepinephrine/creatinine ratio (difference = 3.9 nmol/mmol, p = 0.002). During supine rest, the clonidine group had higher heart rate variability in the low-frequency range (LF-HRV, absolute units) (ratio = 1.4, p = 0.007) as well as higher standard deviation of all RR-intervals (SDNN) (difference = 12.0 ms, p = 0.05); during 20° head-up tilt there were no statistical differences in any cardiovascular variable. Symptoms of orthostatic intolerance did not change during the intervention period. Low-dose clonidine reduces catecholamine levels in adolescent

  17. Dosing considerations for rufinamide in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: Phase III trial results and real-world clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothare, Sanjeev; Kluger, Gerhard; Sachdeo, Rajesh; Williams, Betsy; Olhaye, Omar; Perdomo, Carlos; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a rare, severe form of childhood-onset epilepsy, is difficult to control. Rufinamide is indicated for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with LGS in adults and pediatric patients aged ≥1 year. In clinical practice, rufinamide dosing and titration may differ from the trial setting. Here, rufinamide clinical trial data are compared with real-world experience to provide insight into optimal dosing and titration strategies. Rufinamide Phase III and open-label extension (OLE) studies were reviewed; effect of titration and dose on adverse events (AEs) and concomitant AED use were analyzed. Real-world studies of rufinamide in LGS were identified via PubMed search. Clinical data were extracted and compared. Results demonstrated that a rapid titration schedule (7 or 14 days) of rufinamide was tolerable for most patients and resulted in highly significant reductions in total and tonic-atonic seizures, with efficacy and tolerability sustained over 3 years. The most common AEs during the Phase III study - somnolence, vomiting, and pyrexia - occurred during the first 3 weeks of treatment, and a small subset of patients were unable to reach target dose in that time. Use of concomitant AEDs had no clinically significant effect on plasma concentrations of rufinamide. Data from real-world clinical studies are consistent with the Phase III and OLE study results. However, relative to those used in clinical trials, lower doses and slower titration schedules were commonly employed in real-world settings. A lower dose and slower titration schedule ("low and slow") may reduce incidence of AEs without compromising efficacy of rufinamide in LGS. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of the effectiveness of some common animal data scaling techniques in estimating human radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Aydogan, B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, animal studies are typically performed to get a first approximation of the expected radiation dose in humans. This study evaluates the performance of some commonly used data extrapolation techniques to predict residence times in humans using data collected from animals. Residence times were calculated using animal and human data, and distributions of ratios of the animal results to human results were constructed for each extrapolation method. Four methods using animal data to predict human residence times were examined: (1) using no extrapolation, (2) using relative organ mass extrapolation, (3) using physiological time extrapolation, and (4) using a combination of the mass and time methods. The residence time ratios were found to be log normally distributed for the nonextrapolated and extrapolated data sets. The use of relative organ mass extrapolation yielded no statistically significant change in the geometric mean or variance of the residence time ratios as compared to using no extrapolation. Physiologic time extrapolation yielded a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01, paired t test) in the geometric mean of the residence time ratio from 0.5 to 0.8. Combining mass and time methods did not significantly improve the results of using time extrapolation alone. 63 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A probabilistic model of human variability in physiology for future application to dose reconstruction and QIVIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eMcNally

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The risk assessment of environmental chemicals and drugs is undergoing a paradigm shift in approach which seeks the full replacement of animal testing with high throughput, mechanistic, in vitro systems. This new approach will be reliant on the measurement in vitro, of concentration-dependent responses where prolonged excessive perturbations of specific biochemical pathways are likely to lead to adverse health effects in an intact organism. Such an approach requires a framework, into which disparate data generated by in vitro, in silico and in chemico systems can be integrated and utilised for quantitative in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation (QIVIVE, ultimately to the human population level. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK models are ideally suited to this and are needed to translate in vitro concentration- response relationships to an exposure or dose, route and duration regime in human populations. Thus a realistic description of the variation in the physiology of the human population being modelled is critical. Whilst various studies in the past decade have made progress in describing human variability, the algorithms are typically coded in computer programs and as such are unsuitable for reverse dosimetry. In this report we overcome this limitation by developing a hierarchical statistical model using standard probability distributions for the specification of a virtual US and UK human population. The work draws on information from both population databases and cadaver studies.

  20. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  1. Challenges in validating the sterilisation dose for processed human amniotic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Norimah; Hassan, Asnah; Firdaus Abd Rahman, M. N.; Hamid, Suzina A.

    2007-11-01

    Most of the tissue banks in the Asia Pacific region have been using ionising radiation at 25 kGy to sterilise human tissues for save clinical usage. Under tissue banking quality system, any dose employed for sterilisation has to be validated and the validation exercise has to be a part of quality document. Tissue grafts, unlike medical items, are not produced in large number per each processing batch and tissues relatively have a different microbial population. A Code of Practice established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 2004 offers several validation methods using smaller number of samples compared to ISO 11137 (1995), which is meant for medical products. The methods emphasise on bioburden determination, followed by sterility test on samples after they were exposed to verification dose for attaining of sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -1. This paper describes our experience in using the IAEA Code of Practice in conducting the validation exercise for substantiating 25 kGy as sterilisation dose for both air-dried amnion and those preserved in 99% glycerol.

  2. Challenges in validating the sterilisation dose for processed human amniotic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Norimah [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: norimah@mint.gov.my; Hassan, Asnah [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Firdaus Abd Rahman, M.N.; Hamid, Suzina A. [National Tissue Bank, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, 16130 Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2007-11-15

    Most of the tissue banks in the Asia Pacific region have been using ionising radiation at 25 kGy to sterilise human tissues for save clinical usage. Under tissue banking quality system, any dose employed for sterilisation has to be validated and the validation exercise has to be a part of quality document. Tissue grafts, unlike medical items, are not produced in large number per each processing batch and tissues relatively have a different microbial population. A Code of Practice established by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 2004 offers several validation methods using smaller number of samples compared to ISO 11137 (1995), which is meant for medical products. The methods emphasise on bioburden determination, followed by sterility test on samples after they were exposed to verification dose for attaining of sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10{sup -1}. This paper describes our experience in using the IAEA Code of Practice in conducting the validation exercise for substantiating 25 kGy as sterilisation dose for both air-dried amnion and those preserved in 99% glycerol.

  3. Body fat loss and compensatory mechanisms in response to different doses of aerobic exercise - a randomized controlled trial in overweight sedentary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mads Rosenkilde; Auerbach, Pernille Landrock; Reichkendler, Michala Holm

    2012-01-01

    is limited. A randomized controlled trial was performed in healthy sedentary moderately overweight young men to examine the effects of increasing doses of aerobic exercise on body composition, accumulated energy balance, and the degree of compensation. Eighteen participants were randomized to a continuous...... sedentary control group, 21 to a moderate (MOD; 300 kcal/day) and 22 to a high dose (HIGH; 600 kcal/day) exercise group for 13 weeks, corresponding to approximately 30 and 60 minutes of daily aerobic exercise, respectively. Body weight (MOD: -3.6kg, P...

  4. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  5. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Bellamy, Michael B [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  6. [Rapid dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, M V; Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    The probability of losses of different chromosome aberrations during the dicentric chromosome assay of metaphase cells with incomplete sets of chromosome centromeres was estimated using a mathematical model for low doses of ionizing radiation. A dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes without determination of the total amount of chromosome centromeres in cells without chromosome aberrations (rapid dicentric assay) has been proposed. The rapid dicentric analysis allows to register chromosome aberrations in full compliance with the conventional classification. The experimental data have shown no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes detected by rapid and classical dicentric chromosome assays of human lymphocytes exposed to 0.5 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays. The rate of the rapid dicentric assay was almost twice as high as that of the classical dicentric assay.

  7. Dose-rate models for human survival after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Young, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews new estimates of the L/sub 50/ in man by Mole and by Rotblat, the biological processes contributing to hematologic death, the collection of animal experiments dealing with hematologic death, and the use of regression analysis to make new estimates of human mortality based on all relevant animal studies. Regression analysis of animal mortality data has shown that mortality is dependent strongly on dose rate, species, body weight, and time interval over which the exposure is delivered. The model has predicted human LD/sub 50/s of 194, 250, 310, and 360 rad to marrow when the exposure time is a minute, an hour, a day, and a week, respectively.

  8. Revisiting dosing regimen using PK/PD modeling: the MODEL1 phase I/II trial of docetaxel plus epirubicin in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Emilie; Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; You, Benoit; Guitton, Jérôme; Iliadis, Athanassios; Freyer, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    The MODEL1 trial is the first model-driven phase I/II dose-escalation study of densified docetaxel plus epirubicin administration in metastatic breast cancer patients, a regimen previously known to induce unacceptable life-threatening toxicities. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of this densified regimen. Study of the efficacy was a secondary objective. Her2-negative, hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer patients were treated with escalating doses of docetaxel plus epirubicin every 2 weeks for six cycles with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support. A total of 16 patients were treated with total doses ranging from 85 to 110 mg of docetaxel plus epirubicin per cycle. Dose escalation was controlled by a non-hematological toxicity model. Dose densification was guided by a model of neutrophil kinetics, able to optimize docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing with respect to pre-defined acceptable levels of hematological toxicity while ensuring maximal efficacy. The densified treatment was safe since hematological toxicity was much lower compared to previous findings, and other adverse events were consistent with those observed with this regimen. The maximal tolerated dose was 100 mg given every 2 weeks. The response rate was 45 %; median progression-free survival was 10.4 months, whereas 54.6 months of median overall survival was achieved. The optimized docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing regimen led to fewer toxicities associated with higher efficacy as compared with standard or empirical densified dosing. This study suggests that model-driven dosage adjustment can lead to improved efficacy-toxicity balance in patients with cancer when several anticancer drugs are combined.

  9. Effect of high-dose vitamin D supplementation on bone density in youth with osteogenesis imperfecta: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Laura; Veilleux, Louis-Nicolas; Glorieux, Francis H; Weiler, Hope; Rauch, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable condition characterized by fragile bones. Our previous studies indicated that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations were positively associated with lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (LS-aBMD) in children and adolescents with OI. Here we assessed whether one year of high-dose vitamin D supplementation results in higher LS-aBMD z-scores in youth with OI. A one-year double-blind randomized controlled trial conducted at a pediatric orthopedic hospital in Montreal, Canada. Sixty patients (age: 6.0 to 18.9years; 35 female) were randomized in equal numbers to receive either 400 or 2000international units (IU) of vitamin D, stratified according to baseline bisphosphonate treatment status and pubertal stage. At baseline, the average serum 25OHD concentration was 65.6nmol/L (SD 20.4) with no difference between treatment groups (p=0.77); 21% of patients had results <50nmol/L. Vitamin D supplementation was associated with higher serum 25OHD concentrations in 90% of participants. The increase in mean 25OHD was significantly higher (p=0.02) in the group receiving 2000IU of vitamin D (mean [95% CI]=30.5nmol/L [21.3; 39.6]) than in the group receiving 400IU (15.2nmol/L [6.4; 24.1]). No significant differences in LS-aBMD z-score changes were detected between treatment groups. Thus, supplementation with vitamin D at 2000IU increased serum 25OHD concentrations in children with OI more than supplementation with 400IU. However, in this study where about 80% of participants had baseline serum 25OHD concentrations ≥50nmol/L, this difference had no detectable effect on LS-aBMD z-scores.

  10. Quality of Life in Hematologic Cancer Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Low Dose Naltrexone Versus Placebo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Seifrabiei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate its effect on hematologic cancer patients. This was a randomized controlled trial assessing quality of life in patients with hematologic malignancies from a single institute in Hamedan. Patients were allocated into two study arms and in addition to their routine treatment received either daily naltrexone 3 mg capsules (treatment group or 3 mg starch (placebo group and were followed up for 5 months. Quality of life was measured using the EORTC QLQ-C30 in four points in time (at admission, 1, 3 and 5 months follow-up. Data were analyzed to compare quality of life in two groups. Totally, 89 patients were studied (45 in treatment group and 44 in placebo group. There were no significant differences between two groups either in demographic and clinical characteristics or in baseline quality of life scores. However, at 1 month, 3 and 5-month follow-up assessments significant differences were observed. In one month follow-up two groups were significantly different in social functioning (p<0.05 indicating a better condition in the treatment group. In the 3-month follow-up, social functioning, role functioning, nausea and vomiting and appetite loss were better in the treatment group (all p-values <0.05. In the 5-month follow-up, physical functioning, social functioning, role functioning, global quality of life, nausea and vomiting and appetite loss were significantly better in the nalterxone group. Low dose naltrexone is an effective drug in improving quality of life in patients with hematologic cancers.

  11. The paradox of human equivalent dose formula: A canonical case study of abrus precatorius aqueous leaf extract in monogastric animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saganuwan Alhaji Saganuwan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant literature on the toxicity of A. precatorius seeds. However there is a need to define the toxicity limit of the Abrus precatorius leaf in monogastric animals. Human Equivalent Dose (HED which is equal to animal dose multiplied by animal km (metabolism constant divided by human km was used to project the LD50 of fifteen monogastric animals , where human km factor is body weight (kg divided by body surface area (m2. Human Equivalent No-observable Adverse Effect Doses were determined by multiplying the animal no-observable adverse effect dose by animal weight (Wa divided by human weight (Wh. The LD50 of the aqueous leaf extract of Abrus precatorius in mice was estimated to be between 2559.5 and 3123.3 mg/kg body weight. The LD50 extrapolated from mouse to rat (1349.3-1646.6 mg/kg, hamster (1855.3-2264.1 mg/kg, guinea pig (1279.5-1561.4 mg/kg, rabbit (618.4-754.7 mg/kg, monkey (593.7-724.5 mg/kg, cat (392.7-479.2 mg/kg, dog and baboon (371.1-452.8 mg/kg, child (297-362 mg/kg and adult human (197.8-241.5 mg/kg body weight respectively could be a reality. The therapeutic safe dose range for the animals was 1-12.5 mg/kg body weight for a period of 7 days, but at a dose (≤ 200 mg/kg body weight the leaf extract showed haematinic effect. However, at a higher dose (> 200 mg/kg, the extract showed haemolytic activity in rats, whereas at a dose (≥25.0 mg/kg, the leaf extract might be organotoxic in hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, monkey, cat, dog, baboon, child and adult human if administered orally for a period of 7 days.

  12. Genotoxicity of low dose N-nitroso propoxur to human gastric cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, H H; Shyu, S S; Wang, T C

    2008-05-01

    Propoxur is among the most popular insect control agents in subtropical countries such as Taiwan. As a member of the N-methylcarbamate insecticide group, propoxur is notorious for its potential for conversion into highly genotoxic N-nitroso derivatives. Due to the fact that the stomach has been identified as the major target for N-nitroso N-methylcarbamates, this investigation used a human gastric cell line, SC-M1, in order to obtain results pertinent to the authentic adverse effects of this compound on human health. This report reveals that at dose levels inhibiting propoxur induced significant amounts of DNA damage. Most of the damaged DNA was repaired within 24 h after treatment removal, such that an outcome with a significant induction of chromosomal aberrations was not observed. Gene mutations and anchorage independence, on the other hand, were significantly induced by this same treatment. In conclusion, exposure to low doses of N-nitroso propoxur is not cytotoxic nor clastogenic, nevertheless, has the potential to increase genetic instability and, possibly as a result, to enhance the malignant potential of treated cells. We suggest that although the damaged DNA was repaired during the transient G2/M arrest period, it was probably not done in an appropriate way which would preserve the original genetic stability.

  13. Uterus transplantation: how far away from human trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, Mats; Wranning, Caiza A

    2008-01-01

    Uterus transplantation is being developed as a possible future method to treat uterus factor infertility. This commentary gives an overview of the animal research that has been conducted in preparation for human uterus transplantation. In addition, requirements for further specific research activities within the field are identified. It is our prediction that uterus transplantation will be introduced as an experimental procedure in the human within a few years.

  14. Randomized multicenter trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar Fasciitis (painful heel spur using very low doses – a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micke Oliver

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A lot of retrospective data concerning the effect of radiotherapy on the painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis is available in the literature. Nevertheless, a randomized proof of this effect is still missing. Thus, the GCGBD (German cooperative group on radiotherapy for benign diseases of the DEGRO (German Society for Radiation Oncology decided to start a randomized multicenter trial in order to find out if the effect of a conventional total dose is superior compared to that of a very low dose. Methods/Design In a prospective, controlled and randomized phase III trial two radiotherapy schedules are to be compared: standard arm: total dose 6.0 Gy in single fractions of 1.0 Gy applied twice a week experimental arm: total dose 0.6 Gy in single fractions of 0.1 Gy applied twice a week (acting as a placebo Patients aged over 40 years who have been diagnosed clinically and radiologically to be suffering from a painful heel spur for at least six months can be included. Former trauma, surgery or radiotherapy to the heel are not allowed nor are patients with a severe psychiatric disease or women during pregnancy and breastfeeding. According to the statistical power calculation 100 patients have to be enrolled into each arm. After having obtaining a written informed consent a patient is randomized by the statistician to one of the arms mentioned above. After radiotherapy, the patients are seen first every six weeks, then regularly up to 48 months after therapy, they additionally receive a questionnaire every six weeks after the follow-up examinations. The effect is measured using several target variables (scores: Calcaneodynia-score according to Rowe et al., SF-12 score, and visual analogue scale of pain. The most important endpoint is the pain relief three months after therapy. Patients with an inadequate result are offered a second radiotherapy series applying the standard dose (equally in both arms. This trial protocol has been

  15. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K;

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis...

  16. Phase I randomized dose-ascending placebo-controlled trials of ferroquine - a candidate anti-malarial drug - in adults with asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ospina Salazar Carmen L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and spread of drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains is a major concern and novel anti-malarial drugs are, therefore, needed. Ferroquine is a ferrocenic derivative of chloroquine with proven anti-malarial activity against chloroquine-resistant and -sensitive P. falciparum laboratory strains. Methods Adult young male aged 18 to 45 years, asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum, were included in two-dose escalation, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I trials, a single dose study and a multiple dose study aiming to evaluate oral doses of ferroquine from 400 to 1,600 mg. Results Overall, 54/66 patients (40 and 26 treated in the single and multiple dose studies, respectively experienced at least one adverse event, 15 were under placebo. Adverse events were mainly gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain (16, diarrhoea (5, nausea (13, and vomiting (9, but also headache (11, and dizziness (5. A few patients had slightly elevated liver parameters (10/66 including two patients under placebo. Moderate changes in QTc and morphological changes in T waves were observed in the course of the study. However, no adverse cardiac effects with clinical relevance were observed. Conclusions These phase I trials showed that clinically, ferroquine was generally well-tolerated up to 1,600 mg as single dose and up to 800 mg as repeated dose in asymptomatic young male with P. falciparum infection. Further clinical development of ferroquine, either alone or in combination with another anti-malarial, is highly warranted and currently underway.

  17. Effect of rectal enemas on rectal dosimetric parameters during high-dose-rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Sevillano, Marimar; Berenguer, Roberto; Aguayo, Manuel; Villas, Maria Victoria [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (CHUA), Department of Radiation Oncology, Albacete (Spain); Gascon, Marina; Arenas, Meritxell [Hospital Universitari Sant Joan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Reus (Spain); Rovirosa, Angeles; Camacho-Lopez, Cristina [University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Gynecological Cancer Unit, Radiation Oncology Department, ICMHO, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during postoperative high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). This prospective trial included 59 patients. Two rectal cleansing enemas were self-administered before the second fraction, and fraction 1 was considered the basal status. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Statistical analyses used paired and unpaired t-tests. Despite a significant 15 % reduction in mean rectal volume (44.07 vs. 52.15 cc, p = 0.0018), 35.6 % of patients had larger rectums after rectal enemas. No significant rectal enema-related DVH differences were observed compared to the basal data. Although not statistically significant, rectal cleansing-associated increases in mean rectal DVH values were observed: D{sub 0.1} {sub cc}: 6.6 vs. 7.21 Gy; D{sub 1} {sub cc}: 5.35 vs. 5.52 Gy; D{sub 2} {sub cc}: 4.67 vs. 4.72 Gy, before and after rectal cleaning, respectively (where D{sub x} {sub cc} is the dose to the most exposed x cm {sup 3}). No differences were observed in DVH parameters according to rectal volume increase or decrease after the enema. Patients whose rectal volume increased also had significantly larger DVH parameters, except for D{sub 5} {sub %}, D{sub 25} {sub %}, and D{sub 50} {sub %}. In contrast, in patients whose rectal volume decreased, significance was only seen for D{sub 25} {sub %} and D{sub 50} {sub %} (D{sub x} {sub %} dose covering x % of the volume). In the latter patients, nonsignificant reductions in D{sub 2} {sub cc}, D{sub 5} {sub cc} and V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (volume receiving at least 5 Gy) were observed. The current rectal enemas protocol was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters for HDR-VCB. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Auswirkungen von rektalen Dosen waehrend postoperativer High-Dose-Rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie an der Scheidenmanschette (''vaginal cuff brachytherapy'', VCB). An

  18. The UK Lung Cancer Screening Trial: a pilot randomised controlled trial of low-dose computed tomography screening for the early detection of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, John K; Duffy, Stephen W; Baldwin, David R; Brain, Kate E; Devaraj, Anand; Eisen, Tim; Green, Beverley A; Holemans, John A; Kavanagh, Terry; Kerr, Keith M; Ledson, Martin; Lifford, Kate J; McRonald, Fiona E; Nair, Arjun; Page, Richard D; Parmar, Mahesh Kb; Rintoul, Robert C; Screaton, Nicholas; Wald, Nicholas J; Weller, David; Whynes, David K; Williamson, Paula R; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Hansell, David M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lung cancer kills more people than any other cancer in the UK (5-year survival Nederlands Leuvens Longkanker Screenings Onderzoek: Dutch-Belgian Randomised Lung Cancer Screening Trial) and other European Union trials in 2017 which will provide European mortality and cost-effectiveness data. For now, there is a clear need for mortality results from other trials and further research to identify optimal methods of implementation and delivery. Strategies for increasing uptake and providing support for underserved groups will be key to implementation. TRIAL REGISTRATION Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78513845. FUNDING This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 20, No. 40. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information. PMID:27224642

  19. SMALL-DOSE CYTOKINES IN COMBINATION WITH 5-FLUOROURACIL IN OLISSEMINATED RENAL CELL CARCINOMA: FINAL RESULTS OF A RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Demidov

    2009-01-01

    alone is ineffective. 5-FU does not improve the efficacy of a cytokine combination. Small-dose IL-2 and IFN demonstrate a reasonable efficacy and can be recommend for MRCC pts outside clinical trials.  

  20. A clinical trial of single dose rectal and oral administration of diazepam for the prevention of serial seizures in adult epileptic patients.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The clinical anticonvulsant efficacy of single dose rectal and oral administration of diazepam 20 mg was examined in two double-blind placebo-controlled trials in adult epileptic patients. All subjects suffered from drug resistant epilepsy and frequently experienced serial seizures. Diazepam was administered rectally as a new experimental suppository formulation immediately after a seizure and was highly effective in preventing recurrent fits within a 24 h observation period (p less than 0.00...

  1. Importance of dose intensity in neuro-oncology clinical trials: summary report of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors have been limited, in part, because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium, the focus of which was the "Importance of Dose Intensity in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials," was convened in April 2000, at Government Camp, Mount Hood, Oregon. This meeting, which was supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Neurol...

  2. A Phase 2 Trial on the Effect of Low-Dose versus High-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation on Bone Mass in Adults with Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Delegated Institution. The Clinical Trials office in Hamburg is assessing the manufacture, shipment, and custodianship of study drug, cholecalciferol ...Center for Clinical & Translational Science at the University of Utah Cholecalciferol =vitamin D3 CIN = University of Cincinnati enrollment center...CGRP = Clinical Genetics Research Program DEXA = dual energy x-ray absorptiometry Ddrops = formulation of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) DXA = dual

  3. Individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer radiotherapy: an in silico trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, A.L.; Troost, E.G.C.; Huizenga, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various h

  4. Additional notes on clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaai, Mari; Kayano, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Takako; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2008-01-01

    In the previous study, we performed a simulation of a clinical pharmacokinetic trial, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral administration at the dose, D, and dosing interval, tau. The approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)), estimated as 2 x D/(C(peak) x tau+C(trough) x tau), is accurate for drugs with an elimination half-life comparative to or longer than tau; however, it was suggested that we might not use CL/F(approx) for drugs with a considerably short elimination half-life relative to tau. In the present study, we evaluated the accuracy of the alternative oral clearance (CL/F(exp)) estimated by the simple monoexponential model. In contrast to CL/F(approx), CL/F(exp) was accurate for drugs with a short elimination half-life relative to tau. The present finding in conjunction with our previous study suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design is promising for the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trial for drugs with not only slow but also rapid elimination from the body. We think that the accuracy and precision of the two analysis methods to estimate oral clearance (CL/F(approx) and CL/F(exp)) for a target drug should be evaluated carefully before and after a real clinical trial.

  5. Clinical Trial of 1000 Subjects Randomized to 5 Low-Volume Bowel Preparations for Colonoscopy and Their Acceptance of Split-Dose Bowel Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, David P; Foster, Diane B; Holden, John L; Kang, Jieun; Raiser, Manfred W

    2017-07-01

    We assessed the efficacy and tolerability of 5 low-volume bowel preparations for colonoscopy. We performed an investigator-blinded, randomized trial of 5 bowel preparations: 64 ounces of Gatorade and 306 or 357 g of PEG, both given the day prior; Gatorade and 306 g PEG, 2 L PEG-electrolyte solution with ascorbic acid, and sulfate solution, all 3 given as a split dose. One thousand outpatients consumed their preparation before a morning colonoscopy. The primary endpoint was colon cleanliness assessed by the Chicago Bowel Preparation Scale (BPS). Tolerability was assessed using a subject questionnaire. Another primary endpoint was patient acceptance of a split-dose bowel preparation assessed using a subject questionnaire. No statistically significant differences in the modified Chicago BPS were found among Gatorade and 357 g of PEG given as a day-prior dose and the 3 split-dose arms with 98.5% of colons cleansed adequately. The Gatorade and 357 g of PEG had significantly lower Chicago BPS fluid scores and Chicago BPS total scores (indicating dryer colons that required more irrigation) than the 3 split-dose arms. The Gatorade and PEG preparations were better tolerated. Many subjects are unwilling to consume a split-dose preparation and the majority of subjects would prefer a day-prior preparation with this preference highly dependent on the type of preparation they just consumed. The cleanliness of the colons was not significantly different among the 3 split-dose preparations. Day-prior dosing of Gatorade and 357 g of PEG allowed the mucosa to be visualized as well as did the split-dose preparations.

  6. [Defining trials of medicinal products according to the revised Dutch Medical Research in Human Subjects Act (WMO)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, E J; Huitema, A D R

    2006-09-23

    The revised Dutch Medical Research in Human Subjects Act (WMO), which implements the European directive regarding 'good clinical practice in the conduct of clinical trials on medicinal products for human use' (2001/20/EC), became effective on March 1, 2006. The revision places additional requirements on trials of medicinal products. Whether a trial should be regarded as a trial of a medicinal product is therefore an important question. The law does not provide adequate guidance for the classification of trials in which biological samples are collected, e.g. for genomic, proteomic or pharmacokinetic studies, while a medicinal product is given for a registered indication. Classifying these types of trials as trials of medicinal products does not enhance the safety of the participants. Therefore, these studies should not be considered as trials of medicinal products to avoid the increased administrative burden required by the revised WMO.

  7. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niewald, Marcus, E-mail: marcus.niewald@uks.eu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich [Radiotherapy Center, Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Franziskus Hospital, Bielefeld (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muecke, Ralf [Lippe Hospital, Lemgo (Germany); Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  8. Randomized Trial Comparing Conventional-Dose With High-Dose Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Long-Term Results From Proton Radiation Oncology Group/American College of Radiology 95-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietman, Anthony L.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Slater, Jerry D.; Shipley, William U.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Coen, John J.; Bush, David A.; Lunt, Margie; Spiegel, Daphna Y.; Skowronski, Rafi; Jabola, B. Rodney; Rossi, Carl J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that increasing radiation dose delivered to men with early-stage prostate cancer improves clinical outcomes. Patients and Methods Men with T1b-T2b prostate cancer and prostate-specific antigen ≤ 15 ng/mL were randomly assigned to a total dose of either 70.2 Gray equivalents (GyE; conventional) or 79.2 GyE (high). No patient received androgen suppression therapy with radiation. Local failure (LF), biochemical failure (BF), and overall survival (OS) were outcomes. Results A total of 393 men were randomly assigned, and median follow-up was 8.9 years. Men receiving high-dose radiation therapy were significantly less likely to have LF, with a hazard ratio of 0.57. The 10-year American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology BF rates were 32.4% for conventional-dose and 16.7% for high-dose radiation therapy (P < .0001). This difference held when only those with low-risk disease (n = 227; 58% of total) were examined: 28.2% for conventional and 7.1% for high dose (P < .0001). There was a strong trend in the same direction for the intermediate-risk patients (n = 144; 37% of total; 42.1% v 30.4%, P = .06). Eleven percent of patients subsequently required androgen deprivation for recurrence after conventional dose compared with 6% after high dose (P = .047). There remains no difference in OS rates between the treatment arms (78.4% v 83.4%; P = .41). Two percent of patients in both arms experienced late grade ≥ 3 genitourinary toxicity, and 1% of patients in the high-dose arm experienced late grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity. Conclusion This randomized controlled trial shows superior long-term cancer control for men with localized prostate cancer receiving high-dose versus conventional-dose radiation. This was achieved without an increase in grade ≥ 3 late urinary or rectal morbidity. PMID:20124169

  9. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of high-dose rebamipide treatment for low-dose aspirin-induced moderate-to-severe small intestinal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Watanabe

    Full Text Available Low-dose aspirin (LDA frequently causes small bowel injury. While some drugs have been reported to be effective in treating LDA-induced small intestinal damage, most studies did not exclude patients with mild damage thought to be clinically insignificant.We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a high dose of rebamipide, a gastroprotective drug, for LDA-induced moderate-to-severe enteropathy.We enrolled patients who received 100 mg of enteric-coated aspirin daily for more than 3 months and were found to have more than 3 mucosal breaks (i.e., erosions or ulcers in the small intestine by capsule endoscopy. Eligible patients were assigned to receive either rebamipide 300 mg (triple dose 3 times daily or placebo for 8 weeks in a 2:1 ratio. Capsule endoscopy was then repeated. The primary endpoint was the change in the number of mucosal breaks from baseline to 8 weeks. Secondary endpoints included the complete healing of mucosal breaks at 8 weeks and the change in Lewis score (an endoscopic score assessing damage severity from baseline to 8 weeks.The study was completed by 38 patients (rebamipide group: n = 25, placebo group: n = 13. After 8 weeks of treatment, rebamipide, but not placebo, significantly decreased the number of mucosal breaks (p = 0.046. While the difference was not significant (p = 0.13, the rate of complete mucosal break healing in the rebamipide group (32%, 8 of 25 tended to be higher than that in the placebo group (7.7%, 1 of 13. Rebamipide treatment significantly improved intestinal damage severity as assessed by the Lewis score (p = 0.02, whereas placebo did not. The triple dose of rebamipide was well tolerated.High-dose rebamipide is effective for the treatment of LDA-induced moderate-to-severe enteropathy.UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000003463.

  10. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of high-dose rebamipide treatment for low-dose aspirin-induced moderate-to-severe small intestinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshio; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Handa, Osamu; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Naito, Yuji; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose aspirin (LDA) frequently causes small bowel injury. While some drugs have been reported to be effective in treating LDA-induced small intestinal damage, most studies did not exclude patients with mild damage thought to be clinically insignificant. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a high dose of rebamipide, a gastroprotective drug, for LDA-induced moderate-to-severe enteropathy. We enrolled patients who received 100 mg of enteric-coated aspirin daily for more than 3 months and were found to have more than 3 mucosal breaks (i.e., erosions or ulcers) in the small intestine by capsule endoscopy. Eligible patients were assigned to receive either rebamipide 300 mg (triple dose) 3 times daily or placebo for 8 weeks in a 2:1 ratio. Capsule endoscopy was then repeated. The primary endpoint was the change in the number of mucosal breaks from baseline to 8 weeks. Secondary endpoints included the complete healing of mucosal breaks at 8 weeks and the change in Lewis score (an endoscopic score assessing damage severity) from baseline to 8 weeks. The study was completed by 38 patients (rebamipide group: n = 25, placebo group: n = 13). After 8 weeks of treatment, rebamipide, but not placebo, significantly decreased the number of mucosal breaks (p = 0.046). While the difference was not significant (p = 0.13), the rate of complete mucosal break healing in the rebamipide group (32%, 8 of 25) tended to be higher than that in the placebo group (7.7%, 1 of 13). Rebamipide treatment significantly improved intestinal damage severity as assessed by the Lewis score (p = 0.02), whereas placebo did not. The triple dose of rebamipide was well tolerated. High-dose rebamipide is effective for the treatment of LDA-induced moderate-to-severe enteropathy. UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000003463.

  11. Can human autonomic classical conditioning occur without contingency awareness? The critical importance of the trial sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kulwinder; Dawson, Michael E; Schell, Anne M; Courtney, Christopher G; Payne, Andrew F H

    2013-04-01

    Most evidence suggests that awareness of the CS-US contingency is necessary for human autonomic conditioning. However, Schultz and Helmstetter (2010) reported unaware skin conductance conditioning using difficult-to-discriminate visual CSs. We sought to replicate these findings with procedures nearly identical to Schultz and Helmstetter among 66 participants. Results replicated the findings of significantly greater autonomic responding to CS+ than CS-; however, participants also demonstrated greater expectancy of shock to CS+ than CS- despite being classified as unaware. The differential expectancy and conditioning occurred only on trials that followed a CS+/CS- alternating sequence. On non-alternating trials, there was significantly higher expectancy and skin conductance responding to CS- compared to CS+. These results indicate that what initially appeared to be unaware differential conditioning was likely due to differential expectancy arising from a predictable trial sequence. These results underscore the critical importance of controlling for trial sequence effects in the study of learning.

  12. Electroretinographic analyses of Rpe65-mutant rd12 mice: developing an in vivo bioassay for human gene therapy trials of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Alejandro J; Boye, Sanford L; Aleman, Tomas S; Pang, Ji-jing; McDowell, J Hugh; Boye, Shannon E; Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Hauswirth, William W

    2007-09-18

    Dramatic restoration of retinal function has followed subretinal viral-mediated gene therapy in RPE65-deficient animal models of human Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) caused by RPE65 mutations. Progress in early-phase clinical trials of RPE65-LCA prompted us to begin development of an in vivo bioassay of clinical grade vector stability for later-phase trials. Naturally-occurring Rpe65-mutant rd12 mice (2-4 mo of age) were studied with full-field electroretinograms (ERGs). Flash stimuli (range, -4.1 to 3.6 log scot-cd x s x m(-2)) were used to evoke ERGs in anesthetized, dark-adapted mice. B-wave amplitudes were measured conventionally and luminance-response functions were fit. Leading edges of photoresponses were analyzed with a model of rod phototransduction activation. A unilateral subretinal injection of AAV2-CB(SB)-hRPE65 vector was delivered and therapeutic efficacy of 4 doses spanning a 2 log unit range was studied with ERGs performed about 6 weeks after injection. Uninjected rd12 eyes and wild-type (wt) mice served as controls. Rd12 mice showed substantially smaller amplitudes and lower sensitivities than wt mice for all measured ERG b-wave and photoresponse parameters. For the dose-response study, there was no difference between 0.01X-dosed mice and untreated mutants. Improved receptoral and post-receptoral function was evident for 0.1X, 0.3X, 1X doses: b-wave semi-saturation constants decreased, b-wave amplitudes increased with dose; photoresponses showed faster kinetics and higher maximum amplitudes. ERG b-wave amplitude to a selected stimulus light intensity could provide evidence of biologic activity of the vector; interocular differences in b-wave amplitude comparing treated versus untreated eyes in the same animal also revealed vector efficacy. We have taken the first steps toward developing an ERG assay of biologic activity of human grade vector for future clinical trials of RPE65-LCA. Faithful murine models of treatable human disease tested with

  13. A randomized trial of two doses of granisetron in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced emesis. Dutch results within a multinational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, M W; Dijkstra, H J; Blijham, G H; van der Wall, E; Fehmers, M C; Keizer, H J; Nortier, J W; Siegenbeek van Heukelom, L; Slee, P H; Veenhof, C H

    1992-06-01

    Granisetron is a new serotonin-receptor antagonist with considerable activity in preclinical models and early clinical studies against drug-induced nausea and vomiting. In a randomized, double-blind trial, two dose levels of granisetron were compared with regard to their efficacy and safety if given to patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy with or without cisplatin. The present paper reports the Dutch experience with 125 patients included in this international trial. The two dose levels (40 and 160 micrograms/kg given once i.v. prior to chemotherapy) were equally effective in preventing acute emesis and nausea (within the first 24 h); in the group receiving cisplatin doses of 50 mg/m2 or more, 39% of patients had a complete response (no vomiting and mild nausea at most), with a complete response rate of 82% in the patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Sixty-three percent of patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy with a complete response within 24 h lost this response during the next 6 days, as did 20% of the other patients. Headache was the most frequently reported adverse event (18%), followed by constipation (6%) and dizziness (4%). All adverse events were mild and occurred equally frequently at both dose levels. Granisetron at 40 micrograms/kg i.v. given once is effective in the prevention of acute chemotherapy-induced emesis and nausea, in particular in patients receiving moderately emetogenic therapy.

  14. Importance of dose intensity in neuro-oncology clinical trials: summary report of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, N D; Anderson, C P; Bleyer, W A; Cairncross, J G; Cloughesy, T; Eck, S L; Guastadisegni, P; Hall, W A; Muldoon, L L; Patel, S J; Peereboom, D; Siegal, T; Neuwelt, E A

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors have been limited, in part, because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium, the focus of which was the "Importance of Dose Intensity in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials," was convened in April 2000, at Government Camp, Mount Hood, Oregon. This meeting, which was supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, brought together clinicians and basic scientists from across the U.S. to discuss the role of dose intensity and enhanced chemotherapy delivery in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and to design multicenter clinical trials. Optimizing chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is crucial, particularly in view of recent progress identifying certain brain tumors as chemosensitive. The discovery that specific constellations of genetic alterations can predict which tumors are chemoresponsive, and can therefore more accurately predict prognosis, has important implications for delivery of intensive, effective chemotherapy regimens with acceptable toxicities. This report summarizes the discussions, future directions, and key questions regarding dose-intensive treatment of primary CNS lymphoma, CNS relapse of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, high-grade glioma, and metastatic cancer of the brain. The promising role of cytoenhancers and chemoprotectants as part of dose-intensive regimens for chemosensitive brain tumors and development of improved gene therapies for malignant gliomas are discussed.

  15. Bioavailability of orally administered rhGM-CSF: a single-dose, randomized, open-label, two-period crossover trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF is usually administered by injection, and its oral administration in a clinical setting has been not yet reported. Here we demonstrate the bioavailability of orally administered rhGM-CSF in healthy volunteers. The rhGM-CSF was expressed in Bombyx mori expression system (BmrhGM-CSF. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a single-dose, randomized, open-label, two-period crossover clinical trial design, 19 healthy volunteers were orally administered with BmrhGM-CSF (8 microg/kg and subcutaneously injected with rhGM-CSF (3.75 microg/kg respectively. Serum samples were drawn at 0.0h, 0.5h ,0.75h,1.0h,1.5h,2.0h ,3.0h,4.0h,5.0h,6.0h,8.0h,10.0h and 12.0h after administrations. The hGM-CSF serum concentrations were determined by ELISA. The AUC was calculated using the trapezoid method. The relative bioavailability of BmrhGM-CSF was determined according to the AUC ratio of both orally administered and subcutaneously injected rhGM-CSF. Three volunteers were randomly selected from 15 orally administrated subjects with ELISA detectable values. Their serum samples at the 0.0h, 1.0h, 2.0h, 3.0h and 4.0h after the administrations were analyzed by Q-Trap MS/MS TOF. The different peaks were revealed by the spectrogram profile comparison of the 1.0h, 2.0h, 3.0h and 4.0h samples with that of the 0.0h sample, and further analyzed using both Enhanced Product Ion (EPI scanning and Peptide Mass Fingerprinting Analysis. The rhGM-CSF was detected in the serum samples from 15 of 19 volunteers administrated with BmrhGM-CSF. Its bioavailability was observed at an average of 1.0%, with the highest of 3.1%. The rhGM-CSF peptide sequences in the serum samples were detected by MS analysis, and their sizes ranging from 2,039 to 7,336 Da. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrated that the oral administered BmrhGM-CSF was absorbed into the blood. This study provides an approach for an oral administration of

  16. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury.

  17. Endocrine activity of persistent organic pollutants accumulated in human silicone implants — Dosing in vitro assays by partitioning from silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Mayer, Philipp; Pedersen, Mikael;

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulated in human tissues may pose a risk for human health by interfering with the endocrine system. This study establishes a new link between actual human internal POP levels and the endocrine active dose in vitro, applying partitioning-controlled dosing...... from silicone to the H295R steroidogenesis assay: (1) Measured concentrations of POPs in silicone breast implants were taken from a recent study and silicone disks were loaded according to these measurements. (2) Silicone disks were transferred into H295R cell culture plates in order to control...

  18. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Human Skin Fibroblast Cells Reveals Pathways and Proteins Affected by Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Background High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage; however, the precise relationships between long-term health effects, including cancer, and low-dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high-dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose-dependent responses to radiation. Principal Findings We have identified 7117 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts 1 h post-exposure. Semi-quantitative label-free analyses were performed to identify phosphopeptides that are apparently altered by radiation exposure. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation-responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role for MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conclusions Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provide a basis for the systems-level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at different radiation doses and elucidate the impact of low-dose radiation exposure on human health. PMID:21152398

  19. Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways and proteins affected by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-11-30

    Background: High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage, however the precise relationships between long term health effects, including cancer, and low dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose dependent responses to radiation. Principle Findings: We have identified 6845 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts one hour post-exposure. Dual statistical analyses based on spectral counts and peak intensities identified 287 phosphopeptides (from 231 proteins) and 244 phosphopeptides (from 182 proteins) that varied significantly following exposure to 2 and 50 cGy respectively. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role of MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conlcusions: Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provides a basis for the systems level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at

  20. Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways and proteins affected by low doses of ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage; however, the precise relationships between long-term health effects, including cancer, and low-dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high-dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose-dependent responses to radiation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified 7117 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy primary human skin fibroblasts 1 h post-exposure. Semi-quantitative label-free analyses were performed to identify phosphopeptides that are apparently altered by radiation exposure. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation-responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role for MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provide a basis for the systems-level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at different radiation doses and elucidate the impact of low-dose radiation exposure on human health.

  1. Daily low-dose hCG stimulation during the luteal phase combined with GnRHa triggered IVF cycles without exogenous progesterone: a proof of concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Claus Yding; Elbaek, Helle Olesen; Alsbjerg, Birgit; Laursen, Rita Jakubcionyte; Povlsen, Betina Boel; Thomsen, Lise; Humaidan, Peter

    2015-10-01

    inconvenient exogenous progesterone preparation. Further hCG may reduce the cost of stimulation and may collectively be used for stimulation of the follicular phase, ovulation induction and for luteal phase support. An unrestricted grant from ARTS Biologics made this study possible. None of the authors has any competing interests to declare. ClinicalTrial.gov number: NCT01504139. 28 December 2011. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Mykyta; Neumann, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR) affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures. PMID:24398983

  3. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta Sokolov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy doses of ionizing radiation (IR affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures.

  4. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of ongoing statin plus ezetimibe versus doubling the ongoing statin dose in hypercholesterolemic Taiwanese patients: an open-label, randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chih-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C is associated with reduced risk for major coronary events. Despite statin efficacy, a considerable proportion of statin-treated hypercholesterolemic patients fail to reach therapeutic LDL-C targets as defined by guidelines. This study compared the efficacy of ezetimibe added to ongoing statins with doubling the dose of ongoing statin in a population of Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, parallel-group comparison study of ezetimibe 10 mg added to ongoing statin compared with doubling the dose of ongoing statin. Adult Taiwanese hypercholesterolemic patients not at optimal LDL-C levels with previous statin treatment were randomized (N = 83 to ongoing statin + ezetimibe (simvastatin, atorvastatin or pravastatin + ezetimibe at doses of 20/10, 10/10 or 20/10 mg or doubling the dose of ongoing statin (simvastatin 40 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg or pravastatin 40 mg for 8 weeks. Percent change in total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and triglycerides, and specified safety parameters were assessed at 4 and 8 weeks. Results At 8 weeks, patients treated with statin + ezetimibe experienced significantly greater reductions compared with doubling the statin dose in LDL-C (26.2% vs 17.9%, p = 0.0026 and total cholesterol (20.8% vs 12.2%, p = 0.0003. Percentage of patients achieving treatment goal was greater for statin + ezetimibe (58.6% vs doubling statin (41.2%, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.1675. The safety and tolerability profiles were similar between treatments. Conclusion Ezetimibe added to ongoing statin therapy resulted in significantly greater lipid-lowering compared with doubling the dose of statin in Taiwanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. Studies to assess clinical outcome benefit are ongoing. Trial registration Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00652327

  5. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B(1) pharmacokinetics in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubert, Carole; Mata, John; Bench, Graham; Dashwood, Roderick; Pereira, Cliff; Tracewell, William; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Williams, David; Bailey, George

    2009-12-01

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans, where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB(1). However, neither AFB(1) pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted an unblinded crossover study to establish AFB(1) pharmacokinetic parameters among four human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla cotreatment in three of those volunteers. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an Institutional Review Board-approved dose of 14C-AFB(1) (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 mL water, followed by normal eating and drinking after 2 hours. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hours, and 14C- AFB(1) equivalents were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla or CHL, respectively. Protocols were repeated thrice for each volunteer. The study revealed rapid human AFB(1) uptake (plasma k(a), 5.05 + or - 1.10 h(-1); T(max), 1.0 hour) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hours) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB(1) absorption and reduced Cmax and AUCs (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB(1) pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  6. Phase 2 Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Engineered Oral Mucosa   PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen E. Feinberg DDS, MS, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Michigan Ann Arbor MI 4810...September 29, 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Phase II Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue-Engineered Oral Mucosa   5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...human EVPOME for soft tissue intraoral grafting procedures compared to the “gold standard” palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft. The study will determine

  7. Privacy as a Human Right and Media Trial in India

    OpenAIRE

    GIFTY OOMMEN

    2014-01-01

    Even before India became Independent, it had already become party to the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights 1948 (UDHR). Press had played a very important and productive role in the independence movement, through its strong support for the popular movement of Satyagraha and abdication of foreign goods and other similar forms of freedom struggle. Such was the impact of the print media that it frightened the British, as it gave a picture of a strong India, though the reality was a disin...

  8. High-Dose Vitamin D3 Supplementation in Children and Young Adults with HIV: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Virginia A.; Schall, Joan I.; Hediger, Mary L.; Zemel, Babette S.; Tuluc, Florin; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Samuel, Julia L.; Rutstein, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Suboptimal vitamin D status is prevalent in HIV-infected patients and associated with increased risk of disease severity and morbidity. We aimed to determine 12-mo safety and efficacy of daily 7000IU vitamin D3 (vitD3) vs placebo to sustain increased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and improve immune status in HIV-infected subjects. Methods This was a double-blind trial of perinatally- (PHIV) or behaviorally-acquired (BHIV) HIV-infected subjects (5.0–24.9y). Safety, 25(OH)D-related parameters, and immune status were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Fifty-eight subjects enrolled (67% male, 85% African-American, 64% BHIV) and 50 completed with no safety concerns. In unadjusted analyses, there were no differences between randomization groups at baseline; at 3, 6, and 12 months, 25(OH)D was higher with supplementation than baseline and higher than with placebo (P<0.05). In adjusted mixed models, in the supplementation group, the fixed effect of 25(OH)D was higher (P<0.001). Percentage of naïve T helper cells (Th naïve%) were significantly (P<0.01) and T helper cells (CD4%) marginally (P<0.10) increased with supplementation in those taking highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and RNA viral load was reduced (P ≤ 0.05). In exploratory linear models, change in 25(OH)D predicted RNA viral load at 3 and 12 months and CD4% at 3 months (P<0.05). Conclusions Daily 7000IU vitD3 for 12 months was safe in HIV-infected subjects and effective in increasing 25(OH)D. Supplementation improved in some clinically important HIV immune markers in subjects on HAART. Adjunct therapy with high-dose, daily vitD3 for HIV-infected subjects and for those on/off HAART requires further investigation. PMID:24988118

  9. Recombinant human interleukin 6 in metastatic renal cell cancer : A phase II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, JML; Goey, H; deVries, EGE; deMulder, PH; Groenewegen, A; Stoter, G; Sauerwein, HP; Bakker, PJM; Veenhof, CHN

    A phase II trial investigating the anti-tumour effects of recombinant human interleukin 6 (rhlL-6) in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer was carried out. RhIL-6 (150 mu g) was administered as a daily subcutaneous injection for 42 consecutive days on an outpatient basis. Forty-nine patients

  10. Recombinant human interleukin 6 in metastatic renal cell cancer : A phase II trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouthard, JML; Goey, H; deVries, EGE; deMulder, PH; Groenewegen, A; Stoter, G; Sauerwein, HP; Bakker, PJM; Veenhof, CHN

    1996-01-01

    A phase II trial investigating the anti-tumour effects of recombinant human interleukin 6 (rhlL-6) in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer was carried out. RhIL-6 (150 mu g) was administered as a daily subcutaneous injection for 42 consecutive days on an outpatient basis. Forty-nine patients w

  11. Dose requirements of continuous infusion of rocuronium and atracurium throughout orthotopic liver transplantation in humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Xiao-chuan; ZHOU Liang; FU Yin-yan; ZHU Sheng-mei; HE Hui-liang; WU Jian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dose requirements of continuous infusion of rocuronium and atracurium throughout orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in humans. Methods: Twenty male patients undergoing liver transplantation were randomly assigned to two comparable groups of 10 patients each to receive a continuous infusion of rocuronium or atracurium under itravenous balanced anesthesia. The response of adductor pollicis to train-of-four (TOF) stimulation of unlar nerve was monitored.The infusion rates of rocuronium and atracurium were adjusted to maintain T1/Tc ratio of 2%~10%. The total dose of each drug given during each of the three phases of OLT was recorded. Results: Rocuronium requirement, which were (0.468±0.167)unchanged during orthotopic liver transplantation. Conclusions: This study showed that the exclusion of the liver from the circulation results in the significantly reduced requirement of rocuronium while the requirement of atracurium was not changed,which suggests that the liver is of major importance in the clearance of rocuronium. A continuous infusion of atracurium with constant rate can provide stable neuromuscular blockade during the three stages of OLT.

  12. Consequences of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Piotr; Tubek, Stanislaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose dopamine inhibits peripheral chemoreceptors and attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in humans. However, it is unknown: (1) whether it also modulates the haemodynamic reactions to acute hypoxia, (2) whether it also modulates cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and (3) if there is any effect of dopamine withdrawal. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 healthy male volunteers. At sea level over 2 days every subject was administered low-dose dopamine (2 μg kg–1 min–1) or saline infusion, during which we assessed both ventilatory and haemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia. Separately, we evaluated effects of initiation and withdrawal of each infusion and BRS. The initiation of dopamine infusion did not affect minute ventilation (MV) or mean blood pressure (MAP), but increased both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output. Concomitantly, it decreased systemic vascular resistance. Dopamine blunted the ventilatory, MAP and HR reactions (hypertension, tachycardia) to acute hypoxia. Dopamine attenuated cardiac BRS to falling blood pressure. Dopamine withdrawal evoked an increase in MV. The magnitude of the increment in MV due to dopamine withdrawal correlated with the size of the HVR and depended on the duration of dopamine administration. The ventilatory reaction to dopamine withdrawal constitutes a novel index of peripheral chemoreceptor function. PMID:24396060

  13. In silico models for the prediction of dose-dependent human hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ailan; Dixon, Steven L.

    2003-12-01

    The liver is extremely vulnerable to the effects of xenobiotics due to its critical role in metabolism. Drug-induced hepatotoxicity may involve any number of different liver injuries, some of which lead to organ failure and, ultimately, patient death. Understandably, liver toxicity is one of the most important dose-limiting considerations in the drug development cycle, yet there remains a serious shortage of methods to predict hepatotoxicity from chemical structure. We discuss our latest findings in this area and present a new, fully general in silico model which is able to predict the occurrence of dose-dependent human hepatotoxicity with greater than 80% accuracy. Utilizing an ensemble recursive partitioning approach, the model classifies compounds as toxic or non-toxic and provides a confidence level to indicate which predictions are most likely to be correct. Only 2D structural information is required and predictions can be made quite rapidly, so this approach is entirely appropriate for data mining applications and for profiling large synthetic and/or virtual libraries.

  14. Consequences of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewinski, Piotr; Tubek, Stanislaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-03-15

    Low-dose dopamine inhibits peripheral chemoreceptors and attenuates the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) in humans. However, it is unknown: (1) whether it also modulates the haemodynamic reactions to acute hypoxia, (2) whether it also modulates cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and (3) if there is any effect of dopamine withdrawal. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled study on 11 healthy male volunteers. At sea level over 2 days every subject was administered low-dose dopamine (2 μg kg(-1) min(-1)) or saline infusion, during which we assessed both ventilatory and haemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia. Separately, we evaluated effects of initiation and withdrawal of each infusion and BRS. The initiation of dopamine infusion did not affect minute ventilation (MV) or mean blood pressure (MAP), but increased both heart rate (HR) and cardiac output. Concomitantly, it decreased systemic vascular resistance. Dopamine blunted the ventilatory, MAP and HR reactions (hypertension, tachycardia) to acute hypoxia. Dopamine attenuated cardiac BRS to falling blood pressure. Dopamine withdrawal evoked an increase in MV. The magnitude of the increment in MV due to dopamine withdrawal correlated with the size of the HVR and depended on the duration of dopamine administration. The ventilatory reaction to dopamine withdrawal constitutes a novel index of peripheral chemoreceptor function.

  15. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; MacLean, Katherine A; Caspers, Michael J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Griffiths, Roland R

    2016-04-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n = 4, 21 mcg/kg; n = 2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A.

  16. Acute reinforcing effects of low-dose nicotine nasal spray in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, K A; Grobe, J E; Caggiula, A; Wilson, A S; Stiller, R L

    1997-02-01

    Tobacco smoking behavior is reinforced by nicotine intake, but there has been little human research examining self-administration of nicotine per se, isolated from tobacco. In this study, 10 smokers (5 men, 5 women) who wanted to quit smoking sampled 0 (placebo), 0.75, and 1.5 ug/kg/spray nicotine via nasal spray during separate lab sessions before engaging in a free choice session, involving ad lib access to all three spray doses. Subjects also ad lib smoked during another session. For the group as a whole, neither nicotine spray dose was self-administered significantly more than placebo during the free choice session, suggesting low abuse potential. However, 4 of 10 subjects self-administered 1.5 ug/kg/spray on more than 50% of all sprays (vs. 33% chance) and were designated nicotine "choosers," while the others were "nonchoosers." Choosers responded to initial nicotine spray exposure during sampling sessions with greater positive subjective effects (similar to their responses to tobacco smoking), smoked more during the ad lib smoking session (i.e., self-administered more nicotine via tobacco smoking), and tended to be more heavily dependent smokers. They did not report greater withdrawal relief or less aversive effects from nicotine, suggesting their greater nicotine choice reflected greater positive reinforcement rather than negative reinforcement. These results are consistent with the few existing studies demonstrating that acute nicotine intake per se, in the absence of tobacco, may be reinforcing in some smokers.

  17. Real-time monitoring for human clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, Y.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    On August 3-4, 1994, an INEL team made measurements related to a real-time monitoring system for use on the epithermal beam facility at the BMRR. BNL has installed two fission chambers in front of the beam collimator, which are to monitor the beam coming from the reactor. These two monitors are located with one just above the 16-cm dia. front aperture and the other is just below. The fission chambers contain depleted uranium, but because of the small amount of U-235 present, they respond to thermal and near thermal neutrons rather than fast neutrons. This feature combined with their relatively small size (0.6 cm dia x 4 cm long) makes them very good monitors in the BMRR epithermal neutron beam. The INEL team worked with H.B. Lui (BNL) in performing initial tests of these monitors and established the settings to achieve stable operation. The main purpose of the measurement studies was to establish a basis for a monitoring method that tracks the dose the patient is receiving rather than the neutron fluence being delivered down the beam line.

  18. Phase I dose finding study evaluating the combination of bendamustine with weekly paclitaxel in patients with pre-treated metastatic breast cancer: RiTa trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Sibylle; Murmann, Caroline; Schwedler, Katrin; Warm, Mathias; Müller, Lothar; Heinrich, Georg; Nekljudova, Valentina; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the RiTa trial is to establish a feasible combination of bendamustine and paclitaxel in a weekly schedule in anthracycline pre-treated metastatic breast cancer patients. Starting dose of bendamustine was 50 mg/m(2) and was stepwise increased by 10 mg/m(2) up to 70 mg/m(2). The starting dose of paclitaxel was 60 mg/m(2) and was increased up to 90 mg/m(2). There are five pre-defined dose levels with three patients per dose level (maximum six patients) and six patients in the last dose level according to the Goodman design. Dose-limiting toxicities were defined as severe neutropenia and thrombocytopenia as well as non-haematological toxicities >/=NCI-CTC grade 3 in the first cycle. No dose-limiting toxicity up to 70 mg/m(2) bendamustine and 90 mg/m(2) paclitaxel occurred during the first cycle. Over all cycles, the following severe haematological toxicities (grade 3 and 4) were documented: neutropenia five patients and anaemia one patient. Relevant grade 3 and 4 non-haematological toxicities over all cycles were fatigue two patients, dyspnoea one patient, infection four patients and bone pain in one patient. Five serious adverse events, but no therapy related death occurred. Five patients showed a complete or partial remission, six patients stable disease and six progressed during treatment. The median progression-free survival was 8 months. Treatment with weekly bendamustine and paclitaxel is a feasible and effective regimen in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The recommended dose for forthcoming phase II study is 70 mg/m(2) bendamustine and 90 mg/m(2) paclitaxel.

  19. Development of a flattening filter free multiple source model for use as an independent, Monte Carlo, dose calculation, quality assurance tool for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Popple, Richard; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) Quality Assurance Center (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of compliance from their anthropomorphic phantom auditing program. IROC-H studies have suggested that one source of disagreement between institution submitted calculated doses and measurement is the accuracy of the institution's treatment planning system dose calculations and heterogeneity corrections used. In order to audit this step of the radiation therapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Varian flattening filter free (FFF) 6 MV and FFF 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on central axis depth dose data from a 10 × 10 cm(2) field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm(2) field size. The models were validated against open-field measurements in a water tank for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2) . The models were then benchmarked against IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck phantom and lung phantom measurements. Validation results, assessed with a ±2%/2 mm gamma criterion, showed average agreement of 99.9% and 99.0% for central axis depth dose data for FFF 6 MV and FFF 10 MV models, respectively. Dose profile agreement using the same evaluation technique averaged 97.8% and 97.9% for the respective models. Phantom benchmarking comparisons were evaluated with a ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and agreement averaged 90.1% and 90.8% for the respective models. Multiple source models for Varian FFF 6 MV and FFF 10 MV beams have been developed, validated, and benchmarked for inclusion in an independent dose calculation quality assurance tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Efficacy of Short-Term High-Dose Statin Pretreatment in Prevention of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Updated Study-Level Meta-Analysis of 13 Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Joo Myung Lee; Jonghanne Park; Ki-Hyun Jeon; Ji-Hyun Jung; Sang Eun Lee; Jung-Kyu Han; Hack-Lyoung Kim; Han-Mo Yang; Kyung Woo Park; Hyun-Jae Kang; Bon-Kwon Koo; Sang-Ho Jo; Hyo-Soo Kim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There have been conflicting results across the trials that evaluated prophylactic efficacy of short-term high-dose statin pre-treatment for prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) in patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG). The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date meta-analysis regarding the efficacy of high-dose statin pre-treatment in preventing CIAKI. METHODS AND RESULTS: Randomized-controlled trials comparing high-dose statin versus low-dose ...

  1. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês G Mollet

    Full Text Available Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron.Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types.Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively, and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR foci, and p53 stabilization.These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium, and induce a DNA damage response.

  2. Effect of low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial in a sub-Saharan African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoumessi, Romance Nguetse; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Kaze, Francois Folefack; Essouma, Mickael; Menanga, Alain Patrick; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2016-03-23

    Low-dose spironolactone has been proven to be effective for resistant hypertension in the general population, but this has yet to be confirmed in type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients. We assessed the efficacy of a low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension in a sub-Saharan African population of T2DM patients from Cameroon. This was a four-week single blinded randomized controlled trial in 17 subjects presenting with resistant hypertension in specialized diabetes care units in Cameroon. They were randomly assigned to treatment with a daily 25 mg of spironolactone (n = 9) or to an alternative antihypertensive regimen (n = 8), on top of any ongoing regimen and prevailing lifestyle prescriptions. They were seen at the start of the treatment, then 2 and 4 weeks later. The primary outcome was change in office and self-measured blood pressure (BP) during follow-up, and secondary outcomes were changes in serum potassium, sodium, and creatinine levels. Compared with alternative treatment, low-dose spironolactone was associated with significant decrease in office systolic BP (-33 vs. -14 mmHg; p = 0.024), and in diastolic BP (-14 vs. -5 mmHg; p = 0.006). After 1 month of spironolactone, all the patients were controlled based on BP below 130/80 mmHg, with significant office BP reduction from 158 ± 17/86 ± 11 to 125 ± 11/72 ± 8, vs. 158 ± 8/94 ± 8 to 144 ± 17/89 ± 12 mmHg in the alternative treatment group. There was no significant variation in sodium and creatinine levels in both groups, but a mild increase of potassium levels in the spironolactone group. Add-on low-dose spironolactone was effective in reducing BP to optimal levels in T2DM Cameroonian patients despite mild increase in serum potassium. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02426099. Date of registration April 2015.

  3. Dose of physical activity, physical functioning and disability risk in mobility-limited older adults: Results from the LIFE study randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnik, Jack M.; King, Abby C.; Pahor, Marco; McDermott, Mary M.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Manini, Todd M.; Glynn, Nancy W.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Axtell, Robert S.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the minimal dose of physical activity required to achieve improvement in physical functioning and reductions in disability risk is necessary to inform public health recommendations. To examine the effect of physical activity dose on changes in physical functioning and the onset of major mobility disability in The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study. We conducted a multicenter single masked randomized controlled trial that enrolled participants in 2010 and 2011 and followed them for an average of 2.6 years. 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70–89 years who had functional limitations were randomized to a structured moderate intensity walking, resistance, and flexibility physical activity program or a health education program. Physical activity dose was assessed by 7-day accelerometry and self-report at baseline and 24 months. Outcomes included the 400 m walk gait speed, the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months, and onset of major mobility disability (objectively defined by loss of ability to walk 400 m in 15 min). When the physical activity arm or the entire sample were stratified by change in physical activity from baseline to 24 months, there was a dose-dependent increase in the change in gait speed and SPPB from baseline at 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, the magnitude of change in physical activity over 24 months was related to the reduction in the onset of major mobility disability (overall P 48 minutes per week) in regular physical activity participation had significant and clinically meaningful effects on these outcomes. Trial registration: ClinicalsTrials.gov NCT00116194 PMID:28820909

  4. Increasing the dose of television advertising in a national antismoking media campaign: results from a randomised field trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Tim; Davis, Kevin C; Shafer, Paul; Patel, Deesha; Alexander, Robert; Bunnell, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    While antismoking media campaigns have demonstrated effectiveness, less is known about the country-level effects of increased media dosing. The 2012 US Tips From Former Smokers (Tips) campaign generated approximately 1.6 million quit attempts overall; however, the specific dose-response from the campaign was only assessed by self-report. Assess the impact of higher ad exposure during the 2013 Tips campaign on quit-related behaviours and intentions, campaign awareness, communication about campaign, and disease knowledge. A 3-month national media buy was supplemented within 67 (of 190) randomly selected local media markets. Higher-dose markets received media buys 3 times that of standard-dose markets. We compared outcomes of interest using data collected via web-based surveys from nationally representative, address-based probability samples of 5733 cigarette smokers and 2843 non-smokers. In higher-dose markets, 87.2% of smokers and 83.9% of non-smokers recalled television campaign exposure versus 75.0% of smokers and 73.9% of non-smokers in standard-dose markets. Among smokers overall, the relative quit attempt rate was 11% higher in higher-dose markets (38.8% vs 34.9%; pmarkets without a mental health condition, with a chronic health condition, or with only some college education made quit attempts at a higher rate than those in standard-dose markets. Non-smokers in higher-dose markets were more likely to talk with family or friends about smoking dangers (43.1% vs 35.7%; pmedia campaign compared standard and higher doses by randomisation of local media markets. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a higher dose for engaging non-smokers and further increasing quit attempts among smokers, especially African-Americans. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  6. Total Intravenous Anaesthesia with High-Dose Remifentanil Does Not Aggravate Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting and Pain, Compared with Low-Dose Remifentanil: A Double-Blind and Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Hyop Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to investigate postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV in low- and high-dose remifentanil regimens for total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA in adult female patients with American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status classification I undergoing local breast excision. Propofol and remifentanil 5 ng·mL−1 (L group or 10 ng·mL−1 (H group were administered for anaesthesia induction and maintenance. Propofol was titrated within range of 0.1 μg·mL−1 to maintain bispectral index (BIS values between 40 and 60. Haemodynamic parameters during the intra- and postoperative periods and 24 h postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS and PONV were evaluated. Each group with 63 patients was analyzed. The H group showed higher use of remifentanil and lower use of propofol, with similar recovery time. Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP, heart rate, and BIS did not differ significantly before and after endotracheal intubation in the H group. However, significant increases in MBP and BIS were apparent in the L group. Postoperative VAS, PONV incidence and scale, and Rhodes index did not differ significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, TIVA with high-dose remifentanil did not aggravate PONV with similar postoperative pain, compared with low-dose remifentanil. Furthermore, high-dose remifentanil showed more haemodynamic stability after endotracheal intubation. This trial is registered with KCT0000185.

  7. A Reduced-Dose Seasonal Trivalent Influenza Vaccine Is Safe and Immunogenic in Adult and Elderly Patients in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, Ferenc; Jankovics, Istvan

    2012-01-01

    With the recent pandemic of influenza A (H1N1) and vaccine shortages, there has been considerable interest in developing influenza vaccines with reduced doses, allowing for increased production capacity. Here we report a prospective, randomized, double-blind, single-center clinical trial of a reduced-dose whole-virion inactivated, adjuvanted influenza vaccine in adult and elderly volunteers. A total of 234 subjects, including 120 adults (18 to 60 years of age) and 114 elderly subjects (>60 years of age) were enrolled to receive either 6 μg or the conventional 15-μg dose of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines. The subjects were followed for safety analysis, and serum samples were obtained to assess immunogenicity by hemagglutination inhibition testing. The subjects developed antibody responses against the seasonal influenza A virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains, as well as the seasonal influenza B virus included in the vaccines. Single doses of 6 μg fulfilled licensing criteria for seasonal influenza vaccines. No significant differences in rates of seroconversion or seroprotection or in geometric mean titers were found between the two dosage levels. All adverse events were rare, mild, and transient. We found that the present reduced-dose vaccine is safe and immunogenic in healthy adult and elderly subjects and triggers immune responses that comply with licensing criteria. PMID:22219315

  8. Efficacy of short-term high-dose statin in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchuan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A few studies focused on statin therapy as specific prophylactic measures of contrast-induced nephropathy have been published with conflicting results. In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, we aimed to assess the effectiveness of short-term high-dose statin treatment for the prevention of CIN and clinical outcomes and re-evaluate of the potential benefits of statin therapy. METHODS: We searched PubMed, OVID, EMBASE, Web of science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for randomized controlled trials comparing short-term high-dose statin treatment versus low-dose statin treatment or placebo for preventing CIN. Our outcome measures were the risk of CIN within 2-5 days after contrast administration and need for dialysis. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with a total of 1,399 patients were identified and analyzed. The overall results based on fixed-effect model showed that the use of short-term high-dose statin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in risk of CIN (RR =0.51, 95% CI 0.34-0.76, p =0.001; I(2 = 0%. The incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis was not significant different after the use of statin (RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.05-2.10, p = 0.24; I(2 = 0%. The use of statin was not associated with a significant decrease in the plasma C-reactive protein level (SMD -0.64, 95% CI: -1.57 to 0.29, P = 0.18, I(2 = 97%. CONCLUSIONS: Although this meta-analysis supports the use of statin to reduce the incidence of CIN, it must be considered in the context of variable patient demographics. Only a limited recommendation can be made in favour of the use of statin based on current data. Considering the limitations of included studies, a large, well designed trial that incorporates the evaluation of clinically relevant outcomes in participants with different underlying risks of CIN is required to more adequately assess the role for statin in CIN prevention.

  9. Phase I clinical trial of systemically administered TUSC2(FUS1-nanoparticles mediating functional gene transfer in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor suppressor gene TUSC2/FUS1 (TUSC2 is frequently inactivated early in lung cancer development. TUSC2 mediates apoptosis in cancer cells but not normal cells by upregulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. No drug strategies currently exist targeting loss-of-function genetic abnormalities. We report the first in-human systemic gene therapy clinical trial of tumor suppressor gene TUSC2. METHODS: Patients with recurrent and/or metastatic lung cancer previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were treated with escalating doses of intravenous N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxypropyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride (DOTAP:cholesterol nanoparticles encapsulating a TUSC2 expression plasmid (DOTAP:chol-TUSC2 every 3 weeks. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients were treated at 6 dose levels (range 0.01 to 0.09 milligrams per kilogram. The MTD was determined to be 0.06 mg/kg. Five patients achieved stable disease (2.6-10.8 months, including 2 minor responses. One patient had a metabolic response on positron emission tomography (PET imaging. RT-PCR analysis detected TUSC2 plasmid expression in 7 of 8 post-treatment tumor specimens but not in pretreatment specimens and peripheral blood lymphocyte controls. Proximity ligation assay, performed on paired biopsies from 3 patients, demonstrated low background TUSC2 protein staining in pretreatment tissues compared with intense (10-25 fold increase TUSC2 protein staining in post-treatment tissues. RT-PCR gene expression profiling analysis of apoptotic pathway genes in two patients with high post-treatment levels of TUSC2 mRNA and protein showed significant post-treatment changes in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Twenty-nine genes of the 82 tested in the apoptosis array were identified by Igenuity Pathway Analysis to be significantly altered post-treatment in both patients (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.519; p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: DOTAP:chol-TUSC2 can be safely administered intravenously in lung

  10. Lack of Response in an Autistic Population to a Low Dose Clinical Trial of Pyridoxine Plus Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Lelland; And Others

    1993-01-01

    As some therapeutic benefits for autistic persons have been reported from combined high doses of pyridoxine and magnesium, this study evaluated long-term administration of low doses (to minimize adverse effects) to 15 subjects with autism. Findings indicated that, at this dosage level, pyridoxine and magnesium had no effect on the severity of…

  11. A new method for synthesizing radiation dose-response data from multiple trials applied to prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, Patricia; Vogelius, Ivan S; Bentzen, Søren M

    2010-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing dose-response data for biochemical control of prostate cancer according to study design (randomized vs. nonrandomized) and risk group (low vs. intermediate-high).......A new method is presented for synthesizing dose-response data for biochemical control of prostate cancer according to study design (randomized vs. nonrandomized) and risk group (low vs. intermediate-high)....

  12. A Phase I trial of dose escalation of topotecan combined with whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Ge; Wenyan Zhao; Xiaocang Ren; Yongqiang Wang; Zhigang Li; Yanqi Li; Yuee Liu; Qiang Lin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to define the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and observe the toxicity of escalating topotecan combined whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer. Methods: Patients with brain metastasis of lung cancer received conventional fractionation radiotherapy, with 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy per week, the total radiation dose was 40 Gy, while the larger lesions were boosted to 50-60 Gy. The initial dose of topotecan was 1.0 mg/m2. Escalation dose was 0.25 mg/m2. Every cohort contained at least 3 patients.If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed,the next dose level was opened for entry. These courses were repeated until DLT appeared. MTD was declared as one dose level below which DLT appeared. Results: Eighteen patients were recruited. Two cases of grade 3 leucopenia/neutropenia was observed as DLT at the level of topotecan 2.0 mg/m2. MTD of topotecan was defined as 1.75 mg/m2.The major side effects were leucopenia/neutropenia, nausea and vomiting. Conclusion: Topotecan combined with whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer is well tolerated. Maximum-tolerated dose of topotecan is 1.75 mg/m2, once a week of a total of four.

  13. Optimum dose of vitamin D for disease prevention in older people: BEST-D trial of vitamin D in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, H; Tomson, J; Newman, C; Kurien, R; Lay, M; Cox, J; Sayer, J; Hill, M; Emberson, J; Armitage, J; Clarke, R

    2017-03-01

    This trial compared the effects of daily treatment with vitamin D or placebo for 1 year on blood tests of vitamin D status. The results demonstrated that daily 4000 IU vitamin D3 is required to achieve blood levels associated with lowest disease risks, and this dose should be tested in future trials for fracture prevention. The aim of this trial was to assess the effects of daily supplementation with vitamin D3 4000 IU (100 μg), 2000 IU (50 μg) or placebo for 1 year on biochemical markers of vitamin D status in preparation for a large trial for prevention of fractures and other outcomes. This is a randomized placebo-controlled trial in 305 community-dwelling people aged 65 years or older in Oxfordshire, UK. Outcomes included biochemical markers of vitamin D status (plasma 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25[OH]D], parathyroid hormone [PTH], calcium and alkaline phosphatase), cardiovascular risk factors and tests of physical function. Mean (SD) plasma 25(OH)D levels were 50 (18) nmol/L at baseline and increased to 137 (39), 102 (25) and 53 (16) nmol/L after 12 months in those allocated 4000 IU, 2000 IU or placebo, respectively (with 88%, 70% and 1% of these groups achieving the pre-specified level of >90 nmol/L). Neither dose of vitamin D3 was associated with significant deviation outside the normal range of PTH or albumin-corrected calcium. The additional effect on 25(OH)D levels of 4000 versus 2000 IU was similar in all subgroups except for body mass index, for which the further increase was smaller in overweight and obese participants compared with normal-weight participants. Supplementation with vitamin D had no significant effects on cardiovascular risk factors or on measures of physical function. After accounting for average 70% compliance in long-term trials, doses of 4000 IU vitamin D3 daily may be required to achieve plasma 25(OH)D levels associated with lowest disease risk in observational studies.

  14. Controlled human malaria infection trials: How tandems of trust and control construct scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijker, Else M; Sauerwein, Robert W; Bijker, Wiebe E

    2016-02-01

    Controlled human malaria infections are clinical trials in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with malaria under controlled conditions. Controlled human malaria infections are complex clinical trials: many different groups and institutions are involved, and several complex technologies are required to function together. This functioning together of technologies, people, and institutions is under special pressure because of potential risks to the volunteers. In this article, the authors use controlled human malaria infections as a strategic research site to study the use of control, the role of trust, and the interactions between trust and control in the construction of scientific knowledge. The authors argue that tandems of trust and control play a central role in the successful execution of clinical trials and the construction of scientific knowledge. More specifically, two aspects of tandems of trust and control will be highlighted: tandems are sites where trust and control coproduce each other, and tandems link the personal, the technical, and the institutional domains. Understanding tandems of trust and control results in setting some agendas for both clinical trial research and science and technology studies.

  15. Dose- and Time-Dependent Response of Human Leukemia (HL-60 Cells to Arsenic Trioxide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL has been based on the administration of all-trans retinoic acid plus anthracycline chemotherapy, which is very effective as first line therapy; however 25 to 30% of patients will relapse with their disease becoming refractory to conventional therapy. Recently, studies have shown arsenic trioxide to be effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In this study, we used the human leukemia (HL-60 cell line as a model to evaluate the cytoxicity of arsenic trioxide based on the MTT assay. Data obtained from this assay indicated that arsenic trioxide significantly reduced the viability of HL-60 cells, showing LD50 values of 14.26 + 0.5μg/mL, 12.54 + 0.3μg/mL, and 6.4 + 0.6μg/mL upon 6, 12, and 24 hours of exposure, respectively; indicating a dose- and time-dependent response relationship. Findings from the present study indicate that arsenic trioxide is highly cytotoxic to human leukemia (HL-60 cells, supporting its use as an effective therapeutic agent in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  16. Gamma radiation at a human relevant low dose rate is genotoxic in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Anne; Eide, Dag M.; Instanes, Christine; Andersen, Jill M.; Brede, Dag A.; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Lind, Ole C.; Brandt-Kjelsen, Anicke; Bjerke, Hans; Salbu, Brit; Oughton, Deborah; Brunborg, Gunnar; Olsen, Ann K.

    2016-09-01

    Even today, 70 years after Hiroshima and accidents like in Chernobyl and Fukushima, we still have limited knowledge about the health effects of low dose rate (LDR) radiation. Despite their human relevance after occupational and accidental exposure, only few animal studies on the genotoxic effects of chronic LDR radiation have been performed. Selenium (Se) is involved in oxidative stress defence, protecting DNA and other biomolecules from reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is hypothesised that Se deficiency, as it occurs in several parts of the world, may aggravate harmful effects of ROS-inducing stressors such as ionising radiation. We performed a study in the newly established LDR-facility Figaro on the combined effects of Se deprivation and LDR γ exposure in DNA repair knockout mice (Ogg1-/-) and control animals (Ogg1+/-). Genotoxic effects were seen after continuous radiation (1.4 mGy/h) for 45 days. Chromosomal damage (micronucleus), phenotypic mutations (Pig-a gene mutation of RBCCD24-) and DNA lesions (single strand breaks/alkali labile sites) were significantly increased in blood cells of irradiated animals, covering three types of genotoxic activity. This study demonstrates that chronic LDR γ radiation is genotoxic in an exposure scenario realistic for humans, supporting the hypothesis that even LDR γ radiation may induce cancer.

  17. Inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma growth using survivint34a by low-dose systematic administration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Shan; Chunting Wang; Li Yang; Li Juan Chen; Hong Xin Deng; Han Shuo Yang; Zhimian Li; Zhiyong Li; Li Pan; Fei Leng; Yuquan Wei

    2010-06-01

    Anti-apoptosis plays an important role in tumour formation and development. Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, which is a target for anti-cancer drug exploitation was replaced as development. We investigated the role of the homo dominant-negative mutant Survivin-T34A in suppressing human lung adenocarcinomas (A549). The anti-tumour activity of HSurvivinT34A plasmid was evaluated in the A549 cell line and nude mice bearing A549 subcutaneous tumours. Low-dose systemic administration was continuously used. The HSurvivinT34A plasmid (5 g/one) complexed with a cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) significantly inhibited tumour growth in our model. We observed microvessel density degradation by CD31 immunohistochemistry and apoptotic cell increase by TUNEL assay, PI staining and flow cytometric analysis in the treated group. The present findings suggest that the HSurvivinT34A plasmid complexed with a cationic liposome may provide an effective approach to inhibit the growth of human lung adenocarcinomas in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Dosing and efficacy of glutamine supplementation in human exercise and sport training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Some athletes can have high intakes of l-glutamine because of their high energy and protein intakes and also because they consume protein supplements, protein hydrolysates, and free amino acids. Prolonged exercise and periods of heavy training are associated with a decrease in the plasma glutamine concentration and this has been suggested to be a potential cause of the exercise-induced immune impairment and increased susceptibility to infection in athletes. However, several recent glutamine feeding intervention studies indicate that although the plasma glutamine concentration can be kept constant during and after prolonged strenuous exercise, the glutamine supplementation does not prevent the postexercise changes in several aspects of immune function. Although glutamine is essential for lymphocyte proliferation, the plasma glutamine concentration does not fall sufficiently low after exercise to compromise the rate of proliferation. Acute intakes of glutamine of approximately 20-30 g seem to be without ill effect in healthy adult humans and no harm was reported in 1 study in which athletes consumed 28 g glutamine every day for 14 d. Doses of up to 0.65 g/kg body mass of glutamine (in solution or as a suspension) have been reported to be tolerated by patients and did not result in abnormal plasma ammonia levels. However, the suggested reasons for taking glutamine supplements (support for immune system, increased glycogen synthesis, anticatabolic effect) have received little support from well-controlled scientific studies in healthy, well-nourished humans.

  19. Environmentally relevant dose of arsenic interferes in functions of human monocytes derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Abbas; Salmani, Vahid

    2017-06-05

    Arsenic is a major environmental pollutant and highly hazardous toxin to human health, which well established as carcinogen and immune deregulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) have a pivotal role in cell-mediated immunity for T-cell activation and antigen presentation. In this study, T cell activation, some key functional genes expression, cell stability and phagocytosis capacity of human monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs) were analyzed after in vitro exposure to very low dose of arsenic for 12 and 24h. Arsenic decreased continually phagocytosis capacity of MDDCs. Furthermore, down-regulation of the cell-surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD40 after 24h post treatment with arsenic, confirmed arsenic interferers in the phagocytosis process. Pro inflammatory cytokines, IL1β and TNFα were more expressed in arsenic-treated MDDCs while IL6 transiently was down regulated. In general, our novel findings here strongly suggest that low level of arsenic dysregulates four fundamental immune processes of DCs. Mechanistically; this could explain the observed immunodeficiency activity of Arsenic, and give direction for comprehension the pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Randomised clinical trial: study of escalating doses of NRL001 given in rectal suppositories of different weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D; Pediconi, C; Jacobs, A

    2014-03-01

    The application of α-adrenoceptor agonists can improve faecal incontinence symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic and systemic effects of NRL001 administered as different strengths in 1 or 2 g suppositories. This randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study included 48 healthy subjects. Group 1 consisted of two cohorts of 12 subjects administered either four single doses of 1 or 2 g rectal suppository with either 5, 7.5 or 10 mg NRL001, or matching placebo. Group 2 consisted of two cohorts of 12 subjects administered either four single doses of 1 or 2 g rectal suppository with either 10, 12.5 or 15 mg NRL001, or matching placebo. Doses were given in an escalating manner with placebo at a random position within the sequence. Tmax was at ~4.5 h post-dose for all NRL001 doses. Median AUC0-tz , AUC0-∞ and Cmax increased with increasing dose for both suppository sizes. The estimate of ratios of geometric means comparing 2 g with 1 g suppository, and regression analysis for dose proportionality, was close to 1 for the variables AUC0-tz , AUC0-∞ and Cmax (P > 0.05). For both suppository sizes, 20-min mean pulse rate was significantly decreased compared with placebo with all doses (P < 0.05). Blood pressure decreased overall. There were 144 adverse events (AEs) and no serious AEs reported during the study. All AEs were mild in severity. The regression analysis concluded that the doses were dose proportional. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. An open randomized active-controlled clinical trial with low-dose SKA cytokines versus DMARDs evaluating low disease activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Martin LS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available LS Martin-Martin,1 F Giovannangeli,2 E Bizzi,2 U Massafra,2 E Ballanti,2 M Cassol,3 A Migliore2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Regina Apostolorum Hospital, 2Operative Unit of Rheumatology, 3Department of Internal Medicine, San Pietro Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Rome, Italy Background: Biologic agents are currently the strongest immunosuppressive drugs able to induce remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. One of the objectives of the medical scientific community now is how to maintain remission or low disease activity (LDA. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the contribution of low-dose sequential kinetic activation (SKA IL-4, IL-10, and anti-IL-1 antibodies (10 fg/mL in patients affected by RA in maintaining LDA or remission obtained after biological therapy. Method: This is a randomized, open, active-controlled, prospective, Phase IV trial. Disease activity score (DAS28, clinical disease activity index, simplified disease activity index, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels, global health assessment, and pain visual analog scale were evaluated at baseline visit and then every 3 months together with an assessment of side effects till 12 months. Thirty-nine RA patients were enrolled and randomized to continue disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs therapy or to receive a combination of SKA low-dose cytokines formulated in concentration of 10 fg/mL orally administered at a dose of 20 drops/d for 12 consecutive months. Results: The rate of maintenance of LDA at 12 months was superior in the group treated with low-dose cytokines compared with patients treated with DMARDs, 66.7% and 42.1%, respectively; however, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. No side effects were reported in both groups. Conclusion: This is the first study using a combination of three low-dose cytokines in RA, after data published on psoriasis. These data suggest that the use of a combination of low-dose SKA

  2. Effects of Adjunct Low-Dose Vitamin D on Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Progression: Preliminary Findings of a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the effect of low-dose oral vitamin D in combination with current disease-modifying therapy on the prevention of progression of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS. A phase II double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted between October 2007 and October 2008 included 50 patients with confirmed RRMS aged 25 to 57 years and normal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. They were randomly allocated to receive 12 months of treatment with either escalating calcitriol doses up to 0.5 μg/day or placebo combined with disease-modifying therapy. Response to treatment was assessed at eight-week intervals. In both groups, the mean relapse rate decreased significantly (P<0.001. In the 25 patients treated with placebo, the mean (SD Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS increased from 1.70 (1.21 at baseline to 1.94 (1.41 at the end of study period (P<0.01. Average EDSS and relapse rate at the end of trial did not differ between groups. Adding low-dose vitamin D to routine disease-modifying therapy had no significant effect on the EDSS score or relapse rate. A larger phase III multicenter study of vitamin D in RRMS is warranted to more assess the efficacy of this intervention.

  3. Assessment of maximum tolerated dose of a new herbal drug, Semelil (ANGIPARSTM in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: A Phase I clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmat R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: In many cases of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU management, wound healing is incomplete, and wound closure and epithelial junctional integrity are rarely achieved. Our aim was to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and dose-limiting toxicity (DLT of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new herbal compound for wound treatment in a Phase I clinical trial.Methods: In this open label study, six male diabetic patients with a mean age of 57±7.6 years were treated with escalating intravenous doses of Semelil, which started at 2 cc/day to 13.5 cc/day for 28 days. Patients were assessed with a full physical exam; variables which analyzed included age, past history of diabetes and its duration, blood pressure, body temperature, weight, characteristics of DFU, Na, K, liver function test, Complete Blood Count and Differential(CBC & diff, serum amylase, HbA1c, PT, PTT, proteinuria, hematuria, and side effects were recorded. All the measurements were taken at the beginning of treatment, the end of week 2 and week 4. We also evaluated Semelil's side effects at the end of weeks 4 and 8 after ending therapy.Results and major conclusions: Up to the drug dose of 10 cc/day foot ulcer dramatically improved. We did not observe any clinical or laboratory side effects at this or lower dose levels in diabetic patients. With daily dose of 13.5 cc of Semelil we observed phlebitis at the infusion site, which was the only side effect. Therefore, in this study we determined the MTD of Semelil at 10 cc/day, and the only DLT was phlebitis in injection vein. The recommended dose of Semelil I.V. administration for Phase II studies was 4 cc/day.

  4. Inhibition of platelet function by abciximab or high-dose tirofiban in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Werkum, J.W.; Gerritsen, W.B.M.; Kelder, J.C.; Hackeng, C.M.; Ernst, S.M.; Deneer, V.H.M.; Suttorp, M.J.; Rensing, B.J.W.M.; Plokker, H.W.M.; ten Berg, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary PCI, few data exist on the magnitude of platelet activation, aggregation and dosing of glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors. Methods Sixty STEMI patients were randomised to abciximab, to high-dose tirofiban or to no additional GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor treatment. Platelet activation (P-selectin expression) was measured using flow cytometry and the level of inhibition of platelet aggregation was assessed using the Plateletworks assay. Additionally, the PFA-100 with the collagen/adenosine-diphosphate cartridge (CADP) was used to compare the levels of platelet inhibition. All measurements were performed at baseline (T0), immediately after (T1), 30 minutes (T2), 60 minutes (T3) and 120 minutes (T4) after primary PCI. Results The level of platelet activation in both GP IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor treated groups was significantly lower compared with the control group at all time points after primary PCI (p=0.04). Also the administration of the currently recommended dose of abciximab resulted in significantly lower levels of inhibition of aggregation compared with high-dose tirofiban (p<0.0001). In addition, the CADP closure times were significantly prolonged in both GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor treated groups compared with the control group at time points T1 (p=0.006) and T4 (p<0.0001). Conclusion The administration of high-dose tirofiban resulted in a significantly higher inhibition of platelet aggregation compared with the currently recommended dose of abciximab. Large clinical trials are needed to assess whether this laboratory superiority of high-dose tirofiban translates into higher clinical efficacy. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:375-81.18176639) PMID:18176639

  5. Dose reduction trial from 60 Gy in 10 fractions to 54 Gy in 9 fractions schedule in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hironori; Yoshida, Ken; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Yamazaki, Hideya; Koizumi, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effects of 60 Gy/10 fractions (twice a day) with those of 54 Gy/9 fractions in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) for early tongue cancer, we performed a matched-pair analysis of patients with early tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0), who were treated with 60 or 54 Gy of radiation between 1996 and 2004. Seventeen patients treated with 54 Gy and 34 matched-pair patients treated with 60 Gy were extracted and analyzed. Local recurrence occurred in two patients in the 54-Gy arm and five patients in the 60-Gy arm. The 2-year local control rates were 88% for both the 54-Gy arm and 60-Gy arm (not significant). The 2-year overall survival rates were 88% in the 60-Gy arm and 82% in the 54-Gy arm. Two-year actuarial complication-free rates were 91% in the 60-Gy arm and 83% in the 54-Gy arm (not significant), respectively. There was no significant association between the total dose and local control rate and late complications. The outcome of 54 Gy/ 9 fractions was similar to that of 60 Gy/ 10 fractions in patients with early tongue cancer. PMID:22843365

  6. Effect of low-dose valsartan on proteinuria in normotensive immunoglobulin A nephropathy with minimal proteinuria: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young-Il; Na, Ha-Young; Moon, Ju-Young; Han, Sang-Woong; Yang, Dong-Ho; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Choi, Hoon-Young; Lim, So-Dug; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Yong-Kyu; Shin, Sug-Kyun

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is a generally progressive disease, even in patients with favorable prognostic features. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antiproteinuric effect and tolerability of low-dose valsartan (an angiotensin II receptor blocker) therapy in normotensive IgAN patients with minimal proteinuria of less than 0.5 to 1.0 g/day. Normotensive IgAN patients, who had persistent proteinuria with a spot urine protein-to-creatinine ratio of 0.3 to 1.0 mg/mg creatinine, were recruited from five hospitals and randomly assigned to either 40 mg of valsartan as the low-dose group or 80 mg of valsartan as the regular-dose group. Clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline, and at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after valsartan therapy. Forty-three patients (low-dose group, n = 23; regular-dose group, n = 20) were enrolled in the study. Proteinuria decreased significantly not only in the regular-dose group but also in the low-dose group. The change in urine protein-to-creatinine ratio at week 24 was -41.3% ± 26.1% (p proteinuria without causing any intolerability in normotensive IgAN patients with minimal proteinuria.

  7. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting apolipoprotein(a) in people with raised lipoprotein(a): two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Nicholas J; van Capelleveen, Julian C; Geary, Richard S; Xia, Shuting; Tami, Joseph A; Yu, Rosie Z; Marcovina, Santica M; Hughes, Steven G; Graham, Mark J; Crooke, Rosanne M; Crooke, Stanley T; Witztum, Joseph L; Stroes, Erik S; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-11-05

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is a highly prevalent (around 20% of people) genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease and calcific aortic valve stenosis, but no approved specific therapy exists to substantially lower Lp(a) concentrations. We aimed to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of two unique antisense oligonucleotides designed to lower Lp(a) concentrations. We did two randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. In a phase 2 trial (done in 13 study centres in Canada, the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, and the UK), we assessed the effect of IONIS-APO(a)Rx, an oligonucleotide targeting apolipoprotein(a). Participants with elevated Lp(a) concentrations (125-437 nmol/L in cohort A; ≥438 nmol/L in cohort B) were randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio in cohort A and in a 4:1 ratio in cohort B) with an interactive response system to escalating-dose subcutaneous IONIS-APO(a)Rx (100 mg, 200 mg, and then 300 mg, once a week for 4 weeks each) or injections of saline placebo, once a week, for 12 weeks. Primary endpoints were mean percentage change in fasting plasma Lp(a) concentration at day 85 or 99 in the per-protocol population (participants who received more than six doses of study drug) and safety and tolerability in the safety population. In a phase 1/2a first-in-man trial, we assessed the effect of IONIS-APO(a)-LRx, a ligand-conjugated antisense oligonucleotide designed to be highly and selectively taken up by hepatocytes, at the BioPharma Services phase 1 unit (Toronto, ON, Canada). Healthy volunteers (Lp[a] ≥75 nmol/L) were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of 10-120 mg IONIS-APO(a)LRx subcutaneously in an ascending-dose design or placebo (in a 3:1 ratio; single-ascending-dose phase), or multiple doses of 10 mg, 20 mg, or 40 mg IONIS-APO(a)LRx subcutaneously in an ascending-dose design or placebo (in an 8:2 ratio) at day 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, and 22 (multiple-ascending-dose phase). Primary endpoints were mean percentage change in

  8. Dose-Dependent Response to 3-Nitrobenzanthrone Exposure in Human Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Mario; Verma, Nisha; Zerries, Anna; Schmitz-Spanke, Simone

    2017-09-28

    A product of incomplete combustion of diesel fuel, 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), has been classified as a cancer-causing substance. It first gained attention as a potential urinary bladder carcinogen due to the presence of its metabolite in urine and formation of DNA adducts. The aim of the present study was to characterize the dose-response relationship of 3-NBA in human urothelial cancer cell line (RT4) exposed to concentrations ranging from 0.0003 μM (environmentally relevant) to 80 μM by utilizing toxicological and metabolomic approaches. We observed that the RT4 cells were capable of bioactivation of 3-NBA within 30 min of exposure. Activity measurements of various enzymes involved in the conversion of 3-NBA in RT4 cells demonstrated NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) as the main contributor for its bioactivation. Moreover, cytotoxicity assessment exhibited an initiation of adaptive mechanisms at low dosages, which diminished at higher doses, indicating that the capacity of these mechanisms no longer suffices, resulting in increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, reduced proliferation, and hyperpolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane. To characterize the underlying mechanisms of this cellular response, the metabolism of 3-NBA and metabolomic changes in the cells were analyzed. The metabolomic analysis of the cells (0.0003, 0.01, 0.08, 10, and 80 μM 3-NBA) showed elevated levels of various antioxidants at low concentrations of 3-NBA. However, at higher exposure concentrations, it appeared that the cells reprogrammed their metabolism to maintain the cell homeostasis via activation of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP).

  9. Usefulness of high-dose intravenous human immunoglobulins treatment for refractory recurrent pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Michele; Buiatti, Alessandra; Merlo, Marco; Massa, Laura; Fabris, Enrico; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2013-11-01

    The management of refractory recurrent pericarditis is challenging. Previous clinical reports have noted a beneficial effect of high-dose intravenous human immunoglobulins (IvIgs) in isolated and systemic inflammatory disease-related forms. In this article, we analyzed retrospectively our clinical experience with IvIg therapy in a series of clinical cases of pericarditis refractory to conventional treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 9 patients (1994 to 2010) with refractory recurrent pericarditis, who received high-dose IvIg as a part of their medical treatment. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, or colchicine treatment was not discontinued during IvIg treatment. No patients had a history of autoimmune or connective tissue diseases. During an average period of 11 months from the first recurrence, patients had experienced a mean of 5 relapses before the first IvIg treatment. In 4 cases, patients showed complete clinical remission with no further relapse after the first IvIg cycle. Two patients experienced a single minor relapse, responsive to short-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In 2 patients, we performed a second cycle of IvIg after a recurrence of pericarditis, with subsequent complete remission. One patient did not respond to 3 cycles of IvIg and subsequently underwent pericardial window and long-term immunosuppressive treatment. No major adverse effect was observed in consequence of IvIg administration in all the cases. In conclusion, although IvIg mode of action is still poorly understood in this setting, this treatment can be considered as an option in patients with recurrent pericarditis refractory to conventional medical treatment and, in our small series, has proved to be effective in 8 of 9 cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human guinea pigs and the ethics of experimentation: the BMJ's correspondent at the Nuremberg medical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindling, P

    1996-12-07

    Though the Nuremberg medical trial was a United States military tribunal, British forensic pathologists supplied extensive evidence for the trial. The BMJ had a correspondent at the trial, and he endorsed a utilitarian legitimation of clinical experiments, justifying the medical research carried out under Nazism as of long term scientific benefit despite the human costs. The British supported an international medical commission to evaluate the ethics and scientific quality of German research. Medical opinions differed over whether German medical atrocities should be given publicity or treated in confidence. The BMJ's correspondent warned against medical researchers being taken over by a totalitarian state, and these arguments were used to oppose the NHS and any state control over medical research.

  11. Oral high dose ascorbic acid treatment for one year in young CMT1A patients: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Visser Marianne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High dose oral ascorbic acid substantially improved myelination and locomotor function in a Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A mouse model. A phase II study was warranted to investigate whether high dose ascorbic acid also has such a substantial effect on myelination in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A patients and whether this treatment is safe. Methods Patients below age 25 years were randomly assigned to receive placebo or ascorbic acid (one gram twice daily in a double-blind fashion during one year. The primary outcome measure was the change over time in motor nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve. Secondary outcome measures included changes in minimal F response latencies, compound muscle action potential amplitude, muscle strength, sensory function, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy score, and disability. Results There were no significant differences between the six placebo-treated (median age 16 years, range 13 to 24 and the five ascorbic acid-treated (19, 14 to 24 patients in change in motor nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve (mean difference ascorbic acid as opposed to placebo treatment of 1.3 m/s, confidence interval -0.3 to 3.0 m/s, P = 0.11 or in change of any of the secondary outcome measures over time. One patient in the ascorbic acid group developed a skin rash, which led to discontinuation of the study medication. Conclusion Oral high dose ascorbic acid for one year did not improve myelination of the median nerve in young Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A patients. Treatment was relatively safe. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN56968278, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00271635.

  12. Combined management of retroperitoneal sarcoma with dose intensification radiotherapy and resection: Long-term results of a prospective trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J F

    2014-01-07

    Late failure is a challenging problem following resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). We investigated the effects of preoperative XRT plus dose escalation with early postoperative brachytherapy (BT) on long-term survival and recurrence in RPS.

  13. Relation Between Dose of Loop Diuretics and Outcomes in a Heart Failure Population: Results of the ESCAPE Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselblad, Vic; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Shah, Monica R.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Califf, Robert M.; Adams, Kirkwood F.

    2007-01-01

    Background We examined the relation of maximal in-hospital diuretic dose to weight loss, changes in renal function, and mortality in hospitalised heart failure (HF) patients. Methods In ESCAPE, 395 patients received diuretics in-hospital. Weight was measured at baseline, discharge, and every other day before discharge. Weight loss was defined as the difference between baseline and last in-hospital weight. Mortality was assessed using a log-logistic model with non-zero background. Results Median weight loss: 2.8 kg (0.7, 6.1); mean: 3.7 kg (22% of values 300 mg/day. Dose remained a significant predictor of mortality after adjusting for baseline variables that significantly predicted mortality. Correlation between maximal dose and creatinine level change was not significant (r = 0.043; p = 0.412) Conclusions High diuretic doses during HF hospitalisation are associated with increased mortality and poor 6-month outcome. PMID:17719273

  14. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-05-01

    Outside the protection of earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin’s barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  15. Early effects comparison of X-rays delivered at high-dose-rate pulses by a plasma focus device and at low dose rate on human tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virelli, A; Zironi, I; Pasi, F; Ceccolini, E; Nano, R; Facoetti, A; Gavoçi, E; Fiore, M R; Rocchi, F; Mostacci, D; Cucchi, G; Castellani, G; Sumini, M; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study has been performed on the effects of high-dose-rate (DR) X-ray beams produced by a plasma focus device (PFMA-3), to exploit its potential medical applications (e.g. radiotherapy), and low-DR X-ray beams produced by a conventional source (XRT). Experiments have been performed at 0.5 and 2 Gy doses on a human glioblastoma cell line (T98G). Cell proliferation rate and potassium outward currents (IK) have been investigated by time lapse imaging and patch clamp recordings. The results showed that PFMA-3 irradiation has a greater capability to reduce the proliferation rate activity with respect to XRT, while it does not affect IK of T98G cells at any of the dose levels tested. XRT irradiation significantly reduces the mean IK amplitude of T98G cells only at 0.5 Gy. This work confirms that the DR, and therefore the source of radiation, is crucial for the planning and optimisation of radiotherapy applications.

  16. Low-Dose Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: 10-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshihiko; Okada, Sadanori; Ogawa, Hisao; Soejima, Hirofumi; Sakuma, Mio; Nakayama, Masafumi; Doi, Naofumi; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Waki, Masako; Masuda, Izuru; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2017-02-14

    The long-term efficacy and safety of low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are still inconclusive. The JPAD trial (Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis With Aspirin for Diabetes) was a randomized, open-label, standard care-controlled trial examining whether low-dose aspirin affected cardiovascular events in 2539 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and without preexisting cardiovascular disease. Patients were randomly allocated to receive aspirin (81 or 100 mg daily; aspirin group) or no aspirin (no-aspirin group) in the JPAD trial. After that trial ended in 2008, we followed up with the patients until 2015, with no attempt to change the previously assigned therapy. Primary end points were cardiovascular events, including sudden death, fatal or nonfatal coronary artery disease, fatal or nonfatal stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. For the safety analysis, hemorrhagic events, consisting of gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic stroke, and bleeding from any other sites, were also analyzed. The primary analysis was conducted for cardiovascular events among patients who retained their original allocation (a per-protocol cohort). Analyses on an intention-to-treat cohort were conducted for hemorrhagic events and statistical sensitivity. The median follow-up period was 10.3 years; 1621 patients (64%) were followed up throughout the study; and 2160 patients (85%) retained their original allocation. Low-dose aspirin did not reduce cardiovascular events in the per-protocol cohort (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.42). Multivariable Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for age, sex, glycemic control, kidney function, smoking status, hypertension, and dyslipidemia showed similar results (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.30), with no heterogeneity of efficacy in subgroup analyses stratified by each of these factors (all interaction P>0

  17. Vitamin D receptor expression in human bone tissue and dose-dependent activation in resorbing osteoclasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Allahdad; Morovat, Alireza; Javaid, Kassim; Brown, Cameron P

    2016-01-01

    The effects of vitamin D on osteoblast mineralization are well documented. Reports of the effects of vitamin D on osteoclasts, however, are conflicting, showing both inhibition and stimulation. Finding that resorbing osteoclasts in human bone express vitamin D receptor (VDR), we examined their response to different concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] (100 or 500 nmol·L−1) and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] (0.1 or 0.5 nmol·L−1) metabolites in cell cultures. Specifically, CD14+ monocytes were cultured in charcoal-stripped serum in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) histochemical staining assays and dentine resorption analysis were used to identify the size and number of osteoclast cells, number of nuclei per cell and resorption activity. The expression of VDR was detected in human bone tissue (ex vivo) by immunohistochemistry and in vitro cell cultures by western blotting. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to determine the level of expression of vitamin D-related genes in response to vitamin D metabolites. VDR-related genes during osteoclastogenesis, shown by qRT-PCR, was stimulated in response to 500 nmol·L−1 of 25(OH)D3 and 0.1–0.5 nmol·L−1 of 1,25(OH)2D3, upregulating cytochrome P450 family 27 subfamily B member 1 (CYP27B1) and cytochrome P450 family 24 subfamily A member 1 (CYP24A1). Osteoclast fusion transcripts transmembrane 7 subfamily member 4 (tm7sf4) and nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (nfatc1) where downregulated in response to vitamin D metabolites. Osteoclast number and resorption activity were also increased. Both 25(OH)D3 and 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced osteoclast size and number when co-treated with RANKL and M-CSF. The evidence for VDR expression in resorbing osteoclasts in vivo and low-dose effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 on osteoclasts in vitro

  18. Activation of innate immunity in healthy Macaca mulatta macaques by a single subcutaneous dose of GMP CpG 7909: safety data and interferon-inducible protein-10 kinetics for humans and macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, V Ann; McGrath, Shannon; Krieg, Arthur M; Larson, Noelle S; Angov, Evelina; Smith, Christopher L; Brewer, Thomas G; Heppner, D Gray

    2008-02-01

    Following a demonstration that mouse-optimized cytosine-guanosine dinucleotide (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides stimulated in