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Sample records for human disease phenotype

  1. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  2. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases.

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    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  3. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, S.; Doelken, S.C.; Mungall, C.J.; Bauer, S.; Firth, H.V.; Bailleul-Forestier, I.; Black, G.C.M.; Brown, D.L.; Brudno, M.; Campbell, J.; FitzPatrick, D.R.; Eppig, J.T.; Jackson, A.P.; Freson, K.; Girdea, M.; Helbig, I.; Hurst, J.A.; Jahn, J.; Jackson, L.G.; Kelly, A.M.; Ledbetter, D.H.; Mansour, S.; Martin, C.L.; Moss, C.; Mumford, A.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Park, S.M.; Riggs, E.R.; Scott, R.H.; Sisodiya, S.; Vooren, S. van der; Wapner, R.J.; Wilkie, A.O.; Wright, C.F.; Silfhout, A.T. van; Leeuw, N. de; Vries, B. de; Washingthon, N.L.; Smith, C.L.; Westerfield, M.; Schofield, P.; Ruef, B.J.; Gkoutos, G.V.; Haendel, M.; Smedley, D.; Lewis, S.E.; Robinson, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have d

  4. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C; Mungall, Christopher J; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C M; Brown, Danielle L; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R; Eppig, Janan T; Jackson, Andrew P; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G; Kelly, Anne M; Ledbetter, David H; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Van Vooren, Steven; Wapner, Ronald J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Wright, Caroline F; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B A; Washingthon, Nicole L; Smith, Cynthia L; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E; Robinson, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online.

  5. Linking human diseases to animal models using ontology-based phenotype annotation.

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    Nicole L Washington

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scientists and clinicians who study genetic alterations and disease have traditionally described phenotypes in natural language. The considerable variation in these free-text descriptions has posed a hindrance to the important task of identifying candidate genes and models for human diseases and indicates the need for a computationally tractable method to mine data resources for mutant phenotypes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ontological annotation of disease phenotypes will facilitate the discovery of new genotype-phenotype relationships within and across species. To describe phenotypes using ontologies, we used an Entity-Quality (EQ methodology, wherein the affected entity (E and how it is affected (Q are recorded using terms from a variety of ontologies. Using this EQ method, we annotated the phenotypes of 11 gene-linked human diseases described in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM. These human annotations were loaded into our Ontology-Based Database (OBD along with other ontology-based phenotype descriptions of mutants from various model organism databases. Phenotypes recorded with this EQ method can be computationally compared based on the hierarchy of terms in the ontologies and the frequency of annotation. We utilized four similarity metrics to compare phenotypes and developed an ontology of homologous and analogous anatomical structures to compare phenotypes between species. Using these tools, we demonstrate that we can identify, through the similarity of the recorded phenotypes, other alleles of the same gene, other members of a signaling pathway, and orthologous genes and pathway members across species. We conclude that EQ-based annotation of phenotypes, in conjunction with a cross-species ontology, and a variety of similarity metrics can identify biologically meaningful similarities between genes by comparing phenotypes alone. This annotation and search method provides a novel and efficient means to identify

  6. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

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    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  7. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-06-08

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  8. Human glia can both induce and rescue aspects of disease phenotype in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benraiss, Abdellatif; Wang, Su; Herrlinger, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    (hGPCs), derived from either human embryonic stem cells or mHTT-transduced fetal hGPCs. Here we show that mHTT glia can impart disease phenotype to normal mice, since mice engrafted intrastriatally with mHTT hGPCs exhibit worse motor performance than controls, and striatal neurons in mHTT glial......The causal contribution of glial pathology to Huntington disease (HD) has not been heavily explored. To define the contribution of glia to HD, we established human HD glial chimeras by neonatally engrafting immunodeficient mice with mutant huntingtin (mHTT)-expressing human glial progenitor cells...... survival in R6/2 HD mice. These observations suggest a causal role for glia in HD, and further suggest a cell-based strategy for disease amelioration in this disorder....

  9. Mouse, man, and meaning: bridging the semantics of mouse phenotype and human disease.

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    Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Beck, Tim; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Mungall, Chris; Schofield, Paul N

    2009-08-01

    Now that the laboratory mouse genome is sequenced and the annotation of its gene content is improving, the next major challenge is the annotation of the phenotypic associations of mouse genes. This requires the development of systematic phenotyping pipelines that use standardized phenotyping procedures which allow comparison across laboratories. It also requires the development of a sophisticated informatics infrastructure for the description and interchange of phenotype data. Here we focus on the current state of the art in the description of data produced by systematic phenotyping approaches using ontologies, in particular, the EQ (Entity-Quality) approach, and what developments are required to facilitate the linking of phenotypic descriptions of mutant mice to human diseases.

  10. Human keratin diseases: the increasing spectrum of disease and subtlety of the phenotype-genotype correlation.

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    Irvine, A D; McLean, W H

    1999-05-01

    Keratins are obligate heterodimer proteins that form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. Keratins are tissue and differentiation specific and are expressed in pairs of types I and II proteins. The spectrum of inherited human keratin diseases has steadily increased since the causative role of mutations in the basal keratinocyte keratins 5 and 14 in epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was first reported in 1991. At the time of writing, mutations in 15 epithelial keratins and two trichocyte keratins have been associated with human diseases which include EBS, bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens, diffuse and focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, pachyonychia congenita and monilethrix. Mutations in extracutaneous keratins have been reported in oral white sponge naevus and Meesmann's corneal dystrophy. New subtleties of phenotype-genotype correlation are emerging within the keratin diseases with widely varying clinical presentations attributable to similar mutations within the same keratin. Mutations in keratin-associated proteins have recently been reported for the first time. This article reviews clinical, ultrastructural and molecular aspects of all the keratin diseases described to date and delineates potential future areas of research in this field.

  11. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

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    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  12. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

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    Wang S Alex

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease.

  13. The mouse genome database: genotypes, phenotypes, and models of human disease.

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    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the premier animal model for studying human biology because all life stages can be accessed experimentally, a completely sequenced reference genome is publicly available and there exists a myriad of genomic tools for comparative and experimental research. In the current era of genome scale, data-driven biomedical research, the integration of genetic, genomic and biological data are essential for realizing the full potential of the mouse as an experimental model. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org), the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse, is designed to facilitate the use of the laboratory mouse as a model system for understanding human biology and disease. To achieve this goal, MGD integrates genetic and genomic data related to the functional and phenotypic characterization of mouse genes and alleles and serves as a comprehensive catalog for mouse models of human disease. Recent enhancements to MGD include the addition of human ortholog details to mouse Gene Detail pages, the inclusion of microRNA knockouts to MGD's catalog of alleles and phenotypes, the addition of video clips to phenotype images, providing access to genotype and phenotype data associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) and improvements to the layout and display of Gene Ontology annotations.

  14. Disease Modeling and Phenotypic Drug Screening for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Faye M. Drawnel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance.

  15. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

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    Miller, James R C; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  16. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

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    James R C Miller

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  17. Human severe combined immunodeficiency disease: phenotypic and functional characteristics of peripheral B lymphocytes.

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    Gougeon, M L; Drean, G; Le Deist, F; Dousseau, M; Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Theze, J; Griscelli, C; Fischer, A

    1990-11-01

    Human severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) includes an X-chromosome-linked type characterized by a complete absence of mature T cells, hypogammaglobulinemia but normal or elevated number of B cells, suggesting that the disease results from a block in early T cell differentiation. It has been shown that B cells from obligate carrier women of this disorder exhibit the preferential use of the nonmutant X chromosome as the active X (as shown for T cells), suggesting that the SCID gene product has a direct effect on B cells as well as on T cells. To examine this question, we analyzed the phenotypic and functional characteristics of peripheral B cells from nine infants with SCID. We found a constant absence of spontaneously expressed activation Ag on B cell membrane from all SCID patients tested which contrasts with the phenotypic pattern exhibited by age-matched infants whom all cells bearing surface Ig express the 4F2 Ag and to a lesser extent the transferrin receptor. Concurrently, B cells from SCID patients have a profound impairment in their responses to stimuli that induce in vitro B cell proliferation and differentiation. Although rIL-2 and low-Mr B cell growth factor are potent inducers of proliferation on age-matched infants' B cells, they are poorly efficient in inducing proliferation of anti-mu-activated SCID B cells. This impairment is not related to the resting B cell phenotype of SCID B cells as shown by comparison with normal resting B cells. Furthermore, we observed an apparent block in B cell differentiation inasmuch as neither rIL-2 nor rIL-6 could support SAC-activated SCID B cell differentiation, both lymphokines being very efficient in inducing SAC-activated age-matched infants' B cell or purified resting B cell differentiation. These results suggest that the SCID gene defect has a direct effect on B cells and is required during B cell maturation.

  18. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

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    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  19. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database: new support for human disease models, mutation details, gene expression phenotypes and searching

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    Howe, Douglas G.; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Eagle, Anne; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Kalita, Patrick; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2017-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for zebrafish (Danio rerio) genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators provide expert manual curation and integration of comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenic constructs and lines, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, TALENs, CRISPRs, antibodies, anatomical structures, models of human disease and publications. We integrate curated, directly submitted, and collaboratively generated data, making these available to zebrafish research community. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are superbly suited for rapid generation of sequence-targeted mutant lines, characterization of phenotypes including gene expression patterns, and generation of human disease models. The recent rapid adoption of zebrafish as human disease models is making management of these data particularly important to both the research and clinical communities. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN including use of the zebrafish experimental conditions ontology, ‘Fish’ records in the ZFIN database, support for gene expression phenotypes, models of human disease, mutation details at the DNA, RNA and protein levels, and updates to the ZFIN single box search. PMID:27899582

  20. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  1. Activation of IRF1 in Human Adipocytes Leads to Phenotypes Associated with Metabolic Disease.

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    Friesen, Max; Camahort, Raymond; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Xia, Fang; Gerszten, Robert E; Rhee, Eugene P; Deo, Rahul C; Cowan, Chad A

    2017-05-09

    The striking rise of obesity-related metabolic disorders has focused attention on adipocytes as critical mediators of disease phenotypes. To better understand the role played by excess adipose in metabolic dysfunction it is crucial to decipher the transcriptional underpinnings of the low-grade adipose inflammation characteristic of diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Through employing a comparative transcriptomics approach, we identified IRF1 as differentially regulated between primary and in vitro-derived genetically matched adipocytes. This suggests a role as a mediator of adipocyte inflammatory phenotypes, similar to its function in other tissues. Utilizing adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitors we subsequently demonstrated that expression of IRF1 in adipocytes indeed contributes to upregulation of inflammatory processes, both in vitro and in vivo. This highlights IRF1's relevance to obesity-related inflammation and the resultant metabolic dysregulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Bo Wang; Xiaoqing Zhang; Xue-Jun Li

    2013-01-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease.Here,we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene,survival motor neuron (SMN),in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons.Notably,the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated.Furthermore,these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-A7 (lacking exon 7)knockdown,and were specific to spinal motor neurons.Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes,including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss.Finally,knockdown of SMNFL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors.The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine,a potent antioxidant,which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death.Thus,we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model,which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity,cell type specificity,and phenotype reversibility.Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  3. Large animal models of rare genetic disorders: sheep as phenotypically relevant models of human genetic disease.

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    Pinnapureddy, Ashish R; Stayner, Cherie; McEwan, John; Baddeley, Olivia; Forman, John; Eccles, Michael R

    2015-09-02

    Animals that accurately model human disease are invaluable in medical research, allowing a critical understanding of disease mechanisms, and the opportunity to evaluate the effect of therapeutic compounds in pre-clinical studies. Many types of animal models are used world-wide, with the most common being small laboratory animals, such as mice. However, rodents often do not faithfully replicate human disease, despite their predominant use in research. This discordancy is due in part to physiological differences, such as body size and longevity. In contrast, large animal models, including sheep, provide an alternative to mice for biomedical research due to their greater physiological parallels with humans. Completion of the full genome sequences of many species, and the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, means it is now feasible to screen large populations of domesticated animals for genetic variants that resemble human genetic diseases, and generate models that more accurately model rare human pathologies. In this review, we discuss the notion of using sheep as large animal models, and their advantages in modelling human genetic disease. We exemplify several existing naturally occurring ovine variants in genes that are orthologous to human disease genes, such as the Cln6 sheep model for Batten disease. These, and other sheep models, have contributed significantly to our understanding of the relevant human disease process, in addition to providing opportunities to trial new therapies in animals with similar body and organ size to humans. Therefore sheep are a significant species with respect to the modelling of rare genetic human disease, which we summarize in this review.

  4. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients

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    Meng-Lu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  5. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients.

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    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-05

    Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  6. The Human Phenotype Ontology in 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Vasilevsky, Nicole A.; Engelstad, Mark; Foster, Erin; McMurry, Julie; Aymé, Ségolène; Baynam, Gareth; Bello, Susan M.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Boycott, Kym M.; Brudno, Michael; Buske, Orion J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Cipriani, Valentina; Connell, Laureen E.; Dawkins, Hugh J.S.; DeMare, Laura E.; Devereau, Andrew D.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Firth, Helen V.; Freson, Kathleen; Greene, Daniel; Hamosh, Ada; Helbig, Ingo; Hum, Courtney; Jähn, Johanna A.; James, Roger; Krause, Roland; F. Laulederkind, Stanley J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Lyon, Gholson J.; Ogishima, Soichi; Olry, Annie; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pontikos, Nikolas; Rath, Ana; Schaefer, Franz; Scott, Richard H.; Segal, Michael; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Sever, Richard; Smith, Cynthia L.; Straub, Volker; Thompson, Rachel; Turner, Catherine; Turro, Ernest; Veltman, Marijcke W.M.; Vulliamy, Tom; Yu, Jing; von Ziegenweidt, Julie; Zankl, Andreas; Züchner, Stephan; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Jacobsen, Julius O.B.; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Mungall, Christopher J.; Haendel, Melissa; Robinson, Peter N.

    2017-01-01

    Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO; www.human-phenotype-ontology.org) project are the phenotype vocabulary, disease-phenotype annotations and the algorithms that operate on these. These components are being used for computational deep phenotyping and precision medicine as well as integration of clinical data into translational research. The HPO is being increasingly adopted as a standard for phenotypic abnormalities by diverse groups such as international rare disease organizations, registries, clinical labs, biomedical resources, and clinical software tools and will thereby contribute toward nascent efforts at global data exchange for identifying disease etiologies. This update article reviews the progress of the HPO project since the debut Nucleic Acids Research database article in 2014, including specific areas of expansion such as common (complex) disease, new algorithms for phenotype driven genomic discovery and diagnostics, integration of cross-species mapping efforts with the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, an improved quality control pipeline, and the addition of patient-friendly terminology. PMID:27899602

  7. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-04-11

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Phenotypic screens targeting neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minhua; Luo, Guangrui; Zhou, Yanjiao; Wang, Shaohui; Zhong, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people worldwide, and the incidences increase as the population ages. Disease-modifying therapy that prevents or slows disease progression is still lacking, making neurodegenerative diseases an area of high unmet medical need. Target-based drug discovery for disease-modifying agents has been ongoing for many years, without much success due to incomplete understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Phenotypic screening, starting with a disease-relevant phenotype to screen for compounds that change the outcome of biological pathways rather than activities at certain specific targets, offers an alternative approach to find small molecules or targets that modulate the key characteristics of neurodegeneration. Phenotypic screens that focus on amelioration of disease-specific toxins, protection of neurons from degeneration, or promotion of neuroregeneration could be potential fertile grounds for discovering therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we will summarize the progress of compound screening using these phenotypic-based strategies for this area, with a highlight on unique considerations for disease models, assays, and screening methodologies. We will further provide our perspectives on how best to use phenotypic screening to develop drug leads for neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. The human adult cardiomyocyte phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bird, SD; Doevendans, PA; van Rooijen, MA; de la Riviere, AB; Hassink, RJ; Passier, R; Mummery, CL

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Determination of the phenotype of adult human atrial and ventricular myocytes based on gene expression and morphology. Methods: Atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery using a modified isolation procedure. Myocytes were isolated and cultured

  10. Phenotype of NK-Like CD8(+) T Cells with Innate Features in Humans and Their Relevance in Cancer Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarin, Alice; Cayssials, Emilie; Jacomet, Florence; Nunez, Nicolas Gonzalo; Basbous, Sara; Lefèvre, Lucie; Abdallah, Myriam; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Morin, Benjamin; Lavoue, Vincent; Catros, Véronique; Piaggio, Eliane; Herbelin, André; Gombert, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Unconventional T cells are defined by their capacity to respond to signals other than the well-known complex of peptides and major histocompatibility complex proteins. Among the burgeoning family of unconventional T cells, innate-like CD8(+) T cells in the mouse were discovered in the early 2000s. This subset of CD8(+) T cells bears a memory phenotype without having encountered a foreign antigen and can respond to innate-like IL-12 + IL-18 stimulation. Although the concept of innate memory CD8(+) T cells is now well established in mice, whether an equivalent memory NK-like T-cell population exists in humans remains under debate. We recently reported that CD8(+) T cells responding to innate-like IL-12 + IL-18 stimulation and co-expressing the transcription factor Eomesodermin (Eomes) and KIR/NKG2A membrane receptors with a memory/EMRA phenotype may represent a new, functionally distinct innate T cell subset in humans. In this review, after a summary on the known innate CD8(+) T-cell features in the mouse, we propose Eomes together with KIR/NKG2A and CD49d as a signature to standardize the identification of this innate CD8(+) T-cell subset in humans. Next, we discuss IL-4 and IL-15 involvement in the generation of innate CD8(+) T cells and particularly its possible dependency on the promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger factor expressing iNKT cells, an innate T cell subset well documented for its susceptibility to tumor immune subversion. After that, focusing on cancer diseases, we provide new insights into the potential role of these innate CD8(+) T cells in a physiopathological context in humans. Based on empirical data obtained in cases of chronic myeloid leukemia, a myeloproliferative syndrome controlled by the immune system, and in solid tumors, we observe both the possible contribution of innate CD8(+) T cells to cancer disease control and their susceptibility to tumor immune subversion. Finally, we note that during tumor progression, innate CD8(+) T

  11. Self-Organizing 3D Human Neural Tissue Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem K; Mungenast, Alison E; Lin, Yuan-Ta; Ko, Tak; Abdurrob, Fatema; Seo, Jinsoo; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The dismal success rate of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD) motivates us to develop model systems of AD pathology that have higher predictive validity. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows us to model pathology and study disease mechanisms directly in human neural cells from healthy individual as well as AD patients. However, two-dimensional culture systems do not recapitulate the complexity of neural tissue, and phenotypes such as extracellular protein aggregation are difficult to observe. We report brain organoids that use pluripotent stem cells derived from AD patients and recapitulate AD-like pathologies such as amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and endosome abnormalities. These pathologies are observed in an age-dependent manner in organoids derived from multiple familial AD (fAD) patients harboring amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication or presenilin1 (PSEN1) mutation, compared to controls. The incidence of AD pathology was consistent amongst several fAD lines, which carried different mutations. Although these are complex assemblies of neural tissue, they are also highly amenable to experimental manipulation. We find that treatment of patient-derived organoids with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors significantly reduces amyloid and tau pathology. Moreover, these results show the potential of this model system to greatly increase the translatability of pre-clinical drug discovery in AD.

  12. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT.

  13. Phenotypic Features of Circulating Leukocytes from Non-human Primates Naturally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Resemble the Major Immunological Findings Observed in Human Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Sathler-Avelar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis represent a feasible model for research on Chagas disease since natural T. cruzi infection in these primates leads to clinical outcomes similar to those observed in humans. However, it is still unknown whether these clinical similarities are accompanied by equivalent immunological characteristics in the two species. We have performed a detailed immunophenotypic analysis of circulating leukocytes together with systems biology approaches from 15 cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with T. cruzi (CH presenting the chronic phase of Chagas disease to identify biomarkers that might be useful for clinical investigations.Our data established that CH displayed increased expression of CD32+ and CD56+ in monocytes and enhanced frequency of NK Granzyme A+ cells as compared to non-infected controls (NI. Moreover, higher expression of CD54 and HLA-DR by T-cells, especially within the CD8+ subset, was the hallmark of CH. A high level of expression of Granzyme A and Perforin underscored the enhanced cytotoxicity-linked pattern of CD8+ T-lymphocytes from CH. Increased frequency of B-cells with up-regulated expression of Fc-γRII was also observed in CH. Complex and imbricate biomarker networks demonstrated that CH showed a shift towards cross-talk among cells of the adaptive immune system. Systems biology analysis further established monocytes and NK-cell phenotypes and the T-cell activation status, along with the Granzyme A expression by CD8+ T-cells, as the most reliable biomarkers of potential use for clinical applications.Altogether, these findings demonstrated that the similarities in phenotypic features of circulating leukocytes observed in cynomolgus macaques and humans infected with T. cruzi further supports the use of these monkeys in preclinical toxicology and pharmacology studies applied to development and testing of new drugs for Chagas disease.

  14. Advances in human B cell phenotypic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A Kaminski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (Big Biology, necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort.

  15. Bronchiectasis: Phenotyping a Complex Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, James D

    2017-03-15

    Bronchiectasis is a long-neglected disease currently experiencing a surge in interest. It is a highly complex condition with numerous aetiologies, co-morbidities and a heterogeneous disease presentation and clinical course. The past few years have seen major advances in our understanding of the disease, primarily through large real-life cohort studies. The main outcomes of interest in bronchiectasis are symptoms, exacerbations, treatment response, disease progression and death. We are now more able to identify clearly the radiological, clinical, microbiological and inflammatory contributors to these outcomes. Over the past couple of years, multidimensional scoring systems such as the Bronchiectasis Severity Index have been introduced to predict disease severity and mortality. Although there are currently no licensed therapies for bronchiectasis, an increasing number of clinical trials are planned or ongoing. While this emerging evidence is awaited, bronchiectasis guidelines will continue to be informed largely by real-life evidence from observational studies and patient registries. Key developments in the bronchiectasis field include the establishment of international disease registries and characterisation of disease phenotypes using cluster analysis and biological data.

  16. Immunogenetic phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marla C Dubinsky; Kent Taylor; Stephan R Targan; Jerome I Rotter

    2006-01-01

    The currently accepted etiopathogenic hypothesis suggests that the chronic intestinal inflammation and related systemic manifestations characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are due to an overly aggressive or pathologic immune response to resident luminal bacterial constituents. Predisposing factors are genetic dysregulation of mucosal immune responses and/or barrier function, with onset triggered by environmental stimuli. These factors and their interactions may also be important determinants of disease phenotype and disease progression. The emergence of immunogenetic phenotypes lends support to the proposed hypothesis that susceptibility genes regulate distinct immune processes, driven by luminal antigens, expressed as specific immune phenotypes which in turn influence clinical phenotypes in IBD patient

  17. Evaluating diabetes and hypertension disease causality using mouse phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jing-Dong J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have found hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with common diseases. However, it is largely unknown what genes linked with the SNPs actually implicate disease causality. A definitive proof for disease causality can be demonstration of disease-like phenotypes through genetic perturbation of the genes or alleles, which is obviously a daunting task for complex diseases where only mammalian models can be used. Results Here we tapped the rich resource of mouse phenotype data and developed a method to quantify the probability that a gene perturbation causes the phenotypes of a disease. Using type II diabetes (T2D and hypertension (HT as study cases, we found that the genes, when perturbed, having high probability to cause T2D and HT phenotypes tend to be hubs in the interactome networks and are enriched for signaling pathways regulating metabolism but not metabolic pathways, even though the genes in these metabolic pathways are often the most significantly changed in expression levels in these diseases. Conclusions Compared to human genetic disease-based predictions, our mouse phenotype based predictors greatly increased the coverage while keeping a similarly high specificity. The disease phenotype probabilities given by our approach can be used to evaluate the likelihood of disease causality of disease-associated genes and genes surrounding disease-associated SNPs.

  18. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...... of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  19. SM2PH-db: an interactive system for the integrated analysis of phenotypic consequences of missense mutations in proteins involved in human genetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Anne; Garnier, Nicolas; Gagnière, Nicolas; Nguyen, Hoan; Albou, Laurent-Philippe; Biancalana, Valérie; Bettler, Emmanuel; Deléage, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Muller, Jean; Moras, Dino; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Toursel, Thierry; Moulinier, Luc; Poch, Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Understanding how genetic alterations affect gene products at the molecular level represents a first step in the elucidation of the complex relationships between genotypic and phenotypic variations, and is thus a major challenge in the postgenomic era. Here, we present SM2PH-db (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/sm2ph), a new database designed to investigate structural and functional impacts of missense mutations and their phenotypic effects in the context of human genetic diseases. A wealth of up-to-date interconnected information is provided for each of the 2,249 disease-related entry proteins (August 2009), including data retrieved from biological databases and data generated from a Sequence-Structure-Evolution Inference in Systems-based approach, such as multiple alignments, three-dimensional structural models, and multidimensional (physicochemical, functional, structural, and evolutionary) characterizations of mutations. SM2PH-db provides a robust infrastructure associated with interactive analysis tools supporting in-depth study and interpretation of the molecular consequences of mutations, with the more long-term goal of elucidating the chain of events leading from a molecular defect to its pathology. The entire content of SM2PH-db is regularly and automatically updated thanks to a computational grid data federation facilities provided in the context of the Decrypthon program.

  20. Rare genetic diseases with human lean and/or starvation phenotype open new avenues for obesity and type II diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harosh, Itzik

    2014-01-01

    Treatments of obesity and type II diabetes target often gene functions involved in appetite-satiety, fat and carbohydrate metabolism or thermogenesis. None of these, have provided efficient drug therapy due to a large number of genes involved in weight and energy management, the redundancy of biochemical pathways and the environmental factors. Here I discuss a new approach based on studies of genes/proteins that are associated with human "lean or starvation" phenotype that became very rare in the course of evolution. This approach has led to the identification of the congenital enteropeptidase deficiency gene and the Anderson's Disease gene as a potential targets for obesity and type II diabetes treatment. The advantages of these targets are: 1) they are expressed exclusively in the intestine; 2) they are peripheral targets as opposed to systemic targets; 3) they are not redundant targets. These targets open new hopes for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of common metabolic syndrome.

  1. Huntington's Disease: Relationship Between Phenotype and Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Min; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease with the typical manifestations of involuntary movements, psychiatric and behavior disorders, and cognitive impairment. It is caused by the dynamic mutation in CAG triplet repeat number in exon 1 of huntingtin (HTT) gene. The symptoms of HD especially the age at onset are related to the genetic characteristics, both the CAG triplet repeat and the modified factors. Here, we reviewed the recent advancement on the genotype-phenotype relationship of HD, mainly focus on the characteristics of different expanded CAG repeat number, genetic modifiers, and CCG repeat number in the 3' end of CAG triplet repeat and their effects on the phenotype. We also reviewed the special forms of HD (juvenile HD, atypical onset HD, and homozygous HD) and their phenotype-genotype correlations. The review will aid clinicians to predict the onset age and disease course of HD, give the genetic counseling, and accelerate research into the HD mechanism.

  2. Disruption of long-range gene regulation in human genetic disease: a kaleidoscope of general principles, diverse mechanisms and unique phenotypic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shipra; Kleinjan, Dirk A

    2014-07-01

    The precise control of gene expression programs is crucial for the establishment of the diverse gene activity patterns required for the correct development, patterning and differentiation of the myriad of cell types within an organism. The crucial importance of non-coding regions of the genome in the control of gene regulation is well established and depends on a diverse group of sequence fragments called cis-regulatory elements that reside in these regions. Advances in novel genome-wide techniques have greatly increased the ability to identify potential regulatory elements. In contrast, their functional characterisation and the determination of their diverse modes of action remain a major bottleneck. Greater knowledge of gene expression control is of major importance for human health as disruption of gene regulation has become recognised as a significant cause of human disease. Appreciation of the role of cis-regulatory polymorphism in natural variation and susceptibility to common disease is also growing. While novel techniques such as GWAS and NGS provide the ability to collect large genomic datasets, the challenge for the twenty-first century will be to extract the relevant sequences and how to investigate the functional consequences of disease-associated changes. Here, we review how studies of transcriptional control at selected paradigm disease gene loci have revealed general principles of cis-regulatory logic and regulatory genome organisation, yet also demonstrate how the variety of mechanisms can combine to result in unique phenotypic outcomes. Integration of these principles with the emerging wealth of genome-wide data will provide enhanced insight into the workings of our regulatory genome.

  3. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, R.; Ceballos-Picot, I.; Torres, R.J.; Larovere, L.E.; Yamada, Y.; Nguyen, K.V.; Hegde, M.; Visser, J.E.; Schretlen, D.J.; Nyhan, W.L.; Puig, J.G.; O'Neill, P.J.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an

  4. Shiga toxin 1c-producing Escherichia coli strains : phenotypic and genetic characterization and association with human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Alexander W; Borell, Julia; Bielaszewska, Martina; Fruth, Angelika; Tschäpe, Helmut; Karch, Helge

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of the stx(1c) allele among Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and the virulence characteristics of stx(1c)-harboring STEC are unknown. In this study, we identified stx(1c) in 76 (54.3%) of 140 eae-negative, but in none of 155 eae-positive, human STEC isolates (P <

  5. Shiga toxin 1c-producing Escherichia coli strains : phenotypic and genetic characterization and association with human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Alexander W; Borell, Julia; Bielaszewska, Martina; Fruth, Angelika; Tschäpe, Helmut; Karch, Helge

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of the stx(1c) allele among Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and the virulence characteristics of stx(1c)-harboring STEC are unknown. In this study, we identified stx(1c) in 76 (54.3%) of 140 eae-negative, but in none of 155 eae-positive, human STEC isolates (P <

  6. Disease phenotype at diagnosis in pediatric Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bie, Charlotte I; Paerregaard, Anders; Kolacek, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    It has been speculated that pediatric Crohn's disease (CD) is a distinct disease entity, with probably different disease subtypes. We therefore aimed to accurately phenotype newly diagnosed pediatric CD by using the pediatric modification of the Montreal classification, the Paris classification....

  7. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Jinnah, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease and its attenuated variants are caused by mutations in the HPRT1 gene, which encodes the purine recycling enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The mutations are heterogeneous, with more than 400 different mutations already documented. Prior efforts to correlate variations in the clinical phenotype with different mutations have suggested that milder phenotypes typically are associated with mutants that permit some residual enzyme function, whereas the most severe phenotype is associated with null mutants. However, multiple exceptions to this concept have been reported. In the current studies 44 HPRT1 mutations associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes were reconstructed by site-directed mutagenesis, the mutant enzymes were expressed in vitro and purified, and their kinetic properties were examined toward their substrates hypoxanthine, guanine, and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. The results provide strong evidence for a correlation between disease severity and residual catalytic activity of the enzyme (kcat) toward each of its substrates as well as several mechanisms that result in exceptions to this correlation. There was no correlation between disease severity and the affinity of the enzyme for its substrates (Km). These studies provide a valuable model for understanding general principles of genotype-phenotype correlations in human disease, as the mechanisms involved are applicable to many other disorders. PMID:22157001

  8. Resolution of Disease Phenotypes Resulting from Multilocus Genomic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Jennifer E; Harel, Tamar; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A; James, Regis A; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep H; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Bi, Weimin; Xiao, Rui; Ding, Yan; Xia, Fan; Beaudet, Arthur L; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eng, Christine M; Sutton, V Reid; Shaw, Chad A; Plon, Sharon E; Yang, Yaping; Lupski, James R

    2017-01-05

    Whole-exome sequencing can provide insight into the relationship between observed clinical phenotypes and underlying genotypes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a series of 7374 consecutive unrelated patients who had been referred to a clinical diagnostic laboratory for whole-exome sequencing; our goal was to determine the frequency and clinical characteristics of patients for whom more than one molecular diagnosis was reported. The phenotypic similarity between molecularly diagnosed pairs of diseases was calculated with the use of terms from the Human Phenotype Ontology. A molecular diagnosis was rendered for 2076 of 7374 patients (28.2%); among these patients, 101 (4.9%) had diagnoses that involved two or more disease loci. We also analyzed parental samples, when available, and found that de novo variants accounted for 67.8% (61 of 90) of pathogenic variants in autosomal dominant disease genes and 51.7% (15 of 29) of pathogenic variants in X-linked disease genes; both variants were de novo in 44.7% (17 of 38) of patients with two monoallelic variants. Causal copy-number variants were found in 12 patients (11.9%) with multiple diagnoses. Phenotypic similarity scores were significantly lower among patients in whom the phenotype resulted from two distinct mendelian disorders that affected different organ systems (50 patients) than among patients with disorders that had overlapping phenotypic features (30 patients) (median score, 0.21 vs. 0.36; P=1.77×10(-7)). In our study, we found multiple molecular diagnoses in 4.9% of cases in which whole-exome sequencing was informative. Our results show that structured clinical ontologies can be used to determine the degree of overlap between two mendelian diseases in the same patient; the diseases can be distinct or overlapping. Distinct disease phenotypes affect different organ systems, whereas overlapping disease phenotypes are more likely to be caused by two genes encoding proteins that interact within

  9. HPOSim: an R package for phenotypic similarity measure and enrichment analysis based on the human phenotype ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yue; Gao, Lin; Wang, Bingbo; Guo, Xingli

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic features associated with genes and diseases play an important role in disease-related studies and most of the available methods focus solely on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database without considering the controlled vocabulary. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) provides a standardized and controlled vocabulary covering phenotypic abnormalities in human diseases, and becomes a comprehensive resource for computational analysis of human disease phenotypes. Most of the existing HPO-based software tools cannot be used offline and provide only few similarity measures. Therefore, there is a critical need for developing a comprehensive and offline software for phenotypic features similarity based on HPO. HPOSim is an R package for analyzing phenotypic similarity for genes and diseases based on HPO data. Seven commonly used semantic similarity measures are implemented in HPOSim. Enrichment analysis of gene sets and disease sets are also implemented, including hypergeometric enrichment analysis and network ontology analysis (NOA). HPOSim can be used to predict disease genes and explore disease-related function of gene modules. HPOSim is open source and freely available at SourceForge (https://sourceforge.net/p/hposim/).

  10. Modifying factors and phenotypic diversity in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2014-05-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a human disorder of copper homeostasis caused by mutations in the copper-transporting ATPase ATP7B. WD is characterized by copper accumulation, predominantly in the liver and brain, hepatic pathology, and wide differences between patients in the age of onset and the spectrum of symptoms. Several factors contribute to the phenotypic variability of WD. The WD-causing mutations produce a wide range of changes in stability, activity, intracellular localization, and trafficking of ATP7B; the nonpathogenic genetic polymorphisms may contribute to the phenotype. In Atp7b(-/-) mice, a mouse model of WD, an abnormal intracellular distribution of copper in the liver triggers distinct changes in the transcriptome; these mRNA profiles might be used to more specifically define disease progression. The major effect of accumulating copper on lipid metabolism and especially cholesterol homeostasis in mice and humans suggests the importance of fat and cholesterol metabolism as modifying factors in WD.

  11. A comprehensive global genotype-phenotype database for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillano, Daniel; Oprea, Gabriela-Elena; Schmitz, Yvonne; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Abou Jamra, Rami; Rolfs, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    The ability to discover genetic variants in a patient runs far ahead of the ability to interpret them. Databases with accurate descriptions of the causal relationship between the variants and the phenotype are valuable since these are critical tools in clinical genetic diagnostics. Here, we introduce a comprehensive and global genotype-phenotype database focusing on rare diseases. This database (CentoMD (®)) is a browser-based tool that enables access to a comprehensive, independently curated system utilizing stringent high-quality criteria and a quickly growing repository of genetic and human phenotype ontology (HPO)-based clinical information. Its main goals are to aid the evaluation of genetic variants, to enhance the validity of the genetic analytical workflow, to increase the quality of genetic diagnoses, and to improve evaluation of treatment options for patients with hereditary diseases. The database software correlates clinical information from consented patients and probands of different geographical backgrounds with a large dataset of genetic variants and, when available, biomarker information. An automated follow-up tool is incorporated that informs all users whenever a variant classification has changed. These unique features fully embedded in a CLIA/CAP-accredited quality management system allow appropriate data quality and enhanced patient safety. More than 100,000 genetically screened individuals are documented in the database, resulting in more than 470 million variant detections. Approximately, 57% of the clinically relevant and uncertain variants in the database are novel. Notably, 3% of the genetic variants identified and previously reported in the literature as being associated with a particular rare disease were reclassified, based on internal evidence, as clinically irrelevant. The database offers a comprehensive summary of the clinical validity and causality of detected gene variants with their associated phenotypes, and is a valuable tool

  12. Sickle cell disease clinical phenotypes in children from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The clinical phenotypes of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are ... various clinical phenotypes of SCD in children and investigate the influence of ... but age and low-socioeconomic class are associated with anemic crisis.

  13. A mouse model for triple-negative breast cancer tumor-initiating cells (TNBC-TICs exhibits similar aggressive phenotype to the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kau Punit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC exhibit characteristics quite distinct from other kinds of breast cancer, presenting as an aggressive disease--recurring and metastasizing more often than other kinds of breast cancer, without tumor-specific treatment options and accounts for 15% of all types of breast cancer with higher percentages in premenopausal African-American and Hispanic women. The reason for this aggressive phenotype is currently the focus of intensive research. However, progress is hampered by the lack of suitable TNBC cell model systems. Methods To understand the mechanistic basis for the aggressiveness of TNBC, we produced a stable TNBC cell line by sorting for 4T1 cells that do not express the estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PgR or the gene for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. As a control, we produced a stable triple-positive breast cancer (TPBC cell line by transfecting 4T1 cells with rat HER2, ER and PgR genes and sorted for cells with high expression of ER and PgR by flow cytometry and high expression of the HER2 gene by Western blot analysis. Results We isolated tumor-initiating cells (TICs by sorting for CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells from TNBC (TNBC-TICs and TPBC (TPBC-TICs stable cell lines. Limiting dilution transplantation experiments revealed that CD24+/CD44high/ALDH1+ cells derived from TNBC (TNBC-TICs and TPBC (TPBC-TICs were significantly more effective at repopulating the mammary glands of naïve female BALB/c mice than CD24-/CD44-/ALDH1- cells. Implantation of the TNBC-TICs resulted in significantly larger tumors, which metastasized to the lungs to a significantly greater extent than TNBC, TPBC-TICs, TPBC or parental 4T1 cells. We further demonstrated that the increased aggressiveness of TNBC-TICs correlates with the presence of high levels of mouse twenty-five kDa heat shock protein (Hsp25/mouse HspB1 and seventy-two kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72/HspA1A. Conclusions

  14. Microglia phenotypes in aging-associated diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Zhuoran

    2017-01-01

    Due to the improvement in the public health and medical care, the life span of human beings has elongated considerably over the last decades. Consequently, the occurrence of aging-associated diseases has also increased. Inflammation of the brain increases during aging and could be an important facto

  15. Characterization of Human Disease Phenotypes Associated with Mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR, and IFIH1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Yanick J.; Chase, Diana S.; Schmidt, Johanna Lowenstein; Szynkiewicz, Marcin; Forte, Gabriella M.A.; Gornall, Hannah L.; Oojageer, Anthony; Anderson, Beverley; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M.; Ackroyd, Sam; Aeby, Alec; Agosta, Guillermo; Albin, Catherine; Allon-Shalev, Stavit; Arellano, Montse; Ariaudo, Giada; Aswani, Vijay; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Baildam, Eileen M.; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Bailey, Kathryn M.; Barnerias, Christine; Barth, Magalie; Battini, Roberta; Beresford, Michael W.; Bernard, Geneviève; Bianchi, Marika; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Blair, Edward M.; Bloom, Miriam; Burlina, Alberto B.; Carpanelli, Maria Luisa; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Castro-Gago, Manuel; Cavallini, Anna; Cereda, Cristina; Chandler, Kate E.; Chitayat, David A.; Collins, Abigail E.; Corcoles, Concepcion Sierra; Cordeiro, Nuno J.V.; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Dabydeen, Lyvia; Dale, Russell C.; D’Arrigo, Stefano; De Goede, Christian G.E.L.; De Laet, Corinne; De Waele, Liesbeth M.H.; Denzler, Ines; Desguerre, Isabelle; Devriendt, Koenraad; Di Rocco, Maja; Fahey, Michael C.; Fazzi, Elisa; Ferrie, Colin D.; Figueiredo, António; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Gowrinathan, Nirmala R.; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Hanrahan, Donncha; Isidor, Bertrand; Kara, Bülent; Khan, Nasaim; King, Mary D.; Kirk, Edwin P.; Kumar, Ram; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre; Lauffer, Heinz; Laugel, Vincent; La Piana, Roberta; Lim, Ming J.; Lin, Jean-Pierre S.-M.; Linnankivi, Tarja; Mackay, Mark T.; Marom, Daphna R.; Lourenço, Charles Marques; McKee, Shane A.; Moroni, Isabella; Morton, Jenny E.V.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Murray, Kevin; Nabbout, Rima; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Nunez-Enamorado, Noemi; Oades, Patrick J.; Olivieri, Ivana; Ostergaard, John R.; Pérez-Dueñas, Belén; Prendiville, Julie S.; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Régal, Luc; Ricci, Federica; Rio, Marlène; Rodriguez, Diana; Roubertie, Agathe; Salvatici, Elisabetta; Segers, Karin A.; Sinha, Gyanranjan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stödberg, Tommy I.; Straussberg, Rachel; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Suri, Mohnish; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Y.; Naude, Johann te Water; Teik, Keng Wee; Thomas, Maya Mary; Till, Marianne; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy Noel; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Vassallo, Grace; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Vogt, Julie; Wallace, Geoffrey B.; Wassmer, Evangeline; Webb, Hannah J.; Whitehouse, William P.; Whitney, Robyn N.; Zaki, Maha S.; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Livingston, John H.; Rozenberg, Flore; Lebon, Pierre; Vanderver, Adeline; Orcesi, Simona; Rice, Gillian I.

    2015-01-01

    Aicardi–Goutières syndrome is an inflammatory disease occurring due to mutations in any of TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR or IFIH1. We report on 374 patients from 299 families with mutations in these seven genes. Most patients conformed to one of two fairly stereotyped clinical profiles; either exhibiting an in utero disease-onset (74 patients; 22.8% of all patients where data were available), or a post-natal presentation, usually within the first year of life (223 patients; 68.6%), characterized by a sub-acute encephalopathy and a loss of previously acquired skills. Other clinically distinct phenotypes were also observed; particularly, bilateral striatal necrosis (13 patients; 3.6%) and non-syndromic spastic paraparesis (12 patients; 3.4%). We recorded 69 deaths (19.3% of patients with follow-up data). Of 285 patients for whom data were available, 210 (73.7%) were profoundly disabled, with no useful motor, speech and intellectual function. Chilblains, glaucoma, hypothyroidism, cardiomyopathy, intracerebral vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, bowel inflammation and systemic lupus erythematosus were seen frequently enough to be confirmed as real associations with the Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome phenotype. We observed a robust relationship between mutations in all seven genes with increased type I interferon activity in cerebrospinal fluid and serum, and the increased expression of interferon-stimulated gene transcripts in peripheral blood. We recorded a positive correlation between the level of cerebrospinal fluid interferon activity assayed within one year of disease presentation and the degree of subsequent disability. Interferon-stimulated gene transcripts remained high in most patients, indicating an ongoing disease process. On the basis of substantial morbidity and mortality, our data highlight the urgent need to define coherent treatment strategies for the phenotypes associated with mutations in the Aicardi–Goutières syndrome

  16. Phenotypic Expansion of DGKE-Associated Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westland, Rik; Bodria, Monica; Carrea, Alba; Lata, Sneh; Scolari, Francesco; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G.; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is usually characterized by uncontrolled complement activation. The recent discovery of loss-of-function mutations in DGKE in patients with aHUS and normal complement levels challenged this observation. DGKE, encoding diacylglycerol kinase-ε, has not been implicated in the complement cascade but hypothetically leads to a prothrombotic state. The discovery of this novel mechanism has potential implications for the treatment of infants with aHUS, who are increasingly treated with complement blocking agents. In this study, we used homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to identify a novel truncating mutation in DGKE (p.K101X) in a consanguineous family with patients affected by thrombotic microangiopathy characterized by significant serum complement activation and consumption of the complement fraction C3. Aggressive plasma infusion therapy controlled systemic symptoms and prevented renal failure, suggesting that this treatment can significantly affect the natural history of this aggressive disease. Our study expands the clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in DGKE and challenges the benefits of complement blockade treatment in such patients. Mechanistic studies of DGKE and aHUS are, therefore, essential to the design of appropriate therapeutic strategies in patients with DGKE mutations. PMID:24511134

  17. Similarity-based search of model organism, disease and drug effect phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-02-19

    Background: Semantic similarity measures over phenotype ontologies have been demonstrated to provide a powerful approach for the analysis of model organism phenotypes, the discovery of animal models of human disease, novel pathways, gene functions, druggable therapeutic targets, and determination of pathogenicity. Results: We have developed PhenomeNET 2, a system that enables similarity-based searches over a large repository of phenotypes in real-time. It can be used to identify strains of model organisms that are phenotypically similar to human patients, diseases that are phenotypically similar to model organism phenotypes, or drug effect profiles that are similar to the phenotypes observed in a patient or model organism. PhenomeNET 2 is available at http://aber-owl.net/phenomenet. Conclusions: Phenotype-similarity searches can provide a powerful tool for the discovery and investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying an observed phenotypic manifestation. PhenomeNET 2 facilitates user-defined similarity searches and allows researchers to analyze their data within a large repository of human, mouse and rat phenotypes.

  18. Phenotypical variation within 22 families with Pompe disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.A. Wens (Stephan); C.M. Van Gelder (Carin); M.E. Kruijshaar (Michelle); J.M. de Vries (Juna); N.A.M.E. van der Beek (Nadine); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); E. Brusse (Esther)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pompe disease has a broad clinical spectrum, in which the phenotype is partially explained by the genotype. The aim of this study was to describe phenotypical variation among siblings with non-classic Pompe disease. We hypothesized that siblings and families with the same gen

  19. Phenotype and functions of memory Tfh cells in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ueno, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of the origin and functions of human blood CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells found in human blood has changed dramatically in the past years. These cells are currently considered to represent a circulating memory compartment of T follicular helper (Tfh) lineage cells. Recent studies have shown that blood memory Tfh cells are composed of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Here, we review the current understanding of human blood memory Tfh cells and the subsets within this compartment. We present a strategy to define these subsets based on cell surface profiles. Finally, we discuss how increased understanding of the biology of blood memory Tfh cells may contribute insight into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and the mode of action of vaccines.

  20. Prediction of gene-phenotype associations in humans, mice, and plants using phenologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, John O; Singh-Blom, Ulf Martin; Laurent, Jon M; McGary, Kriston L; Marcotte, Edward M

    2013-06-21

    Phenotypes and diseases may be related to seemingly dissimilar phenotypes in other species by means of the orthology of underlying genes. Such "orthologous phenotypes," or "phenologs," are examples of deep homology, and may be used to predict additional candidate disease genes. In this work, we develop an unsupervised algorithm for ranking phenolog-based candidate disease genes through the integration of predictions from the k nearest neighbor phenologs, comparing classifiers and weighting functions by cross-validation. We also improve upon the original method by extending the theory to paralogous phenotypes. Our algorithm makes use of additional phenotype data--from chicken, zebrafish, and E. coli, as well as new datasets for C. elegans--establishing that several types of annotations may be treated as phenotypes. We demonstrate the use of our algorithm to predict novel candidate genes for human atrial fibrillation (such as HRH2, ATP4A, ATP4B, and HOPX) and epilepsy (e.g., PAX6 and NKX2-1). We suggest gene candidates for pharmacologically-induced seizures in mouse, solely based on orthologous phenotypes from E. coli. We also explore the prediction of plant gene-phenotype associations, as for the Arabidopsis response to vernalization phenotype. We are able to rank gene predictions for a significant portion of the diseases in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database. Additionally, our method suggests candidate genes for mammalian seizures based only on bacterial phenotypes and gene orthology. We demonstrate that phenotype information may come from diverse sources, including drug sensitivities, gene ontology biological processes, and in situ hybridization annotations. Finally, we offer testable candidates for a variety of human diseases, plant traits, and other classes of phenotypes across a wide array of species.

  1. VEN-120, a Recombinant Human Lactoferrin, Promotes a Regulatory T Cell [Treg] Phenotype and Drives Resolution of Inflammation in Distinct Murine Models of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManus, Christopher F; Collins, Colm B; Nguyen, Tom T; Alfano, Randall W; Jedlicka, Paul; de Zoeten, Edwin F

    2017-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] is characterised by a disruption of immune homeostasis, which is tightly regulated to protect against harmful pathogens yet not react to commensal antigens. Animal studies indicate that regulatory T cells [Treg] modulate the immune response to prevent IBD development. Lactoferrin [LF] is an endogenous anti-inflammatory pleiotropic protein secreted at high concentrations in colostrum and at mucosal sites. However, the effect of LF on specific T lymphocyte populations has not been studied. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which a recombinant human LF, VEN-120, regulates T cell populations in health and disease. Two murine models of intestinal inflammation, the dextran sodium sulphate colitis model and the TNFΔARE/+ model of ileitis, were used to study the anti-inflammatory and T cell modulating ability of VEN-120. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate T cell populations within the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes, and to evaluate the effect of VEN-120 on CD4+ T cells in vitro. VEN-120 reduced inflammation in both models of IBD, accompanied by increased Tregs in the intestinal lamina propria. Treatment of CD4+ T cells in vitro resulted in an upregulation of Treg genes and skewing towards a Treg population. This in vitro T cell skewing translated to an increase of Treg homing to the intestinal lamina propria and associated lymph tissue in healthy mice. These data provide a novel immunological mechanism by which VEN-120 modulates T cells to restrict inflammatory T cell-driven disease.

  2. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  3. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Roider

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon® on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC. ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  4. Targeting mitochondrial phenotypes for non-communicable diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengtang Qi; Shuzhe Ding

    2016-01-01

    The concept that“Exercise is Medicine”has been challenged by the rising prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs). This is partly due to the fact that the underlying mechanisms of how exercise influences energy homeostasis and counteracts high-fat diets and physical inactivity is complex and remains relatively poorly understood on a molecular level. In addition to genetic polymorphisms in humans that lead to gross variations in responsiveness to exercise, adaptation in mitochondrial networks is central to physical activity, inactivity, and diet. To harness the benefits of exercise for NCDs, much work still needs to be done to improve health effectively on a societal level such as developing personalized exercise interventions aided by advances in high-throughput genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. We propose that understanding the mitochondrial phenotype according to the molecular information of genotypes, lifestyles, and exercise responsiveness in individuals will optimize exercise effects for prevention of NCDs.

  5. Human pancreatic islet progenitor cells demonstrate phenotypic plasticity in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maithili P Dalvi; Malati R Umrani; Mugdha V Joglekar; Anandwardhan A Hardikar

    2009-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a phenomenon that describes the occurrence of 2 or more distinct phenotypes under diverse conditions. This article discusses the work carried out over the past few years in understanding the potential of human pancreatic islet-derived progenitors for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. The phenotypic plasticity exhibited by pancreatic progenitors during reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and possible role of microRNAs in regulation of this process is also presented herein.

  6. Molecular identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhao, Ya-E; Cheng, Juan; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2014-07-01

    Traditional classification of Demodex mites by hosts and phenotypic characteristics is defective because of environmental influences. In this study, we proposed molecular identification of four phenotypes of two human Demodex species based on mitochondrial cox1 fragments for the first time. Mites collected from sufferers' facial skin were classified into four phenotypes: phenotype A-C with finger-like terminus, and phenotype D with cone-like terminus. The results of molecular data showed that cox1 sequences were all 429 bp. Divergences, genetic distances and transition/transversion ratios among the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus were 0.0-3.0%, 0.000-0.031, and 6/3-5/0, respectively, in line with intraspecific differences. However, those measures between the phenotype with cone-like terminus and phenotypes with finger-like terminus were 19.6-20.5%, 0.256-0.271, and 0.58 (31/53)-0.66 (35/53), respectively, reaching interspecific level. Phylogenetic trees also showed that the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus clustered as one clade, and the phenotype with cone-like terminus formed another one. Therefore, we conclude that mitochondrial cox1 sequence is a good marker for identification of two human Demodex species. Molecular data indicate no subspecies differentiation. Terminus is an effective character for species identification. Mites with finger-like terminus are Demodex folliculorum, and those with cone-like terminus are Demodex brevis.

  7. Angioedema Phenotypes: Disease Expression and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Maddalena Alessandra; Perego, Francesca; Zanichelli, Andrea; Cicardi, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Due to marked heterogeneity of clinical presentations, comprehensive knowledge of angioedema phenotypes is crucial for correct diagnosis and choosing the appropriate therapeutic approach. One of the ways to a meaningful clinical distinction can be made between forms of angioedema occurring "with or without wheals." Angioedema with wheals (rash) is a hallmark of urticaria, either acute or chronic, spontaneous or inducible. Angioedema without wheals may still be manifested in about 10 % of patients with urticaria, but it may also occur as a separate entity. Several classifications of angioedema as part of urticaria were published over time, while a latest one, released in 2014 (HAWK group consensus, see below), provided a classification of all forms of "angioedema without wheals" distinct from urticaria, which will be the focus of the present review. At this time, the HAWK consensus classification is the best in terms of covering the pathophysiology, mediators involved, angioedema triggers, and clinical expression. According to this classification, three types of hereditary angioedema (genetic C1-INH deficiency, normal C1-INH with factor XII mutations, and unknown origin) and four types of acquired angioedema (C1-INH deficiency, related to ACE inhibitors intake, idiopathic histaminergic, and idiopathic non-histaminergic) are presented. We will review the distinctive clinical features of each phenotype in details.

  8. Pathologic and phenotypic alterations in a mouse expressing a connexin47 missense mutation that causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Tress

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels are intercellular conduits that allow diffusional exchange of ions, second messengers, and metabolites. Human oligodendrocytes express the gap junction protein connexin47 (Cx47, which is encoded by the GJC2 gene. The autosomal recessive mutation hCx47M283T causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease 1 (PMLD1, a progressive leukodystrophy characterized by hypomyelination, retarded motor development, nystagmus, and spasticity. We introduced the human missense mutation into the orthologous position of the mouse Gjc2 gene and inserted the mCx47M282T coding sequence into the mouse genome via homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Three-week-old homozygous Cx47M282T mice displayed impaired rotarod performance but unchanged open-field behavior. 10-15-day-old homozygous Cx47M282T and Cx47 null mice revealed a more than 80% reduction in the number of cells participating in glial networks after biocytin injections into oligodendrocytes in sections of corpus callosum. Homozygous expression of mCx47M282T resulted in reduced MBP expression and astrogliosis in the cerebellum of ten-day-old mice which could also be detected in Cx47 null mice of the same age. Three-month-old homozygous Cx47M282T mice exhibited neither altered open-field behavior nor impaired rotarod performance anymore. Adult mCx47M282T expressing mice did not show substantial myelin alterations, but homozygous Cx47M282T mice, additionally deprived of connexin32, which is also expressed in oligodendrocytes, died within six weeks after birth and displayed severe myelin defects accompanied by astrogliosis and activated microglia. These results strongly suggest that PMLD1 is caused by the loss of Cx47 channel function that results in impaired panglial coupling in white matter tissue.

  9. Standardized phenotyping enhances Mendelian disease gene identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has revolutionized the identification of genes with dominant disease-associated variants for rare clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders, but the identification of genes with recessive disease-associated variants has been less successful. A new study now provides a

  10. Association of PRPS1 Mutations with Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Mittal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1 codes for PRS-I enzyme that catalyzes the first step of nucleotide synthesis. PRPS1 gene mutations have been implicated in a number of human diseases. Recently, new mutations in PRPS1 have been identified that have been associated with novel phenotypes like diabetes insipidus expanding the spectrum of PRPS1-related diseases. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current literature on PRPS1-related syndromes and summarize potential therapies. The overexpression of PRPS1 results in PRS-I superactivity resulting in purine overproduction. Patients with PRS-I superactivity demonstrate uric acid overproduction, hypotonia, ataxia, neurodevelopment abnormalities, and postlingual hearing impairment. On the other hand, decreased activity leads to X-linked nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness (DFNX-2, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5 (CMTX5, and Arts syndrome depending on the residual activity of PRS-I. Mild PRS-I deficiency (DFNX-2 results in non-syndromic progressive hearing loss whereas moderate PRS-I deficiency (CMTX5 and severe PRS-I deficiency (Arts syndrome present with peripheral or optic neuropathy, prelingual progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and central nervous system impairment. Currently, purine replacement via S-adenosylmethionine (SAM supplementation in patients with Arts syndrome appears to improve their condition. This suggests that SAM supplementation can alleviate symptoms of PRPS1 deficient patients and open new avenues of therapeutic intervention.

  11. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  12. Human brain evolution: from gene discovery to phenotype discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Todd M

    2012-06-26

    The rise of comparative genomics and related technologies has added important new dimensions to the study of human evolution. Our knowledge of the genes that underwent expression changes or were targets of positive selection in human evolution is rapidly increasing, as is our knowledge of gene duplications, translocations, and deletions. It is now clear that the genetic differences between humans and chimpanzees are far more extensive than previously thought; their genomes are not 98% or 99% identical. Despite the rapid growth in our understanding of the evolution of the human genome, our understanding of the relationship between genetic changes and phenotypic changes is tenuous. This is true even for the most intensively studied gene, FOXP2, which underwent positive selection in the human terminal lineage and is thought to have played an important role in the evolution of human speech and language. In part, the difficulty of connecting genes to phenotypes reflects our generally poor knowledge of human phenotypic specializations, as well as the difficulty of interpreting the consequences of genetic changes in species that are not amenable to invasive research. On the positive side, investigations of FOXP2, along with genomewide surveys of gene-expression changes and selection-driven sequence changes, offer the opportunity for "phenotype discovery," providing clues to human phenotypic specializations that were previously unsuspected. What is more, at least some of the specializations that have been proposed are amenable to testing with noninvasive experimental techniques appropriate for the study of humans and apes.

  13. Phenotypic convergence of Menkes and Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Lewis-Smith, David; Pal, Endre; Duff, Jennifer; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Müller, Juliane S; Rudas, Gabor; Aranyi, Zsuzsanna; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F; Horvath, Rita

    2016-12-01

    Menkes disease is an X-linked multisystem disorder with epilepsy, kinky hair, and neurodegeneration caused by mutations in the copper transporter ATP7A. Other ATP7A mutations have been linked to juvenile occipital horn syndrome and adult-onset hereditary motor neuropathy.(1,2) About 5%-10% of the patients present with "atypical Menkes disease" characterized by longer survival, cerebellar ataxia, and developmental delay.(2) The intracellular copper transport is regulated by 2 P type ATPase copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B. These proteins are expressed in the trans-Golgi network that guides copper to intracellular compartments, and in copper excess, it relocates copper to the plasma membrane to pump it out from the cells.(3)ATP7B mutations cause Wilson disease with dystonia, ataxia, tremor, and abnormal copper accumulation in the brain, liver, and other organs.(4).

  14. Lessons from model organisms: phenotypic robustness and missing heritability in complex disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Queitsch

    Full Text Available Genetically tractable model organisms from phages to mice have taught us invaluable lessons about fundamental biological processes and disease-causing mutations. Owing to technological and computational advances, human biology and the causes of human diseases have become accessible as never before. Progress in identifying genetic determinants for human diseases has been most remarkable for Mendelian traits. In contrast, identifying genetic determinants for complex diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular and neurological diseases has remained challenging, despite the fact that these diseases cluster in families. Hundreds of variants associated with complex diseases have been found in genome-wide association studies (GWAS, yet most of these variants explain only a modest amount of the observed heritability, a phenomenon known as "missing heritability." The missing heritability has been attributed to many factors, mainly inadequacies in genotyping and phenotyping. We argue that lessons learned about complex traits in model organisms offer an alternative explanation for missing heritability in humans. In diverse model organisms, phenotypic robustness differs among individuals, and those with decreased robustness show increased penetrance of mutations and express previously cryptic genetic variation. We propose that phenotypic robustness also differs among humans and that individuals with lower robustness will be more responsive to genetic and environmental perturbations and hence susceptible to disease. Phenotypic robustness is a quantitative trait that can be accurately measured in model organisms, but not as yet in humans. We propose feasible approaches to measure robustness in large human populations, proof-of-principle experiments for robustness markers in model organisms, and a new GWAS design that takes differences in robustness into account.

  15. High Throughput Screening for Neurodegeneration and Complex Disease Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, Hemant; Lo, Donald C.; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2008-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) for complex diseases is challenging. This stems from the fact that complex phenotypes are difficult to adapt to rapid, high throughput assays. We describe the recent development of high throughput and high-content screens (HCS) for neurodegenerative diseases, with a focus on inherited neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington's disease. We describe, among others, HTS assays based on protein aggregation, neuronal death, caspase activation and mutant protei...

  16. Factors and processes modulating phenotypes in neuronopathic lysosomal storage diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Banecki, Bogdan; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are inherited metabolic disorders caused by genetic defects causing deficiency of various lysosomal proteins, and resultant accumulation of non-degraded compounds. They are multisystemic diseases, and in most of them (>70 %) severe brain dysfunctions are evident. However, expression of various phenotypes in particular diseases is extremely variable, from non-neuronopathic to severely neurodegenerative in the deficiency of the same enzyme. Although all lysosomal stor...

  17. Genotype–phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Larovere, Laura E.; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V.; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Nyhan, William L.; Puig, Juan G.; O’Neill, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype–phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype–phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype–phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype–phenotype correlations for other disorders. PMID:23975452

  18. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J; Larovere, Laura E; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E; Schretlen, David J; Nyhan, William L; Puig, Juan G; O'Neill, Patrick J; Jinnah, H A

    2014-05-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype-phenotype correlations for other disorders.

  19. Phenotypic convergence of Menkes and Wilson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Lewis-Smith, David; Pal, Endre; Duff, Jennifer; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Müller, Juliane S.; Rudas, Gabor; Aranyi, Zsuzsanna; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Menkes disease is an X-linked multisystem disorder with epilepsy, kinky hair, and neurodegeneration caused by mutations in the copper transporter ATP7A. Other ATP7A mutations have been linked to juvenile occipital horn syndrome and adult-onset hereditary motor neuropathy.1,2 About 5%–10% of the patients present with “atypical Menkes disease” characterized by longer survival, cerebellar ataxia, and developmental delay.2 The intracellular copper transport is regulated by 2 P type ATPase copper ...

  20. Phenotype-genotype correlations in patients with Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenci, Peter

    2014-05-01

    There is considerable phenotypic variation in Wilson's disease (WD). Some patients present with hepatic disease during the first decade of life and some with neurological degeneration in adolescence or adult life, with or without overt liver disease. Although the absence of neurologic disease in patients with liver disease in childhood or adolescence can be explained by the limited time exposure of the central nervous system to copper toxicity, it is surprising that late-onset neurologic WD can occur without any evidence of liver involvement. This huge variability in the clinical presentation of WD in general reflects our limited knowledge on the natural history of WD. Genetic association studies require the phenotype to be defined as accurately as possible.

  1. The genotype-phenotype correlation in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroos, Marian; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; van der Ploeg, Ans; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2012-02-15

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal glycogen storage disorder that is caused by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency and is due to pathogenic sequence variations in the corresponding GAA gene. The correlation between genotypes and phenotypes is strict, in that patients with the most severe phenotype, classic infantile Pompe disease, have two pathogenic mutations, one in each GAA allele, that prevent the formation of GAA or totally obliterates its function. All patients with less progressive phenotypes have at least one sequence variation that allows normal or low level synthesis of GAA leading to the formation of analytically measurable, low level GAA activity in most cases. There is an overall trend of finding higher GAA enzyme levels in patients with onset of symptoms in adulthood when compared to patients who show clinical manifestations in early childhood, aged 0-5 years, with a rapidly progressive course, but who lack the severe characteristics of classic infantile Pompe disease. However, several cases have been reported of adult-onset disease with very low GAA activity, which in all those cases corresponds with the GAA genotype. The clinical diversity observed within a large group of patients with functionally the same GAA genotype and the same c.-32-13C > T haplotype demonstrates that modifying factors can have a substantial effect on the clinical course of Pompe disease, disturbing the GAA genotype-phenotype correlation. The present day challenge is to identify these factors and explore them as therapeutic targets.

  2. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases. PMID:26924528

  3. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases.

  4. Mechanistic phenotypes: an aggregative phenotyping strategy to identify disease mechanisms using GWAS data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Mosley

    Full Text Available A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs associated with "mechanistic phenotypes", comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1 thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2 four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs, and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p = 0.0001, FDR p = 0.03, driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p = 2×10-5, FDR p = 0.03 (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p = 4×10-6, FDR p = 0.005 (KIF25, PINX1. We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms.

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    focused definition allows for classification of patients into distinct prognostic and therapeutic subgroups for both clinical and research purposes. Ideally, individuals sharing a unique phenotype would also ultimately be determined to have a similar underlying biologic or physiologic mechanism......, propose the following variation on this definition: "a single or combination of disease attributes that describe differences between individuals with COPD as they relate to clinically meaningful outcomes (symptoms, exacerbations, response to therapy, rate of disease progression, or death)." This more...... to clinical outcome is determined. Although this schema represents an ideal construct, we acknowledge any phenotype may be etiologically heterogeneous and that any one individual may manifest multiple phenotypes. We have much yet to learn, but establishing a common language for future research will facilitate...

  6. Human Environmental Disease Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, many epidemiological, toxicological and biological studies have been performed to assess the role of environmental chemicals as potential toxicants for diverse human disorders. However, the relationships between diseases based on chemical exposure have been rarely studied...... by computational biology. We developed a human environmental disease network (EDN) to explore and suggest novel disease-disease and chemical-disease relationships. The presented scored EDN model is built upon the integration on systems biology and chemical toxicology using chemical contaminants information...

  7. Sickle cell disease clinical phenotypes in children from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-20

    Jul 20, 2014 ... Background:The clinical phenotypes of children with sickle cell disease .... oral penicillin prophylaxis and pneumococcal vaccination ... characterized by fever and respiratory symptoms ... included frequency of significant painful episodes, blood ..... aggressive management of acute pain crises; prevention of.

  8. Molecular Pathology of Human Prion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative conditions in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize the molecular background of phenotypic variability, relation of prion protein (PrP to other proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and pathogenesis of neuronal vulnerability. PrP exists in different forms that may be present in both diseased and non-diseased brain, however, abundant disease-associated PrP together with tissue pathology characterizes prion diseases and associates with transmissibility. Prion diseases have different etiological background with distinct pathogenesis and phenotype. Mutations of the prion protein gene are associated with genetic forms. The codon 129 polymorphism in combination with the Western blot pattern of PrP after proteinase K digestion serves as a basis for molecular subtyping of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Tissue damage may result from several parallel, interacting or subsequent pathways that involve cellular systems associated with synapses, protein processing, oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  9. Microbiome Heterogeneity Characterizing Intestinal Tissue and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea D; Kirsch, Richard; Milgrom, Raquel; Stempak, Joanne M; Kabakchiev, Boyko; Silverberg, Mark S

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with differential abundance of numerous organisms when compared to healthy controls (HCs); however, few studies have investigated variability in the microbiome across intestinal locations and how this variability might be related to disease location and phenotype. In this study, we have analyzed the microbiome of a large cohort of individuals recruited at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Biopsies were taken from subjects with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and HC, and also individuals having undergone ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for treatment of ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. Microbial 16S rRNA was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We observed a great deal of variability in the microbiome characterizing different sampling locations. Samples from pouch and afferent limb were comparable in microbial composition. When comparing sigmoid and terminal ileum samples, more differences were observed. The greatest number of differentially abundant microbes was observed when comparing either pouch or afferent limb samples to sigmoid or terminal ileum. Despite these differences, we were able to observe modest microbial variability between inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes and HCs, even when controlling for sampling location and additional experimental factors. Most detected associations were observed between HCs and Crohn's disease, with decreases in specific genera in the families Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae characterizing tissue samples from individuals with Crohn's disease. This study highlights important considerations when analyzing the composition of the microbiome and also provides useful insight into differences in the microbiome characterizing these seemingly related phenotypes.

  10. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  11. Brain connectivity in neurodegenerative diseases--from phenotype to proteinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pievani, Michela; Filippini, Nicola; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Cappa, Stefano F; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2014-11-01

    Functional and structural connectivity measures, as assessed by means of functional and diffusion MRI, are emerging as potential intermediate biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD) and other disorders. This Review aims to summarize current evidence that connectivity biomarkers are associated with upstream and downstream disease processes (molecular pathology and clinical symptoms, respectively) in the major neurodegenerative diseases. The vast majority of studies have addressed functional and structural connectivity correlates of clinical phenotypes, confirming the predictable correlation with topography and disease severity in AD and frontotemporal dementia. In neurodegenerative diseases with motor symptoms, structural--but, to date, not functional--connectivity has been consistently found to be associated with clinical phenotype and disease severity. In the latest studies, the focus has moved towards the investigation of connectivity correlates of molecular pathology. Studies in cognitively healthy individuals with brain amyloidosis or genetic risk factors for AD have shown functional connectivity abnormalities in preclinical disease stages that are reminiscent of abnormalities observed in symptomatic AD. This shift in approach is promising, and may aid identification of early disease markers, establish a paradigm for other neurodegenerative disorders, shed light on the molecular neurobiology of connectivity disruption and, ultimately, clarify the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Genotype-phenotype correlations in Lesch-Nyhan disease: moving beyond the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Jinnah, H A

    2012-01-27

    Lesch-Nyhan disease and its attenuated variants are caused by mutations in the HPRT1 gene, which encodes the purine recycling enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The mutations are heterogeneous, with more than 400 different mutations already documented. Prior efforts to correlate variations in the clinical phenotype with different mutations have suggested that milder phenotypes typically are associated with mutants that permit some residual enzyme function, whereas the most severe phenotype is associated with null mutants. However, multiple exceptions to this concept have been reported. In the current studies 44 HPRT1 mutations associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes were reconstructed by site-directed mutagenesis, the mutant enzymes were expressed in vitro and purified, and their kinetic properties were examined toward their substrates hypoxanthine, guanine, and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. The results provide strong evidence for a correlation between disease severity and residual catalytic activity of the enzyme (k(cat)) toward each of its substrates as well as several mechanisms that result in exceptions to this correlation. There was no correlation between disease severity and the affinity of the enzyme for its substrates (K(m)). These studies provide a valuable model for understanding general principles of genotype-phenotype correlations in human disease, as the mechanisms involved are applicable to many other disorders.

  13. A universal mechanism ties genotype to phenotype in trinucleotide diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Kaplan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide hereditary diseases such as Huntington disease and Friedreich ataxia are cureless diseases associated with inheriting an abnormally large number of DNA trinucleotide repeats in a gene. The genes associated with different diseases are unrelated and harbor a trinucleotide repeat in different functional regions; therefore, it is striking that many of these diseases have similar correlations between their genotype, namely the number of inherited repeats and age of onset and progression phenotype. These correlations remain unexplained despite more than a decade of research. Although mechanisms have been proposed for several trinucleotide diseases, none of the proposals, being disease-specific, can account for the commonalities among these diseases. Here, we propose a universal mechanism in which length-dependent somatic repeat expansion occurs during the patient's lifetime toward a pathological threshold. Our mechanism uniformly explains for the first time to our knowledge the genotype-phenotype correlations common to trinucleotide disease and is well-supported by both experimental and clinical data. In addition, mathematical analysis of the mechanism provides simple explanations to a wide range of phenomena such as the exponential decrease of the age-of-onset curve, similar onset but faster progression in patients with Huntington disease with homozygous versus heterozygous mutation, and correlation of age of onset with length of the short allele but not with the long allele in Friedreich ataxia. If our proposed universal mechanism proves to be the core component of the actual mechanisms of specific trinucleotide diseases, it would open the search for a uniform treatment for all these diseases, possibly by delaying the somatic expansion process.

  14. RNA Directed Modulation of Phenotypic Plasticity in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Laura; Hewson, Chris; Burdach, Jon; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    Natural selective processes have been known to drive phenotypic plasticity, which is the emergence of different phenotypes from one genome following environmental stimulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been observed to modulate transcriptional and epigenetic states of genes in human cells. We surmised that lncRNAs are governors of phenotypic plasticity and drive natural selective processes through epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Using heat shocked human cells as a model we find several differentially expressed transcripts with the top candidates being lncRNAs derived from retro-elements. One particular retro-element derived transcripts, Retro-EIF2S2, was found to be abundantly over-expressed in heat shocked cells. Over-expression of Retro-EIF2S2 significantly enhanced cell viability and modulated a predisposition for an adherent cellular phenotype upon heat shock. Mechanistically, we find that this retro-element derived transcript interacts directly with a network of proteins including 40S ribosomal protein S30 (FAU), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (EIF5A), and Ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 (UBA52) to affect protein modulated cell adhesion pathways. We find one motif in Retro-EIF2S2 that exhibits binding to FAU and modulates phenotypic cell transitions from adherent to suspension states. The observations presented here suggest that retroviral derived transcripts actively modulate phenotypic plasticity in human cells in response to environmental selective pressures and suggest that natural selection may play out through the action of retro-elements in human cells.

  15. Comparative Analyses of QTLs Influencing Obesity and Metabolic Phenotypes in Pigs and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer D Pant

    Full Text Available The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564 designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35 from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days, including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine 60k SNP Beadchip and a combined linkage disequilibrium-linkage analysis was used to identify genome-wide significant associations for collected phenotypes. We identified 229 QTLs which associated with adiposity- and metabolic phenotypes at genome-wide significant levels. Subsequently comparative analyses were performed to identify the extent of overlap between previously identified QTLs in both humans and pigs. The combined analysis of a large number of obesity phenotypes has provided insight in the genetic architecture of the molecular mechanisms underlying these traits indicating that QTLs underlying similar phenotypes are clustered in the genome. Our analyses have further confirmed that genetic heterogeneity is an inherent characteristic of obesity traits most likely caused by segregation or fixation of different variants of the individual components belonging to cellular pathways in different populations. Several important genes previously associated to obesity in human studies, along with novel genes were identified. Altogether, this study provides novel

  16. Human Stem Cell-Derived Spinal Cord Astrocytes with Defined Mature or Reactive Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Roybon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of astrocytes from human stem cells has significant potential for analysis of their role in normal brain function and disease, but existing protocols generate only immature astrocytes. Using early neuralization, we generated spinal cord astrocytes from mouse or human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells with high efficiency. Remarkably, short exposure to fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1 or FGF2 was sufficient to direct these astrocytes selectively toward a mature quiescent phenotype, as judged by both marker expression and functional analysis. In contrast, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1β, but not FGFs, induced multiple elements of a reactive inflammatory phenotype but did not affect maturation. These phenotypically defined, scalable populations of spinal cord astrocytes will be important both for studying normal astrocyte function and for modeling human pathological processes in vitro.

  17. Genetic Factors in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Contribution to Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Borgiani, Paola; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Rufini, Sara; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Sili Scavalli, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors exert an important role in determining Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, interplaying with environmental factors. Several genetic studies in various SLE populations have identified numerous susceptibility loci. From a clinical point of view, SLE is characterized by a great heterogeneity in terms of clinical and laboratory manifestations. As widely demonstrated, specific laboratory features are associated with clinical disease subset, with different severity degree. Similarly, in the last years, an association between specific phenotypes and genetic variants has been identified, allowing the possibility to elucidate different mechanisms and pathways accountable for disease manifestations. However, except for Lupus Nephritis (LN), no studies have been designed to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of different phenotypes. In this review, we will report data currently known about this specific association. PMID:26798662

  18. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS AND GENOTYPE-PHENOTYPE CORRELATIONS IN WILSON DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Scvortova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Knowledge of how mutations other than p.H1069Q translate into the basic defect in Wilson disease (WD is scarce due to the low incidence of homozygous index cases. A total of 12 homozygous mutations of ATP7B, were examined for their functional activity. Transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 exposed to elevated copper levels was used as a model for predicting the severity of different WD mutations. The results of this research have direct implications for WD diagnosis. Our data strongly confirms that phenotypic presentation of the patients is related to the ATP7B mutation, providing evidence for genotype - phenotype correlations and can explain in part the variable clinical features observed in patients with WD. The results we have provided help to highlight the information still needed for understanding the function and malfunction of ATP7B and its role in the disease.

  19. A phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferris, Craig F.; Marella, Mathieu; Smerkers, Brian; Barchet, Thomas M.; Gershman, Benjamin; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Such a model would show loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia, appearance of Lewy bodies, and the early stages of motor dysfunction. The model was developed by subcutaneously injecting biodegradable microspheres of rotenone, a complex I inhibitor in 8–9 month old, ovariectomized Long–Evans rats. Animals were observed for changes in body weight and motor activity. At the end o...

  20. Nigral iron deposition occurs across motor phenotypes of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L; Wang, J; Jin, H; Fei, G; Zhang, Y; Chen, W; Zhao, L; Zhao, N; Sun, X; Zeng, M; Zhong, C

    2012-07-01

      To investigate whether brain iron deposition correlates with motor phenotypic expressions of Parkinson's disease.   We subtyped patients with Parkinson's disease according to their main motor symptoms (tremor, rigidity/bradykinesia) into three subgroups: tremor-dominant subgroup, akinetic/rigid-dominant subgroup, or mixed subgroup. The iron levels in bilateral substantia nigra, globus pallidus, putamen, the head of caudate, and red nucleus of 87 patients and 50 control subjects were assayed by measuring phase values using susceptibility-weighted phase imaging in a 3-tesla magnetic resonance system. The serum ceruloplasmin levels of all subjects were determined.   The bilateral average phase values of the substantia nigra and all other brain regions examined did not correlate with the main motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in the total patient group or when patients were grouped according to serum ceruloplasmin levels. Significant correlations between serum ceruloplasmin levels and nigral bilateral average phase values were observed in the tremor and akinetic/rigid-dominant subgroups. Analysis of patients without prior dopaminergic medication exhibited similar results. Increased nigral iron content correlated with disease severity as assayed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores in the PD(AR) subgroup.   These findings suggest that nigral iron deposition, correlating with decreased serum ceruloplasmin levels, is a risk factor in Parkinson's disease across multiple motor phenotypic expressions. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  1. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongbo; Zhang, Guangde; Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD.

  2. Differences in phenotype and disease course in adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Bartek, Jiri; Wewer, Anne Vibeke;

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have compared phenotype and disease course in children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To compare phenotype, treatment and disease course in children (IBD. Methods Two population-based cohorts comprising paediatric...... or disease course. Cumulative 5-year surgery rates for paediatric and adult patients were 5% and 9% for UC (N.S.) and 18% and 21% for CD (N.S.), respectively. Conclusions Paediatric UC patients had more extensive disease, were more often treated with systemic steroids and AZA, had a higher frequency...

  3. Phenotypic commonalities in familial and sporadic Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yasuhiko; Markopoulou, Katerina; Putzke, John D; Whaley, Nathaniel R; Farrer, Matthew J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J

    2006-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a clinically well-documented neurodegenerative disorder. However, the mechanism or mechanisms of its phenotypic expressions are still unknown. To compare phenotypes by examining demographic and clinical features of patients with familial PD and sporadic PD and with or without a family history of PD. Historical review of patients with sporadic PD in clinic-based samples and individual patients diagnosed with PD from families whose linkage to mutations or loci has been identified. Movement disorder clinic in a referral center. A total of 1277 patients with sporadic PD and 40 patients with familial PD. Clinical features, including distribution by sex, initial motor symptom, location of initial motor symptom, and frequency of asymmetric motor symptoms. Despite different etiologic backgrounds, both familial and sporadic PD exhibited several interesting commonalities, including a higher incidence in men, tremor as the initial motor symptom (predominantly involving the upper extremities), and asymmetric parkinsonism during disease course. The increased incidence of parkinsonism in men with familial PD suggests that the sex disparity is more likely the result of a protective effect against development of PD in women than of an increased risk in men that is associated with environmental factors. Phenotypic similarity among familial and sporadic PD indicates that a similar topographic distribution of the nigrostriatal lesion exists in patients with either form of PD regardless of apparent genetic influence.

  4. Retroviruses and human disease.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 25 years animal retroviruses have been favoured subjects of research by virologists, oncologists, and molecular biologists. Retroviruses have given us reverse transcriptase, oncogenes, and cloning vectors that may one day be exploited for human gene therapy. They have also given us leukaemia and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Kawasaki disease and tropical spastic paraparesis are thought to be associated with retrovirus infection, and other diseases such as de Qu...

  5. Comparative analyses of QTLs influencing obesity and metabolic phenotypes in pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pant, Sameer Dinkar; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Mette Juul;

    2015-01-01

    The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological...... features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits...... in the parental generation. Several obesity and metabolic phenotypes were recorded (n = 35) from birth to slaughter (242 ± 48 days), including body composition determined at about two months of age (63 ± 10 days) via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. All pigs were genotyped using Illumina Porcine...

  6. A novel phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, G; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Mangieri, Michela; Limido, Lucia; Capobianco, Raffaella; Suardi, Silvia; Grisoli, Marina; Binelli, Simona; Fociani, Paolo; Bugiani, Orso; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    An atypical case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is described in a 78-year-old woman homozygous for methionine at codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. The neuropathological signature was the presence of PrP immunoreactive plaque-like deposits in the cerebral cortex, striatum and thalamus. Western blot analysis showed a profile of the pathological form of PrP (PrP(Sc)) previously unrecognised in sporadic CJD, marked by the absence of diglycosylated protease resistant species. These features define a novel neuropathological and molecular CJD phenotype.

  7. A novel phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, G; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Mangieri, Michela; Limido, Lucia; Capobianco, Raffaella; Suardi, Silvia; Grisoli, Marina; Binelli, Simona; Fociani, Paolo; Bugiani, Orso; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    An atypical case of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) is described in a 78-year-old woman homozygous for methionine at codon 129 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. The neuropathological signature was the presence of PrP immunoreactive plaque-like deposits in the cerebral cortex, striatum and thalamus. Western blot analysis showed a profile of the pathological form of PrP (PrPSc) previously unrecognised in sporadic CJD, marked by the absence of diglycosylated protease resistant species. These features define a novel neuropathological and molecular CJD phenotype. PMID:21686549

  8. Comparative analyses of QTLs influencing obesity and metabolic phenotypes in pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pant, Sameer Dinkar; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jacobsen, Mette Juul

    2015-01-01

    in different populations. Several important genes previously associated to obesity in human studies, along with novel genes were identified. Altogether, this study provides novel insight that may further the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human obesity.......The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological...... features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits was ensured by using breeds highly divergent with respect to obesity traits...

  9. CARD15 in inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn's disease phenotypes: an association study and pooled analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenbrug, L.E.; Nolte, I.M.; Oosterom, E.; Steege, G. van der; Meerman, G.J. te; Dullemen, H.M. van; Drenth, J.P.H.; Jong, D.J. de; Linde, K. van der; Jansen, P.L.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three major polymorphisms of the Caspase-Activation Recruitment Domain containing protein 15 gene have been described to be associated with Crohn's disease. Genotype-phenotype studies reported in literature provide conflicting data on disease localisation and behaviour. We investigated

  10. A phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Craig F; Marella, Mathieu; Smerkers, Brian; Barchet, Thomas M; Gershman, Benjamin; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2013-07-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Such a model would show loss of dopamine in the basal ganglia, appearance of Lewy bodies, and the early stages of motor dysfunction. The model was developed by subcutaneously injecting biodegradable microspheres of rotenone, a complex I inhibitor in 8-9 month old, ovariectomized Long-Evans rats. Animals were observed for changes in body weight and motor activity. At the end of 11-12 weeks animals were euthanized and the brains examined for histopathological changes. Rotenone treated animals gain weight and appear normal and healthy as compared to controls but showed modest hypokinesia around 5-6 weeks posttreatment. Animals showed loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and the appearance of putative Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress were evidenced by the appearance of activated microglia, iron precipitates, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine a major product of DNA oxidation. The dorsal striatum, the projection site of midbrain DA neurons, showed a significant reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining, together with an increase in reactive astrocytes, an early sign of DA nerve terminal damage. Levels of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were significantly reduced in the dorsal striatum; however, there was an unexpected increase in dopamine transporter (DAT) levels. Old, ovariectomized females treated with rotenone microspheres present with normal weight gain and good health but a modest hypokinesia. Accompanying this behavioral phenotype are a constellation of neuropathologies characteristic of PD that include loss of DA neurons, microglia activation, oxidative damage to nuclear DNA, iron deposition, and appearance of putative Lewy bodies. This phenotypic model recapitulating the neuropathology of Parkinson's disease could provide insight into early mechanisms of pathogenesis and could aid in the

  11. The effect of ancient population bottlenecks on human phenotypic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Andrea; Amos, William; Balloux, François; Hanihara, Tsunehiko

    2007-07-19

    The origin and patterns of dispersal of anatomically modern humans are the focus of considerable debate. Global genetic analyses have argued for one single origin, placed somewhere in Africa. This scenario implies a rapid expansion, with a series of bottlenecks of small amplitude, which would have led to the observed smooth loss of genetic diversity with increasing distance from Africa. Analyses of cranial data, on the other hand, have given mixed results, and have been argued to support multiple origins of modern humans. Using a large data set of skull measurements and an analytical framework equivalent to that used for genetic data, we show that the loss in genetic diversity has been mirrored by a loss in phenotypic variability. We find evidence for an African origin, placed somewhere in the central/southern part of the continent, which harbours the highest intra-population diversity in phenotypic measurements. We failed to find evidence for a second origin, and we confirm these results on a large genetic data set. Distance from Africa accounts for an average 19-25% of heritable variation in craniometric measurements-a remarkably strong effect for phenotypic measurements known to be under selection.

  12. Prior appendectomy and the phenotype and course of Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jacques Cosnes; Philippe Seksik; Isabelle Nion-Larmurier; Laurent Beaugerie; Jean-Pierre Gendre

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether prior appendectomy modifies the phenotype and severity of Crohn's disease.METHODS: Appendectomy status and smoking habits were specified by direct interview in 2838 patients consecutively seen between 1995 and 2004. Occurrence of complications and therapeutic needs were reviewed retrospectively. Additionally, annual disease activity was assessed prospectively between 1995 and 2004 in patients who had not had ileocecal resection and of a matched control group.RESULTS: Compared to 1770 non-appendectomized patients, appendectomized patients more than 5 years before Crohn's disease diagnosis (n=716) were more often females, smokers, with ileal disease. Cox regression showed that prior appendectomy was positively related to the risk of intestinal stricture (adjusted hazard ratio,1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 1.36; P=0.02)and inversely related to the risk of perianal fistulization (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval,0.68 to 0.83; P=0.002). No difference was observed between the two groups regarding the therapeutic needs, except for an increased risk of surgery in appendectomized patients, attributable to the increased prevalence of ileal disease. Between 1995 and 2004,Crohn's disease was active during 50% of years in appendectomized patients (1318 out of 2637 patient-years) and 51% in non-appendectomized patients (1454out of 2841 patient-years; NS).CONCLUSION: Prior appendectomy is associated with a more proximal disease and has an increased risk of stricture and a lesser risk of anal fistulization. However,the severity of the disease is unaffected.

  13. Unsolved issues related to human mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombès, Anne; Auré, Karine; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Gilleron, Mylène; Jardel, Claude

    2014-05-01

    Human mitochondrial diseases, defined as the diseases due to a mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation defect, represent a large group of very diverse diseases with respect to phenotype and genetic causes. They present with many unsolved issues, the comprehensive analysis of which is beyond the scope of this review. We here essentially focus on the mechanisms underlying the diversity of targeted tissues, which is an important component of the large panel of these diseases phenotypic expression. The reproducibility of genotype/phenotype expression, the presence of modifying factors, and the potential causes for the restricted pattern of tissular expression are reviewed. Special emphasis is made on heteroplasmy, a specific feature of mitochondrial diseases, defined as the coexistence within the cell of mutant and wild type mitochondrial DNA molecules. Its existence permits unequal segregation during mitoses of the mitochondrial DNA populations and consequently heterogeneous tissue distribution of the mutation load. The observed tissue distributions of recurrent human mitochondrial DNA deleterious mutations are diverse but reproducible for a given mutation demonstrating that the segregation is not a random process. Its extent and mechanisms remain essentially unknown despite recent advances obtained in animal models.

  14. Complex disease and phenotype mapping in the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Jessica J; Castelhano, Marta G; Oliveira, Kyle C; Corey, Elizabeth; Balkman, Cheryl; Baxter, Tara L; Casal, Margret L; Center, Sharon A; Fang, Meiying; Garrison, Susan J; Kalla, Sara E; Korniliev, Pavel; Kotlikoff, Michael I; Moise, N S; Shannon, Laura M; Simpson, Kenneth W; Sutter, Nathan B; Todhunter, Rory J; Boyko, Adam R

    2016-01-22

    The domestic dog is becoming an increasingly valuable model species in medical genetics, showing particular promise to advance our understanding of cancer and orthopaedic disease. Here we undertake the largest canine genome-wide association study to date, with a panel of over 4,200 dogs genotyped at 180,000 markers, to accelerate mapping efforts. For complex diseases, we identify loci significantly associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumour and granulomatous colitis; for morphological traits, we report three novel quantitative trait loci that influence body size and one that influences fur length and shedding. Using simulation studies, we show that modestly larger sample sizes and denser marker sets will be sufficient to identify most moderate- to large-effect complex disease loci. This proposed design will enable efficient mapping of canine complex diseases, most of which have human homologues, using far fewer samples than required in human studies.

  15. Phenotypic rescue of a Drosophila model of mitochondrial ANT1 disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Vartiainen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A point mutation in the Drosophila gene that codes for the major adult isoform of adenine nuclear translocase (ANT represents a model for human diseases that are associated with ANT insufficiency [stress-sensitive B1 (sesB1]. We characterized the organismal, bioenergetic and molecular phenotype of sesB1 flies then tested strategies to compensate the mutant phenotype. In addition to developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures, sesB1 flies have an impaired response to sound, defective male courtship, female sterility and curtailed lifespan. These phenotypes, excluding the latter two, are shared with the mitoribosomal protein S12 mutant, tko25t. Mitochondria from sesB1 adults showed a decreased respiratory control ratio and downregulation of cytochrome oxidase. sesB1 adults exhibited ATP depletion, lactate accumulation and changes in gene expression that were consistent with a metabolic shift towards glycolysis, characterized by activation of lactate dehydrogenase and anaplerotic pathways. Females also showed downregulation of many genes that are required for oogenesis, and their eggs, although fertilized, failed to develop to the larval stages. The sesB1 phenotypes of developmental delay and mechanical-stress-induced seizures were alleviated by an altered mitochondrial DNA background. Female sterility was substantially rescued by somatic expression of alternative oxidase (AOX from the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, whereas AOX did not alleviate developmental delay. Our findings illustrate the potential of different therapeutic strategies for ANT-linked diseases, based on alleviating metabolic stress.

  16. Human cytotrophoblasts acquire aneuploidies as they differentiateto an invasive phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Jung, Christine J.; Gormley, Matthew; Zhou, Yuan; Chu, Lisa W.; Genbacev, Olga; Wright, AlexiA.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2004-12-15

    Through an unusual differentiation process, human trophoblast progenitors (cytotrophoblasts) give rise to tumor-like cells that invade the uterus. By an unknown mechanism, invasive cytotrophoblasts exhibit permanent cell cycle withdrawal. Here we report molecular cytogenetic data showing that {approx} 20 to 60 percent of these interphase cells had acquired aneusomies involving chromosomes X, Y, o r16. The incidence positively correlated with gestational age and differentiation to an invasive phenotype. Scoring 12 chromosomes in flow-sorted cytotrophoblasts showed that more than 95 percent of the cells were hyperdiploid. Thus, aneuploidy appears to be an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of cytotrophoblasts within the uterus.

  17. Marshall-Stickler phenotype associated with von Willebrand disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M.R.; Baker, K.S.; Schaefer, G.B. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    1997-01-20

    We report on 6 individuals from three different kindreds with Marshall-Stickler (MS) phenotype, with characteristic orofacial abnormalities, arthropathy, deafness, and eye findings, all of whom were discovered to have a mild bleeding diathesis and coagulation-study findings consistent with mild von Willebrand disease (vWD). MS syndrome has been linked in some cases to the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) on chromosome 12q, and to the collagen XI gene (COL11A2) on chromosome 6. The von Willebrand factor (vWF) is encoded by a 180-Kb gene located on the short arm of chromosome 12. This is the first reported association of these two disorders. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Phenotypic changes of human cells in human-rat liver during partial hepatectomy-induced regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Hong-An Li; Jin-Fang Jiang; Qing Li; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Xi-Gu Chen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components in rat liver and the phenotypic changes of human cells in liver of human-rat chimera (HRC) generated by in utero transplantation of human cells during partial hepatectomy (PHx)-induced liver regeneration. METHODS: Human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components and phenotypic changes of human cells during liver regeneration were examined by flow cytometry, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: ISH analysis demonstrated human Alupositive cells in hepatic parenchyma and stroma of recipient liver. Functional human hepatocytes generated in this model potentially constituted human hepatic functional units with the presence of donor-derived human endothelial and biliary duct cells in host liver. Alpha fetoprotein (AFP)+, CD34+ and CD45+ cells were observed in the chimeric liver on day 10 after PHxinduced liver regeneration and then disappeared in PHx group, but not in non-PHx group, suggesting that dynamic phenotypic changes of human cells expressing AFP, CD34 and CD45 cells may occur during the chimeric liver regeneration. Additionally, immunostaining for human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) showed that the number of PCNA-positive cells in the chimeric liver of PHx group was markedly increased, as compared to that of control group, indicating that donor-derived human cells are actively proliferated during PHx-induced regeneration of HRC liver.

  19. Influence of age, irradiation and humanization on NSG mouse phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn S. Knibbe-Hollinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Humanized mice are frequently utilized in bench to bedside therapeutic tests to combat human infectious, cancerous and degenerative diseases. For the fields of hematology-oncology, regenerative medicine, and infectious diseases, the immune deficient mice have been used commonly in basic research efforts. Obstacles in true translational efforts abound, as the relationship between mouse and human cells in disease pathogenesis and therapeutic studies requires lengthy investigations. The interplay between human immunity and mouse biology proves ever more complicated when aging, irradiation, and human immune reconstitution are considered. All can affect a range of biochemical and behavioral functions. To such ends, we show age- and irradiation-dependent influences for the development of macrocytic hyper chromic anemia, myelodysplasia, blood protein reductions and body composition changes. Humanization contributes to hematologic abnormalities. Home cage behavior revealed day and dark cycle locomotion also influenced by human cell reconstitutions. Significant age-related day-to-day variability in movement, feeding and drinking behaviors were observed. We posit that this data serves to enable researchers to better design translational studies in this rapidly emerging field of mouse humanization.

  20. Disease model discovery from 3,328 gene knockouts by The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Terrence F; Conte, Nathalie; West, David B; Jacobsen, Julius O; Mason, Jeremy; Warren, Jonathan; Chen, Chao-Kung; Tudose, Ilinca; Relac, Mike; Matthews, Peter; Karp, Natasha; Santos, Luis; Fiegel, Tanja; Ring, Natalie; Westerberg, Henrik; Greenaway, Simon; Sneddon, Duncan; Morgan, Hugh; Codner, Gemma F; Stewart, Michelle E; Brown, James; Horner, Neil; Haendel, Melissa; Washington, Nicole; Mungall, Christopher J; Reynolds, Corey L; Gallegos, Juan; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Sorg, Tania; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Bower, Lynette R; Moore, Mark; Morse, Iva; Gao, Xiang; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Obata, Yuichi; Cho, Soo Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Seavitt, John; Beaudet, Arthur L; Dickinson, Mary E; Herault, Yann; Wurst, Wolfgang; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Lloyd, K C Kent; Flenniken, Ann M; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Newbigging, Susan; McKerlie, Colin; Justice, Monica J; Murray, Stephen A; Svenson, Karen L; Braun, Robert E; White, Jacqueline K; Bradley, Allan; Flicek, Paul; Wells, Sara; Skarnes, William C; Adams, David J; Parkinson, Helen; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M; Smedley, Damian

    2017-08-01

    Although next-generation sequencing has revolutionized the ability to associate variants with human diseases, diagnostic rates and development of new therapies are still limited by a lack of knowledge of the functions and pathobiological mechanisms of most genes. To address this challenge, the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is creating a genome- and phenome-wide catalog of gene function by characterizing new knockout-mouse strains across diverse biological systems through a broad set of standardized phenotyping tests. All mice will be readily available to the biomedical community. Analyzing the first 3,328 genes identified models for 360 diseases, including the first models, to our knowledge, for type C Bernard-Soulier, Bardet-Biedl-5 and Gordon Holmes syndromes. 90% of our phenotype annotations were novel, providing functional evidence for 1,092 genes and candidates in genetically uncharacterized diseases including arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia 3. Finally, we describe our role in variant functional validation with The 100,000 Genomes Project and others.

  1. Mutations of glucocerebrosidase: discrimination of neurologic and non-neurologic phenotypes of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, E I; Brady, R O; Pirruccello, S; Moore, C; Sorrell, S; Furbish, F S; Murray, G J; Tager, J; Barranger, J A

    1982-01-01

    Multiple molecular forms of beta-glucocerebrosidase that permit discrimination between neurologic and non-neurologic phenotypes of Gaucher disease have been identified radioimmunologically in fibroblasts and human brain tissue. In normal human fibroblasts these forms have been shown by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to have apparent Mr of 63,000 (form A1), 61,000 (form A2), and 56,000 (form B). The Mr 63,000 form may be a precursor of the Mr 56,000 form. Non-neurologic Gaucher disease (type 1) fibroblasts and normal brain tissue are characteristic in that they contain only one major immunoreactive protein, the Mr 56,000 form. In contrast, fibroblast extracts and brain tissue from neurologic Gaucher disease phenotypes contain only the higher molecular weight forms A1 and A2. These data and the low residual activity of the enzyme in all the variants of Gaucher disease suggest that the mutations of beta-glucocerebrosidase are allelic and involve the active site. Images PMID:6957882

  2. Immortalization of human articular chondrocytes and induction of their phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何清义; 李起鸿; 杨柳; 许建中

    2003-01-01

    Objective To immortalize human articular chondrocytes (HACs) using gene transfection and to maintain stable phenotype of transformed HACs after induction.Methods HACs were transfected with the retroviral vector pLXSN encoding human papillomavirus 16E7 (HPV16E7), and the transformed clones were sorted and proliferated. Karyotype analysis, clone forming tests and nude mice tumor forming tests were applied to check the characteristics of the transformation. Type Ⅱ collagen of transformed chondrocytes was inducted with free serum medium (FSM) supplemented with nutridoma-sp and ascorbate. Results Immortalized HACs were isolated with fifty passages achieved. The HPV16E7 transformed cells were confirmed to be benign. Induction of FSM with nutridoma-sp and ascorbate promoted type Ⅱ collagen of transformed chondrocytes to the high levels of normal chondrocytes. Conclusion HACs transformed with HPV16E7 survive for long periods in vitro, and type Ⅱ collagen can maintain stability after induction.

  3. Phenotypic Variability of Childhood Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Kayla M D; Menezes, Manoj P; Bray, Paula; Halaki, Mark; Shy, Rosemary R; Yum, Sabrina W; Estilow, Timothy; Moroni, Isabella; Foscan, Maria; Pagliano, Emanuela; Pareyson, Davide; Laurá, Matilde; Bhandari, Trupti; Muntoni, Francesco; Reilly, Mary M; Finkel, Richard S; Sowden, Janet; Eichinger, Katy J; Herrmann, David N; Shy, Michael E; Burns, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Disease severity of childhood Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) has not been extensively characterized, either within or between types of CMT to date. To assess the variability of disease severity in a large cohort of children and adolescents with CMT. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 520 children and adolescents aged 3 to 20 years at 8 universities and hospitals involved in the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium between August 6, 2009, and July 31, 2014, in Australia, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Data analysis was conducted from August 1, 2014, to December 1, 2015. Scores on the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Pediatric Scale (CMTPedS), a well-validated unidimensional clinical outcome measure to assess disease severity. This instrument includes 11 items assessing fine and gross motor function, sensation, and balance to produce a total score ranging from 0 (unaffected) to 44 (severely affected). Among the 520 participants (274 males) aged 3 to 20 years, CMT type 1A (CMT1A) was the most prevalent type (252 [48.5%]), followed by CMT2A (31 [6.0%]), CMT1B (15 [2.9%]), CMT4C (13 [2.5%]), and CMTX1 (10 [1.9%]). Disease severity ranged from 1 to 44 points on the CMTPedS (mean [SD], 21.5 [8.9]), with ankle dorsiflexion strength and functional hand dexterity test being most affected. Participants with CMT1B (mean [SD] CMTPedS score, 24.0 [7.4]), CMT2A (29.7 [7.1]), and CMT4C (29.8 [8.6]) were more severely affected than those with CMT1A (18.9 [7.7]) and CMTX1 (males: 15.3 [7.7]; females: 13.0 [3.6]) (P disease severity. These results highlight the phenotypic variability within CMT genotypes and mutation-specific manifestations between types. This study has identified distinct functional limitations and self-reported impairments to target in future therapeutic trials.

  4. Phenotypic variability of Krabbe disease across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pamela; Gelinas, Jennifer; Sirrs, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Krabbe disease (galactocerebrosidase deficiency) is an inherited leukodystrophy that results in severe neurological defects due to altered myelination. Classically, disease onset is within the first year of life. Juvenile and adult-onset cases may have less classic presentations, making diagnosis difficult and often delayed. Here, we review the literature to demonstrate the hetereogeneity of presenting symptoms across all age groups. We also discuss diagnostic approach, emphasizing variation in biochemical, functional, and genetic results among Krabbe phenotypes. Better understanding of the various Krabbe disease phenotypes is critical to facilitate timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment of this clinically heterogeneous disorder. Variabilité phénotypique dans la maladie de Krabbe au cours de la vie du patient. La maladie de Krabbe (déficit en galactocérébrosidase) est une leukodystrophie héréditaire qui donne lieu à des déficits neurologiques sévères dus à un trouble de la myélinisation. Chez les cas dont la présentation est classique, la maladie débute au cours de la première année de vie. Si la maladie commence chez un adolescent ou un adulte, le mode de présentation peut-ětre moins classique, ce qui rend le diagnostic difficile et souvent tardif. Nous analysons les articles traitant du sujet pour démontrer l'hétérogénéité des symptômes au moment de la première consultation et ceci dans tous les groupes d'âge. Nous discutons également de l'approche diagnostique en mettant l'emphase sur la variation des résultats biochimiques, fonctionnels et génétiques des différents phénotypes dans la maladie de Krabbe. Une meilleure compréhension des différents phénotypes est cruciale pour faciliter un diagnostic précoce et un traitement approprié de cette maladie dont le mode de présentation clinique est hétérogène.

  5. The Hartnup phenotype: Mendelian transport disorder, multifactorial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriver, C R; Mahon, B; Levy, H L; Clow, C L; Reade, T M; Kronick, J; Lemieux, B; Laberge, C

    1987-05-01

    The Hartnup mutation affects an amino acid transport system of intestine and kidney used by a large group of neutral charge alpha-amino acids (six essential and several nonessential). We compared developmental outcomes and medical histories of 21 Hartnup subjects, identified through newborn screening, with those of 19 control sibs. We found no significant differences in means of growth percentiles and IQ scores between Hartnup and control groups (but all low academic performance scores were found in the Hartnup group, and various skin lesions occurred in five Hartnup subjects), no significant difference between means of the summed plasma values for amino acids affected by the Hartnup gene in Hartnup and control groups, two Hartnup subjects with clinical manifestations--impaired somatic growth and IQ in one, impaired growth and a "pellagrin" episode in the other--who had the lowest summed plasma amino acid values in the Hartnup group; the corresponding values for their sibs were the low outliers in the control group, and two tissue-specific forms of the Hartnup (transport) phenotype: renal and intestinal involvement (15 families) and renal involvement alone (one family), both forms having been inherited as autosomal recessives (the symptomatic probands had the usual form). Whereas deficient activity of the "Hartnup" transport system is monogenic, the associated plasma amino acid value (measured genotype) is polygenic. The latter describes the parameter of homeostasis and liability to disease. Cause of Hartnup disease is multifactorial.

  6. Renal impairment in different phenotypes of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honghao; Zhou, Zhihua; Hu, Jiyuan; Han, Yongzhu; Wang, Xun; Cheng, Nan; Wu, Yunfan; Yang, Renmin

    2015-11-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in the chronic deposition of copper in both liver and brain. This can lead to hepatic, neurologic, and psychiatric manifestations. Renal impairment can occur in any period of WD, but the mechanism is not yet known. In this study, we analyzed the clinical data of 691 newly diagnosed WD patients to investigate the blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), and uric acid (UA) levels in different subtypes of WD. This study included 691 newly diagnosed WD patients, 34 asymptomatic cases, and 127 healthy controls. The entire sample was assessed for serum levels of BUN, Cr, and UA. We found that the levels of BUN and Cr in WD patients who had neurological manifestations were higher (p < 0.001). In contrast, those patients presenting with a combined neurological and hepatic condition showed the lowest serum levels of UA (p = 0.026). There are differences in renal impairment between the endo-phenotypes of WD. Renal impairment can reflect differential copper deposition in organs other than the liver.

  7. Alcohol consumption, Lewis phenotypes, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, H.O.; Suadicani, P.; Gyntelberg, F. (Rigshospitalet State Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Epidemiological Research Unit); Sorenson, H. (Rigshospitalet State Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Immunology); Hein, H.O. (Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1993-02-13

    The authors have previously found an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a[minus]b[minus]) and suggested that the Lewis blood group has a close genetic relation with insulin resistance. The authors have investigated whether any conventional risk factors explain the increased risk in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men. 3,383 men aged 53-75 years were examined in 1985-86, and morbidity and mortality during the next 4 years were recorded. At baseline, the authors excluded 343 men with a history of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, intermittent claudication, or stroke. The potential risk factors examined were alcohol consumption, physical activity, tobacco smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, body-mass index, blood pressure, prevalence of hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and social class. In 280 (9.6%) men with Le(a[minus]b[minus]), alcohol was the only risk factor significantly associated with risk of IHD. There was a significant inverse dose-effect relation between alcohol consumption and risk; trend tests, with adjustment for age, were significant for fatal IHD (p=0.02), all IHD (p=0.03), and all causes of death (p=0.02). In 2649 (90.4%) men with other phenotypes, there was a limited negative association with alcohol consumption. In Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men, a group genetically at high risk of IHD, alcohol consumption seems to be especially protective. The authors suggest that alcohol consumption may modify insulin resistance in Le(a[minus]b[minus]) men.

  8. rs657075 (CSF2) Is Associated with the Disease Phenotype (BAS-G) of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chiao; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Lu, Hsing-Fang; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Woon, Peng Yeong; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Huang, Jin-Ding; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2017-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a systemic autoimmune disease mainly affecting the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joints, and exhibits peripheral inflammatory arthropathy. More than 25 loci have been identified as associated with AS. Because both AS and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are autoimmune diseases that may share some common genetic factors, we therefore examined if the newly identified RA genetic polymorphisms were associated with AS in a Taiwanese population. In this study, we enrolled 475 AS patients and 11,301 healthy subjects from a Taiwanese biobank as controls. Although none of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were associated with the susceptibility to AS, the AS disease index Bath AS Global (BAS-G) clinical phenotype was observed as significantly correlated to the AA genotype of rs657075 (CSF2). The significance remains after gender/age/disease duration adjustment and after group categorization by human leukocyte antigen-B 27 (HLA-B27) genotype. We further investigated the possible functions of rs657075 through bioinformatics approaches. Results revealed that polymorphism of rs657075 is able to influence the expression of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 6 (ACSL6). In conclusion, our study indicated that rs657075 (CSF2) is strongly associated with the AS disease index Bath AS Global (BAS-G) clinical phenotype. PMID:28054948

  9. Genetic and phenotypic consequences of introgression between humans and Neanderthals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence for introgression of Neanderthal genes into parts of the modern human gene pool has recently emerged. The evidence indicates that some populations of modern humans have received infusions of genes from two different groups of Neanderthals. One of these Neanderthal groups lived in the Middle East and Central Europe and the other group (the Denisovans) is known to have lived in Central Asia and was probably more widespread. This review examines two questions. First, how were these introgressions detected and what does the genetic evidence tell us about their nature and extent? We will see that an unknown but possibly large fraction of the entire Neanderthal gene complement may have survived in modern humans. Even though each modern European and Asian carries only a few percent of genes that can be traced back to Neanderthals, different individuals carry different subgroups of these introgressed genes. Second, what is the likelihood that this Neanderthal genetic legacy has had phenotypic effects on modern humans? We examine evidence for and against the possibility that some of the surviving fragments of Neanderthal genomes have been preserved by natural selection, and we explore the ways in which more evidence bearing on this question will become available in the future.

  10. Genetic Mapping in Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J; Lander, Eric S.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic mapping provides a powerful approach to identify genes and biological processes underlying any trait influenced by inheritance, including human diseases. We discuss the intellectual foundations of genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits in humans, examine lessons emerging from linkage analysis of Mendelian diseases and genome-wide association studies of common diseases, and discuss questions and challenges that lie ahead.

  11. Structural determinants of phenotypic diversity and replication rate of human prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri G Safar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The infectious pathogen responsible for prion diseases is the misfolded, aggregated form of the prion protein, PrPSc. In contrast to recent progress in studies of laboratory rodent-adapted prions, current understanding of the molecular basis of human prion diseases and, especially, their vast phenotypic diversity is very limited. Here, we have purified proteinase resistant PrPSc aggregates from two major phenotypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, determined their conformational stability and replication tempo in vitro, as well as characterized structural organization using recently emerged approaches based on hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange coupled with mass spectrometry. Our data clearly demonstrate that these phenotypically distant prions differ in a major way with regard to their structural organization, both at the level of the polypeptide backbone (as indicated by backbone amide H/D exchange data as well as the quaternary packing arrangements (as indicated by H/D exchange kinetics for histidine side chains. Furthermore, these data indicate that, in contrast to previous observations on yeast and some murine prion strains, the replication rate of sCJD prions is primarily determined not by conformational stability but by specific structural features that control the growth rate of prion protein aggregates.

  12. Clinical phenotype in genetically confirmed von Willebrand disease type 2N patients reflects a haemophilia A phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meegeren, M.E.R. van; Mancini, T.L.; Schoormans, S.C.M.; Haren, B.J.T. van; Duren, C. van; Diekstra, A.; Laros-van Gorkom, B.A.P.; Brons, P.P.; Simons, A.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Heerde, W.L. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Von Willebrand disease (VWD) type 2N is characterized by a defective binding of factor VIII (FVIII) to von Willebrand factor (VWF) resulting in diminished plasma FVIII levels and a clinical phenotype mimicking mild haemophilia A. Several mutations in the FVIII binding site of VWF have

  13. Dissecting phenotypic traits linked to human resilience to Alzheimer's pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Stein, Thor D; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Scotton, Thomas C; Barroeta-Espar, Isabel; Fernandez-Carballo, Leticia; de Munain, Estibaliz Lopez; Perez, Jesus; Marquie, Marta; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Frosch, Mathew P; Lowe, Val; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Ikonomovic, Milos D; López, Oscar L; Klunk, William; Hyman, Bradley T; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2013-08-01

    Clinico-pathological correlation studies and positron emission tomography amyloid imaging studies have shown that some individuals can tolerate substantial amounts of Alzheimer's pathology in their brains without experiencing dementia. Few details are known about the neuropathological phenotype of these unique cases that might prove relevant to understanding human resilience to Alzheimer's pathology. We conducted detailed quantitative histopathological and biochemical assessments on brains from non-demented individuals before death whose brains were free of substantial Alzheimer's pathology, non-demented individuals before death but whose post-mortem examination demonstrated significant amounts of Alzheimer's changes ('mismatches'), and demented Alzheimer's cases. Quantification of amyloid-β plaque burden, stereologically-based counts of neurofibrillary tangles, neurons and reactive glia, and morphological analyses of axons were performed in the multimodal association cortex lining the superior temporal sulcus. Levels of synaptic integrity markers, and soluble monomeric and multimeric amyloid-β and tau species were measured. Our results indicate that some individuals can accumulate equivalent loads of amyloid-β plaques and tangles to those found in demented Alzheimer's cases without experiencing dementia. Analyses revealed four main phenotypic differences among these two groups: (i) mismatches had striking preservation of neuron numbers, synaptic markers and axonal geometry compared to demented cases; (ii) demented cases had significantly higher burdens of fibrillar thioflavin-S-positive plaques and of oligomeric amyloid-β deposits reactive to conformer-specific antibody NAB61 than mismatches; (iii) strong and selective accumulation of hyperphosphorylated soluble tau multimers into the synaptic compartment was noted in demented cases compared with controls but not in mismatches; and (iv) the robust glial activation accompanying amyloid-β and tau pathologies in

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M;

    2010-01-01

    to clinical outcome is determined. Although this schema represents an ideal construct, we acknowledge any phenotype may be etiologically heterogeneous and that any one individual may manifest multiple phenotypes. We have much yet to learn, but establishing a common language for future research will facilitate...

  15. Genetics of kidney disease and related cardiometabolic phenotypes in Zuni Indians: The Zuni Kidney Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra L Laston

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to identify genetic factors associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among participants of the Genetics of Kidney Disease in Zuni Indians study. The study was conducted as a community-based participatory research project in the Zuni Indians, a small endogamous tribe in rural New Mexico. We recruited 998 members from 28 extended multigenerational families, ascertained through probands with CKD who had at least one sibling with CKD. We used the Illumina Infinium Human1M-Duo v3.0 BeadChips to type 1.1 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Prevalence estimates for CKD, hyperuricemia, diabetes and hypertension were 24%, 30%, 17% and 34%, respectively. We found a significant (p<1.58 × 10-7 association for a SNP in a novel gene for serum creatinine (PTPLAD2. We replicated significant associations for genes with serum uric acid (SLC2A9, triglyceride levels (APOA1, BUD13, ZNF259, and total cholesterol (PVRL2. We found novel suggestive associations (p<1.58 × 10-6 for SNPs in genes with systolic (OLFML2B, and diastolic blood pressure (NFIA. We identified a series of genes associated with CKD and related cardiometabolic phenotypes among Zuni Indians, a population with a high prevalence of kidney disease. Illuminating genetic variations that modulate the risk for these disorders may ultimately provide a basis for novel preventive strategies and therapeutic interventions.

  16. Macrophage phenotype modulation by CXCL4 in vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert Gleissner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During atherogenesis, blood monocytes transmigrate into the subendothelial space and differentiate towards macrophages and foam cells. The major driver of this differentiation process is macrophage colony-stimulation factor (M-CSF. M-CSF-induced macrophages are important promoters of atherogenesis as demonstrated in M-CSF and M-CSF receptor knock out mice. However, M-CSF is not the only relevant promoter of macrophage differentiation. The platelet chemokine CXCL4 prevents monocyte apoptosis and promotes macrophage differentiation in vitro. It is secreted from activated platelets and has effects on various cell types relevant in atherogenesis. Knocking out the Pf4 gene coding for CXCL4 in Apoe-/- mice leads to reduced atherogenesis. Thus, it seems likely that CXC4-induced macrophages may have specific pro-atherogenic capacities. We have studied CXC4-induced differentiation of human macrophages using gene chips, systems biology and functional in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Our data indicate that CXCL4-induced macrophages are distinct from both their M-CSF-induced counterparts and other known macrophage polarizations like M1 macrophages (induced by LPS and interferon-gamma or M2 macrophages (induced by interleukin-4. CXCL4-induced macrophages have distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics, e.g. the complete loss of the hemoglobin-haptoglobin (Hb-Hp scavenger receptor CD163 which is necessary for effective hemoglobin clearance after plaque hemorrhage. Lack of CD163 is accompanied by the inability to upregulate the atheroprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 in response to Hb-Hp complexes.This review covers the current knowledge about CXCL4-induced macrophages, which based on their unique properties we have suggested to call these macrophages M4. CXCL4 may represent an important driver of macrophage heterogeneity within atherosclerotic lesions. Further dissecting its effects on macrophage differentiation may help to identify novel

  17. Human and feline adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells have comparable phenotype, immunomodulatory functions, and transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kaitlin C; Fierro, Fernando A; Ko, Emily Mills; Walker, Naomi J; Arzi, Boaz; Tepper, Clifford G; Dahlenburg, Heather; Cicchetto, Andrew; Kol, Amir; Marsh, Lyndsey; Murphy, William J; Fazel, Nasim; Borjesson, Dori L

    2017-03-20

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are a promising cell therapy to treat inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases. Development of appropriate pre-clinical animal models is critical to determine safety and attain early efficacy data for the most promising therapeutic candidates. Naturally occurring diseases in cats already serve as valuable models to inform human clinical trials in oncologic, cardiovascular, and genetic diseases. The objective of this study was to complete a comprehensive side-by-side comparison of human and feline ASCs, with an emphasis on their immunomodulatory capacity and transcriptome. Human and feline ASCs were evaluated for phenotype, immunomodulatory profile, and transcriptome. Additionally, transwells were used to determine the role of cell-cell contact in ASC-mediated inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation in both humans and cats. Similar to human ASCs, feline ASCs were highly proliferative at low passages and fit the minimal criteria of multipotent stem cells including a compatible surface protein phenotype, osteogenic capacity, and normal karyotype. Like ASCs from all species, feline ASCs inhibited mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, with or without direct ASC-lymphocyte contact. Feline ASCs mimic human ASCs in their mediator secretion pattern, including prostaglandin E2, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, transforming growth factor beta, and interleukin-6, all augmented by interferon gamma secretion by lymphocytes. The transcriptome of three unactivated feline ASC lines were highly similar. Functional analysis of the most highly expressed genes highlighted processes including: 1) the regulation of apoptosis; 2) cell adhesion; 3) response to oxidative stress; and 4) regulation of cell differentiation. Finally, feline ASCs had a similar gene expression profile to noninduced human ASCs. Findings suggest that feline ASCs modulate lymphocyte proliferation using soluble mediators that mirror the human ASC secretion

  18. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gehan Hamdy

    2014-04-22

    Apr 22, 2014 ... Results: Analysis revealed association between Hp2-2 phenotype and the presence of .... examination and electro-cardiographic (EEG) findings. ..... Redox Signal 2010;12(2):293–304. ... classification of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Phenotypes and Pathology of Drug-Induced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Zachary D

    2017-02-01

    Drug hepatotoxicity can simulate nearly any clinical syndrome or pathologic lesion that may occur in the liver, so clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury may be difficult. Nevertheless, most drugs that are known to idiosyncratic liver injury tend to cause patterns of injury that produce characteristic phenotypes. Recognition of these patterns or phenotypes in liver biopsy material is helpful in evaluation of clinical cases of suspected drug-induced liver injury.

  20. FGFR4 polymorphic variants modulate phenotypic features of Cushing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano-Tateno, Tae; Tateno, Toru; Hlaing, Maw Maw; Zheng, Lei; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Shozo; Asa, Sylvia L; Ezzat, Shereen

    2014-04-01

    Cushing disease is a potentially lethal condition resulting from hormone excess, usually due to a small pituitary tumor that fails to respond to negative feedback inhibition. A minority of patients develop larger, more aggressive tumors of the same lineage but with modest hormone excess. Here we show that a common polymorphism in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) transmembrane domain yields receptor isoforms with distinct properties that mediate these biological differences. Forced expression of the major FGFR4-G388 variant allele supports pY-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) responses. In contrast, expression of the minor FGFR4-R388 allele enhances STAT3 serine phosphorylation, driving cellular growth. In addition, FGFR4-R388 enhances glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Consistent with these findings, glucocorticoid administration resulted in enhanced hormone negative feedback in mice with knock-in of the FGFR4 variant allele. Moreover, clinical data from patients with pituitary tumors revealed that those homozygous for the R388 allele have a higher frequency of silent corticotroph macroadenomas than FGFR4-G388 carriers, who were more likely to have small but hormonally active microadenomas. These findings demonstrate that the FGFR4 transmembrane polymorphic variants can modulate cellular growth and sensitivity to glucocorticoid hormone negative feedback through distinct STAT3 modifications of relevance to the human forms of Cushing disease.

  1. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne R Prince

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation. OBJECTIVES: To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS or CLD. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+/CD16(+ monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02. Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+ macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02. At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+ mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03, but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05 or CD36 (p = 0.05 positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  2. Genome-wide genetic interaction analysis of glaucoma using expert knowledge derived from human phenotype networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ting; Darabos, Christian; Cricco, Maria E; Kong, Emily; Moore, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of GWAS data poses great computational challenges for analyzing genetic interactions associated with common human diseases. We propose a computational framework for characterizing epistatic interactions among large sets of genetic attributes in GWAS data. We build the human phenotype network (HPN) and focus around a disease of interest. In this study, we use the GLAUGEN glaucoma GWAS dataset and apply the HPN as a biological knowledge-based filter to prioritize genetic variants. Then, we use the statistical epistasis network (SEN) to identify a significant connected network of pairwise epistatic interactions among the prioritized SNPs. These clearly highlight the complex genetic basis of glaucoma. Furthermore, we identify key SNPs by quantifying structural network characteristics. Through functional annotation of these key SNPs using Biofilter, a software accessing multiple publicly available human genetic data sources, we find supporting biomedical evidences linking glaucoma to an array of genetic diseases, proving our concept. We conclude by suggesting hypotheses for a better understanding of the disease.

  3. A knowledge based approach to matching human neurodegenerative disease and animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Sarah M.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Imam, Fahim T.; Martone, Maryann E.

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases present a wide and complex range of biological and clinical features. Animal models are key to translational research, yet typically only exhibit a subset of disease features rather than being precise replicas of the disease. Consequently, connecting animal to human conditions using direct data-mining strategies has proven challenging, particularly for diseases of the nervous system, with its complicated anatomy and physiology. To address this challenge we have explored the use of ontologies to create formal descriptions of structural phenotypes across scales that are machine processable and amenable to logical inference. As proof of concept, we built a Neurodegenerative Disease Phenotype Ontology (NDPO) and an associated Phenotype Knowledge Base (PKB) using an entity-quality model that incorporates descriptions for both human disease phenotypes and those of animal models. Entities are drawn from community ontologies made available through the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF) and qualities are drawn from the Phenotype and Trait Ontology (PATO). We generated ~1200 structured phenotype statements describing structural alterations at the subcellular, cellular and gross anatomical levels observed in 11 human neurodegenerative conditions and associated animal models. PhenoSim, an open source tool for comparing phenotypes, was used to issue a series of competency questions to compare individual phenotypes among organisms and to determine which animal models recapitulate phenotypic aspects of the human disease in aggregate. Overall, the system was able to use relationships within the ontology to bridge phenotypes across scales, returning non-trivial matches based on common subsumers that were meaningful to a neuroscientist with an advanced knowledge of neuroanatomy. The system can be used both to compare individual phenotypes and also phenotypes in aggregate. This proof of concept suggests that expressing complex phenotypes using formal

  4. Multiple Changes of Gene Expression and Function Reveal Genomic and Phenotypic Complexity in SLE-like Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wilbe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of clinical manifestations commonly observed in autoimmune disorders poses a major challenge to genetic studies of such diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE affects humans as well as other mammals, and is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA in patients' sera and multiple disparate clinical features. Here we present evidence that particular sub-phenotypes of canine SLE-related disease, based on homogenous (ANA(H and speckled ANA (ANA(S staining pattern, and also steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA are associated with different but overlapping sets of genes. In addition to association to certain MHC alleles and haplotypes, we identified 11 genes (WFDC3, HOMER2, VRK1, PTPN3, WHAMM, BANK1, AP3B2, DAPP1, LAMTOR3, DDIT4L and PPP3CA located on five chromosomes that contain multiple risk haplotypes correlated with gene expression and disease sub-phenotypes in an intricate manner. Intriguingly, the association of BANK1 with both human and canine SLE appears to lead to similar changes in gene expression levels in both species. Our results suggest that molecular definition may help unravel the mechanisms of different clinical features common between and specific to various autoimmune disease phenotypes in dogs and humans.

  5. Deconstruction of Vulnerability to Complex Diseases: Enhanced Effect Sizes and Power of Intermediate Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The deconstruction of vulnerability to complex disease with the help of intermediate phenotypes, including the heritable and disease-associated endophenotypes, is a legacy of Henri Begleiter. Systematic searches for genes influencing complex disorders, including bipolar disorder, have recently been completed using whole genome association (WGA, identifying a series of validated loci. Using this information, it is possible to compare effect sizes of disease loci discovered in very large samples to the effect sizes of replicated functional loci determining intermediate phenotypes that are of essential interest in psychiatric disorders. It is shown that the genes influencing intermediate phenotypes tend to have a larger effect size. Furthermore, the WGA results reveal that the number of loci of large effect size for complex diseases is limited, and yet multiple functional loci have already been identified for intermediate phenotypes relevant to psychiatric diseases, and without the benefit of WGA.

  6. Homozygous N396T mutation in Gaucher disease: Portuguese sisters with markedly different phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Kimball

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Samantha Kimball1,2, Francis Choy4, Agnes Zay5, Dominick Amato31Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Mt Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada; 4Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada; 5MRC Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, ScotlandAbstract: Gaucher disease (GD is characterized by reduced activity of glucocerebrosidase leading to complications in the reticuloendothelial system. N396T, a rarer mutation of the glucocerebrosidase gene, has been encountered in Portuguese populations and has generally been associated with milder phenotypes. This report presents brief histories of two Portuguese sisters, both with homozygous N396T mutations. These patients are phenotypically very different despite the fact that in both patients residual enzyme activity is very low. The case of patient 1 is complicated by comorbid diabetes mellitus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT improved this patient's clinical picture sufficiently to enable antiretroviral treatment to proceed for the HIV. This report demonstrates the poor correlation of clinical GD with genotype as well as with residual enzyme activity. It further illustrates how treatment of the underlying GD with ERT improved symptoms allowing for antiretroviral therapy thereby improving both the GD and HIV.Keywords: Gaucher disease, N396T mutation, glucocerebrosidase, HIV

  7. Muscular dystrophy in dogs: does the crossing of breeds influence disease phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazato, L G; Moraes, J R E; Beretta, D C; Kornegay, J N

    2011-05-01

    Golden Retriever (GR) muscular dystrophy is an inherited degenerative muscle disease that provides an excellent model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans. This study defined the histopathologic lesions, including the distribution of type I and II muscle fibers (FTI and FTII), in 12 dystrophic and 3 nondystrophic dogs between 7 and 15 months of age. The authors were interested in studying the influence on disease phenotype from crossing the base GR breed with Yellow Labrador Retrievers. The dystrophic dogs were divided according to breed: GRs and Golden Labrador Retrievers (GLRs). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, histopathologic lesions were more severe in GRs than GLRs. Six of eight GR muscles (75%) had a severe lesion grade (grade 3). In contrast, seven GLR muscles (87.5%) had mild lesions (grade 2), and only one had severe lesions (grade 3). Changes in fiber-type distribution were more pronounced in GRs versus GLRs. FTI:FTII ratio inversion was observed in three dystrophic GRs but only one GLR. The mean diameter of FTI and FTII was smaller in GRs and GLRs than in nondystrophic dogs (P muscular dystrophy phenotype.

  8. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke

    2016-01-01

    (-4)). INTERPRETATION: Our data support a continuum of disorders within inflammatory bowel disease, much better explained by three groups (ileal Crohn's disease, colonic Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis) than by Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis as currently defined. Disease location is an intrinsic aspect...

  9. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with a distinct phenotype of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, K.; Erpecum, K.J. van; Nieuwkerk, K.M. van; Drenth, J.P.H.; Poen, A.C.; Witteman, B.J.; Tuynman, H.A.; Beuers, U.; Ponsioen, C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to assess the IBD phenotype associated with PSC in a large well-phenotyped population-based PSC cohort using endoscopic and histopathologic criteria. METHODS: PSC

  10. Genome Sequencing Reveals Loci under Artificial Selection that Underlie Disease Phenotypes in the Laboratory Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atanur, Santosh S.; Diaz, Ana Garcia; Maratou, Klio; Sarkis, Allison; Rotival, Maxime; Game, Laurence; Tschannen, Michael R.; Kaisaki, Pamela J.; Otto, Georg W.; Ma, Man Chun John; Keane, Thomas M.; Hummel, Oliver; Saar, Kathrin; Chen, Wei; Guryev, Victor; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Garrett, Michael R.; Joe, Bina; Citterio, Lorena; Bianchi, Giuseppe; McBride, Martin; Dominiczak, Anna; Adams, David J.; Serikawa, Tadao; Flicek, Paul; Cuppen, Edwin; Hubner, Norbert; Petretto, Enrico; Gauguier, Dominique; Kwitek, Anne; Jacob, Howard; Aitman, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of inbred laboratory rat strains have been developed for a range of complex disease phenotypes. To gain insights into the evolutionary pressures underlying selection for these phenotypes, we sequenced the genomes of 27 rat strains, including 11 models of hypertension, diabetes, and ins

  11. Genome sequencing reveals loci under artificial selection that underlie disease phenotypes in the laboratory rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atanur, S.S.; Diaz, A.G.; Maratou, K.; Sarkis, A.; Rotival, M.; Game, L.; Tschannen, M.R.; Kaisaki, P.J.; Otto, G.W.; Ma, M.C.; Keane, T.M.; Hummel, O.; Saar, K.; Chen, W.; Guryev, V.; Gopalakrishnan, K.; Garrett, M.R.; Joe, B.; Citterio, L.; Bianchi, G.; McBride, M.; Dominiczak, A.; Adams, D.J.; Serikawa, T.; Flicek, P.; Cuppen, E.; Hubner, N.; Petretto, E.; Gauguier, D.; Kwitek, A.; Jacob, H.; Aitman, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Large numbers of inbred laboratory rat strains have been developed for a range of complex disease phenotypes. To gain insights into the evolutionary pressures underlying selection for these phenotypes, we sequenced the genomes of 27 rat strains, including 11 models of hypertension, diabetes, and ins

  12. Early-onset Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes: Neuropsychology and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-11

    Alzheimer Disease, Early Onset; Alzheimer Disease; Alzheimer Disease, Late Onset; Dementia, Alzheimer Type; Logopenic Progressive Aphasia; Primary Progressive Aphasia; Visuospatial/Perceptual Abilities; Posterior Cortical Atrophy; Executive Dysfunction; Corticobasal Degeneration; Ideomotor Apraxia

  13. Rapid Cellular Phenotyping of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes using a Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Voltage Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan S. Leyton-Mange

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to their promise in regenerative medicine, pluripotent stem cells have proved to be faithful models of many human diseases. In particular, patient-specific stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes recapitulate key features of several life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia syndromes. For both modeling and regenerative approaches, phenotyping of stem cell-derived tissues is critical. Cellular phenotyping has largely relied upon expression of lineage markers rather than physiologic attributes. This is especially true for cardiomyocytes, in part because electrophysiological recordings are labor intensive. Likewise, most optical voltage indicators suffer from phototoxicity, which damages cells and degrades signal quality. Here we present the use of a genetically encoded fluorescent voltage indicator, ArcLight, which we demonstrate can faithfully report transmembrane potentials in human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate the application of this fluorescent sensor in high-throughput, serial phenotyping of differentiating cardiomyocyte populations and in screening for drug-induced cardiotoxicity.

  14. Bronchodilator responsiveness as a phenotypic characteristic of established chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Paul; Agusti, Alvar; Edwards, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Bronchodilator responsiveness is a potential phenotypic characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We studied whether change in lung function after a bronchodilator is abnormal in COPD, whether stable responder subgroups can be identified, and whether these subgroups experien...

  15. Gaucher disease types 1 and 3: Phenotypic characterization of large populations from the ICGG Gaucher Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Gregory A; Zimran, Ari; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Study of the natural history of Gaucher disease has revealed marked phenotypic variation. Correlations to genotypes could provide insight into individual susceptibility to varying disease severity, which may impact whole-life medical care, reproductive decisions, and therapeutic choices for affected families. Importantly, pre-symptomatic or prospective interventions or the use of therapies with significant risk require accurate risk-benefit analyses based on the prognosis for individual patients. The body of international data held within the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry provides an unprecedented opportunity to characterize the phenotypes of Gaucher disease types 1 and 3 and to appreciate demographic and ethnic factors that may influence phenotypes. The diversity of GBA gene mutations from patients with Gaucher disease represented in the ICGG Gaucher Registry database and in the literature provides the basis for initial genotype/phenotype correlations, the outcomes of which are summarized here.

  16. A knowledge based approach to matching human neurodegenerative disease and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann E Martone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases present a wide and complex range of biological and clinical features. Animal models are key to translational research, yet typically only exhibit a subset of disease features rather than being precise replicas of the disease. Consequently, connecting animal to human conditions using direct data-mining strategies has proven challenging, particularly for diseases of the nervous system, with its complicated anatomy and physiology. To address this challenge we have explored the use of ontologies to create formal descriptions of structural phenotypes across scales that are machine processable and amenable to logical inference. As proof of concept, we built a Neurodegenerative Disease Phenotype Ontology and an associated Phenotype Knowledge Base using an entity-quality model that incorporates descriptions for both human disease phenotypes and those of animal models. Entities are drawn from community ontologies made available through the Neuroscience Information Framework and qualities are drawn from the Phenotype and Trait Ontology. We generated ~1200 structured phenotype statements describing structural alterations at the subcellular, cellular and gross anatomical levels observed in 11 human neurodegenerative conditions and associated animal models. PhenoSim, an open source tool for comparing phenotypes, was used to issue a series of competency questions to compare individual phenotypes among organisms and to determine which animal models recapitulate phenotypic aspects of the human disease in aggregate. Overall, the system was able to use relationships within the ontology to bridge phenotypes across scales, returning non-trivial matches based on common subsumers that were meaningful to a neuroscientist with an advanced knowledge of neuroanatomy. The system can be used both to compare individual phenotypes and also phenotypes in aggregate. This proof of concept suggests that expressing complex phenotypes using formal

  17. Update on the phenotypic spectrum of Lesch-Nyhan disease and its attenuated variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G; Jinnah, H A

    2012-04-01

    Congenital deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a spectrum of clinical phenotypes. All of these phenotypes are associated with marked overproduction of uric acid and related problems such as hyperuricemia, urate nephrolithiasis, tophi, and gout. The mildest phenotypes include only problems related to overproduction of uric acid. The most severe phenotype is known as Lesch-Nyhan disease, in which the phenotype also includes severe motor handicap, intellectual disability, and self-injurious behavior. In between these two extremes is a continuous spectrum of phenotypes with varying degrees of motor and cognitive handicap but no self-injurious behavior. The pathogenesis of overproduction of uric acid in HPRT deficiency is well-understood, and treatments are available to control it. The pathogenesis of the neurobehavioral problems is less well-understood, and effective treatments for them are lacking.

  18. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM. Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  19. A rare case of haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamee Shastry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a rare case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN with Bombay phenotype mother. A retrospective study of a case with severe haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother was done. Blood grouping, antibody screening, and lectin study was done on the blood sample of the baby and mother to confirm the diagnosis. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained from the hospital laboratory information system for the analysis. Blood group of the baby was A positive, direct antiglobulin test was negative. Blood group of the mother was confirmed to be Bombay phenotype, Hematological parameters showed all the signs of ongoing hemolysis and the bilirubin level was in the zone of exchange transfusion. Due to the unavailability of this rare phenotype blood unit, baby was managed conservatively. Anticipating the fetal anemia and HDN with mothers having Bombay phenotype and prior notification to the transfusion services will be of great help in optimizing the neonatal care and outcome.

  20. A rare case of haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Shamee; Lewis, Leslie E; Bhat, Sudha S

    2013-07-01

    We are reporting a rare case of severe hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) with Bombay phenotype mother. A retrospective study of a case with severe haemolytic disease of newborn with Bombay phenotype mother was done. Blood grouping, antibody screening, and lectin study was done on the blood sample of the baby and mother to confirm the diagnosis. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained from the hospital laboratory information system for the analysis. Blood group of the baby was A positive, direct antiglobulin test was negative. Blood group of the mother was confirmed to be Bombay phenotype, Hematological parameters showed all the signs of ongoing hemolysis and the bilirubin level was in the zone of exchange transfusion. Due to the unavailability of this rare phenotype blood unit, baby was managed conservatively. Anticipating the fetal anemia and HDN with mothers having Bombay phenotype and prior notification to the transfusion services will be of great help in optimizing the neonatal care and outcome.

  1. Viral diseases and human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish l...

  2. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html.

  3. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  4. Stress signaling from human mammary epithelial cells contributes to phenotypes of mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Fordyce, Colleen; Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D

    2014-09-15

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared with epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g., activin A and CD36) to prevent breast cancer.

  5. Human haptoglobin phenotypes and concentration determination by nanogold-enhanced electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Tseng, Shin-Hua; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ching [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ju-Pin, E-mail: ccchang01@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan (China)

    2011-06-17

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute phase protein that binds free hemoglobin (Hb), preventing Hb-induced oxidative damage in the vascular system. There are three phenotypes in human Hp, whose heterogeneous polymorphic structures and varying concentrations in plasma have been attributed to the cause of diseases and outcome of clinical treatments. Different phenotypes of Hp may be composed of the same subunits but different copy numbers, rendering their determination difficult by a single procedure. In this study, we have developed a simple, fast, reliable and sensitive method, using label-free nanogold-modified bioprobes coupled with self-development electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). By this method, probe surface charge transfer resistance is detected. The relative charge transfer resistance ratios for Hp 1-1, Hp 2-1 and Hp 2-2 were characterized. We were able to determine protein size difference within 3 nm, and the linear region of the calibration curve for Hp levels in the range of 90 pg ml{sup -1} and 90 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ({approx}1 fM to 1 pM). We surmise that similar approaches can be used to investigate protein polymorphism and altered protein-protein interaction associated with diseases.

  6. Phenotypic insights into ADCY5‐associated disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Florence C.F.; Westenberger, Ana; Dale, Russell C.; Smith, Martin; Pall, Hardev S.; Perez‐Dueñas, Belen; Grattan‐Smith, Padraic; Ouvrier, Robert A.; Mahant, Neil; Hanna, Bernadette C.; Hunter, Matthew; Lawson, John A.; Max, Christoph; Sachdev, Rani; Meyer, Esther; Crimmins, Dennis; Pryor, Donald; Morris, John G.L.; Münchau, Alex; Grozeva, Detelina; Carss, Keren J.; Raymond, Lucy; Kurian, Manju A.; Klein, Christine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Adenylyl cyclase 5 (ADCY5) mutations is associated with heterogenous syndromes: familial dyskinesia and facial myokymia; paroxysmal chorea and dystonia; autosomal‐dominant chorea and dystonia; and benign hereditary chorea. We provide detailed clinical data on 7 patients from six new kindreds with mutations in the ADCY5 gene, in order to expand and define the phenotypic spectrum of ADCY5 mutations. Methods In 5 of the 7 patients, followed over a period of 9 to 32 years, ADCY5 was sequenced by Sanger sequencing. The other 2 unrelated patients participated in studies for undiagnosed pediatric hyperkinetic movement disorders and underwent whole‐exome sequencing. Results Five patients had the previously reported p.R418W ADCY5 mutation; we also identified two novel mutations at p.R418G and p.R418Q. All patients presented with motor milestone delay, infantile‐onset action‐induced generalized choreoathetosis, dystonia, or myoclonus, with episodic exacerbations during drowsiness being a characteristic feature. Axial hypotonia, impaired upward saccades, and intellectual disability were variable features. The p.R418G and p.R418Q mutation patients had a milder phenotype. Six of seven patients had mild functional gain with clonazepam or clobazam. One patient had bilateral globus pallidal DBS at the age of 33 with marked reduction in dyskinesia, which resulted in mild functional improvement. Conclusion We further delineate the clinical features of ADCY5 gene mutations and illustrate its wide phenotypic expression. We describe mild improvement after treatment with clonazepam, clobazam, and bilateral pallidal DBS. ADCY5‐associated dyskinesia may be under‐recognized, and its diagnosis has important prognostic, genetic, and therapeutic implications. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:27061943

  7. A Computational Protein Phenotype Prediction Approach to Analyze the Deleterious Mutations of Human MED12 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Mohammed, Kaleemuddin; Khan, Imran Ali; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu; Shaik, Noor Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    Genetic mutations in MED12, a subunit of Mediator complex are seen in a broad spectrum of human diseases. However, the underlying basis of how these pathogenic mutations elicit protein phenotype changes in terms of 3D structure, stability and protein binding sites remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the structural and functional impacts of MED12 mutations, using computational methods as an alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. The MED12 gene mutations details and their corresponding clinical associations were collected from different databases and by text-mining. Initially, diverse computational approaches were applied to categorize the different classes of mutations based on their deleterious impact to MED12. Then, protein structures for wild and mutant types built by integrative modeling were analyzed for structural divergence, solvent accessibility, stability, and functional interaction deformities. Finally, this study was able to identify that genetic mutations mapped to exon-2 region, highly conserved LCEWAV and Catenin domains induce biochemically severe amino acid changes which alters the protein phenotype as well as the stability of MED12-CYCC interactions. To better understand the deleterious nature of FS-IDs and Indels, this study asserts the utility of computational screening based on their propensity towards non-sense mediated decay. Current study findings may help to narrow down the number of MED12 mutations to be screened for mediator complex dysfunction associated genetic diseases. This study supports computational methods as a primary filter to verify the plausible impact of pathogenic mutations based on the perspective of evolution, expression and phenotype of proteins. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2023-2035, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The calcineurin inhibitor Sarah (Nebula exacerbates Aβ42 phenotypes in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojin Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1 protein, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, is elevated in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome (DS or Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although increased levels of DSCR1 were often observed to be deleterious to neuronal health, its beneficial effects against AD neuropathology have also been reported, and the roles of DSCR1 on the pathogenesis of AD remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of sarah (sra; also known as nebula, a Drosophila DSCR1 ortholog, in amyloid-β42 (Aβ42-induced neurological phenotypes in Drosophila. We detected sra expression in the mushroom bodies of the fly brain, which are a center for learning and memory in flies. Moreover, similar to humans with AD, Aβ42-expressing flies showed increased Sra levels in the brain, demonstrating that the expression pattern of DSCR1 with regard to AD pathogenesis is conserved in Drosophila. Interestingly, overexpression of sra using the UAS-GAL4 system exacerbated the rough-eye phenotype, decreased survival rates and increased neuronal cell death in Aβ42-expressing flies, without modulating Aβ42 expression. Moreover, neuronal overexpression of sra in combination with Aβ42 dramatically reduced both locomotor activity and the adult lifespan of flies, whereas flies with overexpression of sra alone showed normal climbing ability, albeit with a slightly reduced lifespan. Similarly, treatment with chemical inhibitors of calcineurin, such as FK506 and cyclosporin A, or knockdown of calcineurin expression by RNA interference (RNAi, exacerbated the Aβ42-induced rough-eye phenotype. Furthermore, sra-overexpressing flies displayed significantly decreased mitochondrial DNA and ATP levels, as well as increased susceptibility to oxidative stress compared to that of control flies. Taken together, our results demonstrating that sra overexpression augments Aβ42 cytotoxicity in Drosophila suggest that DSCR1

  9. Absence of progeria-like disease phenotypes in knock-in mice expressing a non-farnesylated version of progerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao H; Chang, Sandy Y; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutant prelamin A, progerin, that terminates with a farnesylcysteine. HGPS knock-in mice (Lmna(HG/+)) develop severe progeria-like disease phenotypes. These phenotypes can be ameliorated with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), suggesting that progerin's farnesyl lipid is important for disease pathogenesis and raising the possibility that FTIs could be useful for treating humans with HGPS. Subsequent studies showed that mice expressing non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(nHG/+) mice, in which progerin's carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -SSIM) also develop severe progeria, raising doubts about whether any treatment targeting protein prenylation would be particularly effective. We suspected that those doubts might be premature and hypothesized that the persistent disease in Lmna(nHG/+) mice could be an unanticipated consequence of the cysteine-to-serine substitution that was used to eliminate farnesylation. To test this hypothesis, we generated a second knock-in allele yielding non-farnesylated progerin (Lmna(csmHG)) in which the carboxyl-terminal -CSIM motif was changed to -CSM. We then compared disease phenotypes in mice harboring the Lmna(nHG) or Lmna(csmHG) allele. As expected, Lmna(nHG/+) and Lmna(nHG/nHG) mice developed severe progeria-like disease phenotypes, including osteolytic lesions and rib fractures, osteoporosis, slow growth and reduced survival. In contrast, Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) mice exhibited no bone disease and displayed entirely normal body weights and survival. The frequencies of misshapen cell nuclei were lower in Lmna(csmHG/+) and Lmna(csmHG/csmHG) fibroblasts. These studies show that the ability of non-farnesylated progerin to elicit disease depends on the carboxyl-terminal mutation used to eliminate protein prenylation.

  10. Prediction of disease and phenotype associations from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome wide association studies (GWAS have proven useful as a method for identifying genetic variations associated with diseases. In this study, we analyzed GWAS data for 61 diseases and phenotypes to elucidate common associations based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. The study was an expansion on a previous study on identifying disease associations via data from a single GWAS on seven diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adjustments to the originally reported study included expansion of the SNP dataset using Linkage Disequilibrium (LD and refinement of the four levels of analysis to encompass SNP, SNP block, gene, and pathway level comparisons. A pair-wise comparison between diseases and phenotypes was performed at each level and the Jaccard similarity index was used to measure the degree of association between two diseases/phenotypes. Disease relatedness networks (DRNs were used to visualize our results. We saw predominant relatedness between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis for the first three levels of analysis. Expected relatedness was also seen between lipid- and blood-related traits. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The predominant associations between Multiple Sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis can be validated by clinical studies. The diseases have been proposed to share a systemic inflammation phenotype that can result in progression of additional diseases in patients with one of these three diseases. We also noticed unexpected relationships between metabolic and neurological diseases at the pathway comparison level. The less significant relationships found between diseases require a more detailed literature review to determine validity of the predictions. The results from this study serve as a first step towards a better understanding of seemingly unrelated diseases and phenotypes with similar symptoms or modes of treatment.

  11. Neuromuscular Imaging and Phenotypical Variation in Pompe Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.A. Wens (Stephan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractPompe disease is a progressive metabolic myopathy. It is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme acid α-glucosidase and leads to glycogen accumulation, predominantly in skeletal muscle. All Dutch patients diagnosed with Pompe disease are referred to the ‘Center of Lysosomal and

  12. Comprehensive characterisation of hypertensive heart disease left ventricular phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C L; Amadu, Antonio Matteo; Dastidar, Amardeep Ghosh; Szantho, Gergley V; Lyen, Stephen M; Godsave, Cattleya; Ratcliffe, Laura E K; Burchell, Amy E; Hart, Emma C; Hamilton, Mark C K; Nightingale, Angus K; Paton, Julian F R; Manghat, Nathan E; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myocardial intracellular/extracellular structure and aortic function were assessed among hypertensive left ventricular (LV) phenotypes using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods An observational study from consecutive tertiary hypertension clinic patients referred for CMR (1.5 T) was performed. Four LV phenotypes were defined: (1) normal with normal indexed LV mass (LVM) and LVM to volume ratio (M/V), (2) concentric remodelling with normal LVM but elevated M/V, (3) concentric LV hypertrophy (LVH) with elevated LVM but normal indexed end-diastolic volume (EDV) or (4) eccentric LVH with elevated LVM and EDV. Extracellular volume fraction was measured using T1-mapping. Circumferential strain was calculated by voxel-tracking. Aortic distensibility was derived from high-resolution aortic cines and contemporaneous blood pressure measurements. Results 88 hypertensive patients (49±14 years, 57% men, systolic blood pressure (SBP): 167±30 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP): 96±14 mm Hg) were compared with 29 age-matched/sex-matched controls (47±14 years, 59% men, SBP: 128±12 mm Hg, DBP: 79±10 mm Hg). LVH resulted from increased myocardial cell volume (eccentric LVH: 78±19 mL/m2 vs concentric LVH: 73±15 mL/m2 vs concentric remodelling: 55±9 mL/m2, p<0.05, respectively) and interstitial fibrosis (eccentric LVH: 33±10 mL/m2 vs concentric LVH: 30±10 mL/m2 vs concentricremodelling: 19±2 mL/m2, p<0.05, respectively). LVH had worst circumferential impairment (eccentric LVH: −12.8±4.6% vs concentric LVH: −15.5±3.1% vs concentric remodelling: –17.1±3.2%, p<0.05, respectively). Concentric remodelling was associated with reduced aortic distensibility, but not with large intracellular/interstitial expansion or myocardial dysfunction versus controls. Conclusions Myocardial interstitial fibrosis varies across hypertensive LV phenotypes with functional consequences. Eccentric LVH has the most fibrosis and

  13. Systematic validation of specific phenotypic markers for in vitro polarized human macrophages.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambarus, C.A.; Krausz, S.; Eijk, M. van der; Hamann, J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Reedquist, K.A.; Tak, P.P.; Baeten, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polarization of macrophages by specific micro-environmental conditions impacts upon their function following subsequent activation. This study aimed to systematically validate robust phenotypic markers for in vitro polarized human macrophages in order to facilitate the study of macrophag

  14. Linking Microbiota to Human Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, F

    2015-01-01

    diabetes (T2D), and irritable bowel syndrome, and some animal experiments have suggested causality. However, few studies have validated causality in humans and the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be elucidated. We discuss how systems biology approaches combined with new experimental technologies......The human gut microbiota encompasses a densely populated ecosystem that provides essential functions for host development, immune maturation, and metabolism. Alterations to the gut microbiota have been observed in numerous diseases, including human metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2...... may disentangle some of the mechanistic details in the complex interactions of diet, microbiota, and host metabolism and may provide testable hypotheses for advancing our current understanding of human-microbiota interaction....

  15. Chromatin remodeling and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Sloan, Emily A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2003-06-01

    In the past few years, there has been a nascent convergence of scientific understanding of inherited human diseases with epigenetics. Identified epigenetic processes involved in human disease include covalent DNA modifications, covalent histone modifications, and histone relocation. Each of these processes influences chromatin structure and thereby regulates gene expression and DNA methylation, replication, recombination, and repair. The importance of these processes for nearly all aspects of normal growth and development is illustrated by the array of multi-system disorders and neoplasias caused by their dysregulation.

  16. Haptoglobin Phenotype Predicts a Low Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, My; Strandhave, Charlotte; Krarup, H.B.;

    F-PO1096 Haptoglobin Phenotype Predicts a Low Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease My Svensson,1 Charlotte Strandhave,1 Henrik My Svensson,1 Charlotte Strandhave,1 HenrikKrarup,2 Jeppe H. Christensen.1 1Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2...... to a phenotype-dependent antioxidant capacity where Hp 2-2 exhibits a low antioxidant ability, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. An attenuated heart rate variability (HRV) may be an important predictor of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the present study, we examined...

  17. Genetic difference in HLA-DR phenotypes between coeliac disease and transitory gluten intolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Meuli, R; Pichler, W J; Gaze, H; Lentze, M J

    1995-01-01

    Genetic differences in HLA phenotypes were studied in coeliac disease to investigate why some patients do not react with mucosal damage after gluten challenge. Forty five children with coeliac disease and 16 with transitory gluten intolerance were typed; 76 subjects served as controls. HLA phenotypes in children with coeliac disease had significantly higher proportions of DR3/X and DR5/7 than controls (48.8% v 11.8% and 26.7% v 5.3%). Children with transitory gluten intolerance had lower DR3/...

  18. Computed tomography-based biomarker provides unique signature for diagnosis of COPD phenotypes and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbán, Craig J; Han, Meilan K; Boes, Jennifer L; Chughtai, Komal A; Meyer, Charles R; Johnson, Timothy D; Galbán, Stefanie; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Kazerooni, Ella A; Martinez, Fernando J; Ross, Brian D

    2012-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasingly being recognized as a highly heterogeneous disorder, composed of varying pathobiology. Accurate detection of COPD subtypes by image biomarkers is urgently needed to enable individualized treatment, thus improving patient outcome. We adapted the parametric response map (PRM), a voxel-wise image analysis technique, for assessing COPD phenotype. We analyzed whole-lung computed tomography (CT) scans acquired at inspiration and expiration of 194 individuals with COPD from the COPDGene study. PRM identified the extent of functional small airways disease (fSAD) and emphysema as well as provided CT-based evidence that supports the concept that fSAD precedes emphysema with increasing COPD severity. PRM is a versatile imaging biomarker capable of diagnosing disease extent and phenotype while providing detailed spatial information of disease distribution and location. PRM's ability to differentiate between specific COPD phenotypes will allow for more accurate diagnosis of individual patients, complementing standard clinical techniques.

  19. Genotype phenotype correlation in Wilson's disease within families-a report on four south Indian families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Santhosh; GM Chandy; RV Shaji; CE Eapen; V Jayanthi; S Malathi; P Finny; N Thomas; M Chandy; G Kurian

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the genotype phenotype correlation inWilson's disease (WD) patients with in families.METHODS: We report four unrelated families from South India with nine members affected withWD. Phenotype was classified as per international consensus phenotypic classification of WD. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and 21 exons of ATP7B gene and flanking introns were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were screened for mutations and the aberrant products noted on screening were sequenced.RESULTS: Four separate ATP7B mutations were found in the four families. ATP7B mutations were identical amongst affected members within each family.Three families had homozygous mutations of ATP7B gene while one family had compound heterozygous mutation, of which only one mutation was identified.We noted concordance between ATP7B gene mutation and Wilson's disease phenotype amongst members within each family. The age of onset of symptoms orof detection of asymptomatic disease, baseline serum ceruloplasmin and baseline urinary copper levelswere also similar in affected members of each family.Minor differences in phenotype and baseline serumceruloplasmin level were noted in one family.CONCLUSION: We report concordance between ATP7B mutation and WD phenotype within each familywith > 1 member affected with WD. Homozygous ATP7B mutation was present in 3 of the 4 families studied. Our report supports allelic dominance as adeterminant of WD phenotype. However, in one familywith compound heterozygous mutation, there was a similar WD phenotype which suggests that there may be other factors determining the phenotype.

  20. Phenotype diversity in type 1 Gaucher disease: discovering the genetic basis of Gaucher disease/hematologic malignancy phenotype by individual genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Sarah M; Choi, Murim; Liu, Jun; Jain, Dhanpat; Boot, Rolf G; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Aerts, Johannes M F G; Pashankar, Farzana; Kupfer, Gary M; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P; Mistry, Pramod K

    2012-05-17

    Gaucher disease (GD), an inherited macrophage glycosphingolipidosis, manifests with an extraordinary variety of phenotypes that show imperfect correlation with mutations in the GBA gene. In addition to the classic manifestations, patients suffer from increased susceptibility to hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies. The mechanism(s) underlying malignancy in GD is not known, but is postulated to be secondary to macrophage dysfunction and immune dysregulation arising from lysosomal accumulation of glucocerebroside. However, there is weak correlation between GD/cancer phenotype and the systemic burden of glucocerebroside-laden macrophages. Therefore, we hypothesized that genetic modifier(s) may underlie the GD/cancer phenotype. In the present study, the genetic basis of GD/T-cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma in 2 affected siblings was deciphered through genomic analysis. GBA gene sequencing revealed homozygosity for a novel mutation, D137N. Whole-exome capture and massively parallel sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping identified a homozygous novel mutation in the MSH6 gene that leads to constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome and increased cancer risk. Enzyme studies demonstrated that the D137N mutation in GBA is a pathogenic mutation, and immunohistochemistry confirmed the absence of the MSH6 protein. Therefore, precise phenotype annotation followed by individual genome analysis has the potential to identify genetic modifiers of GD, facilitate personalized management, and provide novel insights into disease pathophysiology.

  1. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismueller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Faerkkilae, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew L.; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; de Valle, Maria Benito; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. METHODS: We

  2. Complex disease and phenotype mapping in the domestic dog

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The domestic dog is becoming an increasingly valuable model species in medical genetics, showing particular promise to advance our understanding of cancer and orthopaedic disease. Here we undertake the largest canine genome-wide association study to date, with a panel of over 4,200 dogs genotyped at 180,000 markers, to accelerate mapping efforts. For complex diseases, we identify loci significantly associated with hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, idiopathic epilepsy, lymphoma, mast cell tumour...

  3. Lamina propria macrophage phenotypes in relation to Escherichia coli in Crohn’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Timothy R.; Rayment, Neil B.; Barry N Hudspith; Hands, Rebecca E; Taylor, Kirstin; Parkes, Gareth C; Prescott, Natalie J.; Petrovska, Liljana; Hermon-Taylor, John; Brostoff, Jonathan; Boussioutas, Alex; Mathew, Christopher G.; Bustin, Stephen A.; Sanderson, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal handling of E. coli by lamina propria (LP) macrophages may contribute to Crohn’s disease (CD) pathogenesis. We aimed to determine LP macrophage phenotypes in CD, ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy controls (HC), and in CD, to compare macrophage phenotypes according to E. coli carriage. Methods Mucosal biopsies were taken from 35 patients with CD, 9 with UC and 18 HCs. Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate E. coli-laden and unladen LP macrophages from ileal or ...

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum in attenuated variants of Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Chen, Chung-Jen; Jinnah, H A

    2014-08-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease and its attenuated variants are caused by deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt). All patients exhibit excessive production of uric acid, which increases the risk for nephrolithiasis, renal failure, gouty arthritis and tophi. The mildest phenotype includes only problems related to overproduction of uric acid. The most severe clinical phenotype includes prominent neurological abnormalities and the universal feature is self-injurious behavior. In between the mildest and most severe syndromes is a broad spectrum of phenotypes with varying degrees of neurological, neurocognitive and behavioral abnormalities. The effect of HPRT1 gene mutations on residual HGprt enzyme activity is the most relevant factor contributing to disease phenotype. Attenuated clinical phenotypes are associated with residual enzyme function, whereas the most severe phenotype is usually associated with null activity. In cases of gouty arthritis with urate overproduction, a careful evaluation for motor impairments or neurocognitive abnormalities may help to identify attenuated variants of Lesch-Nyhan disease for better management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapamycin Conditioning of Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human ES Cells Promotes a Tolerogenic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M. Silk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs may one day facilitate the treatment of degenerative diseases requiring cell replacement therapy, the success of regenerative medicine is predicated on overcoming the rejection of replacement tissues. Given the role played by dendritic cells (DCs in the establishment of immunological tolerance, we have proposed that DC, rendered tolerogenic during their differentiation from hESC, might predispose recipients to accept replacement tissues. As a first step towards this goal, we demonstrate that DC differentiated from H1 hESCs (H1-DCs are particularly responsive to the immunosuppressive agent rapamycin compared to monocyte-derived DC (moDC. While rapamycin had only modest impact on the phenotype and function of moDC, H1-DC failed to upregulate CD40 upon maturation and displayed reduced immunostimulatory capacity. Furthermore, coculture of naïve allogeneic T cells with rapamycin-treated H1-DC promoted an increased appearance of CD25hi Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, compared to moDC. Our findings suggest that conditioning of hESC-derived DC with rapamycin favours a tolerogenic phenotype.

  6. Optimizing human hepatocyte models for metabolic phenotype and function: effects of treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Green, Charlotte J; Gunn, Pippa J; Hodson, Leanne; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2016-11-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are considered to be the "gold standard" cellular model for studying hepatic fatty acid and glucose metabolism; however, they come with limitations. Although the HepG2 cell line retains many of the primary hepatocyte metabolic functions they have a malignant origin and low rates of triglyceride secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dimethyl sulfoxide supplementation in the media of HepG2 cells would enhance metabolic functionality leading to the development of an improved in vitro cell model that closely recapitulates primary human hepatocyte metabolism. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing 1% dimethyl sulfoxide for 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days. Gene expression, protein levels, intracellular triglyceride, and media concentrations of triglyceride, urea, and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured. Dimethyl sulfoxide treatment altered the expression of genes involved in lipid (FAS, ACC1, ACC2, DGAT1, DGAT2, SCD) and glucose (PEPCK, G6Pase) metabolism as well as liver functionality (albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, AFP). mRNA changes were paralleled by alterations at the protein level. DMSO treatment decreased intracellular triglyceride content and lactate production and increased triglyceride and 3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in the media in a time-dependent manner. We have demonstrated that the addition of 1% dimethyl sulfoxide to culture media changes the metabolic phenotype of HepG2 cells toward a more primary human hepatocyte phenotype. This will enhance the currently available in vitro model systems for the study of hepatocyte biology related to pathological processes that contribute to disease and their response to specific therapeutic interventions. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  7. Motor phenotype is not associated with vascular dysfunction in symptomatic Huntington's disease transgenic R6/2 (160 CAG) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pardo, A; Carrizzo, A; Damato, A; Castaldo, S; Amico, E; Capocci, L; Ambrosio, M; Pompeo, F; De Sanctis, C; Spinelli, C C; Puca, A A; Remondelli, P; Maglione, V; Vecchione, C

    2017-02-17

    Whereas Huntington's disease (HD) is unequivocally a neurological disorder, a critical mass of emerging studies highlights the occurrence of peripheral pathology like cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. The overt impairment in cardiac function is normally expected to be associated with peripheral vascular dysfunction, however whether this assumption is reasonable or not in HD is still unknown. In this study we functionally characterized the vascular system in R6/2 mouse model (line 160 CAG), which recapitulates several features of human pathology including cardiac disease. Vascular reactivity in different arterial districts was determined by wire myography in symptomatic R6/2 mice and age-matched wild type (WT) littermates. Disease stage was assessed by using well-validated behavioural tests like rotarod and horizontal ladder task. Surprisingly, no signs of vascular dysfunction were detectable in symptomatic mice and no link with motor phenotype was found.

  8. Mitochondrial regulation of epigenetics and its role in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Tollefsbol, Trygve O; Singh, Keshav K

    2012-01-01

    Most pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations induce defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). However, phenotypic effects of these mutations show a large degree of variation depending on the tissue affected. These differences are difficult to reconcile with OXPHOS...... as the sole pathogenic factor suggesting that additional mechanisms contribute to lack of genotype and clinical phenotype correlationship. An increasing number of studies have identified a possible effect on the epigenetic landscape of the nuclear genome as a consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction...... to epigenetic changes causing genomic instability in the nuclear genome. We propose that "mitocheckpoint" mediated epigenetic and genetic changes may play key roles in phenotypic variation related to mitochondrial diseases or host of human diseases in which mitochondrial defect plays a primary role....

  9. von Willebrand disease and aging : an evolving phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Y. V.; Giezenaar, M. A.; Laros-van Gorkom, B. A. P.; Meijer, K.; van der Bom, J. G.; Cnossen, M. H.; Nijziel, M. R.; Ypma, P. F.; Fijnvandraat, K.; Eikenboom, J.; Mauser-Bunschoten, E. P.; Leebeek, F. W. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Because the number of elderly von Willebrand disease (VWD) patients is increasing, the pathophysiology of aging in VWD has become increasingly relevant. Objectives: To assess age-related changes in von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII (FVIII) levels and to compare age-related diff

  10. Distinctive inflammatory bowel disease phenotype in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A. Boudewijn; Janse, Marcel; Blokzijl, Hans; Weersma, Rinse K.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review the current literature for the specific clinical characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). METHODS: A systematical review for clinical characteristics of IBD in PSC was performed by conducting a broad search for "primary

  11. Classifying human audiometric phenotypes of age-related hearing loss from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A; Lee, Fu-Shing; Matthews, Lois J; Schmiedt, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbyacusis) has a complex etiology. Results from animal models detailing the effects of specific cochlear injuries on audiometric profiles may be used to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss in older humans and predict cochlear pathologies associated with certain audiometric configurations ("audiometric phenotypes"). Patterns of hearing loss associated with cochlear pathology in animal models were used to define schematic boundaries of human audiograms. Pathologies included evidence for metabolic, sensory, and a mixed metabolic + sensory phenotype; an older normal phenotype without threshold elevation was also defined. Audiograms from a large sample of older adults were then searched by a human expert for "exemplars" (best examples) of these phenotypes, without knowledge of the human subject demographic information. Mean thresholds and slopes of higher frequency thresholds of the audiograms assigned to the four phenotypes were consistent with the predefined schematic boundaries and differed significantly from each other. Significant differences in age, gender, and noise exposure history provided external validity for the four phenotypes. Three supervised machine learning classifiers were then used to assess reliability of the exemplar training set to estimate the probability that newly obtained audiograms exhibited one of the four phenotypes. These procedures classified the exemplars with a high degree of accuracy; classifications of the remaining cases were consistent with the exemplars with respect to average thresholds and demographic information. These results suggest that animal models of age-related hearing loss can be used to predict human cochlear pathology by classifying audiograms into phenotypic classifications that reflect probable etiologies for hearing loss in older humans.

  12. Human copy number variation and complex genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girirajan, Santhosh; Campbell, Catarina D; Eichler, Evan E

    2011-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) play an important role in human disease and population diversity. Advancements in technology have allowed for the analysis of CNVs in thousands of individuals with disease in addition to thousands of controls. These studies have identified rare CNVs associated with neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism, schizophrenia, and intellectual disability. In addition, copy number polymorphisms (CNPs) are present at higher frequencies in the population, show high diversity in copy number, sequence, and structure, and have been associated with multiple phenotypes, primarily related to immune or environmental response. However, the landscape of copy number variation still remains largely unexplored, especially for smaller CNVs and those embedded within complex regions of the human genome. An integrated approach including characterization of single nucleotide variants and CNVs in a large number of individuals with disease and normal genomes holds the promise of thoroughly elucidating the genetic basis of human disease and diversity.

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of Egg Allergy and Relationship to Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoy, Roman; Agashe, Charuta; Grishin, Alexander; Leung, Donald Y.; Wood, Robert A.; Sicherer, Scott H.; Jones, Stacie M.; Burks, A. Wesley; Davidson, Wendy F.; Lindblad, Robert W.; Dawson, Peter; Merad, Miriam; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies of childhood. There is a lack of information on the immunologic basis of egg allergy beyond the role of IgE. Objective To use transcriptional profiling as a novel approach to uncover immunologic processes associated with different phenotypes of egg allergy. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from egg-allergic children who were defined as reactive (BER) or tolerant (BET) to baked egg, and from food allergic controls (AC) who were egg non-allergic. PBMCs were stimulated with egg white protein. Gene transcription was measured by microarray after 24 h, and cytokine secretion by multiplex assay after 5 days. Results The transcriptional response of PBMCs to egg protein differed between BER and BET versus AC subjects. Compared to the AC group, the BER group displayed increased expression of genes associated with allergic inflammation as well as corresponding increased secretion of IL-5, IL-9 and TNF-α. A similar pattern was observed for the BET group. Further similarities in gene expression patterns between BER and BET groups, as well as some important differences, were revealed using a novel Immune Annotation resource developed for this project. This approach identified several novel processes not previously associated with egg allergy, including positive associations with TLR4-stimulated myeloid cells and activated NK cells, and negative associations with an induced Treg signature. Further pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes comparing BER to BET subjects showed significant enrichment of IFN-α and IFN-γ response genes, as well as genes associated with virally-infected DCs. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling identified several novel pathways and processes that differed when comparing the response to egg allergen in BET, BER, and AC groups. We conclude that this approach is a useful hypothesis-generating mechanism to identify novel immune processes associated

  14. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Imaizumi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P and dorsoventral (D-V axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Alzheimer’s disease (AD by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs.

  15. Danon disease: a phenotypic expression of LAMP-2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yukari; Furuta, Akiko; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-03-01

    Danon disease is an X-linked disorder clinically characterized by the triad of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and intellectual disability. Cardiomyopathy is a severe and life-threatening problem, for which cardiac transplantation is the only therapeutic option. The most striking finding in muscle biopsy samples is small basophilic granules scattered in myofibers, which are in fact small autophagic vacuoles surrounded by membranes with sarcolemmal features characterized by the recruitment of sarcolemmal proteins and acetylcholine esterase and by the presence of basal lamina on its luminal side. The mechanism underlying the formation of these autophagic vacuoles with unique sarcolemmal features (AVSF) still remains a mystery and its origin is unknown. In heart, cardiomyocytes show dramatically increased vacuolation and degenerative features, including myofibrillar disruption and lipofuscin accumulation. In brain, pale granular neurons and neurons with lipofuscin-like granules may be seen. Danon disease is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the LAMP2 gene, which encodes lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2), a single-spanned transmembrane protein localized in the limiting membranes of lysosomes and late endosomes. Most mutations lead to splicing defects or protein truncation, resulting in a loss of transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains, leading to LAMP-2 protein deficiency. LAMP-2 is required for the maturation of autophagosomes by fusion with lysosomes; therefore, LAMP-2 deficiency leads to a failure in macroautophagy. There are three LAMP-2 isoforms, LAMP-2A, -2B, and -2C. Clinical features of Danon disease are thought to be mediated by loss of the LAMP-2B isoform which is the major isoform expressed in muscle. It is also known that LAMP-2 plays a role in chaperone-mediated autophagy and RNA- and DNA-targeting autophagy. However, the precise pathophysiological mechanism through which LAMP-2 deficiency causes Danon disease is still not fully

  16. Prevalence of comorbidities according to predominant phenotype and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiciottoli G

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gianna Camiciottoli,1,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Chiara Magni,1 Viola Bonti,1 Stefano Diciotti,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Mario Mascalchi,5 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, 3Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, 4Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Careggi University Hospital, 5Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Background: In addition to lung involvement, several other diseases and syndromes coexist in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of idiopathic arterial hypertension (IAH, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease (PVD, diabetes, osteoporosis, and anxious depressive syndrome in a clinical setting of COPD outpatients whose phenotypes (predominant airway disease and predominant emphysema and severity (mild and severe diseases were determined by clinical and functional parameters. Methods: A total of 412 outpatients with COPD were assigned either a predominant airway disease or a predominant emphysema phenotype of mild or severe degree according to predictive models based on pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/vital capacity; total lung capacity %; functional residual capacity %; and diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide % and sputum characteristics. Comorbidities were assessed by objective medical records. Results: Eighty-four percent of patients suffered from at least one comorbidity and 75% from at least one cardiovascular comorbidity, with IAH and PVD being the most prevalent ones (62% and 28%, respectively. IAH prevailed significantly in predominant airway disease, osteoporosis prevailed

  17. Molecular clocks and the human condition: approaching their characterization in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G A; Yang, G; Paschos, G K; Liang, X; Skarke, C

    2015-09-01

    Molecular clockworks knit together diverse biological networks and compelling evidence from model systems infers their importance in metabolism, immunological and cardiovascular function. Despite this and the diurnal variation in many aspects of human physiology and the phenotypic expression of disease, our understanding of the role and importance of clock function and dysfunction in humans is modest. There are tantalizing hints of connection across the translational divide and some correlative evidence of gene variation and human disease but most of what we know derives from forced desynchrony protocols in controlled environments. We now have the ability to monitor quantitatively ex vivo or in vivo the genome, metabolome, proteome and microbiome of humans in the wild. Combining this capability, with the power of mobile telephony and the evolution of remote sensing, affords a new opportunity for deep phenotyping, including the characterization of diurnal behaviour and the assessment of the impact of the clock on approved drug function.

  18. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Chagas disease and human migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Guhl

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Human Chagas disease is a purely accidental occurrence. As humans came into contact with the natural foci of infection might then have become infected as a single addition to the already extensive host range of Trypanosoma cruzi that includes other primates. Thus began a process of adaptation and domiciliation to human habitations through which the vectors had direct access to abundant food as well as protection from climatic changes and predators. Our work deals with the extraction and specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction of T. cruzi DNA obtained from mummified human tissues and the positive diagnosis of Chagas disease in a series of 4,000-year-old Pre-Hispanic human mummies from the northern coast of Chile. The area has been inhabited at least for 7,000 years, first by hunters, fishers and gatherers, and then gradually by more permanent settlements. The studied specimens belonged to the Chinchorro culture, a people inhabiting the area now occupied by the modern city of Arica. These were essentially fishers with a complex religious ideology, which accounts for the preservation of their dead in the way of mummified bodies, further enhanced by the extremely dry conditions of the desert. Chinchorro mummies are, perhaps, the oldest preserved bodies known to date.

  20. Suppression of Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes by geranylgeranylacetone in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Hoshino

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Aβ is generated by the secretase-mediated proteolysis of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, and cleared by enzyme-mediated degradation and phagocytosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 stimulates this phagocytosis. We recently reported that the APP23 mouse model for AD showed fewer AD-related phenotypes when these animals were crossed with transgenic mice expressing heat shock protein (HSP 70. We here examined the effect of geranylgeranylacetone, an inducer of HSP70 expression, on the AD-related phenotypes. Repeated oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone to APP23 mice for 9 months not only improved cognitive function but also decreased levels of Aβ, Aβ plaque deposition and synaptic loss. The treatment also up-regulated the expression of an Aβ-degrading enzyme and TGF-β1 but did not affect the maturation of APP and secretase activities. These outcomes were similar to those observed in APP23 mice genetically modified to overexpress HSP70. Although the repeated oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone did not increase the level of HSP70 in the brain, a single oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone significantly increased the level of HSP70 when Aβ was concomitantly injected directly into the hippocampus. Since geranylgeranylacetone has already been approved for use as an anti-ulcer drug and its safety in humans has been confirmed, we propose that this drug be considered as a candidate drug for the prevention of AD.

  1. Loss of dopamine phenotype among midbrain neurons in Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttle, Martin; Prudente, Cecilia N; Fu, Rong; Sutcliffe, Diane; Pang, Hong; Cooper, Deborah; Veledar, Emir; Glass, Jonathan D; Gearing, Marla; Visser, Jasper E; Jinnah, H A

    2014-07-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is caused by congenital deficiency of the purine recycling enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt). Affected patients have a peculiar neurobehavioral syndrome linked with reductions of dopamine in the basal ganglia. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the anatomical basis for the reduced dopamine in human brain specimens collected at autopsy. Histopathological studies were conducted using autopsy tissue from 5 LND cases and 6 controls. Specific findings were replicated in brain tissue from an HGprt-deficient knockout mouse using immunoblots, and in a cell model of HGprt deficiency by flow-activated cell sorting (FACS). Extensive histological studies of the LND brains revealed no signs suggestive of a degenerative process or other consistent abnormalities in any brain region. However, neurons of the substantia nigra from the LND cases showed reduced melanization and reduced immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. In the HGprt-deficient mouse model, immunohistochemical stains for TH revealed no obvious loss of midbrain dopamine neurons, but quantitative immunoblots revealed reduced TH expression in the striatum. Finally, 10 independent HGprt-deficient mouse MN9D neuroblastoma lines showed no signs of impaired viability, but FACS revealed significantly reduced TH immunoreactivity compared to the control parent line. These results reveal an unusual phenomenon in which the neurochemical phenotype of dopaminergic neurons is not linked with a degenerative process. They suggest an important relationship between purine recycling pathways and the neurochemical integrity of the dopaminergic phenotype. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  2. Loss of Dopamine Phenotype Among Midbrain Neurons in Lesch–Nyhan Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttle, Martin; Prudente, Cecilia N.; Fu, Rong; Sutcliffe, Diane; Pang, Hong; Cooper, Deborah; Veledar, Emir; Glass, Jonathan D.; Gearing, Marla; Visser, Jasper E.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lesch–Nyhan disease (LND) is caused by congenital deficiency of the purine recycling enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt). Affected patients have a peculiar neurobehavioral syndrome linked with reductions of dopamine in the basal ganglia. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the anatomical basis for the reduced dopamine in human brain specimens collected at autopsy. Methods Histopathological studies were conducted using autopsy tissue from 5 LND cases and 6 controls. Specific findings were replicated in brain tissue from an HGprt-deficient knockout mouse using immunoblots, and in a cell model of HGprt deficiency by flow-activated cell sorting (FACS). Results Extensive histological studies of the LND brains revealed no signs suggestive of a degenerative process or other consistent abnormalities in any brain region. However, neurons of the substantia nigra from the LND cases showed reduced melanization and reduced immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. In the HGprt-deficient mouse model, immunohistochemical stains for TH revealed no obvious loss of midbrain dopamine neurons, but quantitative immunoblots revealed reduced TH expression in the striatum. Finally, 10 independent HGprt-deficient mouse MN9D neuroblastoma lines showed no signs of impaired viability, but FACS revealed significantly reduced TH immunoreactivity compared to the control parent line. Interpretation These results reveal an unusual phenomenon in which the neurochemical phenotype of dopaminergic neurons is not linked with a degenerative process. They suggest an important relationship between purine recycling pathways and the neurochemical integrity of the dopaminergic phenotype. PMID:24891139

  3. Bayesian Network Inference Enables Unbiased Phenotypic Anchoring of Transcriptomic Responses to Cigarette Smoke in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennen, Danyel G J; van Leeuwen, Danitsja M; Hendrickx, Diana M; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; van Delft, Joost H M; Kleinjans, Jos C S

    2015-10-19

    Microarray-based transcriptomic analysis has been demonstrated to hold the opportunity to study the effects of human exposure to, e.g., chemical carcinogens at the whole genome level, thus yielding broad-ranging molecular information on possible carcinogenic effects. Since genes do not operate individually but rather through concerted interactions, analyzing and visualizing networks of genes should provide important mechanistic information, especially upon connecting them to functional parameters, such as those derived from measurements of biomarkers for exposure and carcinogenic risk. Conventional methods such as hierarchical clustering and correlation analyses are frequently used to address these complex interactions but are limited as they do not provide directional causal dependence relationships. Therefore, our aim was to apply Bayesian network inference with the purpose of phenotypic anchoring of modified gene expressions. We investigated a use case on transcriptomic responses to cigarette smoking in humans, in association with plasma cotinine levels as biomarkers of exposure and aromatic DNA-adducts in blood cells as biomarkers of carcinogenic risk. Many of the genes that appear in the Bayesian networks surrounding plasma cotinine, and to a lesser extent around aromatic DNA-adducts, hold biologically relevant functions in inducing severe adverse effects of smoking. In conclusion, this study shows that Bayesian network inference enables unbiased phenotypic anchoring of transcriptomics responses. Furthermore, in all inferred Bayesian networks several dependencies are found which point to known but also to new relationships between the expression of specific genes, cigarette smoke exposure, DNA damaging-effects, and smoking-related diseases, in particular associated with apoptosis, DNA repair, and tumor suppression, as well as with autoimmunity.

  4. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Ogawa

    Full Text Available Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors.

  5. MORPHIN: a web tool for human disease research by projecting model organism biology onto a human integrated gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Yang, Sunmo; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2014-07-01

    Despite recent advances in human genetics, model organisms are indispensable for human disease research. Most human disease pathways are evolutionally conserved among other species, where they may phenocopy the human condition or be associated with seemingly unrelated phenotypes. Much of the known gene-to-phenotype association information is distributed across diverse databases, growing rapidly due to new experimental techniques. Accessible bioinformatics tools will therefore facilitate translation of discoveries from model organisms into human disease biology. Here, we present a web-based discovery tool for human disease studies, MORPHIN (model organisms projected on a human integrated gene network), which prioritizes the most relevant human diseases for a given set of model organism genes, potentially highlighting new model systems for human diseases and providing context to model organism studies. Conceptually, MORPHIN investigates human diseases by an orthology-based projection of a set of model organism genes onto a genome-scale human gene network. MORPHIN then prioritizes human diseases by relevance to the projected model organism genes using two distinct methods: a conventional overlap-based gene set enrichment analysis and a network-based measure of closeness between the query and disease gene sets capable of detecting associations undetectable by the conventional overlap-based methods. MORPHIN is freely accessible at http://www.inetbio.org/morphin.

  6. Cultivation-based multiplex phenotyping of human gut microbiota allows targeted recovery of previously uncultured bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rettedal, Elizabeth; Gumpert, Heidi; Sommer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is linked to a variety of human health issues and implicated in antibiotic resistance gene dissemination. Most of these associations rely on culture-independent methods, since it is commonly believed that gut microbiota cannot be easily or sufficiently cultured. Here, we...... show that carefully designed conditions enable cultivation of a representative proportion of human gut bacteria, enabling rapid multiplex phenotypic profiling. We use this approach to determine the phylogenetic distribution of antibiotic tolerance phenotypes for 16 antibiotics in the human gut...... microbiota. Based on the phenotypic mapping, we tailor antibiotic combinations to specifically select for previously uncultivated bacteria. Utilizing this method we cultivate and sequence the genomes of four isolates, one of which apparently belongs to the genus Oscillibacter; uncultivated Oscillibacter...

  7. PHENOstruct: Prediction of human phenotype ontology terms using heterogeneous data sources [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5j2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indika Kahanda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human phenotype ontology (HPO was recently developed as a standardized vocabulary for describing the phenotype abnormalities associated with human diseases. At present, only a small fraction of human protein coding genes have HPO annotations. But, researchers believe that a large portion of currently unannotated genes are related to disease phenotypes. Therefore, it is important to predict gene-HPO term associations using accurate computational methods. In this work we demonstrate the performance advantage of the structured SVM approach which was shown to be highly effective for Gene Ontology term prediction in comparison to several baseline methods. Furthermore, we highlight a collection of informative data sources suitable for the problem of predicting gene-HPO associations, including large scale literature mining data.

  8. Genetic studies of two inherited human phenotypes : Hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Balciuniene, Jorune

    2001-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the identification of genetic factors underlying two inherited human phenotypes: hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity. Non-syndromic hearing loss segregating in a Swedish family was tested for linkage to 13 previously reported candidate loci for hearing disabilities. Linkage was found to two loci: DFNA12 (llq22-q24) and DFNA2 (lp32). A detailed analysis of the phenotypes and haplotypes shared by the affected individuals supported the hypothesis of digenic inheri...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Shared Mechanistic and Phenotypic Traits Suggest Overlapping Disease Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Francisco; Doyle, Tracy J; Fletcher, Elaine A; Ascherman, Dana P; Rosas, Ivan O

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of clinically evident interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is approximately 10%. An additional 33% of undiagnosed patients have interstitial lung abnormalities that can be detected with high-resolution computed tomography. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease patients have three times the risk of death compared to those with rheumatoid arthritis occurring in the absence of interstitial lung disease, and the mortality related to interstitial lung disease is rising. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease is most commonly classified as the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, overlapping mechanistically and phenotypically with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but can occur in a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, mainly nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Based on this, we propose two possible pathways to explain the coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease: (i) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may come about when an immune response against citrullinated peptides taking place in another site (e.g. the joints) subsequently affects the lungs; (ii) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may represent a disease process in which idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like pathology triggers an immune response against citrullinated proteins that promotes articular disease indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. More studies focused on elucidating the basic mechanisms leading to different sub-phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease and the overlap with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are necessary to improve our understanding of the disease process and to define new therapeutic targets.

  10. Potassium channels and human epileptic phenotypes: an updated overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eVilla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Potassium (K+ channels are expressed in almost every cells and are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell membranes. These channels have been implicated in different disorders, in particular in epilepsy. K+ channel diversity depends on the presence in the human genome of a large number of genes either encoding pore-forming or accessory subunits. More than 80 genes encoding the K+ channels were cloned and they represent the largest group of ion channels regulating the electrical activity of cells in different tissues, including the brain. It is therefore not surprising that mutations in these genes lead to K+ channels dysfunctions linked to inherited epilepsy in humans and non-human model animals.This article reviews genetic and molecular progresses in exploring the pathogenesis of different human epilepsies, with special emphasis on the role of K+ channels in monogenic forms.

  11. [Alzheimer's disease and human memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustache, F; Giffard, B; Rauchs, G; Chételat, G; Piolino, P; Desgranges, B

    2006-10-01

    Memory disorders observed in Alzheimer's disease gave rise, from the eighties, to a detailed analysis into the framework of cognitive neuropsychology which aimed at describing the deficits of very specific processes. Beyond their clinical interest, these studies contributed to the modelisation of human memory thanks to the characterization of different memory systems and their relationships. The first part of this paper gives an overview of the memory deficits in Alzheimer's disease and insists on particular cognitive phenomena. Hence, several examples are developed in the domains of semantic memory (such as hyperpriming and hypopriming effects) and autobiographical memory. Recent results highlight the existence of severe autobiographical amnesia observed in all neurodegenerative diseases, though with contrasting profiles: Ribot's gradient in Alzheimer's disease (showing that remote memories are better preserved than recent ones), reverse gradient in semantic dementia and no clear gradient in the frontal variant of frontotemporal dementia. The second part of this article presents advances in cognitive neuroscience searching to disclose the cerebral substrates of these cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease. The studies using functional imaging techniques are the most informative regarding this problematic. While showing the dysfunctions of an extended network, they emphasize the selectivity of cerebral damages that are at the root of very specific cognitive dysfunctions, coming close in that way to the conceptions of cognitive neuropsychology. These neuroimaging studies unravel the existence of compensatory mechanisms, which until recently were clearly missing in the literature on neurodegenerative diseases. These different researches lead to a wide conception of human memory, not just limited to simple instrumental processes (encoding, storage, retrieval), but necessarily covering models of identity and continuity of the subject, which interact in a dynamic way

  12. The Ames dwarf mutation attenuates Alzheimer's disease phenotype of APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Kendra L; Kulas, Joshua A; Franklin, Whitney; Rakoczy, Sharlene G; Taglialatela, Giulio; Brown-Borg, Holly M; Combs, Colin K

    2016-04-01

    APP/PS1 double transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) demonstrate robust brain amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide containing plaque deposition, increased markers of oxidative stress, behavioral dysfunction, and proinflammatory gliosis. On the other hand, lack of growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone due to a recessive mutation in the Prop 1 gene (Prop1df) in Ames dwarf mice results in a phenotype characterized by potentiated antioxidant mechanisms, improved learning and memory, and significantly increased longevity in homozygous mice. Based on this, we hypothesized that a similar hormone deficiency might attenuate disease changes in the brains of APP/PS1 mice. To test this idea, APP/PS1 mice were crossed to the Ames dwarf mouse line. APP/PS1, wild-type, df/+, df/df, df/+/APP/PS1, and df/df/APP/PS1 mice were compared at 6 months of age through behavioral testing and assessing amyloid burden, reactive gliosis, and brain cytokine levels. df/df mice demonstrated lower brain growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations. This correlated with decreased astrogliosis and microgliosis in the df/df/APP/PS1 mice and, surprisingly, reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 concentrations. The df/df/APP/PS1 mice also demonstrated significantly elevated brain levels of multiple cytokines in spite of the attenuated gliosis. These data indicate that the df/df/APP/PS1 line is a unique resource in which to study aging and resistance to disease and suggest that the affected pituitary hormones may have a role in regulating disease progression.

  13. Prediction of phenotypes of missense mutations in human proteins from biological assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiong; Xu, Qifang; Dunbrack, Roland L

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent variation in the human genome. Nonsynonymous SNPs that lead to missense mutations can be neutral or deleterious, and several computational methods have been presented that predict the phenotype of human missense mutations. These methods use sequence-based and structure-based features in various combinations, relying on different statistical distributions of these features for deleterious and neutral mutations. One structure-based feature that has not been studied significantly is the accessible surface area within biologically relevant oligomeric assemblies. These assemblies are different from the crystallographic asymmetric unit for more than half of X-ray crystal structures. We find that mutations in the core of proteins or in the interfaces in biological assemblies are significantly more likely to be disease-associated than those on the surface of the biological assemblies. For structures with more than one protein in the biological assembly (whether the same sequence or different), we find the accessible surface area from biological assemblies provides a statistically significant improvement in prediction over the accessible surface area of monomers from protein crystal structures (P = 6e-5). When adding this information to sequence-based features such as the difference between wildtype and mutant position-specific profile scores, the improvement from biological assemblies is statistically significant but much smaller (P = 0.018). Combining this information with sequence-based features in a support vector machine leads to 82% accuracy on a balanced dataset of 50% disease-associated mutations from SwissVar and 50% neutral mutations from human/primate sequence differences in orthologous proteins.

  14. Complex inheritance of ABCA4 disease: four mutations in a family with multiple macular phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing; Zernant, Jana; Yuan, Bo; Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Tsang, Stephen H; Lupski, James R; Allikmets, Rando

    2016-01-01

    Over 800 mutations in the ABCA4 gene cause autosomal recessive Stargardt disease. Due to extensive genetic heterogeneity, observed variant-associated phenotypes can manifest tremendous variability of expression. Furthermore, the high carrier frequency of pathogenic ABCA4 alleles in the general population (~1:20) often results in pseudo-dominant inheritance patterns further complicating the diagnosis and characterization of affected individuals. This study describes a genotype/phenotype analysis of an unusual family with multiple macular disease phenotypes spanning across two generations and segregating four distinct ABCA4 mutant alleles. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 discovered two known missense mutations, p.C54Y and p.G1961E. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a large novel deletion combined with a small insertion, c.6148-698_c.6670del/insTGTGCACCTCCCTAG, and complete sequencing of the entire ABCA4 genomic locus uncovered a new deep intronic variant, c.302+68C>T. Patients with the p.G1961E mutation had the mildest, confined maculopathy phenotype with peripheral flecks while those with all other mutant allele combinations exhibited a more advanced stage of generalized retinal and choriocapillaris atrophy. This family epitomizes the clinical and genetic complexity of ABCA4-associated diseases. It contained variants from all classes of mutations, in the coding region, deep intronic, both single nucleotide variants and copy number variants that accounted for varying phenotypes segregating in an apparent dominant fashion. Unequivocally defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires a multifaceted approach that includes advanced mutation detection methods and a thorough analysis of clinical phenotypes.

  15. Phenotypic overlap in the contribution of individual genes to CNV pathogenicity revealed by cross-species computational analysis of single-gene mutations in humans, mice and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelken, Sandra C; Köhler, Sebastian; Mungall, Christopher J; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Ruef, Barbara J; Smith, Cynthia; Smedley, Damian; Bauer, Sebastian; Klopocki, Eva; Schofield, Paul N; Westerfield, Monte; Robinson, Peter N; Lewis, Suzanna E

    2013-03-01

    Numerous disease syndromes are associated with regions of copy number variation (CNV) in the human genome and, in most cases, the pathogenicity of the CNV is thought to be related to altered dosage of the genes contained within the affected segment. However, establishing the contribution of individual genes to the overall pathogenicity of CNV syndromes is difficult and often relies on the identification of potential candidates through manual searches of the literature and online resources. We describe here the development of a computational framework to comprehensively search phenotypic information from model organisms and single-gene human hereditary disorders, and thus speed the interpretation of the complex phenotypes of CNV disorders. There are currently more than 5000 human genes about which nothing is known phenotypically but for which detailed phenotypic information for the mouse and/or zebrafish orthologs is available. Here, we present an ontology-based approach to identify similarities between human disease manifestations and the mutational phenotypes in characterized model organism genes; this approach can therefore be used even in cases where there is little or no information about the function of the human genes. We applied this algorithm to detect candidate genes for 27 recurrent CNV disorders and identified 802 gene-phenotype associations, approximately half of which involved genes that were previously reported to be associated with individual phenotypic features and half of which were novel candidates. A total of 431 associations were made solely on the basis of model organism phenotype data. Additionally, we observed a striking, statistically significant tendency for individual disease phenotypes to be associated with multiple genes located within a single CNV region, a phenomenon that we denote as pheno-clustering. Many of the clusters also display statistically significant similarities in protein function or vicinity within the protein

  16. Early phenotypic differences between Parkinson's disease patients with and without freezing of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, J. M.; Shine, J. M.; Walton, C. C.; Gilat, M.; Kamsma, Y. P. T.; Naismith, S. L.; Lewis, S. J. G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have associated freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease with the presence of specific phenotypic features such as mood disturbances, REM sleep behavior disorder and selective cognitive impairments. However, it is not clear whether these features are present in the earlie

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  18. Clinical and genetic analysis of 29 Brazilian patients with Huntington's disease-like phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Riccioppo Rodrigues

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chorea, behavioral disturbances and dementia, caused by a pathological expansion of the CAG trinucleotide in the HTT gene. Several patients have been recognized with the typical HD phenotype without the expected mutation. The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of diseases such as Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA7, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA and chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc among 29 Brazilian patients with a HD-like phenotype. In the group analyzed, we found 3 patients with HDL2 and 2 patients with ChAc. The diagnosis was not reached in 79.3% of the patients. HDL2 was the main cause of the HD-like phenotype in the group analyzed, and is attributable to the African ancestry of this population. However, the etiology of the disease remains undetermined in the majority of the HD negative patients with HD-like phenotype.

  19. Genotypes and phenotypes for apolipoprotein E and Alzheimer disease in the Honolulu-Asia aging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.P.F. Kardaun (Jan); L. White (Lon); H.E. Resnick; H. Petrovitch; S.M. Marcovina; A.M. Saunders (Ann); D.J. Foley (Dan); R.J. Havlik

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The utility of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) type as an indicator of genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer disease (AD) depends on the reliability of typing. Although ApoE protein isoform phenotyping is generally assumed equivalent to genotyping from DNA

  20. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  1. "Miniguts" from plucked human hair meet Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohwieler, M; Renz, S; Liebau, S; Lin, Q; Lechel, A; Klaus, J; Perkhofer, L; Zenke, M; Seufferlein, T; Illing, A; Müller, M; Kleger, A

    2016-08-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a powerful tool to study human embryonic development and disease but also open up novel strategies for cell replacement therapies. Their capacity to give rise to every cell type of the human body, meanwhile, enables researchers to generate high yields of mesodermal, ectodermal, but also endodermal-derived tissues such as hepatic, pancreatic, or intestinal cells. Another progress in the field came with the advent of 3-dimensional culture conditions, so-called organoids, which facilitate maturation of stem cells and in turn more faithfully recapitulate human tissue architecture. While several studies reported the derivation of organoid cultures from adult intestinal tissue, the derivation of intestinal organoids derived from plucked human hair of Crohn's disease patients has not been reported. The current research project reports such successful generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from hair sheet keratinocyte cultures of a patient with Crohn's disease. Stepwise differentiation along the intestinal lineage showed no differences in intermediate stages such as definitive endoderm formation. We also directed the patterned primitive gut tube toward intestinal organoids resembling the cellular architecture of human "miniguts". As expected from current pathophysiological knowledge on Crohn's disease, there were no obvious morphological differences in the "miniguts" derived from healthy control and diseased patient-induced pluripotent stem cells. Taken together, our platform will enable for detailed and complementary phenotyping of the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease in a novel disease-in-a-dish format.

  2. Nutrition, epigenetics, and developmental plasticity: implications for understanding human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdge, Graham C; Lillycrop, Karen A

    2010-08-21

    There is considerable evidence for induction of differential risk of noncommunicable diseases in humans by variation in the quality of the early life environment. Studies in animal models show that induction and stability of induced changes in the phenotype of the offspring involve altered epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation and covalent modifications of histones. These findings indicate that such epigenetic changes are highly gene specific and function at the level of individual CpG dinucleotides. Interventions using supplementation with folic acid or methyl donors during pregnancy, or folic acid after weaning, alter the phenotype and epigenotype induced by maternal dietary constraint during gestation. This suggests a possible means for reducing risk of induced noncommunicable disease, although the design and conduct of such interventions may require caution. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent advances in understanding the mechanism that underlies the early life origins of disease and to place these studies in a broader life-course context.

  3. Optimizing the phenotyping of rodent ASD models: enrichment analysis of mouse and human neurobiological phenotypes associated with high-risk autism genes identifies morphological, electrophysiological, neurological, and behavioral features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is interest in defining mouse neurobiological phenotypes useful for studying autism spectrum disorders (ASD in both forward and reverse genetic approaches. A recurrent focus has been on high-order behavioral analyses, including learning and memory paradigms and social paradigms. However, well-studied mouse models, including for example Fmr1 knockout mice, do not show dramatic deficits in such high-order phenotypes, raising a question as to what constitutes useful phenotypes in ASD models. Methods To address this, we made use of a list of 112 disease genes etiologically involved in ASD to survey, on a large scale and with unbiased methods as well as expert review, phenotypes associated with a targeted disruption of these genes in mice, using the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology database. In addition, we compared the results with similar analyses for human phenotypes. Findings We observed four classes of neurobiological phenotypes associated with disruption of a large proportion of ASD genes, including: (1 Changes in brain and neuronal morphology; (2 electrophysiological changes; (3 neurological changes; and (4 higher-order behavioral changes. Alterations in brain and neuronal morphology represent quantitative measures that can be more widely adopted in models of ASD to understand cellular and network changes. Interestingly, the electrophysiological changes differed across different genes, indicating that excitation/inhibition imbalance hypotheses for ASD would either have to be so non-specific as to be not falsifiable, or, if specific, would not be supported by the data. Finally, it was significant that in analyses of both mouse and human databases, many of the behavioral alterations were neurological changes, encompassing sensory alterations, motor abnormalities, and seizures, as opposed to higher-order behavioral changes in learning and memory and social behavior paradigms. Conclusions The results indicated that mutations

  4. Phenotype/genotype correlations in Gaucher disease type 1: Clinical and therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibille, A.; Eng, C.M.; Kim, S.J.; Pastores, G. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G.A. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disease and the most prevalent genetic disease among Ashkenazi Jews. Gaucher disease type 1 is characterized by marked variability of the phenotype and by the absence of neuronopathic involvement. To test the hypothesis that this phenotypic variability was due to genetic compounds of several different mutant alleles, 161 symptomatic patients with Gaucher disease type 1 (> 90% Ashkenazi Jewish) were analyzed for clinical involvement, and their genotypes were determined. Qualitative and quantitative measures of disease involvement included age at onset of the disease manifestations, hepatic and splenic volumes, age at splenectomy, and severity of bony disease. High statistically significant differences (P < .005) were found in each clinical parameter in patients with the N370S/N370S genotype compared with those patients with the N370S/84GG, N370S/L444P, and N370/ genotypes. The symptomatic N370S homozygotes had onset of their disease two to three decades later than patients with the other genotypes. In addition, patients with the latter genotypes have much more severely involved livers, spleens, and bones and had a higher incidence of splenectomy at an earlier age. These predictive genotype analyses provide the basis for genetic care delivery and therapeutic recommendations in patients affected with Gaucher disease type 1. 38 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Activation of endogenous human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs) and therapy-resistant phenotypes of malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-07-01

    Recent reports revealed consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviral elements in human preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cells. Activity of stem cell associated retroviruses (SCARs) has been implicated in seeding thousands of human-specific regulatory sequences in the hESC genome. Activation of specific SCARs has been demonstrated in patients diagnosed with multiple types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders, and appears associated with clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. A hallmark feature of human-specific SCAR integration sites is deletions of ancestral DNA. Analysis of human-specific genetic loci of SCARs' stemness networks in tumor samples of TCGA cohorts representing 29 cancer types suggests that this approach may facilitate identification of pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations, gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCAR-regulated host genes. Present analyses indicate that multiple lines of strong circumstantial evidence support the hypothesis that activation of SCARs' networks may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, perhaps contributing to the emergence of clinically-lethal therapy-resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes.

  6. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killen Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  7. Escherichia coli RecG functionally suppresses human Bloom syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Wilson, William A; Pierce, Andrew J

    2012-10-30

    Defects in the human BLM gene cause Bloom syndrome, notable for early development of tumors in a broad variety of tissues. On the basis of sequence similarity, BLM has been identified as one of the five human homologs of RecQ from Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, biochemical characterization of the BLM protein indicates far greater functional similarity to the E. coli RecG protein and there is no known RecG homolog in human cells. To explore the possibility that the shared biochemistries of BLM and RecG may represent an example of convergent evolution of cellular function where in humans BLM has evolved to fulfill the genomic stabilization role of RecG, we determined whether expression of RecG in human BLM-deficient cells could suppress established functional cellular Bloom syndrome phenotypes. We found that RecG can indeed largely suppress both the definitive elevated sister chromatid exchange phenotype and the more recently demonstrated gene cluster instability phenotype of BLM-deficient cells. In contrast, expression of RecG has no impact on either of these phenotypes in human cells with functional BLM protein. These results suggest that the combination of biochemical activities shared by RecG and BLM fill the same evolutionary niche in preserving genomic integrity without requiring exactly identical molecular mechanisms.

  8. Small teleost fish provide new insights into human skeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, P E; Harris, M P; Huysseune, A; Winkler, C

    2017-01-01

    Small teleost fish such as zebrafish and medaka are increasingly studied as models for human skeletal diseases. Efficient new genome editing tools combined with advances in the analysis of skeletal phenotypes provide new insights into fundamental processes of skeletal development. The skeleton among vertebrates is a highly conserved organ system, but teleost fish and mammals have evolved unique traits or have lost particular skeletal elements in each lineage. Several unique features of the skeleton relate to the extremely small size of early fish embryos and the small size of adult fish used as models. A detailed analysis of the plethora of interesting skeletal phenotypes in zebrafish and medaka pushes available skeletal imaging techniques to their respective limits and promotes the development of new imaging techniques. Impressive numbers of zebrafish and medaka mutants with interesting skeletal phenotypes have been characterized, complemented by transgenic zebrafish and medaka lines. The advent of efficient genome editing tools, such as TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9, allows to introduce targeted deficiencies in genes of model teleosts to generate skeletal phenotypes that resemble human skeletal diseases. This review will also discuss other attractive aspects of the teleost skeleton. This includes the capacity for lifelong tooth replacement and for the regeneration of dermal skeletal elements, such as scales and fin rays, which further increases the value of zebrafish and medaka models for skeletal research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of human newborns' B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandy, A; Thuillier, L; Forveille, M; Fischer, A

    1990-01-01

    It has been demonstrated two major facts concerning human newborns' B lymphocytes: 1) they differentiate poorly into Ig-producing cells and 2) they express CD5 and CD1c membrane proteins. We have further analyzed human newborns' B cell characteristics and found that approximately half of them express activation Ag, i.e., 4F2 and IL-2R, both associated in significant proportions with CD23 and Bac-1. These membrane Ag were found both on CD5(+) and CD5(-) B cells. Newborns' B cells do not exhibit other activation markers because they express surface IgD, and because their size, RNA, and DNA contents do not differ from those of adults' B cells, indicating that they are in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Newborns' B cell proliferation can be induced by rIL-2, rIL-4, low m.w. B cell growth factor, and by Staphylococcus aureus protein A. It is presently difficult to build a hypothesis accounting for all the specific findings made on newborns' B cells. It is not known for instance whether CD5(+) and (-) B cells belong to distinct subsets as suggested by the fluorescence intensity curve obtained with an anti-CD5 antibody or to distinct stages in a unique pattern of B cell maturation during fetal and newborn life. This may indicate that partially activated B cells actually produce natural polyspecific autoantibodies of the IgM isotype found in newborns' human serum.

  10. Association of immunological cell profiles with specific clinical phenotypes of scleroderma disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cacho, José Manuel; Gallardo, Soledad; Posada, Manuel; Aguerri, Miriam; Calzada, David; Mayayo, Teodoro; González-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Rabasco, Antonio María; Lahoz, Carlos; Cárdaba, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells, NK, and monocytes) and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction) and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient's stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies.

  11. Association of Immunological Cell Profiles with Specific Clinical Phenotypes of Scleroderma Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel López-Cacho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to search the correlation among immunological profiles and clinical phenotypes of scleroderma in well-characterized groups of scleroderma patients, comparing forty-nine scleroderma patients stratified according to specific clinical phenotypes with forty-nine healthy controls. Five immunological cell subpopulations (B, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, NK, and monocytes and their respective stages of apoptosis and activation were analyzed by flow cytometry, in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Analyses of results were stratified according to disease stage, time since the diagnosis, and visceral damage (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cardiac affliction and by time of treatment with corticosteroids. An increase in the percentages of monocytes and a decrease in the B cells were mainly related to the disease progression. A general apoptosis decrease was found in all phenotypes studied, except in localized scleroderma. An increase of B and NK cells activation was found in patients diagnosed more than 10 years ago. Specific cell populations like monocytes, NK, and B cells were associated with the type of affected organ. This study shows how, in a heterogeneous disease, proper patient’s stratification according to clinical phenotypes allows finding specific cellular profiles. Our data may lead to improvements in the knowledge of prognosis factors and to aid in the analysis of future specific therapies.

  12. High throughput phenotyping to accelerate crop breeding and monitoring of diseases in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Nadia; Lee, Scott; Mockler, Todd C

    2017-08-01

    Effective implementation of technology that facilitates accurate and high-throughput screening of thousands of field-grown lines is critical for accelerating crop improvement and breeding strategies for higher yield and disease tolerance. Progress in the development of field-based high throughput phenotyping methods has advanced considerably in the last 10 years through technological progress in sensor development and high-performance computing. Here, we review recent advances in high throughput field phenotyping technologies designed to inform the genetics of quantitative traits, including crop yield and disease tolerance. Successful application of phenotyping platforms to advance crop breeding and identify and monitor disease requires: (1) high resolution of imaging and environmental sensors; (2) quality data products that facilitate computer vision, machine learning and GIS; (3) capacity infrastructure for data management and analysis; and (4) automated environmental data collection. Accelerated breeding for agriculturally relevant crop traits is key to the development of improved varieties and is critically dependent on high-resolution, high-throughput field-scale phenotyping technologies that can efficiently discriminate better performing lines within a larger population and across multiple environments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Human Microbiota and Ophthalmic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Louise J; Liu, Ji

    2016-09-01

    The human ocular surface, consisting of the cornea and conjunctiva, is colonized by an expansive, diverse microbial community. Molecular-based methods, such as 16S rRNA sequencing, has allowed for more comprehensive and precise identification of the species composition of the ocular surface microbiota compared to traditional culture-based methods. Evidence suggests that the normal microbiota plays a protective immunological role in preventing the proliferation of pathogenic species and thus, alterations in the homeostatic microbiome may be linked to ophthalmic pathologies. Further investigation of the ocular surface microbiome, as well as the microbiome of other areas of the body such as the oral mucosa and gut, and their role in the pathophysiology of diseases is a significant, emerging field of research, and may someday enable the development of novel probiotic approaches for the treatment and prevention of ophthalmic diseases.

  14. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Halenius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention.

  15. Evidence for phenotypic plasticity in aggressive triple-negative breast cancer: human biology is recapitulated by a novel model system.

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    Nicholas C D'Amato

    Full Text Available Breast cancers with a basal-like gene signature are primarily triple-negative, frequently metastatic, and carry a poor prognosis. Basal-like breast cancers are enriched for markers of breast cancer stem cells as well as markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. While EMT is generally thought to be important in the process of metastasis, in vivo evidence of EMT in human disease remains rare. Here we report a novel model of human triple-negative breast cancer, the DKAT cell line, which was isolated from an aggressive, treatment-resistant triple-negative breast cancer that demonstrated morphological and biochemical evidence suggestive of phenotypic plasticity in the patient. The DKAT cell line displays a basal-like phenotype in vitro when cultured in serum-free media, and undergoes phenotypic changes consistent with EMT/MET in response to serum-containing media, a unique property among the breast cancer cell lines we tested. This EMT is marked by increased expression of the transcription factor Zeb1, and Zeb1 is required for the enhanced migratory ability of DKAT cells in the mesenchymal state. DKAT cells also express progenitor-cell markers, and single DKAT cells are able to generate tumorspheres containing both epithelial and mesenchymal cell types. In vivo, as few as ten DKAT cells are capable of forming xenograft tumors which display a range of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The DKAT model provides a novel model to study the molecular mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and the aggressive biology of triple-negative breast cancers.

  16. Aluminium and human breast diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbre, P D; Pugazhendhi, D; Mannello, F

    2011-11-01

    The human breast is exposed to aluminium from many sources including diet and personal care products, but dermal application of aluminium-based antiperspirant salts provides a local long-term source of exposure. Recent measurements have shown that aluminium is present in both tissue and fat of the human breast but at levels which vary both between breasts and between tissue samples from the same breast. We have recently found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids taken from breast cancer patients (mean 268 ± 28 μg/l) compared with control healthy subjects (mean 131 ± 10 μg/l) providing evidence of raised aluminium levels in the breast microenvironment when cancer is present. The measurement of higher levels of aluminium in type I human breast cyst fluids (median 150 μg/l) compared with human serum (median 6 μg/l) or human milk (median 25 μg/l) warrants further investigation into any possible role of aluminium in development of this benign breast disease. Emerging evidence for aluminium in several breast structures now requires biomarkers of aluminium action in order to ascertain whether the presence of aluminium has any biological impact. To this end, we report raised levels of proteins that modulate iron homeostasis (ferritin, transferrin) in parallel with raised aluminium in nipple aspirate fluids in vivo, and we report overexpression of mRNA for several S100 calcium binding proteins following long-term exposure of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro to aluminium chlorhydrate.

  17. Advances in huntington disease drug discovery: novel approaches to model disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Jonathan; Wall, Michael D; Lazari, Ovadia; Arjomand, Jamshid; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    Huntington disease is a monogenic, autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the huntingtin (HTT) gene; age of onset of clinical symptoms inversely correlates with expanded CAG repeat length. HD leads to extensive degeneration of the basal ganglia, hypothalamic nuclei, and selected cortical areas, and a wide range of molecular mechanisms have been implicated in disease pathology in animal or cellular models expressing mutated HTT (mHTT) proteins, either full-length or amino-terminal fragments. However, HD cellular models that recapitulate the slow progression of the disease have not been available due to the toxicity of overexpressed exogenous mHTT or to limitations with using primary cells for long-term studies. Most investigations of the effects of mHTT relied on cytotoxicity or aggregation end points in heterologous systems or in primary embryonic neuroglial cultures derived from HD mouse models. More innovative approaches are currently under active investigation, including screening using electrophysiological endpoints, as well as the recent use of primary blood mononuclear cells and of human embryonic stem cells derived from a variety of HD research participants. Here we describe how these cellular systems are being used to investigate HD biology as well as to identify mechanisms with therapeutic potential.

  18. Sex differences in correlates of intermediate phenotypes and prevalent cardiovascular disease in the general population

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    Renate B. Schnabel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background-There are marked sex differences in cardiovascular disease [CVD] manifestation. It is largely unknown how the distribution of CVD risk factors or intermediate phenotypes explain sex-specific differences.Methods and Results-In 5000 individuals of the population-based Gutenberg Health Study, mean age 55±11 years, 51% males, we examined sex-specific associations of classical CVD risk factors with intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, flow-mediated dilation, peripheral arterial tonometry, echocardiographic and electrocardiographic variables. Intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes were related to prevalent CVD (coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction, lower extremity artery disease [LEAD] N=561.We observed differential distributions of CVD risk factors with a higher risk factor burden in men. Manifest coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction and LEAD were more frequent in men; the proportion of heart failure was higher in women. Intermediate phenotypes showed clear sex differences with more beneficial values in women. Fairly linear changes towards less beneficial values with age were observed in both sexes. In multivariable-adjusted regression analyses age, systolic blood pressure and body mass index were consistently associated with intermediate phenotypes in both sexes with different ranking according to random forests, maximum model R² 0.43. Risk factor-adjusted associations with prevalent CVD showed some differences by sex. No interactions by menopausal status were observed. Conclusions-In a population-based cohort we observed sex differences in risk factors and a broad range of intermediate phenotypes of noninvasive cardiovascular structure and function. Their relation to prevalent CVD differed markedly. Our results indicate the need of future investigations to understand sex differences in CVD manifestation.

  19. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... that includes studying more complex 3D cell cultures, as well as accelerating aging of the neurons, may help to yield stronger phenotypes in the cultured cells. Thus, the use and application of pluripotent stem cells for modelling disease have already shown to be a powerful approach for discovering more about...

  20. Tracking modern human population history from linguistic and cranial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Harvati, Katerina; Jäger, Gerhard

    2016-11-11

    Languages and genes arguably follow parallel evolutionary trajectories, descending from a common source and subsequently differentiating. However, although common ancestry is established within language families, it remains controversial whether language preserves a deep historical signal. To address this question, we evaluate the association between linguistic and geographic distances across 265 language families, as well as between linguistic, geographic, and cranial distances among eleven populations from Africa, Asia, and Australia. We take advantage of differential population history signals reflected by human cranial anatomy, where temporal bone shape reliably tracks deep population history and neutral genetic changes, while facial shape is more strongly associated with recent environmental effects. We show that linguistic distances are strongly geographically patterned, even within widely dispersed groups. However, they are correlated predominantly with facial, rather than temporal bone, morphology, suggesting that variation in vocabulary likely tracks relatively recent events and possibly population contact.

  1. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field.

  2. Multi-minicore disease--searching for boundaries: phenotype analysis of 38 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, A; Estournet, B; Chateau, D; Romero, N B; Laroche, C; Odent, S; Toutain, A; Cabello, A; Fontan, D; dos Santos, H G; Haenggeli, C A; Bertini, E; Urtizberea, J A; Guicheney, P; Fardeau, M

    2000-11-01

    Multi-minicore disease (MmD) is a congenital myopathy morphologically defined by the presence of multiple small zones of sarcomeric disorganization and lack of oxidative activity ("minicores") in muscle fibers. The dinical expression of MmD is considered to be greatly variable, and the morphological lesions are nonspecific; therefore, its boundaries are poorly defined, and its molecular bases are not known. To better define the phenotypic characteristics of MmD, we analyzed a large series of 38 patients with multiple minicores in muscle fibers in the absence of any other potential cause. According to clinical features, 4 subgroups were identified. Most patients (30 cases) shared a common highly consistent phenotype marked by the axial predominance of muscle weakness and a high occurrence of severe respiratory insufficiency and scoliosis ("classical" form). Other forms were characterized by pharyngolaryngeal involvement and total lack of head control (2 cases), antenatal onset with arthrogryposis (3 cases), and slowly progressive weakness with marked hand amyotrophy (3 cases). Type 1 fiber predominance and hypotrophy as well as centrally located nuclei were found in every subgroup. MmD is thus phenotypically heterogeneous, but a typical recognizable phenotype does exist. This phenotype classification should be helpful when undertaking research into the molecular defects that cause MmD.

  3. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Shimoyama

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases.

  4. Exploring human disease using the Rat Genome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulederkind, Stanley J. F.; De Pons, Jeff; Nigam, Rajni; Smith, Jennifer R.; Tutaj, Marek; Petri, Victoria; Hayman, G. Thomas; Wang, Shur-Jen; Ghiasvand, Omid; Thota, Jyothi; Dwinell, Melinda R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rattus norvegicus, the laboratory rat, has been a crucial model for studies of the environmental and genetic factors associated with human diseases for over 150 years. It is the primary model organism for toxicology and pharmacology studies, and has features that make it the model of choice in many complex-disease studies. Since 1999, the Rat Genome Database (RGD; http://rgd.mcw.edu) has been the premier resource for genomic, genetic, phenotype and strain data for the laboratory rat. The primary role of RGD is to curate rat data and validate orthologous relationships with human and mouse genes, and make these data available for incorporation into other major databases such as NCBI, Ensembl and UniProt. RGD also provides official nomenclature for rat genes, quantitative trait loci, strains and genetic markers, as well as unique identifiers. The RGD team adds enormous value to these basic data elements through functional and disease annotations, the analysis and visual presentation of pathways, and the integration of phenotype measurement data for strains used as disease models. Because much of the rat research community focuses on understanding human diseases, RGD provides a number of datasets and software tools that allow users to easily explore and make disease-related connections among these datasets. RGD also provides comprehensive human and mouse data for comparative purposes, illustrating the value of the rat in translational research. This article introduces RGD and its suite of tools and datasets to researchers – within and beyond the rat community – who are particularly interested in leveraging rat-based insights to understand human diseases. PMID:27736745

  5. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what's wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to control

  6. Acquired cold urticaria: Clinical features, particular phenotypes, and disease course in a tertiary care center cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deza, Gustavo; Brasileiro, Ana; Bertolín-Colilla, Marta; Curto-Barredo, Laia; Pujol, Ramon M; Giménez-Arnau, Ana M

    2016-11-01

    Data about special phenotypes, natural course, and prognostic variables of patients with acquired cold urticaria (ACU) are scarce. We sought to describe the clinical features and disease course of patients with ACU, with special attention paid to particular phenotypes, and to examine possible parameters that could predict the evolution of the disease. This study was a retrospective chart review of 74 patients with ACU who visited a tertiary referral center of urticaria between 2005 and 2015. Fourteen patients (18.9%) presented with life-threatening reactions after cold exposure, and 21 (28.4%) showed negative results after cold stimulation tests (classified as atypical ACU). Nineteen patients (25.7%) achieved complete symptoms resolution at the end of the surveillance period and had no subsequent recurrences. Higher rates of atypical ACU along with a lower likelihood of achieving complete symptom resolution was observed in patients who had an onset of symptoms during childhood (P urticaria threshold values were found to be related to disease evolution (P < .05). This study was limited by its retrospective nature. The knowledge of the clinical predictors of the disease evolution along with the clinical features of ACU phenotypes would allow for the establishment of an early and proper therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Aberrant phenotypes of transgenic mice expressing dimeric human erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Seong-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dimeric human erythropoietin (dHuEPO peptides are reported to exhibit significantly higher biological activity than the monomeric form of recombinant EPO. The objective of this study was to produce transgenic (tg mice expressing dHuEPO and to investigate the characteristics of these mice. Methods A dHuEPO-expressing vector under the control of the goat beta-casein promoter, which produced a dimer of human EPO molecules linked by a 2-amino acid peptide linker (Asp-Ile, was constructed and injected into 1-cell fertilized embryos by microinjection. Mice were screened using genomic DNA samples obtained from tail biopsies. Blood samples were obtained by heart puncture using heparinized tubes, and hematologic parameters were assessed. Using the microarray analysis tool, we analyzed differences in gene expression in the spleens of tg and control mice. Results A high rate of spontaneous abortion or death of the offspring was observed in the recipients of dHuEPO embryos. We obtained 3 founder lines (#4, #11, and #47 of tg mice expressing the dHuEPO gene. However, only one founder line showed stable germline integration and transmission, subsequently establishing the only transgenic line (#11. We obtained 2 F1 mice and 3 F2 mice from line #11. The dHuEPO protein could not be obtained because of repeated spontaneous abortions in the tg mice. Tg mice exhibited symptoms such as short lifespan and abnormal blood composition. The red blood cell count, white blood cell count, and hematocrit levels in the tg mice were remarkably higher than those in the control mice. The spleens of the tg mice (F1 and F2 females were 11- and -21-fold larger than those of the control mice. Microarray analysis revealed 2,672 spleen-derived candidate genes; more genes were downregulated than upregulated (849/764. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were used for validating the results of the microarray

  8. Human KATP channelopathies: diseases of metabolic homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Assembly of an inward rectifier K+ channel pore (Kir6.1/Kir6.2) and an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding regulatory subunit (SUR1/SUR2A/SUR2B) forms ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel heteromultimers, widely distributed in metabolically active tissues throughout the body. KATP channels are metabolism-gated biosensors functioning as molecular rheostats that adjust membrane potential-dependent functions to match cellular energetic demands. Vital in the adaptive response to (patho)physiological stress, KATP channels serve a homeostatic role ranging from glucose regulation to cardioprotection. Accordingly, genetic variation in KATP channel subunits has been linked to the etiology of life-threatening human diseases. In particular, pathogenic mutations in KATP channels have been identified in insulin secretion disorders, namely, congenital hyperinsulinism and neonatal diabetes. Moreover, KATP channel defects underlie the triad of developmental delay, epilepsy, and neonatal diabetes (DEND syndrome). KATP channelopathies implicated in patients with mechanical and/or electrical heart disease include dilated cardiomyopathy (with ventricular arrhythmia; CMD1O) and adrenergic atrial fibrillation. A common Kir6.2 E23K polymorphism has been associated with late-onset diabetes and as a risk factor for maladaptive cardiac remodeling in the community-at-large and abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise stress performance in patients with heart failure. The overall mutation frequency within KATP channel genes and the spectrum of genotype–phenotype relationships remain to be established, while predicting consequences of a deficit in channel function is becoming increasingly feasible through systems biology approaches. Thus, advances in molecular medicine in the emerging field of human KATP channelopathies offer new opportunities for targeted individualized screening, early diagnosis, and tailored therapy. PMID:20033705

  9. Evaluation of haptoglobin phenotypes in association with clinical features of patients suffered from preterm labor disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ali Khazaei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth means the birth before thirty seven week of pregnancy that causes a lot of complications for the baby. Variety factors are suggested to be involved in disease. In this study, we decided to evaluate haptoglobin (Hp phenotypes association with clinical features of patients suffered from premature delivery to understand better the possible correlation of genetic and clinical features in this disease. This cross-sectional analytic descriptive study has been carried out in two groups of 120 women, 60 with preterm and 60 with term labor. Patients were selected with previously diagnosed by gynecologist with preterm birth in the labor during the study period. After performing diagnostic tests, the frequency of each haptoglobin phenotype in the two groups was analyzed using the Chi-square test (X2 test and SPSS software. The maximum serum haptoglobin phenotype frequency in patients with Hp2-2, was 43 (71.7% whereas in healthy individuals, 35 (58.3%. No, statistically significant differences between the two groups were found (p=0.310. But based on some patients clinical features such as their history of preterm delivery, previous history of recurrent abortions and history of preterm delivery in their family, significant association was found with Hp2-2 compared with healthy control (p<0.003. This study showed that Hp2-2 phenotypes levels in the case group was higher than in control but the factors influencing the presence or absence of preterm labor is clinically various.

  10. Association of haptoglobin phenotypes with clinical features of preterm labor disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ali Khazaei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth means the birth before thirty seven week of pregnancy that causes a lot of complications for the baby. Variety factors are suggested to be involved in disease. In this study, we decided to evaluate haptoglobin (Hp phenotypes association with clinical features of patients suffered from premature delivery to understand better the possible correlation of genetic and clinical features in this disease. This cross sectional analytic descriptive study has been carried out in two groups of 120 women, 60 with preterm and 60 with term labor. Patients were selected with previously diagnosed by a gynecologist with preterm birth in hospital during the study period. After performing diagnostic tests, the frequency of each haptoglobin phenotype in the two groups was analyzed using the X2 test and SPSS software. The maximum serum haptoglobin phenotype frequency in patients with Hp2-2, was 43 (71.7% whereas in healthy individuals, 35 (58.3%. No statistically significant differences between the two groups was found (P=0.310. But based on some patients clinical features such as their history of preterm delivery, previous history of recurrent abortions and history of preterm delivery in their family, significant association was found with Hp2-2 compared with healthy control (P<0.003. This study showed that Hp2-2 phenotypes levels in the case group was higher than in control but the factors influencing the presence or absence of preterm labor is clinically various.

  11. [Phenotypic characterization and distribution of Yersinia in human and environmental samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Castillo, F; Larraz, V; Asunción Lafarga, M; Navarro, M; Gómez-Lus, R

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of species and phenotypes of Yersinia isolated from environmental samples over an eight year period are compared to that of stool cultures obtained from patients of the same geographical location (Zaragoza, Spain). The number of samples and the percentage contamination were as follows: wastewater 362, 67.4%, freshwater 523, 13.4%, raw food 607, 24.5% and cooked food 1134, 7.9%. Yersinia enterocolitica was isolated significantly more frequently than other species in wastewater, while Yersinia intermedia was the most significant species found in freshwater. Significant differences between the percentage isolates of identified species in raw and cooked foods were not found. Fifteen different serogroups were identified from faeces, thirteen of which were also isolated from environmental samples. Three serogroups of Y. enterocolitica associated with human disease were isolated from the patients faeces as follows: O:3, 145 cases; O:8, 3 cases and O:5,27, 1 case. A low proportion were isolated from food: O:3, 3 strains; O:8, 2 strains and O:5,27, 5 strains. Only one isolate from serogroup O:3 was obtained from freshwater.

  12. Aberrant Phenotype in Human Endothelial Cells of Diabetic Origin: Implications for Saphenous Vein Graft Failure?

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    Anna C. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2DM confers increased risk of endothelial dysfunction, coronary heart disease, and vulnerability to vein graft failure after bypass grafting, despite glycaemic control. This study explored the concept that endothelial cells (EC cultured from T2DM and nondiabetic (ND patients are phenotypically and functionally distinct. Cultured human saphenous vein- (SV- EC were compared between T2DM and ND patients in parallel. Proliferation, migration, and in vitro angiogenesis assays were performed; western blotting was used to quantify phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, and eNOS. The ability of diabetic stimuli (hyperglycaemia, TNF-α, and palmitate to modulate angiogenic potential of ND-EC was also explored. T2DM-EC displayed reduced migration (~30% and angiogenesis (~40% compared with ND-EC and a modest, nonsignificant trend to reduced proliferation. Significant inhibition of Akt and eNOS, but not ERK phosphorylation, was observed in T2DM cells. Hyperglycaemia did not modify ND-EC function, but TNF-α and palmitate significantly reduced angiogenic capacity (by 27% and 43%, resp., effects mimicked by Akt inhibition. Aberrancies of EC function may help to explain the increased risk of SV graft failure in T2DM patients. This study highlights the importance of other potentially contributing factors in addition to hyperglycaemia that may inflict injury and long-term dysfunction to the homeostatic capacity of the endothelium.

  13. Aberrant phenotype in human endothelial cells of diabetic origin: implications for saphenous vein graft failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Anna C; Gohil, Jai; Hudson, Laura; Connolly, Kyle; Warburton, Philip; Suman, Rakesh; O'Toole, Peter; O'Regan, David J; Turner, Neil A; Riches, Kirsten; Porter, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) confers increased risk of endothelial dysfunction, coronary heart disease, and vulnerability to vein graft failure after bypass grafting, despite glycaemic control. This study explored the concept that endothelial cells (EC) cultured from T2DM and nondiabetic (ND) patients are phenotypically and functionally distinct. Cultured human saphenous vein- (SV-) EC were compared between T2DM and ND patients in parallel. Proliferation, migration, and in vitro angiogenesis assays were performed; western blotting was used to quantify phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, and eNOS. The ability of diabetic stimuli (hyperglycaemia, TNF-α, and palmitate) to modulate angiogenic potential of ND-EC was also explored. T2DM-EC displayed reduced migration (~30%) and angiogenesis (~40%) compared with ND-EC and a modest, nonsignificant trend to reduced proliferation. Significant inhibition of Akt and eNOS, but not ERK phosphorylation, was observed in T2DM cells. Hyperglycaemia did not modify ND-EC function, but TNF-α and palmitate significantly reduced angiogenic capacity (by 27% and 43%, resp.), effects mimicked by Akt inhibition. Aberrancies of EC function may help to explain the increased risk of SV graft failure in T2DM patients. This study highlights the importance of other potentially contributing factors in addition to hyperglycaemia that may inflict injury and long-term dysfunction to the homeostatic capacity of the endothelium.

  14. Effect of human epididymis protein 4 gene silencing on the malignant phenotype in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Shu-li; CUI Heng; CHANG Xiao-hong; YE Xue; CHENG Hong-yan; CHENG Ye-xia; TANG Zhi-jian; ZHANG Zu-juan; GAO Li; CHEN Xin-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) has been proved to be a promising novel biomarker for the detection of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Compared with CA125, HE4 assay demonstrated an improved ability to discriminate between pelvic mass with malignant and benign disease. Though it is well known that HE4 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, however, the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer remains unkown.Methods In this study, we explored the role of HE4 in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancer. We screened nine ovarian cancer cell lines for HE4 expression, and using RNA interference (RNAi), we silenced HE4 gene expression in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cell lines. We assessed the effect of HE4 gene silencing on the transformed phenotype by examining the cell cycle, apoptosis, proliferation and transwell migration/invasion in vitro.Results HE4 gene silencing induces G0/G1 arrest and blocks the progression from the G1 to S phase in CaoV3 and SKOV3.ip1 cells. HE4 knockdown also inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in SKOV3.ip1 cells in vitro.Conclusion HE4 may be involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and promote ovarian cancer migration and invasion.

  15. Acquiring Chondrocyte Phenotype from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Inflammatory Conditions

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    Masahiro Kondo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An inflammatory milieu breaks down the cartilage matrix and induces chondrocyte apoptosis, resulting in cartilage destruction in patients with cartilage degenerative diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Because of the limited regenerative ability of chondrocytes, defects in cartilage are irreversible and difficult to repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are expected to be a new tool for cartilage repair because they are present in the cartilage and are able to differentiate into multiple lineages of cells, including chondrocytes. Although clinical trials using MSCs for patients with cartilage defects have already begun, its efficacy and repair mechanisms remain unknown. A PubMed search conducted in October 2014 using the following medical subject headings (MeSH terms: mesenchymal stromal cells, chondrogenesis, and cytokines resulted in 204 articles. The titles and abstracts were screened and nine articles relevant to “inflammatory” cytokines and “human” MSCs were identified. Herein, we review the cell biology and mechanisms of chondrocyte phenotype acquisition from human MSCs in an inflammatory milieu and discuss the clinical potential of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  16. Phenotypes and karyotypes of human malignant mesothelioma cell lines.

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    Vandana Relan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumour of serosal surfaces most commonly pleura. Characterised cell lines represent a valuable tool to study the biology of mesothelioma. The aim of this study was to develop and biologically characterise six malignant mesothelioma cell lines to evaluate their potential as models of human malignant mesothelioma. METHODS: Five lines were initiated from pleural biopsies, and one from pleural effusion of patients with histologically proven malignant mesothelioma. Mesothelial origin was assessed by standard morphology, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and immunocytochemistry. Growth characteristics were assayed using population doubling times. Spectral karyotyping was performed to assess chromosomal abnormalities. Authentication of donor specific derivation was undertaken by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of SNPs. RESULTS: Most of cell lines exhibited spindle cell shape, with some retaining stellate shapes. At passage 2 to 6 all lines stained positively for calretinin and cytokeratin 19, and demonstrated capacity for anchorage-independent growth. At passage 4 to 16, doubling times ranged from 30-72 hours, and on spectral karyotyping all lines exhibited numerical chromosomal abnormalities ranging from 41 to 113. Monosomy of chromosomes 8, 14, 22 or 17 was observed in three lines. One line displayed four different karyotypes at passage 8, but only one karyotype at passage 42, and another displayed polyploidy at passage 40 which was not present at early passages. At passages 5-17, TEM showed characteristic features of mesothelioma ultrastructure in all lines including microvilli and tight intercellular junctions. CONCLUSION: These six cell lines exhibit varying cell morphology, a range of doubling times, and show diverse passage-dependent structural chromosomal changes observed in malignant tumours. However they retain characteristic immunocytochemical protein expression profiles of

  17. Recent genetic discoveries implicating ion channels in human cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Alfred L

    2014-04-01

    The term 'channelopathy' refers to human genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding ion channels or their interacting proteins. Recent advances in this field have been enabled by next-generation DNA sequencing strategies such as whole exome sequencing with several intriguing and unexpected discoveries. This review highlights important discoveries implicating ion channels or ion channel modulators in cardiovascular disorders including cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility, cardiac conduction phenotypes, pulmonary and systemic hypertension. These recent discoveries further emphasize the importance of ion channels in the pathophysiology of human disease and as important druggable targets.

  18. A case of childhood Pompe disease demonstrating phenotypic variability of p.Asp645Asn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroos, Marian A; Kirschner, Janbernd; Gellerich, Frank N; Hermans, Monique M P; Van Der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J; Korinthenberg, Rudolf

    2004-06-01

    A six-year-old child presented at 8 months of age with proximal muscle weakness and mild cardiac hypertrophy. Some alpha-glucosidase activity was detected in muscle but not in fibroblasts. As none of the two pathogenic mutations, [c.1933G>A]+[c.2702T>A] (Asp645Asn/Leu901Gln), led to detectable alpha-glucosidase activity upon expression in COS cells, the phenotype of the patient remained unexplained. A functionally comparable set of mutations, Asp645Asn/insGnt2243, was reported previously to cause classic infantile Pompe disease [Biochem Biophys Res Commun 244 (1998) 921]. We conclude that secondary genetic or environmental factors can be decisive for the phenotypic outcome of classic infantile versus childhood Pompe disease, when the acid alpha-glucosidase activity is extremely low.

  19. Disease Ontology 2015 update: an expanded and updated database of human diseases for linking biomedical knowledge through disease data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbe, Warren A; Arze, Cesar; Felix, Victor; Mitraka, Elvira; Bolton, Evan; Fu, Gang; Mungall, Christopher J; Binder, Janos X; Malone, James; Vasant, Drashtti; Parkinson, Helen; Schriml, Lynn M

    2015-01-01

    The current version of the Human Disease Ontology (DO) (http://www.disease-ontology.org) database expands the utility of the ontology for the examination and comparison of genetic variation, phenotype, protein, drug and epitope data through the lens of human disease. DO is a biomedical resource of standardized common and rare disease concepts with stable identifiers organized by disease etiology. The content of DO has had 192 revisions since 2012, including the addition of 760 terms. Thirty-two percent of all terms now include definitions. DO has expanded the number and diversity of research communities and community members by 50+ during the past two years. These community members actively submit term requests, coordinate biomedical resource disease representation and provide expert curation guidance. Since the DO 2012 NAR paper, there have been hundreds of term requests and a steady increase in the number of DO listserv members, twitter followers and DO website usage. DO is moving to a multi-editor model utilizing Protégé to curate DO in web ontology language. This will enable closer collaboration with the Human Phenotype Ontology, EBI's Ontology Working Group, Mouse Genome Informatics and the Monarch Initiative among others, and enhance DO's current asserted view and multiple inferred views through reasoning. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Modeling Cardiovascular Diseases with Patient-Specific Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Paul W.; Diecke, Sebastian; Matsa, Elena; Sharma, Arun; Wu, Haodi; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a source of cells that accurately recapitulate the human cardiac pathophysiology. The application of these cells allows for modeling of cardiovascular diseases, providing a novel understanding of human disease mechanisms and assessment of therapies. Here, we describe a stepwise protocol developed in our laboratory for the generation of hiPSCs from patients with a specific disease phenotype, long-term hiPSC culture and cryopreservation, differentiation of hiPSCs to cardiomyocytes, and assessment of disease phenotypes. Our protocol combines a number of innovative tools that include a codon-optimized mini intronic plasmid (CoMiP), chemically defined culture conditions to achieve high efficiencies of reprogramming and differentiation, and calcium imaging for assessment of cardiomyocyte phenotypes. Thus, this protocol provides a complete guide to use a patient cohort on a testable cardiomyocyte platform for pharmacological drug assessment. PMID:25690476

  1. From pluripotent stem cells to multifunctional cordocytic phenotypes in the human brain: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Viorel; Danaila, Leon; Pais, Emil

    2012-08-01

    Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate surgical cases in a variety of pathological conditions (thromboses, tumors, cerebrovascular malformations, Moyamoya disease) to identify and characterize different phenotypes belonging to a new interstitial cell recently described ultrastructurally in the brain and here named "cordocyte." Also, this work is an attempt to identify and characterize precursor/stem cells for cordocytic lineage in the perivascular areas, within perivascular nerves and pia mater (now considered a cordocytic-vascular tissue). Unexpected relationships and functions emerge from observations concerning these phenotypes, almost ubiquitous, but not yet fully studied in the brain.

  2. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra [Max Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Center of Molecular Medicine (CMMC) and Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); MPI for Neurological Research, Laboratory for Gene Therapy and Molecular Imaging, Cologne (Germany); Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro [University of California Los Angeles (United States). Department of Medicine

    2005-12-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being

  3. Phenotype of adult Refsum disease due to a defect in peroxin 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, M A; van den Brink, D M; Wanders, R J A; Duran, M; Poll-The, B T; Tallaksen, C M E; Stokke, O H; Moser, H; Skjeldal, O H

    2007-02-27

    The biochemical hallmark of adult Refsum disease (ARD) is an isolated deficiency in the breakdown of phytanic acid. This usually results from a PHYH gene defect, although some cases have been found to carry a PEX7 defect. We describe the phenotype of such a patient, indistinguishable from that of classic ARD. Hence, we propose the subdivision of ARD into type 1 and type 2, depending on which gene is defective.

  4. Dynamic cyclic compression modulates the chondrogenic phenotype in human chondrocytes from late stage osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Hua Jia; Fung, Hon Sing; Yeung, Pan; Lam, K L; Yan, Chun Hoi; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2017-02-16

    Human osteoarthritic chondrocytes (hOACs) are characterized by their "dedifferentiated" and catabolic phenotype and lack the ability for restoring their inherent functions by themselves. Here we investigated whether extrinsically supplemented mechanical signal via compression loading would affect the phenotype of hOACs. Specifically, we applied cyclic compression loading on cultured hOACs-collagen constructs and measured the expression of the major chondrogenic factors, cell-matrix interaction molecules and matrix degradation enzymes. Dynamic compression loading stimulates the expression and nuclear localization of sox9 in hOACs and reduces the catabolic events via downregulated expression of collagenases. These results contribute to better understanding towards mechanoregulation of hOACs.

  5. Mutations in Two Genes Encoding Different Subunits of a Receptor Signaling Complex Result in an Identical Disease Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloneva, Juha; Manninen, Tuula; Christman, Grant; Hovanes, Karine; Mandelin, Jami; Adolfsson, Rolf; Bianchin, Marino; Bird, Thomas; Miranda, Roxana; Salmaggi, Andrea; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Konttinen, Yrjö; Peltonen, Leena

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy (PLOSL), also known as “Nasu-Hakola disease,” is a globally distributed recessively inherited disease leading to death during the 5th decade of life and is characterized by early-onset progressive dementia and bone cysts. Elsewhere, we have identified PLOSL mutations in TYROBP (DAP12), which codes for a membrane receptor component in natural-killer and myeloid cells, and also have identified genetic heterogeneity in PLOSL, with some patients carrying no mutations in TYROBP. Here we complete the molecular pathology of PLOSL by identifying TREM2 as the second PLOSL gene. TREM2 forms a receptor signaling complex with TYROBP and triggers activation of the immune responses in macrophages and dendritic cells. Patients with PLOSL have no defects in cell-mediated immunity, suggesting a remarkable capacity of the human immune system to compensate for the inactive TYROBP-mediated activation pathway. Our data imply that the TYROBP-mediated signaling pathway plays a significant role in human brain and bone tissue and provide an interesting example of how mutations in two different subunits of a multisubunit receptor complex result in an identical human disease phenotype. PMID:12080485

  6. Expression of ZFX gene correlated with the central features of the neoplastic phenotype in human brain tumors with distinct phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzali, Azita; Emadi-Baygi, Modjtaba; Nikpour, Parvaneh; Nazemroaya, Fatemehe; Kheirollahi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor zinc finger protein, X-linked (ZFX) acts as an important director of self-renewal in several stem cell types. Moreover, ZFX expression abnormally increases in various cancers and relates to tumor grade. We performed this study, to examine its role in the pathogenesis of astrocytoma and meningioma. We used real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for evaluation of ZFX expression in 25 astrocytoma tumoral tissue and 25 meningioma tumoral tissues with different WHO grades. Furthermore, the association of gene expression with various clinic-pathological characteristics was examined. We found that there is a significant association between gene expression and different tumor grades, the presence or absence of invasion, forming and nonforming of glomeruloid vessels, the age over or under 50 and the presence or absence of calcification in astrocytomas. This is the first report that shows that ZFX was directly correlated with the central features of the neoplastic phenotype, including the growth of cancer cells, angiogenesis, and invasion. Regarding all the above-mentioned studies, it is highly plausible that silencing the expression of ZFX gene in gliomas has a major role in the therapeutic interventions of the disease in future.

  7. DUF1220 domains, cognitive disease, and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, L; Sikela, J M

    2009-01-01

    We have established that human genome sequences encoding a novel protein domain, DUF1220, show a dramatically elevated copy number in the human lineage (>200 copies in humans vs. 1 in mouse/rat) and may be important to human evolutionary adaptation. Copy-number variations (CNVs) in the 1q21.1 region, where most DUF1220 sequences map, have now been implicated in numerous diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction, including autism, autism spectrum disorder, mental retardation, schizophrenia, microcephaly, and macrocephaly. We report here that these disease-related 1q21.1 CNVs either encompass or are directly flanked by DUF1220 sequences and exhibit a dosage-related correlation with human brain size. Microcephaly-producing 1q21.1 CNVs are deletions, whereas macrocephaly-producing 1q21.1 CNVs are duplications. Similarly, 1q21.1 deletions and smaller brain size are linked with schizophrenia, whereas 1q21.1 duplications and larger brain size are associated with autism. Interestingly, these two diseases are thought to be phenotypic opposites. These data suggest a model which proposes that (1) DUF1220 domain copy number may be involved in influencing human brain size and (2) the evolutionary advantage of rapidly increasing DUF1220 copy number in the human lineage has resulted in favoring retention of the high genomic instability of the 1q21.1 region, which, in turn, has precipitated a spectrum of recurrent human brain and developmental disorders.

  8. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human memory T cell responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharaporn Tippayawat

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is an important cause of community-acquired lethal sepsis in endemic regions in southeast Asia and northern Australia and is increasingly reported in other tropical areas. In animal models, production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma is critical for resistance, but in humans the characteristics of IFN-gamma production and the bacterial antigens that are recognized by the cell-mediated immune response have not been defined.Peripheral blood from 133 healthy individuals who lived in the endemic area and had no history of melioidosis, 60 patients who had recovered from melioidosis, and 31 other patient control subjects were stimulated by whole bacteria or purified bacterial proteins in vitro, and IFN-gamma responses were analyzed by ELISPOT and flow cytometry.B. pseudomallei was a potent activator of human peripheral blood NK cells for innate production of IFN-gamma. In addition, healthy individuals with serological evidence of exposure to B. pseudomallei and patients recovered from active melioidosis developed CD4(+ (and CD8(+ T cells that recognized whole bacteria and purified proteins LolC, OppA, and PotF, members of the B. pseudomallei ABC transporter family. This response was primarily mediated by terminally differentiated T cells of the effector-memory (T(EMRA phenotype and correlated with the titer of anti-B. pseudomallei antibodies in the serum.Individuals living in a melioidosis-endemic region show clear evidence of T cell priming for the ability to make IFN-gamma that correlates with their serological status. The ability to detect T cell responses to defined B. pseudomallei proteins in large numbers of individuals now provides the opportunity to screen candidate antigens for inclusion in protein or polysaccharide-conjugate subunit vaccines against this important but neglected disease.

  9. Immune phenotype in children with therapy-nave remitted and relapsed Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aron; Cseh; Barna; Vasarhelyi; Kriszta; Molnar; Balazs; Szalay; Peter; Svec; Andras; Treszl; Antal; Dezsofi; Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos; Andras; Arato; Tivadar; Tulassay; Gabor; Veres

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the prevalence of subpopulations of CD4+ cells along with that of major inhibitor or stimulator cell types in therapy-nave childhood Crohn's disease (CD) and to test whether abnormalities of immune phenotype are normalized with the improvement of clinical signs and symptoms of disease. METHODS: We enrolled 26 pediatric patients with CD. 14 therapy-nave CD children; of those, 10 children remitted on conventional therapy and formed the remission group. We also tested another group of 12...

  10. Components of physical capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with phenotypic expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Márquez-Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Márquez-Martín1, Pilar Cejudo Ramos1, José Luis López-Campos1, María del Pilar Serrano Gotarredona2, Silvia Navarro Herrero2, Rodrigo Tallón Aguilar1, Emilia Barrot Cortes1, Francisco Ortega Ruiz11Medical-Surgical Unit of Respiratory Diseases, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, Spain; 2Radiodiagnostic Unit, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Seville, SpainBackground: More accurate phenotyping of COPD is of great interest since it may have prognostic and therapeutic consequences. We attempted to explore the possible relationship between the extent of emphysema, as assessed by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT, and COPD severity. We also included some study variables involving exercise tolerance evaluation and peripheral muscle strength (PMS measurement.Methods: Sixty-four patients with COPD (mean age 64 ± 7 years were enrolled in a prospective observational cross-sectional study. All patients underwent clinical and functional evaluations: assessment of dyspnea, body mass index (BMI, health status assessment, spirometry testing, and arterial blood gas analysis. The extent of emphysema was graded using HRCT. Functional capacity was evaluated by a cardiopulmonary maximal exercise testing (CPET, the shuttle walking test, and by estimation of PMS.Results: Half of the study patients had an emphysematous phenotype. There was a significant correlation between the score derived from analysis of HRCT images and BMI and respiratory functional parameters, as well as VO2 max (maximal oxygen uptake and chest pull 1RM (1 rep max. Compared with subjects with a nonemphysematous phenotype, those with an emphysematous phenotype showed a lower BMI, a reduced PMS, and displayed a lower power at CPET. Significant differences in lung function tests were found for diffusing capacity and hyperinflation. No significant differences in quality of life were observed between the two study groups.Conclusions: Compared with subjects with

  11. Mechanisms for phenotypic variation in Lesch–Nyhan disease and its variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampat, Radhika; Fu, Rong; Larovere, Laura E.; Torres, Rosa J.; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Fischbach, Michel; de Kremer, Raquel; Schretlen, David J.; Puig, Juan Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Lesch–Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by mutation of the HPRT1 gene on the X chromosome. There is significant variation in the clinical phenotype, with more than 300 different known mutations. There are few studies that have addressed whether similar mutations result in similar phenotypes across different patients because hypoxanthine–guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt) deficiency is rare, and most mutations are unique or limited to individual families. However, recent studies have revealed multiple unrelated patients with similar mutations, providing an opportunity to examine genotype–phenotype correlations. We found significant variation among the clinical features of 10 patients from 8 unrelated families all carrying a mutation replacing guanine with adenine at base position 143 (c.143G>A) in the HPRT1 gene. This mutation results in replacement of arginine by histidine at amino acid position 48 (p.arg48his) in the HGprt enzyme. Biochemically, the enzyme exhibits reduced thermal integrity, a mechanism that may explain clinical variation. The literature reveals similar clinical variation among other patients with similar mutations, although the variation is relatively minor across the whole population of patients. Identifiable sources of clinical variation include known limitations of clinical ascertainment and mechanisms that affect residual enzyme activity and stability. These results are helpful for understanding genotype–phenotype correlations and discordance and likely are applicable to other neurogenetic disorders where similar variation occurs. PMID:20981450

  12. Mechanisms for phenotypic variation in Lesch-Nyhan disease and its variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampat, Radhika; Fu, Rong; Larovere, Laura E; Torres, Rosa J; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Fischbach, Michel; de Kremer, Raquel; Schretlen, David J; Puig, Juan Garcia; Jinnah, H A

    2011-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by mutation of the HPRT1 gene on the X chromosome. There is significant variation in the clinical phenotype, with more than 300 different known mutations. There are few studies that have addressed whether similar mutations result in similar phenotypes across different patients because hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt) deficiency is rare, and most mutations are unique or limited to individual families. However, recent studies have revealed multiple unrelated patients with similar mutations, providing an opportunity to examine genotype-phenotype correlations. We found significant variation among the clinical features of 10 patients from 8 unrelated families all carrying a mutation replacing guanine with adenine at base position 143 (c.143G>A) in the HPRT1 gene. This mutation results in replacement of arginine by histidine at amino acid position 48 (p.arg48his) in the HGprt enzyme. Biochemically, the enzyme exhibits reduced thermal integrity, a mechanism that may explain clinical variation. The literature reveals similar clinical variation among other patients with similar mutations, although the variation is relatively minor across the whole population of patients. Identifiable sources of clinical variation include known limitations of clinical ascertainment and mechanisms that affect residual enzyme activity and stability. These results are helpful for understanding genotype-phenotype correlations and discordance and likely are applicable to other neurogenetic disorders where similar variation occurs.

  13. Gene-metabolite network analysis in different nonalcoholic fatty liver disease phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Lin; Ming, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jing-Yi; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Zeng, Min-De; Mao, Yi-Min

    2017-01-01

    We sought to identify common key regulators and build a gene-metabolite network in different nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) phenotypes. We used a high-fat diet (HFD), a methionine-choline-deficient diet (MCDD) and streptozocin (STZ) to establish nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and NAFL+type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in rat models, respectively. Transcriptomics and metabolomics analyses were performed in rat livers and serum. A functional network-based regulation model was constructed using Cytoscape with information derived from transcriptomics and metabolomics. The results revealed that 96 genes, 17 liver metabolites and 4 serum metabolites consistently changed in different NAFLD phenotypes (>2-fold, PGene-metabolite network analysis identified ccl2 and jun as hubs with the largest connections to other genes, which were mainly involved in tumor necrosis factor, P53, nuclear factor-kappa B, chemokine, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. The specifically regulated genes and metabolites in different NAFLD phenotypes constructed their own networks, which were mainly involved in the lipid and fatty acid metabolism in HFD models, the inflammatory and immune response in MCDD models, and the AMPK signaling pathway and response to insulin in HFD+STZ models. Our study identified networks showing the general and specific characteristics in different NAFLD phenotypes, complementing the genetic and metabolic features in NAFLD with hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. PMID:28082742

  14. Parkinsonian phenotype in Machado-Joseph disease (MJD/SCA3: a two-case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcelos João

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Machado-Joseph disease (MJD, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder of late onset, which is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the coding region of the ATXN3 gene. This disease presents clinical heterogeneity, which cannot be completely explained by the size of the repeat tract. MJD presents extrapyramidal motor signs, namely Parkinsonism, more frequently than the other subtypes of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias. Although Parkinsonism seems to segregate within MJD families, only a few MJD patients develop parkinsonian features and, therefore, the clinical and genetic aspects of these rare presentations remain poorly investigated. The main goal of this work was to describe two MJD patients displaying the parkinsonian triad (tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity, namely on what concerns genetic variation in Parkinson's disease (PD associated loci (PARK2, LRRK2, PINK1, DJ-1, SNCA, MAPT, APOE, and mtDNA tRNAGln T4336C. Case presentation Patient 1 is a 40 year-old female (onset at 30 years of age, initially with a pure parkinsonian phenotype (similar to the phenotype previously reported for her mother. Patient 2 is a 38 year-old male (onset at 33 years of age, presenting an ataxic phenotype with parkinsonian features (not seen either in other affected siblings or in his father. Both patients presented an expanded ATXN3 allele with 72 CAG repeats. No PD mutations were found in the analyzed loci. However, allelic variants previously associated with PD were observed in DJ-1 and APOE genes, for both patients. Conclusions The present report adds clinical and genetic information on this particular and rare MJD presentation, and raises the hypothesis that DJ-1 and APOE polymorphisms may confer susceptibility to the parkinsonian phenotype in MJD.

  15. Alzheimer's disease in a dish: promises and challenges of human stem cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jessica E; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-10-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into disease-relevant cell types, which capture the unique genome of an individual patient and provide insight into pathological mechanisms of human disease. Recently, human stem cell models for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative dementia, have been described. Stem cell-derived neurons from patients with familial and sporadic AD and Down's syndrome recapitulate human disease phenotypes such as amyloid β peptide production, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein and endosomal abnormalities. Treatment of human neurons with small molecules can modulate these phenotypes, demonstrating the utility of this system for drug development and screening. This review will highlight the current AD stem cell models and discuss the remaining challenges and potential future directions of this field.

  16. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Constanza J; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L; Bennett, C Frank; Shelton, G Diane; Cleveland, Don W; La Spada, Albert R

    2014-04-16

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments.

  17. Infectious prion diseases in humans: cannibalism, iatrogenicity and zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïk, Stéphane; Brandel, Jean-Philippe

    2014-08-01

    In contrast with other neurodegenerative disorders associated to protein misfolding, human prion diseases include infectious forms (also called transmitted forms) such as kuru, iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The transmissible agent is thought to be solely composed of the abnormal isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host-encoded prion protein that accumulated in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Compared to its normal counterpart, PrP(Sc) is β-sheet enriched and aggregated and its propagation is based on an autocatalytic conversion process. Increasing evidence supports the view that conformational variations of PrP(Sc) encoded the biological properties of the various prion strains that have been isolated by transmission studies in experimental models. Infectious forms of human prion diseases played a pivotal role in the emergence of the prion concept and in the characterization of the very unconventional properties of prions. They provide a unique model to understand how prion strains are selected and propagate in humans. Here, we review and discuss how genetic factors interplay with strain properties and route of transmission to influence disease susceptibility, incubation period and phenotypic expression in the light of the kuru epidemics due to ritual endocannibalism, the various series iatrogenic diseases secondary to extractive growth hormone treatment or dura mater graft and the epidemics of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease linked to dietary exposure to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

  18. Inherited determinants of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleynen, Isabelle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Jostins, Luke; Schumm, L Philip; Zeissig, Sebastian; Ahmad, Tariq; Andersen, Vibeke; Andrews, Jane M; Annese, Vito; Brand, Stephan; Brant, Steven R; Cho, Judy H; Daly, Mark J; Dubinsky, Marla; Duerr, Richard H; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Franke, Andre; Gearry, Richard B; Goyette, Philippe; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hov, Johannes R; Huang, Hailang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Kupcinskas, Limas; Lawrance, Ian C; Lee, James C; Satsangi, Jack; Schreiber, Stephan; Théâtre, Emilie; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Weersma, Rinse K; Wilson, David C; Parkes, Miles; Vermeire, Severine; Rioux, John D; Mansfield, John; Silverberg, Mark S; Radford-Smith, Graham; McGovern, Dermot P B; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lees, Charlie W

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease; treatment strategies have historically been determined by this binary categorisation. Genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease, mostly shared between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. We undertook the largest genotype association study, to date, in widely used clinical subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease with the goal of further understanding the biological relations between diseases. Methods This study included patients from 49 centres in 16 countries in Europe, North America, and Australasia. We applied the Montreal classification system of inflammatory bowel disease subphenotypes to 34 819 patients (19 713 with Crohn's disease, 14 683 with ulcerative colitis) genotyped on the Immunochip array. We tested for genotype–phenotype associations across 156 154 genetic variants. We generated genetic risk scores by combining information from all known inflammatory bowel disease associations to summarise the total load of genetic risk for a particular phenotype. We used these risk scores to test the hypothesis that colonic Crohn's disease, ileal Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis are all genetically distinct from each other, and to attempt to identify patients with a mismatch between clinical diagnosis and genetic risk profile. Findings After quality control, the primary analysis included 29 838 patients (16 902 with Crohn's disease, 12 597 with ulcerative colitis). Three loci (NOD2, MHC, and MST1 3p21) were associated with subphenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease, mainly disease location (essentially fixed over time; median follow-up of 10·5 years). Little or no genetic association with disease behaviour (which changed dramatically over time) remained after conditioning on disease location and age at onset. The genetic risk score representing all known risk alleles for

  19. The interpretation of disease phenotypes to identify TSE strains following murine bioassay: characterisation of classical scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Katy E; Vickery, Christopher M; Lockey, Richard; Holder, Thomas; Thorne, Leigh; Terry, Linda A; Denyer, Margaret; Webb, Paul; Simmons, Marion M; Spiropoulos, John

    2012-11-01

    Mouse bioassay can be readily employed for strain typing of naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy cases. Classical scrapie strains have been characterised historically based on the established methodology of assessing incubation period of disease and the distribution of disease-specific vacuolation across the brain following strain stabilisation in a given mouse line. More recent research has shown that additional methods could be used to characterise strains and thereby expand the definition of strain "phenotype". Here we present the phenotypic characteristics of classical scrapie strains isolated from 24 UK ovine field cases through the wild-type mouse bioassay. PrPSc immunohistochemistry (IHC), paraffin embedded tissue blots (PET-blot) and Western blotting approaches were used to determine the neuroanatomical distribution and molecular profile of PrPSc associated with each strain, in conjunction with traditional methodologies. Results revealed three strains isolated through each mouse line, including a previously unidentified strain. Moreover IHC and PET-blot methodologies were effective in characterising the strain-associated types and neuroanatomical locations of PrPSc. The use of Western blotting as a parameter to define classical scrapie strains was limited. These data provide a comprehensive description of classical scrapie strain phenotypes on isolation through the mouse bioassay that can provide a reference for further scrapie strain identification.

  20. Extending Injury- and Disease-Resistant CNS Phenotypes by Repetitive Epigenetic Conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Gidday

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant reductions in the extent of acute injury in the CNS can be achieved by exposure to different preconditioning stimuli, but the duration of the induced protective phenotype is typically short-lasting, and thus is deemed as limiting its clinical applicability. Extending the period over which such adaptive epigenetic changes persist – in effect, expanding conditioning’s therapeutic window – would significantly broaden the potential applications of such a treatment approach in patients. The frequency of the conditioning stimulus may hold the key. While transient (1-3 days protection against CNS ischemic injury is well established preclinically following a single preconditioning stimulus, repetitively presenting preconditioning stimuli extends the duration of ischemic tolerance by many weeks. Moreover, repetitive intermittent postconditioning enhances postischemic recovery metrics and improves long-term survival. Intermittent conditioning is also efficacious for preventing or delaying injury in preclinical models of chronic neurodegenerative disease, and for promoting long-lasting functional improvements in a number of other pathologies as well. Although the detailed mechanisms underlying these protracted kinds of neuroplasticity remain largely unstudied, accumulating empirical evidence supports the contention that all of these adaptive phenotypes are epigenetically mediated. Going forward, additional preclinical demonstrations of the ability to induce sustained beneficial phenotypes that reduce the burden of acute and chronic neurodegeneration, and experimental interrogations of the regulatory constructs responsible for these epigenetic responses, will accelerate the identification of not only efficacious, but practical, adaptive epigenetics-based treatments for individuals with neurological disease.

  1. High frequency of Fredrickson's phenotypes IV and IIb in Brazilians infected by human immunodeficiency virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Helena CF

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is very prevalent in Brazil. HIV therapy has been recently associated with coronary heart disease (CHD. Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for CHD that is frequently described in HIV positive patients, but very few studies have been conducted in Brazilian patients evaluating their lipid profiles. Methods In the present work, we evaluated the frequency and severity of dyslipidemia in 257 Brazilian HIV positive patients. Two hundred and thirty-eight (93% were submitted to antiretroviral therapy (224 treated with protease inhibitors plus nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, 14 treated only with the latter, 12 naive and 7 had no records of treatment. The average time on drug treatment with antiretroviral therapy was 20 months. None of the patients was under lipid lowering drugs. Cholesterol, triglyceride, phospholipid and free fatty acids were determined by enzymatic colorimetric methods. Lipoprotein profile was estimated by the Friedewald formula and Fredrickson's phenotyping was obtained by serum electrophoresis on agarose. Apolipoprotein B and AI and lipoprotein "a" were measured by nephelometry. Results The Fredrickson phenotypes were: type IIb (51%, IV (41%, IIa (7%. In addition one patient was type III and another type V. Thirty-three percent of all HIV+ patients presented serum cholesterol levels ≥ 200 mg/dL, 61% LDL-cholesterol ≥ 100 mg/dL, 65% HDL-cholesterol below 40 mg/dL, 46% triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dL and 10% have all these parameters above the limits. Eighty-six percent of patients had cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio ≥ 3.5, 22% increased lipoprotein "a", 79% increased free fatty acids and 9% increased phospholipids. The treatment with protease inhibitors plus nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors increased the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in these patients when compared with naïve patients. The HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.01 and

  2. Supporting the annotation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) phenotypes with text mining workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao; Batista-Navarro, Riza; Rak, Rafal; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a life-threatening lung disorder whose recent prevalence has led to an increasing burden on public healthcare. Phenotypic information in electronic clinical records is essential in providing suitable personalised treatment to patients with COPD. However, as phenotypes are often "hidden" within free text in clinical records, clinicians could benefit from text mining systems that facilitate their prompt recognition. This paper reports on a semi-automatic methodology for producing a corpus that can ultimately support the development of text mining tools that, in turn, will expedite the process of identifying groups of COPD patients. A corpus of 30 full-text papers was formed based on selection criteria informed by the expertise of COPD specialists. We developed an annotation scheme that is aimed at producing fine-grained, expressive and computable COPD annotations without burdening our curators with a highly complicated task. This was implemented in the Argo platform by means of a semi-automatic annotation workflow that integrates several text mining tools, including a graphical user interface for marking up documents. When evaluated using gold standard (i.e., manually validated) annotations, the semi-automatic workflow was shown to obtain a micro-averaged F-score of 45.70% (with relaxed matching). Utilising the gold standard data to train new concept recognisers, we demonstrated that our corpus, although still a work in progress, can foster the development of significantly better performing COPD phenotype extractors. We describe in this work the means by which we aim to eventually support the process of COPD phenotype curation, i.e., by the application of various text mining tools integrated into an annotation workflow. Although the corpus being described is still under development, our results thus far are encouraging and show great potential in stimulating the development of further automatic COPD phenotype extractors.

  3. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Genetically Modified Pig Models for Human Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nana Fan; Liangxue Lai

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified animal models are important for understanding the pathogenesis of human disease and developing therapeutic strategies.Although genetically modified mice have been widely used to model human diseases,some of these mouse models do not replicate important disease symptoms or pathology.Pigs are more similar to humans than mice in anatomy,physiology,and genome.Thus,pigs are considered to be better animal models to mimic some human diseases.This review describes genetically modified pigs that have been used to model various diseases including neurological,cardiovascular,and diabetic disorders.We also discuss the development in gene modification technology that can facilitate the generation of transgenic pig models for human diseases.

  5. Human platelet releasates combined with polyglycolic acid scaffold promote chondrocyte differentiation and phenotypic maintenance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Giulia Bernardini; Federico Chellini; Bruno Frediani; Adriano Spreafico; Annalisa Santucci

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the differentiating properties of platelet-rich plasma releasates (PRPr) on human chondrocytes seeded on a polygtlycolic acid (PGA) 3D scaffold. Gene expression and biochemical analysis were carried out to assess the improved quality of our PGA-based cartilage constructs supplemented with PRPr. We observed that the use of PRPr as cell cultures supplementation to PGA-chondrocyte constructs may promote chondrocyte differentiation, and thus may contribute to maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype longer than conventional supplementation by increasing high levels of important chondrogenic markers (e.g. sox9, aggrecan and type II collagen), without induction of type I collagen. Moreover, our constructs were analysed for the secretion and deposition of important ECM molecules (sGAG, type II collagen, etc.). Our results indicate that PRPr supplementation may synergize with PGA-based scaffolds to stimulate human articular chondrocyte differentiation, maturation and phenotypic maintenance.

  6. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Dean BOUDOULAS; Peter J MOHLER

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects ("channelopathies" - the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2),ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAPg), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease.

  7. A critical window of CAG repeat-length correlates with phenotype severity in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Damian M; Alaghband, Yasaman; Hickey, Miriam A; Joshi, Prasad R; Hong, S Candice; Zhu, Chunni; Ando, Timothy K; André, Véronique M; Cepeda, Carlos; Watson, Joseph B; Levine, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The R6/2 mouse is the most frequently used model for experimental and preclinical drug trials in Huntington's disease (HD). When the R6/2 mouse was first developed, it carried exon 1 of the huntingtin gene with ~150 cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) repeats. The model presented with a rapid and aggressive phenotype that shared many features with the human condition and was particularly similar to juvenile HD. However, instability in the CAG repeat length due to different breeding practices has led to both decreases and increases in average CAG repeat lengths among colonies. Given the inverse relationship in human HD between CAG repeat length and age at onset and to a degree, the direct relationship with severity of disease, we have investigated the effect of altered CAG repeat length. Four lines, carrying ~110, ~160, ~210, and ~310 CAG repeats, were examined using a battery of tests designed to assess the basic R6/2 phenotype. These included electrophysiological properties of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons, motor activity, inclusion formation, and protein expression. The results showed an unpredicted, inverted "U-shaped" relationship between CAG repeat length and phenotype; increasing the CAG repeat length from 110 to 160 exacerbated the R6/2 phenotype, whereas further increases to 210 and 310 CAG repeats greatly ameliorated the phenotype. These findings demonstrate that the expected relationship between CAG repeat length and disease severity observed in humans is lost in the R6/2 mouse model and highlight the importance of CAG repeat-length determination in preclinical drug trials that use this model.

  8. Interactome Networks and Human Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Marc; Cusick, Michael E.; Barabási, Albert-László

    2011-01-01

    Complex biological systems and cellular networks may underlie most genotype to phenotype relationships. Here we review basic concepts in network biology, discussing different types of interactome networks and the insights that can come from analyzing them. We elaborate on why interactome networks are important to consider in biology, how they can be mapped and integrated with each other, what global properties are starting to emerge from interactome network models, and how these properties ma...

  9. Uncovering disease-disease relationships through the incomplete human interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menche, Jörg; Sharma, Amitabh; Kitsak, Maksim; Ghiassian, Susan; Vidal, Marc; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-01-01

    According to the disease module hypothesis the cellular components associated with a disease segregate in the same neighborhood of the human interactome, the map of biologically relevant molecular interactions. Yet, given the incompleteness of the interactome and the limited knowledge of disease-associated genes, it is not obvious if the available data has sufficient coverage to map out modules associated with each disease. Here we derive mathematical conditions for the identifiability of disease modules and show that the network-based location of each disease module determines its pathobiological relationship to other diseases. For example, diseases with overlapping network modules show significant co-expression patterns, symptom similarity, and comorbidity, while diseases residing in separated network neighborhoods are clinically distinct. These tools represent an interactome-based platform to predict molecular commonalities between clinically related diseases, even if they do not share disease genes. PMID:25700523

  10. A feeder-free, human plasma-derived hydrogel for maintenance of a human embryonic stem cell phenotype in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Fiona C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs represent a tremendous resource for cell therapies and the study of human development; however to maintain their undifferentiated state in vitro they routinely require the use of mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF feeder-layers and exogenous protein media supplementation. Results These well established requirements can be overcome and in this study, it will be demonstrated that phenotypic stability of hESCs can be maintained using a novel, human plasma protein-based hydrogel as an extracellular culture matrix without the use of feeder cell co-culture. hESCs were resuspended in human platelet poor plasma (PPP, which was gelled by the addition of calcium containing DMEM-based hESC culture medium. Phenotypic and genomic expression of the pluripotency markers OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 were measured using immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR respectively. Typical hESC morphology was demonstrated throughout in vitro culture and both viability and phenotypic stability were maintained throughout extended culture, up to 25 passages. Conclusions PPP-derived hydrogel has demonstrated to be an efficacious alternative to MEF co-culture with its hydrophilicity allowing for this substrate to be delivered via minimally invasive procedures in a liquid phase with polymerization ensuing in situ. Together this provides a novel technique for the study of this unique group of stem cells in either 2D or 3D both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Serum anti-glycan antibodies in paediatric-onset Crohn's disease: association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sładek, Małgorzata; Wasilewska, Agata; Swiat, Agnieszka; Cmiel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies reacting with various microbial epitopes have been described in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and are associated with a specific diagnosis and clinical presentation. To evaluate the profile of new anti-glycan antibodies, their potential association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy in paediatric Crohn's disease (CD). Blood samples from 134 paediatric IBD patients (109 CD, 25 ulcerative colitis (UC)) and 67 controls were blindly analysed for anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA), anti-chitobioside carbohydrate (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside carbohydrate (ALCA), and anti-mannobioside carbohydrate (AMCA) antibodies using commercially available assays. The serological response to glycans was correlated with clinical disease characteristics. At least one of the tested anti-glycan antibodies was present in 75% of CD patients. Despite the high frequency of reactivity to glycan epitopes, a limited overlap of serological markers was observed. In total, 49% of ASCA-negative patients presented with one of the following: ACCA, ALCA, or AMCA. The occurrence of one antibody from the anti-glycan panel was independently associated with complicated disease phenotype and ileocolonic disease location. A higher level of immune response as assessed by the quartile sum scores for ACCA, ALCA, and AMCA was linked with older age at diagnosis (10-17 years) and ileocolonic disease location. The ASCA had the greatest accuracy for diagnosis and differentiation of CD. Qualitative and quantitative serologicalal response to glycan epitopes was associated with distinct clinical presentation in paediatric CD patients. This raises the possibility for the use of these markers to differentiate subgroups of CD patients with more sever clinical presentation. The ASCA was the most accurate serological marker for CD; however, testing for the new anti-glycan antibodies may constitute an adjunctive tool in a specific group of patients to aid in the differentiation of CD with absent

  12. Muscle fiber-type distribution, fiber-type-specific damage, and the Pompe disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, L E M; Drost, M R; Schaart, G; de Laat, J; van Doorn, P A; van der Ploeg, A T; Reuser, A J J

    2013-09-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by acid α-glucosidase deficiency and characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has ameliorated patients' perspectives, but reversal of skeletal muscle pathology remains a challenge. We studied pretreatment biopsies of 22 patients with different phenotypes to investigate to what extent fiber-type distribution and fiber-type-specific damage contribute to clinical diversity. Pompe patients have the same fiber-type distribution as healthy persons, but among nonclassic patients with the same GAA mutation (c.-32-13T>G), those with early onset of symptoms tend to have more type 2 muscle fibers than those with late-onset disease. Further, it seemed that the older, more severely affected classic infantile patients and the wheelchair-bound and ventilated nonclassic patients had a greater proportion of type 2x muscle fibers. However, as in other diseases, this may be caused by physical inactivity of those patients.

  13. Genetic susceptibility and genotype-phenotype association in 588 Danish children with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Cleynen, I; Andersen, Susanne Pia;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated genetic variants and development of paediatric IBD, and specific clinical sub-phenotypes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this case-control study we included IBD patients ... retrieved and clinical information was extracted. DNA was obtained from Guthrie cards from the Danish National Neonatal Screening Biobank (PKU-biobanken) at Statens Serum Institut and from blood samples. RESULTS: A total of 588 IBD patients (244 Crohn's disease (CD), 318 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 26 IBD...... associated with disease localisation, medical treatment or surgery after correcting for multiple analyses. CONCLUSION: We found an association between CD and three previously published genetic variants and replicated the association with the paediatric specific ZMIZ1 gene. No Bonferroni corrected significant...

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of the noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae: adaptation and pathogenesis in the human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Junkal; Martí-Lliteras, Pau; Moleres, Javier; Puig, Carmen; Bengoechea, José A

    2012-12-01

    The human respiratory tract contains a highly adapted microbiota including commensal and opportunistic pathogens. Noncapsulated or nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a human-restricted member of the normal airway microbiota in healthy carriers and an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. The duality of NTHi as a colonizer and as a symptomatic infectious agent is closely related to its adaptation to the host, which in turn greatly relies on the genetic plasticity of the bacterium and is facilitated by its condition as a natural competent. The variable genotype of NTHi accounts for its heterogeneous gene expression and variable phenotype, leading to differential host-pathogen interplay among isolates. Here we review our current knowledge of NTHi diversity in terms of genotype, gene expression, antigenic variation, and the phenotypes associated with colonization and pathogenesis. The potential benefits of NTHi diversity studies discussed herein include the unraveling of pathogenicity clues, the generation of tools to predict virulence from genomic data, and the exploitation of a unique natural system for the continuous monitoring of long-term bacterial evolution in human airways exposed to noxious agents. Finally, we highlight the challenge of monitoring both the pathogen and the host in longitudinal studies, and of applying comparative genomics to clarify the meaning of the vast NTHi genetic diversity and its translation to virulence phenotypes.

  15. Alzheimer disease-like clinical phenotype in a family with FTDP-17 caused by a MAPT R406W mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindquist, S.G.; Holm, I.E.; Schwartz, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre-symptomatic an......We report clinical, molecular, neuroimaging and neuropathological features of a Danish family with autosomal dominant inherited dementia, a clinical phenotype resembling Alzheimer's disease and a pathogenic mutation (R406W) in the microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. Pre...

  16. Geographic associations between lactase phenotype, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel diseases; Does obesity trump geography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Andew; Xue, Xiaoqing

    2016-11-01

    Geographic patterns with diminishing rates from north to south toward the equator have been described for a number of diseases, putatively related largely to "western" lifestyle. Among these the inflammatory bowel diseases; Crohn's (CD) and Ulcerative colitis (UC) have been prominent in sharing distributions with a number of autoimmune diseases. One of the interesting associations is the epidemiologic similarity with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, in addition, at least some of these diseases also correlated inversely with lactase non persistent population (LNP) distributions. It is hypothesized that MS should also have an inverse relationship with LNP. We provide support for this by comparing published MS, CD, UC and LNP national rates to the beginning of the new millennium. Possible links among these diseases may be an evolutionary signature of new genes which may have accompanied emergence of lactase persistence millennia ago. The emergent phenotypic dichotomy also forced different assimilation responses to lactose digestion. While intestinal retention of lactase results in direct host enzymatic digestion, in LNP persons intestinal bacterial metabolism of lactose impacts on the host micro-flora. These microbial changes may play some role in altering rates of diseases including IBD and MS. However, since the late 20th century previously observed patterns are changing. Although industrialization is considered to play an important modifying role, the rising rates of obesity with an emphasis on diet, and microfloral pathogenesis, but with an independent geographic pattern may also facilitate altering rates and geographic distributions of both of these and other diseases.

  17. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-03

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  18. Effective diagnosis of genetic disease by computational phenotype analysis of the disease-associated genome

    OpenAIRE

    Zemojtel, T.; Koehler, S; Mackenroth, L; Jaeger, M.; Hecht, J.; Krawitz, P.; Graul-Neumann, L; Doelken, S.; Ehmke, N.; Spielmann, M.; Oien, N.C.; Schweiger, M R; Krueger, U; Frommer, G.; Fischer, B.

    2014-01-01

    Less than half of patients with suspected genetic disease receive a molecular diagnosis. We have therefore integrated next-generation sequencing (NGS), bioinformatics, and clinical data into an effective diagnostic workflow. We used variants in the 2741 established Mendelian disease genes [the disease-associated genome (DAG)] to develop a targeted enrichment DAG panel (7.1 Mb), which achieves a coverage of 20-fold or better for 98% of bases. Furthermore, we established a computational method ...

  19. Liver cirrhosis in patients newly diagnosed with neurological phenotype of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłkowski, Adam; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Chabik, Grzegorz; Wierzchowska, Agata; Litwin, Tomasz; Członkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) can manifest itself in different clinical forms, the neurological and hepatic ones being the most common. It is suggested that neurological signs and psychiatric symptoms develop secondary to liver involvement. The aim of this study was to characterize the liver disease in patients newly diagnosed with the neurological form of WD. Treatment-naive patients diagnosed with WD were classified into three phenotypic groups: hepatic, neurological and pre-symptomatic. Liver involvement was ascertained through surrogate markers: abdominal ultrasound and laboratory parameters. In addition, study participants were screened for esophageal varices. Of 53 consecutively diagnosed WD patients, 23 individuals (43.4%) had a predominantly neurological presentation. In this group, cirrhosis was diagnosed in 11 (47.8%) subjects. Esophageal varices were present in all of them. In every patient with neurological WD, there was at least one sign of hepatic disease on ultrasound examination, indicating universal presence of liver involvement. The prevalence of surrogate signs of cirrhosis was similar in patients with the neurological and in those with the hepatic phenotype.

  20. Phenotypic charactheristics of fluorescent pseudomonss, biological control agent of lincat disease of temanggung tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NINING NURUL AZIZAH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pseudomonass isolated from local plants-rishosphere in temanggung controlled lincat disease of tobacco. This report describe phenotypic charactheristics of the bacteria in order to be used as a base for the development of the bacteria as a biological control agent of lincat disease. Phenotypic charactheristics of six isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonass which controlled lincat disease in the field were determined in the laboratory of Plant Bacteriology, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University. Plant pathogenicity tests were conducted by hypersensitive reaction into tobacco leaf and inoculation to tobacco plants. Antagonism test between fluorescent Pseudomonass and other candidate of biological control agents were also conducted. The results indicated that the bacteria were rod shape, Gram negative, positive reaction in catalase and oxidase tests. Nitrate reduce to nitrite, arginine was hydrolysed, fluorescent pigment were produced on King’s B medium, levan formation positive and all bacteria denitrifiy. The bacteria used urea, tween 80 and amylum were not hydrolised, poly--hydroxybutyrate was not accumulated in the cells. Negative reactions were observed for lysine decarboxylation, indol production, VP/MR reaction, and gelatn liquefation. Some compounds could be used as solely carbon sources. All isolates grew on the medium containing 2% NaCl. The best pH for growth was 6-7 and all isolates grew at 20-41C. Negative result were obtained for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity tests.

  1. Parkinson disease phenotype in Ashkenazi Jews with and without LRRK2 G2019S mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalay, Roy N; Mirelman, Anat; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Tang, Ming-X; Mejia Santana, Helen; Raymond, Deborah; Roos, Ernest; Orbe-Reilly, Martha; Gurevich, Tanya; Bar Shira, Anat; Gana Weisz, Mali; Yasinovsky, Kira; Zalis, Maayan; Thaler, Avner; Deik, Andres; Barrett, Matthew James; Cabassa, Jose; Groves, Mark; Hunt, Ann L; Lubarr, Naomi; San Luciano, Marta; Miravite, Joan; Palmese, Christina; Sachdev, Rivka; Sarva, Harini; Severt, Lawrence; Shanker, Vicki; Swan, Matthew Carrington; Soto-Valencia, Jeannie; Johannes, Brooke; Ortega, Robert; Fahn, Stanley; Cote, Lucien; Waters, Cheryl; Mazzoni, Pietro; Ford, Blair; Louis, Elan; Levy, Oren; Rosado, Llency; Ruiz, Diana; Dorovski, Tsvyatko; Pauciulo, Michael; Nichols, William; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ozelius, Laurie; Clark, Lorraine; Giladi, Nir; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen S

    2013-12-01

    The phenotype of Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients with and without leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) G2019S mutations reportedly is similar; however, large, uniformly evaluated series are lacking. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical phenotype of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) PD carriers of the LRRK2 G2019S mutation. We studied 553 AJ PD patients, including 65 patients who were previously reported, from three sites (two in New York and one in Tel-Aviv). Glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutation carriers were excluded. Evaluations included the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Non-Motor Symptoms (NMS) questionnaire. Regression models were constructed to test the association between clinical and demographic features and LRRK2 status (outcome) in 488 newly recruited participants. LRRK2 G2019S carriers (n = 97) and non-carriers (n = 391) were similar in age and age at onset of PD. Carriers had longer disease duration (8.6 years vs. 6.1 years; P 5 years (P = 0.042). Performance on the UPDRS, MoCA, GDS, and NMS did not differ by mutation status. PD in AJ LRRK2 G2019S mutation carriers is similar to idiopathic PD but is characterized by more frequent lower extremity involvement at onset and PIGD without the associated cognitive impairment.

  2. Distinctive Menkes disease variant with occipital horns: Delineation of natural history and clinical phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proud, V.K.; Mussell, H.G.; Percy, A.K. [Univ. of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-02

    To delineate further the clinical spectrum of Menkes disease, an X-linked recessive disorder of copper transport, we studied 4 related males, ranging in age from 4-38 years, with a unique phenotype that combines manifestations of classical and mild Menkes disease and occipital horn syndrome (OHS). The propositus, an 18-year-old man, was evaluated following an intracerebral hemorrhage at age 15 years and was noted to have marked hypotonia, motor delay with mental retardation, bladder diverticula, failure to thrive, and diarrhea from infancy; seizures from age 3 years; and abnormal hair (pili torti) and face, cutis laxa, and multiple joint dislocations. Radiographic abnormalities included occipital exostoses, tortuous cerebral blood vessels with multiple branch occlusions, and hammer-shaped clavicles. Biochemical studies demonstrated reduced copper and ceruloplasmin levels in serum, and abnormal plasma catecholamine ratios. We reported previously the molecular defect in this family, a splice-site mutation that predicts formation of approximately 20% of the normal Menkes gene product. Here, we detail the clinical course and physical features and radiographic findings in these 4 individuals, and compare their phenotype with classical and mild Menkes and OHS. Unusual Menkes disease variants such as this may escape recognition due to anomalies that appear inconsistent with the diagnosis, particularly prolonged survival and later onset of seizures. Males with mental retardation and connective tissue abnormalities should be evaluated for biochemical evidence of defective copper transport. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Physical Activity across Frailty Phenotypes in Females with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlyn P. Roland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Females with Parkinson’s disease (PD are vulnerable to frailty. PD eventually leads to decreased physical activity, an indicator of frailty. We speculate PD results in frailty through reduced physical activity. Objective. Determine the contribution of physical activity on frailty in PD (n=15, 65 ± 9 years and non-PD (n=15, 73 ± 14 years females. Methods. Frailty phenotype (nonfrail/prefrail/frail was categorized and 8 hours of physical activity was measured using accelerometer, global positioning system, and self-report. Two-way ANCOVA (age as covariate was used to compare physical activity between disease and frailty phenotypes. Spearman correlation assessed relationships, and linear regression determined associations with frailty. Results. Nonfrail recorded more physical activity (intensity, counts, self-report compared with frail. Self-reported physical activity was greater in PD than non-PD. In non-PD, step counts, light physical activity time, sedentary time, and self-reported physical activity were related to frailty (R=0.91. In PD, only carbidopa-levodopa dose was related to frailty (r=0.61. Conclusion. Physical activity influences frailty in females without PD. In PD females, disease management may be a better indicator of frailty than physical activity. Further investigation into how PD associated factors contribute to frailty is warranted.

  4. Neuroimaging as a tool to study the sources of phenotypic heterogeneity in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gorro, Clara; Camara, Estela; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth

    2017-08-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a triad of motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. There is great variability regarding the prominence and evolution of each type of clinical sign. One possible source of phenotypic heterogeneity could be the more prominent degeneration of specific brain circuits. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent neuroimaging studies that have analysed the relationship between brain changes and motor, cognitive and psychiatric alterations in Huntington's disease. The results from recent neuroimaging studies are heterogeneous. Although there is a great overlap between the different regions associated with each symptomatic domain, there is some degree of differentiation. For example, the motor network is associated with motor impairment, whereas the ventral striatum is especially involved in emotional deficits related with psychiatric problems. Motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairments are associated with structural and functional brain biomarkers. However, the specificity of the regions involved remains unknown, because these studies focused on specific regions and symptoms. In order to tease apart the neural substrates that underlie the phenotypic heterogeneity in Huntington's disease, multivariate approaches combining brain and behavioural measures related to all symptomatic domains should be considered in the future.

  5. Modeling disease using three dimensional cell culture: multi-lumen and inverted cyst phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleon, Christine L; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2012-06-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture provides a unique system to investigate intrinsic mechanisms and micro environmental cues involved in the morphogenesis of epithelial glandular architectures. While this culture system allows insight into normal tissue development, it is also is readily amenable to manipulations that permit cellular modeling of various disease states. Here, we discuss a range of cellular and genetic alterations that result in two distinct cyst phenotypes, the multi-lumen cyst and the inverted cyst, both of which involve defects in cell polarity and lumen formation. Multi-lumen cyst formation results from disturbances in the mechanisms that regulate cell polarity, apical assembly, and the rate of lumen clearance. In the inverted cyst, the apical domain is oriented adjacent to the matrix, markedly affecting the morphogenic cues the matrix provides for cystogenesis. Both of these abnormal glandular phenotypes are highly reminiscent of histological patterns used to classify a number of diseases. A better understanding of the causes of multi-lumen and inverted cysts will provide insights into the origin and progression of epithelial diseases, potentially leading to the development of new therapies.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis disease-causing strains in Argentina, 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sorhouet-Pereira

    Full Text Available Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 133 isolates of Neisseria meningitidis obtained from meningococcal disease cases in Argentina during 2010 were performed by the National Reference Laboratory as part of a project coordinated by the PAHO within the SIREVA II network. Serogroup, serotype, serosubtype and MLST characterization were performed. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifampin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were determined and interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Almost 49% of isolates were W135, and two serotype:serosubtype combinations, W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 and W135:2a:P1.2:ST-11 accounted for 78% of all W135 isolates. Serogroup B accounted for 42.1% of isolates, and was both phenotypically and genotypically diverse. Serogroup C isolates represented 5.3% of the dataset, and one isolate belonging to the ST-198 complex was non-groupable. Isolates belonged mainly to the ST-11 complex (48% and to a lesser extent to the ST-865 (18%, ST-32 (9,8% and the ST-35 complexes (9%. Intermediate resistance to penicillin and ampicillin was detected in 35.4% and 33.1% of isolates respectively. Two W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11:ST-11 isolates presented resistance to ciprofloxacin associated with a mutation in the QRDR of gyrA gene Thr91-Ile. These data show serogroup W135 was the first cause of disease in Argentina in 2010, and was strongly associated with the W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 epidemic clone. Serogroup B was the second cause of disease and isolates belonging to this serogroup were phenotypically and genotypically diverse. The presence of isolates with intermediate resistance to penicillin and the presence of fluorquinolone-resistant isolates highlight the necessity and importance of maintaining and strengthening National Surveillance Programs.

  7. The structure of prion: is it enough for interpreting the diverse phenotypes of prion diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chan Tian; Xiaoping Dong

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases,or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,are neurodegenerative diseases,which affect human and many species of animals with 100% fatality rate.The most accepted etiology for prion disease is 'prion',which arises from the conversion from cellular PrPC to the pathological PrPsc.This review discussed the characteristic structure of PrP,including PRNP gene,PrPC,PrPSc,PrP amyloid,and prion strains.

  8. Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

    2014-04-01

    Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk.

  9. Congenital Heart Disease in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: Phenotype and Genotype Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Schrier, Samantha A.; Li, Jennifer; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Kline, Antonie D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Jackson, Laird S.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Krantz, Ian D.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) has been reported to occur in 14–70% of individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS, OMIM 122470) and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality when present. Charts from a cohort of 479 patients with CdLS were reviewed for cardiac evaluations, gene testing and information to determine phenotypic severity. Two hundred fifty-nine individuals had either documented structural defects or minor cardiac findings. The presence of CHD was then quantified as a function of mutation status and severity of CdLS: mild, moderate, or severe. Different types of CHD were also evaluated by mutation status to assess for any genotype –phenotype correlation. NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 mutation-positive patients were equally likely to have CHD, although the number of SMC1A and SMC3 mutation-positive patients were small in comparison. Structural CHDs were more likely to be present in individuals with moderate and severe CdLS than in the mild phenotype. This study evaluates the trends of CHD seen in the CdLS population and correlates these findings with genotype. PMID:22965847

  10. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine M Hölter

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  11. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölter, Sabine M; Stromberg, Mary; Kovalenko, Marina; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Lopez, Edith; Guide, Jolene; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewed, Anja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wursta, Wolfgang; Gillis, Tammy; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Jonathan; MacDonald, Marcy E; Cotman, Susan; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Lee, Jong-Min; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  12. Genetic control of human brain transcript expression in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jennifer A; Gibbs, J Raphael; Clarke, Jennifer; Ray, Monika; Zhang, Weixiong; Holmans, Peter; Rohrer, Kristen; Zhao, Alice; Marlowe, Lauren; Kaleem, Mona; McCorquodale, Donald S; Cuello, Cindy; Leung, Doris; Bryden, Leslie; Nath, Priti; Zismann, Victoria L; Joshipura, Keta; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hu-Lince, Diane; Coon, Keith D; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Heward, Christopher B; Reiman, Eric M; Stephan, Dietrich; Hardy, John; Myers, Amanda J

    2009-04-01

    We recently surveyed the relationship between the human brain transcriptome and genome in a series of neuropathologically normal postmortem samples. We have now analyzed additional samples with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD; final n = 188 controls, 176 cases). Nine percent of the cortical transcripts that we analyzed had expression profiles correlated with their genotypes in the combined cohort, and approximately 5% of transcripts had SNP-transcript relationships that could distinguish LOAD samples. Two of these transcripts have been previously implicated in LOAD candidate-gene SNP-expression screens. This study shows how the relationship between common inherited genetic variants and brain transcript expression can be used in the study of human brain disorders. We suggest that studying the transcriptome as a quantitative endo-phenotype has greater power for discovering risk SNPs influencing expression than the use of discrete diagnostic categories such as presence or absence of disease.

  13. Modeling the human MTM1 p.R69C mutation in murine Mtm1 results in exon 4 skipping and a less severe myotubular myopathy phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Christopher R.; Dulin-Smith, Ashley N.; Durban, Ashley N.; Marshall, Morgan L.; Marshall, Jordan T.; Snyder, Andrew D.; Naiyer, Nada; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.; Lawlor, Michael W.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Dowling, James J.; Beggs, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM) is a severe neuromuscular disease of infancy caused by mutations of MTM1, which encodes the phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase, myotubularin. The Mtm1 knockout (KO) mouse has a severe phenotype and its short lifespan (8 weeks) makes it a challenge to use as a model in the testing of certain preclinical therapeutics. Many MTM patients succumb early in life, but some have a more favorable prognosis. We used human genotype–phenotype correlation data to develop a myotubularin-deficient mouse model with a less severe phenotype than is seen in Mtm1 KO mice. We modeled the human c.205C>T point mutation in Mtm1 exon 4, which is predicted to introduce the p.R69C missense change in myotubularin. Hemizygous male Mtm1 p.R69C mice develop early muscle atrophy prior to the onset of weakness at 2 months. The median survival period is 66 weeks. Histopathology shows small myofibers with centrally placed nuclei. Myotubularin protein is undetectably low because the introduced c.205C>T base change induced exon 4 skipping in most mRNAs, leading to premature termination of myotubularin translation. Some full-length Mtm1 mRNA bearing the mutation is present, which provides enough myotubularin activity to account for the relatively mild phenotype, as Mtm1 KO and Mtm1 p.R69C mice have similar muscle phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels. These data explain the basis for phenotypic variability among human patients with MTM1 p.R69C mutations and establish the Mtm1 p.R69C mouse as a valuable model for the disease, as its less severe phenotype will expand the scope of testable preclinical therapies. PMID:22068590

  14. Parasitic diseases in humans transmitted by vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewiński, Marcin; Derda, Monika; Hadaś, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress of medicine, parasitic diseases still pose a great threat to human health and life. Among parasitic diseases, those transmitted by vectors, mainly arthropods, play a particular role. These diseases occur most frequently in the poorest countries and affect a vast part of the human population. They include malaria, babesiosis, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis and filariasis. This study presents those vector-transmitted diseases that are responsible for the greatest incidence and mortality of people on a global scale. Attention is focused primarily on diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, flies, Hemiptera and ticks.

  15. Regional and cellular gene expression changes in human Huntington's disease brain

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) pathology is well understood at a histological level but a comprehensive molecular analysis of the effect of the disease in the human brain has not previously been available. To elucidate the molecular phenotype of HD on a genome-wide scale, we compared mRNA profiles from 44 human HD brains with those from 36 unaffected controls using microarray analysis. Four brain regions were analyzed: caudate nucleus, cerebellum, prefrontal association cortex [Brodmann's area 9 (...

  16. Exhaled volatile organic compounds for phenotyping chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanta Maria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive phenotyping of chronic respiratory diseases would be highly beneficial in the personalised medicine of the future. Volatile organic compounds can be measured in the exhaled breath and may be produced or altered by disease processes. We investigated whether distinct patterns of these compounds were present in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and clinically relevant disease phenotypes. Methods Breath samples from 39 COPD subjects and 32 healthy controls were collected and analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Subjects with COPD also underwent sputum induction. Discriminatory compounds were identified by univariate logistic regression followed by multivariate analysis: 1. principal component analysis; 2. multivariate logistic regression; 3. receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results Comparing COPD versus healthy controls, principal component analysis clustered the 20 best-discriminating compounds into four components explaining 71% of the variance. Multivariate logistic regression constructed an optimised model using two components with an accuracy of 69%. The model had 85% sensitivity, 50% specificity and ROC area under the curve of 0.74. Analysis of COPD subgroups showed the method could classify COPD subjects with far greater accuracy. Models were constructed which classified subjects with ≥2% sputum eosinophilia with ROC area under the curve of 0.94 and those having frequent exacerbations 0.95. Potential biomarkers correlated to clinical variables were identified in each subgroup. Conclusion The exhaled breath volatile organic compound profile discriminated between COPD and healthy controls and identified clinically relevant COPD subgroups. If these findings are validated in prospective cohorts, they may have diagnostic and management value in this disease.

  17. Advances in chromatin remodeling and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Sang; Elizondo, Leah I; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2004-06-01

    Epigenetic factors alter phenotype without changing genotype. A primary molecular mechanism underlying epigenetics is the alteration of chromatin structure by covalent DNA modifications, covalent histone modifications, and nucleosome reorganization. Remodeling of chromatin structure regulates DNA methylation, replication, recombination, and repair as well as gene expression. As these functions would predict, dysfunction of the proteins that remodel chromatin causes an array of multi-system disorders and neoplasias. Insights from these diseases suggest that during embryonic and fetal life, environmental distortions of chromatin remodeling encode a 'molecular memory' that predispose the individual to diseases in adulthood.

  18. Altered monocyte and fibrocyte phenotype and function in scleroderma interstitial lung disease: reversal by caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourkina, Elena; Bonner, Michael; Oates, James; Hofbauer, Ann; Richard, Mathieu; Znoyko, Sergei; Visconti, Richard P; Zhang, Jing; Hatfield, Corey M; Silver, Richard M; Hoffman, Stanley

    2011-07-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, or SSc). Fibrocytes are a monocyte-derived cell population implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders. Given the recently recognized importance of caveolin-1 in regulating function and signaling in SSc monocytes, in the present study we examined the role of caveolin-1 in the migration and/or trafficking and phenotype of monocytes and fibrocytes in fibrotic lung disease in human patients and an animal model. These studies fill a gap in our understanding of how monocytes and fibrocytes contribute to SSc-ILD pathology. We found that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+)/collagen I-positive (ColI+), CD34+/ColI+ and CD45+/ColI+ cells are present in SSc-ILD lungs, but not in control lungs, with CXCR4+ cells being most prevalent. Expression of CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (CXCL12), are also highly upregulated in SSc-ILD lung tissue. SSc monocytes, which lack caveolin-1 and therefore overexpress CXCR4, exhibit almost sevenfold increased migration toward CXCL12 compared to control monocytes. Restoration of caveolin-1 function by administering the caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD) peptide reverses this hypermigration. Similarly, transforming growth factor β-treated normal monocytes lose caveolin-1, overexpress CXCR4 and exhibit 15-fold increased monocyte migration that is CSD peptide-sensitive. SSc monocytes exhibit a different phenotype than normal monocytes, expressing high levels of ColI, CD14 and CD34. Because ColI+/CD14+ cells are prevalent in SSc blood, we looked for such cells in lung tissue and confirmed their presence in SSc-ILD lungs but not in normal lungs. Finally, in the bleomycin model of lung fibrosis, we show that CSD peptide diminishes fibrocyte accumulation in the lungs. Our results suggest that low caveolin-1 in SSc monocytes contributes to ILD via effects on cell migration and phenotype and that the

  19. Altered monocyte and fibrocyte phenotype and function in scleroderma interstitial lung disease: reversal by caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tourkina Elena

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma (systemic sclerosis, or SSc. Fibrocytes are a monocyte-derived cell population implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders. Given the recently recognized importance of caveolin-1 in regulating function and signaling in SSc monocytes, in the present study we examined the role of caveolin-1 in the migration and/or trafficking and phenotype of monocytes and fibrocytes in fibrotic lung disease in human patients and an animal model. These studies fill a gap in our understanding of how monocytes and fibrocytes contribute to SSc-ILD pathology. We found that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+/collagen I-positive (ColI+, CD34+/ColI+ and CD45+/ColI+ cells are present in SSc-ILD lungs, but not in control lungs, with CXCR4+ cells being most prevalent. Expression of CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (CXCL12, are also highly upregulated in SSc-ILD lung tissue. SSc monocytes, which lack caveolin-1 and therefore overexpress CXCR4, exhibit almost sevenfold increased migration toward CXCL12 compared to control monocytes. Restoration of caveolin-1 function by administering the caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD peptide reverses this hypermigration. Similarly, transforming growth factor β-treated normal monocytes lose caveolin-1, overexpress CXCR4 and exhibit 15-fold increased monocyte migration that is CSD peptide-sensitive. SSc monocytes exhibit a different phenotype than normal monocytes, expressing high levels of ColI, CD14 and CD34. Because ColI+/CD14+ cells are prevalent in SSc blood, we looked for such cells in lung tissue and confirmed their presence in SSc-ILD lungs but not in normal lungs. Finally, in the bleomycin model of lung fibrosis, we show that CSD peptide diminishes fibrocyte accumulation in the lungs. Our results suggest that low caveolin-1 in SSc monocytes contributes to ILD via effects on cell migration and

  20. The perivascular phenotype and behaviors of dedifferentiated cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ning; Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Sugawara, Atsunori; Shimizu, Yutaka; Wu, Min-Ke; Du, Li; Wang, Hang; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2015-02-13

    Derived from mature adipocytes, dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells represent a special group of multipotent cells. However, their phenotype and cellular nature remain unclear. Our study found that human DFAT cells adopted perivascular characteristics and behaviors. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescent staining revealed that human DFAT cells positively expressed markers highly related to perivascular cell lineages, such as CD140b, NG2 and desmin, but were negative for common endothelial markers, including CD31, CD34, and CD309. Furthermore, DFAT cells displayed vascular network formation ability in Matrigel, and they noticeably promoted and stabilized the vessel structures formed by human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. These results provide novel evidence on the pericyte nature of human DFAT cells, further supporting the recent model for the perivascular origin of adult stem cells, in which tissue-specific progenitor cells in mesenchymal tissues associate with blood vessels, exhibiting perivascular characteristics and functions.

  1. The relationship between clinical phenotype and early staged bilateral deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Victor W; Watts, Ray L; Schrandt, Christian J; Guthrie, Stephanie; Wang, Deli; Amara, Amy W; Guthrie, Barton L; Walker, Harrison C

    2013-12-01

    While many centers place bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems simultaneously, unilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS followed by a staged contralateral procedure has emerged as a treatment option for many patients. However, little is known about whether the preoperative phenotype predicts when staged placement of a DBS electrode in the opposite STN will be required. The authors aimed to determine whether preoperative clinical phenotype predicts early staged placement of a second STN DBS electrode in patients who undergo unilateral STN DBS for Parkinson disease (PD). Eighty-two consecutive patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral STN DBS contralateral to the most affected hemibody and had at least 2 years of follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis determined preoperative characteristics that predicted staged placement of a second electrode in the opposite STN. Preoperative measurements included aspects of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), motor asymmetry index, and body weight. At 2-year follow-up, 28 (34%) of the 82 patients had undergone staged placement of a contralateral electrode while the remainder chose to continue with unilateral stimulation. Statistically significant improvements in UPDRS total and Part 3 scores were retained at the end of the 2-year follow-up period in both subsets of patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the most important predictors for early staged placement of a second subthalamic stimulator were low asymmetry index (OR 13.4, 95% CI 2.8-64.9), high tremor subscore (OR 7.2, CI 1.5-35.0), and low body weight (OR 5.5, 95% CI 1.4-22.3). This single-center study provides evidence that elements of the preoperative PD phenotype predict whether patients will require early staged bilateral STN DBS. These data may aid in the management of patients with advanced PD who undergo STN DBS.

  2. Genomewide linkage analysis of quantitative spirometric phenotypes in severe early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Edwin K; Palmer, Lyle J; Mosley, Jonathan D; Barth, Matthew; Senter, Jody M; Brown, Alison; Drazen, Jeffrey M; Kwiatkowski, David J; Chapman, Harold A; Campbell, Edward J; Province, Michael A; Rao, D C; Reilly, John J; Ginns, Leo C; Speizer, Frank E; Weiss, Scott T

    2002-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, complex disease associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. COPD is defined by irreversible airflow obstruction; airflow obstruction is typically determined by reductions in quantitative spirometric indices, including forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FEV(1)) and the ratio of FEV(1) to forced vital capacity (FVC). To identify genetic determinants of quantitative spirometric phenotypes, an autosomal 10-cM genomewide scan of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphic markers was performed in 72 pedigrees (585 individuals) ascertained through probands with severe early-onset COPD. Multipoint variance-component linkage analysis (using SOLAR) was performed for quantitative phenotypes, including FEV(1), FVC, and FEV(1)/FVC. In the initial genomewide scan, significant evidence for linkage to FEV(1)/FVC was demonstrated on chromosome 2q (LOD score 4.12 at 222 cM). Suggestive evidence was found for linkage to FEV(1)/FVC on chromosomes 1 (LOD score 1.92 at 120 cM) and 17 (LOD score 2.03 at 67 cM) and to FVC on chromosome 1 (LOD score 2.05 at 13 cM). The highest LOD score for FEV(1) in the initial genomewide scan was 1.53, on chromosome 12, at 36 cM. After inclusion of 12 additional STR markers on chromosome 12p, which had been previously genotyped in this population, suggestive evidence for linkage of FEV(1) (LOD score 2.43 at 37 cM) to this region was demonstrated. These observations provide both significant evidence for an early-onset COPD-susceptibility locus on chromosome 2 and suggestive evidence for linkage of spirometry-related phenotypes to several other genomic regions. The significant linkage of FEV(1)/FVC to chromosome 2q could reflect one or more genes influencing the development of airflow obstruction or dysanapsis.

  3. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Clinical, Neuropsychological, and Radiological Phenotypes, Histopathological Correlates, and Described Genotypes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gregor Issac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vascular cognitive impairment is a common yet preventable cause for dementia. It needs high degree of suspicion and appropriate designing of investigatory tools to confirm diagnosis, identify comorbidities, and ascertain the areas of impairment. Commonly DSM-IV criterion is applied for diagnosis and detailed clinical and neuropsychological examination for identifying the specific phenotype is used. Early diagnosis using the mandatory criteria will help in early initiation of disease modifying treatment strategies which can result in partial reversal of vascular changes and arrest of progression. Patients with young onset disease might require genetic characterization for designing more aggressive treatment. Discussion and Conclusion. Dementias as such carry poor course and prognosis resulting in severe Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs for patients and caregivers. Therefore, it is mandatory to identify treatable and preventable causes so that man power loss can be reduced.

  4. Tissue remodelling in chronic bronchial diseases: from the epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Pain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling is a critical feature of chronic bronchial diseases, characterised by aberrant repair of the epithelium and accumulation of fibroblasts, which contribute to extracellular matrix (ECM deposition resulting in fixed bronchial obstruction. Recently, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT has been identified as a new source of fibroblasts that could contribute to the remodelling of the airways. This phenomenon consists of the loss of the epithelial phenotype by bronchial epithelial cells and the acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype. These cells are then able to migrate and secrete ECM molecules. Herein, we review the different types of EMT. We will then focus on the signalling pathways that are involved, such as transforming growth factor-β and Wnt, as well as the more recently described Sonic Hedgehog pathway. Finally, we will highlight the implication of EMT in airway remodelling in specific chronic bronchial pathologies, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiolitis obliterans following lung transplantation. Despite the limitations of in vitro models, future studies of EMT in vivo are warranted to shed new light on the pathomechanisms of bronchial obstruction.

  5. Evaluation of cystine transport in cultured human kidney cells and establishment of cystinuria type I phenotype by antisense technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar; Sagi, Sreedhar; Bolenz, Christian; Alken, Peter; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Knoll, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Cystinuria is a rare hereditary disease resulting in recurrent stone formation and the need for repeated invasive interventions. So far, two responsible genes have been identified which encode the two transporters, rBAT and b(0,+)AT forming a heterodimer to transport cystine in proximal tubular cells (PTC) and whose defect results in increased excretion of cystine. A human cell line mimicing the phenotype of cystinuria in vitro is yet to be developed. Human kidney (HK)-2 is a PTC line derived from normal HK. After determining the presence of rBAT gene by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, radioactively labeled cystine (S(35)) was used to evaluate the functional presence of the amino acid transport in HK-2 cells when cultured in vitro. To achieve a cystinuria type I phenotype in HK-2 cells, the rBAT gene was silenced using antisense oligonucleotides complimentary to human rBAT mRNA. The reduced transport activity of cystine was then determined by radiolabeled cystine uptake measurements. RT-PCR and Western blot confirmed the expression of the rBAT gene in HK-2 cells. Considerable transport of the radio labeled cystine was observed in HK-2 cells and was linearly dependent on the incubation time with the amino acid. The cystine transport in rBAT knockdown cells after incubation with antisense oligonucleotides was significantly lower compared to control (0.76 vs. 0.98%; P=0.0008), proving a transient knock-down of the rBAT gene. This study demonstrates the presence of the b(0,+) amino acid transport system in human proximal tubular HK-2 cells when cultured in vitro. Inhibition of this transport system is possible by using antisense technology. A permanent inhibition of the cystine transport, based on our model, would be useful for the development and evaluation gene therapeutic approaches.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of human tympanic membrane derived cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Sharon L; Levin, Brett; Heel, Kathryn A; Atlas, Marcus D; Marano, Robert J

    2011-02-01

    The human tympanic membrane (hTM), known more commonly as the eardrum, is a thin, multi-layered membrane that is unique in the body as it is suspended in air. When perforated, the hTM's primary function of sound-pressure transmission is compromised. For the purposes of TM reconstruction, we investigated the phenotype and genotype of cultured primary cells derived from hTM tissue explants, compared to epithelial (HaCaT cells) and mesenchymal (human dermal fibroblasts (HDF)) reference cells. Epithelium-specific ets-1 (ESE-1), E-cadherin, keratinocyte growth factor-1 (KGF-1/FGF-7), keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2/FGF10), fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), variants of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), fibroblast surface protein (FSP), and vimentin proteins were used to assess the phenotypes of all cultured cells. Wholemount and paraffin-embedded hTM tissues were stained with ESE-1 and E-cadherin proteins to establish normal epithelial-specific expression patterns within the epithelial layers. Immunofluorescent (IF) cell staining of hTM epithelial cells (hTMk) demonstrated co-expression of both epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific proteins. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis further demonstrated co-expression of these epithelial and mesenchymal-specific proteins, indicating the subcultured hTMk cells possessed a transitional phenotype. Gene transcript analysis of hTMk cells by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed a down regulation of ESE-1, E-cadherin, FGFR2, variant 1 and variant 2 (FGFR2v1 and FGFR2v2) between low and high passages, and up-regulation of KGF-1, KGF-2, and FGFR1. All results indicate a gradual shift in cell phenotype of hTMk-derived cells from epithelial to mesenchymal.

  7. Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of a Cohort of Pediatric Wilson Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaghy Suzan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Egypt, Wilson disease seems to be under diagnosed and clinical data on large cohorts are limited. The aim of this study is to highlight the clinical, laboratory and genetic characteristics of this disease in our pediatric population as well as to report our experience with both treatment options and outcome. Methods The study included 77 patients from 50 unrelated families (62 were followed up for a mean period of 58.9 ± 6.4 months and 27 were asymptomatic siblings. Data were collected retrospectively by record analysis and patient interviews. Diagnosis was confirmed by sequencing of the ATP7B gene in 64 patients Results Our patients had unique characteristics compared to other populations. They had a younger age of onset (median: 10 years, higher prevalence of Kayser-Fleischer rings (97.6% in the symptomatic patients, low ceruloplasmin (93.5%, high rate of parental consanguinity (78.9% as well as a more severe course. 71.42% of those on long term D-penicillamine improved or were stable during the follow up with severe side effects occurring in only 11.5%. Preemptive treatment with zinc monotherapy was an effective non-toxic alternative to D-penicillamine. Homozygous mutations were found in 85.7%, yet limited by the large number of mutations detected, it was difficult to find genotype-phenotype correlations. Missense mutations were the most common while protein-truncating mutations resulted in a more severe course with higher incidence of acute liver failure and neurological symptoms. Conclusions Egyptian children with Wilson disease present with early Kayser-Fleischer rings and early onset of liver and neurological disease. The mutational spectrum identified differs from that observed in other countries. The high rate of homozygous mutations (reflecting the high rate of consanguinity may potentially offer further insights on genotype-phenotype correlation

  8. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollini, Pierre; Faes-Van't Hull, Eveline; Kaiser, Stefan; Kapp, Ursula; Leyvraz, Serge

    2007-04-01

    Steady-state hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transplantation rely on the unique potential of stem cells to undergo both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Fetal liver (FL) represents a promising alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but limited by the total cell number obtained in a typical harvest. We reported that human FL nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) repopulating cells (SRCs) could be expanded under simple stroma-free culture conditions. Here, we sought to further characterize FL HSC/SRCs phenotypically and functionally before and following culture. Unexpanded or cultured FL cell suspensions were separated into various subpopulations. These were tested for long-term culture potential and for in vivo repopulating function following transplantation into NOD/SCID mice. We found that upon culture of human FL cells, a tight association between classical stem cell phenotypes, such as CD34(+) /CD38(-) and/or side population, and NOD/SCID repopulating function was lost, as observed with other sources. Although SRC activity before and following culture consistently correlated with the presence of a CD34(+) cell population, we provide evidence that, contrary to umbilical cord blood and adult sources, stem cells present in both CD34(+) and CD34(-) FL populations can sustain long-term hematopoietic cultures. Furthermore, upon additional culture, CD34-depleted cell suspensions, devoid of SRCs, regenerated a population of CD34(+) cells possessing SRC function. Our studies suggest that compared to neonatal and adult sources, the phenotypical characteristics of putative human FL HSCs may be less strictly defined, and reinforce the accumulated evidence that human FL represents a unique, valuable alternative and highly proliferative source of HSCs for clinical applications.

  9. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Phenotypic impact of genomic structural variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Symmons, Orsolya; Spitz, François;

    2013-01-01

    Genomic structural variants have long been implicated in phenotypic diversity and human disease, but dissecting the mechanisms by which they exert their functional impact has proven elusive. Recently however, developments in high-throughput DNA sequencing and chromosomal engineering technology have...... facilitated the analysis of structural variants in human populations and model systems in unprecedented detail. In this Review, we describe how structural variants can affect molecular and cellular processes, leading to complex organismal phenotypes, including human disease. We further present advances...

  11. Computational analysis of human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase enzyme: an update in genotype-phenotype correlation for Morquio A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarte-Avellaneda, Sergio; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos Javier; Barrera, Luis Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (MPS IV A) is a lysosomal storage disease produced by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) enzyme. Although genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported, these approaches have not enabled to establish a complete genotype-phenotype correlation, and they have not considered a ligand-enzyme interaction. In this study, we expanded the in silico evaluation of GALNS mutations by using several bioinformatics tools. Tertiary GALNS structure was modeled and used for molecular docking against galactose-6-sulfate, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate, keratan sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and the artificial substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-galactopyranoside-6-sulfate. Furthermore, we considered the evolutionary residue conservation, change conservativeness, position within GALNS structure, and the impact of amino acid substitution on the structure and function of GALNS. Molecular docking showed that amino acids involved in ligand interaction correlated with those observed in other human sulfatases, and mutations within the active cavity reduced affinity of all evaluated ligands. Combination of several bioinformatics approaches allowed to explaine 90% of the missense mutations affecting GALNS, and the prediction of the phenotype for another 21 missense mutations. In summary, we have shown for the first time a docking evaluation of natural and artificial ligands for human GALNS, and proposed an update in genotype-phenotype correlation for Morquio A, based on the use of multiple parameters to predict the disease severity.

  12. Identification and outcomes of clinical phenotypes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: Australian National Motor Neuron Disease observational cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Paul; Duong, Thi; Vucic, Steve; Mathers, Susan; Venkatesh, Svetha; Henderson, Robert; Rowe, Dominic; Schultz, David; Edis, Robert; Needham, Merrilee; Macdonnell, Richard; McCombe, Pamela; Birks, Carol; Kiernan, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To capture the clinical patterns, timing of key milestones and survival of patients presenting with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND) within Australia. Methods Data were prospectively collected and were timed to normal clinical assessments. An initial registration clinical report form (CRF) and subsequent ongoing assessment CRFs were submitted with a completion CRF at the time of death. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Participants 1834 patients with a diagnosis of ALS/MND were registered and followed in ALS/MND clinics between 2005 and 2015. Results 5 major clinical phenotypes were determined and included ALS bulbar onset, ALS cervical onset and ALS lumbar onset, flail arm and leg and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Of the 1834 registered patients, 1677 (90%) could be allocated a clinical phenotype. ALS bulbar onset had a significantly lower length of survival when compared with all other clinical phenotypes (p<0.004). There were delays in the median time to diagnosis of up to 12 months for the ALS phenotypes, 18 months for the flail limb phenotypes and 19 months for PLS. Riluzole treatment was started in 78–85% of cases. The median delays in initiating riluzole therapy, from symptom onset, varied from 10 to 12 months in the ALS phenotypes and 15–18 months in the flail limb phenotypes. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was implemented in 8–36% of ALS phenotypes and 2–9% of the flail phenotypes. Non-invasive ventilation was started in 16–22% of ALS phenotypes and 21–29% of flail phenotypes. Conclusions The establishment of a cohort registry for ALS/MND is able to determine clinical phenotypes, survival and monitor time to key milestones in disease progression. It is intended to expand the cohort to a more population-based registry using opt-out methodology and facilitate data linkage to other national registries. PMID:27694488

  13. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  14. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Murtaza

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson's disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson's disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson's disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson's disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson's disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression.

  15. Concordant but Varied Phenotypes among Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient-Specific Myoblasts Derived using a Human iPSC-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD remains an intractable genetic disease. Althogh there are several animal models of DMD, there is no human cell model that carries patient-specific DYSTROPHIN mutations. Here, we present a human DMD model using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. Our model reveals concordant disease-related phenotypes with patient-dependent variation, which are partially reversed by genetic and pharmacological approaches. Our “chemical-compound-based” strategy successfully directs hiPSCs into expandable myoblasts, which exhibit a myogenic transcriptional program, forming striated contractile myofibers and participating in muscle regeneration in vivo. DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts show disease-related phenotypes with patient-to-patient variability, including aberrant expression of inflammation or immune-response genes and collagens, increased BMP/TGFβ signaling, and reduced fusion competence. Furthermore, by genetic correction and pharmacological “dual-SMAD” inhibition, the DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts and genetically corrected isogenic myoblasts form “rescued” multi-nucleated myotubes. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a human “DMD-in-a-dish” model using hiPSC-based disease modeling.

  16. Reduced penetrance in human inherited disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... tant role in cellular senescence, tumorigenesis and in several diseases ... A correlation between epigenetic DNA modifications and human life span ... Most studies demonstrated that aging is associated with a relaxation in ...

  17. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured with salivary gland biopsies adopt an epithelial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Ola M; Tran, Simon D

    2011-06-01

    Sjogren's syndrome and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer result in severe xerostomia and irreversible salivary gland damage for which no effective treatment is currently available. Cell culture methods of primary human salivary gland epithelial cells (huSGs) are slow and cannot provide a sufficient number of cells. In addition, the majority of cultured huSGs are of a ductal phenotype and thus not fluid/saliva secretory cells. Some reports indicated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possessed the potential to differentiate into epithelial cells. To test this hypothesis with huSGs, a coculture system containing 2 chambers separated by a polyester membrane was used to study the capacity of human MSCs to adopt an epithelial phenotype when cocultured with human salivary gland biopsies. Results were that 20%-40% of cocultured MSCs expressed tight junction proteins [claudin-1 (CLDN-1), -2, -3, and -4; occludin; junctional adhesion molecule-A; and zonula occludens-1] as well as other epithelial markers [aquaporin-5, α-amylase (α-AMY), and E-cadherin], and generated a higher transepithelial electrical resistance. Electron microscopy demonstrated that these MSCs had comparable cellular structures to huSGs, such as tight junction structures and numerous secretory granules. Quantitative real time (RT)-polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation of several salivary genes (aquaporin-5, AMY, and CLDN-2). Moreover, the amounts of α-AMY detected in cocultured MSCs were comparable to those detected in huSGs control cultures. These data suggest that cocultured MSCs can demonstrate a temporary change into a salivary gland acinar phenotype.

  18. Genetic heterogeneity among slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2 phenotypes in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W

    2017-07-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) modify the metabolism of numerous drugs and carcinogens. These genetic polymorphisms modify both drug efficacy and toxicity and cancer risk associated with carcinogen exposure. Previous studies have suggested phenotypic heterogeneity among different NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes. NAT2 phenotype was investigated in vitro and in situ in samples of human hepatocytes obtained from various NAT2 slow and intermediate NAT2 acetylator genotypes. NAT2 gene dose response (NAT2*5B/*5B > NAT2*5B/*6A > NAT2*6A/*6A) was observed towards the N-acetylation of the NAT2-specific drug sulfamethazine by human hepatocytes both in vitro and in situ. N-acetylation of 4-aminobiphenyl, an arylamine carcinogen substrate for both N-acetyltransferase 1 and NAT2, showed the same trend both in vitro and in situ although the differences were not significant (p > 0.05). The N-acetylation of the N-acetyltransferase 1-specific substrate p-aminobenzoic acid did not follow this trend. In comparisons of NAT2 intermediate acetylator genotypes, differences in N-acetylation between NAT2*4/*5B and NAT2*4/*6B hepatocytes were not observed in vitro or in situ towards any of these substrates. These results further support phenotypic heterogeneity among NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, consistent with differential risks of drug failure or toxicity and cancer associated with carcinogen exposure.

  19. Tissue transglutaminase treatment leads to concentration-dependent changes in dendritic cell phenotype - implications for the role of transglutaminase in coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalleywater William J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are part of the innate immune system with a key role in initiating and modulating T cell mediated immune responses. Coeliac disease is caused by inappropriate activation of such a response leading to small intestinal inflammation when gluten is ingested. Tissue transglutaminase, an extracellular matrix (ECM protein, has an established role in coeliac disease; however, little work to date has examined its impact on DCs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of small intestinal ECM proteins, fibronectin (FN and tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG-2, on human DCs by including these proteins in DC cultures. The study used flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of FN and TG-2 on phenotype, endocytic ability and and morphology of DCs. Furthermore, DCs treated with FN and TG-2 were cultured with T cells and subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine profile was determined. The data indicate that transglutaminase affected DCs in a concentration-dependent manner. High concentrations were associated with a more mature phenotype and increased ability to stimulate T cells, while lower concentrations led to maintenance of an immature phenotype. These data provide support for an additional role for transglutaminase in coeliac disease and demonstrate the potential of in vitro modelling of coeliac disease pathogenesis.

  20. Beyond the Definitions of the Phenotypic Complications of Sickle Cell Disease: An Update on Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir K. Ballas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sickle hemoglobin is an abnormal hemoglobin due to point mutation (GAG → GTG in exon 1 of the β globin gene resulting in the substitution of glutamic acid by valine at position 6 of the β globin polypeptide chain. Although the molecular lesion is a single-point mutation, the sickle gene is pleiotropic in nature causing multiple phenotypic expressions that constitute the various complications of sickle cell disease in general and sickle cell anemia in particular. The disease itself is chronic in nature but many of its complications are acute such as the recurrent acute painful crises (its hallmark, acute chest syndrome, and priapism. These complications vary considerably among patients, in the same patient with time, among countries and with age and sex. To date, there is no well-established consensus among providers on the management of the complications of sickle cell disease due in part to lack of evidence and in part to differences in the experience of providers. It is the aim of this paper to review available current approaches to manage the major complications of sickle cell disease. We hope that this will establish another preliminary forum among providers that may eventually lead the way to better outcomes.

  1. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In Situ Characterizing Membrane Lipid Phenotype of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines Using Mass Spectrometry Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolisms are closely associated with cancers. In this study, mass spectrometry was employed to in situ investigate the associations of membrane lipid phenotypes of six human lung cancer cell lines (i.e., A549, H1650, H1975 from adenocarcinoma, H157 and H1703 from squamous cell carcinomas, and H460 from a large cell carcinoma) with cancer cell types and finally total 230 lipids were detected. Based these 230 lipids, partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that fi...

  5. Phenotypic and functional characterization of human mammary stem/progenitor cells in long term culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaveena Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancer stem cells exhibit close resemblance to normal stem cells in phenotype as well as function. Hence, studying normal stem cell behavior is important in understanding cancer pathogenesis. It has recently been shown that human breast stem cells can be enriched in suspension cultures as mammospheres. However, little is known about the behavior of these cells in long-term cultures. Since extensive self-renewal potential is the hallmark of stem cells, we undertook a detailed phenotypic and functional characterization of human mammospheres over long-term passages. METHODOLOGY: Single cell suspensions derived from human breast 'organoids' were seeded in ultra low attachment plates in serum free media. Resulting primary mammospheres after a week (termed T1 mammospheres were subjected to passaging every 7th day leading to the generation of T2, T3, and T4 mammospheres. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that primary mammospheres contain a distinct side-population (SP that displays a CD24(low/CD44(low phenotype, but fails to generate mammospheres. Instead, the mammosphere-initiating potential rests within the CD44(high/CD24(low cells, in keeping with the phenotype of breast cancer-initiating cells. In serial sphere formation assays we find that even though primary (T1 mammospheres show telomerase activity and fourth passage T4 spheres contain label-retaining cells, they fail to initiate new mammospheres beyond T5. With increasing passages, mammospheres showed an increase in smaller sized spheres, reduction in proliferation potential and sphere forming efficiency, and increased differentiation towards the myoepithelial lineage. Significantly, staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity revealed a dramatic increase in the number of senescent cells with passage, which might in part explain the inability to continuously generate mammospheres in culture. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the self-renewal potential of human breast stem cells is

  6. Defining disease phenotypes using national linked electronic health records: a case study of atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine I Morley

    Full Text Available National electronic health records (EHR are increasingly used for research but identifying disease cases is challenging due to differences in information captured between sources (e.g. primary and secondary care. Our objective was to provide a transparent, reproducible model for integrating these data using atrial fibrillation (AF, a chronic condition diagnosed and managed in multiple ways in different healthcare settings, as a case study.Potentially relevant codes for AF screening, diagnosis, and management were identified in four coding systems: Read (primary care diagnoses and procedures, British National Formulary (BNF; primary care prescriptions, ICD-10 (secondary care diagnoses and OPCS-4 (secondary care procedures. From these we developed a phenotype algorithm via expert review and analysis of linked EHR data from 1998 to 2010 for a cohort of 2.14 million UK patients aged ≥ 30 years. The cohort was also used to evaluate the phenotype by examining associations between incident AF and known risk factors.The phenotype algorithm incorporated 286 codes: 201 Read, 63 BNF, 18 ICD-10, and four OPCS-4. Incident AF diagnoses were recorded for 72,793 patients, but only 39.6% (N = 28,795 were recorded in primary care and secondary care. An additional 7,468 potential cases were inferred from data on treatment and pre-existing conditions. The proportion of cases identified from each source differed by diagnosis age; inferred diagnoses contributed a greater proportion of younger cases (≤ 60 years, while older patients (≥ 80 years were mainly diagnosed in SC. Associations of risk factors (hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure with incident AF defined using different EHR sources were comparable in magnitude to those from traditional consented cohorts.A single EHR source is not sufficient to identify all patients, nor will it provide a representative sample. Combining multiple data sources and integrating information on treatment and

  7. An ileal Crohn's disease gene signature based on whole human genome expression profiles of disease unaffected ileal mucosal biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyi Zhang

    Full Text Available Previous genome-wide expression studies have highlighted distinct gene expression patterns in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD compared to control samples, but the interpretation of these studies has been limited by sample heterogeneity with respect to disease phenotype, disease activity, and anatomic sites. To further improve molecular classification of inflammatory bowel disease phenotypes we focused on a single anatomic site, the disease unaffected proximal ileal margin of resected ileum, and three phenotypes that were unlikely to overlap: ileal Crohn's disease (ileal CD, ulcerative colitis (UC, and control patients without IBD. Whole human genome (Agilent expression profiling was conducted on two independent sets of disease-unaffected ileal samples collected from the proximal margin of resected ileum. Set 1 (47 ileal CD, 27 UC, and 25 Control non-IBD patients was used as the training set and Set 2 was subsequently collected as an independent test set (10 ileal CD, 10 UC, and 10 control non-IBD patients. We compared the 17 gene signatures selected by four different feature-selection methods to distinguish ileal CD phenotype with non-CD phenotype. The four methods yielded different but overlapping solutions that were highly discriminating. All four of these methods selected FOLH1 as a common feature. This gene is an established biomarker for prostate cancer, but has not previously been associated with Crohn's disease. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed increased expression of FOLH1 in the ileal epithelium. These results provide evidence for convergent molecular abnormalities in the macroscopically disease unaffected proximal margin of resected ileum from ileal CD subjects.

  8. Clear correlation of genotype with disease phenotype in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, B S; Olpin, S; Poorthuis, B J; Scholte, H R; Vianey-Saban, C; Wanders, R; Ijlst, L; Morris, A; Pourfarzam, M; Bartlett, K; Baumgartner, E R; deKlerk, J B; Schroeder, L D; Corydon, T J; Lund, H; Winter, V; Bross, P; Bolund, L; Gregersen, N

    1999-01-01

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the initial rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. VLCAD deficiency is clinically heterogenous, with three major phenotypes: a severe childhood form, with early onset, high mortality, and high incidence of cardiomyopathy; a milder childhood form, with later onset, usually with hypoketotic hypoglycemia as the main presenting feature, low mortality, and rare cardiomyopathy; and an adult form, with isolated skeletal muscle involvement, rhabdomyolysis, and myoglobinuria, usually triggered by exercise or fasting. To examine whether these different phenotypes are due to differences in the VLCAD genotype, we investigated 58 different mutations in 55 unrelated patients representing all known clinical phenotypes and correlated the mutation type with the clinical phenotype. Our results show a clear relationship between the nature of the mutation and the severity of disease. Patients with the severe childhood phenotype have mutations that result in no residual enzyme activity, whereas patients with the milder childhood and adult phenotypes have mutations that may result in residual enzyme activity. This clear genotype-phenotype relationship is in sharp contrast to what has been observed in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, in which no correlation between genotype and phenotype can be established. PMID:9973285

  9. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute......Protein misfolding is a common event in living cells. In young and healthy cells, the misfolded protein load is disposed of by protein quality control (PQC) systems. In aging cells and in cells from certain individuals with genetic diseases, the load may overwhelm the PQC capacity, resulting...... in accumulation of misfolded proteins. Dependent on the properties of the protein and the efficiency of the PQC systems, the accumulated protein may be degraded or assembled into toxic oligomers and aggregates. To illustrate this concept, we discuss a number of very different protein misfolding diseases including...

  10. Multicolor Fluorescence Imaging as a Candidate for Disease Detection in Plant Phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bueno, María L.; Pineda, Mónica; Cabeza, Francisco M.; Barón, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The negative impact of conventional farming on environment and human health make improvements on farming management mandatory. Imaging techniques are implemented in remote sensing for monitoring crop fields and plant phenotyping programs. The increasingly large size and complexity of the data obtained by these techniques, makes the implementation of powerful mathematical tools necessary in order to identify informative parameters and to apply them in precision agriculture. Multicolor fluorescence imaging is a useful approach for the study of plant defense responses to stress factors at bench scale. However, it has not been fully applied to plant phenotyping. This work evaluates the possible application of multicolor fluorescence imaging in combination with thermography for the particular case of zucchini plants affected by soft-rot, caused by Dickeya dadantii. Several statistical models -based on logistic regression analysis (LRA) and artificial neural networks (ANN)- were obtained for the experimental system zucchini-D. dadantii, which classify new samples as “healthy” or “infected.” The LRA worked best in identifying high dose-infiltrated leaves (in infiltrated and non-infiltrated areas) whereas ANN offered a higher accuracy at identifying low dose-infiltrated areas. To assess the applicability of these results to cucurbits in a more general way, these models were validated for melon infected by the same pathogen, achieving accurate predictions for the infiltrated areas. The values of accuracy achieved are comparable to those found in the literature for classifiers identifying other infections based on data obtained by different techniques. Thus, MCFI in combination with thermography prove useful at providing data at lab scale that can be analyzed by machine learning. This approach could be scaled up to be applied in plant phenotyping. PMID:27994607

  11. Multicolor fluorescence imaging as a candidate for disease detection in plant phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Pérez-Bueno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The negative impact of conventional farming on environment and human health make improvements on farming management mandatory. Imaging techniques are implemented in remote sensing for monitoring crop fields and plant phenotyping programs. The increasingly large size and complexity of the data obtained by these techniques, makes the implementation of powerful mathematical tools necessary in order to identify informative parameters and to apply them in precision agriculture.Multicolor fluorescence imaging is a useful approach for the study of plant defense responses to stress factors at bench scale. However, it has not been fully applied to plant phenotyping. This work evaluates the possible application of multicolor fluorescence imaging in combination with thermography for the particular case of zucchini plants affected by soft rot, caused by Dickeya dadantii. Several statistical models -based on logistic regression analysis (LRA and artificial neural networks (ANN- were obtained for the experimental system zucchini-D. dadantii, which classify new samples as healthy or infected. The LRA worked best in identifying high dose-infiltrated leaves (in infiltrated and non-infiltrated areas whereas ANN offered a higher accuracy at identifying low dose-infiltrated areas. To assess the applicability of these results to cucurbits in a more general way, these models were validated for melon infected by the same pathogen, achieving accurate predictions for the infiltrated areas. The values of accuracy achieved are comparable to those found in the literature for classifiers identifying other infections based on data obtained by different techniques. Thus, MCFI in combination with thermography prove useful at providing data at lab scale that can be analyzed by machine learning. This approach could be scaled up to be applied in plant phenotyping.

  12. Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae infection of human astrocytes and microglia in culture displays an active, rather than a persistent, phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Gérard, Hervé C; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Hudson, Alan P

    2006-10-01

    The intracellular pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae can cause persistent infections during which its morphologic, molecular, and pathogenic characteristics differ importantly from those of active infection. This bacterium was identified within astrocytes and microglia in the brain of late-onset Alzheimer disease patients. We investigated whether infection of these two host cell types displays an active or persistent growth phenotype. The human astrocytoma and microglioma cell lines U-87 MG and CHME-5 (respectively) and the human epithelial cell line HEp-2 were infected by the standard method with C pneumoniae strain AR-39. Cultures were harvested at 24, 48, and 72 hours postinfection and subjected to analysis of inclusion morphology. DNA and RNA were prepared from portions of each infected culture sample and analyzed for relative chromosome accumulation and presence or absence of several specific bacterial mRNAs. Astrocytes and microglial cells infected in vitro with C pneumoniae displayed inclusions that were indistinguishable from those characteristic of active infection of the standard HEp-2 host cell line. Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that the relative accumulation of chlamydial chromosome over time during infection of these two cell lines also was virtually identical to that in actively infected HEp-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analyses showed that mRNA from ftsK, pyk, and other chlamydial genes whose expression is abrogated during persistent infection were easily identifiable in infected CHME-5 and U-87 MG cells. In cultured human astrocytes and microglia, C pneumoniae displays an active, not a persistent, growth phenotype. This indicates normal passage through the developmental cycle with its probable concomitant destruction by lysis of some portion of host cells at the termination of that cycle.

  13. Human embryonic stem cell microenvironment suppresses the tumorigenic phenotype of aggressive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Margaryan, Naira V; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Lipavsky, Alina; Wheaton, William W; Abbott, Daniel E; Seftor, Richard E B; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2008-03-18

    Embryonic stem cells sustain a microenvironment that facilitates a balance of self-renewal and differentiation. Aggressive cancer cells, expressing a multipotent, embryonic cell-like phenotype, engage in a dynamic reciprocity with a microenvironment that promotes plasticity and tumorigenicity. However, the cancer-associated milieu lacks the appropriate regulatory mechanisms to maintain a normal cellular phenotype. Previous work from our laboratory reported that aggressive melanoma and breast carcinoma express the embryonic morphogen Nodal, which is essential for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) pluripotency. Based on the aberrant expression of this embryonic plasticity gene by tumor cells, this current study tested whether these cells could respond to regulatory cues controlling the Nodal signaling pathway, which might be sequestered within the microenvironment of hESCs, resulting in the suppression of the tumorigenic phenotype. Specifically, we discovered that metastatic tumor cells do not express the inhibitor to Nodal, Lefty, allowing them to overexpress this embryonic morphogen in an unregulated manner. However, exposure of the tumor cells to a hESC microenvironment (containing Lefty) leads to a dramatic down-regulation in their Nodal expression concomitant with a reduction in clonogenicity and tumorigenesis accompanied by an increase in apoptosis. Furthermore, this ability to suppress the tumorigenic phenotype is directly associated with the secretion of Lefty, exclusive to hESCs, because it is not detected in other stem cell types, normal cell types, or trophoblasts. The tumor-suppressive effects of the hESC microenvironment, by neutralizing the expression of Nodal in aggressive tumor cells, provide previously unexplored therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment.

  14. Is Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Caused by Wood Smoke a Different Phenotype or a Different Entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Duque, Carlos A; García-Rodriguez, María Carmen; González-García, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Around 40% of the world's population continue using solid fuel, including wood, for cooking or heating their homes. Chronic exposure to wood smoke is a risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In some regions of the world, this can be a more important cause of COPD than exposure to tobacco smoke from cigarettes. Significant differences between COPD associated with wood smoke (W-COPD) and that caused by smoking (S-COPD) have led some authors to suggest that W-COPD should be considered a new COPD phenotype. We present a review of the differences between W-COPD and S-COPD. On the premise that wood smoke and tobacco smoke are not the same and the physiopathological mechanisms they induce may differ, we have analyzed whether W-COPD can be considered as another COPD phenotype or a distinct nosological entity. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Darier disease in Slovenia: spectrum of ATP2A2 mutations and relation to patients' phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godic, Aleksandar; Strazisar, Mojca; Zupan, Andrej; Korosec, Branka; Kansky, Aleksej; Glavac, Damjan

    2010-01-01

    ATP2A2 encodes the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+- ATPase (SERCA2) and has been identified as a defective gene in Darier disease (DD). It is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis, which is characterized by loss of adhesion between suprabasal epidermal keratinocytes (acantholysis) and abnormal keratinization (dyskeratosis). We examined 28 Slovenian patients with DD (the cohort of patients represents over 50% of all DD patients in Slovenia) and screened genomic DNA for ATP2A2 mutations and RNA for splice site mutations. We identified 7 different ATP2A2 mutations, 4 of which are novel: A516P, R559G, 544+1del6, and 1762-6del18. We also found two previously described polymorphisms 2741+54 G>A in intron XVIII and 2172 G>A (A724A) in exon 15, with allele frequencies of 64.2% and 11.3%, respectively. The mutations are scattered throughout the gene and affect the actuator, phosphorylation, stalk and transmembrane domains of SERCA2. A P160L mutation in a Slovene patient with severe DD and a history of deafness is another consistent genotype-phenotype correlation. It seems that mutations of the ATP2A2 gene may also play a role in the pathogenesis of deafness, which seems to be a new phenotypic characteristic of DD patients.

  16. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Related Hereditary Neuropathies: From Gene Function to Associated Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareyson, D; Saveri, P; Piscosquito, G

    2014-10-10

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related neuropathies are a genetically highly heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. CMT affects both the sensory and motor nerves, distal Hereditary Motor Neuropathies (dHMN) are phenotypically similar disorders involving only motor nerves, while Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies (HSAN) are rare distinct disorders affecting sensory and sometimes autonomic nerves. Almost 70 genes have been identified as responsible for these disorders. It is astonishing to learn how diverse are the cellular sublocalisation and the functional roles of the encoded proteins of CMT-associated genes which all lead to similar disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Myelin formation and maintenance, mitochondrial dynamics, cytoskeleton organization, axonal transport, and vesicular trafficking are the most frequently involved pathways. However, dysfunction of several activities from the nucleus to the neuromuscular junction forms the basis for these hereditary neuropathies, making it challenging predicting the functions of newly identified mutated genes. In this review we will discuss the function and related phenotypes of all the genes thus far associated with CMT, dHMN, and HSAN.

  17. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliger Harold I.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers.

  18. Attenuation of disease phenotype through alternative translation initiation in low-penetrance retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen; Weekes, Daniel B; Beneyto, Magdalena; Prieto, Félix; Nájera, Carmen; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2007-02-01

    Hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma (RB) is caused by germline mutations in the retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) gene and transmits as an autosomal dominant trait. In the majority of cases disease develops in greater than 90% of carriers. However, reduced penetrance with a large portion of disease-free carrier is seen in some families. Unambiguous identification of the predisposing mutation in these families is important for accurate risk prediction in relatives and their genetic counseling but also provides conceptual information regarding the relationship between the RB1 genotype and the disease phenotype. In this study we report a novel mutation detected in 10 individuals of an extended family, only three of whom are affected by RB disease. The mutation comprises a 23-basepair (bp) duplication in the first exon of RB1 (c.43_65dup) producing a frameshift in exon 1 and premature chain termination in exon 2. Mutations resulting in premature chain termination classically are associated with high penetrance disease, as message translation may not generate functional product and nonsense mediated RNA decay (NMD) frequently eliminates the mutant transcript. However, appreciable NMD does not follow from the mutation described here and transcript expression in tissue culture cells and translation in vitro reveals that alternative in-frame translation start sites involving Met113 and possibly Met233 are used to generate truncated RB1 products (pRB94 and pRB80), known and suspected to exhibit tumor suppressor activity. These results strongly suggest that modulation of disease penetrance in this family is achieved by internal translation initiation. Our observations provide the first example for rescue of a chain-terminating mutation in RB1 through alternative translation initiation.

  19. Nucleation of protein aggregation kinetics as a basis for genotype-phenotype correlations in polyglutamine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsubara Shiro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies of inherited neurodegenerative disorders have suggested a linkage between the propensity toward aggregation of mutant protein and disease onset. This is particularly apparent for polyglutamine (polyQ diseases caused by expansion of CAG-trinucleotide repeats. However, a quantitative framework for relating aggregation kinetics with molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration initiation is lacking. Here, using the repeat-length-dependent age-of-onset in polyQ diseases, we derived a mathematical model based on nucleation of aggregation kinetics to describe genotype-phenotype correlations, and validated the model using both in vitro data and clinical data. Instead of describing polyQ aggregation kinetics with a derivative equation, our model divided age-of-onset (equivalent to the time required for aggregation into two processes: nucleation lag time (a first-order exponential function of CAG-repeat length and elongation time. With the exception of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 3, the relation between CAG-repeat length and age-of-onset in all examined polyQ diseases, including Huntington's disease, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and SCA1, -2, -6 and -7, could be well explained by three parameters derived from linear regression analysis based on the nucleated growth polymerization model. These parameters composed of probability of nucleation at an individual repeat, a protein concentration associated factor, and elongation time predict the overall features of neurodegeneration initiation, including constant risk for cell death, toxic polyQ species, main pathological subcellular site and the contribution of cellular factors. Our model also presents an alternative therapeutic strategy according to the distinct subcellular loci by the finding that nuclear localization of soluble mutant protein monomers itself has great impact on disease onset.

  20. Human Echinococcosis: A Neglected Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Menezes da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is among the most neglected parasitic diseases. Development of new drugs and other treatment modalities receives very little attention, if any. In most developed countries, Cystic Echinococcosis (CE is an imported disease of very low incidence and prevalence and is found almost exclusively in migrants from endemic regions. In endemic regions, predominantly settings with limited resources, patient numbers are high. Whole communities do not have access to appropriate treatment. The choice of treatment modalities is limited because of poor infrastructure and shortage of equipment and drugs. In this context, CE meets the criteria for a neglected disease. Furthermore, the terminology related to the designations around the parasite, its evolution and some therapeutic procedures is not uniform and sometimes inappropriate terms and wrong designations are used based on incorrect concepts. Although all of us know the different aspects of the disease it is pertinent to remember some important points and, above all, to clarify some aspects concerning the hydatid cyst's nomenclature in order to understand better the therapeutic options in the liver locations, particularly the different surgical approaches.

  1. Molecular identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Classification of Demodex mites has long depended on hosts and morphological characteristics. However, the fact that two species coexist in the same host and phenotype is easily influenced by environment causes difficulty and indeterminacy in traditional classification. Genotype, which directly reflects the molecular structure characteristics, is relatively stable. In this study, species identification of four phenotypes of human Demodex mites was conducted. Mites were morphologically classified into four phenotypes: long- and short-bodied Demodex folliculorum with finger-like terminus and Demodex brevis with finger- or cone-like terminus. The mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragment of individual mite was amplified, cloned, sequenced, and aligned. Sequence divergences, genetic distances, transition/transversion rates, and phylogenetic trees were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the 16S rDNA sequence of three phenotypes with finger-like terminus was 337 bp, and that of phenotype with cone-like terminus was 342 bp. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates among the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus were 0.0-2.7%, 0.000-0.029, and 5.0-7/0 (5/1-7/0), respectively, indicating an intraspecific variation. Yet, those between these three phenotypes and the one with cone-like terminus were 21.6-22.8%, 2.510-2.589, and 0.47-0.59 (22/47-27/46), respectively, suggesting an interspecific variation. The five phylogenetic trees showed that the three phenotypes with finger-like terminus clustered into one branch, while the phenotype with cone-like terminus clustered into another. In conclusion, terminus is a major morphological characteristic for the identification of human Demodex species. The three phenotypes with finger-like terminus belong to D. folliculorum, while the phenotype with cone-like terminus belongs to D. brevis. Molecular identification can verify and replenish morphological identification.

  2. Phenotype prediction of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in human phase II drug/xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: perspectives on molecular evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in coding regions can lead to amino acid changes that might alter the protein’s function and account for susceptibility to disease and altered drug/xenobiotic response. Many nsSNPs have been found in genes encoding human phase II metabolizing enzymes; however, there is little known about the relationship between the genotype and phenotype of nsSNPs in these enzymes. We have identified 923 validated nsSNPs in 104 human phase II enzyme genes from the Ensembl genome database and the NCBI SNP database. Using PolyPhen, Panther, and SNAP algorithms, 44%?59% of nsSNPs in phase II enzyme genes were predicted to have functional impacts on protein function. Predictions largely agree with the available experimental annotations. 68% of deleterious nsSNPs were correctly predicted as damaging. This study also identified many amino acids that are likely to be functionally critical, but have not yet been studied experimentally. There was significant concordance between the predicted results of Panther and PolyPhen, and between SNAP non-neutral predictions and PolyPhen scores. Evolutionarily non-neutral (destabilizing) amino acid substitutions are thought to be the pathogenetic basis for the alteration of phase II enzyme activity and to be associated with disease susceptibility and drug/xenobiotic toxicity. Furthermore, the molecular evolutionary patterns of phase II enzymes were characterized with regards to the predicted deleterious nsSNPs.

  3. Public support for neonatal screening for Pompe disease, a broad-phenotype condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinreich Stephanie

    2012-03-01

    screening for Pompe disease, not only among those who have personal experience of the disease but also among the general public in the Netherlands. Optional screening on the basis of informed parental consent is probably unrealistic, underlining the need for new guidelines to help policymakers in their consideration of newborn screening for broad phenotype conditions.

  4. [Primary human demodicosis. A disease sui generis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C-K; Zink, A; Wei, K-J; Dzika, E; Plewig, G; Chen, W

    2015-03-01

    Human Demodex mites (Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis) are unique in that they are an obligate human ectoparasite that can inhabit the pilosebaceous unit lifelong without causing obvious host immune response in most cases. The mode of symbiosis between humans and human Demodex mites is unclear, while the pathogenicity of human Demodex mites in many inflammatory skin diseases is now better understood. Primary human demodicosis is a skin disease sui generis not associated with local or systemic immunosuppression. Diagnosis is often underestimated and differentiation from folliculitis, papulopustular rosacea and perioral dermatitis is not always straightforward. Dependent on the morphology and degree of inflammation, the clinical manifestations can be classified into spinulate, papulopustular, nodulocystic, crustic and fulminant demodicosis. Therapy success can be achieved only with acaricides/arachidicides. The effective doses, optimal regimen and antimicrobial resistance remain to be determined.

  5. Motor phenotype is not associated with vascular dysfunction in symptomatic Huntington’s disease transgenic R6/2 (160 CAG) mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pardo, A.; Carrizzo, A.; Damato, A.; Castaldo, S.; Amico, E.; Capocci, L.; Ambrosio, M.; Pompeo, F.; De Sanctis, C.; Spinelli, C. C.; Puca, A. A.; Remondelli, P.; Maglione, V.; Vecchione, C.

    2017-01-01

    Whereas Huntington’s disease (HD) is unequivocally a neurological disorder, a critical mass of emerging studies highlights the occurrence of peripheral pathology like cardiovascular defects in both animal models and humans. The overt impairment in cardiac function is normally expected to be associated with peripheral vascular dysfunction, however whether this assumption is reasonable or not in HD is still unknown. In this study we functionally characterized the vascular system in R6/2 mouse model (line 160 CAG), which recapitulates several features of human pathology including cardiac disease. Vascular reactivity in different arterial districts was determined by wire myography in symptomatic R6/2 mice and age-matched wild type (WT) littermates. Disease stage was assessed by using well-validated behavioural tests like rotarod and horizontal ladder task. Surprisingly, no signs of vascular dysfunction were detectable in symptomatic mice and no link with motor phenotype was found. PMID:28211486

  6. Genetic architecture for human aggression: A study of gene-phenotype relationship in OMIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-James, Yanli; Faraone, Stephen V

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies of human aggression have mainly focused on known candidate genes and pathways regulating serotonin and dopamine signaling and hormonal functions. These studies have taught us much about the genetics of human aggression, but no genetic locus has yet achieved genome-significance. We here present a review based on a paradoxical hypothesis that studies of rare, functional genetic variations can lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying complex multifactorial disorders such as aggression. We examined all aggression phenotypes catalogued in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), an Online Catalog of Human Genes and Genetic Disorders. We identified 95 human disorders that have documented aggressive symptoms in at least one individual with a well-defined genetic variant. Altogether, we retrieved 86 causal genes. Although most of these genes had not been implicated in human aggression by previous studies, the most significantly enriched canonical pathways had been previously implicated in aggression (e.g., serotonin and dopamine signaling). Our findings provide strong evidence to support the causal role of these pathways in the pathogenesis of aggression. In addition, the novel genes and pathways we identified suggest additional mechanisms underlying the origins of human aggression. Genome-wide association studies with very large samples will be needed to determine if common variants in these genes are risk factors for aggression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Global biogeography of human infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kris A; Preston, Nicholas; Allen, Toph; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Hosseini, Parviez R; Daszak, Peter

    2015-10-13

    The distributions of most infectious agents causing disease in humans are poorly resolved or unknown. However, poorly known and unknown agents contribute to the global burden of disease and will underlie many future disease risks. Existing patterns of infectious disease co-occurrence could thus play a critical role in resolving or anticipating current and future disease threats. We analyzed the global occurrence patterns of 187 human infectious diseases across 225 countries and seven epidemiological classes (human-specific, zoonotic, vector-borne, non-vector-borne, bacterial, viral, and parasitic) to show that human infectious diseases exhibit distinct spatial grouping patterns at a global scale. We demonstrate, using outbreaks of Ebola virus as a test case, that this spatial structuring provides an untapped source of prior information that could be used to tighten the focus of a range of health-related research and management activities at early stages or in data-poor settings, including disease surveillance, outbreak responses, or optimizing pathogen discovery. In examining the correlates of these spatial patterns, among a range of geographic, epidemiological, environmental, and social factors, mammalian biodiversity was the strongest predictor of infectious disease co-occurrence overall and for six of the seven disease classes examined, giving rise to a striking congruence between global pathogeographic and "Wallacean" zoogeographic patterns. This clear biogeographic signal suggests that infectious disease assemblages remain fundamentally constrained in their distributions by ecological barriers to dispersal or establishment, despite the homogenizing forces of globalization. Pathogeography thus provides an overarching context in which other factors promoting infectious disease emergence and spread are set.

  8. Gene-Environment Interactions in the Development of Complex Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Olden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of knowledge about the earliest events in disease development is due to the multi-factorial nature of disease risk. This information gap is the consequence of the lack of appreciation for the fact that most diseases arise from the complex interactions between genes and the environment as a function of the age or stage of development of the individual. Whether an environmental exposure causes illness or not is dependent on the efficiency of the so-called “environmental response machinery” (i.e., the complex of metabolic pathways that can modulate response to environmental perturbations that one has inherited. Thus, elucidating the causes of most chronic diseases will require an understanding of both the genetic and environmental contribution to their etiology. Unfortunately, the exploration of the relationship between genes and the environment has been hampered in the past by the limited knowledge of the human genome, and by the inclination of scientists to study disease development using experimental models that consider exposure to a single environmental agent. Rarely in the past were interactions between multiple genes or between genes and environmental agents considered in studies of human disease etiology. The most critical issue is how to relate exposure-disease association studies to pathways and mechanisms. To understand how genes and environmental factors interact to perturb biological pathways to cause injury or disease, scientists will need tools with the capacity to monitor the global expression of thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites simultaneously. The generation of such data in multiple species can be used to identify conserved and functionally significant genes and pathways involved in geneenvironment interactions. Ultimately, it is this knowledge that will be used to guide agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in decisions regarding biomedical research funding

  9. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirena Soriano

    Full Text Available Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA, the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Metal Homeostasis Regulators Suppress FRDA Phenotypes in a Drosophila Model of the Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Sirena; Calap-Quintana, Pablo; Llorens, José Vicente; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Martínez-Sebastián, María José; Botas, Juan; Moltó, María Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA), the most commonly inherited ataxia in populations of European origin, is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a decrease in frataxin levels. One of the hallmarks of the disease is the accumulation of iron in several tissues including the brain, and frataxin has been proposed to play a key role in iron homeostasis. We found that the levels of zinc, copper, manganese and aluminum were also increased in a Drosophila model of FRDA, and that copper and zinc chelation improve their impaired motor performance. By means of a candidate genetic screen, we identified that genes implicated in iron, zinc and copper transport and metal detoxification can restore frataxin deficiency-induced phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the metal dysregulation in FRDA includes other metals besides iron, therefore providing a new set of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27433942

  11. Complement regulators in human disease: lessons from modern genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Liszewski, M; Atkinson, J P

    2015-03-01

    First identified in human serum in the late 19th century as a 'complement' to antibodies in mediating bacterial lysis, the complement system emerged more than a billion years ago probably as the first humoral immune system. The contemporary complement system consists of nearly 60 proteins in three activation pathways (classical, alternative and lectin) and a terminal cytolytic pathway common to all. Modern molecular biology and genetics have not only led to further elucidation of the structure of complement system components, but have also revealed function-altering rare variants and common polymorphisms, particularly in regulators of the alternative pathway, that predispose to human disease by creating 'hyperinflammatory complement phenotypes'. To treat these 'complementopathies', a monoclonal antibody against the initiator of the membrane attack complex, C5, has received approval for use. Additional therapeutic reagents are on the horizon.

  12. Let-7b inhibits human cancer phenotype by targeting cytochrome P450 epoxygenase 2J2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiong Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, noncoding RNA molecules of 20 to 22 nucleotides that regulate gene expression by binding to their 3' untranslated region (3'UTR. Increasing data implicate altered miRNA participation in the progress of cancer. We previously reported that CYP2J2 epoxygenase promotes human cancer phenotypes. But whether and how CYP2J2 is regulated by miRNA is not understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using bioinformatics analysis, we found potential target sites for miRNA let-7b in 3'UTR of human CYP2J2. Luciferase and western blot assays revealed that CYP2J2 was regulated by let-7b. In addition, let-7b decreased the enzymatic activity of endogenous CYP2J2. Furthermore, let-7b may diminish cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis of tumor cells via posttranscriptional repression of CYP2J2. Tumor xenografts were induced in nude mice by subcutaneous injection of MDA-MB-435 cells. The let-7b expression vector, pSilencer-let-7b, was injected through tail vein every 3 weeks. Let-7b significantly inhibited the tumor phenotype by targeting CYP2J2. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to determine the expression levels of let-7b and CYP2J2 protein from 18 matched lung squamous cell cancer and adjacent normal lung tissues; the expression level of CYP2J2 was inversely proportional to that of let-7b. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that the decreased expression of let-7b could lead to the high expression of CYP2J2 protein in cancerous tissues. These findings suggest that miRNA let-7b reduces CYP2J2 expression, which may contribute to inhibiting tumor phenotypes.

  13. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  14. Clinical and biological phenotypes of frontotemporal dementia: Perspectives for disease modifying therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzina, S; Manes, M A; Padovani, A; Borroni, B

    2017-06-01

    Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition which encompasses a group of clinically, neuropathologically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by selective involvement of the frontal and temporal lobes. FTD is characterized by changes in behaviour and personality, frontal executive deficits and language dysfunction. Different phenotypes have been defined on the basis of presenting clinical symptoms, behavioural variants of FTD (bvFTD) and primary progressive aphasia (PPA), which includes nonfluent/agrammatic variant PPA (avPPA) and semantic variant PPA (svPPA). These presentations can overlap with atypical parkinsonian disorders (i.e., corticobasal syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Each syndrome can be associated with one or more neuropathological hallmark, and in some cases it may be due to autosomal inherited disorder caused by mutations in a number of genes. Currently, there is no specific treatment available to prevent disease progression. FTD treatment is based on symptomatic management, and most therapies lack quality evidence from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Recent advances in the understanding of FTD pathophysiology and genetics have led to the development of potentially disease-modifying therapies. In this review, we discussed current knowledge and recommendations with regards to symptomatic and disease-modifying therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease: an overview of genotypes, phenotypes, and clinical management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Abassi, Rima; England, John D; Carter, Gregory T

    2014-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, which encompasses several hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies, is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders. Our understanding of the molecular genotypes of CMT and the resultant clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes has increased greatly in the past decade. Characterized by electrodiagnostic studies into demyelinating (type 1) and axonal (type 2) forms, subsequent genetic testing often provides an exact diagnosis of a specific subtype of CMT. These advancements have made diagnostic paradigms fairly straightforward. Still, the nature and extent of neuromuscular disability is often complex in persons with CMT, and no curative treatments are yet available. Genotypically homologous animal models of CMT have improved exploration of disease-modifying treatments, of which molecular genetic manipulation and stem cell therapies appear to be the most promising. Research is also needed to develop better rehabilitative strategies that may limit disease burden and improve physical performance and psychosocial integration. Clinical management should be multidisciplinary, including neurologists, physiatrists, neurogeneticists, neuromuscular nurse practitioners, and orthopedists, along with physical and occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, orthotists, vocational counselors, social workers, and other rehabilitation clinicians. Goals should include maximizing functional independence and quality of life while minimizing disability and secondary morbidity. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Infections associated with chronic granulomatous disease: linking genetics to phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Josef; Wolach, Ofir; Gavrieli, Ronit; Wolach, Baruch

    2012-08-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited primary immunodeficiency characterized by the absence or malfunction of the NADPH oxidase in phagocytic cells. As a result, there is an impaired ability to generate superoxide anions and the subsequent reactive oxygen intermediates. Consequently, CGD patients suffer from two clinical manifestations: recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammatory reactions leading to granulomatous lesions. Although the genotype of CGD was linked to the phenotypic expression of the disease, this connection is still controversial and poorly understood. Certain correlations were reported, but the clinical expression of the disease is usually unpredictable, regardless of the pattern of inheritance. CGD mainly affects the lungs, lymph nodes, skin, GI tract and liver. Patients are particularly susceptible to catalase-positive microorganisms, including Staphyloccocus aureus, Nocardia spp. and Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia marcescens, Burkholderia cepacea and Salmonella spp. Unusually, catalase-negative microorganisms were reported as well. New antibacterial and antimycotic agents considerably improved the prognosis of CGD. Therapy with IFN-γ is still controversial. Bone marrow stem cell transplantation is currently the only curative treatment and gene therapy needs further development. In this article, the authors discuss the genetic, functional and molecular aspects of CGD and their impact on the clinical expression, infectious complications and the hyperinflammatory state.

  17. Impairment of adolescent hippocampal plasticity in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease precedes disease phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hartl

    Full Text Available The amyloid precursor protein (APP was assumed to be an important neuron-morphoregulatory protein and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. In the study presented here, we analyzed the APP-transgenic mouse model APP23 using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis technology in combination with DIGE and mass spectrometry. We investigated cortex and hippocampus of transgenic and wildtype mice at 1, 2, 7 and 15 months of age. Furthermore, cortices of 16 days old embryos were analyzed. When comparing the protein patterns of APP23 with wildtype mice, we detected a relatively large number of altered protein spots at all age stages and brain regions examined which largely preceded the occurrence of amyloid plaques. Interestingly, in hippocampus of adolescent, two-month old mice, a considerable peak in the number of protein changes was observed. Moreover, when protein patterns were compared longitudinally between age stages, we found that a large number of proteins were altered in wildtype mice. Those alterations were largely absent in hippocampus of APP23 mice at two months of age although not in other stages compared. Apparently, the large difference in the hippocampal protein patterns between two-month old APP23 and wildtype mice was caused by the absence of distinct developmental changes in the hippocampal proteome of APP23 mice. In summary, the absence of developmental proteome alterations as well as a down-regulation of proteins related to plasticity suggest the disturption of a normally occurring peak of hippocampal plasticity during adolescence in APP23 mice. Our findings are in line with the observation that AD is preceded by a clinically silent period of several years to decades. We also demonstrate that it is of utmost importance to analyze different brain regions and different age stages to obtain information about disease-causing mechanisms.

  18. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  19. Phenotypic studies of natural killer cell subsets in human transporter associated with antigen processing deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Zimmer

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from patients with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP deficiency are hyporesponsive. The mechanism of this defect is unknown, but the phenotype of TAP-deficient NK cells is almost normal. However, we noticed a high percentage of CD56(bright cells among total NK cells from two patients. We further investigated TAP-deficient NK cells in these patients and compared them to NK cells from two other TAP-deficient patients with no clinical symptoms and to individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases other than TAP deficiency (chronic lung diseases or vasculitis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies and the phenotype of NK cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, (51Chromium release assays were performed to assess the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In the symptomatic patients, CD56(bright NK cells represented 28% and 45%, respectively, of all NK cells (higher than in healthy donors. The patients also displayed a higher percentage of CD56(dimCD16(- NK cells than controls. Interestingly, this unusual NK cell subtype distribution was not found in the two asymptomatic TAP-deficient cases, but was instead present in several of the other patients. Over-expression of the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A by TAP-deficient NK cells was confirmed and extended to the inhibitory receptor ILT2 (CD85j. These inhibitory receptors were not involved in regulating the cytotoxicity of TAP-deficient NK cells. We conclude that expansion of the CD56(bright NK cell subtype in peripheral blood is not a hallmark of TAP deficiency, but can be found in other diseases as well. This might reflect a reaction of the immune system to pathologic conditions. It could be interesting to investigate the relative distribution of NK cell subsets in various respiratory and autoimmune diseases.

  20. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismüller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J.; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Färkkilä, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouillères, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; Benito de Valle, Maria; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. METHODS We performed a retrospective outcome analysis of patients diagnosed with PSC from 1980 through 2010 at 37 centers in Europe, North America, and Australia. For each patient, we collected data on sex, clinician-reported age at and date of PSC and IBD diagnoses, phenotypes of IBD and PSC, and date and indication of IBD-related surgeries. The primary and secondary endpoints were liver transplantation or death (LTD) and hepatopancreatobiliary malignancy, respectively. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to determine the effects of individual covariates on rates of clinical events, with time-to-event analysis ascertained through Kaplan-Meier estimates. RESULTS Of the 7121 patients in the cohort, 2616 met the primary endpoint (median time to event of 14.5 years) and 721 developed hepatopancreatobiliary malignancy. The most common malignancy was cholangiocarcinoma (n = 594); patients of advanced age at diagnosis had an increased incidence compared with younger patients (incidence rate: 1.2 per 100 patient-years for patients younger than 20 years old, 6.0 per 100 patient-years for patients 21–30 years old, 9.0 per 100 patient-years for patients 31–40 years old, 14.0 per 100 patient-years for patients 41–50 years old, 15.2 per 100 patient-years for patients 51–60 years old, and 21.0 per 100 patient-years for patients older than 60 years). Of all patients with PSC studied, 65.5% were men, 89.8% had classical or large-duct disease, and 70.0% developed IBD at some point. Assessing the development of IBD as a time-dependent covariate, Crohn’s disease and no IBD (both vs ulcerative colitis) were associated with a lower risk of LTD (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.62; P

  1. Blue eyes in lemurs and humans: same phenotype, different genetic mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Brenda J; Pedersen, Anja; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2009-01-01

    Almost all mammals have brown or darkly-pigmented eyes (irises), but among primates, there are some prominent blue-eyed exceptions. The blue eyes of some humans and lemurs are a striking example of convergent evolution of a rare phenotype on distant branches of the primate tree. Recent work...... on humans indicates that blue eye color is associated with, and likely caused by, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs12913832) in an intron of the gene HERC2, which likely regulates expression of the neighboring pigmentation gene OCA2. This raises the immediate question of whether blue eyes in lemurs might...... have a similar genetic basis. We addressed this by sequencing the homologous genetic region in the blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur macaco flavifrons; N = 4) and the closely-related black lemur (Eulemur macaco macaco; N = 4), which has brown eyes. We then compared a 166-bp segment corresponding...

  2. The expression of HSP in human skeletal muscle. Effects of muscle fiber phenotype and training background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Mattias; Mackey, Abigail L; Langberg, Henning;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds...... HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 are influenced only by endurance training suggesting the existence of a training......-modality specific action on the adaptive processes including heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  3. Heritability maps of human face morphology through large-scale automated three-dimensional phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Hysi, Pirro; Spector, Tim; Montana, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    The human face is a complex trait under strong genetic control, as evidenced by the striking visual similarity between twins. Nevertheless, heritability estimates of facial traits have often been surprisingly low or difficult to replicate. Furthermore, the construction of facial phenotypes that correspond to naturally perceived facial features remains largely a mystery. We present here a large-scale heritability study of face geometry that aims to address these issues. High-resolution, three-dimensional facial models have been acquired on a cohort of 952 twins recruited from the TwinsUK registry, and processed through a novel landmarking workflow, GESSA (Geodesic Ensemble Surface Sampling Algorithm). The algorithm places thousands of landmarks throughout the facial surface and automatically establishes point-wise correspondence across faces. These landmarks enabled us to intuitively characterize facial geometry at a fine level of detail through curvature measurements, yielding accurate heritability maps of the human face (www.heritabilitymaps.info).

  4. miR-196a Ameliorates Cytotoxicity and Cellular Phenotype in Transgenic Huntington’s Disease Monkey Neural Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard L.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Yang, Jinjing; Parnpai, Rangsun; Chan, Anthony W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) tract that leads to motor, cognitive and psychiatric impairment. Currently there is no cure for HD. A transgenic HD nonhuman primate (HD-NHP) model was developed with progressive development of clinical and pathological features similar to human HD, which suggested the potential preclinical application of the HD-NHP model. Elevated expression of miR-196a was observed in both HD-NHP and human HD brains. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were ameliorated by the overexpression of miR-196a in HD-NHP neural progenitor cells (HD-NPCs) and differentiated neural cells (HD-NCs). The expression of apoptosis related gene was also down regulated. Mitochondrial morphology and activity were improved as indicated by mitotracker staining and the upregulation of CBP and PGC-1α in HD-NPCs overexpressing miR-196a. Here we demonstrated the amelioration of HD cellular phenotypes in HD-NPCs and HD-NCs overexpressing miR-196a. Our results also suggested the regulatory role of miR-196a in HD pathogenesis that may hold the key for understanding molecular regulation in HD and developing novel therapeutics. PMID:27631085

  5. Multifactorial Patterns of Gene Expression in Colonic Epithelial Cells Predict Disease Phenotypes in Experimental Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Aubrey L.; Bruno, Maria E.C.; Rogier, Eric W.; Tuna, Halide; Cohen, Donald A.; Bondada, Subbarao; Chelvarajan, R. Lakshman; Brandon, J. Anthony; Jennings, C. Darrell; Kaetzel, Charlotte S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is complex and the need to identify molecular biomarkers is critical. Epithelial cells play a central role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. We previously identified 5 “signature” biomarkers in colonic epithelial cells (CEC) that are predictive of disease phenotype in Crohn’s disease. Here we investigate the ability of CEC biomarkers to define the mechanism and severity of intestinal inflammation. Methods We analyzed expression of RelA, A20, pIgR, TNF and MIP-2 in CEC of mice with DSS acute colitis or T cell-mediated chronic colitis. Factor analysis was used to combine the 5 biomarkers into 2 multifactorial principal components (PCs). PC scores for individual mice were correlated with disease severity. Results For both colitis models, PC1 was strongly weighted toward RelA, A20 and pIgR, and PC2 was strongly weighted toward TNF and MIP-2, while the contributions of other biomarkers varied depending on the etiology of inflammation. Disease severity was correlated with elevated PC2 scores in DSS colitis and reduced PC1 scores in T cell transfer colitis. Down-regulation of pIgR was a common feature observed in both colitis models and was associated with altered cellular localization of pIgR and failure to transport IgA. Conclusions A multifactorial analysis of epithelial gene expression may be more informative than examining single gene responses in IBD. These results provide insight into the homeostatic and pro-inflammatory functions of CEC in IBD pathogenesis and suggest that biomarker analysis could be useful for evaluating therapeutic options for IBD patients. PMID:23070952

  6. Lyme Disease Diagnosed by Alternative Methods: A Phenotype Similar to That of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, David M; Miller, Ruth R; Gardy, Jennifer L; Parker, Shoshana M; Morshed, Muhammad G; Steiner, Theodore S; Singer, Joel; Shojania, Kam; Tang, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    A subset of patients reporting a diagnosis of Lyme disease can be described as having alternatively diagnosed chronic Lyme syndrome (ADCLS), in which diagnosis is based on laboratory results from a nonreference Lyme specialty laboratory using in-house criteria. Patients with ADCLS report symptoms similar to those reported by patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). We performed a case-control study comparing patients with ADCLS and CFS to each other and to both healthy controls and controls with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Subjects completed a history, physical exam, screening laboratory tests, 7 functional scales, reference serology for Lyme disease using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria, reference serology for other tick-associated pathogens, and cytokine expression studies. The study enrolled 13 patients with ADCLS (12 of whom were diagnosed by 1 alternative US laboratory), 25 patients with CFS, 25 matched healthy controls, and 11 SLE controls. Baseline clinical data and functional scales indicate significant disability among ADCLS and CFS patients and many important differences between these groups and controls, but no significant differences between each other. No ADCLS patient was confirmed as having positive Lyme serology by reference laboratory testing, and there was no difference in distribution of positive serology for other tick-transmitted pathogens or cytokine expression across the groups. In British Columbia, a setting with low Lyme disease incidence, ADCLS patients have a similar phenotype to that of CFS patients. Disagreement between alternative and reference laboratory Lyme testing results in this setting is most likely explained by false-positive results from the alternative laboratory. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  8. Beyond the zebrafish: diverse fish species for modeling human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Schartl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, zebrafish, and to a lesser extent medaka, have become widely used small animal models for human diseases. These organisms have convincingly demonstrated the usefulness of fish for improving our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to pathological conditions, and for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Despite the usefulness of zebrafish and medaka in the investigation of a wide spectrum of traits, there is evidence to suggest that other fish species could be better suited for more targeted questions. With the emergence of new, improved sequencing technologies that enable genomic resources to be generated with increasing efficiency and speed, the potential of non-mainstream fish species as disease models can now be explored. A key feature of these fish species is that the pathological condition that they model is often related to specific evolutionary adaptations. By exploring these adaptations, new disease-causing and disease-modifier genes might be identified; thus, diverse fish species could be exploited to better understand the complexity of disease processes. In addition, non-mainstream fish models could allow us to study the impact of environmental factors, as well as genetic variation, on complex disease phenotypes. This Review will discuss the opportunities that such fish models offer for current and future biomedical research.

  9. Human endometrial side population cells exhibit genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of somatic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC.

  10. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  11. Integrating pathology into human disease modelling--how to eat the elephant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudamore, Cheryl L

    2014-05-01

    Mouse models are increasingly being used for the study of human disease, and the generation and functional characterisation of new models is underpinned by high-throughput phenotyping consortia such as the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium. A new study by Adissu and colleagues, published in Disease Models & Mechanisms, demonstrates the usefulness of histopathology in providing corroborative information and uncovering novel phenotypes in genetically modified mice in a high-throughput screen. Although pathology is recognised as a valuable tool to enhance our understanding of animal disease models, it has also been systematically under-resourced. This Editorial aims to highlight ways in which the gap between the usefulness of pathology and its perceived inaccessibility can be addressed by considering pragmatic solutions for planning, resourcing and accessing pathology expertise. The role of funding agencies, academic centres and journals in ensuring that the value of pathology is fully recognised and is adequately supported and funded is also discussed.

  12. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  13. Sequence to Medical Phenotypes: A Framework for Interpretation of Human Whole Genome DNA Sequence Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick E Dewey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing has facilitated a precipitous drop in the cost of genomic sequencing, prompting predictions of a revolution in medicine via genetic personalization of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. There are significant barriers to realizing this goal that are related to the difficult task of interpreting personal genetic variation. A comprehensive, widely accessible application for interpretation of whole genome sequence data is needed. Here, we present a series of methods for identification of genetic variants and genotypes with clinical associations, phasing genetic data and using Mendelian inheritance for quality control, and providing predictive genetic information about risk for rare disease phenotypes and response to pharmacological therapy in single individuals and father-mother-child trios. We demonstrate application of these methods for disease and drug response prognostication in whole genome sequence data from twelve unrelated adults, and for disease gene discovery in one father-mother-child trio with apparently simplex congenital ventricular arrhythmia. In doing so we identify clinically actionable inherited disease risk and drug response genotypes in pre-symptomatic individuals. We also nominate a new candidate gene in congenital arrhythmia, ATP2B4, and provide experimental evidence of a regulatory role for variants discovered using this framework.

  14. Future impact of integrated high-throughput methylome analyses on human health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee M Butcher; Stephan Beck

    2008-01-01

    A spate of high-powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have recently identified numerous single-nucleotide polymor- phisms (SNPs) robustly linked with complex disease. Despite interrogating the majority of common human variation, these SNPs only account for a small proportion of the phenotypic variance, which suggests genetic factors are acting in concert with non-genetic factors. Although environmental measures are logical covariants for genotype-phenotype investigations, another non-genetic intermediary exists: epigenetics. Epigenetics is the analysis of somatically-acquired and, in some cases, transgenerationally inherited epigenetic modifications that regulate gene expression, and offers to bridge the gap between genetics and environment to understand phenotype. The most widely studied epigenetic mark is DNA methylation. Aberrant methylation at gene promoters is strongly implicated in disease etiology, most notably cancer. This review will highlight the importance of DNA methylation as an epigenetic regulator, outline techniques to character- ize the DNA methylome and present the idea of reverse phenotyping, where multiple layers of analysis are integrated at the individual level to create personalized digital phenotypes and, at a phenotype level, to identify novel molecular signatures of disease.

  15. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A: from typical to rare phenotypic and genotypic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombelli, Francesco; Stojkovic, Tanya; Dubourg, Odile; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Tardieu, Sandrine; Larcher, Kathy; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Latour, Philippe; Vignal, Odile; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Brice, Alexis; Leguern, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous, with 11 genes identified. Axonal CMT has most frequently been associated with mutations in the MFN2 gene (CMT2A). To describe the clinical and molecular features of CMT2A, to delineate prognostic factors, to understand connections between a certain phenotype and more serious clinical consequences, and to identify interactions among the associated genes. We describe the clinical, molecular, electrophysiological, and additional features of 43 patients with CMT2A. The degree of physical disability was determined by the CMT neuropathy score and adapted to the CMT neuropathy score gradient to evaluate the clinical course. We evaluated all data within the context of the most recent and important publications concerning this issue. Twenty-five patients had early-onset CMT2A and severe functional disability, with 9 being wheelchair bound, and 18 had late-onset disease and a milder phenotype. Optic atrophy, vocal cord palsy, and auditory impairment were observed in 5, 6, and 2 patients, respectively. Among the 24 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord, 6 had evidence of spinal atrophy with or without hydromyelia. In 1 patient, magnetic resonance imaging revealed hydrocephalus. Twenty different MFN2 mutations were identified, and 14 were considered new variants. Their transmission was predominantly autosomal dominant, with vertical transmission in 8 and de novo occurrence in 3. However, we also identified rare types of transmission, especially a germinal mosaicism and an autosomal recessive inheritance. One patient carried a rare variant in the GDAP1 gene and another in the OPA1 gene in association with MFN2 mutation. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A associated with MFN2 mutations is clinically very heterogeneous. Ranging from a mild to a severe form, CMT2A exhibits various types of transmission. Optic atrophy and vocal cord palsy were observed in patients with severe

  16. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance.

  17. Transduction of Oct6 or Oct9 gene concomitant with Myc family gene induced osteoblast-like phenotypic conversion in normal human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizoshiri, N. [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedics, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Kishida, T. [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Dental Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shirai, T.; Terauchi, R.; Tsuchida, S. [Department of Orthopaedics, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mori, Y. [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedics, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Ejima, A. [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Sato, Y. [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Dental Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Arai, Y.; Fujiwara, H. [Department of Orthopaedics, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamoto, T.; Kanamura, N. [Department of Dental Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mazda, O., E-mail: mazda@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Kubo, T. [Department of Orthopaedics, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2015-11-27

    Introduction: Osteoblasts play essential roles in bone formation and regeneration, while they have low proliferation potential. Recently we established a procedure to directly convert human fibroblasts into osteoblasts (dOBs). Transduction of Runx2 (R), Osterix (X), Oct3/4 (O) and L-myc (L) genes followed by culturing under osteogenic conditions induced normal human fibroblasts to express osteoblast-specific genes and produce calcified bone matrix both in vitro and in vivo Intriguingly, a combination of only two factors, Oct3/4 and L-myc, significantly induced osteoblast-like phenotype in fibroblasts, but the mechanisms underlying the direct conversion remains to be unveiled. Materials and Methods: We examined which Oct family genes and Myc family genes are capable of inducing osteoblast-like phenotypic conversion. Results: As result Oct3/4, Oct6 and Oct9, among other Oct family members, had the capability, while N-myc was the most effective Myc family gene. The Oct9 plus N-myc was the best combination to induce direct conversion of human fibroblasts into osteoblast-like cells. Discussion: The present findings may greatly contribute to the elucidation of the roles of the Oct and Myc proteins in osteoblast direct reprogramming. The results may also lead to establishment of novel regenerative therapy for various bone resorption diseases. - Highlights: • Introducing L-myc in a combination with either Oct3/4, Oct6 or Oct9 enables the conversion of fibroblasts to osteoblasts. • A combination of L-myc with Oct3/4 or Oct9 can induce the cells to a phenotype closer to normal osteoblasts. • N-myc was considered the most appropriate Myc family gene for induction of osteoblast-like phenotype in fibroblasts. • The combination of Oct9 plus N-myc has the strongest capability of inducing osteoblast-like phenotype.

  18. Human mesenchymal stem cells shift CD8+ T cells towards a suppressive phenotype by inducing tolerogenic monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof-Nahor, Irit; Leshansky, Lucy; Shivtiel, Shoham; Eldor, Liron; Aberdam, Daniel; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2012-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated under extreme conditions of strong T cell activation, which induces the rapid death of activated lymphocytes. The objective of this study was to investigate these mechanisms in the absence of additional polyclonal activation. In co-cultures of peripheral mononuclear blood cells with human MSCs (hereafter referred to as hMSCs), we observed a striking decrease in the level of CD8 expression on CD8+ cells, together with decreased expression of CD28 and CD44, and impaired production of IFN-gamma and Granzyme B. This effect was specific to hMSCs, because it was not observed with several other cell lines. Downregulation of CD8 expression required CD14+ monocytes to be in direct contact with the CD8+ cells, whereas the effects of hMSCs on the CD14+ cells were essentially mediated by soluble factors. The CD14+ monocytes exhibited a tolerogenic pattern when co-cultured with hMSCs, with a clear decrease in CD80 and CD86 co-stimulatory molecules, and an increase in the inhibitory receptors ILT-3 and ILT-4. CD8+ cells that were preconditioned by MSCs had similar effects on monocytes and were able to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation. Injection of hMSCs in humanized NSG mice showed similar trends, in particular decreased levels of CD44 and CD28 in human immune cells. Our study demonstrates a new immunomodulation mechanism of action of hMSCs through the modulation of CD8+ cells towards a non-cytotoxic and/or suppressive phenotype. This mechanism of action has to be taken into account in clinical trials, where it should be beneficial in grafts and autoimmune diseases, but potentially detrimental in malignant diseases.

  19. Engineering large animal models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Sheets, Timothy P; Lillico, Simon G; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of gene editing tools and methodology for use in livestock enables the production of new animal disease models. These tools facilitate site-specific mutation of the genome, allowing animals carrying known human disease mutations to be produced. In this review, we describe the various gene editing tools and how they can be used for a range of large animal models of diseases. This genomic technology is in its infancy but the expectation is that through the use of gene editing tools we will see a dramatic increase in animal model resources available for both the study of human disease and the translation of this knowledge into the clinic. Comparative pathology will be central to the productive use of these animal models and the successful translation of new therapeutic strategies.

  20. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. PMID:27601585

  1. Mutator Phenotype and DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in BLM Helicase-Deficient Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yasui, Manabu; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-12-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS), an autosomal recessive disorder of the BLM gene, predisposes sufferers to various cancers. To investigate the mutator phenotype and genetic consequences of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in BS cells, we developed BLM helicase-deficient human cells by disrupting the BLM gene. Cells with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) due to homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) can be restored with or without site-directed DSB induction. BLM cells exhibited a high frequency of spontaneous interallelic HR with crossover, but noncrossover events with long-tract gene conversions also occurred. Despite the highly interallelic HR events, BLM cells predominantly produced hemizygous LOH by spontaneous deletion. These phenotypes manifested during repair of DSBs. Both NHEJ and HR appropriately repaired DSBs in BLM cells, resulting in hemizygous and homozygous LOHs, respectively. However, the magnitude of the LOH was exacerbated in BLM cells, as evidenced by large deletions and long-tract gene conversions with crossover. BLM helicase suppresses the elongation of branch migration and crossover of double Holliday junctions (HJs) during HR repair, and a deficiency in this enzyme causes collapse, abnormal elongation, and/or preferable resolution to crossover of double HJs, resulting in a large-scale LOH. This mechanism underlies the predisposition for cancer in BS. Copyright © 2016 Suzuki et al.

  2. Enteropeptidase: a gene associated with a starvation human phenotype and a novel target for obesity treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Braud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity research focuses essentially on gene targets associated with the obese phenotype. None of these targets have yet provided a viable drug therapy. Focusing instead on genes that are involved in energy absorption and that are associated with a "human starvation phenotype", we have identified enteropeptidase (EP, a gene associated with congenital enteropeptidase deficiency, as a novel target for obesity treatment. The advantages of this target are that the gene is expressed exclusively in the brush border of the intestine; it is peripheral and not redundant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Potent and selective EP inhibitors were designed around a boroarginine or borolysine motif. Oral administration of these compounds to mice restricted the bioavailability of dietary energy, and in a long-term treatment it significantly diminished the rate of increase in body weight, despite ad libitum food intake. No adverse reactions of the type seen with lipase inhibitors, such as diarrhea or steatorrhea, were observed. This validates EP as a novel, druggable target for obesity treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In vivo testing of novel boroarginine or borolysine-based EP inhibitors validates a novel approach to the treatment of obesity.

  3. Phenotypic Diversity of Sickle Cell Disease in Patients with a Double Heterozygosity for Hb S and Hb D-Punjab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lidiane S; Okumura, Jéssika V; Belini-Júnior, Édis; Oliveira, Renan G; Nascimento, Patrícia P; Silva, Danilo G H; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Oliani, Sonia M; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity for sickle cell disease is associated to several genetic factors such as genotype for sickle cell disease, β-globin gene cluster haplotypes and Hb F levels. The coinheritance of Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) and Hb D-Punjab (HBB: c.364G > C) results in a double heterozygosity, which constitutes one of the genotypic causes of sickle cell disease. This study aimed to assess the phenotypic diversity of sickle cell disease presented by carriers of the Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and the Bantu [- + - - - -] haplotype. We evaluated medical records from 12 patients with sickle cell disease whose Hb S/Hb D-Punjab genotype and Bantu haplotype were confirmed by molecular analysis. Hb S and Hb D-Punjab levels were quantified by chromatographic analysis. Mean concentrations of Hb S and Hb D-Punjab were 44.8 ± 2.3% and 43.3 ± 1.8%, respectively. Painful crises were present in eight (66.7%) patients evaluated, representing the most common clinical event. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) was the second most prevalent manifestation, occurring in two individuals (16.7%). Three patients were asymptomatic, while another two exhibited greater diversity of severe clinical manifestations. Medical records here analyzed reported a significant clinical diversity in sickle cell disease ranging from the absence of symptoms to wide phenotypic variety. The sickle cell disease genotype, Bantu haplotype and hemoglobin (Hb) levels did not influence the clinical diversity. Thus, we concluded that the phenotypic variation in sickle cell disease was present within a specific genotype for disease regardless of the β-globin gene cluster haplotypes.

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Huntington's disease show CAG-repeat-expansion-associated phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded stretch of CAG trinucleotide repeats that results in neuronal dysfunction and death. Here, The HD Consortium reports the generation and characterization of 14 induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from HD patients and controls. Microarray profiling revealed CAG-repeat-expansion-associated gene expression patterns that distinguish patient lines from controls, and early onset versus late onset HD. Differentiated HD neural cells showed disease-associated changes in electrophysiology, metabolism, cell adhesion, and ultimately cell death for lines with both medium and longer CAG repeat expansions. The longer repeat lines were however the most vulnerable to cellular stressors and BDNF withdrawal, as assessed using a range of assays across consortium laboratories. The HD iPSC collection represents a unique and well-characterized resource to elucidate disease mechanisms in HD and provides a human stem cell platform for screening new candidate therapeutics.

  5. Epidemiology of comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: clusters, phenotypes and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shambhu Aryala

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available COPD is a complex multisystem disease often accompanied by multiple co-morbidities that contribute to symptoms, exacerbations, hospital admissions and mortality. Individual comorbidities can be grouped into clusters of common human pathology: inflammation/immune response (e.g., ischemic heart disease, metabolic syndrome, thrombosis/hemorrhage (e.g., cerebrovascular diseases, pulmonary embolism, fibrosis/cell proliferation (e.g., lung cancer and other malignancies and apoptosis/necrosis (e.g., osteoporosis, skeletal muscle dysfunction. While the prevalence of the co-morbidities has been described in a number of observational studies, there is considerable variability in results; moreover characterization of cluster of co-morbidities with the most clinical significance in terms of morbidity and mortality is still lacking. Pathological mechanisms underlying some of the identified clusters are well known; others need further clarification to identify possible preventative strategies. Treatment of COPD must include management of the underlying co-morbidities for best outcomes.

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis-like phenotype in feline Sandhoff disease and partial correction after AAV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Brunson, Brandon L; Holland, Merrilee; Hespel, Adrien-Maxence; Bradbury, Allison M; McCurdy, Victoria J; Beadlescomb, Patricia M; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Voyles, Meredith L; Montgomery, Ronald D; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Children with infantile onset SD develop seizures, loss of motor tone and swallowing problems, eventually reaching a vegetative state with death typically by 4years of age. Other symptoms include vertebral gibbus and cardiac abnormalities strikingly similar to those of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Isolated fibroblasts from SD patients have impaired catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). To evaluate mucopolysaccharidosis-like features of the feline SD model, we utilized radiography, MRI, echocardiography, histopathology and GAG quantification of both central nervous system and peripheral tissues/fluids. The feline SD model exhibits cardiac valvular and structural abnormalities, skeletal changes and spinal cord compression that are consistent with accumulation of GAGs, but are much less prominent than the severe neurologic disease that defines the humane endpoint (4.5±0.5months). Sixteen weeks after intracranial AAV gene therapy, GAG storage was cleared in the SD cat cerebral cortex and liver, but not in the heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, skin, or urine. GAG storage worsens with time and therefore may become a significant source of pathology in humans whose lives are substantially lengthened by gene therapy or other novel treatments for the primary, neurologic disease.

  7. Characterization of isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum associated with coldwater disease or rainbow trout fry syndrome I : phenotypic and genomic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ellen; Dalsgaard, Inger; Bernardet, Jean-Francois

    1997-01-01

    differences, which might be related to differences in pathogenicity. European isolates originating from clinical outbreaks of either RTFS or CND usually harboured one plasmid of 3.2 kb, whereas isolates originating from fish with different or no disease signs had other profiles. Phenotypically, the Danish...

  8. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  9. Functional and phenotypic changes in human lymphocytes after coincubation with Leishmania donovani in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Sørensen, A L; Kharazmi, A

    1990-01-01

    that the inhibition of the proliferative response to PHA by live L. donovani in vitro is associated with early processes in lymphocyte activation. Further studies on the inhibitory phenomena described may be of potential significance in the investigation of the suppressive mechanisms in human visceral leishmaniasis.......In this paper we describe functional and phenotypic changes in T cells after in vitro coincubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and Leishmania donovani parasites at different parasite/peripheral blood mononuclear cell ratios. The phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphoproliferative...... response was reduced by the coincubation, and at the maximal parasite/peripheral blood mononuclear cell ratio used (7.5:1), the average response was less than 40% of the response in the absence of parasites. The cause of the reduction in lymphoproliferation is not clear, but it requires live parasites...

  10. Natural variation in populations of persistently colonizing bacteria affect human host cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rahul A; Lee, Yongchan; Kim, Sung-Kook; Israel, Dawn; Peek, Richard M; Blaser, Martin J

    2003-08-15

    The highly diverse bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which persistently colonizes the human stomach, provides models to study the role of genome plasticity in host adaptation. Within H. pylori populations from 2 colonized individuals, intragenomic recombination between cagA DNA repeat sequences leads to deletion or duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the CagA protein, which is injected by a type IV secretion system into host cells. Experimental coculture of gastric epithelial cells with the strains containing these naturally occurring CagA phosphorylation site variants induced markedly divergent host cell morphologic responses. Mutants were constructed in which a phosphorylation site was either added or deleted in the expressed CagA protein; coculture studies confirmed that the naturally occurring differences in CagA phosphorylation are responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. These findings indicate that within an individual host, intragenomic recombination between H. pylori repetitive DNA produces strain variants differing in their signals to host cells.

  11. Human breast microvascular endothelial cells retain phenotypic traits in long-term finite life span culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Kjartansson, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits...... with the tissue of origin. Microvasculature was localized in situ by immunohistochemistry in breast samples. From this tissue, collagen-rich stroma and adipose tissue were dissected mechanically and further disaggregated to release microvessel organoids. BRENCs were cultured from these organoids in endothelial...... uptake of low-density lipoprotein, and had E-selectin induced upon treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. The first signs of senescence in passage 14 were accompanied by gain of trisomy 11. At passage 18 cells showed chromosomal aberrations and growth arrest as revealed by beta...

  12. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish) moving within a confined home range (HR). Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity, stemming, in

  13. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Alós

    Full Text Available Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish moving within a confined home range (HR. Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity

  14. Global Nav1.7 knockout mice recapitulate the phenotype of human congenital indifference to pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinthe Gingras

    Full Text Available Clinical genetic studies have shown that loss of Nav1.7 function leads to the complete loss of acute pain perception. The global deletion is reported lethal in mice, however, and studies of mice with promoter-specific deletions of Nav1.7 have suggested that the role of Nav1.7 in pain transduction depends on the precise form of pain. We developed genetic and animal husbandry strategies that overcame the neonatal-lethal phenotype and enabled construction of a global Nav1.7 knockout mouse. Knockouts were anatomically normal, reached adulthood, and had phenotype wholly analogous to human congenital indifference to pain (CIP: compared to littermates, knockouts showed no defects in mechanical sensitivity or overall movement yet were completely insensitive to painful tactile, thermal, and chemical stimuli and were anosmic. Knockouts also showed no painful behaviors resulting from peripheral injection of nonselective sodium channel activators, did not develop complete Freund's adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia, and were insensitive to intra-dermal histamine injection. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current recorded from cell bodies of isolated sensory neurons and the mechanically-evoked spiking of C-fibers in a skin-nerve preparation each were reduced but not eliminated in tissue from knockouts compared to littermates. Results support a role for Nav1.7 that is conserved between rodents and humans and suggest several possibly translatable biomarkers for the study of Nav1.7-targeted therapeutics. Results further suggest that Nav1.7 may retain its key role in persistent as well as acute forms of pain.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic variation among Staphylococcus saprophyticus from human and animal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören; Sakinc, Türkan

    2010-06-10

    The main aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates from human and animal origin. In total, 236 clinical isolates and 15 animal isolates of S. saprophyticus were characterized in respect of the occurrence of 9 potential virulence genes and four surface properties. All strains were PCR positive for the regulatory genes agr, sar >it>A and rot as well as for the surface proteins UafA and Aas. Nearly 90% of the clinical isolates were found to possess the gene for the surface-associated lipase Ssp and 10% for the collagen binding MSCRAMM SdrI. All animal isolates were negative forsdrI. Lipolytic activity could be detected in 66% of the clinical and 46% of the animal isolates. Adherence to collagen type I was shown of 20% of the clinical strains and 6% of the strains of animal origin. Most S. saprophyticus strains showed hydrophobic properties and only few could agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. We described a broad analysis of animal and human S. saprophyticus isolates regarding virulence genes and phenotypic properties such as lipase activity, hydrophobicity, and adherence. While S. saprophyticus strains from animal sources have prerequisites for colonization of the urinary tract like the D-serine-deaminase, out findings suggested that they need to acquire new genes e.g. MSCRAMMS for adherence like sdrI and to modulate their existing properties e.g. increasing the lipase activity or reducing hydrophobicity. These apparently important new genes or properties for virulence have to be further analyzed.

  16. Genotypic and phenotypic variation among Staphylococcus saprophyticus from human and animal isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakinc Türkan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates from human and animal origin. Findings In total, 236 clinical isolates and 15 animal isolates of S. saprophyticus were characterized in respect of the occurrence of 9 potential virulence genes and four surface properties. All strains were PCR positive for the regulatory genes agr, sar>it>A and rot as well as for the surface proteins UafA and Aas. Nearly 90% of the clinical isolates were found to possess the gene for the surface-associated lipase Ssp and 10% for the collagen binding MSCRAMM SdrI. All animal isolates were negative forsdrI. Lipolytic activity could be detected in 66% of the clinical and 46% of the animal isolates. Adherence to collagen type I was shown of 20% of the clinical strains and 6% of the strains of animal origin. Most S. saprophyticus strains showed hydrophobic properties and only few could agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. Conclusions We described a broad analysis of animal and human S. saprophyticus isolates regarding virulence genes and phenotypic properties such as lipase activity, hydrophobicity, and adherence. While S. saprophyticus strains from animal sources have prerequisites for colonization of the urinary tract like the D-serine-deaminase, out findings suggested that they need to acquire new genes e.g. MSCRAMMS for adherence like sdrI and to modulate their existing properties e.g. increasing the lipase activity or reducing hydrophobicity. These apparently important new genes or properties for virulence have to be further analyzed.

  17. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ling-ling; ZHANG Zhe; ZHENG Jie-sheng; SHENG Ji-fang; LIU Ke-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed at developing a simple and easy way to generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in vitro. Methods: PBMCs were isolated directly from white blood cell rather than whole blood and purified by patching methods (collecting the attached cell and removing the suspension cell). DCs were then generated by culturing PBMCs for six days with 30 ng/ml recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and 20 ng/ml recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) in vitro. On the sixth day, TNF-alpha (TNFα) 30 ng/ml was added into some DC cultures, which were then incubated for two additional days. The morphology was monitored by light microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy, and the phenotypes were determined by flow cytometry. Autologous mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR) were used to characterize DC function after TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations for 24 h. Results: After six days of culture, the monocytes developed significant dendritic morphology and a portion of cells expressed CD 1 a, CD80 and CD86, features of DCs. TNFα treatment induced DCs maturation and up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD83. Autologous MLR demonstrated that these DCs possess potent T-cell stimulatory capacity. Conclusion: This study developed a simple and easy way to generate DCs from PBMCs exposed to rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. The DCs produced by this method acquired morphologic and antigenic characteristics of DCs.

  18. Cellular phenotype impacts human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr is a virion-associated regulatory protein that functions at several points within the viral life cycle and has been shown to accumulate primarily in the nucleus and at the nuclear envelope. However, most studies have investigated Vpr localization employing cell types irrelevant to HIV-1 pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of how cellular phenotype might impact HIV-1 Vpr intracellular localization, Vpr localization was examined in several cell lines representing major cellular targets for HIV-1 infection within the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and central nervous system (CNS. Results Utilizing a green fluorescent protein-tagged Vpr, we detected Vpr mainly in foci inside the nucleus, at the nuclear envelope, and around the nucleoli, with dispersed accumulation in the cytoplasm of human endothelial kidney 293T cells. No differences were observed in Vpr localization pattern with respect to either the location of the tag (N- or C-terminus or the presence of other viral proteins. Subsequently, the Vpr localization pattern was explored in two primary HIV-1 target cells within the peripheral blood: the CD4+ T lymphocyte (represented by the Jurkat CD4+ T-cell line and the monocyte-macrophage (represented by the U-937 cell line. Vpr was found primarily in speckles within the cytoplasm of the Jurkat T cells, whereas it accumulated predominantly intranuclearly in U-937 monocytic cells. These patterns differ from that observed in a bone marrow progenitor cell line (TF-1, wherein Vpr localized mainly at the nuclear envelope with some intranuclear punctuate staining. Within the CNS, we examined two astroglioma cell lines and found that Vpr displayed a perinuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. Conclusions The results suggest that the pattern of Vpr localization depends on cellular phenotype, probably owing to interactions between Vpr and cell type-specific host

  19. A Case of Bordetella brochiseptica at a Military Medical Facility in Hawai‘i: Phenotypic and Molecular Testing of an Uncommon Human Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Willie A; Kajiura, Lauren; Hawley-Molloy, Joshua S; Staege, Catherine M; Barnhill, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica) is rarely implicated in human disease. Human infections typically occur in the context of immunosuppression and while human infection has been sporadically reported in the literature, the majority of these reports are largely descriptive and do not explore the molecular and phenotypic properties of the isolates in question. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a B. bronchiseptica isolate derived from an HIV positive patient at Tripler Army Medical Center on O‘ahu. This case represents the first published report of human infection of B. bronchiseptica in the state of Hawai‘i and the most detailed description of the biochemical and molecular features of a Hawaiian isolate to date. PMID:26225268

  20. A Case of Bordetella brochiseptica at a Military Medical Facility in Hawai'i: Phenotypic and Molecular Testing of an Uncommon Human Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Michael A; Agee, Willie A; Kajiura, Lauren; Hawley-Molloy, Joshua S; Staege, Catherine M; Barnhill, Jason C

    2015-07-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica) is rarely implicated in human disease. Human infections typically occur in the context of immunosuppression and while human infection has been sporadically reported in the literature, the majority of these reports are largely descriptive and do not explore the molecular and phenotypic properties of the isolates in question. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a B. bronchiseptica isolate derived from an HIV positive patient at Tripler Army Medical Center on O'ahu. This case represents the first published report of human infection of B. bronchiseptica in the state of Hawai'i and the most detailed description of the biochemical and molecular features of a Hawaiian isolate to date.

  1. A Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Weltevreden, an Emerging Agent of Diarrheal Disease in Tropical Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Makendi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden (S. Weltevreden is an emerging cause of diarrheal and invasive disease in humans residing in tropical regions. Despite the regional and international emergence of this Salmonella serovar, relatively little is known about its genetic diversity, genomics or virulence potential in model systems. Here we used whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analyses to define the phylogenetic structure of a diverse global selection of S. Weltevreden. Phylogenetic analysis of more than 100 isolates demonstrated that the population of S. Weltevreden can be segregated into two main phylogenetic clusters, one associated predominantly with continental Southeast Asia and the other more internationally dispersed. Subcluster analysis suggested the local evolution of S. Weltevreden within specific geographical regions. Four of the isolates were sequenced using long read sequencing to produce high quality reference genomes. Phenotypic analysis in Hep-2 cells and in a murine infection model indicated that S. Weltevreden were significantly attenuated in these models compared to the classical S. Typhimurium reference strain SL1344. Our work outlines novel insights into this important emerging pathogen and provides a baseline understanding for future research studies.

  2. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders.

  3. Transcriptome-scale similarities between mouse and human skeletal muscles with normal and myopathic phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Peter B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse and human skeletal muscle transcriptome profiles vary by muscle type, raising the question of which mouse muscle groups have the greatest molecular similarities to human skeletal muscle. Methods Orthologous (whole, sub- transcriptome profiles were compared among four mouse-human transcriptome datasets: (M six muscle groups obtained from three mouse strains (wildtype, mdx, mdx5cv; (H1 biopsied human quadriceps from controls and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients; (H2 four different control human muscle types obtained at autopsy; and (H3 12 different control human tissues (ten non-muscle. Results Of the six mouse muscles examined, mouse soleus bore the greatest molecular similarities to human skeletal muscles, independent of the latters' anatomic location/muscle type, disease state, age and sampling method (autopsy versus biopsy. Significant similarity to any one mouse muscle group was not observed for non-muscle human tissues (dataset H3, indicating this finding to be muscle specific. Conclusion This observation may be partly explained by the higher type I fiber content of soleus relative to the other mouse muscles sampled.

  4. Modeling human muscle disease in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Steffen, Leta S; Howell, Melanie H.; Pusack, Timothy J; Lawrence, Chris; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Modeling human muscle disease in zebrafish correspondence: Corresponding author. Children's Hospital Boston, Enders Bldg, Rm 570, 300 Longwood Ave Boston, MA 02115. Tel.: +1 617 355 7576. (Kunkel, Louis M.) (Kunkel, Louis M.) Program in Genomics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Children's Hospital Boston - Boston--> , MA 02115--> - UNITED STATES (Guyon, Jeffrey R.) Program in Genomics a...

  5. DNA Phenotyping: The prediction of human pigmentation traits from genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Walsh (Susan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPhenotyping is the ability to assign characteristics to an organism based on certain measurable parameters. In the case of DNA phenotyping, it is limited to the sole use of DNA to determine a phenotype such as an externally visible characteristic. In a forensic setting, it encompasses

  6. DNA Phenotyping: The prediction of human pigmentation traits from genetic data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Walsh (Susan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPhenotyping is the ability to assign characteristics to an organism based on certain measurable parameters. In the case of DNA phenotyping, it is limited to the sole use of DNA to determine a phenotype such as an externally visible characteristic. In a forensic setting, it encompasses th

  7. Additive reductions in zebrafish PRPS1 activity result in a spectrum of deficiencies modeling several human PRPS1-associated diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Wuhong; Xu, Lisha; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Huang, Sunny C.; Idol, Jennifer; Pretorius, Pamela R.; Beirl, Alisha; Schimmenti, Lisa A.; Kindt, Katie S.; Sood, Raman; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase-1 (PRPS1) is a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis, and mutations in PRPS1 are found in several human diseases including nonsyndromic sensorineural deafness, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-5, and Arts Syndrome. We utilized zebrafish as a model to confirm that mutations in PRPS1 result in phenotypic deficiencies in zebrafish similar to those in the associated human diseases. We found two paralogs in zebrafish, prps1a and prps1b and characterized each paralogous mutant individually as well as the double mutant fish. Zebrafish prps1a mutants and prps1a;prps1b double mutants showed similar morphological phenotypes with increasingly severe phenotypes as the number of mutant alleles increased. Phenotypes included smaller eyes and reduced hair cell numbers, consistent with the optic atrophy and hearing impairment observed in human patients. The double mutant also showed abnormal development of primary motor neurons, hair cell innervation, and reduced leukocytes, consistent with the neuropathy and recurrent infection of the human patients possessing the most severe reductions of PRPS1 activity. Further analyses indicated the phenotypes were associated with a prolonged cell cycle likely resulting from reduced nucleotide synthesis and energy production in the mutant embryos. We further demonstrated the phenotypes were caused by delays in the tissues most highly expressing the prps1 genes. PMID:27425195

  8. Abberant protein synthesis in G2019S LRRK2 Drosophila Parkinson disease-related phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ian; Abalde-Atristain, Leire; Kim, Jungwoo Wren; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2014-01-01

    LRRK2 mutations are a frequent cause of familial Parkinson disease (PD) and are also found in a number of sporadic PD cases. PD-linked G2019S and I2020T mutations in the kinase domain of LRRK2 result in elevated kinase activity, which is required for the toxicity of these pathogenic variants in cell and animal models of PD. We recently reported that LRRK2 interacts with and phosphorylates a number of mammalian ribosomal proteins, several of which exhibit increased phosphorylation via both G2019S and I2020T LRRK2. Blocking the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein s15 through expression of phospho-deficient T136A s15 prevents age-associated locomotor deficits and dopamine neuron loss caused by G2019S LRRK2 expression in Drosophila indicating that s15 is a pathogenic LRRK2 substrate. We previously described that G2019S LRRK2 causes an induction of bulk mRNA translation that is blocked by T136A s15 or the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin. Here, we report the protective effects of the eIF4E/eIF4G interaction inhibitor 4EGI-1, in preventing neurodegenerative phenotypes in G2019S LRRK2 flies, and discuss how our findings and those of other groups provide a framework to begin investigating the mechanistic impact of LRRK2 on translation. PMID:25483009

  9. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. EXPERIMENTAL: FINDINGS: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas that express AR. CONCLUSION: This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines

  10. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, 65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD.

  11. [Human prion diseases in the Czech Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Z; Rusina, R; Marešová, M; Matěj, R

    2015-09-01

    Human prion diseases are a group of very rare diseases with a unique pathogenesis and, due to an inauspicious prognosis and unavailability of therapy, with fatal consequences. The etiopathogenetic background is the presence of pathologically misfolded prion protein, highly resistant to denaturation, the aggregation and presence of which in the brain tissue causes irreversible neuronal damage. The most frequent prion disease in humans is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) which occurs in sporadic, hereditary/familial, or acquired/infectious/iatrogenic forms. A new form of CJD, variant CJD, is considered to be linked to dietary exposure to beef products from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and to infection via blood transfusion. The clinical picture of these diseases is characterized by a rapidly progressing dementia, cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptoms, and rather specific MRI, EEG, and CSF findings. Clinically, the diagnosis is described as possible or probable prion disease and needs to be confirmed by neuropathological or immunological investigation of the brain tissue. Epidemiological data from the Czech Republic spanning the last decade are presented.

  12. Genomic signatures of human and animal disease in the zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Lucy A; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Wang, Jinhong; Peters, Sarah E; Corander, Jukka; Jombart, Thibaut; Baig, Abiyad; Howell, Kate J; Vehkala, Minna; Välimäki, Niko; Harris, David; Chieu, Tran Thi Bich; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Campbell, James; Schultsz, Constance; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Langford, Paul R; Rycroft, Andrew N; Wren, Brendan W; Farrar, Jeremy; Baker, Stephen; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Holden, Matthew T G; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J

    2015-03-31

    Streptococcus suis causes disease in pigs worldwide and is increasingly implicated in zoonotic disease in East and South-East Asia. To understand the genetic basis of disease in S. suis, we study the genomes of 375 isolates with detailed clinical phenotypes from pigs and humans from the United Kingdom and Vietnam. Here, we show that isolates associated with disease contain substantially fewer genes than non-clinical isolates, but are more likely to encode virulence factors. Human disease isolates are limited to a single-virulent population, originating in the 1920, s when pig production was intensified, but no consistent genomic differences between pig and human isolates are observed. There is little geographical clustering of different S. suis subpopulations, and the bacterium undergoes high rates of recombination, implying that an increase in virulence anywhere in the world could have a global impact over a short timescale.

  13. Demonstration of a novel HIV-1 restriction phenotype from a human T cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxing Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although retroviruses may invade host cells, a productive infection can be established only after the virus counteracts inhibition from different types of host restriction factors. Fv1, APOBEC3G/F, TRIM5alpha, ZAP, and CD317 inhibit the replication of different retroviruses by interfering with viral uncoating, reverse transcription, nuclear import, RNA stability, and release. In humans, although APOBEC3G/3F and CD317 block HIV-1 replication, their antiviral activities are neutralized by viral proteins Vif and Vpu. So far, no human gene has been found to effectively block wild type HIV-1 replication under natural condition. Thus, identification of such a gene product would be of great medical importance for the development of HIV therapies. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In this study, we discovered a new type of host restriction against the wild type HIV-1 from a CD4/CXCR4 double-positive human T cell line. We identified a CEM-derived cell line (CEM.NKR that is highly resistant to productive HIV-1 infection. Viral production was reduced by at least 1000-fold when compared to the other permissive human T cell lines such as H9, A3.01, and CEM-T4. Importantly, this resistance was evident at extremely high multiplicity of infection. Further analyses demonstrated that HIV-1 could finish the first round of replication in CEM.NKR cells, but the released virions were poorly infectious. These virions could enter the target cells, but failed to initiate reverse transcription. Notably, this restriction phenotype was also present in CEM.NKR and 293T heterokaryons. CONCLUSIONS: These results clearly indicate that CEM.NKR cells express a HIV inhibitory gene(s. Further characterization of this novel gene product(s will reveal a new antiretroviral mechanism that directly inactivates wild type HIV-1.

  14. Phenotypic and Genomic Analysis of Hypervirulent Human-associated Bordetella bronchiseptica

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    Ahuja Umesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B. bronchiseptica infections are usually associated with wild or domesticated animals, but infrequently with humans. A recent phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct B. bronchiseptica subpopulations, designated complexes I and IV. Complex IV isolates appear to have a bias for infecting humans; however, little is known regarding their epidemiology, virulence properties, or comparative genomics. Results Here we report a characterization of the virulence of human-associated complex IV B. bronchiseptica strains. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, complex IV strains showed increased cytotoxicity in comparison to a panel of complex I strains. Some complex IV isolates were remarkably cytotoxic, resulting in LDH release levels in A549 cells that were 10- to 20-fold greater than complex I strains. In vivo, a subset of complex IV strains was found to be hypervirulent, with an increased ability to cause lethal pulmonary infections in mice. Hypercytotoxicity in vitro and hypervirulence in vivo were both dependent on the activity of the bsc T3SS and the BteA effector. To clarify differences between lineages, representative complex IV isolates were sequenced and their genomes were compared to complex I isolates. Although our analysis showed there were no genomic sequences that can be considered unique to complex IV strains, there were several loci that were predominantly found in complex IV isolates. Conclusion Our observations reveal a T3SS-dependent hypervirulence phenotype in human-associated complex IV isolates, highlighting the need for further studies on the epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics of this B. bronchiseptica lineage.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic aspects of primary immunodeficiency diseases of the lymphoid system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Noordzij

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the immunological phenotype, the mutation analysis, and the residual activity of mutated proteins in patients with PID of the lymphoid system. During this project, we have investigated possible genotype-(immuno)phenotype relationships in patients with antibody defi

  16. MicroRNAs and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Human Disease Mouse Modeling

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    Chingiz Underbayev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human disease animal models are absolutely invaluable tools for our understanding of mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathological processes. By studying various genetic abnormalities in these organisms we can get a better insight into potential candidate genes responsible for human disease development. To this point a mouse represents one of the most used and convenient species for human disease modeling. Hundreds if not thousands of inbred, congenic, and transgenic mouse models have been created and are now extensively utilized in the research labs worldwide. Importantly, pluripotent stem cells play a significant role in developing new genetically engineered mice with the desired human disease-like phenotype. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells which represent reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells represent a significant advancement in research armament. The novel application of microRNA manipulation both in the generation of iPS cells and subsequent lineage-directed differentiation is discussed. Potential applications of induced pluripotent stem cell—a relatively new type of pluripotent stem cells—for human disease modeling by employing human iPS cells derived from normal and diseased somatic cells and iPS cells derived from mouse models of human disease may lead to uncovering of disease mechanisms and novel therapies.

  17. Tracing the sources of human salmonellosis: a multi-model comparison of phenotyping and genotyping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Smid, Joost; Enserink, Remko; Franz, Eelco; Schouls, Leo; Heck, Max; van Pelt, Wilfrid

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella source attribution is usually performed using frequency-matched models, such as the (modified) Dutch and Hald models, based on phenotyping data, i.e. serotyping, phage typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling. However, for practical and economic reasons, genotyping methods such as Multi-locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) are gradually replacing traditional phenotyping of salmonellas beyond the serovar level. As MLVA-based source attribution of human salmonellosis using frequency-matched models is problematic due to the high variability of the genetic targets investigated, other models need to be explored. Using a comprehensive data set from the Netherlands in 2005-2013, this study aimed at attributing sporadic and domestic cases of Salmonella Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Enteritidis to four putative food-producing animal sources (pigs, cattle, broilers, and layers/eggs) using the modified Dutch and Hald models (based on sero/phage typing data) in comparison with a widely applied population genetics model - the asymmetric island model (AIM) - supplied with MLVA data. This allowed us to compare model outcomes and to corroborate whether MLVA-based Salmonella source attribution using the AIM is able to provide sound, comparable results. All three models provided very similar results, confirming once more that most S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis cases are attributable to pigs and layers/eggs, respectively. We concluded that MLVA-based source attribution using the AIM is a feasible option, at least for S. Typhimurium/4,[5],12:i:- and S. Enteritidis. Enough information seems to be contained in the MLVA profiles to trace the sources of human salmonellosis even in presence of imperfect temporal overlap between human and source isolates. Besides Salmonella, the AIM might also be applicable to other pathogens that do not always comply to clonal models. This would add further value to current surveillance

  18. Phenotypic diversity and emerging new tools to study macrophage activation in bacterial infectious diseases

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    Jean-Louis eMege

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage polarization is a concept that has been useful to describe the different features of macrophage activation related to specific functions. Macrophage polarization is responsible for a dichotomic approach (killing versus repair of the host response to bacteria: M1-type conditions are protective, whereas M2-type conditions are associated with bacterial persistence. The use of the polarization concept to classify the features of macrophage activation in infected patients using transcriptional and/or molecular data and to provide biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis has most often been unsuccessful. The confrontation of polarization with different clinical situations in which monocytes/macrophages encounter bacteria obliged us to reappraise this concept. With the exception of M2-type infectious diseases such as leprosy and Whipple’s disease, most acute (sepsis or chronic (Q fever, tuberculosis infectious diseases do not exhibit polarized monocytes/macrophages. This is also the case for commensals that shape the immune response and for probiotics that alter the immune response independent of macrophage polarization. We propose that the type of myeloid cells (monocytes vs. macrophages and the kinetics of the immune response (early vs. late responses are critical variables for understanding macrophage activation in human infectious diseases. Explorating the role of these new markers will provide important tools to better understand complex macrophage physiology.

  19. Lin28a transgenic mice manifest size and puberty phenotypes identified in human genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Shah, Samar; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Shinoda, Gen; Einhorn, William S; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Grasemann, Corinna; Rinn, John L; Lopez, Mary F; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Palmert, Mark R; Daley, George Q

    2010-07-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies have implicated the human LIN28B locus in regulating height and the timing of menarche. LIN28B and its homolog LIN28A are functionally redundant RNA-binding proteins that block biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs. lin-28 and let-7 were discovered in Caenorhabditis elegans as heterochronic regulators of larval and vulval development but have recently been implicated in cancer, stem cell aging and pluripotency. The let-7 targets Myc, Kras, Igf2bp1 and Hmga2 are known regulators of mammalian body size and metabolism. To explore the function of the Lin28-Let-7 pathway in vivo, we engineered transgenic mice to express Lin28a and observed in them increased body size, crown-rump length and delayed onset of puberty. Investigation of metabolic and endocrine mechanisms of overgrowth in these transgenic mice revealed increased glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Here we report a mouse that models the human phenotypes associated with genetic variation in the Lin28-Let-7 pathway.

  20. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengcheng; Kannan, Nagarajan; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2017-05-16

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny.

  1. Phenotypic effects of genetic variability in human clock genes on circadian and sleep parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malcolm Von Schantz

    2008-12-01

    Circadian rhythms and sleep are two separate but intimately related processes. Circadian rhythms are generated through the precisely controlled, cyclic expression of a number of genes designated clock genes. Genetic variability in these genes has been associated with a number of phenotypic differences in circadian as well as sleep parameters, both in mouse models and in humans. Diurnal preferences as determined by the selfreported Horne–Östberg (HÖ) questionnaire, has been associated with polymorphisms in the human genes CLOCK, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Circadian rhythm-related sleep disorders have also been associated with mutations and polymorphisms in clock genes, with the advanced type cosegrating in an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with mutations in the genes PER2 and CSNK1D, and the delayed type associating without discernible Mendelian inheritance with polymorphisms in CLOCK and PER3. Several mouse models of clock gene null alleles have been demonstrated to have affected sleep homeostasis. Recent findings have shown that the variable number tandem polymorphism in PER3, previously linked to diurnal preference, has profound effects on sleep homeostasis and cognitive performance following sleep loss, confirming the close association between the processes of circadian rhythms and sleep at the genetic level.

  2. A red wine polyphenolic extract reduces the activation phenotype of cultured human liver myofibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Véronique Neaud; Jean Rosenbaum

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To test the effect of a standardized red wine polyphenolic extract (RWPE) on the phenotype of human liver myofibroblasts in culture.METHODS: Human myofibroblasts grown from liver explants were used in this study. Cell proliferation was measured with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Signaling events were analyzed by western blot with phosphospecific antibodies. Matrix-metalloproteinase activity was measured with gel zymography.RESULTS: We found that cell proliferation was dosedependently decreased by up to 90% by RWPE while cell viability was not affected. Exposure to RWPE also greatly decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/ERK2 and Akt in response to stimulation by the mitogenic factor platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB).Finally, RWPE affected extracellular matrix remodeling by decreasing the secretion by myofibroblasts of matrixmetalloproteinase-2 and of tissue inhibitor of matrixmetalloproteinases-1.CONCLUSION: Altogether, RWPE decreases the activation state of liver myofibroblasts. The identification of the active compounds in RWPE could offer new therapeutic strategies against liver fibrosis.

  3. CD161 Defines a Transcriptional and Functional Phenotype across Distinct Human T Cell Lineages

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    Joannah R. Fergusson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin CD161 is expressed by a large proportion of human T lymphocytes of all lineages, including a population known as mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells. To understand whether different T cell subsets expressing CD161 have similar properties, we examined these populations in parallel using mass cytometry and mRNA microarray approaches. The analysis identified a conserved CD161++/MAIT cell transcriptional signature enriched in CD161+CD8+ T cells, which can be extended to CD161+ CD4+ and CD161+TCRγδ+ T cells. Furthermore, this led to the identification of a shared innate-like, TCR-independent response to interleukin (IL-12 plus IL-18 by different CD161-expressing T cell populations. This response was independent of regulation by CD161, which acted as a costimulatory molecule in the context of T cell receptor stimulation. Expression of CD161 hence identifies a transcriptional and functional phenotype, shared across human T lymphocytes and independent of both T cell receptor (TCR expression and cell lineage.

  4. Human keratin diseases: hereditary fragility of specific epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corden, L D; McLean, W H

    1996-12-01

    Keratins are heteropolymeric proteins which form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in epithelial cells. Since 1991, mutations in several keratin genes have been found to cause a variety of human diseases affecting the epidermis and other epithelial structures. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was the first mechanobullous disease for which the underlying genetic lesion was found, with mutations in both the K5 and K14 genes rendering basal epidermal keratinocytes less resilient to trauma, resulting in skin fragility. The site of mutation in the keratin protein correlates with phenotypic severity in this disorder. Since mutations were identified in the basal cell keratins, the total number of keratin genes associated with diseases has risen to eleven. The rod domains of suprabasal keratins K1 and K10 are mutated in bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (BCIE; also called epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, EH) and mosaicism for K1/K10 mutations results in a nevoid distribution of EH. An unusual mutation in the VI domain of K1 has also been found to cause diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (DNEPPK). Mutations in palmoplantar specific keratin K9 cause epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) and mutations in the late differentiation suprabasal keratin K2e cause ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). In the last year or so, mutations were discovered in differentiation specific keratins K6a and K16 causing pachyonychia congenita type 1 and K17 mutations occur in pachyonychia congenita type 2. K16 and K17 mutations have also been reported to produce phenotypes with little or no nail changes: K16 mutations can present as focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) and K17 mutations can result in a phenotype resembling steatocystoma multiplex. Recently, mutation of mucosal keratin pair K4 and K13 has been shown to underlie white sponge nevus (WSN). This year, the first mutations in a keratin-associated protein, plectin, were shown to

  5. DNMT3b overexpression contributes to a hypermethylator phenotype in human breast cancer cell lines

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    Rivenbark Ashley G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA hypermethylation events and other epimutations occur in many neoplasms, producing gene expression changes that contribute to neoplastic transformation, tumorigenesis, and tumor behavior. Some human cancers exhibit a hypermethylator phenotype, characterized by concurrent DNA methylation-dependent silencing of multiple genes. To determine if a hypermethylation defect occurs in breast cancer, the expression profile and promoter methylation status of methylation-sensitive genes were evaluated among breast cancer cell lines. Results The relationship between gene expression (assessed by RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR, promoter methylation (assessed by methylation-specific PCR, bisulfite sequencing, and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine treatment, and the DNA methyltransferase machinery (total DNMT activity and expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b proteins were examined in 12 breast cancer cell lines. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the expression of 64 methylation-sensitive genes revealed two groups of cell lines that possess distinct methylation signatures: (i hypermethylator cell lines, and (ii low-frequency methylator cell lines. The hypermethylator cell lines are characterized by high rates of concurrent methylation of six genes (CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, SCNN1A, whereas the low-frequency methylator cell lines do not methylate these genes. Hypermethylator cell lines coordinately overexpress total DNMT activity and DNMT3b protein levels compared to normal breast epithelial cells. In contrast, most low-frequency methylator cell lines possess DNMT activity and protein levels that are indistinguishable from normal. Microarray data mining identified a strong cluster of primary breast tumors that express the hypermethylation signature defined by CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, and SCNN1A. This subset of breast cancers represents 18/88 (20% tumors in the dataset analyzed, and 100% of these tumors were classified as basal

  6. Different prion disease phenotypes result from inoculation of cattle with two temporally separated sources of sheep scrapie from Great Britain

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    Hawkins Steve AC

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the theoretical proposal that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE could have originated from sheep scrapie, this study investigated the pathogenicity for cattle, by intracerebral (i.c. inoculation, of two pools of scrapie agents sourced in Great Britain before and during the BSE epidemic. Two groups of ten cattle were each inoculated with pools of brain material from sheep scrapie cases collected prior to 1975 and after 1990. Control groups comprised five cattle inoculated with sheep brain free from scrapie, five cattle inoculated with saline, and for comparison with BSE, naturally infected cattle and cattle i.c. inoculated with BSE brainstem homogenate from a parallel study. Phenotypic characterisation of the disease forms transmitted to cattle was conducted by morphological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and biological methods. Results Disease occurred in 16 cattle, nine inoculated with the pre-1975 inoculum and seven inoculated with the post-1990 inoculum, with four cattle still alive at 83 months post challenge (as at June 2006. The different inocula produced predominantly two different disease phenotypes as determined by histopathological, immunohistochemical and Western immunoblotting methods and biological characterisation on transmission to mice, neither of which was identical to BSE. Whilst the disease presentation was uniform in all scrapie-affected cattle of the pre-1975 group, the post-1990 inoculum produced a more variable disease, with two animals sharing immunohistochemical and molecular profile characteristics with animals in the pre-1975 group. Conclusion The study has demonstrated that cattle inoculated with different pooled scrapie sources can develop different prion disease phenotypes, which were not consistent with the phenotype of BSE of cattle and whose isolates did not have the strain typing characteristics of the BSE agent on transmission to mice.

  7. Genotypic and phenotypic modifications of Neisseria meningitidis after an accidental human passage.

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    Hélène Omer

    Full Text Available A scientist in our laboratory was accidentally infected while working with Z5463, a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A strain. She developed severe symptoms (fever, meningism, purpuric lesions that fortunately evolved with antibiotic treatment to complete recovery. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis confirmed that the isolate obtained from the blood culture (Z5463BC was identical to Z5463, more precisely to a fourth subculture of this strain used the week before the contamination (Z5463PI. In order to get some insights into genomic modifications that can occur in vivo, we sequenced these three isolates. All the strains contained a mutated mutS allele and therefore displayed an hypermutator phenotype, consistent with the high number of mutations (SNP, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism detected in the three strains. By comparing the number of SNP in all three isolates and knowing the number of passages between Z5463 and Z5463PI, we concluded that around 25 bacterial divisions occurred in the human body. As expected, the in vivo passage is responsible for several modifications of phase variable genes. This genomic study has been completed by transcriptomic and phenotypic studies, showing that the blood strain used a different haemoglobin-linked iron receptor (HpuA/B than the parental strains (HmbR. Different pilin variants were found after the in vivo passage, which expressed different properties of adhesion. Furthermore the deletion of one gene involved in LOS biosynthesis (lgtB results in Z5463BC expressing a different LOS than the L9 immunotype of Z2491. The in vivo passage, despite the small numbers of divisions, permits the selection of numerous genomic modifications that may account for the high capacity of the strain to disseminate.

  8. Bax-inhibitor-1 knockdown phenotypes are suppressed by Buffy and exacerbate degeneration in a Drosophila model of Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1) is an evolutionarily conserved cytoprotective transmembrane protein that acts as a suppressor of Bax-induced apoptosis by regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. We knocked down BI-1 in the sensitive dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) expressing neurons of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate its neuroprotective functions. We additionally sought to rescue the BI-1-induced phenotypes by co-expression with the pro-survival Buffy and determined the effect of BI-1 knockdown on the neurodegenerative α-synuclein-induced Parkinson disease (PD) model. Methods We used organismal assays to assess longevity of the flies to determine the effect of the altered expression of BI-1 in the Ddc-Gal4-expressing neurons by employing two RNAi transgenic fly lines. We measured the locomotor ability of these RNAi lines by computing the climbing indices of the climbing ability and compared them to a control line that expresses the lacZ transgene. Finally, we performed biometric analysis of the developing eye, where we counted the number of ommatidia and calculated the area of ommatidial disruption. Results The knockdown of BI-1 in these neurons was achieved under the direction of the Ddc-Gal4 transgene and resulted in shortened lifespan and precocious loss of locomotor ability. The co-expression of Buffy, the Drosophila anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 homologue, with BI-1-RNAi resulted in suppression of the reduced lifespan and impaired climbing ability. Expression of human α-synuclein in Drosophila dopaminergic neurons results in neuronal degeneration, accompanied by the age-dependent loss in climbing ability. We exploited this neurotoxic system to investigate possible BI-1 neuroprotective function. The co-expression of α-synuclein with BI-1-RNAi results in a slight decrease in lifespan coupled with an impairment in climbing ability. In supportive experiments, we employed the neuron-rich Drosophila compound eye to investigate subtle phenotypes

  9. Human lagochilascariasis-A rare helminthic disease.

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    Dulcinea Maria Barbosa Campos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lagochilascariasis is a parasitic disease caused by a helminth of the order Ascaroidea, genus Lagochilascaris that comprises 6 species, among which only Lagochilascaris minor Leiper, 1909, is implicated in the human form of the disease. It is remarkable that the majority of cases of human lagochilascariasis in the Americas have been reported in Brazil. The natural definitive hosts of this parasite seem to be wild felines and canines. Lagochilascariasis is mostly a chronic human disease that can persist for several years, in which the parasite burrows into the subcutaneous tissues of the neck, paranasal sinuses, and mastoid. L. minor exhibits remarkable ability to migrate through the tissues of its hosts, destroying even bone tissue. Fatal cases have been described in which the parasite was found in the lungs or central nervous system. Treatment is often palliative, with recurrence of lesions. This paper summarizes the main features of the disease and its etiologic agent, including prevalence, life cycle, clinical course, and treatment.

  10. Heartworm disease in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John W; Genchi, Claudio; Kramer, Laura H; Guerrero, Jorge; Venco, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Heartworm disease due to Dirofilaria immitis continues to cause severe disease and even death in dogs and other animals in many parts of the world, even though safe, highly effective and convenient preventatives have been available for the past two decades. More