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Sample records for human diabetic cardiomyopathy

  1. Disease modeling and phenotypic drug screening for diabetic cardiomyopathy using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Drawnel, Faye M; Boccardo, Stefano; Prummer, Michael; Delobel, Frédéric; Graff, Alexandra; Weber, Michael; Gérard, Régine; Badi, Laura; Kam-Thong, Tony; Bu, Lei; Jiang, Xin; Hoflack, Jean-Christophe; Kiialainen, Anna; Jeworutzki, Elena; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Burcin, Mark; Gromo, Gianni; Boehringer, Markus; Stahlberg, Henning; Hall, Benjamin J; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Kolaja, Kyle; Chien, Kenneth R; Bailly, Jacques; Iacone, Roberto

    2014-11-06

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Disease Modeling and Phenotypic Drug Screening for Diabetic Cardiomyopathy using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Faye M. Drawnel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a complication of type 2 diabetes, with known contributions of lifestyle and genetics. We develop environmentally and genetically driven in vitro models of the condition using human-induced-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes. First, we mimic diabetic clinical chemistry to induce a phenotypic surrogate of diabetic cardiomyopathy, observing structural and functional disarray. Next, we consider genetic effects by deriving cardiomyocytes from two diabetic patients with variable disease progression. The cardiomyopathic phenotype is recapitulated in the patient-specific cells basally, with a severity dependent on their original clinical status. These models are incorporated into successive levels of a screening platform, identifying drugs that preserve cardiomyocyte phenotype in vitro during diabetic stress. In this work, we present a patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC model of a complex metabolic condition, showing the power of this technique for discovery and testing of therapeutic strategies for a disease with ever-increasing clinical significance.

  3. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Bench to Bedside

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    Schilling, Joel D.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    The study of diabetic cardiomyopathy (diabetic CM) is an area of significant interest given the strong association between diabetes and the risk of heart failure. Many unanswered questions remain regarding the clinical definition and pathogenesis of this metabolic cardiomyopathy. This article reviews the current understanding of diabetic CM with a particular emphasis on the unresolved issues that have limited translation of scientific discovery to patient bedside. PMID:22999244

  4. Different gene expression in human heart tissue and progenitor cells from control and diabetic subjects: relevance to the pathogenesis of human diabetic cardiomyopathy.

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    de Cillis, Emanuela; Leonardini, Anna; Laviola, Luigi; Giorgino, Francesco; Tupputi Schinosa, Luigi de Luca; Bortone, Alessandro Santo

    2010-04-01

    The The aim of our study is to investigate the molecular mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy through the identification of remarkable genes for the myocardial function that are expressed differently between diabetic and normal subjects. Moreover, we intend to characterize both in human myocardial tissue and in the related cardiac progenitor cells the pattern of gene expression and the levels of expression and protein activation of molecular effectors involved in the regulation of the myocardial function and differentiation to clarify whether in specific human pathological conditions (type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure, coronary artery disease) specific alterations of the aforementioned factors could take place. Thirty-five patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or for aortic or mitral valve replacement were recruited into the study. There were 13 men and 22 women with a mean age of 64.8 +/- 13.4 years. A list of anamnestic, anthropometric, clinical, and instrumental data required for an optimal phenotypical characterization of the patients is reported. The small cardiac biopsy specimens were placed in the nourishing buffer, in a sterile tube provided the day of the procedure, to maintain the stability of the sample for several hours at room temperature. The cells were isolated by a dedicated protocol and then cultured in vitro. The sample was processed for total RNA extraction and levels of gene expression and protein activation of molecular effectors involved in the regulation of function and differentiation of human myocardium was analyzed. In particular, cardiac genes that modulate the oxidative stress response or the stress induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines (p66Shc, SOCS-1, SOCS-3) were analyzed. From a small sample of myocardium cardiac stem cells and cardiomyoblasts were also isolated and characterized. These cells showed a considerable proliferative capacity due to the fact that they demonstrate stability up to the

  5. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

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    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  6. Riboflavin alleviates cardiac failure in Type I diabetic cardiomyopathy

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    Xue Zhao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a common and serious comorbidity of diabetes. Oxidative stress has been associated with the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications including cardiomyopathy. The ability of antioxidants to inhibit injury has raised the possibility of new therapeutic treatment for diabetic heart diseases. Riboflavin constitutes an essential nutrient for humans and animals and it is an important food additive. Riboflavin, a precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, enhances the oxidative folding and subsequent secretion of proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardioprotective effect of riboflavin in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in 30 rats by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ (70 mg /kg. Riboflavin (20 mg/kg was orally administered to animals immediately after induction of diabetes and was continued for eight weeks. Rats were examined for diabetic cardiomyopathy by left ventricular (LV remadynamic function. Myocardial oxidative stress was assessed by measuring the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 protein level. Myocardial connective tissue growth factor (CTGF level was measured by Western blot in all rats at the end of the study. In the untreated diabetic rats, left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP rate of pressure rose (+dp/dt, and rate of pressure decay (−dp/dt were depressed while left ventricular enddiastolic pressure (LVEDP was increased, which indicated the reduced left ventricular contractility and slowing of left ventricular relaxation. The level of SOD decreased, CTGF and HO-1 protein expression and MDA content rose. Riboflavin treatment significantly improved left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in diabetic rats, there were persistent increases in significant activation of SOD and the level of HO-1 protein, and a decrease in the level of CTGF. These results suggest

  7. Mice long-term high-fat diet feeding recapitulates human cardiovascular alterations: an animal model to study the early phases of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

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    Sebastián D Calligaris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Hypercaloric diet ingestion and sedentary lifestyle result in obesity. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of clinical features secondary to obesity, considered as a pre-diabetic condition and recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. To better understand the relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, animal models that reproduce the etiology, course and outcomes of these pathologies are required. The aim of this work was to characterize the long-term effects of high-fat diet-induced obesity on the mice cardiovascular system, in order to make available a new animal model for diabetic cardiomyopathy. METHODS/RESULTS: Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a standardized high-fat diet (obese or regular diet (normal for 16 months. Metabolic syndrome was evaluated testing plasma glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Arterial pressure was measured using a sphygmomanometer (non invasive method and by hemodynamic parameters (invasive method. Cardiac anatomy was described based on echocardiography and histological studies. Cardiac function was assessed by cardiac catheterization under a stress test. Cardiac remodelling and metabolic biomarkers were assessed by RT-qPCR and immunoblotting. As of month eight, the obese mice were overweight, hyperglycaemic, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic and hypercholesterolemic. At month 16, they also presented normal arterial pressure but altered vascular reactivity (vasoconstriction, and cardiac contractility reserve reduction, heart mass increase, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and heart metabolic compensations. By contrast, the normal mice remained healthy throughout the study. CONCLUSIONS: Mice fed with a high-fat diet for prolonged time recapitulates the etiology, course and outcomes of the early phases of human diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  8. Early molecular events in the development of the diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monkemann, H.; Vriese, A.S. de; Blom, H.J.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Heil, S.G.; Schild, H.H.; Golubnitschaja, O.

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA has been well documented in cardiac cells isolated from diabetic patients and rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (DM). This study evaluates possible molecular mechanisms for early events in the development of DM-induced cardiomyopathy. Methods: To analyze the

  9. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Siobhan Simpson; Jennifer Edwards; Thomas F. N. Ferguson-Mignan; Malcolm Cobb; Nigel P. Mongan; Catrin S. Rutland

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In th...

  10. Fractalkine in human inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

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    Escher, F; Vetter, R; Kühl, U; Westermann, D; Schultheiss, H-P; Tschöpe, C

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac inflammation is important for the prognosis of patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi), but the mechanisms leading to it are not fully elucidated. To study the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in chemotactic and adhesive properties of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with CMi. Patients with enterovirus (EV)-positive CMi, patients with virus-negative CMi, patients with parvovirus B19 (B19) genomes with low intramyocardial inflammation and patients without cardiac inflammation and viral infection in the endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) were enrolled (n=10/group). The expression of CX3CL1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in EMBs was significantly increased in EV-positive and virus-negative patients with CMi in contrast to controls and B19-positive patients (EV+ vs controls: CX3CL1-area fraction (AF) % 0.078±0.012 vs 0.009±0.003 pattenuated positive chronotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation with isoproterenol. The cardiac and plasma CX3CL1/CX3CR1 system is upregulated in CMi and this affects the functional potential of PBMCs. Moreover, a direct cardiodepressive effect of CX3CL1 in cardiac tissue was demonstrated since neonatal cardiomyocytes exhibited an attenuated positive chronotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation.

  11. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Siobhan Simpson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In this review the aetiology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of canine DCM are examined, along with highlighting possible different subtypes of canine DCM and their potential relevance to human DCM. Finally the current position of genetic research into canine and human DCM, including the genetic loci, is identified and the reasons many studies may have failed to find a genetic association with canine DCM are reviewed.

  12. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

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    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Ferguson-Mignan, Thomas F N; Cobb, Malcolm; Mongan, Nigel P; Rutland, Catrin S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In this review the aetiology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of canine DCM are examined, along with highlighting possible different subtypes of canine DCM and their potential relevance to human DCM. Finally the current position of genetic research into canine and human DCM, including the genetic loci, is identified and the reasons many studies may have failed to find a genetic association with canine DCM are reviewed.

  13. Norepinephrine storage, distribution, and release in diabetic cardiomyopathy

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    Ganguly, P.K.; Beamish, R.E.; Dhalla, K.S.; Innes, J.R.; Dhalla, N.S.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of hearts to store, distribute, and release norepinephrine (NE) was investigated in rats 8 wk after the induction of diabetes by an injection of streptozotocin. Chronic diabetes was associated with increased content and concentration of NE in heart and in other tissues such as kidney, brain, and spleen. Reserpine or tyramine treatment resulted in depletion of endogenous cardiac NE in control and diabetic rats. The depletion of NE stores at different times after a dose of reserpine was greater in diabetic hearts. On the other hand, NE stores in diabetic hearts were less sensitive than control hearts to low doses of tyramine but were more sensitive to high doses. The uptake of [ 3 H]NE was greater in diabetic hearts in isolated perfused preparations. In comparison with the control values, diabetic hearts showed a decrease in [ 3 H]NE in the granular fraction and an increase in the supernatant fraction. Diabetic hearts also showed an accelerated spontaneous release of [ 3 H]NE. The increased cardiac NE and the uptake and release of NE in diabetic animals were reversible upon treatment with insulin. These results are consistent with the view that sympathetic activity is increased in diabetic cardiomyopathy and indicate that cardiac NE in diabetic rats is maintained at a higher level partly due to an increased uptake of released NE by adrenergic nerve terminals

  14. Symmetric Dimethylarginine in Cats with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy and Diabetes Mellitus

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    Langhorn, R.; Kieler, I. N.; Koch, J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been increasingly used as a marker of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats, but little is known about the influence of comorbidities on SDMA in this species. Hypothesis: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and diabetes mellitus (DM), independe......Background: Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been increasingly used as a marker of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats, but little is known about the influence of comorbidities on SDMA in this species. Hypothesis: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and diabetes mellitus (DM......), independently of CKD, are associated with changes in serum SDMA. Animals: Ninety-four cats (17 with CKD, 40 with HCM, 17 with DM, and 20 healthy controls). Methods: Case-control study. Clinical examination, echocardiography, ECG, blood pressure, CBC, biochemistry, thyroxine, and SDMA measurement were performed....... Urinalysis was performed in controls and cats with CKD and DM. Analysis of variance was used to compare overall differences in the log-transformed SDMA data among groups. A random forest algorithm was applied to explore which clinical and other factors influenced serum SDMA. Results: Median (range) serum...

  15. Frequency of diabetic cardiomyopathy among type-2 diabetics presenting as heart failure

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    Muhammad, Z.; Hashmi, A.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of diabetic cardiomyopathy among patients with type-2 diabetes presenting with overt heart failure. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Cardiology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from April 2008 to July 2009. Methodology: One hundred patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus having symptoms and signs of heart failure were enrolled. Anthropometric parameters were recorded and all patients had investigations including complete blood count, blood glucose (fasting and random), serum creatinine, fasting lipid profile, haemoglobin A1c, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram and Doppler echocardiography. After stabilization, every patient underwent coronary angiography. The data was entered in a structured proforma. Results: Sixty (60%) patients were males and 40 (40%) were females. Duration of diabetes was > 10 years in all. Eighty (80%) were on oral hypoglycemic and 20 (20%) were on insulin. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was found in 40 patients (40%) of the total study patients. Forty percent (40%) patients had marked left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction (ejection fraction < 30%). Three (5%) patients died during hospitalization. Conclusion: Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a fairly common cause of heart failure in the native population with type-2 diabetes mellitus and results in high morbidity and mortality. (author)

  16. Cardiomyopathy

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    ... as a disorder that causes the buildup of abnormal proteins (amyloidosis), a disease that causes inflammation and can cause lumps of ... Cardiomyopathy can lead to abnormal heart rhythms. These abnormal heart rhythms ... other types of heart disease by living a heart-healthy lifestyle and making ...

  17. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Diabetic cardiomyopathy: pathophysiology and potential metabolic interventions state of the art review.

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    Levelt, Eylem; Gulsin, Gaurav; Neubauer, Stefan; McCann, Gerry P

    2018-04-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes contributes to the development of heart failure through a variety of mechanisms, including disease-specific myocardial structural, functional and metabolic changes. This review will focus on the contemporary contributions of state of the art non-invasive technologies to our understanding of diabetic cardiomyopathy, including data on cardiac disease phenotype, cardiac energy metabolism and energetic deficiency, ectopic and visceral adiposity, diabetic liver disease, metabolic modulation strategies and cardiovascular outcomes with new classes of glucose-lowering therapies. © 2018 The authors.

  18. Overexpression of decorin promoted angiogenesis in diabetic cardiomyopathy via IGF1R-AKT-VEGF signaling.

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    Lai, Jinsheng; Chen, Fuqiong; Chen, Jing; Ruan, Guoran; He, Mengying; Chen, Chen; Tang, Jiarong; Wang, Dao Wen

    2017-03-14

    Microcirculatory dysfunction is believed to play an important role in diabetic cardiomyopathy. The small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin is generally considered a pro-angiogenic factor. Here, we investigate whether overexpression of decorin ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy and its effects on angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Diabetes was induced through intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin combined with a high-fat diet, and decorin was overexpressed via recombinant adeno-associated virus in Wistar rats. Six months later, cardiac function was determined using an echocardiography and cardiac catheter system. The results showed that cardiac function was decreased in diabetic rats and restored by overexpression of decorin. In addition, overexpression of decorin upregulated the expression of VEGF and attenuated the reduction in the cardiac capillary density. In the in vitro study, high glucose induced apoptosis and inhibited the capabilities of tube formation, migration and proliferation, which were all ameliorated by decorin overexpression. Meanwhile, decorin overexpression increased the expression of VEGF and IGF1R, as well as the phosphorylation level of AKT and AP-1. Nonetheless, all of these effects were abolished by pretreatment with the IGF1R antibody or AKT inhibitor. In conclusion, overexpression of decorin ameliorated diabetic cardiomyopathy and promoted angiogenesis through the IGF1R-AKT-VEGF signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Genotype-specific pathogenic effects in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

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    Bollen, Ilse A E; Schuldt, Maike; Harakalova, Magdalena; Vink, Aryan; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Pinto, Jose R; Krüger, Martina; Kuster, Diederik W D; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2017-07-15

    Mutations in genes encoding cardiac troponin I (TNNI3) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) caused altered troponin protein stoichiometry in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. TNNI3 p.98trunc resulted in haploinsufficiency, increased Ca 2+ -sensitivity and reduced length-dependent activation. TNNT2 p.K217del caused increased passive tension. A mutation in the gene encoding Lamin A/C (LMNA p.R331Q ) led to reduced maximal force development through secondary disease remodelling in patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy. Our study shows that different gene mutations induce dilated cardiomyopathy via diverse cellular pathways. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) can be caused by mutations in sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric genes. In this study we defined the pathogenic effects of three DCM-causing mutations: the sarcomeric mutations in genes encoding cardiac troponin I (TNNI3 p.98truncation ) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2 p.K217deletion ; also known as the p.K210del) and the non-sarcomeric gene mutation encoding lamin A/C (LMNA p.R331Q ). We assessed sarcomeric protein expression and phosphorylation and contractile behaviour in single membrane-permeabilized cardiomyocytes in human left ventricular heart tissue. Exchange with recombinant troponin complex was used to establish the direct pathogenic effects of the mutations in TNNI3 and TNNT2. The TNNI3 p.98trunc and TNNT2 p.K217del mutation showed reduced expression of troponin I to 39% and 51%, troponin T to 64% and 53%, and troponin C to 73% and 97% of controls, respectively, and altered stoichiometry between the three cardiac troponin subunits. The TNNI3 p.98trunc showed pure haploinsufficiency, increased Ca 2+ -sensitivity and impaired length-dependent activation. The TNNT2 p.K217del mutation showed a significant increase in passive tension that was not due to changes in titin isoform composition or phosphorylation. Exchange with wild-type troponin complex corrected troponin protein levels to 83% of controls in the TNNI3

  20. Genotype‐specific pathogenic effects in human dilated cardiomyopathy

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    Schuldt, Maike; Harakalova, Magdalena; Vink, Aryan; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Pinto, Jose R.; Krüger, Martina; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2017-01-01

    Key points Mutations in genes encoding cardiac troponin I (TNNI3) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) caused altered troponin protein stoichiometry in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. TNNI3p.98trunc resulted in haploinsufficiency, increased Ca2+‐sensitivity and reduced length‐dependent activation. TNNT2p.K217del caused increased passive tension.A mutation in the gene encoding Lamin A/C (LMNA p.R331Q) led to reduced maximal force development through secondary disease remodelling in patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy.Our study shows that different gene mutations induce dilated cardiomyopathy via diverse cellular pathways. Abstract Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) can be caused by mutations in sarcomeric and non‐sarcomeric genes. In this study we defined the pathogenic effects of three DCM‐causing mutations: the sarcomeric mutations in genes encoding cardiac troponin I (TNNI3p.98truncation) and cardiac troponin T (TNNT2p.K217deletion; also known as the p.K210del) and the non‐sarcomeric gene mutation encoding lamin A/C (LMNAp.R331Q). We assessed sarcomeric protein expression and phosphorylation and contractile behaviour in single membrane‐permeabilized cardiomyocytes in human left ventricular heart tissue. Exchange with recombinant troponin complex was used to establish the direct pathogenic effects of the mutations in TNNI3 and TNNT2. The TNNI3p.98trunc and TNNT2p.K217del mutation showed reduced expression of troponin I to 39% and 51%, troponin T to 64% and 53%, and troponin C to 73% and 97% of controls, respectively, and altered stoichiometry between the three cardiac troponin subunits. The TNNI3p.98trunc showed pure haploinsufficiency, increased Ca2+‐sensitivity and impaired length‐dependent activation. The TNNT2p.K217del mutation showed a significant increase in passive tension that was not due to changes in titin isoform composition or phosphorylation. Exchange with wild‐type troponin complex corrected troponin protein levels to 83% of

  1. Data of methylome and transcriptome derived from human dilated cardiomyopathy

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    Bong-Seok Jo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in DNA methylation and gene expression have been implicated in the development of human dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Differentially methylated probes (DMPs and differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified between the left ventricle (LV, a pathological locus for DCM and the right ventricle (RV, a proxy for normal hearts. The data in this DiB are for supporting our report entitled “Methylome analysis reveals alterations in DNA methylation in the regulatory regions of left ventricle development genes in human dilated cardiomyopathy” (Bong-Seok Jo, In-Uk Koh, Jae-Bum Bae, Ho-Yeong Yu, Eun-Seok Jeon, Hae-Young Lee, Jae-Joong Kim, Murim Choi, Sun Shim Choi, 2016 [1].

  2. Preservation of the positive lusitropic effect of beta-adrenoceptors stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

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    Amour, Julien; Loyer, Xavier; Michelet, Pierre; Birenbaum, Aurélie; Riou, Bruno; Heymes, Christophe

    2008-10-01

    In diabetic cardiomyopathy, diastolic dysfunction results in part from sarcoplasmic reticulum abnormalities affecting both phospholamban and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake (SERCA2a). Consequently, the positive lusitropic effect of beta-adrenoceptors stimulation could be altered, and beta3-adrenoceptor over-expression may play a role, as previously demonstrated with an altered positive inotropic effect. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the beta-adrenergic positive lusitropic effect is altered in diabetic cardiomyopathy, and that beta3-adrenoceptor over-expression is involved. beta-adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (dobutamine-echocardiography) and in vitro (papillary muscle preparation) in healthy and diabetic rats killed 4 (4W) and 12 (12W) wk after IV streptozotocin injection. The effect of beta3-adrenoceptor pathway inhibition by S-cyanopindolol (selective beta3-adrenoceptor antagonist) or by NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (nonselective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) on the lusitropic response to isoproterenol (nonselective beta-adrenoceptors agonist) was studied in vitro. Western blots were performed to quantify the protein expressions of beta1- and beta3-adrenoceptors, phospholamban, and SERCA2a. Data are presented as mean percentages of baseline+/-sd. Despite the increased phospholamban/SERCA2a protein ratio and documented diastolic dysfunction, the positive lusitropic effect of beta-adrenoceptors stimulation was preserved in vivo (dobutamine) and in vitro (isoproterenol) in 4W and 12W diabetic, compared with healthy, rats. The beta3-adrenoceptor was up-regulated whereas beta1-adrenoceptor was down-regulated in 4W and 12W diabetic, compared with healthy, rats. Nevertheless, S-cyanopindolol or NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester had no lusitropic effect. The positive lusitropic effect of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation was preserved in diabetic cardiomyopathy. beta3-adrenoceptor over-expression does not seem to affect this process.

  3. Noninvasive assessment of cardiomyopathy in normotensive diabetic patients between 20 and 50 years old

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    Bouchard, A.; Sanz, N.; Botvinick, E.H.; Phillips, N.; Heilbron, D.; Byrd, B.F. III; Karam, J.H.; Schiller, N.B.

    1989-01-01

    To further the understanding of diabetic heart disease, we tested the hypothesis that an asymptomatic group of normotensive diabetic patients between 20 and 50 years old had a restrictive cardiomyopathy independent of clinically significant coronary artery disease. Quantitative two-dimensional echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were performed to detect and characterize the cardiac abnormalities in this study group comprising 88 patients with rigorously classified diabetes and 65 volunteer control subjects. Diabetic patients were shown to have a mildly reduced left ventricular end-diastolic volume index: 50.1 +/- 8.2 and 52.1 +/- 14.7 mL/m2 for patients with type I and type II diabetes, respectively, versus 58.9 +/- 11.7 mL/m2 for control subjects. The left ventricular diastolic filling was also impaired in diabetic patients as reflected by a lower atrial emptying index: 0.73 +/- 0.24 and 0.76 +/- 0.3 for type I and type II diabetics, respectively, compared with 1.14 +/- 0.24 for control subjects. Exercise tolerance was normal in subjects with type I diabetes and slightly reduced in subjects with type II diabetes. Only one patient developed regional ischemia on thallium exercise testing. Using a comprehensive, noninvasive approach, we have shown that asymptomatic normotensive patients with type I or type II diabetes who were between 20 and 50 years old had a restrictive cardiomyopathy characterized by mildly reduced left ventricular end-diastolic volume and altered left ventricular compliance independent of critical coronary artery disease

  4. Cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction in experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy are ameliorated by alpha-lipoic acid

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    Li Chun-jun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA, a naturally occurring compound, exerts powerful protective effects in various cardiovascular disease models. However, its role in protecting against diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM has not been elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ALA on cardiac dysfunction, mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS, extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling and interrelated signaling pathways in a diabetic rat model. Methods Diabetes was induced in rats by I.V. injection of streptozotocin (STZ at 45 mg/kg. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal groups with or without ALA treatment, and diabetes groups with or without ALA treatment. All studies were carried out 11 weeks after induction of diabetes. Cardiac catheterization was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Mitochondrial oxidative biochemical parameters were measured by spectophotometeric assays. Extracellular matrix content (total collagen, type I and III collagen was assessed by staining with Sirius Red. Gelatinolytic activity of Pro- and active matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 levels were analyzed by a zymogram. Cardiac fibroblasts differentiation to myofibroblasts was evaluated by Western blot measuring smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β. Key components of underlying signaling pathways including the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, p38 MAPK and ERK were also assayed by Western blot. Results DCM was successfully induced by the injection of STZ as evidenced by abnormal heart mass and cardiac function, as well as the imbalance of ECM homeostasis. After administration of ALA, left ventricular dysfunction greatly improved; interstitial fibrosis also notably ameliorated indicated by decreased collagen deposition, ECM synthesis as well as enhanced ECM degradation. To further assess the underlying mechanism of improved DCM by ALA, redox status and cardiac remodeling associated

  5. My Sweetheart Is Broken: Role of Glucose in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

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    Manoja K. Brahma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite overall reductions in heart disease prevalence, the risk of developing heart failure has remained 2-fold greater among people with diabetes. Growing evidence has supported that fluctuations in glucose level and uptake contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD by modifying proteins, DNA, and gene expression. In the case of glucose, clinical studies have shown that increased dietary sugars for healthy individuals or poor glycemic control in diabetic patients further increased CVD risk. Furthermore, even after decades of maintaining tight glycemic control, susceptibility to disease progression can persist following a period of poor glycemic control through a process termed "glycemic memory." In response to chronically elevated glucose levels, a number of studies have identified molecular targets of the glucose-mediated protein posttranslational modification by the addition of an O-linked N-acetylglucosamine to impair contractility, calcium sensitivity, and mitochondrial protein function. Additionally, elevated glucose contributes to dysfunction in coupling glycolysis to glucose oxidation, pentose phosphate pathway, and polyol pathway. Therefore, in the "sweetened" environment associated with hyperglycemia, there are a number of pathways contributing to increased susceptibly to "breaking" the heart of diabetics. In this review we will discuss the unique contribution of glucose to heart disease and recent advances in defining mechanisms of action.

  6. Advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) accumulation and AGE receptor (RAGE) up‐regulation contribute to the onset of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Heng; Li, Shi‐Yan; Xu, Peisheng; Babcock, Sara A.; Dolence, E. Kurt; Brownlee, Michael; Li, Ji

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic cardiomyopathy is manifested by compromised systolic and diastolic function. This study was designed to examine the role of advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) and AGE receptor (RAGE) in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Heart function was assessed in isolated control and streptozotocin‐induced diabetic hearts following in vivo RAGE gene knockdown using RNA interference. Cardiomyocyte mechanical properties were evaluated including peak shortening (PS), time‐to‐PS (TPS) and time‐to‐90% relengthening (TR90). RAGE was assayed by RT‐PCR and immunoblot. Diabetes significantly enhanced cardiac MG, AGE and RAGE levels accompanied with colocalization of AGE and RAGE in cardiomyocytes. Diabetes‐elicited increase in RAGE was inhibited by in vivo siRNA interference. The AGE formation inhibitor benfotiamine significantly attenuated diabetes‐induced elevation in MG, AGE, RAGE and collagen cross‐linking without affecting hypertriglyceridaemia and hypercholesterolaemia in diabetes. Diabetes markedly decreased LV contractility, as evidenced by reduced ±dP/dt and LV developed pressure (LVDP), which were protected by RAGE gene knockdown. In addition, MG‐derived AGE (MG‐AGE) up‐regulated cardiac RAGE mRNA and triggered cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction reminiscent of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The MG‐AGE‐elicited prolongation of TPS and TR90 was ablated by an anti‐RAGE antibody in cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, MG‐AGE‐induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction was associated with mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization and reduced GSK‐3β inactivation in control cardiomyocytes, similar to those from in vivo diabetes. Treatment with siRNA‐RAGE ablated diabetes‐induced MMP depolarization and GSK‐3β inactivation. Collectively, our result implicated a role of AGE‐RAGE in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:19602045

  7. The Chinese Herb Yi-Qi-Huo-Xue Protects Cardiomyocyte Function in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

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    Xiangsheng Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To study the effect of the Chinese herb Yi-qi-huo-xue on cardiomyopathy in diabetic rats. Methods. Rats were fed a high fat and high glucose diet and injected with 50 ml/kg streptozotocin (STZ to induce diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM, followed by treatment with Yi-qi-huo-xue for 4 weeks. We measured the rats’ heart weight index, observed the myocardial morphology using hematoxylin eosin (HE staining, and determined the content of collagen types I and III in the myocardium using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. We determined Bcl-2, Bax, and P53 protein expression by Western blot analysis and the cardiomyocyte apoptosis rate via a flow cytometry assay. Results. Compared with the rats in the control group, the diabetic rats gained weight and had increased blood sugar levels, an enhanced heart weight index, and increased myocardial pathophysiological damage. There was a decrease in their Bcl-2 expression, and their Bax and P53 expression increased. The Bcl-2/Bax ratio was enhanced, and there was an increase in the content of collagen types I and III in the myocardium. After treatment with Yi-qi-huo-xue, all levels listed above returned to normal. Conclusion. The Chinese herb Yi-qi-huo-xue degraded the myocardial interstitial collagen types I and III to protect the myocardium of the diabetic rats, thus delaying the role of myocardial fibrosis. Yi-qi-huo-xue could play an important role in protecting the myocardium of DCM rats by enhancing the expression of the Bcl-2 protein, inhibiting the expression of the Bax and P53 proteins, increasing the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and inhibiting the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes.

  8. Atorvastatin reduces β-Adrenergic dysfunction in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy.

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    Aude Carillion

    Full Text Available In the diabetic heart the β-adrenergic response is altered partly by down-regulation of the β1-adrenoceptor, reducing its positive inotropic effect and up-regulation of the β3-adrenoceptor, increasing its negative inotropic effect. Statins have clinical benefits on morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients which are attributed to their "pleiotropic" effects. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of statin treatment on β-adrenergic dysfunction in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes.β-adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (echocardiography and ex vivo (left ventricular papillary muscles in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, who were pre-treated or not by oral atorvastatin over 15 days (50 mg.kg-1.day-1. Micro-array analysis and immunoblotting were performed in left ventricular homogenates. Data are presented as mean percentage of baseline ± SD.Atorvastatin restored the impaired positive inotropic effect of β-adrenergic stimulation in diabetic hearts compared with healthy hearts both in vivo and ex vivo but did not suppress the diastolic dysfunction of diabetes. Atorvastatin changed the RNA expression of 9 genes in the β-adrenergic pathway and corrected the protein expression of β1-adrenoceptor and β1/β3-adrenoceptor ratio, and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibition abolished the beneficial effects of atorvastatin on the β-adrenoceptor response.Atorvastatin restored the positive inotropic effect of the β-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy. This effect is mediated by multiple modifications in expression of proteins in the β-adrenergic signaling pathway, particularly through the NOS pathway.

  9. Atorvastatin reduces β-Adrenergic dysfunction in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillion, Aude; Feldman, Sarah; Na, Na; Biais, Matthieu; Carpentier, Wassila; Birenbaum, Aurélie; Cagnard, Nicolas; Loyer, Xavier; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Hatem, Stéphane; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2017-01-01

    In the diabetic heart the β-adrenergic response is altered partly by down-regulation of the β1-adrenoceptor, reducing its positive inotropic effect and up-regulation of the β3-adrenoceptor, increasing its negative inotropic effect. Statins have clinical benefits on morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients which are attributed to their "pleiotropic" effects. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of statin treatment on β-adrenergic dysfunction in diabetic rat cardiomyocytes. β-adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (echocardiography) and ex vivo (left ventricular papillary muscles) in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, who were pre-treated or not by oral atorvastatin over 15 days (50 mg.kg-1.day-1). Micro-array analysis and immunoblotting were performed in left ventricular homogenates. Data are presented as mean percentage of baseline ± SD. Atorvastatin restored the impaired positive inotropic effect of β-adrenergic stimulation in diabetic hearts compared with healthy hearts both in vivo and ex vivo but did not suppress the diastolic dysfunction of diabetes. Atorvastatin changed the RNA expression of 9 genes in the β-adrenergic pathway and corrected the protein expression of β1-adrenoceptor and β1/β3-adrenoceptor ratio, and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4). Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition abolished the beneficial effects of atorvastatin on the β-adrenoceptor response. Atorvastatin restored the positive inotropic effect of the β-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy. This effect is mediated by multiple modifications in expression of proteins in the β-adrenergic signaling pathway, particularly through the NOS pathway.

  10. Tiny molecule, big power: Multi-target approach for curcumin in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Sreedhar, Remya; Bose, Rajendran J C; Vanama, Jyothi; Palaniyandi, Suresh S; Konishi, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kenichi; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is described as impaired cardiac diastolic and systolic functions. Diabetes mellitus (DM), a related cardiovascular disease, has become one of the major causes of death in DM patients. Mortality in these diseases is 2 to 3 times higher than in non-DM patients with cardiovascular disease. The progression of DCM and the cellular and molecular perturbations associated with the pathogenesis are complex and multifactorial. Although considerable progress has been achieved, the molecular etiologies of DCM remain poorly understood. There is an expanding need for natural antidiabetic medicines that do not cause the side effects of modern drugs. Curcumin, a pleiotropic molecule, from Curcuma longa, is known to possess numerous impacts such as scavenging free radical, antioxidant, antitumor, and antiinflammatory activities. The reports from preclinical and clinical findings revealed that curcumin can reverse insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, obesity, and obesity-related metabolic diseases. The current review provides an updated overview of the possible molecular mechanism of DCM and multitarget approach of curcumin in alleviating DCM and diabetic complication. Additionally, we mentioned the approaches that are currently being implemented to improve the bioavailability of this promising natural product in diabetes therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Comparative Summary on Antioxidant-like Actions of Timolol with Other Antioxidants in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Belma

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signaling associated with cardiac β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) is composed of coupled mechanism among β 1-/β2-AR and Gs proteins with contribution of constitutive β3-AR coupling to Gi proteins. However, down-regulation of β-ARs in the heart under pathological conditions is mediated with a signaling G proteins-included mechanism. Additionally, there are serious conflicting data on this field in literature yet. Although some of these conflictions are generally related with either experimental protocols for different approaches or different animal models. To treat cardiovascular disorders, generally, various types of β-blockers are used while their action mechanisms are not fully known yet. Furthermore, although β-blockers are generally used to block the activated β-ARs, they can be used to scavenge free radicals under oxidative stress. Studies, in whole-system, organ or cellular levels, showed that some β-blockers, including timolol, have protective-actions against increased oxidative stress in diseased heart via ROSscavenging. Additionally, it has been mentioned that some β-blockers nicely prevented the development of heart failure in both experimental and clinical studies by restoring sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channels, RyR2. Since diabetic cardiomyopathy is recognized due to its diminished responsiveness to β1-AR agonist stimulation in the heart with an up-regulation of β 3-AR, inducing a strong negative inotropic effect on left ventricular function, it has been shown that treatment of streptozotocin-diabetic rats with timolol provided a marked cardio-protection. Importantly, it has been also documented that timolol treatment-dependent cardio-protection in diabetic rats includes basically prevention of RyR2- hyperphosphorylation, which, in turn, block Ca(2+)-leakage from SR via scavenging oxidative agents to control redox-state of cardiomyocytes. This action of timolol in diabetic heart is very similar to other known

  12. Atlas of the clinical genetics of human dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas, Jan; Frese, Karen S; Peil, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Numerous genes are known to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, until now technological limitations have hindered elucidation of the contribution of all clinically relevant disease genes to DCM phenotypes in larger cohorts. We now utilized next-generation sequencing to overcome...... these limitations and screened all DCM disease genes in a large cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this multi-centre, multi-national study, we have enrolled 639 patients with sporadic or familial DCM. To all samples, we applied a standardized protocol for ultra-high coverage next-generation sequencing of 84 genes...... disease variants, we find titin, plakophilin-2, myosin-binding protein-C 3, desmoplakin, ryanodine receptor 2, desmocollin-2, desmoglein-2, and SCN5A variants among the most commonly mutated genes. The overlap between DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and channelopathy causing mutations...

  13. The critical role of Astragalus polysaccharides for the improvement of PPARα [ correction of PPRAα]-mediated lipotoxicity in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

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    Wei Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity-related diabetes mellitus leads to increased myocardial uptake and oxidation of fatty acids, resulting in a form of cardiac dysfunction referred to as lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. We have shown previously that Astragalus polysaccharides (APS administration was sufficient to improve the systemic metabolic disorder and cardiac dysfunction in diabetic models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the precise role of APS therapy in the pathogenesis of myocardial lipotoxity in diabetes, db/db diabetic mice and myosin heavy chain (MHC- peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR α mice were characterized and administrated with or without APS with C57 wide- type mice as normal control. APS treatment strikingly improved the myocyte triacylglyceride accumulation and cardiac dysfunction in both db/db mice and MHC-PPARα mice, with the normalization of energy metabolic derangements in both db/db diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts. Consistently, the activation of PPARα target genes involved in myocardial fatty acid uptake and oxidation in both db/db diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts was reciprocally repressed by APS administration, while PPARα-mediated suppression of genes involved in glucose utilization of both diabetic hearts and MHC-PPARα hearts was reversed by treatment with APS. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that APS therapy could prevent the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy through a mechanism mainly dependent on the cardiac PPARα-mediated regulatory pathways.

  14. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies

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    Ayman W. El-Hattab

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA while more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA. Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular noncompaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain (ETC complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial tRNAs, rRNAs, ribosomal proteins, and translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  15. Type I Diabetic Akita Mouse Model is Characterized by Abnormal Cardiac Deformation During Early Stages of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy with Speckle-Tracking Based Strain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingchao; Xiao, Hong; Wu, Jianfei; Zha, Lingfeng; Zhou, Mengchen; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Mengru; Shi, Shumei; Li, Yanze; Lyu, Liangkun; Wang, Qing; Tu, Xin; Lu, Qiulun

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been demonstrated to have a strong association with heart failure. Conventional echocardiographic analysis cannot sensitively monitor cardiac dysfunction in type I diabetic Akita hearts, but the phenotype of heart failure is observed in molecular levels during the early stages. Male Akita (Ins2WT/C96Y) mice were monitored with echocardiographic imaging at various ages, and then with conventional echocardiographic analysis and speckle-tracking based strain analyses. With speckle-tracking based strain analyses, diabetic Akita mice showed changes in average global radial strain at the age of 12 weeks, as well as decreased longitudinal strain. These changes occurred in the early stage and remained throughout the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy in Akita mice. Speckle-tracking showed that the detailed and precise changes of cardiac deformation in the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy in the genetic type I diabetic Akita mice were uncoupled. We monitored early-stage changes in the heart of diabetic Akita mice. We utilize this technique to elucidate the underlying mechanism for heart failure in Akita genetic type I diabetic mice. It will further advance the assessment of cardiac abnormalities, as well as the discovery of new drug treatments using Akita genetic type I diabetic mice. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Sansevieria roxburghiana Schult. & Schult. F. (Family: Asparagaceae) Attenuates Type 2 Diabetes and Its Associated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Niloy; Khanra, Ritu; Dua, Tarun K; Das, Susmita; De, Bratati; Zia-Ul-Haq, M; De Feo, Vincenzo; Dewanjee, Saikat

    2016-01-01

    Sansevieria roxburghiana Schult. & Schult. F. (Family: Asparagaceae) rhizome has been claimed to possess antidiabetic activity in the ethno-medicinal literature in India. Therefore, present experiments were carried out to explore the protective role of edible (aqueous) extract of S. roxburghiana rhizome (SR) against experimentally induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its associated cardiomyopathy in Wistar rats. SR was chemically characterized by GC-MS analysis. Antidiabetic activity of SR (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally) was measured in high fat diets (ad libitum) + low-single dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) induced type 2 diabetic (T2D) rat. Fasting blood glucose level was measured at specific intermissions. Serum biochemical and inflammatory markers were estimated after sacrificing the animals. Besides, myocardial redox status, expressions of signal proteins (NF-κB and PKCs), histological and ultrastructural studies of heart were performed in the controls and SR treated T2D rats. Phytochemical screening of the crude extract revealed the presence of phenolic compounds, sugar alcohols, sterols, amino acids, saturated fatty acids within SR. T2D rats exhibited significantly (p disintegration, oxidative stress, vascular inflammation and prevented the activation of oxidative stress induced signaling cascades leading to cell death. Histological and ultra-structural studies of cardiac tissues supported the protective characteristics of SR. From the present findings it can be concluded that, SR could offer protection against T2DM and its associated cardio-toxicity via multiple mechanisms viz. hypoglycemic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  17. Zinc Prevents the Development of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy in db/db Mice

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    Shudong Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetes (T2DM patients. Zinc is an important essential trace metal, whose deficiency is associated with various chronic ailments, including vascular diseases. We assessed T2DM B6.BKS(D-Leprdb/J (db/db mice fed for six months on a normal diet containing three zinc levels (deficient, adequate, and supplemented, to explore the role of zinc in DCM development and progression. Cardiac function, reflected by ejection fraction, was significantly decreased, along with increased left ventricle mass and heart weight to tibial length ratio, in db/db mice. As a molecular cardiac hypertrophy marker, atrial natriuretic peptide levels were also significantly increased. Cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy were accompanied by significantly increased fibrotic (elevated collagen accumulation as well as transforming growth factor β and connective tissue growth factor levels and inflammatory (enhanced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, caspase recruitment domain family member 9, and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10, and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in the heart. All these diabetic effects were exacerbated by zinc deficiency, and not affected by zinc supplementation, respectively. Mechanistically, oxidative stress and damage, mirrored by the accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, was significantly increased along with significantly decreased expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidants (NQO-1 and catalase. This was also exacerbated by zinc deficiency in the db/db mouse heart. These results suggested that zinc deficiency promotes the development and progression of DCM in T2DM db/db mice. The exacerbated effects by zinc deficiency on the heart of db/db mice may be related to further suppression of Nrf2 expression and function.

  18. Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo attenuates diabetic cardiomyopathy through inhibiting oxidative stress, inflammation and fibrosis in streptozotocin-induced mice.

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    Zhang, Zhihao; Zhang, Duoduo; Dou, Mengmeng; Li, Zhubo; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Xiaoyan

    2016-12-01

    Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo (Dendrobium catenatum Lindley), a prized traditional Chinese Medicine, has been used in China and Southeast Asian countries for centuries. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects and the possible mechanisms of the Dendrobium officinale extracts (DOE) on diabetic cardiomyopathy in mice. The diabetic model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin at the dose of 50mg/kg body weight for 5 consecutive days. After 8 weeks treatment of DOE, mice were sacrificed, blood sample and heart tissues were collected. Our results showed that Streptozotocin-induced diabetic model was effectively achieved and serum CK and LDH levels were significantly increased in mice with diabetic cardiomyopathy. Pretreatment with DOE decreased the heart-to-body weight ratio (HW/BW) and showed an evident hypoglycemic effect. DOE pretreatment significantly decreased CK, LDH, TC and TG levels, limited the production of MDA and increased the activities of T-SOD. The histological analysis of Oil red O staining and Sirius red staining showed an obvious amelioration of cardiac injury, inhibition of cardiac lipid accumulation and deposition of collagen when pretreatment with DOE. In addition, Western blot detection and analysis showed that DOE down-regulated the expression of TGF-β, collegan-1, fibronectin, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β. In conclusion, our study suggested that DOE possesses the cardioprotective potential against diabetic cardiomyopathy, which may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress, cardiac lipid accumulation, pro-inflammatory cytokines and cardiac fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of ERK1/2 in the Development of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

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    Zheng Xu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic condition that affects carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism and may impair numerous organs and functions of the organism. Cardiac dysfunction afflicts many patients who experience the oxidative stress of the heart. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is one of the major complications that accounts for more than half of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality cases. Chronic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia from diabetes mellitus cause cardiac oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, impaired cellular calcium handling, mitochondrial dysfunction, metabolic disturbances, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix, which ultimately lead to DCM. Although many studies have explored the mechanisms leading to DCM, the pathophysiology of DCM has not yet been fully clarified. In fact, as a potential mechanism, the associations between DCM development and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation have been the subjects of tremendous interest. Nonetheless, much remains to be investigated, such as tissue- and cell-specific processes of selection of MAPK activation between pro-apoptotic vs. pro-survival fate, as well as their relation with the pathogenesis of diabetes and associated complications. In general, it turns out that MAPK signaling pathways, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK and p38 MAP kinase, are demonstrated to be actively involved in myocardial dysfunction, hypertrophy, fibrosis and heart failure. As one of MAPK family members, the activation of ERK1/2 has also been known to be involved in cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. However, many recent studies have demonstrated that ERK1/2 signaling activation also plays a crucial role in FGF21 signaling and exerts a protective environment of glucose and lipid metabolism, therefore preventing abnormal healing and cardiac dysfunction. The duration, extent, and subcellular compartment of ERK1

  20. What Is Cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... underlying conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure . Cardiomyopathy often runs in families. Your doctor may suggest that your parents, brothers and sisters, and children get checked to see whether they have the ...

  1. Catalase inhibition in diabetic rats potentiates DNA damage and apoptotic cell death setting the stage for cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanović-Matić, Svetlana; Bogojević, Desanka; Martinović, Vesna; Petrović, Anja; Jovanović-Stojanov, Sofija; Poznanović, Goran; Grigorov, Ilijana

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease that has a multifactorial etiology, with oxidative stress as an important component. Our previous observation of a significant diabetes-related increase in rat cardiac catalase (CAT) activity suggested that CAT could play a major role in delaying the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Thus, in the present work, we examined the effects of the daily administration of the CAT inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (1 mg/g), on the hearts of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Administration of CAT inhibitor was started from the 15th day after the last STZ treatment (40 mg/kg/5 days), and maintained until the end of the 4th or 6th weeks of diabetes. Compared to untreated diabetic rats, at the end of the observation period, CAT inhibition lowered the induced level of cardiac CAT activity to the basal level and decreased CAT protein expression, mediated through a decline in the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 /nuclear factor-kappa B p65 (Nrf2/NF-κB p65) subunit ratio. The perturbed antioxidant defenses resulting from CAT inhibition promoted increased H₂O₂production (P < 0.05) and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05). Generated cytotoxic stimuli increased DNA damage (P < 0.05) and activated pro-apoptotic events, observed as a decrease (P < 0.05) in the ratio of the apoptosis regulator proteins Bcl-2/Bax, increased (P < 0.05) presence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) 85 kDa apoptotic fragment and cytoplasmic levels of cytochrome C. These findings confirm an important function of CAT in the suppression of events leading to diabetes-promoted cardiac dysfunction and cardiomyopathy.

  2. [Sepsis, cardiomyopathy and human immunodeficiency virus infection: presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llagunes, J; Arastey, S; Cobo Del Prado, I; Carmona, P; Peña, J J; Mínguez, C

    2014-04-01

    Sepsis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be associated with the appearance of cardiac dysfunction. This is a challenge, both when making the differential diagnosis and determining the proper treatment, as there are numerous risk factors: Myocarditis due to the HIV itself, the presence or absence of highly active antiretroviral therapy, toxic substances, and cardiomyopathy associated with sepsis. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach to an HIV positive patient with septic shock and cardiac dysfunction is described, as well as a brief review of the different causes of cardiomyopathy which may affect this group of patients is also presented. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro/vivo drug release and anti-diabetic cardiomyopathy properties of curcumin/PBLG-PEG-PBLG nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fei; Chai, Rongkui; Jiang, Haiying; Dong, Bo

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to survey the therapeutic function of curcumin-encapsulated poly(gamma-benzyl l-glutamate)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(gammabenzyl l-glutamate) (PBLG-PEG-PBLG) (P) on diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) via cross regulation effect of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and endogenous cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE)/hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S). Diabetic rats were preconditioned with 20 mg/kg curcumin or curcumin/P complex continuously for 8 weeks. The blood and myocardiums were collected, the level of serum H 2 S was observed, and the [Ca 2+ ] i content was measured in myocardial cells, and hematoxylin-eosin, CaSR, CSE, and calmodulin (CaM) expression were detected. Both curcumin and curcumin/P pretreatment alleviated pathological morphological damage of myocardium, increased H 2 S and [Ca 2+ ] i levels, and upregulated the expression of CaSR, CSE, and CaM as compared to DCM group, while curcumin/P remarkably augmented this effect. PBLG-PEG-PBLG could improve water-solubility and bioactivity of curcumin and curcumin/PBLG-PEG-PBLG significantly alleviated diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  4. Treadmill exercise alleviates diabetic cardiomyopathy by suppressing plasminogen activator inhibitor expression and enhancing eNOS in streptozotocin-induced male diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengji, Wang; Xianjin, Fan

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the biological mechanism of the effect of different intensity exercises on diabetic cardiomyopathy. 87 raise specific pathogen SPF healthy 6-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats, fed 6 weeks with high-fat diet for rats were used, and a diabetic model was established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin - randomly selected 43 rats were divided into Diabetic control group (DCG, n  = 10), Diabetic exercise group 1 (DEG1, n  = 11), Diabetic exercise group 2 (DEG2, n  = 11) and Diabetic exercise group 3 (DEG3, n  = 11). The rats in DEG1 were forced to run on a motorized treadmill, the exercise load consisted of running at a speed of 10 m/min, the exercise load of the rats in DEG2 were running at a speed of 15 m/min, the exercise load of the rats in DEG3 were running at a speed of 20 m/min, for one hour once a day for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks of exercise intervention, glucose metabolism-related indexes in rats such as blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated serum protein (GSP) and insulin (FINS); cardiac fibrinolytic system parameters such as PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), Von Willebrand factor (vWF), protein kinase C (PKC) and diacylglycerol (DAG); and serum level of NO, eNOS and T-NOS were measured. Compared with DCG, fasting blood glucose and GSP were decreased, while insulin sensitivity index and insulin level were increased in all rats of the three exercise groups. FBG decrease was statistically significant ( P  diabetic rats; myocardial PAI-1 in DEG1, DEG2 and DEG3 rats decreased significantly ( P  diabetic cardiomyopathy by affecting the levels of PAI-1 and eNOS, and there is a dependence on intensity. © 2018 The authors.

  5. Chronic Co-Administration of Sepiapterin and L-Citrulline Ameliorates Diabetic Cardiomyopathy and Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, Shelley L; Paterson, Mark; Leucker, Thorsten M; Fang, Juan; Zhang, David X; Bosnjak, Zeljko J; Warltier, David C; Kersten, Judy R; Ge, Zhi-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic heart disease is associated with tetrahydrobiopterin oxidation and high arginase activity, leading to endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction. Sepiapterin (SEP) is a tetrahydrobiopterin precursor, and L-citrulline (L-Cit) is converted to endothelial nitric oxide synthase substrate, L-arginine. Whether SEP and L-Cit are effective at reducing diabetic heart disease is not known. The present study examined the effects of SEP and L-Cit on diabetic cardiomyopathy and ischemia/reperfusion injury in obese type 2 diabetic mice. Db/db and C57BLKS/J mice at 6 to 8 weeks of age received vehicle, SEP, or L-Cit orally alone or in combination for 8 weeks. Cardiac function was evaluated with echocardiography. Db/db mice displayed hyperglycemia, obesity, and normal blood pressure and cardiac function compared with C57BLKS/J mice at 6 to 8 weeks of age. After vehicle treatment for 8 weeks, db/db mice had reduced ejection fraction, mitral E/A ratio, endothelium-dependent relaxation of coronary arteries, tetrahydrobiopterin concentrations, ratio of endothelial nitric oxide synthase dimers/monomers, and nitric oxide levels compared with vehicle-treated C57BLKS/J mice. These detrimental effects of diabetes mellitus were abrogated by co-administration of SEP and L-Cit. Myocardial infarct size was increased, and coronary flow rate and ± dP/dt were decreased during reperfusion in vehicle-treated db/db mice subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury compared with control mice. Co-administration of SEP and L-Cit decreased infarct size and improved coronary flow rate and cardiac function in both C57BLKS/J and db/db mice. Co-administration of SEP and L-Cit limits diabetic cardiomyopathy and ischemia/reperfusion injury in db/db mice through a tetrahydrobiopterin/endothelial nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide pathway. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Protection by dimethyl fumarate against diabetic cardiomyopathy in type 1 diabetic mice likely via activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinyue; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Sun, Jian; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2018-05-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play key roles in the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an FDA approved medicine for relapsing multiple sclerosis, has manifested its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory function mostly in the central nervous system. In this study, we investigated whether DMF could attenuate the development of DCM. Type 1 diabetes mouse model was established using multiple low-dose streptozotocin, and the diabetic mice were treated with DMF (10 mg/kg body weight) for 3 months. Cardiac functions were determined using echocardiography. Oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-fibrotic markers were determined with commercially available kits, real-time quantitative PCR or western blot techniques. DCM was characterized by diminished cardiac function, accompanied by oxidative stress and enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Diabetic cardiac tissue exhibited marked fibrosis, revealed by extracellular matrix deposition as determined by Sirius red staining of the myocardial tissues. Furthermore, Nrf2 and its downstream effectors were repressed in diabetic myocardium. On the contrary, diabetic animals treated with DMF exhibited blunted oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis and this correlated with Nrf2 activation. Our findings suggest that DMF could potentially thwart diabetes-induced myocardial tissue injury, likely via activation of Nrf2 function, providing firm impetus for future repurposing of DMF in the management of DCM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) rescues against streptozotocin-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy: Role of autophagy and ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhaohui; Deng, Qinqin; Babcock, Sara A; He, Emily Y; Ren, Jun; Zhang, Yingmei

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in the heart. Although several rationales have been speculated, the precise mechanism behind diabetic cardiomyopathy remains elusive. This study was designed to assess the role of inhibition of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cardiac dysfunction. Cardiac contractile function was assessed in normal C57BL/6 and STZ (200mg/kg, single injection and maintained for 2 wks)-induced diabetic mice treated with or without the AGE inhibitor aminoguanidine (50mg/kg/d in drinking water) for 2 weeks using echocardiography and IonOptix MyoCam techniques. Diabetes compromised cardiac contractile function shown as reduced fractional shortening and ejection fraction, enlarged left ventricular end systolic/diastolic diameters, decreased peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, prolonged shortening and relengthening duration as well as impaired intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis, the effects of which were alleviated or reversed by aminoguanidine treatment. Diabetes also inhibited autophagy, increased ER stress and phosphorylation of pro-hypertrophic signaling molecules Akt and mTOR, the effect of which was reversed by aminoguanidine. In vitro study revealed that methylglyoxal-derived AGE (MG-AGE) incubation in isolated cardiomyocytes promoted oxidation of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA2a) and production of superoxide, the effects of which were negated by the autophagy inducer rapamycin, the ER stress chaperone TUDCA or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these data revealed that inhibition of AGE formation rescues against experimental diabetes-induced cardiac remodeling and contractile dysfunction possible through regulation of autophagy and ER stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Complex phenotype linked to a mutation in exon 11 of the lamin A/C gene: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana Rita G; Santos Gonçalves, Inês; Veiga, Fátima; Mendes Pedro, Mónica; Pinto, Fausto J; Brito, Dulce

    2017-09-01

    The lamin A/C (LMNA) gene encodes lamins A and C, which have an important role in nuclear cohesion and chromatin organization. Mutations in this gene usually lead to the so-called laminopathies, the primary cardiac manifestations of which are dilated cardiomyopathy and intracardiac conduction defects. Some mutations, associated with lipodystrophy but not cardiomyopathy, have been linked to metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and severe dyslipidemia. Herein we describe a new phenotype associated with a mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular block, severe dyslipidemia and diabetes. A 64-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene (c.1718C>T, Ser573Leu) presented with severe symptomatic ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. She underwent septal alcohol ablation, followed by Morrow myectomy. The patient was also diagnosed with severe dyslipidemia, diabetes and obesity, and fulfilled diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome. No other characteristics of LMNA mutation-related phenotypes were identified. The development of type III atrioventricular block with no apparent cause, and mildly depressed systolic function, prompted referral for cardiac resynchronization therapy. In conclusion, the association between LMNA mutations and different phenotypes is complex and not fully understood, and can present with a broad spectrum of severity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Emodin Protects against Diabetic Cardiomyopathy by Regulating the AKT/GSK-3β Signaling Pathway in the Rat Model

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    Zhiqin Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM has been recognized as a major health problem. Emodin (Emo has been reported to exhibit protective effects against diabetic nephropathy. However, little has been known about the effect of Emo on diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM. A type 2 DM model was induced in rats by low dose streptozotocin (STZ combined with high energy intake. We found that Emo-treated groups displayed significantly higher body weight (BW and lower heart weight (HW/BW. Furthermore, Emo could significantly decrease blood glucose, total cholesterol (TG levels, and triglyceride (TC levels in diabetic rats. Moreover, the Emo-treated group showed a marked increase in heart rate (HR and showed lower left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD, left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD, left ventricular posterior wall thickness (LWPWT, and interventricular septal diastolic wall thickness (IVSD. Emo induced a significant increase in phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β in myocardium. These results suggest that Emo may have great therapeutic potential in the treatment of DCM by Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  10. Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Family history of dilated cardiomyopathy Inflammation of heart muscle from immune system disorders, such as lupus Neuromuscular disorders, such as muscular dystrophy Complications Complications from dilated cardiomyopathy include: Heart ...

  11. New Altered Non-Fibrillar Collagens in Human Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Role in the Remodeling Process.

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    Carolina Gil-Cayuela

    Full Text Available In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, cardiac failure is accompanied by profound alterations of extracellular matrix associated with the progression of cardiac dilation and left ventricular (LV dysfunction. Recently, we reported alterations of non-fibrillar collagen expression in ischemic cardiomyopathy linked to fibrosis and cardiac remodeling. We suspect that expression changes in genes coding for non-fibrillar collagens may have a potential role in DCM development.This study sought to analyze changes in the expression profile of non-fibrillar collagen genes in patients with DCM and to examine relationships between cardiac remodeling parameters and the expression levels of these genes.Twenty-three human left ventricle tissue samples were obtained from DCM patients (n = 13 undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 10 for RNA sequencing analysis. We found increased mRNA levels of six non-fibrillar collagen genes, such as COL4A5, COL9A1, COL21A1, and COL23A1 (P < 0.05 for all, not previously described in DCM. Protein levels of COL8A1 and COL16A1 (P < 0.05 for both, were correspondingly increased. We also identified TGF-β1 significantly upregulated and related to both COL8A1 and COL16A1. Interestingly, we found a significant relationship between LV mass index and the gene expression level of COL8A1 (r = 0.653, P < 0.05.In our research, we identified new non-fibrillar collagens with altered expression in DCM, being COL8A1 overexpression directly related to LV mass index, suggesting that they may be involved in the progression of cardiac dilation and remodeling.

  12. Exogenous H2S facilitating ubiquitin aggregates clearance via autophagy attenuates type 2 diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jichao; Tian, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Lu, Cuicui; Liu, Ning; Gao, Zhaopeng; Zhang, Linxue; Dong, Shiyun; Yang, Fan; Zhong, Xin; Xu, Changqing; Lu, Fanghao; Zhang, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a serious complication of diabetes. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a newly found gaseous signalling molecule, has an important role in many regulatory functions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of exogenous H2S on autophagy and its possible mechanism in DCM induced by type II diabetes (T2DCM). In this study, we found that sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) attenuated the augment in left ventricular (LV) mass and increased LV volume, decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and ameliorated H2S production in the hearts of db/db mice. NaHS facilitated autophagosome content degradation, reduced the expression of P62 (a known substrate of autophagy) and increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 II. It also increased the expression of autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) and Beclin1 in db/db mouse hearts. NaHS increased the expression of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap-1) and reduced the ubiquitylation level in the hearts of db/db mice. 1,4-Dithiothreitol, an inhibitor of disulphide bonds, increased the ubiquitylation level of Keap-1, suppressed the expression of Keap-1 and abolished the effects of NaHS on ubiquitin aggregate clearance and ROS production in H9C2 cells treated with high glucose and palmitate. Overall, we concluded that exogenous H2S promoted ubiquitin aggregate clearance via autophagy, which might exert its antioxidative effect in db/db mouse myocardia. Moreover, exogenous H2S increased Keap-1 expression by suppressing its ubiquitylation, which might have an important role in ubiquitin aggregate clearance via autophagy. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanisms responsible for the antioxidative effects of H2S in the context of T2DCM. PMID:28796243

  13. Modeling Treatment Response for Lamin A/C Related Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee-Ki; Lau, Yee-Man; Cai, Zhu-Jun; Lai, Wing-Hon; Wong, Lai-Yung; Tse, Hung-Fat; Ng, Kwong-Man; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2017-07-28

    Precision medicine is an emerging approach to disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in the environment, lifestyle, and genetic makeup of patients. Patient-specific human induced pluripotent stem cells hold promise to transform precision medicine into real-life clinical practice. Lamin A/C (LMNA)-related cardiomyopathy is the most common inherited cardiomyopathy in which a substantial proportion of mutations in the LMNA gene are of nonsense mutation. PTC124 induces translational read-through over the premature stop codon and restores production of the full-length proteins from the affected genes. In this study we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiomyocytes from patients who harbored different LMNA mutations (nonsense and frameshift) to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of PTC124 in LMNA -related cardiomyopathy. We generated human induced pluripotent stem cells lines from 3 patients who carried distinctive mutations (R225X, Q354X, and T518fs) in the LMNA gene. The cardiomyocytes derived from these human induced pluripotent stem cells lines reproduced the pathophysiological hallmarks of LMNA -related cardiomyopathy. Interestingly, PTC124 treatment increased the production of full-length LMNA proteins in only the R225X mutant, not in other mutations. Functional evaluation experiments on the R225X mutant further demonstrated that PTC124 treatment not only reduced nuclear blebbing and electrical stress-induced apoptosis but also improved the excitation-contraction coupling of the affected cardiomyocytes. Using cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells carrying different LMNA mutations, we demonstrated that the effect of PTC124 is codon selective. A premature stop codon UGA appeared to be most responsive to PTC124 treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. High-Intensity Exercise Reduces Cardiac Fibrosis and Hypertrophy but Does Not Restore the Nitroso-Redox Imbalance in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

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    Ulises Novoa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy refers to the manifestations in the heart as a result of altered glucose homeostasis, reflected as fibrosis, cellular hypertrophy, increased oxidative stress, and apoptosis, leading to ventricular dysfunction. Since physical exercise has been indicated as cardioprotective, we tested the hypothesis that high-intensity exercise training could reverse the cardiac maladaptations produced by diabetes. For this, diabetes was induced in rats by a single dose of alloxan. Diabetic rats were randomly assigned to a sedentary group or submitted to a program of exercise on a treadmill for 4 weeks at 80% of maximal performance. Another group of normoglycemic rats was used as control. Diabetic rat hearts presented cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Chronic exercise reduced both parameters but increased apoptosis. Diabetes increased the myocardial levels of the mRNA and proteins of NADPH oxidases NOX2 and NOX4. These altered levels were not reduced by exercise. Diabetes also increased the level of uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS that was not reversed by exercise. Finally, diabetic rats showed a lower degree of phosphorylated phospholamban and reduced levels of SERCA2 that were not restored by high-intensity exercise. These results suggest that high-intensity chronic exercise was able to reverse remodeling in the diabetic heart but was unable to restore the nitroso-redox imbalance imposed by diabetes.

  15. Differential gene expression of cardiac ion channels in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

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    Maria Micaela Molina-Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is characterized by idiopathic dilation and systolic contractile dysfunction of the cardiac chambers. The present work aimed to study the alterations in gene expression of ion channels involved in cardiomyocyte function. METHODS AND RESULTS: Microarray profiling using the Affymetrix Human Gene® 1.0 ST array was performed using 17 RNA samples, 12 from DCM patients undergoing cardiac transplantation and 5 control donors (CNT. The analysis focused on 7 cardiac ion channel genes, since this category has not been previously studied in human DCM. SCN2B was upregulated, while KCNJ5, KCNJ8, CLIC2, CLCN3, CACNB2, and CACNA1C were downregulated. The RT-qPCR (21 DCM and 8 CNT samples validated the gene expression of SCN2B (p < 0.0001, KCNJ5 (p < 0.05, KCNJ8 (p < 0.05, CLIC2 (p < 0.05, and CACNB2 (p < 0.05. Furthermore, we performed an IPA analysis and we found a functional relationship between the different ion channels studied in this work. CONCLUSION: This study shows a differential expression of ion channel genes involved in cardiac contraction in DCM that might partly underlie the changes in left ventricular function observed in these patients. These results could be the basis for new genetic therapeutic approaches.

  16. Altered contractile response due to increased beta3-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy: the role of nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Loyer, Xavier; Le Guen, Morgan; Mabrouk, Nejma; David, Jean-Stéphane; Camors, Emmanuel; Carusio, Nunzia; Vivien, Benoît; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Heymes, Christophe; Riou, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    In the diabetic heart, the positive inotropic response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation is altered and beta1 and beta2 adrenoceptors are down-regulated, whereas beta3 adrenoceptor is up-regulated. In heart failure, beta3-adrenoceptor stimulation induces a negative inotropic effect that results from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3)-derived nitric oxide production. The objective of our study was to investigate the role of beta3-adrenoceptor in diabetic cardiomyopathy. beta-Adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (dobutamine echocardiography) and in vitro (left ventricular papillary muscle) in healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The effect of beta3-adrenoceptor inhibition on the inotropic response was studied in vitro. Immunoblots and NOS activities were performed in heart homogenates (electron paramagnetic resonance) and isolated cardiomyocytes. Data are mean percentage of baseline +/- SD. The impaired positive inotropic effect was confirmed in diabetes both in vivo (121 +/- 15% vs. 160 +/- 16%; P < 0.05) and in vitro (112 +/- 5% vs. 179 +/- 15%; P < 0.05). In healthy rat, the positive inotropic effect was not significantly modified in presence of beta3-adrenoceptor antagonist (174 +/- 20%), nonselective NOS inhibitor (N -nitro-l-arginine methylester [l-NAME]; 183 +/- 19%), or selective NOS1 inhibitor (vinyl-l-N-5-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine [l-VNIO]; 172 +/- 13%). In diabetes, in parallel with the increase in beta3-adrenoceptor protein expression, the positive inotropic effect was partially restored by beta3-adrenoceptor antagonist (137 +/- 8%; P < 0.05), l-NAME (133 +/- 11%; P < 0.05), or l-VNIO (130 +/- 13%; P < 0.05). Nitric oxide was exclusively produced by NOS1 within diabetic cardiomyocytes. NOS2 and NOS3 proteins were undetectable. beta3-Adrenoceptor is involved in altered positive inotropic response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation in diabetic cardiomyopathy. This effect is mediated by NOS1-derived nitric oxide in diabetic

  17. The effect of maternal gestational diabetes and HbA1c on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy of infants

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    Hoda Rezaie

    2017-09-01

    Methods: This case-control study was performed on 60 neonates born in Afzalipour Hospital (Kerman University of Medical Sciences from May to November 2014 in two groups of eligible infants using the convenience sampling method. Information about the age, sex, weight, gestational age, maternal age, obstetric history, gestational diabetes through the checklist were collected. Then Doppler echocardiography, M- Mode, Doppler tissue was conducted on two groups. Echocardiographic criteria including ventricular septal thickness and blood HbA1c mothers in both groups were compared. To compare quantitative and qualitative variables between the two groups’ Independent samples t‐test and Chi-square test was used. A significant level of 0.05 was considered in all of the statistical samples and SPSS software, ver. 20 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA was used to analyze the data. Results: In this study, the birth weight of infants and the age of mothers did not differ between two groups (Respectively P=0.56, P=0.08 However, HbA1c was significantly higher in the infants of mothers with impaired glucose tolerance test (GTT (P<0.001. In infants of mothers with impaired GTT, ventricular septal thickness was significantly higher than the healthy controls (P=0.03, Also there was a significant difference between two groups in tissue Doppler criteria (Ea (P=0.04, In other echocardiographic criteria, no significant differences were reported (The LA/AO, LVPWT, LVEF, LVEF, LVFS, LVFS, LVEDd, LVESd, Sa and Aa, All P-values were ≥ 0.05. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus of mothers causes several complications in their infants. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy hypertrophy is higher in babies whose mothers have higher levels of HbA1c and a sign of poor control of blodd glucose level during pregnancy.

  18. L-glutamine supplementation prevents the development of experimental diabetic cardiomyopathy in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats.

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    Sachin L Badole

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of L-glutamine on cardiac myopathy in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in overnight fasted Sprague Dawely rats by using intraperitonial injection of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg. Nicotinamide (100 mg/kg, i.p. was administered 20 min before administration of streptozotocin. Experimental rats were divided into Group I: non-diabetic control (distilled water; 10 ml/kg, p.o., II: diabetic control (distilled water, 10 ml/kg, p.o., III: L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o. and IV: L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.. All groups were diabetic except group I. The plasma glucose level, body weight, electrocardiographic abnormalities, hemodynamic changes and left ventricular contractile function, biological markers of cardiotoxicity, antioxidant markers were determined after 4 months after STZ with nicotinamide injection. Histopathological changes of heart tissue were carried out by using H and E stain. L-glutamine treatment improved the electrocardiographic, hemodynamic changes; LV contractile function; biological markers; oxidative stress parameters and histological changes in STZ induced diabetic rats. Results from the present investigation demonstrated that L-glutamine has seemed a cardioprotective activity.

  19. Dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore, M.; Cuocolo, A.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide techniques are easily obtainable, noninvasive examinations that provide useful information in the evaluation, diagnosis and management of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The gated blood pool scan allows the assessment of ventricular size, configuration, and wall and septal thickness. These data allow the functional class of the cardiomyopathy (congestive, restrictive or hypertrophic) to be defined. Often THallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging adds further information and is particularly useful in distinguishing congestive cardiomyopathy from severe coronary artery disease and in depicting septal abnormalities in hipertrophic cardiomyopathy. Useful as these techniques are, they are not substitutes for conventional approaches to diagnosis. Careful history taking and physical examination, as well as scrutiny of the electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and echocardiogram should be standard practice for the evaluation of patients with suspected cardiomyopathy. Judicious use of noninvasive techniques may obviate the need for cardiac catheterization in many patients

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces different molecular structural alterations in human dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy.

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    Ana Ortega

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a multifunctional organelle responsible for the synthesis and folding of proteins as well as for signalling and calcium storage, that has been linked to the contraction-relaxation process. Perturbations of its homeostasis activate a stress response in diseases such as heart failure (HF. To elucidate the alterations in ER molecular components, we analyze the levels of ER stress and structure proteins in human dilated (DCM and ischemic (ICM cardiomyopathies, and its relationship with patient's functional status. METHODS AND RESULTS: We examined 52 explanted human hearts from DCM (n = 21 and ICM (n = 21 subjects and 10 non-failing hearts as controls. Our results showed specific changes in stress (IRE1, p<0.05; p-IRE1, p<0.05 and structural (Reticulon 1, p<0.01 protein levels. The stress proteins GRP78, XBP1 and ATF6 as well as the structural proteins RRBP1, kinectin, and Nogo A and B, were upregulated in both DCM and ICM patients. Immunofluorescence results were concordant with quantified Western blot levels. Moreover, we show a novel relationship between stress and structural proteins. RRBP1, involved in procollagen synthesis and remodeling, was related with left ventricular function. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we report the existence of alterations in ER stress response and shaping proteins. We show a plausible effect of the ER stress on ER structure in a suitable sample of DCM and ICM subjects. Patients with higher values of RRBP1 had worse left ventricular function.

  1. Beneficial Role of Some Natural Products to Attenuate the Diabetic Cardiomyopathy Through Nrf2 Pathway in Cell Culture and Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathibabu Uddandrao, V V; Brahmanaidu, Parim; Nivedha, P R; Vadivukkarasi, S; Saravanan, Ganapathy

    2017-10-27

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy, as one of the main cardiac complications in diabetic patients, is identified to connect with oxidative stress that is due to interruption in balance between reactive oxygen species or/and reactive nitrogen species generation and their clearance by antioxidant protection systems. Transcription factor the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a significant role in maintaining the oxidative homeostasis by regulating multiple downstream antioxidants. The Nrf2 plays a significant role in ARE-mediated basal and inducible expression of more than 200 genes that can be grouped into numerous categories as well as antioxidant genes and phase II detoxifying enzymes. On the other hand, activation of Nrf2 by natural and synthetic therapeutics or antioxidants has been revealed effective for the prevention and treatment of toxicities and diseases connected with oxidative stress. Hence, recently focus has been shifted toward plants and plant-based medicines in curing such chronic diseases, as they are supposed to be less toxic. In this review, we focused on the role of some natural products on diabetic cardiomyopathy through Nrf2 pathway.

  2. Matrine pretreatment improves cardiac function in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy via suppressing ROS/TLR-4 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-wei; Wang, Jun-kui; Qiu, Chuan; Guan, Gong-chang; Liu, Xin-hong; Li, Shang-jian; Deng, Zheng-rong

    2015-03-01

    Matrine is an alkaloid from Sophora alopecuroides L, which has shown a variety of pharmacological activities and potential therapeutic value in cardiovascular diseases. In this study we examined the protective effects of matrine against diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) in rats. Male SD rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) to induce DCM. One group of DCM rats was pretreated with matrine (200 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) for 10 consecutive days before STZ injection. Left ventricular function was evaluated using invasive hemodynamic examination, and myocardiac apoptosis was assessed. Primary rat myocytes were used for in vitro experiments. Intracellular ROS generation, MDA content and GPx activity were determined. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect the expression of relevant mRNAs and proteins. DCM rats exhibited abnormally elevated non-fasting blood glucose levels at 4 weeks after STZ injection, and LV function impairment at 16 weeks. The cardiac tissues of DCM rats showed markedly increased apoptosis, excessive ROS production, and activation of TLR-4/MyD-88/caspase-8/caspase-3 signaling. Pretreatment with matrine significantly decreased non-fasting blood glucose levels and improved LV function in DCM rats, which were associated with reducing apoptosis and ROS production, and suppressing TLR-4/MyD-88/caspase-8/caspase-3 signaling in cardiac tissues. Incubation in a high-glucose medium induced oxidative stress and activation of TLR-4/MyD-88 signaling in cultured myocytes in vitro, which were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine. Excessive ROS production in DCM activates the TLR-4/MyD-88 signaling, resulting in cardiomyocyte apoptosis, whereas pretreatment with matrine improves cardiac function via suppressing ROS/TLR-4 signaling pathway.

  3. Deficient regulatory T cell activity and low frequency of IL-17-producing T cells correlate with the extent of cardiomyopathy in human Chagas' disease.

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    Paulo Marcos Matta Guedes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardium damage during Chagas' disease results from the immunological imbalance between pro- and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and has been explained based on the Th1-Th2 dichotomy and regulatory T cell activity. Recently, we demonstrated that IL-17 produced during experimental T. cruzi infection regulates Th1 cells differentiation and parasite induced myocarditis. Here, we investigated the role of IL-17 and regulatory T cell during human Chagas' disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we observed CD4(+IL-17(+ T cells in culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from Chagas' disease patients and we evaluated Th1, Th2, Th17 cytokine profile production in the PBMC cells from Chagas' disease patients (cardiomyopathy-free, and with mild, moderate or severe cardiomyopathy cultured with T. cruzi antigen. Cultures of PBMC from patients with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy produced high levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and low levels of IL-10, when compared to mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free patients. Flow cytometry analysis showed higher CD4(+IL-17(+ cells in PBMC cultured from patients without or with mild cardiomyopathy, in comparison to patients with moderate or severe cardiomyopathy. We then analyzed the presence and function of regulatory T cells in all patients. All groups of Chagas' disease patients presented the same frequency of CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells. However, CD4(+CD25(+ T cells from patients with mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free showed higher suppressive activity than those with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy. IFN-γ levels during chronic Chagas' disease are inversely correlated to the LVEF (P = 0.007, r = -0.614, while regulatory T cell activity is directly correlated with LVEF (P = 0.022, r = 0.500. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that reduced production of the cytokines IL-10 and IL-17 in association with high levels of IFN-γ and TNF

  4. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

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    ... People with restrictive cardiomyopathy may be heart transplant candidates. The outlook depends on the cause of the ... www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. ...

  5. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... short- ness of breath, and palpitations. •  Electrocardiogram (heart tracing) to assess heart rate and rhythm, to look ... Accessed January 22, 2013. The Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Network Web site. http: / / www. peripartumcmnetwork. pitt. edu. Accessed January ...

  6. Intravenous administration of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells has a neutral effect on obesity-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy

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    Sebastián D Calligaris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major global health issue. Obese patients develop metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of clinical features characterized by insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Its cardiac manifestation, diabetic cardiomyopathy, leads to heart failure. Bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, also referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are envisioned as a therapeutic tool not only for cardiovascular diseases but also for other degenerative conditions. Our aim was to evaluate whether the intravenous administration of MSC modifies cardiac dysfunction in obese mice. To this end, C57BL/6 mice were fed a regular (normal or high-fat diet (obese. Obese animals received the vehicle (obese, a single dose (obese + 1x MSC or three doses (obese + 3x MSC of 0.5x10(6 syngeneic MSC. Two to three months following MSC administration, cardiac function was assessed by cardiac catheterization, at basal condition and after a pharmacological stress. Compared to normal mice, obese mice presented hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia and cardiac dysfunction after stress condition. Exogenous MSC neither improved nor impaired this cardiac dysfunction. Thus, intravenous administration of MSC has neutral effect on obesity-induced diabetic cardiomyopathy

  7. Cardiomyopathy induced by anthracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroz, Isabel; Espinoza, Gerson; Poveda, Maria; Flores, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Anthracycline cardiomyopathy is less frequently encountered nowadays, due to the well recognized dose limitations and cardiac monitoring protocols used by chemotherapy centers. However, it is a condition that will persist due to the sensitivity of some patients to these drugs and the necessity for large doses to be used for certain individuals. We have demonstrated the benefit of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy and would consider introducing these compounds at the earliest opportunity. The use of probucol and vitamins as antioxidants capable of preventing the onset of cardiomyopathy in humans appears to require further investigation but may significantly reduce the incidence of this condition in the future. (The author)

  8. MTO1 mutations are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lactic acidosis and cause respiratory chain deficiency in humans and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruffini, Enrico; Dallabona, Cristina; Invernizzi, Federica; Yarham, John W; Melchionda, Laura; Blakely, Emma L; Lamantea, Eleonora; Donnini, Claudia; Santra, Saikat; Vijayaraghavan, Suresh; Roper, Helen P; Burlina, Alberto; Kopajtich, Robert; Walther, Anett; Strom, Tim M; Haack, Tobias B; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W; Ferrero, Ileana; Zeviani, Massimo; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We report three families presenting with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and multiple defects of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activities. By direct sequencing of the candidate gene MTO1, encoding the mitochondrial-tRNA modifier 1, or whole exome sequencing analysis, we identified novel missense mutations. All MTO1 mutations were predicted to be deleterious on MTO1 function. Their pathogenic role was experimentally validated in a recombinant yeast model, by assessing oxidative growth, respiratory activity, mitochondrial protein synthesis, and complex IV activity. In one case, we also demonstrated that expression of wt MTO1 could rescue the respiratory defect in mutant fibroblasts. The severity of the yeast respiratory phenotypes partly correlated with the different clinical presentations observed in MTO1 mutant patients, although the clinical outcome was highly variable in patients with the same mutation and seemed also to depend on timely start of pharmacological treatment, centered on the control of lactic acidosis by dichloroacetate. Our results indicate that MTO1 mutations are commonly associated with a presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and MRC deficiency, and that ad hoc recombinant yeast models represent a useful system to test the pathogenic potential of uncommon variants, and provide insight into their effects on the expression of a biochemical phenotype. © 2013 The Authors. *Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up in the circulatory system. In time, the heart fails. What causes it? Restrictive cardiomyopathy is often caused by diseases in other parts of the body. One known cause is cardiac ... build up in the heart tissue, making the tissue stiff and thickened. Cardiac ...

  10. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the ..... cohort with nominal significance, and a recent meta-analysis ..... Whereas it is generally thought that lysine acetylation is.

  11. Cardiomyocytes undergo apoptosis in human immunodeficiency virus cardiomyopathy through mitochondrion- and death receptor-controlled pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Cheryl; Liu, Nancy Q; Popik, Waldemar; Bukrinsky, Michael; Sayre, James; Roberts, Jaclyn; Rania, Shammas; Bramhandam, Vishnu; Roos, Kenneth P; MacLellan, W Robb; Fiala, Milan

    2002-10-29

    We investigated 18 AIDS hearts (5 with and 13 without cardiomyopathy) by using immunocytochemistry and computerized image analysis regarding the roles of HIV-1 proteins and tumor necrosis factor ligands in HIV cardiomyopathy (HIVCM). HIVCM and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were significantly related to each other and to the expression by inflammatory cells of gp120 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In HIVCM heart, active caspase 9, a component of the mitochondrion-controlled apoptotic pathway, and the elements of the death receptor-mediated pathway, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and Fas ligand, were expressed strongly on macrophages and weakly on cardiomyocytes. HIVCM showed significantly greater macrophage infiltration and cardiomyocyte apoptosis rate compared with non-HIVCM. HIV-1 entered cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes by macropinocytosis but did not replicate. HIV-1- or gp120-induced apoptosis of rat myocytes through a mitochondrion-controlled pathway, which was inhibited by heparin, AOP-RANTES, or pertussis toxin, suggesting that cardiomyocyte apoptosis is induced by signaling through chemokine receptors. In conclusion, in patients with HIVCM, cardiomyocytes die through both mitochondrion- and death receptor-controlled apoptotic pathways.

  12. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Munk, Kim; Goetzsche, Ole

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sparse information with regard to the electrocardiographic (ECG) changes in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and electrocardiographic changes in a Danish cohort of patients with TC. We discuss the pote......INTRODUCTION: Sparse information with regard to the electrocardiographic (ECG) changes in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is available. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics and electrocardiographic changes in a Danish cohort of patients with TC. We discuss...... retrospectively from medical records and the hospitals laboratory database. RESULTS: Seven patients with TC were identified comprising six females and one male (mean age 70, range 53-81 years). In the acute phase all patients had ECG changes compatible with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI...

  14. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the cardiovascular system constitute a major public health problem. There is evidence demonstrating that genetic factors contribute to the risk of DVC genetic variants, structural variants, and epigenetic changes play ...

  15. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Cashman

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS, which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and

  16. Mechanisms of pro-arrhythmic abnormalities in ventricular repolarisation and anti-arrhythmic therapies in human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passini, Elisa; Mincholé, Ana; Coppini, Raffaele; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Rodriguez, Blanca; Severi, Stefano; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a cause of sudden arrhythmic death, but the understanding of its pro-arrhythmic mechanisms and an effective pharmacological treatment are lacking. HCM electrophysiological remodelling includes both increased inward and reduced outward currents, but their role in promoting repolarisation abnormalities remains unknown. The goal of this study is to identify key ionic mechanisms driving repolarisation abnormalities in human HCM, and to evaluate anti-arrhythmic effects of single and multichannel inward current blocks. Experimental ionic current, action potential (AP) and Ca(2+)-transient (CaT) recordings were used to construct populations of human non-diseased and HCM AP models (n=9118), accounting for inter-subject variability. Simulations were conducted for several degrees of selective and combined inward current block. Simulated HCM cardiomyocytes exhibited prolonged AP and CaT, diastolic Ca(2+) overload and decreased CaT amplitude, in agreement with experiments. Repolarisation abnormalities in HCM models were consistently driven by L-type Ca(2+) current (ICaL) re-activation, and ICaL block was the most effective intervention to normalise repolarisation and diastolic Ca(2+), but compromised CaT amplitude. Late Na(+) current (INaL) block partially abolished repolarisation abnormalities, with small impact on CaT. Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (INCX) block effectively restored repolarisation and CaT amplitude, but increased Ca(2+) overload. Multichannel block increased efficacy in normalising repolarisation, AP biomarkers and CaT amplitude compared to selective block. Experimentally-calibrated populations of human AP models identify ICaL re-activation as the key mechanism for repolarisation abnormalities in HCM, and combined INCX, INaL and ICaL block as effective anti-arrhythmic therapies also able to partially reverse the HCM electrophysiological phenotype. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Atorvastatin vs. Rosuvastatin on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in non-diabetic patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutamoto, Takayoshi; Ibe, Kunihiro [Toyosato Hospital, Toyosato, Shiga (Japan); Sakai, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Masayuki; Kawahara, Chiho; Nakae, Ichiro; Fujii, Masanori; Yamamoto, Takashi; Horie, Minoru [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Otsu, Shiga (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Effects of statin therapy on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have not previously been evaluated. To compare the effects of lipophilic atorvastatin and hydrophilic rosuvastatin on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in CHF patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), 63 stable outpatients with DCM, who were already receiving standard therapy for CHF, were randomized to atorvastatin (n=32) or rosuvastatin (n=31). We evaluated cardiac sympathetic nerve activity by cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, hemodynamic parameters and neurohumoral factors before and after 6 months of treatment. There were no differences in the baseline characteristics of the 2 groups. In the rosuvastatin group, there were no changes in MIBG parameters, left ventricular ejection fraction or plasma levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) after 6 months of treatment. In contrast, the atorvastatin group showed a significant increase in the delayed heart/mediastinum count ratio (2.18{+-}0.4 vs. 2.36{+-}0.4, P<0.0001), and the washout rate was significantly decreased (34.8{+-}5.7 vs. 32.6{+-}6.3%, P=0.0001) after 6 months of treatment compared with the baseline values. The plasma NT-proBNP level was also significantly decreased (729{+-}858 vs. 558{+-}747 pg/ml, P=0.0139). Lipophilic atorvastatin but not hydrophilic rosuvastatin improves cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in CHF patients with DCM. (author)

  18. Gene-Targeted Mice with the Human Troponin T R141W Mutation Develop Dilated Cardiomyopathy with Calcium Desensitization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohun Ramratnam

    Full Text Available Most studies of the mechanisms leading to hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM have been performed in reconstituted in vitro systems. Genetically engineered murine models offer the opportunity to dissect these mechanisms in vivo. We generated a gene-targeted knock-in murine model of the autosomal dominant Arg141Trp (R141W mutation in Tnnt2, which was first described in a human family with DCM. Mice heterozygous for the mutation (Tnnt2R141W/+ recapitulated the human phenotype, developing left ventricular dilation and reduced contractility. There was a gene dosage effect, so that the phenotype in Tnnt2R141W/+mice was attenuated by transgenic overexpression of wildtype Tnnt2 mRNA transcript. Male mice exhibited poorer survival than females. Biomechanical studies on skinned fibers from Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts showed a significant decrease in pCa50 (-log[Ca2+] required for generation of 50% of maximal force relative to wildtype hearts, indicating Ca2+ desensitization. Optical mapping studies of Langendorff-perfused Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts showed marked increases in diastolic and peak systolic intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i, and prolonged systolic rise and diastolic fall of [Ca2+]i. Perfused Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts had slower intrinsic rates in sinus rhythm and reduced peak heart rates in response to isoproterenol. Tnnt2R141W/+ hearts exhibited a reduction in phosphorylated phospholamban relative to wildtype mice. However, crossing Tnnt2R141W/+ mice with phospholamban knockout (Pln-/- mice, which exhibit increased Ca2+ transients and contractility, had no effect on the DCM phenotype. We conclude that the Tnnt2 R141W mutation causes a Ca2+ desensitization and mice adapt by increasing Ca2+-transient amplitudes, which impairs Ca2+ handling dynamics, metabolism and responses to β-adrenergic activation.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dilated cardiomyopathy: the complexity of a diverse genetic architecture. Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 Sep;10(9):531- ... Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical ...

  20. A Crude 1-DNJ Extract from Home Made Bombyx Batryticatus Inhibits Diabetic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Fibrosis in db/db Mice and Reduces Protein N-Glycosylation Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhao

    2018-06-01

    from LCA lectin affinity histochemistry and lectin blot analysis. The expression level of α-1,6-fucosyltransferase (FUT8 mRNA was also detected, and the results showed that 1-DNJ administration did not cause obvious inhibitory effects on FUT8 expression. Therefore, the mechanism of 1-DNJ for relieving diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM-associated fibrosis can be concluded as the inhibition of N-acetylglucosamine (N-GlcNAc formation and the reduction of substrate concentration.

  1. Intramuscular injection of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells improves cardiac function in dilated cardiomyopathy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chenggang; Hou, Xu; Wang, Benzhen; Chi, Jingwei; Jiang, Yanjie; Zhang, Caining; Li, Zipu

    2017-01-28

    Stem cells provide a promising candidate for the treatment of the fatal pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study aimed to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) on the cardiac function of a DCM rat model. A DCM model was established by intraperitoneal injections of doxorubicin in Sprague-Dawley rats. hUCMSCs at different concentrations or cultured medium were injected via limb skeletal muscles, with blank medium injected as the control. The rats were monitored for 4 weeks, meanwhile BNP, cTNI, VEGF, HGF, GM-CSF, and LIF in the peripheral blood were examined by ELISA, and cardiac function was monitored by echocardiography (Echo-CG). Finally, the expression of IGF-1, HGF, and VEGF in the myocardium was examined by histoimmunochemistry and real-time PCR, and the ultrastructure of the myocardium was examined by electron microscopy. Injection of hUCMSCs markedly improved cardiac function in the DCM rats by significantly elevating left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS). The BNP and cTNI levels in the peripheral blood were reduced by hUCMSCs, while HGF, LIF, GM-CSF, and VEGF were increased by hUCMSCs. Expression of IGF-1, HGF, and VEGF in the myocardium from the DCM rats was significantly increased by hUCMSC injection. Furthermore, hUCMSCs protected the ultrastructure of cardiomyocytes by attenuating mitochondrial swelling and maintaining sarcolemma integrity. Intramuscular injection of UCMSCs can improve DCM-induced cardiac function impairment and protect the myocardium. These effects may be mediated by regulation of relevant cytokines in serum and the myocardium.

  2. MR imaging in cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.; Riessen, R.

    2005-01-01

    According to the WHO classification, cardiomyopathies are a group of diseases which are associated with myocardial dysfunction and can be classified either as primary or secondary cardiomyopathies. Genetic disorders have been identified in certain primary cardiomyopathies, however often the etiology remains unknown. The term ''secondary cardiomyopathy'' is used to specify diseases with the clinical indications of a cardiomyopathy, but can be attributed to a certain pathophysiological mechanism such as exposure to toxic substances, metabolic syndromes or systemic diseases. Based on morphological and functional criteria, primary cardiomyopathies are divided into dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). During the last two decades MR imaging has emerged to a well established diagnostic tool for the understanding and treatment of cardiomyopathies. Morphological and functional information can be achieved with a high level of accuracy and reproducibility. Tissue alteration of the myocardium can be detected assessing regional contrast enhancement, T1- and T2-signal intensities and chemical shift phenomena. This article describes characteristic aspects of MR imaging for the diagnosis of primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. (orig.)

  3. Peripartum cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez V, Jorge E; Duque R, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a clinical entity with a variable frequency according to the zone of the study. It is characterized by a systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle and posterior appearance of heart failure symptoms that occur during the last month of pregnancy and the first post-partum months. Its etiology isn't still clear, but different theories are proposed based on inflammatory, infectious and autoimmune processes. Alterations related to oxidative stress that could largely explain this pathology were recently described. Its clinical presentation has a big similitude with all other causes of heart failure although atypical presentations have been described. Its diagnosis requires a high suspicion level and must be considered in any woman with symptoms of heart failure during the peripartum. The conventional treatment of chronic heart failure that includes beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and diuretics, in addition to the advances in diagnosis and management of acute heart failure, allowed changing the history of the disease by lowering mortality and recovering systolic function of the left ventricle. Gestations posterior to the development of this entity will depend on the complete recovery of heart function without lowering the risk of recurrence. There still remain many questions to answer in areas like etiology, risk factors, treatment and prognosis markers that may allow to prevent and to manage in an appropriate and safe way both the mother and her son.

  4. The effect of Astragalus polysaccharides on attenuation of diabetic cardiomyopathy through inhibiting the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in high glucose -stimulated H9C2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuqin; Yang, Shuo; Dai, Min; Jia, Xiujuan; Wang, Qiyan; Zhang, Zheng; Mao, Yongjun

    2017-06-13

    Apoptosis plays a critical role in the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC). Astragalus polysaccharides (APS), an extract of astragalus membranaceus (AM), is an effective cardioprotectant. Currently, little is known about the detailed mechanisms underlying cardioprotective effects of APS. The aims of this study were to investigate the potential effects and mechanisms of APS on apoptosis employing a model of high glucose induction of apoptosis in H9C2 cells. A model of high glucose induction of H9C2 cell apoptosis was adopted in this research. The cell viabilities were analyzed by MTT assay, and the apoptotic response was quantified by flow cytometry. The expression levels of the apoptosis related proteins were determined by Real-time PCR and western blotting. Incubation of H9C2 cells with various concentrations of glucose (i.e., 5.5, 12.5, 25, 33 and 44 mmol/L) for 24 h revealed that cell viability was reduced by high glucose dose-dependently. Pretreatment of cells with APS could inhibit high glucose-induced H9C2 cell apoptosis by decreasing the expressions of caspases and the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria to cytoplasm. Further experiments also showed that APS could modulate the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in mitochondria. APS decreases high glucose-induced H9C2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins of both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways and modulating the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax in mitochondria.

  5. Human Genetics of Diabetic Retinopathy: Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. K. Ng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a most severe microvascular complication which, if left unchecked, can be sight-threatening. With the global prevalence of diabetes being relentlessly projected to rise to 438 million subjects by 2030, DR will undoubtedly pose a major public health concern. Efforts to unravel the human genetics of DR have been undertaken using the candidate gene and linkage approaches, while GWAS efforts are still lacking. Aside from evidence for a few genes including aldose reductase and vascular endothelial growth factor, the genetics of DR remain poorly elucidated. Nevertheless, the promise of impactful scientific discoveries may be realized if concerted and collaborative efforts are mounted to identify the genes for DR. Harnessing new genetic technologies and resources such as the upcoming 1000 Genomes Project will help advance this field of research, and potentially lead to a rich harvest of insights into the biological mechanisms underlying this debilitating complication.

  6. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune multifactorial disease which has a great socio-economic impact. In Morocco, less is known about the contribution of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles to type 1 diabetes susceptibility. Our study focused on evaluating the distribution of class II ...

  7. A predictive model for canine dilated cardiomyopathy-a meta-analysis of Doberman Pinscher data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Emes, Richard D; Cobb, Malcolm A; Mongan, Nigel P; Rutland, Catrin S

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a prevalent and often fatal disease in humans and dogs. Indeed dilated cardiomyopathy is the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans, reported to affect approximately 36 individuals per 100,000 individuals. In dogs, dilated cardiomyopathy is the second most common cardiac disease and is most prevalent in the Irish Wolfhound, Doberman Pinscher and Newfoundland breeds. Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterised by ventricular chamber enlargement and systolic dysfunction which often leads to congestive heart failure. Although multiple human loci have been implicated in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy, the identified variants are typically associated with rare monogenic forms of dilated cardiomyopathy. The potential for multigenic interactions contributing to human dilated cardiomyopathy remains poorly understood. Consistent with this, several known human dilated cardiomyopathy loci have been excluded as common causes of canine dilated cardiomyopathy, although canine dilated cardiomyopathy resembles the human disease functionally. This suggests additional genetic factors contribute to the dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.This study represents a meta-analysis of available canine dilated cardiomyopathy genetic datasets with the goal of determining potential multigenic interactions relating the sex chromosome genotype (XX vs. XY) with known dilated cardiomyopathy associated loci on chromosome 5 and the PDK4 gene in the incidence and progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. The results show an interaction between known canine dilated cardiomyopathy loci and an unknown X-linked locus. Our study is the first to test a multigenic contribution to dilated cardiomyopathy and suggest a genetic basis for the known sex-disparity in dilated cardiomyopathy outcomes.

  8. A human type 5 adenovirus-based Trypanosoma cruzi therapeutic vaccine re-programs immune response and reverses chronic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Resende Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a prototypical neglected tropical disease. Specific immunity promotes acute phase survival. Nevertheless, one-third of CD patients develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC associated with parasite persistence and immunological unbalance. Currently, the therapeutic management of patients only mitigates CCC symptoms. Therefore, a vaccine arises as an alternative to stimulate protective immunity and thereby prevent, delay progression and even reverse CCC. We examined this hypothesis by vaccinating mice with replication-defective human Type 5 recombinant adenoviruses (rAd carrying sequences of amastigote surface protein-2 (rAdASP2 and trans-sialidase (rAdTS T. cruzi antigens. For prophylactic vaccination, naïve C57BL/6 mice were immunized with rAdASP2+rAdTS (rAdVax using a homologous prime/boost protocol before challenge with the Colombian strain. For therapeutic vaccination, rAdVax administration was initiated at 120 days post-infection (dpi, when mice were afflicted by CCC. Mice were analyzed for electrical abnormalities, immune response and cardiac parasitism and tissue damage. Prophylactic immunization with rAdVax induced antibodies and H-2Kb-restricted cytotoxic and interferon (IFNγ-producing CD8+ T-cells, reduced acute heart parasitism and electrical abnormalities in the chronic phase. Therapeutic vaccination increased survival and reduced electrical abnormalities after the prime (analysis at 160 dpi and the boost (analysis at 180 and 230 dpi. Post-therapy mice exhibited less heart injury and electrical abnormalities compared with pre-therapy mice. rAdVax therapeutic vaccination preserved specific IFNγ-mediated immunity but reduced the response to polyclonal stimuli (anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, CD107a+ CD8+ T-cell frequency and plasma nitric oxide (NO levels. Moreover, therapeutic rAdVax reshaped immunity in the heart tissue as reduced the number of perforin+ cells

  9. Significance of thymosin β4 and implication of PINCH-1-ILK-α-parvin (PIP complex in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Sopko

    Full Text Available Myocardial remodeling is a major contributor in the development of heart failure (HF after myocardial infarction (MI. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK, LIM-only adaptor PINCH-1, and α-parvin are essential components of focal adhesions (FAs, which are highly expressed in the heart. ILK binds tightly to PINCH-1 and α-parvin, which regulates FA assembly and promotes cell survival via the activation of the kinase Akt. Mice lacking ILK, PINCH or α-parvin have been shown to develop severe defects in the heart, suggesting that these proteins play a critical role in heart function. Utilizing failing human heart tissues (dilated cardiomyopathy, DCM, we found a 2.27-fold (p<0.001 enhanced expression of PINCH, 4 fold for α-parvin, and 10.5 fold (p<0.001 for ILK as compared to non-failing (NF counterparts. No significant enhancements were found for the PINCH isoform PINCH-2 and parvin isoform β-parvin. Using a co-immunoprecipitation method, we also found that the PINCH-1-ILK-α-parvin (PIP complex and Akt activation were significantly up-regulated. These observations were further corroborated with the mouse myocardial infarction (MI and transaortic constriction (TAC model. Thymosin beta4 (Tβ4, an effective cell penetrating peptide for treating MI, was found to further enhance the level of PIP components and Akt activation, while substantially suppressing NF-κB activation and collagen expression--the hallmarks of cardiac fibrosis. In the presence of an Akt inhibitor, wortmannin, we show that Tβ4 had a decreased effect in protecting the heart from MI. These data suggest that the PIP complex and activation of Akt play critical roles in HF development. Tβ4 treatment likely improves cardiac function by enhancing PIP mediated Akt activation and suppressing NF-κB activation and collagen-mediated fibrosis. These data provide significant insight into the role of the PIP-Akt pathway and its regulation by Tβ4 treatment in post-MI.

  10. A predictive model for canine dilated cardiomyopathy: a meta-analysis of Doberman Pinscher data

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Emes, Richard D.; Cobb, Malcolm A.; Mongan, Nigel P.; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a prevalent and often fatal disease in humans and dogs. Indeed dilated cardiomyopathy is the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans, reported to affect approximately 36 individuals per 100,000 individuals. In dogs, dilated cardiomyopathy is the second most common cardiac disease and is most prevalent in the Irish Wolfhound, Doberman Pinscher and Newfoundland breeds. Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterised by ventricular chamber enlargement and systolic d...

  11. Diabetes-associated dry eye syndrome in a new humanized transgenic model of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Elagin, Raya B; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) are at high risk of developing lacrimal gland dysfunction. We have developed a new model of human T1D using double-transgenic mice carrying HLA-DQ8 diabetes-susceptibility haplotype instead of mouse MHC-class II and expressing the human beta cell autoantigen Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in pancreatic beta cells. We report here the development of dry eye syndrome (DES) after diabetes induction in our humanized transgenic model. Double-transgenic mice were immunized with DNA encoding human GAD65, either naked or in adenoviral vectors, to induce T1D. Mice monitored for development of diabetes developed lacrimal gland dysfunction. Animals developed lacrimal gland disease (classically associated with diabetes in Non Obese Diabetic [NOD] mice and with T1D in humans) as they developed glucose intolerance and diabetes. Animals manifested obvious clinical signs of dry eye syndrome (DES), from corneal erosions to severe keratitis. Histological studies of peri-bulbar areas revealed lymphocytic infiltration of glandular structures. Indeed, infiltrative lesions were observed in lacrimal/Harderian glands within weeks following development of glucose intolerance. Lesions ranged from focal lymphocytic infiltration to complete acinar destruction. We observed a correlation between the severity of the pancreatic infiltration and the severity of the ocular disease. Our results demonstrate development of DES in association with antigen-specific insulitis and diabetes following immunization with clinically relevant human autoantigen concomitantly expressed in pancreatic beta cells of diabetes-susceptible mice. As in the NOD mouse model and as in human T1D, our animals developed diabetes-associated DES. This specific finding stresses the relevance of our model for studying these human diseases. We believe our model will facilitate studies to prevent/treat diabetes-associated DES as well as human diabetes.

  12. Lone ventricular cardiomyopathy,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (I) cardiac catheterisation, including coronary arteriography and pulmonary ... described existence of lone ventricular idiopathic ... spectrum of classic idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. ... endomyocardial fibrosis, and from discussions at an.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cardiomyopathy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Cardiomyopathy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Abnormal Heart Rhythms Orphanet: Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy Orphanet: Familial isolated arrhythmogenic right ventricular ...

  14. Basement membrane abnormalities in human eyes with diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljubimov, A V; Burgeson, R E; Butkowski, R J

    1996-01-01

    Vascular and parenchymal basement membranes (BMs) are thickened in diabetes, but alterations in individual BM components in diabetic eyes, especially in diabetic retinopathy (DR), are obscure. To identify abnormalities in the distribution of specific constituents, we analyzed cryostat sections...... of human eyes obtained at autopsy (seven normal, five diabetic without DR, and 13 diabetic with DR) by immunofluorescence with antibodies to 30 BM and extracellular matrix components. In non-DR eyes, no qualitative changes of ocular BM components were seen. In some DR corneas, epithelial BM was stained...... discontinuously for laminin-1, entactin/nidogen, and alpha3-alpha4 Type IV collagen, in contrast to non-DR corneas. Major BM alterations were found in DR retinas compared to normals and non-DR diabetics. The inner limiting membrane (retinal BM) of DR eyes had accumulations of fibronectin (including cellular...

  15. Diabetes technology and the human factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, A; Buckingham, B; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    When developing new technologies for human use the developer should take into consideration not only the efficacy and safety of the technology but also the desire and capabilities of the potential user. Any chronic disease is a challenge for both the patient and his/her caregivers. This statement is especially true in the case of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) where adherence to therapy is crucial 24 hours a day 365 days a year. No vacation days are possible for the T1DM patient. It is therefore obvious why any new technology which is developed for helping patients cope with the disease should take into consideration the 'human factor' before, during and after the production process starts. There is no doubt that technology has changed the life of patients with T1DM in the last few decades, but despite the availability of new meters, new syringes, new sophisticated insulin pumps and continuous glucose sensors and communication tools, these technologies have not been well utilised by many patients. It is therefore important to understand why the technology is not always utilised and to find new ways to maximise use and benefits from the technology to as many patients as possible. The present chapter will review papers published in the last year where the patient's ability or willingness was an important factor in the success of the technology. We will try to understand why insulin pumps, glucose sensors and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) are not used enough or appropriately, whether there is a specific group that finds it more difficult than others to adopt new technologies and what can be done to overcome that issue. For this chapter we chose articles from a Public Medicine review of the literature related to human factors affecting the outcome of studies and of user acceptance of continuous glucose monitoring, insulin infusion pump therapy. We also searched the literature in the field of psychology in order to accurately define the problems

  16. Erythropoetin receptor expression in the human diabetic retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsang Stephen H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests erythropoietin (EPO and the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR may play a direct role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Better characterization of the EPO-EPOR signaling system in the ischemic retina may offer a new therapeutic modality for ischemic ophthalmic diseases. This study was performed to identify EPOR mRNA expression in the human diabetic eye. Findings EPOR antisense RNA probes were validated on human pancreas tissue. In the normal eye, EPOR was expressed in the retinal ganglion cell layer. Minimal expression was observed in the inner and outer nuclear layer. Under conditions of diabetic retinopathy, EPOR expression shifted to photoreceptor cells. Increased expression was also observed in the peripheral retina. Conclusion EPOR expression may be a biomarker or contribute to disease mechanisms in diabetic retinopathy.

  17. Ultrastructure of neurovascular changes in human diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, János; Taurone, Samanta; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Biró, Zsolt; Varsányi, Balázs; Scuderi, Gianluca; Orlando, Maria Patrizia; Turchetta, Rosaria; Micera, Alessandra; Artico, Marco

    2018-01-01

    The previous concept regarding diabetic retinopathy assigned a primary role to hyperglycemia-induced microvascular alterations, while neuronal and glial abnormalities were considered to be secondary to either ischemia or exudation. The aim of this study was to reveal the potential role of neuronal and glial cells in initial and advanced alterations of the retinopathy in human type 2 diabetes. Electron microscopy and histochemical studies were performed on 38 surgically removed human eyes (28 obtained from diabetic patients and 10 from non-diabetic patients). Morphometric analysis of basement membrane material and lipids was performed. An accumulation of metabolic by-products was found in the capillary wall with aging: this aspect was significantly more pronounced in diabetics. Müller glial cells were found to contribute to alterations of the capillary wall and to occlusion, as well as to the development of proliferative retinopathy and cystoid degeneration of the retina. Our results showed morphological evidence regarding the role of neuronal and glial cells in the pathology of diabetic retinopathy, prior and in addition to microangiopathy. These morphological findings support a neurovascular pathogenesis at the origin of diabetic retinopathy, thus the current treatment approach should be completed by neuroprotective measures.

  18. Gut microbiota in human adults with type 2 diabetes differs from non-diabetic adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadja; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; van der Berg, Franciscus Winfried J

    2010-01-01

    . Methods and Findings The study included 36 male adults with a broad range of age and body-mass indices (BMIs), among which 18 subjects were diagnosed with diabetes type 2. The fecal bacterial composition was investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and in a subgroup of subjects (N = 20) by tag...... = 0.04). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that type 2 diabetes in humans is associated with compositional changes in intestinal microbiota. The level of glucose tolerance should be considered when linking microbiota with metabolic diseases such as obesity and developing strategies......Background Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between metabolic diseases and bacterial populations in the gut. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between the composition of the intestinal microbiota in humans with type 2 diabetes and non-diabetic persons as control...

  19. The mitochondrial DNA T16189C polymorphism and HIV-associated cardiomyopathy: a genotype-phenotype association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulton Joanna

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA T16189C polymorphism, with a homopolymeric C-tract of 10–12 cytosines, is a putative genetic risk factor for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in the African and British populations. We hypothesized that this variant may predispose to dilated cardiomyopathy in people who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Methods A case-control study of 30 HIV-positive cases with dilated cardiomyopathy and 37 HIV-positive controls without dilated cardiomyopathy was conducted. The study was confined to persons of black African ancestry to minimize confounding of results by population admixture. HIV-positive patients with an echocardiographically confirmed diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy and HIV-positive controls with echocardiographically normal hearts were studied. Patients with secondary causes of cardiomyopathy (such as hypertension, diabetes, pregnancy, alcoholism, valvular heart disease, and opportunistic infection were excluded from the study. DNA samples were sequenced for the mtDNA T16189C polymorphism with a homopolymeric C-tract in the forward and reverse directions on an ABI3100 sequencer. Results The cases and controls were well matched for age (median 35 years versus 34 years, P = 0.93, gender (males 60% vs 53%, P = 0.54, and stage of HIV disease (mean CD4 T cell count 260.7/μL vs. 176/μL, P = 0.21. The mtDNA T16189C variant with a homopolymeric C-tract was detected at a frequency of 26.7% (8/30 in the HIV-associated cardiomyopathy cases and 13.5% (5/37 in the HIV-positive controls. There was no significant difference between cases and controls (Odds Ratio 2.33, 95% Confidence Interval 0.67–8.06, p = 0.11. Conclusion The mtDNA T16189C variant with a homopolymeric C-tract is not associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in black African people infected with HIV.

  20. Divergent effects of adrenaline in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes obtained from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prajapati

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a common inherited cardiac disease that affects the heart muscle with diverse clinical outcomes. HCM can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD during or immediately after mild to rigorous physical activity in young patients. However, the mechanism causing SCD as a result of exercise remains unknown, but exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias are thought to be responsible for this fatal consequence. To understand the disease mechanism behind HCM in a better way, we generated patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs from HCM patients carrying either the MYBPC3-Gln1061X or TPM1-Asp175Asn mutation. We extensively investigated the effects of low to high concentrations of adrenaline on action potential characteristics, and the occurrence of arrhythmias in the presence of various concentrations of adrenaline and in wash-out condition. We classified and quantified different types of arrhythmias observed in hiPSC-CMs, and found that the occurrence of arrhythmias was dependent on concentrations of adrenaline and positions of mutations in genes causing HCM. In addition, we observed ventricular tachycardia types of arrhythmias in hiPSC-CMs carrying the TPM1-Asp175Asn mutation. We additionally examined the antiarrhythmic potency of bisoprolol in HCM-specific hiPSC-CMs. However, bisoprolol could not reduce the occurrence of arrhythmias during administration or during the wash-out condition of adrenaline in HCM-specific hiPSC-CMs. Our study demonstrates hiPSC-CMs as a promising tool for studying HCM. The experimental design used in this study could be suitable and beneficial for studying other components and drugs related to cardiac disease in general.

  1. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajnberg, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy corresponds to a syndrome characterized by a transient myocardial dysfunction affecting the left ventricular apex that classically occurs after major physical or emotional stress (also called 'broken heart syndrome' or 'stress-induced cardiomyopathy'). The author describes the case of a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked mutation in troponin T causes myofibrillar disarray and pro-arrhythmic action potential changes in human iPSC cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Kim, Kyungsoo; Parikh, Shan; Cadar, Adrian Gabriel; Bersell, Kevin R; He, Huan; Pinto, Jose R; Kryshtal, Dmytro O; Knollmann, Bjorn C

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in cardiac troponin T (TnT) are linked to increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death despite causing little to no cardiac hypertrophy. Studies in mice suggest that the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)-associated TnT-I79N mutation increases myofilament Ca sensitivity and is arrhythmogenic, but whether findings from mice translate to human cardiomyocyte electrophysiology is not known. To study the effects of the TnT-I79N mutation in human cardiomyocytes. Using CRISPR/Cas9, the TnT-I79N mutation was introduced into human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We then used the matrigel mattress method to generate single rod-shaped cardiomyocytes (CMs) and studied contractility, Ca handling and electrophysiology. Compared to isogenic control hiPSC-CMs, TnT-I79N hiPSC-CMs exhibited sarcomere disorganization, increased systolic function and impaired relaxation. The Ca-dependence of contractility was leftward shifted in mutation containing cardiomyocytes, demonstrating increased myofilament Ca sensitivity. In voltage-clamped hiPSC-CMs, TnT-I79N reduced intracellular Ca transients by enhancing cytosolic Ca buffering. These changes in Ca handling resulted in beat-to-beat instability and triangulation of the cardiac action potential, which are predictors of arrhythmia risk. The myofilament Ca sensitizer EMD57033 produced similar action potential triangulation in control hiPSC-CMs. The TnT-I79N hiPSC-CM model not only reproduces key cellular features of TnT-linked HCM such as myofilament disarray, hypercontractility and diastolic dysfunction, but also suggests that this TnT mutation causes pro-arrhythmic changes of the human ventricular action potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Canine candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy: annotation of and polymorphic markers for 14 genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wiersma, Anje C; Leegwater, Peter AJ; van Oost, Bernard A; Ollier, William E; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Dilated cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disease occurring in humans and domestic animals and is characterized by dilatation of the left ventricle, reduced systolic function and increased sphericity of the left ventricle. Dilated cardiomyopathy has been observed in several, mostly large and giant, dog breeds, such as the Dobermann and the Great Dane. A number of genes have been identified, which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in the human, mouse and hamster. Thes...

  4. Pacing-induced Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Koo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of pacing-induced cardiomyopathy. The patient presented with clinical symptoms of dyspnea, leg swelling, and orthopnea several months after a dual-chambered pacemaker was placed for third-degree heart block. The echocardiogram demonstrated a depressed ejection fraction. Coronary angiography was performed, which showed widely patent vessels. Single- and dual-chambered pacemakers create ventricular dyssynchrony, which in turn can cause structural, molecular changes leading to cardiomyopathy. With early intervention of biventricular pacemaker replacement, these changes can be reversible; thus, a timely diagnosis and awareness is warranted.

  5. Characterization of human myotubes from type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic subjects using complementary quantitative mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Bak, Steffen; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2011-01-01

    2 diabetes. Several abnormalities have been identified in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic subjects, however, the exact molecular mechanisms leading to the diabetic phenotype has still not been found. Here we present a large-scale study in which we combine a quantitative proteomic discovery...... strategy using iTRAQ and a label-free study with a targeted quantitative proteomic approach using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to identify, quantify and validate changes in protein abundance between human myotubes obtained from non-diabetic lean, non-diabetic obese and type 2 diabetic subjects...

  6. Cardiomyopathy Following Latrodectus Envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Latrodectus envenomations are common throughout the United States and the world. While many envenomations can result in catecholamine release with resultant hypertension and tachycardia, myocarditis is very rare. We describe a case of a 22- year-old male who sustained a Latrodectus envenomation complicated by cardiomyopathy. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:521-523.

  7. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be donated to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. iGive.com - Online Shopping Joing iGive.com to earn money for the ... it works, check out the iGive website . AmazonSmile - Online Shopping Amazon donates 0.5% of the purchase price ...

  8. Hormones and postpartum cardiomyopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clapp, C.; Thebault, S.C.; Martinez de la Escalera, G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin, a hormone fundamental for lactation, was recently shown to mediate postpartum cardiomyopathy, a life-threatening disease in late-term and lactating mothers. The detrimental effect of prolactin results from myocardial upregulation of cathepsin-D, which in turn cleaves prolactin to a 16 kDa

  9. Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy of Heart Failure in Genetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J.; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J.; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel sub-units. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemi...

  10. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastrointestinal transit in nonobese diabetic mouse: an animal model of human diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal transit (GI) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an animal model of human diabetes type 1, was examined in animals with short- (duration 1-5 days) and long-term (duration 28-35 days) diabetes. Blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, and gut neuroendocrine peptide content were also measured. GI was significantly rapid in NOD mice with long-term diabetes (LTD), but was not correlated with blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, or pancreatic insulin content. GI was correlated with duodenal secretin content, but not with the content of other neuroendocrine peptides in the different segments investigated. Whereas antral vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) content in NOD mice with LTD was significantly higher, colonic VIP was lower in NOD mice with short-term diabetes (STD). In the duodenum, whereas the concentration of secretin in NOD mice with both STD and LTD was lower, the gastrin content was higher. Duodenal somatostatin content in NOD mice with LTD was lower. In colon, the content of galanin in NOD mice with LTD was higher than in controls. The decreased content of secretin may be among the factors that cause rapid GI in NOD mice with LTD. Changes in the antral content of VIP, duodenal somatostatin, and colonic galanin in NOD mice with LTD may cause low intestinal secretion and, together with rapid GI, give rise to diarrhoea, which is a common symptom in diabetes.

  12. Transcriptional profile of isoproterenol-induced cardiomyopathy and comparison to exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy and human cardiac failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIver Lauren J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice has been used in a number of studies to model human cardiac disease. In this study, we compared the transcriptional response of the heart in this model to other animal models of heart failure, as well as to the transcriptional response of human hearts suffering heart failure. Results We performed microarray analyses on RNA from mice with isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy and mice with exercise-induced physiological hypertrophy and identified 865 and 2,534 genes that were significantly altered in pathological and physiological cardiac hypertrophy models, respectively. We compared our results to 18 different microarray data sets (318 individual arrays representing various other animal models and four human cardiac diseases and identified a canonical set of 64 genes that are generally altered in failing hearts. We also produced a pairwise similarity matrix to illustrate relatedness of animal models with human heart disease and identified ischemia as the human condition that most resembles isoproterenol treatment. Conclusion The overall patterns of gene expression are consistent with observed structural and molecular differences between normal and maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy and support a role for the immune system (or immune cell infiltration in the pathology of stress-induced hypertrophy. Cross-study comparisons such as the results presented here provide targets for further research of cardiac disease that might generally apply to maladaptive cardiac stresses and are also a means of identifying which animal models best recapitulate human disease at the transcriptional level.

  13. Takotsubo (Stress Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin J Hourmozdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency department in shock from pneumonia. The patient was initially afebrile, pulse rate 120 beats per minute, blood pressure 117/69 mmHg, respiratory rate 42 breaths per minute, pulse oximetry 94% on a non-rebreather mask and a lactate of 14 mmol/L. He became progressively more hypotensive despite fluid resuscitation and was started on norepinephrine. Shortly after, the patient developed torsades de pointes that was terminated with intravenous push magnesium. His initial ECG had shown sinus tachycardia; however, repeat ECG showed ST-segment elevation in the inferolateral leads and the patient had troponin I elevation that peaked at 16 ng/mL. Significant findings: Bedside echocardiography showed the findings consistent with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Echocardiographic images are shown in subxiphoid (A and apical four chamber (B views. Note the apical ballooning appearance (asterisk of the left ventricle (LV. Discussion: Formal echocardiography confirmed features classic for Takotsubo (stress cardiomyopathy, including globally depressed left ventricle (LV ejection fraction, systolic apical ballooning appearance of the LV, mid and apical segments of LV depression, and hyper kinesis of the basal walls. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a syndrome known to cause ST-segment elevation on ECG, transient LV dysfunction, and dysrhythmia in the absence of acute obstructive coronary disease. There is no consensus on diagnostic criteria; however, these criteria are commonly used: 1 transient hypokinesis, akinesis, or dyskinesis in the LV mid-segments with or without apical involvement; regional wall motion abnormalities that extend beyond a single epicardial vascular distribution; and frequently, but not always, a stressful trigger 2 the absence of acute coronary disease or angiographic evidence of acute plaque rupture 3 new ECG abnormalities (ST-segment elevation and/or T-wave inversion or modest

  14. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nepom, Gerald T; Gebe, John A

    2008-01-01

    The CD4+ T cell response is critical for cellular autoimmunity in human T1D, but incomplete understanding of issues of specific cell frequency, avidity, function, and correlation with disease status presents...

  15. NETosis Delays Diabetic Wound Healing in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadini, Gian Paolo; Menegazzo, Lisa; Rigato, Mauro; Scattolini, Valentina; Poncina, Nicol; Bruttocao, Andrea; Ciciliot, Stefano; Mammano, Fabio; Ciubotaru, Catalin Dacian; Brocco, Enrico; Marescotti, Maria Cristina; Cappellari, Roberta; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Millioni, Renato; Vigili de Kreutzenberg, Saula; Albiero, Mattia; Avogaro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Upon activation, neutrophils undergo histone citrullination by protein arginine deiminase (PAD)4, exocytosis of chromatin and enzymes as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and death. In diabetes, neutrophils are primed to release NETs and die by NETosis. Although this process is a defense against infection, NETosis can damage tissue. Therefore, we examined the effect of NETosis on the healing of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Using proteomics, we found that NET components were enriched in nonhealing human DFUs. In an independent validation cohort, a high concentration of neutrophil elastase in the wound was associated with infection and a subsequent worsening of the ulcer. NET components (elastase, histones, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and proteinase-3) were elevated in the blood of patients with DFUs. Circulating elastase and proteinase-3 were associated with infection, and serum elastase predicted delayed healing. Neutrophils isolated from the blood of DFU patients showed an increased spontaneous NETosis but an impaired inducible NETosis. In mice, skin PAD4 activity was increased by diabetes, and FACS detection of histone citrullination, together with intravital microscopy, showed that NETosis occurred in the bed of excisional wounds. PAD4 inhibition by Cl-amidine reduced NETting neutrophils and rescued wound healing in diabetic mice. Cumulatively, these data suggest that NETosis delays DFU healing. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  16. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Jeffrey B; Ommen, Steve R; Gersh, Bernard J

    2018-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heritable cardiomyopathy, manifesting as left ventricular hypertrophy in the absence of a secondary cause. The genetic underpinnings of HCM arise largely from mutations of sarcomeric proteins; however, the specific underlying mutation often remains undetermined. Patient presentation is phenotypically diverse, ranging from asymptomatic to heart failure or sudden cardiac death. Left ventricular hypertrophy and abnormal ventricular configuration result in dynamic left ventricular outflow obstruction in most patients. The goal of therapeutic interventions is largely to reduce dynamic obstruction, with treatment modalities spanning lifestyle modifications, pharmacotherapies, and septal reduction therapies. A small subset of patients with HCM will experience sudden cardiac death, and risk stratification remains a clinical challenge. This paper presents a clinical update for diagnosis, family screening, clinical imaging, risk stratification, and management of symptoms in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium

  18. Peripartum cardiomyopathy as a part of familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.Y. van Spaendonck-Zwarts (Karin); J.P. van Tintelen (Peter); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); R. van der Werf (Rik); J.D.H. Jongbloed (Jan); W.J. Paulus (Walter); D. Dooijes (Dennis); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND-: Anecdotal cases of familial clustering of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) and familial occurrences of PPCM and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) together have been observed, suggesting that genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis of PPCM. We hypothesized that

  19. Single Cell Dissection of Human Pancreatic Islet Dysfunction in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    of memory T cells , innate cells and the differentiation potential of naive T cells during ME/CFS; and 3) To determine the T cell and innate cell ...apoptosis and the innate immune response in human pancreatic β- cells . Diabetes 64: 3808–3817. Marselli L, Thorne J, Dahiya S, Sgroi DC, Sharma A, Bonner-Weir...interactive nature of CellView aids in cell doublet identification. In the PBMC data, ‘Subcluster-analysis’ reveals a mixture of lymphoid and myeloid

  20. Multiple Species Comparison of Cardiac Troponin T and Dystrophin: Unravelling the DNA behind Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer England

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals have frequently been used as models for human disorders and mutations. Following advances in genetic testing and treatment options, and the decreasing cost of these technologies in the clinic, mutations in both companion and commercial animals are now being investigated. A recent review highlighted the genes associated with both human and non-human dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac troponin T and dystrophin were observed to be associated with both human and turkey (troponin T and canine (dystrophin dilated cardiomyopathies. This review gives an overview of the work carried out in cardiac troponin T and dystrophin to date in both human and animal dilated cardiomyopathy.

  1. Multiple Species Comparison of Cardiac Troponin T and Dystrophin: Unravelling the DNA behind Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Jennifer; Loughna, Siobhan; Rutland, Catrin Sian

    2017-07-07

    Animals have frequently been used as models for human disorders and mutations. Following advances in genetic testing and treatment options, and the decreasing cost of these technologies in the clinic, mutations in both companion and commercial animals are now being investigated. A recent review highlighted the genes associated with both human and non-human dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac troponin T and dystrophin were observed to be associated with both human and turkey (troponin T) and canine (dystrophin) dilated cardiomyopathies. This review gives an overview of the work carried out in cardiac troponin T and dystrophin to date in both human and animal dilated cardiomyopathy.

  2. Cardiomyopathy in the pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a group of myocardial diseases with complex taxonomies. Cardiomyopathy can occur in children at any age, and it is a common cause of heart failure and heart transplantation in children. The incidence of pediatric cardiomyopathy is increasing with time. They may be associated with variable comorbidities, which are most often arrhythmia, heart failure, and sudden death. Medical imaging technologies, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear cardiology, are helpful in reaching a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless, endomyocardial biopsy is the final diagnostic method of diagnosis. Patients warrant surgical operations, such as palliative operations, bridging operations, ventricular septal maneuvers, and heart transplantation, if pharmaceutical therapies are ineffective. Individual therapeutic regimens due to pediatric characteristics, genetic factors, and pathogenesis may improve the effects of treatment and patients' survival. Key Words: cardiomyopathy, classification, pediatrics

  3. Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    cardiomyopathy. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), one of the progressive muscular dystrophies , is an X-linked muscle disease caused by mutations in the...including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), develop progressive cardiomyopathy. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, which involves the transplantation of...hepatic failure in a clinically relevant non-human primate model of this process. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Project 1: Duchenne muscular dystrophy

  4. ACE I/D polymorphism in Indian patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Dhandapany, Perundurai Subramaniam; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh

    2008-01-01

    The study was carried to determine the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with the risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM).......The study was carried to determine the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism with the risk of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)....

  5. Catecholamine induced cardiomyopathy in pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Thomas Varghese

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catecholamine induced cardiomyopathy in the setting of pheochromocytoma is an unusual clinical entity. Earlier studies have reported left ventricular dysfunction in around 10% of subjects with pheochromocytoma. [1] Catecholamine induced vasoconstriction, direct toxic effect of byproducts of catecholamine degradation and direct receptor-mediated mechanisms are thought to contribute to cardiomyopathy in subjects with pheochromocytoma. The presentation remains a diagnostic challenge as patients may already have hypertensive heart disease and acute coronary syndrome on account of uncontrolled secondary hypertension. We report a case of a 42-year-old male, who presented with features of pheochromocytoma induced cardiomyopathy.

  6. Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfibrillar cardiomyopathy is a very rare cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM. The index case was a male patient who presented with shortness of breath and pedal edema. Further clinical investigations favored a clinical diagnosis of RCM. An endomyocardial biopsy revealed subendocardial and interstitial hyaline eosinophillic material resembling amyloid that did not stain with Congo red. An electron microscopic examination showed that this material was composed of twisted linear and bundles of tangled microfibrils. The etiology of the microfibrillar deposition is currently unknown. The pathologists should entertain the diagnosis of microfibrillar cardiomyopathy in suspected cases of amyloidosis that are negative for Congo red.

  7. SGLT2 Protein Expression Is Increased in Human Diabetic Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxin X.; Levi, Jonathan; Luo, Yuhuan; Myakala, Komuraiah; Herman-Edelstein, Michal; Qiu, Liru; Wang, Dong; Peng, Yingqiong; Grenz, Almut; Lucia, Scott; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; D'Agati, Vivette D.; Koepsell, Hermann; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Rosenberg, Avi Z.; Levi, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    There is very limited human renal sodium gradient-dependent glucose transporter protein (SGLT2) mRNA and protein expression data reported in the literature. The first aim of this study was to determine SGLT2 mRNA and protein levels in human and animal models of diabetic nephropathy. We have found that the expression of SGLT2 mRNA and protein is increased in renal biopsies from human subjects with diabetic nephropathy. This is in contrast to db-db mice that had no changes in renal SGLT2 protein expression. Furthermore, the effect of SGLT2 inhibition on renal lipid content and inflammation is not known. The second aim of this study was to determine the potential mechanisms of beneficial effects of SGLT2 inhibition in the progression of diabetic renal disease. We treated db/db mice with a selective SGLT2 inhibitor JNJ 39933673. We found that SGLT2 inhibition caused marked decreases in systolic blood pressure, kidney weight/body weight ratio, urinary albumin, and urinary thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances. SGLT2 inhibition prevented renal lipid accumulation via inhibition of carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein-β, pyruvate kinase L, SCD-1, and DGAT1, key transcriptional factors and enzymes that mediate fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. SGLT2 inhibition also prevented inflammation via inhibition of CD68 macrophage accumulation and expression of p65, TLR4, MCP-1, and osteopontin. These effects were associated with reduced mesangial expansion, accumulation of the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and type IV collagen, and loss of podocyte markers WT1 and synaptopodin, as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy. In summary, our study showed that SGLT2 inhibition modulates renal lipid metabolism and inflammation and prevents the development of nephropathy in db/db mice. PMID:28196866

  8. Minireview: Epigenetics of obesity and diabetes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomko, Howard; Heo, Hye J; Einstein, Francine H

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the determinants of human health and disease is overwhelmingly complex, particularly for common, late-onset, chronic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. Elucidating the genetic and environmental factors that influence susceptibility to disruptions in energy homeostasis and metabolic regulation remain a challenge, and progress will entail the integration of multiple assessments of temporally dynamic environmental exposures in the context of each individual's genotype. To meet this challenge, researchers are increasingly exploring the epigenome, which is the malleable interface of gene-environment interactions. Epigenetic variation, whether innate or induced, contributes to variation in gene expression, the range of potential individual responses to internal and external cues, and risk for metabolic disease. Ultimately, advancement in our understanding of chronic disease susceptibility in humans will depend on refinement of exposure assessment tools and systems biology approaches to interpretation. In this review, we present recent progress in epigenetics of human obesity and diabetes, existing challenges, and the potential for new approaches to unravel the complex biology of metabolic dysregulation.

  9. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Ketone body metabolism in normal and diabetic human skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosadini, R.; Avogaro, A.; Sacca, L.

    1985-01-01

    Although the liver is considered the major source of ketone bodies (KB) in humans, these compounds may also be formed by nonhepatic tissues. To study this aspect further, 3-[ 14 C]hydroxybutyrate (BOH) or [3- 14 C]acetoacetate (AcAc) were constantly infused after a priming dose and contemporaneous arterial and venous samples were taken at splanchnic, heart, kidney, and leg sites in eight normal subjects (N) undergoing diagnostic catheterization and at the forearm site in five normal and six ketotic diabetic (D) subjects. After 70 min of infusion, tracer and tracee levels of AcAc and BOH reached a steady state in the artery and vein in both normal and diabetic subjects. The venous-arterial (V-A) difference at the forearm step for cold KB was negligible both in normal and diabetic subjects, whereas for labeled KB it was approximately 10-fold higher in diabetic subjects (V-A AcAc, -31 +/- 7 and -270 +/- 34 dpm/ml in N and D, respectively; V-A BOH, -38 +/- 6 and -344 +/- 126 dpm/ml in N and D, respectively). The authors assumed that the V-A difference in tracer concentration was consistent with dilution of the tracer by newly synthesized tracee inside the muscle and calculated that the forearm muscle produces KB at a rate of 16.2 +/- 3.3 mumol/min in D and 0.9 +/- 0.9 mumol/min in N. These findings can be accounted for by the hypothesis that the disappearance flux of KB from circulation was replaced by an equivalent flux of KB entering the vein at the muscle step in D but not in N. Moreover, in N KB were not only produced but also utilized by the splanchnic area (39 +/- 9 mumol/min)

  11. Genetics of cardiomyopathies in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Vatta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart muscle leading to heart failure and/or an increased risk of arrhythmogenic sudden cardiac death. These disorders represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. In childhood forms of cardiomyopathy, genetic etiologies are frequent, but non-genetic or acquired causes, such viral infection, also play a significant role. In the last twenty years, the genetic causes of cardiomyopathies have been increasingly identified and clinical correlations are beginning to be defined. Here we present an overview of the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of cardiomyopathies in children and what is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these gene-related forms of disease.

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy associated with thyrotoxicosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, Myrto; El-Maouche, Diala; Choudhary, Chitra; Zinsmeister, Bruce; Burman, Kenneth D

    2014-02-01

    Takotsubo or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is a form of reversible cardiomyopathy commonly associated with emotional or physical stress. Thyrotoxicosis has been identified as a rare cause of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, with only 12 cases reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of thyroid storm presenting with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of Graves' disease. A 71-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, confusion, and history of weight loss. She was initially diagnosed and treated for diabetic ketoacidosis at another hospital and was transferred to our hospital one day after initial presentation because of concern for acute coronary syndrome. A diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was made on the basis of cardiac catheterization. At that time, she was diagnosed and treated for thyroid storm. Follow-up 7 weeks later revealed improvement of her cardiac function and near-normalization of thyroid hormone levels. In this patient, who presented with symptoms of heart failure, acute coronary syndrome was initially considered, but the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy associated with thyroid storm was ultimately made based on cardiac catheterization and laboratory investigation. Thyrotoxicosis is associated with adverse disturbances in the cardiovascular system. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy could be a presenting manifestation of thyroid storm, perhaps related to excess catecholamine levels or sensitivity.

  13. Cell therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy: from animal models to clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. del Corsso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy can be the end-stage form and common denominator of several cardiac disorders of known cause, such as hypertensive, ischemic, diabetic and Chagasic diseases. However, some individuals have clinical findings, such as an increase in ventricular chamber size and impaired contractility (classical manifestations of dilated cardiomyopathy even in the absence of a diagnosed primary disease. In these patients, dilated cardiomyopathy is classified as idiopathic since its etiology is obscure. Nevertheless, regardless of all of the advances in medical, pharmacological and surgical procedures, the fate of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (of idiopathic or of any other known cause is linked to arrhythmic episodes, severe congestive heart failure and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In this review, we will summarize present data on the use of cell therapies in animal models of dilated cardiomyopathies and will discuss the few clinical trials that have been published so far involving patients affected by this disease. The animal models discussed here include those in which the cardiomyopathy is produced by genetic manipulation and those in which disease is induced by chemical or infectious agents. The specific model used clearly creates restrictions to translation of the proposed cell therapy to clinical practice, insofar as most of the clinical trials performed to date with cell therapy have used autologous cells. Thus, translation of genetic models of dilated cardiomyopathy may have to wait until the use of allogeneic cells becomes more widespread in clinical trials of cell therapies for cardiac diseases.

  14. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C. However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t was used, compared to wild-type (WT mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure.

  15. Influence of diabetes mellitus on immunity to human tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Nathella, Pavan; Babu, Subash

    2017-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus(DM) is a major risk factor for the development of active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), with development of DM pandemic in countries where TB is also endemic. Understanding the impact of DM on TB and the determinants of co-morbidity is essential in responding to this growing public health problem with improved therapeutic approaches. Despite the clinical and public health significance posed by the dual burden of TB and DM, little is known about the immunological and biochemical mechanisms of susceptibility. One possible mechanism is that an impaired immune response in patients with DM facilitates either primary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or reactivation of latent TB. Diabetes is associated with immune dysfunction and alterations in the components of the immune system, including altered levels of specific cytokines and chemokines. Some effects of DM on adaptive immunity that are potentially relevant to TB defence have been identified in humans. In this review, we summarize current findings regarding the alterations in the innate and adaptive immune responses and immunological mechanisms of susceptibility of patients with DM to M. tuberculosis infection and disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Genetic Variation in Cardiomyopathy and Cardiovascular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    With the wider deployment of massively-parallel, next-generation sequencing, it is now possible to survey human genome data for research and clinical purposes. The reduced cost of producing short-read sequencing has now shifted the burden to data analysis. Analysis of genome sequencing remains challenged by the complexity of the human genome, including redundancy and the repetitive nature of genome elements and the large amount of variation in individual genomes. Public databases of human genome sequences greatly facilitate interpretation of common and rare genetic variation, although linking database sequence information to detailed clinical information is limited by privacy and practical issues. Genetic variation is a rich source of knowledge for cardiovascular disease because many, if not all, cardiovascular disorders are highly heritable. The role of rare genetic variation in predicting risk and complications of cardiovascular diseases has been well established for hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, where the number of genes that are linked to these disorders is growing. Bolstered by family data, where genetic variants segregate with disease, rare variation can be linked to specific genetic variation that offers profound diagnostic information. Understanding genetic variation in cardiomyopathy is likely to help stratify forms of heart failure and guide therapy. Ultimately, genetic variation may be amenable to gene correction and gene editing strategies.

  17. Neuronal human BACE1 knockin induces systemic diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucińska, Kaja; Dekeryte, Ruta; Koss, David; Shearer, Kirsty; Mody, Nimesh; Whitfield, Phillip D; Doherty, Mary K; Mingarelli, Marco; Welch, Andy; Riedel, Gernot; Delibegovic, Mirela; Platt, Bettina

    2016-07-01

    β-Secretase 1 (BACE1) is a key enzyme in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis that catalyses the amyloidogenic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Recently, global Bace1 deletion was shown to protect against diet-induced obesity and diabetes, suggesting that BACE1 is a potential regulator of glucose homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether increased neuronal BACE1 is sufficient to alter systemic glucose metabolism, using a neuron-specific human BACE1 knockin mouse model (PLB4). Glucose homeostasis and adiposity were determined by glucose tolerance tests and EchoMRI, lipid species were measured by quantitative lipidomics, and biochemical and molecular alterations were assessed by western blotting, quantitative PCR and ELISAs. Glucose uptake in the brain and upper body was measured via (18)FDG-PET imaging. Physiological and molecular analyses demonstrated that centrally expressed human BACE1 induced systemic glucose intolerance in mice from 4 months of age onward, alongside a fatty liver phenotype and impaired hepatic glycogen storage. This diabetic phenotype was associated with hypothalamic pathology, i.e. deregulation of the melanocortin system, and advanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress indicated by elevated central C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) signalling and hyperphosphorylation of its regulator eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). In vivo (18)FDG-PET imaging further confirmed brain glucose hypometabolism in these mice; this corresponded with altered neuronal insulin-related signalling, enhanced protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) levels, along with upregulation of the ribosomal protein and lipid translation machinery. Increased forebrain and plasma lipid accumulation (i.e. ceramides, triacylglycerols, phospholipids) was identified via lipidomics analysis. Our data reveal that neuronal BACE1 is a key regulator of metabolic homeostasis and provide a potential mechanism for the high

  18. Inherited cardiomyopathies and sports participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, A; Pelliccia, A; Corrado, D

    2018-03-01

    Competitive sports activity is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiovascular death in adolescents and young adults with inherited cardiomyopathies. Many young subjects aspire to continue competitive sport after a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy and the clinician is frequently confronted with the problem of eligibility and the request of designing specific exercise programs. Since inherited cardiomyopathies are the leading cause of sudden cardiovascular death during sports performance, a conservative approach implying disqualification of affected athletes from most competitive athletic disciplines is recommended by all the available international guidelines. On the other hand, we know that the health benefits of practicing recreational sports activity can overcome the potential arrhythmic risk in these patients, provided that the type and level of exercise are tailored on the basis of the specific risk profile of the underlying cardiomyopathy. This article will review the available evidence on the sports-related risk of sudden cardiac death and the recommendations regarding eligibility of individuals affected by inherited cardiomyopathies for sports activities.

  19. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clearance from the anterior chamber of RBCs from human diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.A.; Hatchell, D.L.; Collier, B.D.; Knobel, J.

    1984-01-01

    Erythrocytes from diabetic patients manifest decreased deformability and increased adherence. These abnormal membrane properties may diminish the ability of erythrocytes (RBCs) from diabetics to undergo deformation in passage through the trabecular meshwork. Using sodium chromate Cr 51-labeled RBCs from type I diabetic patients with proliferative retinopathy and normal control subjects, we studied RBC clearance from the rabbit anterior chamber. The mean time for 50% clearance (T50) of RBCs from diabetics (76 hours) was significantly longer than that for RBCs from normal subjects (19.5 hours). In this model, RBCs from diabetics have a slower clearance from the anterior chamber than do RBCs from normal subjects

  1. TREATMENT OF PERIPARTUM CARDIOMYOPATHY (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Vatutin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented review concerns discussion about current insights into treatment of peripartum cardiomyopathy. The definition of peripartum cardiomyopathy and general issues about diagnosis and pathogenesis of the disorder are provided at the head of the review. Particularly, the role of the system «prolactin — cathepsin D — prolactin 16 kDa» in cardiomyopathy development is disclosed. The general approaches to management of the patients are highlighted. The review provides detailed data about indications, adverse effects and derived clinical experience concerning the main pharmacological drugs which had been used in peripartum cardiomyopathy treatment given their possible unfavorable influence on fetus maturation and maternal lactation. The detailed description is provided on diuretics including loop, thiazide and potassium-sparing drugs. It was noted relative safety and efficiency of nitrates and hydralazine in conditions of limited choice from vasodilator group and, particularly, angiotensinconverting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor blockers which are contraindicated in pregnancy. A special attention is paid to the group of inotropic drugs: levosimendan, milrinone, and cardiac glycosides. The role of β-blockers and ivabradine is disclosed in heart failure treatment of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Anticoagulants were presented in details given that these drugs are justified in severe cardiac chambers dilation, decrease in ejection fraction, and in presence of intracardiac thrombosis. The place of antiarrhythmic drugs administrating in various cardiac rhythm disorders is discussed in the review. The data is given with account of potential influence on fetus in antenatal peripartum cardiomyopathy in which lidocaine and sotalol are the most preferable drugs; adenosine, quinidine, and flecainide are useful with caution, but amiodarone and dronedarone are absolutely contraindicated. Taking into account proposed pathogenic

  2. Trabecular bone histomorphometry in humans with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Akhter, Mohammed P; Drincic, Andjela; Recker, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) have markedly increased risk of fracture, but little is known about abnormalities in bone microarchitecture or remodeling properties that might give insight into the pathogenesis of skeletal fragility in these patients. We report here a case-control study comparing bone histomorphometric and micro-CT results from iliac biopsies in 18 otherwise healthy subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with those from healthy age- and sex-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Five of the diabetics had histories of low-trauma fracture. Transilial bone biopsies were obtained after tetracycline labeling. The biopsy specimens were fixed, embedded, and scanned using a desktop μCT at 16 μm resolution. They were then sectioned and quantitative histomorphometry was performed as previously described by Recker et al. [1]. Two sections, >250 μm apart, were read from the central part of each biopsy. Overall there were no significant differences between diabetics and controls in histomorphometric or micro-CT measurements. However, fracturing diabetics had structural and dynamic trends different from nonfracturing diabetics by both methods of analysis. In conclusion, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus does not result in abnormalities in bone histomorphometric or micro-CT variables in the absence of manifest complications from the diabetes. However, diabetics suffering fractures may have defects in their skeletal microarchitecture that may underlie the presence of excess skeletal fragility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardioprotection by controlling hyperamylinemia in a "humanized" diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despa, Sanda; Sharma, Savita; Harris, Todd R; Dong, Hua; Li, Ning; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Margulies, Kenneth B; Hammock, Bruce D; Despa, Florin

    2014-08-21

    Chronic hypersecretion of the pancreatic hormone amylin is common in humans with obesity or prediabetic insulin resistance and induces amylin aggregation and proteotoxicity in the pancreas. We recently showed that hyperamylinemia also affects the cardiovascular system. Here, we investigated whether amylin aggregates interact directly with cardiac myocytes and whether controlling hyperamylinemia protects the heart. By Western blot, we found abundant amylin aggregates in lysates of cardiac myocytes from obese patients, but not in controls. Aggregated amylin was elevated in failing hearts, suggesting a role in myocyte injury. Using rats overexpressing human amylin in the pancreas (HIP rats) and control myocytes incubated with human amylin, we show that amylin aggregation at the sarcolemma induces oxidative stress and Ca(2+) dysregulation. In time, HIP rats developed cardiac hypertrophy and left-ventricular dilation. We then tested whether metabolites with antiaggregation properties, such as eicosanoid acids, limit myocardial amylin deposition. Rats were treated with an inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase, the enzyme that degrades endogenous eicosanoids. Treatment doubled the blood concentration of eicosanoids, which drastically reduced incorporation of aggregated amylin in cardiac myocytes and blood cells, without affecting pancreatic amylin secretion. Animals in the treated group showed reduced cardiac hypertrophy and left-ventricular dilation. The cardioprotective mechanisms included the mitigation of amylin-induced cardiac oxidative stress and Ca(2+) dysregulation. The results suggest blood amylin as a novel therapeutic target in diabetic heart disease and elevating blood levels of antiaggregation metabolites as a pharmacological strategy to reduce amylin aggregation and amylin-mediated cardiotoxicity. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Clinical features of Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Caliskan (Kadir)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractNoncompaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM) is recognized as a separate disease entity since the first report in 1984 of a rare case with persistent myocardial sinusoids and a series of 8 pediatric and adolescent patients in 1990 with increased trabeculation of the left ventricular endocardium.

  5. New insights into cirrhotic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Hove, Jens D; Dixen, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    beta-receptor function seem involved in the autonomic and cardiac dysfunction. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy can be revealed by tissue Doppler imaging but is best demasked by physical or pharmacological stress. Liver transplantation may revert cardiac dysfunction but surgery and shunt insertion may also...

  6. Living with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Kim

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insider's account of what it is like to live with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic cardiovascular illness that carries the risk for sudden cardiac death. This study aims to reveal how HCM impacts the family and guides the decision whether or not to pursue genetic testing, how the physical limitations associated with HCM alter being-in-the-world, and how HCM alters social relationships. Fifteen adults with HCM were recruited for a longitudinal, phenomenological, qualitative study through purposive sampling and word of mouth. A total of 45 interviews were conducted by the researcher at a time and place designated by the participant between August 2011 and January 2012. The first interview with each participant was conducted in person. While efforts were made to conduct all interviews in person, a total of three interviews were conducted by telephone as requested by three participants due to scheduling conflicts. Through methods of interpretive phenomenology, three audio-recorded, semistructured interviews occurred over the course of 3 months. Detailed narratives were solicited and transcribed verbatim. Methodological and analytical documentation was supported with the identification of key phrases, similar experiences, themes, and documentation of the rationale for decisions throughout the research process. Participation in genetic testing carries a multitude of personal, familial, financial, and emotional implications. The results of a genetic test elicited an emotional response regardless of whether the results were negative, positive, or inconclusive. Living with a potentially life-threatening illness altered identity, disrupted social relationships, and generated chronic fear and uncertainty. A new normal was re-ordered or transformed by the demands and limitations posed by HCM, and by the person's concerns, priorities, and the meaning of the illness. Results from this study underscore the need for healthcare

  7. Connections between the human gut microbiome and gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Jin-Hua; Li, Sheng-Hui; Li, Jun-Hua; Yuan, Ming-Yang; He, Jian-Rong; Chen, Nian-Nian; Xiao, Wan-Qing; Shen, Song-Ying; Qiu, Lan; Wu, Ying-Fang; Hu, Cui-Yue; Wu, Yan-Yan; Li, Wei-Dong; Chen, Qiao-Zhu; Deng, Hong-Wen; Papasian, Christopher J; Xia, Hui-Min; Qiu, Xiu

    2017-08-01

    The human gut microbiome can modulate metabolic health and affect insulin resistance, and it may play an important role in the etiology of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Here, we compared the gut microbial composition of 43 GDM patients and 81 healthy pregnant women via whole-metagenome shotgun sequencing of their fecal samples, collected at 21-29 weeks, to explore associations between GDM and the composition of microbial taxonomic units and functional genes. A metagenome-wide association study identified 154 837 genes, which clustered into 129 metagenome linkage groups (MLGs) for species description, with significant relative abundance differences between the 2 cohorts. Parabacteroides distasonis, Klebsiella variicola, etc., were enriched in GDM patients, whereas Methanobrevibacter smithii, Alistipes spp., Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium spp. were enriched in controls. The ratios of the gross abundances of GDM-enriched MLGs to control-enriched MLGs were positively correlated with blood glucose levels. A random forest model shows that fecal MLGs have excellent discriminatory power to predict GDM status. Our study discovered novel relationships between the gut microbiome and GDM status and suggests that changes in microbial composition may potentially be used to identify individuals at risk for GDM. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. EMMPRIN and its ligand cyclophilin A as novel diagnostic markers in inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizer, Peter; Geisler, Tobias; Bigalke, Boris; Schneider, Martin; Klingel, Karin; Kandolf, Reinhard; Stellos, Konstantinos; Schreieck, Jürgen; Gawaz, Meinrad; May, Andreas E

    2013-03-10

    During inflammatory cardiomyopathy matrix metalloproteinases are crucially involved in cardiac remodeling. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the "extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer" EMMPRIN (CD147) and its ligand Cyclophilin A (CyPA) are upregulated in inflammatory cardiomyopathy and may serve as diagnostic markers. Therefore, a series of 102 human endomyocardial biopsies were analyzed for the expression of EMMPRIN and CyPA and correlated with histological and immunohistological findings. Endomyocardial biopsies were stained for EMMPRIN and CyPA in addition to standard histology (HE, Trichrom) and immunohistological stainings (MHC-II, CD68, CD3). 39 (38.2%) biopsies met the immunohistological criteria of an inflammatory cardiomyopathy. EMMPRIN, which was predominantly expressed on cardiomyocytes, was slightly (but significantly) upregulated in non inflammatory cardiomyopathies compared to normal histopathological findings and highly upregulated in inflammatory cardiomyopathy compared to both non inflammatory cardiomyopathy and normal histopathology. In contrast, CyPA reveals no enhanced expression in non inflammatory cardiomyopathies and a highly enhanced expression in inflammatory cardiomyopathy, where it is closely associated with leucocytes infiltrates. We found a strong correlation between both EMMPRIN and CyPA with the expression of MHC-II molecules (correlation coefficient 0.475 and 0.527, pEMMPRIN and CyPA with CD68 (correlation coefficient 0.393 and 0.387, pEMMPRIN is enhanced in both inflammatory and non inflammatory cardiomyopathies and can serve as a marker of myocardial remodeling. CyPA may represent a novel and specific marker for cardiac inflammation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduced statherin reactivity of human submandibular gland in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isola, M; Solinas, P; Proto, E; Cossu, M; Lantini, M S

    2011-03-01

     Statherin is a salivary protein involved in the formation of enamel pellicle and in regulation of calcium homeostasis. Diabetes and other pathologies affect both salivary flow and protein secretion by salivary glands, causing increased susceptibility to mucosal infections, tooth demineralization, and caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the statherin expression in submandibular glands of healthy and diabetic subjects.  Fragments of submandibular glands obtained from diabetic and non diabetic patients were fixed, dehydrated, embedded in Epon Resin and processed for the immunogold histochemistry. The results were statistically evaluated.  Specific statherin labeling was demonstrated in secretory granules of acinar cells in both diabetic and normal samples. The staining was much more intense in the latter compared to those of diabetics. The labeling density was quantified by evaluating the number and spatial distribution of gold particles within the granules. The number of gold particles was significantly lower in glands from diabetics than in control glands.  The results obtained suggest that a reduced statherin secretion by salivary glands might be partly responsible for a less effective protection of the oral tissues, resulting in an higher incidence of caries and oral infections associated with diabetes. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Arsenic and diabetes and hypertension in human populations: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-J.; Wang, S.-L.; Chiou, J.-M.; Tseng, C.-H.; Chiou, H.-Y.; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Chen, S.-Y.; Wu, M.-M.; Lai, M.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term exposure to ingested arsenic from drinking water has been well documented to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and hypertension in a dose-response relationship among residents of arseniasis-endemic areas in southwestern Taiwan and Bangladesh. An increased risk of self-reported hypertension but not diabetes was reported in a community-based study of residents who consumed drinking water with a low level of arsenic. Increased glycosylated hemoglobin level and systolic blood pressure were observed in workers occupationally exposed to arsenic. Inconsistent findings of arsenic and diabetes in occupational studies may result from the healthy worker effect and the variation in exposure measurement, age composition, number of patients, accuracy in diagnosis and classification of underlying causes of death, competing causes of death, and method to detect diabetes. The dose-response relationship and toxicological mechanisms of arsenic-induced diabetes and hypertension need further elucidation

  11. Comparative Aspects of Human, Canine, and Feline Obesity and Factors Predicting Progression to Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Margarethe Hoenig

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are common diseases in humans, dogs and cats and their prevalence is increasing. Obesity has been clearly identified as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in humans and cats but recent data are missing in dogs, although there is evidence that the unprecedented rise in canine obesity in the last decade has led to a rise in canine diabetes of similar magnitude. The insulin resistance of obesity has often been portrayed as major culprit in the loss of glucose control...

  12. Comparative Aspects of Human, Canine, and Feline Obesity and Factors Predicting Progression to Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarethe Hoenig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes mellitus are common diseases in humans, dogs and cats and their prevalence is increasing. Obesity has been clearly identified as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in humans and cats but recent data are missing in dogs, although there is evidence that the unprecedented rise in canine obesity in the last decade has led to a rise in canine diabetes of similar magnitude. The insulin resistance of obesity has often been portrayed as major culprit in the loss of glucose control; however, insulin resistance alone is not a good indicator of progression to diabetes in people or pets. A loss of beta cell function is necessary to provide the link to impaired fasting and post-prandial plasma glucose. Increased endogenous glucose output by the liver is also a prerequisite for the increase in fasting blood glucose when non-diabetic obese humans and pets develop diabetes. This may be due to decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity, decreased insulin concentrations, or a combination of both. While inflammation is a major link between obesity and diabetes in humans, there is little evidence that a similar phenomenon exists in cats. In dogs, more studies are needed to examine this important issue.

  13. Topically applied connective tissue growth factor/CCN2 improves diabetic preclinical cutaneous wound healing: potential role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, F R; Boughton, P; Lo, L; McLennan, S V; Twigg, S M

    2015-01-01

    Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r = 0.406; P diabetic foot ulcers.

  14. Risk of Cardiomyopathy in Younger Persons With a Family History of Death from Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis F; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Øyen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    at the population level is unclear. In a nationwide cohort, we examined the risk of cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death (... ascertained family history of premature (... incidence rate ratios for cardiomyopathy by family history of premature death. Premature cardiomyopathy deaths in first- and second-degree relatives were associated with 29- and 6-fold increases in the rate of cardiomyopathy, respectively. If the first-degree relative died aged

  15. Role of cardiac MRI in nonischemic cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Senthil; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) with its higher spatial resolution is considered the gold standard for evaluating ventricular mass, volumes, and ejection fraction. CMR can be used for accurate diagnosis of several conditions, especially cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this article is to review the utility of CMR in the diagnosis and management of nonischemic cardiomyopathies. We have reviewed both common and rare types of nonischemic cardiomyopathies in detail and elaborated on the specific CMR findings in each. We believe that CMR is an invaluable tool, not only in differentiating nonischemic from ischemic cardiomyopathy, but also in aiding the accurate diagnosis and management of the subtype of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. CMR should routinely be integrated in the diagnostic workup of various cardiomyopathies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Role of cardiac MRI in nonischemic cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Anand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR with its higher spatial resolution is considered the gold standard for evaluating ventricular mass, volumes, and ejection fraction. CMR can be used for accurate diagnosis of several conditions, especially cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this article is to review the utility of CMR in the diagnosis and management of nonischemic cardiomyopathies. We have reviewed both common and rare types of nonischemic cardiomyopathies in detail and elaborated on the specific CMR findings in each. We believe that CMR is an invaluable tool, not only in differentiating nonischemic from ischemic cardiomyopathy, but also in aiding the accurate diagnosis and management of the subtype of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. CMR should routinely be integrated in the diagnostic workup of various cardiomyopathies.

  17. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and infiltrative cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield, Rebecca; Manacho, Katia; Castelletti, Silvia; Moon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiac disease. Cardiac imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management, with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) an important modality. CMR provides a number of different techniques in one examination: structure and function, flow imaging and tissue characterisation particularly with the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. Other techniques include vasodilator perfusion, mapping (especially T1 mapping and ex...

  18. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppe, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Kongsgaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between...... tissue cross-linking were greater in diabetic patients compared to controls. The higher foot pressure indicates that material stiffness of tendon and other tissue (e.g skin and joint capsule) may influence on foot gait. The difference in foot pressure distribution may contribute to the development...... of foot ulcers in diabetic patients....

  19. Hydrogen peroxide production is not primarily increased in human myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, A D; Gaster, M

    2011-09-01

    Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. To date, it is unknown whether increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes is primarily increased or a secondary adaptation to environmental, lifestyle, and hormonal factors. This study investigates whether ROS production is primarily increased in isolated diabetic myotubes. Mitochondrial membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), superoxide, and mitochondrial mass were determined in human myotubes precultured under normophysiological conditions. Furthermore, the corresponding ATP synthesis was measured in isolated mitochondria. Muscle biopsies were taken from 10 lean subjects, 10 obese subjects, and 10 subjects with type 2 diabetes; satellite cells were isolated, cultured, and differentiated to myotubes. Mitochondrial mass, membrane potential/mitochondrial mass, and superoxide-production/mitochondrial mass were not different between groups. In contrast, H(2)O(2) production/mitochondrial mass and ATP production were significantly reduced in diabetic myotubes compared to lean controls (P production is not primarily increased in diabetic myotubes but rather is reduced. Moreover, the comparable ATP/H(2)O(2) ratios indicate that the reduced ROS production in diabetic myotubes parallels the reduced ATP production because ROS production in diabetic myotubes must be considered to be in a proportion comparable to lean. Thus, the increased ROS production seen in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients is an adaptation to the in vivo conditions.

  20. Protein Kinase-C Beta Contributes to Impaired Endothelial Insulin Signaling in Humans with Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabit, Corey E; Shenouda, Sherene M; Holbrook, Monica; Fetterman, Jessica L; Kiani, Soroosh; Frame, Alissa A; Kluge, Matthew A; Held, Aaron; Dohadwala, Mustali; Gokce, Noyan; Farb, Melissa; Rosenzweig, James; Ruderman, Neil; Vita, Joseph A; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal endothelial function promotes atherosclerotic vascular disease in diabetes. Experimental studies indicate that disruption of endothelial insulin signaling through the activity of protein kinase C-β (PKCβ) and nuclear factor κB (NFκB) reduces nitric oxide availability. We sought to establish whether similar mechanisms operate in the endothelium in human diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results We measured protein expression and insulin response in freshly isolated endothelial cells from patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=40) and non-diabetic controls (n=36). Unexpectedly, we observed 1.7-fold higher basal endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation at serine 1177 in patients with diabetes (P=0.007) without a difference in total eNOS expression. Insulin stimulation increased eNOS phosphorylation in non-diabetic subjects but not in diabetic patients (P=0.003) consistent with endothelial insulin resistance. Nitrotyrosine levels were higher in diabetic patients indicating endothelial oxidative stress. PKCβ expression was higher in diabetic patients and was associated with lower flow-mediated dilation (r=−0.541, P=0.02) Inhibition of PKCβ with LY379196 reduced basal eNOS phosphorylation and improved insulin-mediated eNOS activation in patients with diabetes. Endothelial NFκB activation was higher in diabetes and was reduced with PKCβ inhibition. Conclusions We provide evidence for the presence of altered eNOS activation, reduced insulin action and inflammatory activation in the endothelium of patients with diabetes. Our findings implicate PKCβ activity in endothelial insulin resistance. PMID:23204109

  1. Proinflammatory effects of hypoglycemia in humans with or without diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratter, Jacqueline M.; Rooijackers, Hanne M.M.; Tack, Cees J.; Hijmans, Anneke G.M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Galan, de Bastiaan E.; Stienstra, Rinke

    2017-01-01

    Severe hypoglycemic events have been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes, which may be explained by hypoglycemiainduced inflammation. We used ex vivo stimulations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and monocytes obtained during

  2. Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Filho, Moyses de Oliveira; Figueiredo, Geraldo L.; Simoes, Marcus V.; Pyntia, Antonio O.; Marin Neto, Jose Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is multifactorial and explains the occurrence of angina, in about 50% of patients. The pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia may be explained by the increase of the ventricular mass and relative paucity of the coronary microcirculation; the elevated ventricular filling pressures and myocardial stiffness causing a compression of the coronary microvessels; the impaired coronary vasodilator flow reserve caused by anatomic and functional abnormalities; and the systolic compression of epicardial vessel (myocardial bridges). Myocardial ischemia must be investigated by perfusion scintigraphic methods since its presence influences the prognosis and has relevant clinical implications for management of patients. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and documented myocardial ischemia usually need to undergo invasive coronary angiography to exclude the presence of concomitant atherosclerotic coronary disease. (author)

  3. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Bradycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Codsi, Elisabeth; Rose, Carl H.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Hayes, Sharonne N.; Best, Patricia J. M.; Blauwet, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a disease that typically affects young otherwise healthy women. As PPCM is associated with significant mortality, timely diagnosis is necessary to ensure appropriate care. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of PPCM presenting as symptomatic bradycardia. We describe the patient’s clinical presentation and relevant findings and review the potential etiology and ramifications of bradycardia in patients with PPCM.

  4. Congenital Malformations Associated with Maternal Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal diabetes has toxic effects on the development of the embryo and significantly increases the risk of congenital malformations in humans. The incidence of fetal structural defects caused by maternal pregestational diabetes is three- to fourfold higher than that caused by non-diabetic pregnancy. The congenital malformations associated with diabetic pregnancy arise before the seventh gestational week. Diabetic embryopathy can affect any developing organ system, including the central nervous system (CNS (anencephaly, spina bifida, microcephaly, and holoprosencephaly, skeletal system (caudal regression syndrome, sacral agenesis, and limb defects, renal system (renal agenesis, hydronephrosis, and ureteric abnormalities, cardiovascular system (transposition of the great vessels, ventricular septal defects, atrial septal defects, coarctation of the aorta, cardiomyopathy, and single umbilical artery, and gastrointestinal system (duodenal atresia, anorectal atresia, and small left colon syndrome. Pregnant women with fetuses with diabetic embryopathy may have chronic or unrecognized hyperglycemia and elevated levels of glycerated hemoglobin. This review emphasizes the necessity to consider hyperglycemia-induced teratogenesis during genetic counseling of parents with prenatally detected fetal malformations. Successful preconception counseling for women with diabetes mellitus and metabolic control will reduce birth defects and maternal morbidity.

  5. Determinants of Thyrotoxic Cardiomyopathy Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Oliveros-Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the disease duration prior to treatment, thyroid hormones level, or both on the reversibility of dilated cardiomyopathy. Between January 2006 and December 2010, a longitudinal study with a 6 months follow-up was carried on. One hundred and seventy patients with hyperthyroidism were referred to the cardiologist, and 127 had a 6 months followup after antithyroid treatment and were evaluated by echocardiography. Dilated cardiomyopathy reversibility criteria were established according to echocardiographic parameters. Complete reversibility existed when all parameters were met, partial reversibility when LVEF was ≥55% plus two or three other parameters, and no reversibility when LVEF was ≤55% regardless of other parameters. The results showed that echocardiography parameters related to the regression of myocardial mass were associated with a disease duration shorter than 10.38 months. This was the main predictive variable for reversal of dilated cardiomyopathy, followed by β-blocker treatment, and the last predictive variable was the serum level of free triiodothyronine. This study showed that the effect on the myocardium related to thyrotoxicosis was associated with the disease duration before treatment.

  6. Genetic basis of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmouch, Jennifer; Protonotarios, Alexandros; Syrris, Petros

    2018-05-01

    To date 16 genes have been associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM). Mutations in these genes can lead to a broad spectrum of phenotypic expression ranging from disease affecting predominantly the right or left ventricle, to biventricular subtypes. Understanding the genetic causes of ACM is important in diagnosis and management of the disorder. This review summarizes recent advances in molecular genetics and discusses the application of next-generation sequencing technology in genetic testing in ACM. Use of next-generation sequencing methods has resulted in the identification of novel causative variants and genes for ACM. The involvement of filamin C in ACM demonstrates the genetic overlap between ACM and other types of cardiomyopathy. Putative pathogenic variants have been detected in cadherin 2 gene, a protein involved in cell adhesion. Large genomic rearrangements in desmosome genes have been systematically investigated in a cohort of ACM patients. Recent studies have identified novel causes of ACM providing new insights into the genetic spectrum of the disease and highlighting an overlapping phenotype between ACM and dilated cardiomyopathy. Next-generation sequencing is a useful tool for research and genetic diagnostic screening but interpretation of identified sequence variants requires caution and should be performed in specialized centres.

  7. Human and rodent muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in diabetes related to insulin, starvation, and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, T A; Hasselbalch, S; Farrell, P A

    1994-01-01

    cerebral cortex Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase concentration as a result of diabetes, semistarvation, or insulin treatment. In human subjects, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase concentration in vastus lateralis muscle biopsies was 17 and 22% greater (P dependent diabetes...... mellitus (n = 24) and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (n = 7) than in control subjects (n = 8). A positive linear correlation between muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and plasma insulin concentrations was observed (r = 0.50, P = 0.006; n = 29). Thus, insulin seems a regulator of muscle Na......(+)-K(+)-ATPase concentration, reduction of muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase concentration with untreated diabetes bears similarities with undernourishment, and physical conditioning may ameliorate the muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase concentration decrease induced by diabetes....

  8. Elevated circulating lipasin/betatrophin in human type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhiyao; Berhane, Feven; Fite, Alemu; Seyoum, Berhane; Abou-Samra, Abdul B; Zhang, Ren

    2014-05-23

    Lipasin (also known as C19ORF80, RIFL, ANGPTL8 and betatrophin) is a newly discovered circulating factor that regulates lipid metabolism and promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Whether circulating levels of lipasin in humans are altered in a) type 2 diabetes; b) obesity and c) the postprandial state, however, is unknown. The current study aimed to compare serum lipasin levels in those who were a) non-diabetic (N=15) or diabetic (BMI- and age-matched; N=14); b) lean or obese (N=53 totally) and c) fasting and 2 hours following a defined meal (N=12). Serum lipasin levels were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lipasin levels [mean±SEM] were increased by more than two fold (Plipasin levels were positively correlated with BMI (rho=0.49, Plipasin/betatrophin is nutritionally-regulated hepatokine that is increased in human type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  9. Differentially expressed wound healing-related microRNAs in the human diabetic cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funari, Vincent A; Winkler, Michael; Brown, Jordan; Dimitrijevich, Slobodan D; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are powerful gene expression regulators, but their corneal repertoire and potential changes in corneal diseases remain unknown. Our purpose was to identify miRNAs altered in the human diabetic cornea by microarray analysis, and to examine their effects on wound healing in cultured telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) in vitro. Total RNA was extracted from age-matched human autopsy normal (n=6) and diabetic (n=6) central corneas, Flash Tag end-labeled, and hybridized to Affymetrix® GeneChip® miRNA Arrays. Select miRNAs associated with diabetic cornea were validated by quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR) and by in situ hybridization (ISH) in independent samples. HCEC were transfected with human pre-miR™miRNA precursors (h-miR) or their inhibitors (antagomirs) using Lipofectamine 2000. Confluent transfected cultures were scratch-wounded with P200 pipette tip. Wound closure was monitored by digital photography. Expression of signaling proteins was detected by immunostaining and Western blot. Using microarrays, 29 miRNAs were identified as differentially expressed in diabetic samples. Two miRNA candidates showing the highest fold increased in expression in the diabetic cornea were confirmed by Q-PCR and further characterized. HCEC transfection with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 significantly retarded wound closure, but their respective antagomirs significantly enhanced wound healing vs. controls. Cells treated with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 had decreased p-p38 and p-EGFR staining, but these increased over control levels close to the wound edge upon antagomir treatment. In conclusion, several miRNAs with increased expression in human diabetic central corneas were found. Two such miRNAs inhibited cultured corneal epithelial cell wound healing. Dysregulation of miRNA expression in human diabetic cornea may be an important mediator of abnormal wound healing.

  10. Differentially expressed wound healing-related microRNAs in the human diabetic cornea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A Funari

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are powerful gene expression regulators, but their corneal repertoire and potential changes in corneal diseases remain unknown. Our purpose was to identify miRNAs altered in the human diabetic cornea by microarray analysis, and to examine their effects on wound healing in cultured telomerase-immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC in vitro. Total RNA was extracted from age-matched human autopsy normal (n=6 and diabetic (n=6 central corneas, Flash Tag end-labeled, and hybridized to Affymetrix® GeneChip® miRNA Arrays. Select miRNAs associated with diabetic cornea were validated by quantitative RT-PCR (Q-PCR and by in situ hybridization (ISH in independent samples. HCEC were transfected with human pre-miR™miRNA precursors (h-miR or their inhibitors (antagomirs using Lipofectamine 2000. Confluent transfected cultures were scratch-wounded with P200 pipette tip. Wound closure was monitored by digital photography. Expression of signaling proteins was detected by immunostaining and Western blot. Using microarrays, 29 miRNAs were identified as differentially expressed in diabetic samples. Two miRNA candidates showing the highest fold increased in expression in the diabetic cornea were confirmed by Q-PCR and further characterized. HCEC transfection with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 significantly retarded wound closure, but their respective antagomirs significantly enhanced wound healing vs. controls. Cells treated with h-miR-146a or h-miR-424 had decreased p-p38 and p-EGFR staining, but these increased over control levels close to the wound edge upon antagomir treatment. In conclusion, several miRNAs with increased expression in human diabetic central corneas were found. Two such miRNAs inhibited cultured corneal epithelial cell wound healing. Dysregulation of miRNA expression in human diabetic cornea may be an important mediator of abnormal wound healing.

  11. Elevated circulating lipasin/betatrophin in human type 2 diabetes and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyao Fu; Feven Berhane; Alemu Fite; Berhane Seyoum; Abdul B. Abou-Samra; Ren Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Lipasin (also known as C19ORF80, RIFL, ANGPTL8 and betatrophin) is a newly discovered circulating factor that regulates lipid metabolism and promotes pancreatic ?-cell proliferation. Whether circulating levels of lipasin in humans are altered in a) type 2 diabetes; b) obesity and c) the postprandial state, however, is unknown. The current study aimed to compare serum lipasin levels in those who were a) non-diabetic (N = 15) or diabetic (BMI- and age-matched; N = 14); b) lean or obese (N = 53 ...

  12. Spontaneous diabetes mellitus in captive Mandrillus sphinx monkeys: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirarat, N; Kesdangsakolwut, S; Chotiapisitkul, S; Assarasakorn, S

    2008-06-01

    Case history The two obese mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) showed clinical signs of depression, anorexia, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, glucosuria, proteinuria and ketonuria. Septic bed sore wounds were noted on both fore and hind limbs. Results Histopathological study revealed severe islet amyloidosis in both mandrills. Immunohistochemical study using polyclonal anti-cat amylin antibody confirmed derivation of the islet amyloid from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). Cardiomyopathy and myocardial fibrosis were also evident. Conclusions The present study documents diabetes mellitus in two obese mandrills. Diabetes in these animals had features very similar type 2 diabetes mellitus of humans, including the development of severe, IAPP-derived islet amyloidosis. The mandrill may, therefore, serve as an animal model of human type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  13. Topically Applied Connective Tissue Growth Factor/CCN2 Improves Diabetic Preclinical Cutaneous Wound Healing: Potential Role for CTGF in Human Diabetic Foot Ulcer Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Henshaw, F. R.; Boughton, P.; Lo, L.; McLennan, S. V.; Twigg, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis. Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Methods. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1??g?rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulati...

  14. Downregulation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity Onset Diabetes of Young Pathways in Human Pancreatic Islets from Hyperglycemic Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Taneera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although several molecular pathways have been linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D pathogenesis, it is uncertain which pathway has the most implication on the disease. Changes in the expression of an entire pathway might be more important for disease pathogenesis than changes in the expression of individual genes. To identify the molecular alterations in T2D, DNA microarrays of human pancreatic islets from donors with hyperglycemia n=20 and normoglycemia n=58 were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA. About 178 KEGG pathways were investigated for gene expression changes between hyperglycemic donors compared to normoglycemic. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY pathways are downregulated in hyperglycemic donors, while proteasome and spliceosome pathways are upregulated. The mean centroid of gene expression of T2DM and MODY pathways was shown to be associated positively with insulin secretion and negatively with HbA1c level. To conclude, downregulation of T2DM and MODY pathways is involved in islet function and might be involved in T2D. Also, the study demonstrates that gene expression profiles from pancreatic islets can reveal some of the biological processes related to regulation of glucose hemostats and diabetes pathogenesis.

  15. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed.

  16. Diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Caforio, Alida L P

    2013-01-01

    a framework for the clinical approach to diagnosis in cardiomyopathies based on the recognition of diagnostic 'red flags' that can be used to guide rational selection of specialized tests including genetic analysis. The basic premise is that the adoption of a cardiomyopathy-specific mindset which combines...

  17. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: Euro Observational Research Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, M. F.; van Hagen, I.; Russo, F.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.; van den Berg, M. P.; Roos-Hesselink, J.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; van der Meer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening form of heart failure affecting women late in pregnancy or in the first months after delivery. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is difficult to diagnose and its onset and progression are variable between individuals. The pathophysiology

  18. Peripartum cardiomyopathy : Euro Observational Research Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, M. F.; van Hagen, I.; Russo, F.; Van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Van den Berg, M. P.; Roos-Hesselink, J.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; van der Meer, P.

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening form of heart failure affecting women late in pregnancy or in the first months after delivery. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is difficult to diagnose and its onset and progression are variable between individuals. The pathophysiology

  19. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: Euro Observational Research Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Hoes; I.M. van Hagen (Iris); F. Russo; D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); K.Y. van Spaendonck-Zwarts (Karin); P. van der Meer (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPeripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially life-threatening form of heart failure affecting women late in pregnancy or in the first months after delivery. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is difficult to diagnose and its onset and progression are variable between individuals. The

  20. [Ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients with cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, K.; Christensen, A.H.; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2008-01-01

    by disease, gender, age, previous cardiac arrest and treatment with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). RESULTS: 993 patients were screened and 128 patients with cardiomyopathy were identified, corresponding to 13% of the screened patients. 58 (45%) of the patients had dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM......), 57 (45%) patients had arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and 13 (10%) had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The average age was 44 years for HCM, 41 years for ARVC and 58 years for DCM. The majority of the patients were male. ICD treatment was used in 95% of the patients...... with ARVC, 70% of the patients with HCM and 59% of the patients with DCM. Only 5 patients had previous cardiac arrest without reversible cause. CONCLUSION: The study shows that cardiomyopathies are relatively frequent causes of ventricular tachyarrhythmias in patients discharged from a specialised...

  1. Increased endothelial apoptotic cell density in human diabetic erectile tissue--comparison with clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Carla; Soares, Raquel; Castela, Angela; Adães, Sara; Hastert, Véronique; Vendeira, Pedro; Virag, Ronald

    2009-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes. Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is one of the main mechanisms of diabetic ED. However, loss of EC integrity has never been assessed in human diabetic corpus cavernosum. To identify and quantify apoptotic cells in human diabetic and normal erectile tissue and to compare these results with each patient's clinical data and erection status. Eighteen cavernosal samples were collected, 13 from diabetics with ED and 5 from nondiabetic individuals. Cavernosal structure and cell proliferation status were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Tissue integrity was assessed by terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay, an index of apoptotic cell density (ACD) established and compared with each patient age, type of diabetes, arterial risk factors number, arterial/veno-occlusive disease, response to intracavernous vasoactive injections (ICI), and penile nitric oxide release test (PNORT). Establish an index of ACD and correlate those results with patient clinical data. Nondiabetic samples presented few scattered cells in apoptosis and an ACD of 7.15 +/- 0.44 (mean apoptotic cells/tissue area mm(2) +/- standard error). The diabetic group showed an increased ACD of 23.82 +/- 1.53, and apoptotic cells were located specifically at vascular sites. Rehabilitation of these endothelial lesions seemed impaired, as no evidence of EC proliferation was observed. Furthermore, higher ACD in diabetic individuals correlated to poor response to PNORT and to ICI. We provided evidence for the first time that loss of cavernosal EC integrity is a crucial event involved in diabetic ED. Furthermore, we were able to establish a threshold between ACD values and cavernosal tissue functionality, as assessed by PNORT and vasoactive ICI.

  2. Method for identifying type I diabetes mellitus in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Thomas O [Kennewick, WA; Qian, Weijun [Richland, WA; Jacobs, Jon M [Pasco, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-04-12

    A method and system for classifying subject populations utilizing predictive and diagnostic biomarkers for type I diabetes mellitus. The method including determining the levels of a variety of markers within the serum or plasma of a target organism and correlating this level to general populations as a screen for predisposition or progressive monitoring of disease presence or predisposition.

  3. Endothelial function in pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy: a new frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristina Tavares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that obesity, diabetes, and Kawasaki's disease play important roles in systemic inflammation and in the development of both endothelial dysfunction and cardiomyopathy, there is a lack of data regarding the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children suffering from cardiomyopathy. In this study, we performed a systematic review of the literature on pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy to assess the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. We searched the published literature indexed in PubMed, Bireme and SciELO using the keywords 'endothelial', 'children', 'pediatric' and 'infant' and then compiled a systematic review. The end points were age, the pubertal stage, sex differences, the method used for the endothelial evaluation and the endothelial values themselves. No studies on children with cardiomyopathy were found. Only 11 papers were selected for our complete analysis, where these included reports on the flow-mediated percentage dilatation, the values of which were 9.80±1.80, 5.90±1.29, 4.50±0.70, and 7.10±1.27 for healthy, obese, diabetic and pre-pubertal children with Kawasaki's disease, respectively. There was no significant difference in the dilatation, independent of the endothelium, either among the groups or between the genders for both of the measurements in children; similar results have been found in adolescents and adults. The endothelial function in cardiomyopathic children remains unclear because of the lack of data; nevertheless, the known dysfunctions in children with obesity, type 1 diabetes and Kawasaki's disease may influence the severity of the cardiovascular symptoms, the prognosis, and the mortality rate. The results of this study encourage future research into the consequences of endothelial dysfunction in pre-pubertal children.

  4. Embryonic stem cell therapy of heart failure in genetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-10-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel subunits. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemic heart disease, but the reparative capacity of this allogeneic regenerative cell source has not been tested in inherited cardiomyopathy. Here, in a Kir6.2-knockout model lacking functional K(ATP) channels, we recapitulated under the imposed stress of pressure overload the gene-environment substrate of CMD10. Salient features of the human malignant heart failure phenotype were reproduced, including compromised contractility, ventricular dilatation, and poor survival. Embryonic stem cells were delivered through the epicardial route into the left ventricular wall of cardiomyopathic stressed Kir6.2-null mutants. At 1 month of therapy, transplantation of 200,000 cells per heart achieved teratoma-free reversal of systolic dysfunction and electrical synchronization and halted maladaptive remodeling, thereby preventing end-stage organ failure. Tracked using the lacZ reporter transgene, stem cells engrafted into host heart. Beyond formation of cardiac tissue positive for Kir6.2, transplantation induced cell cycle activation and halved fibrotic zones, normalizing sarcomeric and gap junction organization within remuscularized hearts. Improved systemic function induced by stem cell therapy translated into increased stamina, absence of anasarca, and benefit to overall survivorship. Embryonic stem cells thus achieve functional repair in nonischemic genetic cardiomyopathy, expanding indications to the therapy of heritable heart failure. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is

  5. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you, discussing your symptoms, and going over your health history, your doctor may test for diabetes if he or she suspects you are at risk. To check for diabetes, your doctor may request the following tests: Fasting blood sugar test. This test is usually done ...

  6. Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    For >30 years, insulin has been the drug of choice for the medical treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. However, the use of oral hypoglycaemic agents has increased during the past 1–2 decades, so a recent comparison of treatment with glibenclamide, metformin or insulin in women...... with gestational diabetes mellitus is highly relevant....

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells alleviate interstitial fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction in a dilated cardiomyopathy rat model by inhibiting TNF-α and TGF-β1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changyi; Zhou, Guichi; Chen, Yezeng; Liu, Sizheng; Chen, Fen; Xie, Lichun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yonggang; Wang, Tianyou; Lai, Xiulan; Ma, Lian

    2018-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the heart characterized by pathological remodeling, including patchy interstitial fibrosis and degeneration of cardiomyocytes. In the present study, the beneficial role of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HuMSCs) derived from Wharton's jelly was evaluated in the myosin-induced rat model of DCM. Male Lewis rats (aged 8-weeks) were injected with porcine myosin to induce DCM. Cultured HuMSCs (1×106 cells/rat) were intravenously injected 28 days after myosin injection and the effects on myocardial fibrosis and the underlying signaling pathways were investigated and compared with vehicle-injected and negative control rats. Myosin injections in rats (vehicle group and experimental group) for 28 days led to severe fibrosis and significant deterioration of cardiac function indicative of DCM. HuMSC treatment reduced fibrosis as determined by Masson's staining of collagen deposits, as well as quantification of molecular markers of myocardial fibrosis such as collagen I/III, profibrotic factors transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). HuMSC treatment restored cardiac function as observed using echocardiography. In addition, western blot analysis indicated that HuMSC injections in DCM rats inhibited the expression of TNF-α, extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and TGF-β1, which is a master switch for inducing myocardial fibrosis. These findings suggested that HuMSC injections attenuated myocardial fibrosis and dysfunction in a rat model of DCM, likely by inhibiting TNF-α and the TGF-β1/ERK1/2 fibrosis pathways. Therefore, HuMSC treatment may represent a potential therapeutic method for treatment of DCM. PMID:29115435

  8. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity.

  9. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: A contemporary review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshai Bhandary

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder affecting women in late pregnancy and the postpartum period. Historically, PPCM was not recognized as a separate disease entity until the 1930s. Further research has since led to the identification of at-risk demographics, theories on etiology, and new targets of therapy. Management to date has largely been focused on guideline-based treatment for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. However, newer studies have shown the efficacy of novel therapies. In this article, we will review the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PPCM and conclude with some of the newest therapies being offered.

  10. Ergotamine-Induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozpelit, Mehmet E; Akdeniz, Bahri; Göldeli, Özhan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is a recently increasing diagnosed disease showed by transient apical or mid-apical left ventricular dysfunction. It is known as a disease of postmenopausal women, which is usually triggered by emotional or physical stress. Although the trigger is mostly endogenous, some drugs have also been reported as the cause. Published case reports of TC associated with drug usage consist of sympathomimetic drugs, inotropic agents, thyroid hormone, cocaine, and 5-fluorouracil. We present an unusual case of TC in which the possible trigger is ergotamine toxicity.

  11. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Sandeep; Prasad, Heramba; Kozman, Hani

    2007-01-01

    A 57-year-old Caucasian woman presented to the emergency department with chest discomfort after testifying in a child custody battle in court. Electrocardiography (ECG) revealed ST-segment elevation in the lateral leads, and T-wave inversions in the inferior and lateral leads. The creatine kinase, creatine kinase-MB, and troponin I concentrations were elevated on presentation. Despite the ECG changes and elevated cardiac markers, coronary angiography demonstrated normal arteries. Left ventricular angiogram revealed an aneurysm at the apex. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was diagnosed on the basis of these characteristic findings. The patient was discharged on her third hospital day without any complications from the coronary angiography.

  12. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy: A Current Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie M. Twomley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare but potentially lethal complication of pregnancy occurring in approximately 1 : 3,000 live births in the United States although some series report a much higher incidence. African-American women are particularly at risk. Diagnosis requires symptoms of heart failure in the last month of pregnancy or within five months of delivery in the absence of recognized cardiac disease prior to pregnancy as well as objective evidence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. This paper provides an updated, comprehensive review of PPCM, including emerging insights into the etiology of this disorder as well as current treatment options.

  13. Podocytic PKC-alpha is regulated in murine and human diabetes and mediates nephrin endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini Tossidou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microalbuminuria is an early lesion during the development of diabetic nephropathy. The loss of high molecular weight proteins in the urine is usually associated with decreased expression of slit diaphragm proteins. Nephrin, is the major component of the glomerular slit diaphragm and loss of nephrin has been well described in rodent models of experimental diabetes as well as in human diabetic nephropathy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this manuscript we analyzed the role of PKC-alpha (PKCalpha on endocytosis of nephrin in podocytes. We found that treatment of diabetic mice with a PKCalpha-inhibitor (GO6976 leads to preserved nephrin expression and reduced proteinuria. In vitro, we found that high glucose stimulation would induce PKCalpha protein expression in murine and human podocytes. We can demonstrate that PKCalpha mediates nephrin endocytosis in podocytes and that overexpression of PKCalpha leads to an augmented endocytosis response. After PKC-activation, we demonstrate an inducible association of PKCalpha, PICK1 and nephrin in podocytes. Moreover, we can demonstrate a strong induction of PKCalpha in podocytes of patients with diabetic nephropathy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We therefore conclude that activation of PKCalpha is a pathomechanistic key event during the development of diabetic nephropathy. PKCalpha is involved in reduction of nephrin surface expression and therefore PKCalpha inhibition might be a novel target molecule for anti-proteinuric therapy.

  14. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  15. Lung-Derived Microscaffolds Facilitate Diabetes Reversal after Mouse and Human Intraperitoneal Islet Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualhassan, Nasser; Sapozhnikov, Lena; Pawlick, Rena L; Kahana, Meygal; Pepper, Andrew R; Bruni, Antonio; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Kin, Tatsuya; Mitrani, Eduardo; Shapiro, A M James

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to develop three-dimensional structures that mimic the natural islet tissue microenvironment. Endocrine micro-pancreata (EMPs) made up of acellular organ-derived micro-scaffolds seeded with human islets have been shown to express high levels of key beta-cell specific genes and secrete quantities of insulin per cell similar to freshly isolated human islets in a glucose-regulated manner for more than three months in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of EMPs to restore euglycemia in vivo after transplantation of mouse or human islets in chemically diabetic mice. We proposed that the organ-derived EMPs would restore the extracellular components of the islet microenvironment, generating favorable conditions for islet function and survival. EMPs seeded with 500 mouse islets were implanted intraperitoneally into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and reverted diabetes in 67% of mice compared to 13% of controls (p = 0.018, n = 9 per group). Histological analysis of the explanted grafts 60 days post-transplantation stained positive for insulin and exhibited increased vascular density in a collagen-rich background. EMPs were also seeded with human islets and transplanted into the peritoneal cavity of immune-deficient diabetic mice at 250 islet equivalents (IEQ), 500 IEQ and 1000 IEQ. Escalating islet dose increased rates of normoglycemia (50% of the 500 IEQ group and 75% of the 1000 IEQ group, n = 3 per group). Human c-peptide levels were detected 90 days post-transplantation in a dose-response relationship. Herein, we report reversal of diabetes in mice by intraperitoneal transplantation of human islet seeded on EMPs with a human islet dose as low as 500 IEQ.

  16. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a dog : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Möhr

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available An 8-month-old Labrador retriever bitch was evaluated for sudden-onset, progressive abdominal distension. Physical examination revealed an exaggerated inspiratory effort, severe ascites, bilateral jugular vein distension, and hypokinetic femoral arterial pulses. Thoracic auscultation detected tachycardia with muffled heart sounds, without audible cardiac murmurs. Thoracic radiographs identified severe right ventricular enlargement and pleural effusion. The electrocardiogram was consistent with incomplete right bundle branch block or right ventricular enlargement. Echocardiography demonstrated severe right ventricular and atrial dilation, secondary tricuspid regurgitation, and thinning and hypocontractility of the right ventricular myocardium. Left heart chamber sizes were slightly decreased, with normal left ventricular contractility. Adiagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy was reached, based on the characteristic clinical, electrocardiographic, radiographic and echocardiographic findings, and the exclusion of other causes of isolated right ventricular failure. Treatment effected good control of clinical signs, until acutely decompensated congestive right heart failure led to euthanasia after 4 months. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a well-described clinical entity in humans, and has previously been documented in 3 male dogs. The condition is characterised by progressive fibro-adipose replacement of right ventricular myocardium, while the left ventricle usually remains unaffected. It should be considered a differential diagnosis in any young dog presented with isolated right heart failure, syncope, or unexplained ventricular tachyarrhythmias. This article reports the 1st case of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a female dog, and highlights its echocardiographic features.

  17. Cardiac magnetic resonance assessment of takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.; Sonnex, E.; Pereira, R.S.; Coulden, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an important condition that can be difficult to differentiate from acute coronary syndrome on the basis of clinical, electrocardiogram, and cardiac enzyme assessment alone. Although coronary angiography remains important in the acute assessment of patients with suspected takotsubo cardiomyopathy, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged over the last decade as an important non-invasive imaging tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of this condition. We present a review highlighting the CMR features of takotsubo cardiomyopathy and its complications with particular focus on differentiating this condition from acute myocardial infarction and myocarditis.

  18. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  19. Diabetes

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for diabetes. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway Health Plan,...

  20. Females Are Protected From Iron?Overload Cardiomyopathy Independent of Iron Metabolism: Key Role of Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Subhash K.; Patel, Vaibhav B.; Basu, Ratnadeep; Wang, Wang; DesAulniers, Jessica; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background Sex?related differences in cardiac function and iron metabolism exist in humans and experimental animals. Male patients and preclinical animal models are more susceptible to cardiomyopathies and heart failure. However, whether similar differences are seen in iron?overload cardiomyopathy is poorly understood. Methods and Results Male and female wild?type and hemojuvelin?null mice were injected and fed with a high?iron diet, respectively, to develop secondary iron overload and geneti...

  1. A novel locus for dilated cardiomyopathy maps to canine chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Petra; Raducha, Michael G; Prociuk, Ulana; Sleeper, Meg M; Van Winkle, Thomas J; Henthorn, Paula S

    2008-06-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the most common form of cardiomyopathy, often leads to heart failure and sudden death. While a substantial proportion of DCMs are inherited, mutations responsible for the majority of DCMs remain unidentified. A genome-wide linkage study was performed to identify the locus responsible for an autosomal recessive inherited form of juvenile DCM (JDCM) in Portuguese water dogs using 16 families segregating the disease. Results link the JDCM locus to canine chromosome 8 with two-point and multipoint lod scores of 10.8 and 14, respectively. The locus maps to a 3.9-Mb region, with complete syntenic homology to human chromosome 14, that contains no genes or loci known to be involved in the development of any type of cardiomyopathy. This discovery of a DCM locus with a previously unknown etiology will provide a new gene to examine in human DCM patients and a model for testing therapeutic approaches for heart failure.

  2. Metabolomics applied to diabetes-lessons from human population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggi, Sonia; Griffin, Julian L

    2017-12-01

    The 'classical' distribution of type 2 diabetes (T2D) across the globe is rapidly changing and it is no longer predominantly a disease of middle-aged/elderly adults of western countries, but it is becoming more common through Asia and the Middle East, as well as increasingly found in younger individuals. This global altered incidence of T2D is most likely associated with the spread of western diets and sedentary lifestyles, although there is still much debate as to whether the increased incidence rates are due to an overconsumption of fats, sugars or more generally high-calorie foods. In this context, understanding the interactions between genes of risk and diet and how they influence the incidence of T2D will help define the causative pathways of the disease. This review focuses on the use of metabolomics in large cohort studies to follow the incidence of type 2 diabetes in different populations. Such approaches have been used to identify new biomarkers of pre-diabetes, such as branch chain amino acids, and associate metabolomic profiles with genes of known risk in T2D from large scale GWAS studies. As the field develops, there are also examples of meta-analysis across metabolomics cohort studies and cross-comparisons with different populations to allow us to understand how genes and diet contribute to disease risk. Such approaches demonstrate that insulin resistance and T2D have far reaching metabolic effects beyond raised blood glucose and how the disease impacts systemic metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A systems genetics approach identifies genes and pathways for type 2 diabetes in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneera, Jalal; Lang, Stefan; Sharma, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    Close to 50 genetic loci have been associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but they explain only 15% of the heritability. In an attempt to identify additional T2D genes, we analyzed global gene expression in human islets from 63 donors. Using 48 genes located near T2D risk variants, we identified ...

  4. Plasma Dihydroceramides Are Diabetes Susceptibility Biomarker Candidates in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonore Wigger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Plasma metabolite concentrations reflect the activity of tissue metabolic pathways and their quantitative determination may be informative about pathogenic conditions. We searched for plasma lipid species whose concentrations correlate with various parameters of glucose homeostasis and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D. Shotgun lipidomic analysis of the plasma of mice from different genetic backgrounds, which develop a pre-diabetic state at different rates when metabolically stressed, led to the identification of a group of sphingolipids correlated with glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. Quantitative analysis of these and closely related lipids in the plasma of individuals from two population-based prospective cohorts revealed that specific long-chain fatty-acid-containing dihydroceramides were significantly elevated in the plasma of individuals who will progress to diabetes up to 9 years before disease onset. These lipids may serve as early biomarkers of, and help identify, metabolic deregulation in the pathogenesis of T2D. : Wigger et al. find that several sphingolipids in mouse plasma correlate with glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. Quantitative analysis of these and closely related lipids in human plasma from two cohorts reveal that dihydroceramides are significantly elevated in individuals progressing to diabetes, up to 9 years before disease onset. Keywords: diabetes, T2D, ceramides, dihydroceramides, biomarkers, lipidomics, prognostic, mouse, human, high-fat diet, metabolic challenge, glucose intolerance, insulin sensitivity, prospective cohort

  5. Endothelial Dysfunction in Human Diabetes Is Mediated by Wnt5a-JNK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Feng, Bihua; Holbrook, Monika; Farb, Melissa G; Fetterman, Jessica L; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Masaki, Nobuyuki; Weisbrod, Robert M; Inagaki, Elica; Gokce, Noyan; Fuster, Jose J; Walsh, Kenneth; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is linked to insulin resistance, inflammatory activation, and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetes mellitus; however, the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Recent studies have identified proinflammatory signaling of wingless-type family member (Wnt) 5a through c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as a regulator of metabolic dysfunction with potential relevance to vascular function. We sought to gain evidence that increased activation of Wnt5a-JNK signaling contributes to impaired endothelial function in patients with diabetes mellitus. We measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery and characterized freshly isolated endothelial cells by protein expression, eNOS activation, and nitric oxide production in 85 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=42) and age- and sex-matched nondiabetic controls (n=43) and in human aortic endothelial cells treated with Wnt5a. Endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus displayed 1.3-fold higher Wnt5a levels (P=0.01) along with 1.4-fold higher JNK activation (P<0.01) without a difference in total JNK levels. Higher JNK activation was associated with lower flow-mediated dilation, consistent with endothelial dysfunction (r=0.53, P=0.02). Inhibition of Wnt5a and JNK signaling restored insulin and A23187-mediated eNOS activation and improved nitric oxide production in endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus. In endothelial cells from nondiabetic controls, rWnt5a treatment inhibited eNOS activation replicating the diabetic endothelial phenotype. In human aortic endothelial cells, Wnt5a-induced impairment of eNOS activation and nitric oxide production was reversed by Wnt5a and JNK inhibition. Our findings demonstrate that noncanonical Wnt5a signaling and JNK activity contribute to vascular insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction and may represent a novel therapeutic opportunity to protect the vasculature in patients with diabetes mellitus. © 2016 American Heart

  6. Global metabolomic analysis of human saliva and plasma from healthy and diabetic subjects, with and without periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia M Barnes

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are bi-directionally associated. Identification of a molecular signature for periodontitis using unbiased metabolic profiling could allow identification of biomarkers to assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of both diabetes and periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study identified plasma and salivary metabolic products associated with periodontitis and/or diabetes in order to discover biomarkers that may differentiate or demonstrate an interaction of these diseases. Saliva and plasma samples were analyzed from 161 diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects with a healthy periodontium, gingivitis and periodontitis. Metabolite profiling was performed using Metabolon's platform technology. A total of 772 metabolites were found in plasma and 475 in saliva. Diabetics had significantly higher levels of glucose and α-hydroxybutyrate, the established markers of diabetes, for all periodontal groups of subjects. Comparison of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis saliva samples within the non-diabetic group confirmed findings from previous studies that included increased levels of markers of cellular energetic stress, increased purine degradation and glutathione metabolism through increased levels of oxidized glutathione and cysteine-glutathione disulfide, markers of oxidative stress, including increased purine degradation metabolites (e.g. guanosine and inosine, increased amino acid levels suggesting protein degradation, and increased ω-3 (docosapentaenoate and ω-6 fatty acid (linoleate and arachidonate signatures. Differences in saliva between diabetic and non-diabetic cohorts showed altered signatures of carbohydrate, lipid and oxidative stress exist in the diabetic samples. Global untargeted metabolic profiling of human saliva in diabetics replicated the metabolite signature of periodontal disease progression in non-diabetic patients and revealed unique metabolic

  7. Medulla Oblongata Hemorrhage and Reverse Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeske, Kevin T; Sarano, Maurice E; Fugate, Jennifer E; Wijdicks, Eelco F

    2017-12-19

    Acute brain injury with strong surges of adrenergic outflow has resulted in takotsubo cardiomyopathy, but there are surprisingly few reports of takotsubo cardiomyopathy after intracranial hemorrhage, and none have been described from hemorrhage within the brainstem. We describe a patient with reverse and reversible cardiomyopathy following a hemorrhage in the lateral medulla oblongata. While it is limited in size, the location of the hemorrhage caused acute systolic failure with left ventricular ejection fraction of 27% and vasopressor requirement for cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema. There was full recovery after 7 days. Detailed case report. Hemorrhage into medulla oblongata pressor centers may result in acute, reversible, stress-induced cardiomyopathy, affirming the adrenergic origin of this condition.

  8. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  9. The myocardial microangiopathy in human and experimental diabetes mellitus. (A microscopic, ultrastructural, morphometric and computer-assisted symbolic-logic analysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşcă, C; Stefăneanu, L; Vasilescu, C

    1986-01-01

    The following microscopical aspects were found in the small intramural arteries in the myocardium of 30 diabetic patients: endothelial proliferations with focal protuberances leading to partial narrowing of the lumen, increased thickness of the arterial wall due to fibrosis and accumulations of neutral mucopolysaccharides: alteration of elastic fibres. Morphometrically, the arterial wall thickness and the arterial diameter were increased whereas the arterial density decreased in the diabetic heart. In 25 rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes the small intramyocardial arteries were investigated at 11 to 40 weeks of diabetic state. Using morphometrical analysis a constant increase of arterial wall thickness paralleling the diabetes duration was found. Microscopically, the lesions consist in endothelial proliferation with bridging across the vascular lumen and slight perivascular and diffuse fibrosis. Ultrastructurally, the capillary basal lamina was thickened in the diabetic myocardium. In order to investigate the morphometrical data we used symbolic-logic as a decision method, by applying an original computer program based on the Quine-McCluskey algorithm. All our results together with the final symbolic-logic expression suggest that damage of the small intramyocardial arteries plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  10. Stress cardiomyopathy syndrome: a contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Divya; Bybee, Kevin A

    2009-12-01

    Stress cardiomyopathy (SC) syndrome represents a reversible form of cardiomyopathy that commonly presents proximate to an acute emotional or physiologic stressor. The clinical presentation is similar to an acute coronary syndrome in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease to explain the unusual distribution of associated transient wall motion abnormalities. Postmenopausal women seem particularly prone to SC for unclear reasons. The pathophysiology of the syndrome is unknown but may involve pathologic sympathetic myocardial stimulation.

  11. RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY IN TAKOTSUBO CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marchev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational pharmacotherapy in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is based on clinical picture and data of functional and laboratory investigations of concrete patient. In patients with hypotension and moderate-to-severe left ventricle outflow tract obstruction inotropic agents must not to be used because they can worsen the degree of obstruction. In these patients beta blockers can improve hemodynamics by causing resolution of the obstruction. If intraventricular thrombus is detected, anticoagulation for at least 3 months is recommended. The duration of anticoagulant therapy may be modified depending on the extent of cardiac function recovery and thrombus resolution. For patients without thrombus but with severe left ventricular dysfunction, anticoagulation is recommended until the akinesis or dyskinesis has resolved but not more than 3 months.

  12. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: an overlooked cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hackbart Bermudes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC, also known as apical ballooning syndrome, broken heart syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is defined as a transient disturbance of the left ventricle, which is quite often associated with electrocardiographic abnormalities that may mimic acute myocardial infarction. The syndrome is also characterized by a mild alteration of cardiac biomarkers in absence of coronary blood flow obstruction on the coronariography. Clinical presentation is often manifested by angina, dyspnea, syncope, and arrhythmias. Peculiarly, the left ventricle takes the form of “tako-tsubo” (a Japanese word for “octopus trap” on the imaging workup. The authors report the case of a post-menopausal, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and type-II diabetic woman admitted at the emergency service with acute chest pain post physical exertion. Electrocardiogram showed signs of ischemia and myocardial necrosis markers were mildly increased. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed apical and mid-ventricular akinesia, with mild atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Thus diagnostic workup and the outcome followed the diagnostic criteria for TTC. The authors called attention to the potential of overlooking this diagnosis, since this syndrome is still not widely recognized.

  13. A case of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with restrictive transmitral filling pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otsui K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kazunori Otsui, Nobutaka Inoue, Anna Tamagawa, Kazuo OnishiDepartment of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kobe Rosai Hospital, Kobe, JapanAbstract: A 61-year-old diabetic woman with a mitochondrial A3243G mutation was hospitalized for evaluation of breathlessness, general fatigue, and leg edema. Chest radiography revealed cardiomegaly with massive pleural effusion. Serum lactate, pyruvate, and brain natriuretic peptide concentrations were elevated. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a restrictive pattern of transmitral flow, although systolic function of the left ventricle was only mildly impaired. Based on these findings and her clinical course, the patient was diagnosed with right-sided heart failure caused by mitochondrial cardiomyopathy associated with a restrictive transmitral filling pattern. Treatment with furosemide, enalapril, and eplerenone was effective, and improvement in her symptoms was associated with amelioration of transthoracic echocardiographic findings and a reduction in serum brain natriuretic peptide levels. Previous reports have indicated heterogeneity in the clinical features of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in patients carrying the A3243G mutation; the present case highlights the substantial variability in the clinical features of this disease.Keywords: mitochondrial disease, A3243G mutation, diastolic dysfunction, transmitral flow

  14. Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood flow to the damaged or weakened heart muscle Heart transplant that may be tried when all other treatments have failed Recently, implantable artificial heart pumps have been developed. These may be ...

  15. Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rounds Seminar Series & Daily Conferences Fellowships and Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Education Resources Library & Learning Resource Center CME Resources THI Journal THI Cardiac Society Register for the Cardiac Society ...

  16. The Role of Circulating Slit2, the One of the Newly Batokines, in Human Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yea Eun Kang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSlit2 is a new secreted protein from adipose tissue that improves glucose hemostasis in mice; however, there is no study about the serum levels and precise role of Slit2 in human. The aim of this study is to explore the serum level of Slit2 in human, and to identify the role of Slit2 in diabetes mellitus (DM.MethodsThe participants of this study consist of 38 subjects with newly diagnosed DM, and 75 healthy subjects as a control group. Serum Slit2 levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Relationship between circulating Slit2 and diabetic related factors was investigated in diabetic group compared with non-diabetic group. Additionally, the correlations between the serum level of Slit2 and diverse metabolic parameters were analyzed.ResultsCirculating Slit2 level was more decreased in diabetic group than in control group, but there was no significant difference statistically. Interestingly, serum levels of Slit2 were significantly negatively correlated to the serum concentrations of fasting glucose (coefficient r=–0.246, P=0.008, the serum concentrations of postprandial glucose (coefficient r=–0.233, P=0.017, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c; coefficient r=–0.357, P<0.001.ConclusionFrom our study, the first report of circulating Slit2 levels in human, circulating Slit2 level significantly negatively correlated with serum glucose and HbA1c. Our results suggest that the circulating Slit2 may play a role in maintainence of glucose homeostasis in human, even though exact contribution and mechanism are not yet known.

  17. Titin gene mutations are common in families with both peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Posafalvi, Anna; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Sliwa, Karen; Alders, Marielle; AlMomani, Rowida; van Langen, Irene M.; van der Meer, Peter; Sinke, Richard J.; van der Velden, Jolanda; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) can be an initial manifestation of familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We aimed to identify mutations in families that could underlie their PPCM and DCM. Methods and results We collected 18 families with PPCM and DCM cases from various countries. We studied

  18. Titin gene mutations are common in families with both peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Posafalvi, Anna; van den Berg, Maarten P.; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Sliwa, Karen; Alders, Mariëlle; Almomani, Rowida; van Langen, Irene M.; van der Meer, Peter; Sinke, Richard J.; van der Velden, Jolanda; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) can be an initial manifestation of familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We aimed to identify mutations in families that could underlie their PPCM and DCM. We collected 18 families with PPCM and DCM cases from various countries. We studied the clinical

  19. Multiple species comparison of cardiac troponin T and dystrophin: unravelling the DNA behind dilated cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    England, Jennifer; Loughna, Siobhan; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2017-01-01

    Animals have frequently been used as models for human disorders and mutations. Following advances in genetic testing and treatment options, and the decreasing cost of these technologies in the clinic, mutations in both companion and commercial animals are now being investigated. A recent review highlighted the genes associated with both human and non-human dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac troponin T and dystrophin were observed to be associated with both human and turkey (troponin T) and canin...

  20. Prioritizing disease candidate proteins in cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks based on "guilt by association" analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Li

    Full Text Available The cardiomyopathies are a group of heart muscle diseases which can be inherited (familial. Identifying potential disease-related proteins is important to understand mechanisms of cardiomyopathies. Experimental identification of cardiomyophthies is costly and labour-intensive. In contrast, bioinformatics approach has a competitive advantage over experimental method. Based on "guilt by association" analysis, we prioritized candidate proteins involving in human cardiomyopathies. We first built weighted human cardiomyopathy-specific protein-protein interaction networks for three subtypes of cardiomyopathies using the known disease proteins from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man as seeds. We then developed a method in prioritizing disease candidate proteins to rank candidate proteins in the network based on "guilt by association" analysis. It was found that most candidate proteins with high scores shared disease-related pathways with disease seed proteins. These top ranked candidate proteins were related with the corresponding disease subtypes, and were potential disease-related proteins. Cross-validation and comparison with other methods indicated that our approach could be used for the identification of potentially novel disease proteins, which may provide insights into cardiomyopathy-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way.

  1. Characterization of human organ donors testing positive for type 1 diabetes-associated autoantibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, A; Granstam, A; Ingvast, S; Härkönen, T; Knip, M; Korsgren, O; Skog, O

    2015-01-01

    In this study we aim to describe the characteristics of non-diabetic organ donors with circulating diabetes-associated autoantibodies collected within the Nordic Network for Islet Transplantation. One thousand and thirty organ donors have been screened in Uppsala for antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and islet antigen-2 (IA-2A). The 32 non-diabetic donors that tested positive for GADA (3·3% of all non-diabetic donors) were studied in more detail, together with 32 matched controls. Mean age among the autoantibody-positive donors was 52·6 (range 21–74), family history of type 1 diabetes (T1D) was unknown, and no donor was genetically predisposed for T1D regarding the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) locus. Subjects were analysed for islet cell antibodies (ICA), insulin autoantibodies (IAA) and zinc transporter 8 antibodies (ZnT8A), and pancreas morphology and clinical data were examined. Eight non-diabetic donors tested positive for two antibodies and one donor tested positive for four antibodies. No insulitis or other signs of a diabetic process were found in any of the donors. While inflammatory cells were present in all donors, subjects with high GADA titres had significantly higher CD45 cell numbers in exocrine tissue than controls. The extent of fibrosis was more pronounced in autoantibody-positive donors, even in subjects with lower GADA titres. Notably, it is possible that events not related directly to T1D (e.g. subclinical pancreatitis) may induce autoantibodies in some cases. PMID:26313035

  2. Cardiac angiogenic imbalance leads to peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Ian S; Rana, Sarosh; Shahul, Sajid; Rowe, Glenn C; Jang, Cholsoon; Liu, Laura; Hacker, Michele R; Rhee, Julie S; Mitchell, John; Mahmood, Feroze; Hess, Philip; Farrell, Caitlin; Koulisis, Nicole; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Burke, Suzanne D; Tudorache, Igor; Bauersachs, Johann; del Monte, Federica; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Arany, Zoltan

    2012-05-09

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is an often fatal disease that affects pregnant women who are near delivery, and it occurs more frequently in women with pre-eclampsia and/or multiple gestation. The aetiology of PPCM, and why it is associated with pre-eclampsia, remain unknown. Here we show that PPCM is associated with a systemic angiogenic imbalance, accentuated by pre-eclampsia. Mice that lack cardiac PGC-1α, a powerful regulator of angiogenesis, develop profound PPCM. Importantly, the PPCM is entirely rescued by pro-angiogenic therapies. In humans, the placenta in late gestation secretes VEGF inhibitors like soluble FLT1 (sFLT1), and this is accentuated by multiple gestation and pre-eclampsia. This anti-angiogenic environment is accompanied by subclinical cardiac dysfunction, the extent of which correlates with circulating levels of sFLT1. Exogenous sFLT1 alone caused diastolic dysfunction in wild-type mice, and profound systolic dysfunction in mice lacking cardiac PGC-1α. Finally, plasma samples from women with PPCM contained abnormally high levels of sFLT1. These data indicate that PPCM is mainly a vascular disease, caused by excess anti-angiogenic signalling in the peripartum period. The data also explain how late pregnancy poses a threat to cardiac homeostasis, and why pre-eclampsia and multiple gestation are important risk factors for the development of PPCM.

  3. Human fibrocyte-derived exosomes accelerate wound healing in genetically diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Adolf, E-mail: ageiger@dreirosen-pharma.com; Walker, Audrey, E-mail: awalker@dreirosen-pharma.com; Nissen, Erwin, E-mail: enissen@dreirosen-pharma.com

    2015-11-13

    Diabetic ulcers represent a substantial societal and healthcare burden worldwide and scarcely respond to current treatment strategies. This study was addressed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of exosomes secreted by human circulating fibrocytes, a population of mesenchymal progenitors involved in normal wound healing via paracrine signaling. The exosomes released from cells sequentially stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1, in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2, did not show potential immunogenicity. These exosomes exhibited in-vitro proangiogenic properties, activated diabetic dermal fibroblasts, induced the migration and proliferation of diabetic keratinocytes, and accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in vivo. Important components of the exosomal cargo were heat shock protein-90α, total and activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, proangiogenic (miR-126, miR-130a, miR-132) and anti-inflammatory (miR124a, miR-125b) microRNAs, and a microRNA regulating collagen deposition (miR-21). This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of the use of fibrocytes-derived exosomes for the treatment of diabetic ulcers. - Highlights: • Fibrocytes have shown potent wound healing properties in vitro and in vivo. • Their clinical use is precluded by low numbers and antigen-presenting function. • We isolated exosomes with no immunogenicity potential from human fibrocytes. • Their cargo included microRNAs and proteins that are known healing promoters. • They accelerated wound closure in diabetic mice in a dose-dependent manner.

  4. A negative screen for mutations in calstabin 1 and 2 genes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagi Diogo G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calstabins 1 and 2 bind to Ryanodine receptors regulating muscle excitation-contraction coupling. Mutations in Ryanodine receptors affecting their interaction with calstabins lead to different cardiac pathologies. Animal studies suggest the involvement of calstabins with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results We tested the hypothesis that calstabins mutations may cause dilated cardiomyopathy in humans screening 186 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy for genetic alterations in calstabins 1 and 2 genes (FKBP12 and FKBP12.6. No missense variant was found. Five no-coding variations were found but not related to the disease. Conclusions These data corroborate other studies suggesting that mutations in FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 genes are not commonly related to cardiac diseases.

  5. Enhanced expression of two discrete isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in experimental and human diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    Full Text Available We recently reported on the enhanced expression of two isoforms of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 in human renal transplantation delayed graft function. These consist of the conventional secreted, full length MMP-2 isoform (FL-MMP-2 and a novel intracellular N-Terminal Truncated isoform (NTT-MMP-2 generated by oxidative stress-mediated activation of an alternate promoter in the MMP-2 first intron. Here we evaluated the effect of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus on the in vitro and in vivo expression of the two MMP-2 isoforms.We quantified the abundance of the FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 transcripts by qPCR in HK2 cells cultured in high glucose or 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE and tested the effects of the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC. The streptozotocin (STZ murine model of Type I diabetes mellitus and renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy were used in this study.Both isoforms of MMP-2 in HK2 cells were upregulated by culture in high glucose or with HHE. PDTC treatment did not suppress high glucose-mediated FL-MMP-2 expression but potently inhibited NTT-MMP-2 expression. With STZ-treated mice, renal cortical expression of both isoforms was increased (FL-MMP-2, 1.8-fold; NTT-MMP-2, greater than 7-fold. Isoform-specific immunohistochemical staining revealed low, but detectable levels of the FL-MMP-2 isoform in controls, while NTT-MMP-2 was not detected. While there was a modest increase in tubular epithelial cell staining for FL-MMP-2 in STZ-treated mice, NTT-MMP-2 was intensely expressed in a basolateral pattern. FL-MMP-2 and NTT-MMP-2 isoform expression as quantified by qPCR were both significantly elevated in renal biopsies of human diabetic nephropathy (12-fold and 3-fold, respectively.The expression of both isoforms of MMP-2 was enhanced in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy and in human diabetic nephropathy. Selective MMP-2 isoform inhibition could offer a novel approach for the treatment of diabetic renal

  6. Effects of the photodynamic therapy on microbial reduction of diabetic ulcers in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrinho Aureliano, Patrícia Michelassi; Andreani, Dora Inés. Kozusny; Morete, Vislaine de Aguiar; Iseri Giraldeli, Shizumi; Baptista, Alessandra; Navarro, Ricardo Scarparo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2018-02-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a chronic disease that can lead to lower-limb ulceration. The photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on light interaction with a photosensitizer capable to promote bacterial death and tissue repair acceleration. This study analyzed the effects of PDT in the repair of human diabetic ulcers, by means of microbiological assessment. The clinical study was composed of 12 patients of both sexes with diabetic ulcers in lower limbs that were divided into two groups, control group (n=6) and PDT group (n=6). All patients were treated with collagenase/chloramphenicol during the experimental period, in which 6 of them have received PDT with methylene blue dye (0.01%) associated with laser therapy (660 nm), dose of 6 J/cm2¨ and 30 mW laser power. PDT group received ten treatment sessions. Wounds were evaluated for micro-organisms analysis. It was found a reduction in the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus in both groups, being that reduction more pronounced in the PDT group. Microbial count was performed on PDT group, showing a statistical difference reduction (p<0.05) when compared before and after the treatment. It is concluded that PDT seems to be effective in microbial reduction of human diabetic wounds, promoting acceleration and improvement of tissue repair quality.ty.

  7. Serum amyloid A is found on ApoB-containing lipoproteins in obese humans with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Anisa; Wilson, Patricia G; Hou, Tianfei; Brown, Aparna; King, Victoria L; Tannock, Lisa R

    2013-05-01

    In murine models of obesity/diabetes, there is an increase in plasma serum amyloid A (SAA) levels along with redistribution of SAA from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoprotein particles, namely, low-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine if obesity is associated with similar SAA lipoprotein redistribution in humans. Three groups of obese individuals were recruited from a weight loss clinic: healthy obese (n = 14), metabolic syndrome (MetS) obese (n = 8), and obese with type 2 diabetes (n = 6). Plasma was separated into lipoprotein fractions by fast protein liquid chromatography, and SAA was measured in lipid fractions using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Only the obese diabetic group had SAA detectable in apoB-containing lipoproteins, and SAA reverted back to HDL with active weight loss. In human subjects, SAA is found in apoB-containing lipoprotein particles only in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes, but not in healthy obese or obese subjects with MetS. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  8. Protective effects of tea, red wine and cocoa in diabetes. Evidences from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maria Angeles; Goya, Luis; Ramos, Sonia

    2017-11-01

    Prevention of diabetes through the diet has recently received an increasing interest, and polyphenolic compounds, such as flavanols, have become important potential chemopreventive natural agents due to their proved benefits on health, with low toxicity and cost. Tea, red wine and cocoa are good sources of flavanols and these highly consumed foods might contribute to prevent diabetes. In this regard, there is increasing evidence for a protective effect of tea, red wine and cocoa consumption against this disorder. This review summarizes the available epidemiological and interventional human studies providing evidence for and against this effect. Overall observational data suggest a benefit, but results are still equivocal and likely confounded by lifestyle and background dietary factors. The weight of data indicate favourable effects on diabetes risk factors for tea, red wine and cocoa intake, and a number of plausible mechanisms have been elucidated in human studies. However, despite the growing evidence it remains uncertain whether tea, red wine and cocoa consumption should be recommended to the general population or to patients as a strategy to reduce the risk of diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative genetics: synergizing human and NOD mouse studies for identifying genetic causation of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, John P; Chen, Yi-Guang; Mathews, Clayton E

    2012-01-01

    Although once widely anticipated to unlock how human type 1 diabetes (T1D) develops, extensive study of the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse has failed to yield effective treatments for patients with the disease. This has led many to question the usefulness of this animal model. While criticism about the differences between NOD and human T1D is legitimate, in many cases disease in both species results from perturbations modulated by the same genes or different genes that function within the same biological pathways. Like in humans, unusual polymorphisms within an MHC class II molecule contributes the most T1D risk in NOD mice. This insight supports the validity of this model and suggests the NOD has been improperly utilized to study how to cure or prevent disease in patients. Indeed, clinical trials are far from administering T1D therapeutics to humans at the same concentration ranges and pathological states that inhibit disease in NOD mice. Until these obstacles are overcome it is premature to label the NOD mouse a poor surrogate to test agents that cure or prevent T1D. An additional criticism of the NOD mouse is the past difficulty in identifying genes underlying T1D using conventional mapping studies. However, most of the few diabetogenic alleles identified to date appear relevant to the human disorder. This suggests that rather than abandoning genetic studies in NOD mice, future efforts should focus on improving the efficiency with which diabetes susceptibility genes are detected. The current review highlights why the NOD mouse remains a relevant and valuable tool to understand the genes and their interactions that promote autoimmune diabetes and therapeutics that inhibit this disease. It also describes a new range of technologies that will likely transform how the NOD mouse is used to uncover the genetic causes of T1D for years to come.

  10. Clinical-radiological experiences in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A; Bonse, G; Beck, B; Sauter, E; Sundermeyer, R; Gunkel, L V

    1986-09-01

    The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows a series of interesting clinical and radiological problems, discussed in case of selected patients. A special difficult problem arises in the differential diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac disease secondary to systemic hypertension.

  11. Frequency and clinical genetics of familial dilated cardiomyopathy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frequency and clinical genetics of familial dilated cardiomyopathy in Cape Town: Implications for the evaluation of patients with unexplained cardiomyopathy. NBA Ntusi, A Wonkam, G Shaboodien, M Badri, BM Mayosi ...

  12. Inhibition of diabetes in NOD mice by human pregnancy factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N.A.; Khan, A.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Benner, R.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of Th1 mediated autoimmune diseases regress in many patients during pregnancy. A prominent feature of pregnancy is the presence of human chorionic gonadotrophin hormone (hCG) in blood and urine. In this report we tested the effect of clinical grade hCG (c-hCG) on the development of

  13. A Diet Rich in Medium-Chain Fatty Acids Improves Systolic Function and Alters the Lipidomic Profile in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airhart, Sophia; Cade, W Todd; Jiang, Hui; Coggan, Andrew R; Racette, Susan B; Korenblat, Kevin; Spearie, Catherine Anderson; Waller, Suzanne; O'Connor, Robert; Bashir, Adil; Ory, Daniel S; Schaffer, Jean E; Novak, Eric; Farmer, Marsha; Waggoner, Alan D; Dávila-Román, Víctor G; Javidan-Nejad, Cylen; Peterson, Linda R

    2016-02-01

    Excessive cardiac long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) metabolism/storage causes cardiomyopathy in animal models of type 2 diabetes. Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are absorbed and oxidized efficiently. Data in animal models of diabetes suggest MCFAs may benefit the heart. Our objective was to test the effects of an MCFA-rich diet vs an LCFA-rich diet on plasma lipids, cardiac steatosis, and function in patients with type 2 diabetes. This was a double-blind, randomized, 2-week matched-feeding study. The study included ambulatory patients in the general community. Sixteen patients, ages 37-65 years, with type 2 diabetes, an ejection fraction greater than 45%, and no other systemic disease were included. Fourteen days of a diet rich in MCFAs or LCFAs, containing 38% as fat in total, was undertaken. Cardiac steatosis and function were the main outcome measures, with lipidomic changes considered a secondary outcome. The relatively load-independent measure of cardiac contractility, S', improved in the MCFA group (P diet decreased several plasma sphingolipids, ceramide, and acylcarnitines implicated in diabetic cardiomyopathy, and changes in several sphingolipids correlated with improved fasting insulins. Although a diet high in MCFAs does not change cardiac steatosis, our findings suggest that the MCFA-rich diet alters the plasma lipidome and may benefit or at least not harm cardiac function and fasting insulin levels in humans with type 2 diabetes. Larger, long-term studies are needed to further evaluate these effects in less-controlled settings.

  14. Diffuse glomerular nodular lesions in diabetic pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha, an inheritant diabetic gene in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hara

    Full Text Available Glomerular nodular lesions, known as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, are a pathological hallmark of progressive human diabetic nephropathy. We have induced severe diabetes in pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α P291fsinsC, a maturity-onset diabetes of the young type-3 (MODY3 gene in humans. In this model, glomerular pathology revealed that formation of diffuse glomerular nodules commenced as young as 1 month of age and increased in size and incidence until the age of 10 months, the end of the study period. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nodules consisted of various collagen types (I, III, IV, V and VI with advanced glycation end-product (AGE and Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML deposition, similar to those in human diabetic nodules, except for collagen type I. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β was also expressed exclusively in the nodules. The ultrastructure of the nodules comprised predominant interstitial-type collagen deposition arising from the mesangial matrices. Curiously, these nodules were found predominantly in the deep cortex. However, diabetic pigs failed to show any of the features characteristic of human diabetic nephropathy; e.g., proteinuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening, exudative lesions, mesangiolysis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and vascular hyalinosis. The pigs showed only Armanni-Ebstein lesions, a characteristic tubular manifestation in human diabetes. RT-PCR analysis showed that glomeruli in wild-type pigs did not express endogenous HNF1α and HNF1β, indicating that mutant HNF1α did not directly contribute to glomerular nodular formation in diabetic pigs. In conclusion, pigs harboring the dominant-negative mutant human MODY3 gene showed reproducible and distinct glomerular nodules, possibly due to AGE- and CML-based collagen accumulation. Although the pathology differed in several respects from that of human glomerular nodular lesions, the

  15. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBarrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; AlHayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.

    2009-01-01

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  16. Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Association with PulmonaryArtery Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Peighambari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is an uncommon condition constituting 1% -2% of the cases with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM diagnosis. We interestingly report two patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in association with significant pulmonary artery hypertension without any other underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assessed by echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and pulmonary function parameters study.

  17. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geltman, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies

  18. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-11-04

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  20. The Dynamics of the Human Infant Gut Microbiome in Development and in Progression Toward Type1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Colonization of the fetal and infant gut microbiome results in dynamic changes in diversity, which can impact disease...susceptibility. To examine the relationship between human gut microbiome dynamics throughout infancy and type 1 diabetes (T1D), we examined a cohort of 33...unlimited. The dynamics of the human infant gut microbiome in development and in progression toward type 1 diabetes. The views, opinions and/or

  1. Implications of the new Food and Drug Administration draft guidance on human factors engineering for diabetes device manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Stephen B; Drucker, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses the implications of the new Food and Drug Administration's draft guidance on human factors and usability engineering for the development of diabetes-related devices. Important considerations include the challenge of identifying users, when the user population is so dramatically broad, and the challenge of identifying use environments when the same can be said for use environments. Another important consideration is that diabetes-related devices, unlike many other medical devices, are used constantly as part of the user's lifestyle--adding complexity to the focus on human factors and ease of use emphasized by the draft guidance. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and infiltrative cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schofield

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common inherited cardiac disease. Cardiac imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management, with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR an important modality. CMR provides a number of different techniques in one examination: structure and function, flow imaging and tissue characterisation particularly with the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE technique. Other techniques include vasodilator perfusion, mapping (especially T1 mapping and extracellular volume quantification [ECV] and diffusion-weighted imaging with its potential to detect disarray. Clinically, the uses of CMR are diverse. The imaging must be considered within the context of work-up, particularly the personal and family history, Electrocardiogram (ECG and echocardiogram findings. Subtle markers of possible HCM can be identified in genotype positive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH-negative subjects. CMR has particular advantages for assessment of the left ventricle (LV apex and is able to detect both missed LVH (apical and basal antero-septum, when the echocardiography is normal but the ECG abnormal. CMR is important in distinguishing HCM from both common phenocopies (hypertensive heart disease, athletic adaptation, ageing related changes and rarer pheno and/or genocopies such as Fabry disease and amyloidosis. For these, in particular the LGE technique and T1 mapping are very useful with a low T1 in Fabry’s, and high T1 and very high ECV in amyloidosis. Moreover, the tissue characterisation that is possible using CMR offers a potential role in patient risk stratification, as scar is a very strong predictor of future heart failure. Scar may also play a role in the prediction of sudden death. CMR is helpful in follow-up assessment, especially after septal alcohol ablation and myomectomy.

  3. [Recombinant human gapM1 expressed in Pichia pastoris and its anti-diabetic effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiang; Du, Renqian; Li, Xi; Huang, Haiyan; Yu, Min; Tang, Qiqun

    2009-08-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine predominantly synthesized and secreted by adipocytes in the white adipose tissue, and it can lower the blood glucose level and increase free fatty acid oxidation. In the current study, we developed the globular domain of adiponectin (gapM1) to treat type II diabetes. In both flask and fermentor, we cultivated Pichia pastoris expressing recombinant gapM1 and established the purification procedure by using gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. To evaluate the biological activity of recombinant gapM1, we used rat type II diabetes model fed high-fat diet in combination with low-dose STZ (Streptozocin) induction. We purified 200 mg gapM1 with purity of 96% from 10 liters of supernatant. The recombinant gapM1 significantly lowered blood glucose (34.2%), serum triglyceride (79.6%) and total cholesterol (62.1%) in type II diabetes induced rat. Therefore, the recombinant human gapM1 is successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and effectively treated type II diabetes in rat models.

  4. Multiple Genetic Associations with Irish Wolfhound Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Siobhan; Dunning, Mark D; Brownlie, Serena; Patel, Janika; Godden, Megan; Cobb, Malcolm; Mongan, Nigel P; Rutland, Catrin S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in dogs and humans, with dilated cardiomyopathy being a large contributor to this. The Irish Wolfhound (IWH) is one of the most commonly affected breeds and one of the few breeds with genetic loci associated with the disease. Mutations in more than 50 genes are associated with human dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), yet very few are also associated with canine DCM. Furthermore, none of the identified canine loci explain many cases of the disease and previous work has indicated that genotypes at multiple loci may act together to influence disease development. In this study, loci previously associated with DCM in IWH were tested for associations in a new cohort both individually and in combination. We have identified loci significantly associated with the disease individually, but no genotypes individually or in pairs conferred a significantly greater risk of developing DCM than the population risk. However combining three loci together did result in the identification of a genotype which conferred a greater risk of disease than the overall population risk. This study suggests multiple rather than individual genetic factors, cooperating to influence DCM risk in IWH.

  5. Multiple Genetic Associations with Irish Wolfhound Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Simpson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in dogs and humans, with dilated cardiomyopathy being a large contributor to this. The Irish Wolfhound (IWH is one of the most commonly affected breeds and one of the few breeds with genetic loci associated with the disease. Mutations in more than 50 genes are associated with human dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, yet very few are also associated with canine DCM. Furthermore, none of the identified canine loci explain many cases of the disease and previous work has indicated that genotypes at multiple loci may act together to influence disease development. In this study, loci previously associated with DCM in IWH were tested for associations in a new cohort both individually and in combination. We have identified loci significantly associated with the disease individually, but no genotypes individually or in pairs conferred a significantly greater risk of developing DCM than the population risk. However combining three loci together did result in the identification of a genotype which conferred a greater risk of disease than the overall population risk. This study suggests multiple rather than individual genetic factors, cooperating to influence DCM risk in IWH.

  6. Cardiomyopathy from 1,1-Difluoroethane Inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suwen; Joginpally, Tejaswini; Kim, David; Yadava, Mrinal; Norgais, Konchok; Laird-Fick, Heather S

    2016-10-01

    Consumer aerosol products can be inhaled for their psychoactive effects, but with attendant adverse health effects including "sudden sniffing death." Cardiomyopathy has rarely been described in association with 1,1-difluoroethane (DFE), a common aerosol propellant. We report a 33-year-old male who developed acute myocardial injury and global hypokinesis along with rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and fulminant hepatitis after 2 days' nearly continuous huffing. Workup for other causes, including underlying coronary artery disease, was negative. His cardiac function improved over time. The exact mechanism of DFE's effects is uncertain but may include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, coronary vasospasm, or direct cellular toxicity.

  7. Controversies Surrounding Exercise in Genetic Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteya, Gourg; Lampert, Rachel

    2018-04-01

    Exercise and sports are an integral part of daily life for millions of Americans, with 16% of the US population older than age 15 years engaged in sports or exercise activities (Bureau of Labor statistics). The physical and psychological benefits of exercise are well-recognized. However, high-profile cases of athletes dying suddenly on the field, often due to undiagnosed genetic cardiomyopathies, raise questions about the risks and benefits of exercise for those with cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Canine candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy: annotation of and polymorphic markers for 14 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oost Bernard A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dilated cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disease occurring in humans and domestic animals and is characterized by dilatation of the left ventricle, reduced systolic function and increased sphericity of the left ventricle. Dilated cardiomyopathy has been observed in several, mostly large and giant, dog breeds, such as the Dobermann and the Great Dane. A number of genes have been identified, which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in the human, mouse and hamster. These genes mainly encode structural proteins of the cardiac myocyte. Results We present the annotation of, and marker development for, 14 of these genes of the dog genome, i.e. α-cardiac actin, caveolin 1, cysteine-rich protein 3, desmin, lamin A/C, LIM-domain binding factor 3, myosin heavy polypeptide 7, phospholamban, sarcoglycan δ, titin cap, α-tropomyosin, troponin I, troponin T and vinculin. A total of 33 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms were identified for these canine genes and 11 polymorphic microsatellite repeats were developed. Conclusion The presented polymorphisms provide a tool to investigate the role of the corresponding genes in canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy by linkage analysis or association studies.

  9. Canine candidate genes for dilated cardiomyopathy: annotation of and polymorphic markers for 14 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Anje C; Leegwater, Peter Aj; van Oost, Bernard A; Ollier, William E; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna

    2007-10-19

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a myocardial disease occurring in humans and domestic animals and is characterized by dilatation of the left ventricle, reduced systolic function and increased sphericity of the left ventricle. Dilated cardiomyopathy has been observed in several, mostly large and giant, dog breeds, such as the Dobermann and the Great Dane. A number of genes have been identified, which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in the human, mouse and hamster. These genes mainly encode structural proteins of the cardiac myocyte. We present the annotation of, and marker development for, 14 of these genes of the dog genome, i.e. alpha-cardiac actin, caveolin 1, cysteine-rich protein 3, desmin, lamin A/C, LIM-domain binding factor 3, myosin heavy polypeptide 7, phospholamban, sarcoglycan delta, titin cap, alpha-tropomyosin, troponin I, troponin T and vinculin. A total of 33 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms were identified for these canine genes and 11 polymorphic microsatellite repeats were developed. The presented polymorphisms provide a tool to investigate the role of the corresponding genes in canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy by linkage analysis or association studies.

  10. Establishment of a canine model of human type 2 diabetes mellitus by overexpressing phosphoenolypyruvate carboxykinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon Woo; Lee, Geun-Shik; Kim, Joung Joo; Park, Sun Woo; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Kang, Mina; Kim, Yu Kyung; Jung, Eui-Man; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2012-08-01

    Dogs are useful models for studying human metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus due to similarities in physiology, anatomy and life styles with humans. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) facilitates the production of transgenic dogs. In this study, we generated transgenic dogs expressing the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene, which is closely involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, we assessed the cloning efficiency associated with adult or fetal (cloned or natural mating) fibroblasts as a nuclear source. Cloning efficiency was determined by the fusion, pregnancy and cloning rates. The fusion rates were significantly high for fibroblasts from cloned fetuses, but the pregnancy and cloning rates were relatively high for cells from normal fetuses. Based on these data, fetal fibroblasts were selected as the nuclear donor for SCNT and genetically engineered to overexpress the PEPCK gene and dual selection marker genes controlled by the PEPCK promoter. The transgenic cells were introduced into oocytes and transferred into five recipient dogs, resulting in two pregnancies. Finally, three puppies were born and confirmed by microsatellite analysis to be genetically identical to the donor. One puppy successfully overexpressed PEPCK mRNA and protein in the liver. This canine disease model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis and/or therapeutic targets of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipu, H.N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  12. Nephrin expression is reduced in human diabetic nephropathy: evidence for a distinct role for glycated albumin and angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublier, Sophie; Salvidio, Gennaro; Lupia, Enrico; Ruotsalainen, Vesa; Verzola, Daniela; Deferrari, Giacomo; Camussi, Giovanni

    2003-04-01

    We studied the distribution of nephrin in renal biopsies from 17 patients with diabetes and nephrotic syndrome (7 type 1 and 10 type 2 diabetes), 6 patients with diabetes and microalbuminuria (1 type 1 and 5 type 2 diabetes), and 10 normal subjects. Nephrin expression was semiquantitatively evaluated by measuring immunofluorescence intensity by digital image analysis. We found an extensive reduction of nephrin staining in both type 1 (67 +/- 9%; P < 0.001) and type 2 (65 +/- 10%; P < 0.001) diabetic patients with diabetes and nephrotic syndrome when compared with control subjects. The pattern of staining shifted from punctate/linear distribution to granular. In patients with microalbuminuria, the staining pattern of nephrin also showed granular distribution and reduction intensity of 69% in the patient with type 1 diabetes and of 62 +/- 4% (P < 0.001) in the patients with type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies on human cultured podocytes demonstrated that glycated albumin and angiotensin II reduced nephrin expression. Glycated albumin inhibited nephrin synthesis through the engagement of receptor for advanced glycation end products, whereas angiotensin II acted on cytoskeleton redistribution, inducing the shedding of nephrin. This study indicates that the alteration in nephrin expression is an early event in proteinuric patients with diabetes and suggests that glycated albumin and angiotensin II contribute to nephrin downregulation.

  13. Islet expression of the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanosine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1 in human type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Kun-Ho

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly clear that β-cell failure plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Free-radical mediated β-cell damage has been intensively studied in type 1 diabetes, but not in human type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we studied the protein expression of the DNA repair enzyme Ogg1 in pancreases from type 2 diabetics. Ogg1 was studied because it is the major enzyme involved in repairing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine DNA adducts, a lesion previously observed in a rat model of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, in a gene expression screen, Ogg1 was over-expressed in islets from a human type 2 diabetic. Methods Immunofluorescent staining of Ogg1 was performed on pancreatic specimens from healthy controls and patients with diabetes for 2–23 years. The intensity and islet area stained for Ogg1 was evaluated by semi-quantitative scoring. Results Both the intensity and the area of islet Ogg1 staining were significantly increased in islets from the type 2 diabetic subjects compared to the healthy controls. A correlation between increased Ogg1 fluorescent staining intensity and duration of diabetes was also found. Most of the staining observed was cytoplasmic, suggesting that mitochondrial Ogg1 accounts primarily for the increased Ogg1 expression. Conclusion We conclude that oxidative stress related DNA damage may be a novel important factor in the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes. An increase of Ogg1 in islet cell mitochondria is consistent with a model in which hyperglycemia and consequent increased β-cell oxidative metabolism lead to DNA damage and the induction of Ogg1 expression.

  14. Cardiomyopathy-Associated Gene 1-Sensitive PKC-Dependent Connexin 43 Expression and Phosphorylation in Left Ventricular Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Xie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cardiomyopathy-associated gene 1 (CMYA1 plays an important role in embryonic cardiac development, postnatal cardiac remodeling and myocardial injury repair. Abnormal CMYA1 expression may be involved in cardiac dysplasia and primary cardiomyopathy. Our study aims to establish the relationship between CMYA1 and Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC pathogenesis. Methods: We explored the effects of CMYA1 on connexins (Cx, which contribute to gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC, and the underlying signaling pathway in human normal tissues, LVNC myocardial tissues and HL1 cells by means of western blotting, RT-qPCR, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation and scrape loading-dye transfer. Results: CMYA1 expression was inversely associated with Cx43 and Cx40 expression, as determined by gap junction PCR array analysis. An increased expression and disordered distribution of CMYA1 at the intercalated discs in LVNC myocardial tissue was also observed. CMYA1 and Cx43 are co-expressed and interact in myocardial cells. CMYA1 expression was positively correlated with p-Cx43 (S368 via the Protein kinase C (PKC signaling pathway in myocardial tissue and HL1 cells. The diffusion distance of Lucifer Yellow in the HL1 cells in which CMYA1 was over-expressed or knocked down was significantly less or more than that of the control group, respectively. Conclusion: Abnormal CMYA1 expression affects the expression and phosphorylation of Cx43 through the PKC signaling pathway, which is involved in the regulation of GJIC. CMYA1 participates in the molecular mechanism of LVNC pathogenesis.

  15. Recombinant human erythropoietin stimulates angiogenesis and wound healing in the genetically diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Altavilla, Domenica; Cucinotta, Domenico; Russo, Giuseppina T; Calò, Margherita; Bitto, Alessandra; Marini, Herbert; Marini, Rolando; Adamo, Elena B; Seminara, Paolo; Minutoli, Letteria; Torre, Valerio; Squadrito, Francesco

    2004-09-01

    The effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) in diabetes-related healing defects were investigated by using an incisional skin-wound model produced on the back of female diabetic C57BL/KsJ-m(+/+)Lept(db) mice (db(+)/db(+)) and their normoglycemic littermates (db(+/+)m). Animals were treated with rHuEPO (400 units/kg in 100 microl s.c.) or its vehicle alone (100 microl). Mice were killed on different days (3, 6, and 12 days after skin injury) for measurement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression and protein synthesis, for monitoring angiogenesis by CD31 expression, and for evaluating histological changes. Furthermore, we evaluated wound-breaking strength at day 12. At day 6, rHuEPO injection in diabetic mice resulted in an increase in VEGF mRNA expression (vehicle = 0.33 +/- 0.1 relative amount of mRNA; rHuEPO = 0.9 +/- 0.09 relative amount of mRNA; P < 0.05) and protein wound content (vehicle = 23 +/- 5 pg/wound; rHuEPO = 92 +/- 12 pg/wound; P < 0.05) and caused a marked increase in CD31 gene expression (vehicle = 0.18 +/- 0.05 relative amount of mRNA; rHuEPO = 0.98 +/- 0.21 relative amount of mRNA; P < 0.05) and protein synthesis. Furthermore, rHuEPO injection improved the impaired wound healing and, at day 12, increased the wound-breaking strength in diabetic mice (vehicle = 12 +/- 2 g/mm; rHuEPO 21 +/- 5 g/mm; P < 0.05). Erythropoietin may have a potential application in diabetes-related wound disorders.

  16. Type 2 diabetes and obesity induce similar transcriptional reprogramming in human myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Väremo, Leif; Henriksen, Tora Ida; Scheele, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle is one of the primary tissues involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The close association between obesity and T2D makes it difficult to isolate specific effects attributed to the disease alone. Therefore, here we set out to identify and characterize...... in sphingolipid metabolism was transcriptionally regulated. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings identify inherent characteristics in myocytes, as a memory of the in vivo phenotype, without the influence from a diabetic or obese extracellular environment, highlighting their importance in the development of T2D....... intrinsic properties of myocytes, associated independently with T2D or obesity. METHODS: We generated and analyzed RNA-seq data from primary differentiated myotubes from 24 human subjects, using a factorial design (healthy/T2D and non-obese/obese), to determine the influence of each specific factor...

  17. Promoter demethylation of Keap1 gene in human diabetic cataractous lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsamy, Periyasamy [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Ayaki, Masahiko [Shizuoka National Hospital, Saitama (Japan); Elanchezhian, Rajan [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Shinohara, Toshimichi, E-mail: tshinohara@unmc.edu [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found significant Keap1 promoter demethylation in diabetic cataractous lenses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demethylation of Keap1 gene upregulated the expression of Keap1 mRNA and protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated levels of Keap1 are known to decrease the levels of Nrf2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thereby, the levels of antioxidant enzymes are suppressed by decreased Nrf2 level. -- Abstract: Age-related cataracts (ARCs) are the major cause of visual impairments worldwide, and diabetic adults tend to have an earlier onset of ARCs. Although age is the strongest risk factor for cataracts, little is known how age plays a role in the development of ARCs. It is known that oxidative stress in the lens increases with age and more so in the lenses of diabetics. One of the central adaptive responses against the oxidative stresses is the activation of the nuclear transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which then activates more than 20 different antioxidative enzymes. Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets and binds to Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia will lead to a dysfunction of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative protection in the lens of diabetics. We studied the methylation status of the CpG islands in 15 clear and 21 diabetic cataractous lenses. Our results showed significant levels of demethylated DNA in the Keap1 promoter in the cataractous lenses from diabetic patients. In contrast, highly methylated DNA was found in the clear lens and tumorized human lens epithelial cell (HLEC) lines (SRA01/04). HLECs treated with a demethylation agent, 5-aza-2 Prime deoxycytidine (5-Aza), had a 10-fold higher levels of Keap1 mRNA, 3-fold increased levels of Keap1 protein, produced higher levels of ROS, and increased cell death. Our results indicated that demethylation of the CpG islands in the Keap1 promoter will activate the expression of Keap1 protein, which

  18. Promoter demethylation of Keap1 gene in human diabetic cataractous lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsamy, Periyasamy; Ayaki, Masahiko; Elanchezhian, Rajan; Shinohara, Toshimichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We found significant Keap1 promoter demethylation in diabetic cataractous lenses. ► Demethylation of Keap1 gene upregulated the expression of Keap1 mRNA and protein. ► Elevated levels of Keap1 are known to decrease the levels of Nrf2. ► Thereby, the levels of antioxidant enzymes are suppressed by decreased Nrf2 level. -- Abstract: Age-related cataracts (ARCs) are the major cause of visual impairments worldwide, and diabetic adults tend to have an earlier onset of ARCs. Although age is the strongest risk factor for cataracts, little is known how age plays a role in the development of ARCs. It is known that oxidative stress in the lens increases with age and more so in the lenses of diabetics. One of the central adaptive responses against the oxidative stresses is the activation of the nuclear transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which then activates more than 20 different antioxidative enzymes. Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1 (Keap1) targets and binds to Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia will lead to a dysfunction of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative protection in the lens of diabetics. We studied the methylation status of the CpG islands in 15 clear and 21 diabetic cataractous lenses. Our results showed significant levels of demethylated DNA in the Keap1 promoter in the cataractous lenses from diabetic patients. In contrast, highly methylated DNA was found in the clear lens and tumorized human lens epithelial cell (HLEC) lines (SRA01/04). HLECs treated with a demethylation agent, 5-aza-2′deoxycytidine (5-Aza), had a 10-fold higher levels of Keap1 mRNA, 3-fold increased levels of Keap1 protein, produced higher levels of ROS, and increased cell death. Our results indicated that demethylation of the CpG islands in the Keap1 promoter will activate the expression of Keap1 protein, which then increases the targeting of Nrf2 for proteosomal degradation. Decreased Nrf2 activity represses the

  19. Transplantation of Human Pancreatic Endoderm Cells Reverses Diabetes Post Transplantation in a Prevascularized Subcutaneous Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Pepper

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Beta-cell replacement therapy is an effective means to restore glucose homeostasis in select humans with autoimmune diabetes. The scarcity of “healthy” human donor pancreata restricts the broader application of this effective curative therapy. “β-Like” cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, with the capacity to secrete insulin in a glucose-regulated manner, have been developed in vitro, with limitless capacity for expansion. Here we report long-term diabetes correction in mice transplanted with hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs in a prevascularized subcutaneous site. This advancement mitigates chronic foreign-body response, utilizes a device- and growth factor-free approach, facilitates in vivo differentiation of PECs into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells, and reliably restores glycemic control. Basal and stimulated human C-peptide secretion was detected throughout the study, which was abolished upon graft removal. Recipient mice demonstrated physiological clearance of glucose in response to metabolic challenge and safely retrieved grafts contained viable glucose regulatory cells.

  20. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may

  1. Human resources requirements for diabetic patients healthcare in primary care clinics of the Mexican Institute of Social Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Doubova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the requirements of human resources (HR of two models of care for diabetes patients: conventional and specific, also called DiabetIMSS, which are provided in primary care clinics of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. Materials and methods. An evaluative research was conducted. An expert group identified the HR activities and time required to provide healthcare consistent with the best clinical practices for diabetic patients. HR were estimated by using the evidence-based adjusted service target approach for health workforce planning; then, comparisons between existing and estimated HRs were made. Results. To provide healthcare in accordance with the patients’ metabolic control, the conventional model required increasing the number of family doctors (1.2 times nutritionists (4.2 times and social workers (4.1 times. The DiabetIMSS model requires greater increase than the conventional model. Conclusions. Increasing HR is required to provide evidence-based healthcare to diabetes patients.

  2. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vi...

  3. Clinical and molecular classification of cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cecchi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The term “cardiomyopathies” was used for the first time 55 years ago, in 1957. Since then awareness and knowledge of this important and complex group of heart muscle diseases have improved substantially. Over these past five decades a large number of definitions, nomenclature and schemes, have been advanced by experts and consensus panel, which reflect the fast and continued advance of the scientific understanding in the field. Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited myocardial diseases, which represent an important cause of disability and adverse outcome. Although considered rare diseases, the overall estimated prevalence of all cardiomyopathies is at least 3% in the general population worldwide. Furthermore, their recognition is increasing due to advances in imaging techniques and greater awareness in both the public and medical community. Cardiomyopathies represent an ideal translational model of integration between basic and clinical sciences. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore essential in order to ensure their correct diagnosis and management. In the present work, we aim to provide a concise overview of the historical background, genetic and phenotypic spectrum and evolving concepts leading to the various attempts of cardiomyopathy classifications produced over the decades.

  4. Pregnancy in women with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, P. G.; Walker, F.

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is increasingly being diagnosed in pregnant women. Women with HCM generally tolerate pregnancy well. The risk is however higher in women who are symptomatic before pregnancy or in those with severe left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The incidence of

  5. Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy after a quarrel.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy after a quarrel. Dong-Mei Jiang1,a, Ze-Wei Sunc2,a, Jie Han2. 1. Department of Cardiology, Biomedical research (therapy) center, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital,. College of ... acterized by (1) sudden onset of chest pain or shortness of breath; (2) ... In the present report, we de- scribe a case of ...

  6. Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Heart Hospital, London, UK and Monaldi Hospital, Naples, Italy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This abstract book contains four reports and all abstracts presented to the Joint Meeting: Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure, 22-23 September 2011 - Naples, Italy, endorsed by the Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases (WG 21 of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC.

  7. BAG3 myofibrillar myopathy presenting with cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konersman, Chamindra G; Bordini, Brett J; Scharer, Gunter; Lawlor, Michael W; Zangwill, Steven; Southern, James F; Amos, Louella; Geddes, Gabrielle C; Kliegman, Robert; Collins, Michael P

    2015-05-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs) are a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders distinguished by the pathological hallmark of myofibrillar dissolution. Most patients present in adulthood, but mutations in several genes including BCL2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) cause predominantly childhood-onset disease. BAG3-related MFM is particularly severe, featuring weakness, cardiomyopathy, neuropathy, and early lethality. While prior cases reported either neuromuscular weakness or concurrent weakness and cardiomyopathy at onset, we describe the first case in which cardiomyopathy and cardiac transplantation (age eight) preceded neuromuscular weakness by several years (age 12). The phenotype comprised distal weakness and severe sensorimotor neuropathy. Nerve biopsy was primarily axonal with secondary demyelinating/remyelinating changes without "giant axons." Muscle biopsy showed extensive neuropathic changes that made myopathic changes difficult to interpret. Similar to previous cases, a p.Pro209Leu mutation in exon 3 of BAG3 was found. This case underlines the importance of evaluating for MFMs in patients with combined neuromuscular weakness and cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rat as a model for human disease based on urinary peptidomic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Siwy

    Full Text Available Representative animal models for diabetes-associated vascular complications are extremely relevant in assessing potential therapeutic drugs. While several rodent models for type 2 diabetes (T2D are available, their relevance in recapitulating renal and cardiovascular features of diabetes in man is not entirely clear. Here we evaluate at the molecular level the similarity between Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats, as a model of T2D-associated vascular complications, and human disease by urinary proteome analysis. Urine analysis of ZDF rats at early and late stages of disease compared to age- matched LEAN rats identified 180 peptides as potentially associated with diabetes complications. Overlaps with human chronic kidney disease (CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD biomarkers were observed, corresponding to proteins marking kidney damage (eg albumin, alpha-1 antitrypsin or related to disease development (collagen. Concordance in regulation of these peptides in rats versus humans was more pronounced in the CVD compared to the CKD panels. In addition, disease-associated predicted protease activities in ZDF rats showed higher similarities to the predicted activities in human CVD. Based on urinary peptidomic analysis, the ZDF rat model displays similarity to human CVD but might not be the most appropriate model to display human CKD on a molecular level.

  9. Transient Cardiomyopathy and Quadriplegia Induced by Ephedrine Decongestant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David F; Kurklinsky, Andrew K; Chirila, Razvan

    2015-12-01

    Ephedrine decongestant products are widely used. Common side effects include palpitations, nervousness, and headache. More severe adverse reactions include cardiomyopathy and vasospasm. We report the case of an otherwise healthy 37-year-old woman who presented with acute-onset quadriplegia and heart failure. She had a normal chest radiograph on admission, but developed marked pulmonary edema and bilateral effusions the next day. Echocardiography revealed a left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.18 and no obvious intrinsic pathologic condition such as foramen narrowing on spinal imaging. Laboratory screening was positive for methamphetamines in the urine, and the patient admitted to having used, over the past several weeks, multiple ephedrine-containing products for allergy-symptom relief. She was ultimately diagnosed with an acute catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy and spinal artery vasospasm consequential to excessive use of decongestants. Her symptoms resolved completely with supportive care and appropriate heart-failure management. An echocardiogram 2 weeks after admission showed improvement of the left ventricular ejection fraction to 0.33. Ten months after the event, the patient was entirely asymptomatic and showed further improvement of her ejection fraction to 0.45. To our knowledge, ours is the first report of spinal artery vasospasm resulting in quadriplegia in a human being after ephedrine ingestion.

  10. Human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 improved wound healing in diabetes through its anti-apoptotic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Guojuan; Ren, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Jinglu; Huang, Yanrui; Liu, Dan; Luo, Hengcong; Yang, Chuan; Yan, Li

    2017-09-08

    Impaired wound healing accompanies severe cell apoptosis in diabetic patients. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) was known to have effects on promoting growth and anti-apoptosis for cells. We aimed to determine the actual levels of TIMP-1 and cell apoptosis in: (i) the biopsies of diabetic and non-diabetic foot tissue and (ii) the human fibroblasts with or without treatments of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Next, we aimed to determine the improved levels of cell apoptosis and wound healing after the treatments of either active protein of TIMP-1 or in vivo expression of gene therapy vector-mediated TIMP-1 in both the human fibroblasts and the animal model of diabetic rats. The levels of TIMP-1 were significantly reduced in diabetic skin tissues and in AGEs-treated fibroblasts. Both AGEs-treated cells were effectively protected from apoptosis by active protein of TIMP-1 at appropriate dose level. So did the induced in vivo TIMP-1 expression after gene delivery. Similar effects were also found on the significant improvement of impaired wound healing in diabetic rats. We concluded that TIMP-1 improved wound healing through its anti-apoptotic effect. Treatments with either active protein TIMP-1 or TIMP-1 gene therapy delivered in local wound sites may be used as a strategy for accelerating diabetic wound healing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Pioglitazone and bladder cancer in human studies: Is it diabetes itself, diabetes drugs, flawed analyses or different ethnicities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews human observations on pioglitazone and bladder cancer risk. The PROspective pioglitAzone Clinical Trial In macroVascular Events trial showed an imbalance in bladder cancer between users of pioglitazone and placebo (14 versus six cases, p = 0.069. However, after excluding bladder cancer probably ascribed to other etiology, a blind assessment concluded that the imbalance might not be related to pioglitazone. Epidemiologic studies conducted in the United States and France using insurance databases independently suggested that pioglitazone use for >2 years might confer a 20%–40% higher risk. Another study evaluating bladder cancer risk in diabetic patients using the National Health Insurance in Taiwan did not find any incident bladder cancer case among 422 pioglitazone users for a follow-up of up to 3 years. Because observational studies may suffer from selection and information bias, and inadequate adjustment for confounders may inflate the estimated risk, causal inference from these studies should be interpreted with caution. While investigating cancer risk associated with a medication, indication bias should also be attended, especially when the medication is used at a late stage of the disease. Because pioglitazone is usually a second or third line antidiabetic agent, the users are always characterized by older age, longer diabetes duration, poorer glycemic control, and higher rates of complications and comorbidities. Biased estimates will also result if these differences are not appropriately addressed in the analyses. Current evidence neither concludes nor excludes a causal role of pioglitazone on bladder cancer. Clinical trials aiming at evaluating the risk of cancer associated with a medication is not ethical and may not be expected to provide an answer on the issue of pioglitazone-related bladder cancer. However, a meta-analysis using all available clinical trials to compare the bladder cancer risk between

  12. Automated Diabetic Retinopathy Image Assessment Software: Diagnostic Accuracy and Cost-Effectiveness Compared with Human Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufail, Adnan; Rudisill, Caroline; Egan, Catherine; Kapetanakis, Venediktos V; Salas-Vega, Sebastian; Owen, Christopher G; Lee, Aaron; Louw, Vern; Anderson, John; Liew, Gerald; Bolter, Louis; Srinivas, Sowmya; Nittala, Muneeswar; Sadda, SriniVas; Taylor, Paul; Rudnicka, Alicja R

    2017-03-01

    With the increasing prevalence of diabetes, annual screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR) by expert human grading of retinal images is challenging. Automated DR image assessment systems (ARIAS) may provide clinically effective and cost-effective detection of retinopathy. We aimed to determine whether ARIAS can be safely introduced into DR screening pathways to replace human graders. Observational measurement comparison study of human graders following a national screening program for DR versus ARIAS. Retinal images from 20 258 consecutive patients attending routine annual diabetic eye screening between June 1, 2012, and November 4, 2013. Retinal images were manually graded following a standard national protocol for DR screening and were processed by 3 ARIAS: iGradingM, Retmarker, and EyeArt. Discrepancies between manual grades and ARIAS results were sent to a reading center for arbitration. Screening performance (sensitivity, false-positive rate) and diagnostic accuracy (95% confidence intervals of screening-performance measures) were determined. Economic analysis estimated the cost per appropriate screening outcome. Sensitivity point estimates (95% confidence intervals) of the ARIAS were as follows: EyeArt 94.7% (94.2%-95.2%) for any retinopathy, 93.8% (92.9%-94.6%) for referable retinopathy (human graded as either ungradable, maculopathy, preproliferative, or proliferative), 99.6% (97.0%-99.9%) for proliferative retinopathy; Retmarker 73.0% (72.0 %-74.0%) for any retinopathy, 85.0% (83.6%-86.2%) for referable retinopathy, 97.9% (94.9%-99.1%) for proliferative retinopathy. iGradingM classified all images as either having disease or being ungradable. EyeArt and Retmarker saved costs compared with manual grading both as a replacement for initial human grading and as a filter prior to primary human grading, although the latter approach was less cost-effective. Retmarker and EyeArt systems achieved acceptable sensitivity for referable retinopathy when compared

  13. Netrin-1, a urinary proximal tubular injury marker, is elevated early in the time course of human diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Nauta, Ferdau L.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bilo, Henk; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Ramesh, Ganesan

    Netrin-1 was recently identified as an early diagnostic biomarker of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an experimental animal model. However, its usefulness for early diagnosis of CKD in humans is unknown. The current study evaluated whether netrin-1 is increased in urine from human diabetic patients.

  14. Human umbilical vein endothelium-derived exosomes play a role in foetoplacental endothelial dysfunction in gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sáez, Tamara; Salsoso, Rocío; Leiva, Andrea; Toledo, Fernando; de Vos, Paul; Faas, Marijke; Sobrevia, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) characterizes by foetoplacental endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from women with GDM show increased L-arginine transport via the human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1). Moreover, expression of endothelial nitric

  15. Human umbilical vein endothelium-derived exosomes play a role in foetoplacental endothelial dysfunction in gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sáez, Tamara; Salsoso, Rocío; Leiva, Andrea; Toledo, Fernando; de Vos, Paul; Faas, Marijke; Sobrevia, Luis

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) characterizes by foetoplacental endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from women with GDM show increased L-arginine transport via the human cationic amino acid transporter 1 (hCAT-1). Moreover, expression of endothelial nitric

  16. Acylcarnitine Profiles in Plasma and Tissues of Hyperglycemic NZO Mice Correlate with Metabolite Changes of Human Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Weiser, Anna; Giesbertz, Pieter; Daniel, Hannelore; Spanier, Britta

    2018-01-01

    The New Zealand obese (NZO) mouse is a polygenic model for obesity and diabetes with obese females and obese, diabetes-prone males, used to study traits of the metabolic syndrome like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and dyslipidaemia. By using LC-MS/MS, we here examine the suitability of this model to mirror tissue-specific changes in acylcarnitine (AC) and amino acid (AA) species preceding T2DM which may reflect patterns investigated in human metabolism. We observed high concentrat...

  17. Effect of diabetes mellitus on the quality and cytokine content of human semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaosheng; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Huina; Zhao, Junzhao

    2017-09-01

    The effects of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the quality and cytokine levels of human semen remain unknown. Sixty semen samples from 30 normal volunteers and 30 DM patients were assayed. The percentage of sperm progressive motility, sperm vitality, sperm survival rate, the rate of normal sperm morphology, semen volume, and semen pH and density of DM males were significantly lower than those of normal males (psemen interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-18 levels in DM males were significantly higher than those in normal males (psemen decreased semen quality and might lead to male infertility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  19. Short-acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin for adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Birgit; Siebenhofer, Andrea; Jeitler, Klaus; Horvath, Karl; Semlitsch, Thomas; Berghold, Andrea; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2016-06-30

    Short-acting insulin analogue use for people with diabetes is still controversial, as reflected in many scientific debates. To assess the effects of short-acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin in adults with type 1 diabetes. We carried out the electronic searches through Ovid simultaneously searching the following databases: Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R) (1946 to 14 April 2015), EMBASE (1988 to 2015, week 15), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the European (EU) Clinical Trials register (both March 2015). We included all randomised controlled trials with an intervention duration of at least 24 weeks that compared short-acting insulin analogues with regular human insulins in the treatment of adults with type 1 diabetes who were not pregnant. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trials for risk of bias, and resolved differences by consensus. We graded overall study quality using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) instrument. We used random-effects models for the main analyses and presented the results as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We identified nine trials that fulfilled the inclusion criteria including 2693 participants. The duration of interventions ranged from 24 to 52 weeks with a mean of about 37 weeks. The participants showed some diversity, mainly with regard to diabetes duration and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The majority of the trials were carried out in the 1990s and participants were recruited from Europe, North America, Africa and Asia. None of the trials was carried out in a blinded manner so that the risk of performance bias, especially for subjective outcomes such as hypoglycaemia, was present in all of the trials. Furthermore, several trials showed inconsistencies in

  20. Confocal Raman study of aging process in diabetes mellitus human voluntaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Liliane; Téllez Soto, Claudio Alberto; dos Santos, Laurita; Ali, Syed Mohammed; Fávero, Priscila Pereira; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of AGEs [Advanced Glycation End - products] occurs slowly during the human aging process. However, its formation is accelerated in the presence of diabetes mellitus. In this paper, we perform a noninvasive analysis of glycation effect on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy. This technique uses a laser of 785 nm as excitation source and, by the inelastic scattering of light, it is possible to obtain information about the biochemical composition of the skin. Our aim in this work was to characterize the aging process resulting from the glycation process in a group of 10 Health Elderly Women (HEW) and 10 Diabetic Elderly Women (DEW). The Raman data were collected from the dermis at a depth of 70-130 microns. Through the theory of functional density (DFT) the bands positions of hydroxyproline, proline and AGEs (pentosidine and glucosepane) were calculated by using Gaussian 0.9 software. A molecular interpretation of changes in type I collagen was performed by the changes in the vibrational modes of the proline (P) and hydroxyproline (HP). The data analysis shows that the aging effects caused by glycation of proteins degrades type I collagen differently and leads to accelerated aging process.

  1. Candidate genes expressed in human islets and their role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storling, Joachim; Brorsson, Caroline Anna

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the insulin-producing β cells are destroyed by an immune-mediated process leading to complete insulin deficiency. There is a strong genetic component in T1D. Genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are the most important genetic determinants of disease......, but more than 40 additional loci are known to significantly affect T1D risk. Since most of the currently known genetic candidates have annotated immune cell functions, it is generally considered that most of the genetic susceptibility in T1D is caused by variation in genes affecting immune cell function....... Recent studies, however, indicate that most T1D candidate genes are expressed in human islets suggesting that the functions of the genes are not restricted to immune cells, but also play roles in the islets and possibly the β cells. Several candidates change expression levels within the islets following...

  2. Disentangling type 2 diabetes and metformin treatment signatures in the human gut microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk ; Nielsen, Trine N.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several associations between common chronic human disorders and altered gut microbiome composition and function have been reported1,2. In most of these reports, treatment regimens were not controlled for and conclusions could thus be confounded by the effects of various drugs...... on the microbiota, which may obscure microbial causes, protective factors or diagnostically relevant signals. Our study addresses disease and drug signatures in the human gut microbiome of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Two previous quantitative gut metagenomics studies of T2D patients that were unstratified......, we report a unified signature of gut microbiome shifts in T2D with a depletion of butyrate-producing taxa3,4. These in turn cause functional microbiome shifts, in part alleviated by metformin-induced changes. Overall, the present study emphasizes the need to disentangle gut microbiota signatures...

  3. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (pdiabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  4. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: computerized anatomic study of relashionship between septal and free left ventricle wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliani, Paulo Sérgio; Costa, Eder França da; Correia, Aristides Tadeu; Monteiro, Rosangela; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    A feature of dilated cardiomyopathy is the deformation of ventricular cavity, which contributes to systolic dysfunction. Few studies have evaluated this deformation bearing in mind ventricular regions and segments of the ventricle, which could reveal important details of the remodeling process, supporting a better understanding of its role in functional impairment and the development of new therapeutic strategies. To evaluate if, in basal, equatorial and apical regions, increased internal transverse perimeter of left ventricle in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy occurs proportionally between the septal and non-septal segment. We performed an anatomical study with 28 adult hearts from human cadavers. One group consisted of 18 hearts with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and another group with 10 normal hearts. After lamination and left ventricle digital image capture, in three different regions (base, equator and apex), the transversal internal perimeter of left ventricle was divided into two segments: septal and not septal. These segments were measured by proper software. It was established an index of proportionality between these segments, called septal and non-septal segment index. Then we determined whether this index was the same in both groups. Among patients with normal hearts and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the index of proportionality between the two segments (septal and non-septal) showed no significant difference in the three regions analyzed. The comparison results of the indices NSS/SS among normal and enlarged hearts were respectively: in base 1.99 versus 1.86 (P=0.46), in equator 2.22 versus 2.18 (P=0.79) and in apex 2.96 versus 3.56 (P=0.11). In the idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, the transversal dilatation of left ventricular internal perimeter occurs proportionally between the segments corresponding to the septum and free wall at the basal, equatorial and apical regions of this chamber.

  5. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy and neonatal hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, L; Masson, P; Millet, V; Simeoni, U

    2004-10-01

    Cushing's syndrome is rare in pregnancy but can cause spontaneous abortion, stillbirth or premature birth. We report a case of transient hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in a newborn whose mother had hypercortisolism due to a primary adrenal lesion. There was no family history of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy. Follow-up revealed complete resolution of the cardiac abnormalities in the infant. Cushing's syndrome in the mother resolved after delivery. Although maternal hypercortisolism seldom results in symptomatic hypercortisolism in the newborn, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy can occur.

  6. Assessment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by ECG gated cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Kazuhide; Tanaka, Chujiro; Oku, Hisao

    1981-01-01

    The applicability of ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) in 12 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was examined. Six of the 12 patients had hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, including one patient with mid-ventricular obstruction. Three of the 12 patients had hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy, and three had apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was confirmed by the angiocardiogram in all patients. Cardiac CT was performed after intravenous administration of contrast media usually given as a bolus injection. The gantry was set with positive 20 0 tilt angle. In all patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy except for mid-ventricular obstruction, the hypertrophied interventricular septum in the basal and mid portions was observed, and the left ventricular cavity was narrowed in systole. In a patient with mid-ventricular obstruction, the marked hypertrophied interventricular septum and antero-lateral papillary muscle were observed. In diastole, the left ventricular cavity was narrow and divided into two parts. The apical cavity was completely disappeared in systole. In all patients with hypertrophic non-obstructive cardiomyopathy, the diffuse hypertrophied interventricular septum was observed in diastole. In systole, the apical portion of the left ventricular cavity was markedly narrow and antero-lateral papillary muscle was hypertrophic. In all patients with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the marked apical hypertrophy of the left ventricular wall was observed in diastole. It is concluded that ECG gated cardiac CT could estimate myocardial wall motion and thickness and differentiate the types of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy each other. (author)

  7. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Tassi, Eduardo Marinho

    2007-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  8. Histologic characterization of canine dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidholm, A; Jönsson, L

    2005-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by chamber dilatation and myocardial systolic and diastolic dysfunction, is one of the most common heart diseases in dogs. The clinical diagnosis is based on findings on echocardiographic and Doppler examinations, with the active exclusion of other acquired or congenital heart diseases. However, the echocardiographic criteria for the diagnosis of DCM are not wholly specific for the disease, and histologic examination may be necessary for final diagnosis. Review of reports on histologic findings in dogs with clinically diagnosed DCM reveals two histologically distinct forms of DCM: 1) cardiomyopathy of Boxers and Doberman Pinschers, corresponding to the "fatty infiltration-degenerative" type and 2) the form seen in many giant, large-, and medium-sized breeds, including some Boxers and Doberman Pinschers, classified as the "attenuated wavy fiber" type of DCM. The histologic changes of the attenuated wavy fiber type of DCM may precede clinical and echocardiographic signs of heart disease, thus indicating an early stage of DCM.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichida, Fukiko; Hamamichi, Yuuji; Hashimoto, Ikuo; Tsubata, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Ayumi; Okada, Toshio; Futatsuya, Ryuusuke; Okada, Eikichi

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomical diagnosis and tissue characterization, 8 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied comparing with echocardiography and 201 Tl myocardial imaging. The severity and distribution of hypertrophy were comparable on echocardiography and MRI. MRI was superior to echocardiography to demonstrate the apical hypertrophy. In 4 patients with severe hypertrophy, heterogenous high signal intensity was demonstrated in the site of hypertrophy, which was enhanced by T 2 weighted imaging. In the patient with decreased cardiac performance and progressed cardiac failure, the heterogeneity and high signal intensity progressed in one year interval. Simultaneously performed 201 Tl myocardial imaging showed patchy perfusion defect. Histological findings of the left ventricle demonstrated hypertrophy, degeneration and marked dysarray of the myocytes and fibrosis. MRI has the potential ability for the evaluation and sequential monitoring of myocardial tissue characterization as well as cardiac anatomy in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichida, Fukiko; Hamamichi, Yuuji; Hashimoto, Ikuo; Tsubata, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Ayumi; Okada, Toshio; Futatsuya, Ryuusuke; Okada, Eikichi [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)

    1994-02-01

    To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomical diagnosis and tissue characterization, 8 children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were studied comparing with echocardiography and [sup 201]Tl myocardial imaging. The severity and distribution of hypertrophy were comparable on echocardiography and MRI. MRI was superior to echocardiography to demonstrate the apical hypertrophy. In 4 patients with severe hypertrophy, heterogenous high signal intensity was demonstrated in the site of hypertrophy, which was enhanced by T[sub 2] weighted imaging. In the patient with decreased cardiac performance and progressed cardiac failure, the heterogeneity and high signal intensity progressed in one year interval. Simultaneously performed [sup 201]Tl myocardial imaging showed patchy perfusion defect. Histological findings of the left ventricle demonstrated hypertrophy, degeneration and marked dysarray of the myocytes and fibrosis. MRI has the potential ability for the evaluation and sequential monitoring of myocardial tissue characterization as well as cardiac anatomy in childhood hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author).

  11. Tried and true: self-regulation theory as a guiding framework for teaching parents diabetes education using human patient simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Johnson, Kimberly; Cullen, Karen; Hamm, Terry; Bisordi, Jean; Blaney, Kathleen; Maguire, Laura; Melkus, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Parents become emotionally upset when learning that their child has type 1 diabetes, yet they are expected to quickly learn functional diabetes management. The purpose of this article is to describe the application of self-regulation theory to guide a family-focused education intervention using human patient simulation to enhance the initial education of parents in diabetes management. A brief description is provided of the intervention framed by self-regulation theory. On the basis of the literature, we describe the educational vignettes used based on self-regulation in the randomized controlled trial entitled "Parent Education Through Simulation-Diabetes." Examples of theory-in-practice will be illustrated by parental learning responses to this alternative educational innovation.

  12. Ultrastructural myocardial changes in seven cats with spontaneous hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Prats Gavalda, Clara; Hyttel, Poul

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heart disease in cats and shares clinical and pathological characteristics with human HCM. Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms underlying development of spontaneous feline HCM. ANIMALS: The study population consisted...... of seven cats diagnosed with HCM and eight age-matched cats with no evidence of cardiac disease. METHODS: Fresh myocardial biopsies taken from the middle of the left ventricular posterior free wall were obtained and examined with transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: Electron microscopic examination...... showed ultrastructural aberrations of the myocardial cytoarchitecture and of the interstitium in the seven cats with HCM. In the most severely affected cats the myofibrils were disorganized and subsarcolemmal mitochondria were depleted. In control cats, contraction band artifacts were commonly seen...

  13. Activin a is associated with impaired myocardial glucose metabolism and left ventricular remodeling in patients with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Weena J. Y.; Greulich, Sabrina; van der Meer, Rutger W.; Rijzewijk, Luuk J.; Lamb, Hildo J.; de Roos, Albert; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Ruige, Johannes B.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Lubberink, Mark; Diamant, Michaela; Ouwens, D. Margriet

    2013-01-01

    Activin A released from epicardial adipose tissue has been linked to contractile dysfunction and insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes. This study investigated the role of activin A in clinical diabetic cardiomyopathy by assessing whether circulating activin A levels associate with cardiometabolic

  14. Immuno-chemistry of hydroxyl radical modified GAD-65: A possible role in experimental and human diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinuddin; Ansari, Nadeem A; Shahab, Uzma; Habeeb, Safia; Ahmad, Saheem

    2015-10-01

    The repertoire of known auto-antigens is limited to a very small proportion of all human proteins, and the reason why only some proteins become auto-antigens is unclear. The 65 kDa isoform of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-65) is a major auto-antigen in type I diabetes, and in various neurological diseases. Most patients with type I diabetes (70-80%) have auto-antibodies against GAD-65, which often appear years before clinical onset of the autoimmune diabetes. Thus, the aim of the study is to focus on the immunogenicity of GAD65 and its reactive oxygen species (ROS) conformer in STZ-induced diabetic rats and on human diabetic patients. In the present study, GAD-65 was modified by hydroxyl radical following Fenton's reaction. The modifications in the structure of the GAD-65 are supported by UV-vis and fluorescence spectral studies. Immunogenicity of both native and hydroxyl radical modified GAD-65 (ROS-GAD-65) was studied in experimental rabbits and was confirmed by inducing type I diabetes in experimental male albino rats using streptozotocin (45 mg/kg). We found that ROS-GAD-65 was a better immunogen as compared to the native GAD-65. A considerable high binding to ROS-GAD-65 was observed as compared to native GAD-65 in both the serum antibodies from diabetes animal models and as well as in the serum samples of type I diabetes. Hydrogen peroxide under the exposure of UV light produces hydroxyl radical (·OH) which is most potent oxidant, and could cause protein damage (GAD-65) to the extent of generating neo-epitopes on the molecule, thus making it immunogenic. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Treating fat grafts with human endothelial progenitor cells promotes their vascularization and improves their survival in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Saher; Ben-Nun, Ohad; Egozi, Dana; Keren, Aviad; Malyarova, Nastya; Kruchevsky, Danny; Gilhar, Amos; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2012-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells are required for vascularization of a fat graft to form a functional microvasculature within the graft and to facilitate its integration into the surrounding tissues. Organ transplantation carries a high risk of graft loss and rejection in patients with diabetes mellitus because endothelial progenitor cell function is impaired. The authors investigated the influence of endothelial progenitor cell treatment on the phenotype and survival of human fat grafts in immunocompromised mice with experimentally induced diabetes mellitus. The authors injected 1 ml of human fat tissue into the scalps of 14 nondiabetic and 28 diabetic immunocompromised mice, and then treated some of the grafts with endothelial progenitor cells that was isolated from the blood of a human donor. The phenotype of the endothelial progenitor cell-treated fat grafts from the 14 diabetic mice was compared with that of the untreated fat grafts from 14 nondiabetic and 14 diabetic mice, 18 days and 15 weeks after fat transplantation. Determination of graft phenotype included measurements of weight and volume, vascular endothelial growth factor levels, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and caspase 3 expression levels, and histologic analysis of the extent of vascularization. The untreated grafts from the diabetic mice were fully resorbed 15 weeks after fat transplantation. The phenotype of endothelial progenitor cell-treated fat grafts from the diabetic mice was similar to that of the untreated fat grafts from the nondiabetic mice. Endothelial progenitor cell treatment of transplanted fat can increase the survival of a fat graft by inducing its vascularization and decreasing the extent of apoptosis.

  16. Disentangling type 2 diabetes and metformin treatment signatures in the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Nielsen, Trine; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Prifti, Edi; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Pedersen, Helle K; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Kristiansen, Karsten; Voigt, Anita Yvonne; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hercog, Rajna; Costea, Paul Igor; Kultima, Jens Roat; Li, Junhua; Jørgensen, Torben; Levenez, Florence; Dore, Joël; Nielsen, H Bjørn; Brunak, Søren; Raes, Jeroen; Hansen, Torben; Wang, Jun; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Bork, Peer; Pedersen, Oluf

    2015-12-10

    In recent years, several associations between common chronic human disorders and altered gut microbiome composition and function have been reported. In most of these reports, treatment regimens were not controlled for and conclusions could thus be confounded by the effects of various drugs on the microbiota, which may obscure microbial causes, protective factors or diagnostically relevant signals. Our study addresses disease and drug signatures in the human gut microbiome of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Two previous quantitative gut metagenomics studies of T2D patients that were unstratified for treatment yielded divergent conclusions regarding its associated gut microbial dysbiosis. Here we show, using 784 available human gut metagenomes, how antidiabetic medication confounds these results, and analyse in detail the effects of the most widely used antidiabetic drug metformin. We provide support for microbial mediation of the therapeutic effects of metformin through short-chain fatty acid production, as well as for potential microbiota-mediated mechanisms behind known intestinal adverse effects in the form of a relative increase in abundance of Escherichia species. Controlling for metformin treatment, we report a unified signature of gut microbiome shifts in T2D with a depletion of butyrate-producing taxa. These in turn cause functional microbiome shifts, in part alleviated by metformin-induced changes. Overall, the present study emphasizes the need to disentangle gut microbiota signatures of specific human diseases from those of medication.

  17. Chronic oral exposure to the aldehyde pollutant acrolein induces dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismahil, Mohamed Ameen; Hamid, Tariq; Haberzettl, Petra; Gu, Yan; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2011-01-01

    Environmental triggers of dilated cardiomyopathy are poorly understood. Acute exposure to acrolein, a ubiquitous aldehyde pollutant, impairs cardiac function and cardioprotective responses in mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that chronic oral exposure to acrolein induces inflammation and cardiomyopathy. C57BL/6 mice were gavage-fed acrolein (1 mg/kg) or water (vehicle) daily for 48 days. The dose was chosen based on estimates of human daily unsaturated aldehyde consumption. Compared with vehicle-fed mice, acrolein-fed mice exhibited significant (P acrolein adduct formation indicative of physical translocation of ingested acrolein to the heart. Acrolein also induced myocyte hypertrophy (∼2.2-fold increased myocyte area, P acrolein-exposed hearts, along with upregulated gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Long-term oral exposure to acrolein, at an amount within the range of human unsaturated aldehyde intake, induces a phenotype of dilated cardiomyopathy in the mouse. Human exposure to acrolein may have analogous effects and raise consideration of an environmental, aldehyde-mediated basis for heart failure. PMID:21908791

  18. Weight loss efficacy of a novel mobile Diabetes Prevention Program delivery platform with human coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Andreas; Raby, Christine; Wood, Meghan; Farr, Kit

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the weight loss efficacy of a novel mobile platform delivering the Diabetes Prevention Program. Research Design and Methods 43 overweight or obese adult participants with a diagnosis of prediabetes signed-up to receive a 24-week virtual Diabetes Prevention Program with human coaching, through a mobile platform. Weight loss and engagement were the main outcomes, evaluated by repeated measures analysis of variance, backward regression, and mediation regression. Results Weight loss at 16 and 24 weeks was significant, with 56% of starters and 64% of completers losing over 5% body weight. Mean weight loss at 24 weeks was 6.58% in starters and 7.5% in completers. Participants were highly engaged, with 84% of the sample completing 9 lessons or more. In-app actions related to self-monitoring significantly predicted weight loss. Conclusions Our findings support the effectiveness of a uniquely mobile prediabetes intervention, producing weight loss comparable to studies with high engagement, with potential for scalable population health management. PMID:27651911

  19. Type 1 diabetes: Through the lens of human genome and metagenome interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Moghaddas Sani, Hakimeh; Rahbar Saadat, Yalda; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Omidi, Yadollah

    2018-05-15

    Diabetes is a genetic- and epigenetic-related disease from which a large population worldwide suffers. Some genetic factors along with various mutations related to the immune system for disease mechanism(s) have contrastively been determined. However, sometimes mechanisms have not been fully managed for the clarification of the initiation and/or progression of diseases to help patients. In the recent years, due to familiarity with the role of gut microbiota in the health, it has been found that the changes of the microbial balance in the industrialized societies can cause a battery of modern diseases, for which we have no specific definition of how they emerge. This work aims to explore the relationship between the human gut microbiota and the immune system along with their possible role in avoiding/emerging of type 1 diabetes (T1D) accompanied with the relation between genome and metagenome and their imbalance in causing T1D. Moreover, it provides novel view on how to balance the intestinal microbiota by lifestyle to hinder the mechanisms leading to T1D. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. 64,000-Mr autoantigen in type I diabetes. Evidence against its surface location on human islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colman, P.G.; Campbell, I.L.; Kay, T.W.; Harrison, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The sera of type I (insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects are reported to contain autoantibodies against a 64,000-Mr protein identified in [ 35 S]methionine biosynthetically labeled pancreatic islet cells. We have attempted to localize this autoantigen to the surface of the beta-cell and to define its properties. Sera from 10 newly diagnosed type I diabetic subjects, including five of the index sera originally used to identify the autoantigen, were shown to specifically precipitate a reduced protein of 67,000 Mr from Triton-solubilized, surface 125 I-labeled cultured adult human islet and rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells but not from fresh rat spleen cells. Further characterization revealed that this protein was bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed to cells from fetal calf serum (FCS)-supplemented culture medium and precipitated by BSA antibodies present in many diabetic sera. No labeled proteins were specifically precipitated when surface 125 I-labeled and solubilized human islet or RINm5F cells were precleared with anti-BSA immunoglobulins or when cells were first cultured in human serum. In contrast, a 64,000-Mr protein, clearly not BSA, was precipitated by diabetic globulins from human islets but not from RINm5F cells labeled with [ 35 S]methionine. In addition, a protein of the same size as well as proteins of approximately 35,000, 43,000, 140,000, and 200,000 Mr were specifically precipitated by diabetic globulins from freshly isolated human islets solubilized in Triton X-100 and then labeled with 125 I. These findings suggest that the 64,000-Mr antigen is not expressed on the surface of human islet cells, at least in culture, and therefore question its relevance as a target for islet cell surface antibodies in initiating beta-cell damage

  1. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong, E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Zhang, Yongkang [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Jain, Sumit [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Skidgel, Randal A. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Prabhakar, Bellur S. [Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Mazzone, Theodore [Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Holterman, Mark J. [Department of Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  2. Reduced insulin exocytosis in human pancreatic β-cells with gene variants linked to type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosengren, Anders H; Braun, Matthias; Mahdi, Taman

    2012-01-01

    The majority of genetic risk variants for type 2 diabetes (T2D) affect insulin secretion, but the mechanisms through which they influence pancreatic islet function remain largely unknown. We functionally characterized human islets to determine secretory, biophysical, and ultrastructural features ...

  3. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a snake bite victim: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurs in patients with severe emotional or physiologic stress. The prognosis is usually favorable, and the left ventricular wall motion dyskinesis normalizes within days to weeks. In this paper we report a case of snake bite complicated by takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We advise physicians to ...

  4. The Effect of Diabetes-Associated Autoantigens on Cell Processes in Human PBMCs and Their Relevance to Autoimmune Diabetes Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Včeláková, J.; Blatný, R.; Halbhuber, Z.; Kolář, Michal; Neuwirth, Aleš; Petruželková, L.; Ulmannová, T.; Koloušková, S.; Sumnik, Z.; Pithová, P.; Krivjanská, M.; Filipp, Dominik; Štechová, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, May (2013), s. 589451 ISSN 2314-6745 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06019 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : type 1 diabetes * autoimmune disease * Th17 * TGF-beta Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Study of retinal neurodegeneration and maculopathy in diabetic Meriones shawi: A particular animal model with human-like macula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoum, Imane; Benlarbi, Maha; Dellaa, Ahmed; Szabó, Klaudia; Dékány, Bulcsú; Csaba, Dávid; Almási, Zsuzsanna; Hajdú, Rozina I; Azaiz, Rached; Charfeddine, Ridha; Lukáts, Ákos; Ben Chaouacha-Chekir, Rafika

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate a potentially useful animal model, Meriones shawi (M.sh)-developing metabolic X syndrome, diabetes and possessing a visual streak similar to human macula-in the study of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema (DME). Type 2 diabetes (T2D) was induced by high fat diet administration in M.sh. Body weights, blood glucose levels were monitored throughout the study. Diabetic retinal histopathology was evaluated 3 and 7 months after diabetes induction. Retinal thickness was measured, retinal cell types were labeled by immunohistochemistry and the number of stained elements were quantified. Apoptosis was determined with TUNEL assay. T2D induced progressive changes in retinal histology. A significant decrease of retinal thickness and glial reactivity was observed without an increase in apoptosis rate. Photoreceptor outer segment degeneration was evident, with a significant decrease in the number of all cones and M-cone subtype, but-surprisingly-an increase in S-cones. Damage of the pigment epithelium was also confirmed. A decrease in the number and labeling intensity of parvalbumin- and calretinin-positive amacrine cells and a loss of ganglion cells was detected. Other cell types showed no evident alterations. No DME-like condition was noticed even after 7 months. M.sh could be a useful model to study the evolution of diabetic retinal pathology and to identify the role of hypertension and dyslipidemia in the development of the reported alterations. Longer follow up would be needed to evaluate the potential use of the visual streak in modeling human macular diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Contribution of Post-translational Phosphorylation to Sarcomere-linked Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret V Westfall

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary shifts develop in post-translational phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins in multi¬ple animal models of inherited cardiomyopathy. These signaling alterations together with the primary mutation are predicted to contribute to the overall cardiac phenotype. As a result, identification and integration of post-translational myofilament signaling responses are identified as priorities for gaining insights into sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. However, significant questions remain about the nature and contribution of post-translational phosphorylation to structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in animal models and human patients. This perspective essay discusses specific goals for filling critical gaps about post-translational signaling in response to these inherited mutations, especially within sarcomeric proteins. The discussion focuses primarily on pre-clinical analysis of animal models and defines challenges and future directions in this field.

  7. Females Are Protected From Iron-Overload Cardiomyopathy Independent of Iron Metabolism: Key Role of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhash K; Patel, Vaibhav B; Basu, Ratnadeep; Wang, Wang; DesAulniers, Jessica; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2017-01-23

    Sex-related differences in cardiac function and iron metabolism exist in humans and experimental animals. Male patients and preclinical animal models are more susceptible to cardiomyopathies and heart failure. However, whether similar differences are seen in iron-overload cardiomyopathy is poorly understood. Male and female wild-type and hemojuvelin-null mice were injected and fed with a high-iron diet, respectively, to develop secondary iron overload and genetic hemochromatosis. Female mice were completely protected from iron-overload cardiomyopathy, whereas iron overload resulted in marked diastolic dysfunction in male iron-overloaded mice based on echocardiographic and invasive pressure-volume analyses. Female mice demonstrated a marked suppression of iron-mediated oxidative stress and a lack of myocardial fibrosis despite an equivalent degree of myocardial iron deposition. Ovariectomized female mice with iron overload exhibited essential pathophysiological features of iron-overload cardiomyopathy showing distinct diastolic and systolic dysfunction, severe myocardial fibrosis, increased myocardial oxidative stress, and increased expression of cardiac disease markers. Ovariectomy prevented iron-induced upregulation of ferritin, decreased myocardial SERCA2a levels, and increased NCX1 levels. 17β-Estradiol therapy rescued the iron-overload cardiomyopathy in male wild-type mice. The responses in wild-type and hemojuvelin-null female mice were remarkably similar, highlighting a conserved mechanism of sex-dependent protection from iron-overload-mediated cardiac injury. Male and female mice respond differently to iron-overload-mediated effects on heart structure and function, and females are markedly protected from iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Ovariectomy in female mice exacerbated iron-induced myocardial injury and precipitated severe cardiac dysfunction during iron-overload conditions, whereas 17β-estradiol therapy was protective in male iron-overloaded mice.

  8. Cushing’s Disease Presented by Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna İmge Aydoğan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is rarely reported among CS patients especially without hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. Materials and Methods. We hereby report a Cushing’s syndrome case presenting with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results. A 48-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with severe proximal myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy without ventricular hypertrophy. Cushing’s disease was diagnosed and magnetic-resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed a microadenoma. Under diuretic and ketoconazole treatments, she underwent a successful transnasal/transsphenoidal adenomectomy procedure. Full recovery of symptoms and echocardiographic features was achieved after six months of surgery. Conclusion. Cushing’s syndrome must be kept in mind as a reversible cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recovery of cardiomyopathy is achieved with successful surgery.

  9. Radiology and pathology correlation in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varzeshi, Neda; Hansen, Mark; Rezaee, Amir; Slaughter, Richard; Dixon, Natalie; Duhig, Edwina

    2012-01-01

    Infiltrative cardiomyopathies generally pose a diagnostic dilemma as current diagnostic tools are imprecise. Invasive endomyocardial biopsy is considered as the gold standard however it has some limitations. Recently cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is emerging as an excellent technique in diagnosing infiltrative cardiomyopathies and is increasingly being used. Characteristic pathologic and radiologic findings in most common infiltrative cardiomyopathies (amyloid, sarcoid and Fabry's) are discussed and correlated with relative CMR and histologic examples. There is fairly good correlation between the non-invasive radiologic and the invasive histologic findings in common infiltrative cardiomyopathies. Non-invasive CMR with its high sensitivity and specificity has an excellent role in establishing the diagnosis and improving the prognosis of common infiltrative cardiomyopathies.

  10. Effect of genetic variation in a Drosophila model of diabetes-associated misfolded human proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin Z; Ludwig, Michael Z; Dickerson, Desiree A; Barse, Levi; Arun, Bharath; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Jiang, Pengyao; Park, Soo-Young; Tamarina, Natalia A; Selleck, Scott B; Wittkopp, Patricia J; Bell, Graeme I; Kreitman, Martin

    2014-02-01

    The identification and validation of gene-gene interactions is a major challenge in human studies. Here, we explore an approach for studying epistasis in humans using a Drosophila melanogaster model of neonatal diabetes mellitus. Expression of the mutant preproinsulin (hINS(C96Y)) in the eye imaginal disc mimics the human disease: it activates conserved stress-response pathways and leads to cell death (reduction in eye area). Dominant-acting variants in wild-derived inbred lines from the Drosophila Genetics Reference Panel produce a continuous, highly heritable distribution of eye-degeneration phenotypes in a hINS(C96Y) background. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 154 sequenced lines identified a sharp peak on chromosome 3L, which mapped to a 400-bp linkage block within an intron of the gene sulfateless (sfl). RNAi knockdown of sfl enhanced the eye-degeneration phenotype in a mutant-hINS-dependent manner. RNAi against two additional genes in the heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthetic pathway (ttv and botv), in which sfl acts, also modified the eye phenotype in a hINS(C96Y)-dependent manner, strongly suggesting a novel link between HS-modified proteins and cellular responses to misfolded proteins. Finally, we evaluated allele-specific expression difference between the two major sfl-intronic haplotypes in heterozygtes. The results showed significant heterogeneity in marker-associated gene expression, thereby leaving the causal mutation(s) and its mechanism unidentified. In conclusion, the ability to create a model of human genetic disease, map a QTL by GWAS to a specific gene, and validate its contribution to disease with available genetic resources and the potential to experimentally link the variant to a molecular mechanism demonstrate the many advantages Drosophila holds in determining the genetic underpinnings of human disease.

  11. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Thyrotoxicosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Eliades, Myrto; El-Maouche, Diala; Choudhary, Chitra; Zinsmeister, Bruce; Burman, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Takotsubo or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is a form of reversible cardiomyopathy commonly associated with emotional or physical stress. Thyrotoxicosis has been identified as a rare cause of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, with only 12 cases reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of thyroid storm presenting with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of Graves' disease.

  12. Influence of diabetes mellitus on heart failure risk and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Belle Eric

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our aim is to summarize and discuss the recent literature linking diabetes mellitus with heart failure, and to address the issue of the optimal treatment for diabetic patients with heart failure. The studies linking diabetes mellitus (DM with heart failure (HF The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in heart failure populations is close to 20% compared with 4 to 6% in control populations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increased risk of heart failure in diabetics; moreover, in diabetic populations, poor glycemic control has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Various mechanisms may link diabetes mellitus to heart failure: firstly, associated comorbidities such as hypertension may play a role; secondly, diabetes accelerates the development of coronary atherosclerosis; thirdly, experimental and clinical studies support the existence of a specific diabetic cardiomyopathy related to microangiopathy, metabolic factors or myocardial fibrosis. Subgroup analyses of randomized trials demonstrate that diabetes is also an important prognostic factor in heart failure. In addition, it has been suggested that the deleterious impact of diabetes may be especially marked in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment of heart failure in diabetic patients The knowledge of the diabetic status may help to define the optimal therapeutic strategy for heart failure patients. Cornerstone treatments such as ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers appear to be uniformly beneficial in diabetic and non diabetic populations. However, in ischemic cardiomyopathy, the choice of the revascularization technique may differ according to diabetic status. Finally, clinical studies are needed to determine whether improved metabolic control might favorably influence the outcome of diabetic heart failure patients.

  13. Basal wall hypercontraction of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient who had been diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Noboru; Fujita, Shuichi; Kanzaki, Yumiko; Fujisaka, Tomohiro; Ozeki, Michishige; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2017-12-12

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is characterized by the basal hypercontractility and apical ballooning of the left ventriculum and T-wave inversion in the electrocardiogram. It has been suggested that Takotsubo cardiomyopathy might underlie the pathogenesis of persistent cardiac dysfunction; however, few reports are present demonstrating the advent of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy. A 64-year-old women was admitted due to dyspnea on effort and lower extremity edema. She had been diagnosed with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy 2.5 years before owing to the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (24%), normal coronary artery, and interstitial fibrosis of the myocardial samples. On admission, her electrocardiogram showed giant negative T wave in II, III, aVF, and precordial leads. Echocardiography showed dyskinesis of the left ventricular apex and hypercontraction of the basal wall, which had not been observed in the previous examinations. Coronary angiography showed normal coronary arteries, and apical ballooning and basal hypercontractility was confirmed by left ventriculography. On day 15 of admission, contraction of apical wall was recovered, and basal hypercontraction was disappeared. The present case is the first report demonstrating appearance the transient basal wall hypercontraction along with the advent of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy. Whether such findings are indicative of fair prognosis and have the utility of understanding the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy needs further investigation.

  14. Deferiprone attenuates inflammation and myocardial fibrosis in diabetic cardiomyopathy rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Chunbo; Liu, Xiaogang; Xie, Rujuan; Bao, Yushi; Jin, Qing; Jia, Xibei; Li, Li; Liu, Ruichan

    2017-01-01

    We attempted to investigate the therapeutic effects of deferiprone on DC rats and explore the underlying mechanism. Total 24 6-week-old male Wistar rats (weighing from 180 g to 220 g) were subjected to DC model construction and then randomly divided to three groups (8 rats per group): DC group, DC + 50 mg, and DC + 100 mg deferiprone treatment group. The 8 normal rats were considered as controls. After deferiprone treatment for 20 weeks, the blood samples were collected for the biochemical parameters test, including fasting glucose, HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment of the insulin resistance), serum iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation (TS). The oxidative stress was assessed by detecting the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Histopathologic changes were determined by Masson's trichrome staining and electron microscopy imaging. The expression levels of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B), COX2 (cytochrome c oxidase), tenascin C, collagen IV were measured by RT-PCR and western blotting. The expression of nitrotyrosine and MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1) were determined by immunohistochemistry. Deferiprone treatment reduced iron deposition and IR in DC rats except for blood glucose. After deferiprone treatment, MDA level was significantly decreased and SOD level was increased significantly. The level of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, tenascin C, collagen IV MCP-1 and nitrotyrosine were significantly reduced. There was no significant difference in the effect of deferiprone at 50 and 100 mg doses. Deferiprone showed therapeutic effects on DC by regulating the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic factors. - Highlights: • The expression of serum iron, ferritin and TS were elevated in DC rats. • Oxidative stress related MDA and SOD were upregulated in DC rats. • NF-κB, COX2, tenascin C, collagen IV were accumulated in DC rats. • All the changes were reversed by deferiprone treatment.

  15. Histopathologic Evolution of Cardiomyopathy in a Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia M.M. Malvestio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized for mutation in dystrophin gene and manifested by progressive degeneration and necrosis of skeletal and cardiac muscle with replacement leading to generalized muscular weakness and atrophy. The dog Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD is the best experimental model for DMD, with genotypic and phenotypic manifestations closely of human disease. Similar to patients with DMD, heart failure is a major cause of death in GRMD animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pathological progression of myocardial lesions from GRMD dogs in different ages in order to clarify the pathogenesis of Duchenne´s cardiomyopathy. Fragments of left and right ventricle and interventricular septum, from 18 GRMD dogs between 6 to 51 months were collected, fixed, dehydrated, clarified, and finally embedded in paraffin. Five micrometer thick serial sections were obtained and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE, Picrosirius red, and Von Kossa. Histological analyses were performed at the light microscopy. Myocardial lesions were observed in all GRMD dogs and the sequence of cardiac lesion classified according to according to the age included: abnormal calcium accumulation, myofibrillar necrosis, proliferation of granulation tissue, endomysial and perimysial fibrosis, and finally myocardial fatty infiltration. Interestingly, several Anitschkow cells, the hallmark of rheumatic carditis, were detected in inflammatory infiltrate present at granulation tissue. Our results demonstrate the sequence of cardiac lesions that determine the cardiomyopathy in Golden Retriever dogs affected by DMD and exhibit, for the first time, the Anitschkow cells in the histological findings of this cardiomyopathy. These results are relevant for to clarify the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in dogs and humans affected by DMD.

  16. Acylcarnitine Profiles in Plasma and Tissues of Hyperglycemic NZO Mice Correlate with Metabolite Changes of Human Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Weiser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The New Zealand obese (NZO mouse is a polygenic model for obesity and diabetes with obese females and obese, diabetes-prone males, used to study traits of the metabolic syndrome like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, obesity, and dyslipidaemia. By using LC-MS/MS, we here examine the suitability of this model to mirror tissue-specific changes in acylcarnitine (AC and amino acid (AA species preceding T2DM which may reflect patterns investigated in human metabolism. We observed high concentrations of fatty acid-derived ACs in 11 female mice, high abundance of branched-chain amino acid- (BCAA- derived ACs in 6 male mice, and slight increases in BCAA-derived ACs in the remaining 6 males. Principal component analysis (PCA including all ACs and AAs confirmed our hypothesis especially in plasma samples by clustering females, males with high BCAA-derived ACs, and males with slight increases in BCAA-derived ACs. Concentrations of insulin, blood glucose, NEFAs, and triacylglycerols (TAGs further supported the hypothesis of high BCAA-derived ACs being able to mirror the onset of diabetic traits in male individuals. In conclusion, alterations in AC and AA profiles overlap with observations from human studies indicating the suitability of NZO mice to study metabolic changes preceding human T2DM.

  17. Fabry Disease in Families With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adalsteinsdottir, Berglind; Palsson, Runolfur; Desnick, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The screening of Icelandic patients clinically diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy resulted in identification of 8 individuals from 2 families with X-linked Fabry disease (FD) caused by GLA(α-galactosidase A gene) mutations encoding p.D322E (family A) or p.I232T (family B...... asymmetrical, and had similar late gadolinium enhancement patterns. Ischemic stroke and severe white matter lesions were more frequent among family A men, but neither family A nor family B men had overt renal disease. Family A and family B heterozygotes had less severe or no clinical manifestations...

  18. Genetic complexity in a Drosophila model of diabetes-associated misfolded human proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Young; Ludwig, Michael Z; Tamarina, Natalia A; He, Bin Z; Carl, Sarah H; Dickerson, Desiree A; Barse, Levi; Arun, Bharath; Williams, Calvin L; Miles, Cecelia M; Philipson, Louis H; Steiner, Donald F; Bell, Graeme I; Kreitman, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been widely used as a model of human Mendelian disease, but its value in modeling complex disease has received little attention. Fly models of complex disease would enable high-resolution mapping of disease-modifying loci and the identification of novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe a fly model of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus and explore the complexity of this model. The approach involves the transgenic expression of a misfolded mutant of human preproinsulin, hINS(C96Y), which is a cause of permanent neonatal diabetes. When expressed in fly imaginal discs, hINS(C96Y) causes a reduction of adult structures, including the eye, wing, and notum. Eye imaginal discs exhibit defects in both the structure and the arrangement of ommatidia. In the wing, expression of hINS(C96Y) leads to ectopic expression of veins and mechano-sensory organs, indicating disruption of wild-type signaling processes regulating cell fates. These readily measurable "disease" phenotypes are sensitive to temperature, gene dose, and sex. Mutant (but not wild-type) proinsulin expression in the eye imaginal disc induces IRE1-mediated XBP1 alternative splicing, a signal for endoplasmic reticulum stress response activation, and produces global change in gene expression. Mutant hINS transgene tester strains, when crossed to stocks from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, produce F1 adults with a continuous range of disease phenotypes and large broad-sense heritability. Surprisingly, the severity of mutant hINS-induced disease in the eye is not correlated with that in the notum in these crosses, nor with eye reduction phenotypes caused by the expression of two dominant eye mutants acting in two different eye development pathways, Drop (Dr) or Lobe (L), when crossed into the same genetic backgrounds. The tissue specificity of genetic variability for mutant hINS-induced disease has, therefore, its own distinct signature. The genetic dominance

  19. Mouse-human experimental epigenetic analysis unmasks dietary targets and genetic liability for diabetic phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multhaup, Michael L.; Seldin, Marcus; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Lei, Xia; Kirchner, Henriette; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Rodriguez, Varenka; Drong, Alexander; Hussain, Mehboob; Lindgren, Cecilia; McCarthy, Mark; Näslund, Erik; Zierath, Juleen R.; Wong, G. William; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a functional approach to investigate the epigenetics of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), we combine three lines of evidence – diet-induced epigenetic dysregulation in mouse, epigenetic conservation in humans, and T2D clinical risk evidence – to identify genes implicated in T2D pathogenesis through epigenetic mechanisms related to obesity. Beginning with dietary manipulation of genetically homogeneous mice, we identify differentially DNA-methylated genomic regions. We then replicate these results in adipose samples from lean and obese patients pre- and post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, identifying regions where both the location and direction of methylation change is conserved. These regions overlap with 27 genetic T2D risk loci, only one of which was deemed significant by GWAS alone. Functional analysis of genes associated with these regions revealed four genes with roles in insulin resistance, demonstrating the potential general utility of this approach for complementing conventional human genetic studies by integrating cross-species epigenomics and clinical genetic risk. PMID:25565211

  20. Smart sensors and virtual physiology human approach as a basis of personalized therapies in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Peruchena, Carlos M; Prado-Velasco, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has a growing incidence and prevalence in modern societies, pushed by the aging and change of life styles. Despite the huge resources dedicated to improve their quality of life, mortality and morbidity rates, these are still very poor. In this work, DM pathology is revised from clinical and metabolic points of view, as well as mathematical models related to DM, with the aim of justifying an evolution of DM therapies towards the correction of the physiological metabolic loops involved. We analyze the reliability of mathematical models, under the perspective of virtual physiological human (VPH) initiatives, for generating and integrating customized knowledge about patients, which is needed for that evolution. Wearable smart sensors play a key role in this frame, as they provide patient's information to the models.A telehealthcare computational architecture based on distributed smart sensors (first processing layer) and personalized physiological mathematical models integrated in Human Physiological Images (HPI) computational components (second processing layer), is presented. This technology was designed for a renal disease telehealthcare in earlier works and promotes crossroads between smart sensors and the VPH initiative. We suggest that it is able to support a truly personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare model for the delivery of evolved DM therapies.

  1. Structural and biochemical alterations of human diabetic dermis studied by 3H-lysine incorporation and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moczar, M.; Allard, R.; Ouzilou, J.; Robert, L.; Pieraggi, M.-T.; Bouissou, H.; Julian, M.

    1976-01-01

    The alteration of the structural organization of dermal connective tissue was studied by light and electron microscopy and by biochemical techniques in normal human and in diabetic patients using skin biopsies. Part of the tissue was used for light and electron microscopy, the rest was incubated in the presence of 3 H-lysine for four hours. The 3 H-lysine labelled biopsies were submitted to a sequential extraction procedure in order to obtain representative macromolecular fractions containing the matrix macromolecules. The extracts were analyzed for their chemical composition and radioactivity. Electron microscopy revealed microstructural modifications of the fibroblasts, of the collagen and elastic fibers in the diabetic dermis. The incorporation pattern of 3 H-lysine into the macromolecular fractions was different in the normal and diabetic skin biopsies. The percentage of total radioactivity incorporated increased significantly in the 1M CaCl 2 extractable fraction and in the 6M urea extractable fraction and decreased significantly in the collagenase and elastase extracts in diabetic skin biopsy. These results demonstrate the existence of morphological and biochemical alterations in diabetic connective tissue (dermis) reflecting alterations in the relative rates of synthesis and/or degradation of the intercellular matrix macromolecules as well as of their microarchitectural arrangement

  2. Expression of β human chorionic gonadotropin in the placenta of gestational diabetic mothers: an immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Muhammed Erdal; Deveci, Engin; Evsen, Mehmet Siddik; Kalkanhi, Sevgi; Baran, Ozlem; Ozekinci, Selver; Seker, Uğur

    2013-02-01

    To investigate morphologic differences of the placenta in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes compared to nondiabetic pregnancies. This was a comparative morphological study of the placentas from 20 women with gestational diabetes and 20 healthy pregnancies at 28-35 weeks of gestation. The presence of lesions such as fibrinoid necrosis, villous edema, syncytial knot and vascular lesions like chorangiosis was apparent, mainly in the diabetes group. There was an apparent decrease in the intensity of the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) immunostaining in the syncytiotrophoblast from the 28th to 35th weeks of gestation in the placentas of the healthy control group. No hCG immunostaining was observed in the villous or intervillous areas of any of the placentas. In diabetic placentas the expression of hCG was homogeneous with a moderate to intense immunoreactivity in the syncytiotrophoblast. Several syncytiotrophoblast cells showed dilations of both rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and loss and alteration of microvilli, and large vacuoles were observed just below the plasma membrane, as well as irregularities in the mitochondria. Syncytial cells play an important role in the placental transition. Increased expression of beta-hCG, deterioration, degeneration of organelles and cell structure and the basal membrane disorder in chorionic vessels were seen in placentas with gestational diabetes. These changes can affect placental transfer. However, further studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  3. Pathology of Human Coronary and Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis and Vascular Calcification in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Kolodgie, Frank D; Lutter, Christoph; Mori, Hiroyoshi; Romero, Maria E; Finn, Aloke V; Virmani, Renu

    2017-02-01

    The continuing increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the general population is predicted to result in a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated progression of atherosclerosis are not fully understood, at clinical and pathological levels, there is an appreciation of increased disease burden and higher levels of arterial calcification in these subjects. Plaques within the coronary arteries of patients with diabetes mellitus generally exhibit larger necrotic cores and significantly greater inflammation consisting mainly of macrophages and T lymphocytes relative to patients without diabetes mellitus. Moreover, there is a higher incidence of healed plaque ruptures and positive remodeling in hearts from subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting a more active atherogenic process. Lesion calcification in the coronary, carotid, and other arterial beds is also more extensive. Although the role of coronary artery calcification in identifying cardiovascular disease and predicting its outcome is undeniable, our understanding of how key hormonal and physiological alterations associated with diabetes mellitus such as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia influence the process of vascular calcification continues to grow. Important drivers of atherosclerotic calcification in diabetes mellitus include oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in mineral metabolism, increased inflammatory cytokine production, and release of osteoprogenitor cells from the marrow into the circulation. Our review will focus on the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus- and type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated vascular disease with particular focus on coronary and carotid atherosclerotic calcification. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dnm1l leads to cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Ashrafian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease.

  5. Characterization of phosphorus metabolism in dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffermann, W.; Chew, W.; Tavares, N.J.; Donnelly, T.; Parmley, W.W.; Chatterjee, K.; Wolfe, C.; Higgins, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Five patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (ejection fraction, ∼25%) and six normal volunteers were studied with localized, gated P-31 MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T. The typical peaks of adenogine triphosphate (ATP[, phosphocreatine (PCr), phosphodiesters (PD), and peaks attributable to 2,3 diphosphoglycerate, inorganic phosphate, and phosphomonoesters were identified and the areas under each peak numerically integrated after baseline correction. PCr/β-ATP was not significantly lower (1.42 +- 0.06 vs 1.54 +- 0.04), but PD/PCr (1.1 +- 0.02 vs 0.6 +- 0.1) (P ≤ .01) and PD/β-ATP (1.50 +- 0.04 vs 0.97 +- 0.17) (P ≤ .05) were significantly higher in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy compared with normal volunteers. Thus, localized, gated P-31 MR spectroscopy in cardiomyopathic patients identifies abnormal myocardial phosphorus metabolism, which might become useful to monitor noninvasively the response to positive inotropic therapy

  6. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Parvari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  7. Dilated congestive cardiomyopathy in Doberman pinschers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvert, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy of Doberman Pinschers (DCDP) is a progressive disease often presenting with a history of episodic weakness and syncope, or with clinical signs of predominantly left-sided congestive heart failure. A systematic dissection and histomorphologic evaluation of the heart from 32 Doberman Pinschers with a clinical diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy revealed a highly specific location for the characteristic myocardial lesions. The lesions of DCDP were found only in the left ventricular free wall, and in 30 cases, the lesions were characterized by myofiber degeneration and atrophy, and replacement of myocardium by dense bundles of collagen and clusters of adipocytes. In the two remaining hearts, myofiber atrophy and degeneration were accompanied by collagen deposition, but not adipocytes. In stained longitudinal (base to apex) tissue sections of the left ventricle, the lesions of DCDP were usually apparent to the unaided eye; appearing as a central linear pale zone, aligned in the long axis of the ventricular free wall. The lesions did not contain inflammatory cell infiltrates and often involved >50% of ventricular wall

  8. A novel Dock8 gene mutation confers diabetogenic susceptibility in the LEW.1AR1/Ztm-iddm rat, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, Tanja; Wedekind, Dirk; Jörns, Anne; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Cuppen, Edwin; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes, arose through a spontaneous mutation within the inbred strain LEW.1AR1. A susceptibility locus (Iddm8) on rat chromosome 1 (RNO1) has been identified previously, which is accompanied by autoimmune diabetes and the

  9. A human gut phage catalog correlates the gut phageome with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingfei; You, Xiaoyan; Mai, Guoqin; Tokuyasu, Taku; Liu, Chenli

    2018-02-01

    Substantial efforts have been made to link the gut bacterial community to many complex human diseases. Nevertheless, the gut phages are often neglected. In this study, we used multiple bioinformatic methods to catalog gut phages from whole-community metagenomic sequencing data of fecal samples collected from both type II diabetes (T2D) patients (n = 71) and normal Chinese adults (n = 74). The definition of phage operational taxonomic units (pOTUs) and identification of large phage scaffolds (n = 2567, ≥ 10 k) revealed a comprehensive human gut phageome with a substantial number of novel sequences encoding genes that were unrelated to those in known phages. Interestingly, we observed a significant increase in the number of gut phages in the T2D group and, in particular, identified 7 pOTUs specific to T2D. This finding was further validated in an independent dataset of 116 T2D and 109 control samples. Co-occurrence/exclusion analysis of the bacterial genera and pOTUs identified a complex core interaction between bacteria and phages in the human gut ecosystem, suggesting that the significant alterations of the gut phageome cannot be explained simply by co-variation with the altered bacterial hosts. Alterations in the gut bacterial community have been linked to the chronic disease T2D, but the role of gut phages therein is not well understood. This is the first study to identify a T2D-specific gut phageome, indicating the existence of other mechanisms that might govern the gut phageome in T2D patients. These findings suggest the importance of the phageome in T2D risk, which warrants further investigation.

  10. Hormonal Responses to Cholinergic Input Are Different in Humans with and without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Peripheral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors regulate insulin and glucagon release in rodents but their importance for similar roles in humans is unclear. Bethanechol, an acetylcholine analogue that does not cross the blood-brain barrier, was used to examine the role of peripheral muscarinic signaling on glucose homeostasis in humans with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 10, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 11, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; n = 9. Subjects received four liquid meal tolerance tests, each with a different dose of oral bethanechol (0, 50, 100, or 150 mg given 60 min before a meal containing acetaminophen. Plasma pancreatic polypeptide (PP, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, glucose, glucagon, C-peptide, and acetaminophen concentrations were measured. Insulin secretion rates (ISRs were calculated from C-peptide levels. Acetaminophen and PP concentrations were surrogate markers for gastric emptying and cholinergic input to islets. The 150 mg dose of bethanechol increased the PP response 2-fold only in the IGT group, amplified GLP-1 release in the IGT and T2DM groups, and augmented the GIP response only in the NGT group. However, bethanechol did not alter ISRs or plasma glucose, glucagon, or acetaminophen concentrations in any group. Prior studies showed infusion of xenin-25, an intestinal peptide, delays gastric emptying and reduces GLP-1 release but not ISRs when normalized to plasma glucose levels. Analysis of archived plasma samples from this study showed xenin-25 amplified postprandial PP responses ~4-fold in subjects with NGT, IGT, and T2DM. Thus, increasing postprandial cholinergic input to islets augments insulin secretion in mice but not humans.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01434901.

  11. The Peri-islet Basement Membrane, a Barrier to Infiltrating Leukocytes in Type 1 Diabetes in Mouse and Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korpos, Eva; Kadri, Nadir; Kappelhoff, Reinhild

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first comprehensive analysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of peri-islet capsules, composed of the peri-islet basement membrane (BM) and subjacent interstitial matrix (IM), in development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice and in human type 1 diabetes. Our data demonstr...... IM are reconstituted once inflammation subsides, indicating that the peri-islet BM-producing cells are not lost due to the inflammation, which has important ramifications to islet transplantation studies.......We provide the first comprehensive analysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of peri-islet capsules, composed of the peri-islet basement membrane (BM) and subjacent interstitial matrix (IM), in development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice and in human type 1 diabetes. Our data...... demonstrate global loss of peri-islet BM and IM components only at sites of leukocyte infiltration into the islet. Stereological analyses reveal a correlation between incidence of insulitis and the number of islets showing loss of peri-islet BM versus islets with intact BMs, suggesting that leukocyte...

  12. Clinical Presentation and Natural History of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in RASopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagni, Giulio; Adorisio, Rachele; Martinelli, Simone; Grutter, Giorgia; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Drago, Fabrizio; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco; Marino, Bruno

    2018-04-01

    RASopathies are a heterogeneous group of genetic syndromes characterized by mutations in genes that regulate cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, survival, migration, and metabolism. Excluding congenital heart defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequent cardiovascular defect in patients affected by RASopathies. A worse outcome (in terms of surgical risk and/or mortality) has been described in a specific subset of Rasopathy patients with early onset, severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure. New short-term therapy with a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor has recently been used to prevent heart failure in these patients with a severe form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in Intensive Care Unit: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy has substantial prognostic implications in an intensive care unit, given its increased mortality risk and association with life-threatening complications. This report seeks to discuss diagnostic modalities that can be useful in accurately differentiating Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy from Acute Coronary Syndrome, and also briefly discuss prevention and management of this cardiomyopathy in an intensive care unit. For critically ill Takotsubo patients, intensive clinicians can consider establishment of diagnosis by specific electrocardiograph changes, distinctive marked release of cardiac enzymes, characteristic echocardiograph findings, as well as invasive coronary angiography or noninvasive cardiac magnetic imaging.

  14. Acute peritonitis as the first presentation of valvular cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, Nikki

    2012-02-01

    Valvular cardiomyopathy can present a diagnostic challenge in the absence of overt cardiac symptoms. This report describes the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute peritonitis associated with vomiting and abdominal distension. Subsequent abdominal computed tomography and ultrasound revealed bibasal pleural effusions, ascites, and normal ovaries. An echocardiogram revealed that all cardiac chambers were dilated with a global decrease in contractility and severe mitral, tricuspid, and aortic regurgitation. A diagnosis of cardiomyopathy with acute heart failure, secondary to valvular heart disease, was secured. Acute peritonitis as the presenting feature of valvular cardiomyopathy is a rare clinical entity.

  15. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Dilated cardiomyopathy and left bundle branch block associated with ingestion of colloidal gold and silver is reversed by British antiLewisite and vitamin E: The potential toxicity of metals used as health supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Stephen Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    A case of left bundle branch block and a dilated, nonhypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with ingestion of colloidal gold and silver as an ‘energy tonic’ is described. The cardiac disease was reversed within two months by a course of dimercaprol (Akorn Inc, USA) (British antiLewisite) and vitamin E. This is the first case of gold and silver cardiomyopathy in humans, and highlights the risks of these colloidal metal ‘health supplements’. PMID:18464946

  17. Hydrogen peroxide production is not primarily increased in human myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minet, A D; Gaster, M

    2011-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. To date, it is unknown whether increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes is prima......Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. To date, it is unknown whether increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes...

  18. Comparison of T wave alternans in patients with cardiomyopathy and healthy controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hira, A.; Khan, M. A.; Hayat, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare T wave alternans in patients with cardiomyopathy and healthy controls. Study Design: Cross-sectional comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Cardiac Electrophysiology, Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology Rawalpindi, from Feb 2016 to Aug 2016. Material and Methods: Sixty patients with cardiomyopathy (any type) along with sixty healthy controls of matched age and gender were recruited through non-probability purposive sampling. Patients with diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular accident, heart failure, bundle branch block, systemic arterial hypertension and ongoing antiarrhythmic therapy were excluded from the study. DMS 300-4L Holters were used to obtain ambulatory ECG recordings. Cardio Scan premier 12 lux software was used for analysis of T wave alternans. Results: Total one twenty subjects were enrolled in the study. Cardiomyopathic patients with positive T wave alternans were 13 (21.7 percent) out of 60, while only 4 (6.7 percent) out of 60 healthy controls demonstrated positive T wave alternans. There was significant variation in frequency of patients with positive T wave alternans as compared to healthy controls with p-value of 0.02. In cases the mean value of T wave alternans was 55.10 µv ± 33.58 while 39.45 µv ± 13.53 in controls. The difference in mean value of T wave alternans between cases and controls was significant with p-value of 0.001. Conclusion: The frequency of patients with cardiomyopathy having positive T wave alternans was significantly higher as compared to the healthy controls. (author)

  19. Distinct adiponectin profiles might contribute to differences in susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in dogs and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkest, K R; Rand, J S; Fleeman, L M; Morton, J M; Richards, A A; Rose, F J; Whitehead, J P

    2011-08-01

    Dogs develop obesity-associated insulin resistance but not type 2 diabetes mellitus. Low adiponectin is associated with progression to type 2 diabetes in obese humans. The aims of this study were to compare total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin and the ratio of HMW to total adiponectin (S(A)) between dogs and humans and to examine whether total or HMW adiponectin or both are associated with insulin resistance in naturally occurring obese dogs. We compared adiponectin profiles between 10 lean dogs and 10 lean humans and between 6 lean dogs and 6 age- and sex-matched, client-owned obese dogs. Total adiponectin was measured with assays validated in each species. We measured S(A) with velocity centrifugation on sucrose gradients. The effect of total and HMW adiponectin concentrations on MINMOD-estimated insulin sensitivity was assessed with linear regression. Lean dogs had total and HMW adiponectin concentrations three to four times higher than lean humans (total: dogs 32 ± 5.6 mg/L, humans 10 ± 1.3 mg/L, Pobese dogs (0.76 ± 0.05 in both groups; P=1). Total adiponectin, HMW adiponectin, and S(A) were not associated with insulin sensitivity in dogs. We propose that differences in adiponectin profiles between humans and dogs might contribute to the propensity of humans but not dogs to develop type 2 diabetes. Dogs with chronic, naturally occurring obesity do not have selectively reduced HMW adiponectin, and adiponectin does not appear to be important in the development of canine obesity-associated insulin resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic engineering and therapy for inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Sharlene; Davis, Jennifer; Westfall, Margaret; Metzger, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    The cardiac myofilaments consist of a highly ordered assembly of proteins that collectively generate force in a calcium-dependent manner. Defects in myofilament function and its regulation have been implicated in various forms of acquired and inherited human heart disease. For example, during cardiac ischemia, cardiac myocyte contractile performance is dramatically downregulated due in part to a reduced sensitivity of the myofilaments to calcium under acidic pH conditions. Over the last several years, the thin filament regulatory protein, troponin I, has been identified as an important mediator of this response. Mutations in troponin I and other sarcomere genes are also linked to several distinct inherited cardiomyopathic phenotypes, including hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive cardiomyopathies. With the cardiac sarcomere emerging as a central player for such a diverse array of human heart diseases, genetic-based strategies that target the myofilament will likely have broad therapeutic potential. The development of safe vector systems for efficient gene delivery will be a critical hurdle to overcome before these types of therapies can be successfully applied. Nonetheless, studies focusing on the principles of acute genetic engineering of the sarcomere hold value as they lay the essential foundation on which to build potential gene-based therapies for heart disease.

  1. Derivation of Insulin Producing Cells From Human Endometrial Stromal Stem Cells and Use in the Treatment of Murine Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Santamaria, Xavier; Massasa, Efi E; Feng, Yuzhe; Wolff, Erin; Taylor, Hugh S

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell transplantation is an effective approach to treat type 1 diabetes, however the shortage of cadaveric donors and limitations due to rejection require alternative solutions. Multipotent cells derived from the uterine endometrium have the ability to differentiate into mesodermal and ectodermal cellular lineages, suggesting the existence of mesenchymal stem cells in this tissue. We differentiated human endometrial stromal stem cells (ESSC) into insulin secreting cells using ...

  2. High resolution systematic digital histological quantification of cardiac fibrosis and adipose tissue in phospholamban p.Arg14del mutation associated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M I H Gho

    Full Text Available Myocardial fibrosis can lead to heart failure and act as a substrate for cardiac arrhythmias. In dilated cardiomyopathy diffuse interstitial reactive fibrosis can be observed, whereas arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy is characterized by fibrofatty replacement in predominantly the right ventricle. The p.Arg14del mutation in the phospholamban (PLN gene has been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and recently also with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Aim of the present study is to determine the exact pattern of fibrosis and fatty replacement in PLN p.Arg14del mutation positive patients, with a novel method for high resolution systematic digital histological quantification of fibrosis and fatty tissue in cardiac tissue. Transversal mid-ventricular slices (n = 8 from whole hearts were collected from patients with the PLN p.Arg14del mutation (age 48±16 years; 4 (50% male. An in-house developed open source MATLAB script was used for digital analysis of Masson's trichrome stained slides (http://sourceforge.net/projects/fibroquant/. Slides were divided into trabecular, inner and outer compact myocardium. Per region the percentage of connective tissue, cardiomyocytes and fatty tissue was quantified. In PLN p.Arg14del mutation associated cardiomyopathy, myocardial fibrosis is predominantly present in the left posterolateral wall and to a lesser extent in the right ventricular wall, whereas fatty changes are more pronounced in the right ventricular wall. No difference in distribution pattern of fibrosis and adipocytes was observed between patients with a clinical predominantly dilated and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy phenotype. In the future, this novel method for quantifying fibrosis and fatty tissue can be used to assess cardiac fibrosis and fatty tissue in animal models and a broad range of human cardiomyopathies.

  3. Active-Site Environment of Copper-Bound Human Amylin Relevant to Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Manas; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh

    2018-01-02

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2Dm) is characterized by reduced β cell mass and amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) or amylin, a 37 amino acid containing peptide around pancreatic β cells. The interaction of copper (Cu) with amylin and its mutants has been studied in detail using absorption, circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Cu binds amylin in a 1:1 ratio, and the binding domain lies within the first 19 amino acid residues of the peptide. Depending on the pH of the medium, Cu-amylin shows the formation of five pH-dependent components (component IV at pH 4.0, component III at pH 5.0, component II at pH 6.0, component I at pH 8.0, and another higher pH component above pH 9.0). The terminal amine, His18, and amidates are established as key residues in the peptide that coordinate the Cu center. The physiologically relevant components I and II can generate H 2 O 2 , which can possibly account for the enhanced toxicity of amylin in the presence of Cu, causing damage of the β cells of the pancreas via oxidative stress.

  4. Effects of SGLT2 inhibition in human kidney proximal tubular cells--renoprotection in diabetic nephropathy?

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    Usha Panchapakesan

    Full Text Available Sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors are oral hypoglycemic agents used to treat patients with diabetes mellitus. SGLT2 inhibitors block reabsorption of filtered glucose by inhibiting SGLT2, the primary glucose transporter in the proximal tubular cell (PTC, leading to glycosuria and lowering of serum glucose. We examined the renoprotective effects of the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin to determine whether blocking glucose entry into the kidney PTCs reduced the inflammatory and fibrotic responses of the cell to high glucose. We used an in vitro model of human PTCs. HK2 cells (human kidney PTC line were exposed to control 5 mM, high glucose (HG 30 mM or the profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ1; 0.5 ng/ml in the presence and absence of empagliflozin for up to 72 h. SGLT1 and 2 expression and various inflammatory/fibrotic markers were assessed. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to determine the binding of phosphorylated smad3 to the promoter region of the SGLT2 gene. Our data showed that TGFβ1 but not HG increased SGLT2 expression and this occurred via phosphorylated smad3. HG induced expression of Toll-like receptor-4, increased nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid binding for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB and activator protein 1, induced collagen IV expression as well as interleukin-6 secretion all of which were attenuated with empagliflozin. Empagliflozin did not reduce high mobility group box protein 1 induced NF-κB suggesting that its effect is specifically related to a reduction in glycotoxicity. SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression was not significantly altered with HG or empagliflozin. In conclusion, empagliflozin reduces HG induced inflammatory and fibrotic markers by blocking glucose transport and did not induce a compensatory increase in SGLT1/GLUT2 expression. Although HG itself does not regulate SGLT2 expression in our model, TGFβ increases SGLT2 expression through phosphorylated smad3.

  5. Recombinant human GLP-1(rhGLP-1) alleviating renal tubulointestitial injury in diabetic STZ-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weiqin; Xu, Shiqing; Wang, Zai; Liu, Honglin; Peng, Liang; Fang, Qing; Deng, Tingting; Zhang, Wenjian; Lou, Jinning

    2018-01-01

    GLP-1-based treatment improves glycemia through stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon secretion. Recently, more and more findings showed that GLP-1 could also protect kidney from diabetic nephropathy. Most of these studies focused on glomeruli, but the effect of GLP-1 on tubulointerstitial and tubule is not clear yet. In this study, we examined the renoprotective effect of recombinant human GLP-1 (rhGLP-1), and investigated the influence of GLP-1 on inflammation and tubulointerstitial injury using diabetic nephropathy rats model of STZ-induced. The results showed that rhGLP-1 reduced urinary albumin without influencing the body weight and food intake. rhGLP-1 could increased the serum C-peptide slightly but not lower fasting blood glucose significantly. In diabetic nephropathy rats, beside glomerular sclerosis, tubulointerstitial fibrosis was very serious. These lesions could be alleviated by rhGLP-1. rhGLP-1 decreased the expression of profibrotic factors collagen I, α-SMA, fibronectin, and inflammation factors MCP-1 and TNFα in tubular tissue and human proximal tubular cells (HK-2 cells). Furthermore, rhGLP-1 significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of NF-κB, MAPK in both diabetic tubular tissue and HK-2 cells. The inhibition of the expression of TNFα, MCP-1, collagen I and α-SMA in HK-2 cells by GLP-1 could be mimicked by blocking NF-κB or MAPK. These results indicate that rhGLP-1 exhibit renoprotective effect by alleviation of tubulointerstitial injury via inhibiting phosphorylation of MAPK and NF-κB. Therefore, rhGLP-1 may be a potential drug for treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fetal and perinatal outcomes in type 1 diabetes pregnancy: a randomized study comparing insulin aspart with human insulin in 322 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hod, Moshe; Damm, Peter; Kaaja, Risto

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy.......The objective of the study was a comparison of insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with neutral protamine Hagedorn for fetal and perinatal outcomes of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy....

  7. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, M.; Vinciguerra, M.; Daghighi, M.; Ozcan, B.; Akbarkhanzadeh, V.; Sheedfar, F.; Amini, M.; Mazza, T.; Pazienza, V.; Motazacker, M.M.; Mahmoudi, M.; Rooij, F.W. De; Sijbrands, E.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Rezaee, F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and

  8. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, Mehran; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Daghighi, Mojtaba; Oezcan, Behiye; Akbarkhanzadeh, Vishtaseb; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Amini, Marzyeh; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Motazacker, Mahdi M.; Mahmoudi, Morteza; De Rooij, Felix W. M.; Sijbrands, Eric; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Rezaee, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue (AT) and

  9. Age-related obesity and type 2 diabetes dysregulate neuronal associated genes and proteins in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rahimi (Mehran); M. Vinciguerra (Manlio); M. Daghighi (Mojtaba); B. Özcan (Behiye); V. Akbarkhanzadeh (Vishtaseb); F. Sheedfar (Fareeba); M. Amini (Marzyeh); T. Mazza (Tommaso); V. Pazienza (Valerio); M.M. Motazacker (Mohammad); T. Mahmoudi (Tokameh); F.W.M. de Rooij (Felix); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); M.P. Peppelenbosch (Maikel); F. Rezaee (Farhad)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDespite numerous developed drugs based on glucose metabolism interventions for treatment of age-related diseases such as diabetes neuropathies (DNs), DNs are still increasing in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (T1D, T2D). We aimed to identify novel candidates in adipose tissue

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The other conditions in the spectrum, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy , are characterized by progressive weakness and wasting of ... linked dilated cardiomyopathy is sometimes classified as subclinical Becker muscular dystrophy. Related Information What does it mean if a ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: early-onset myopathy with fatal cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in childhood, people with EOMFC may also develop joint deformities called contractures that restrict the movement of ... Home Edition for Patients and Caregivers: Dilated Cardiomyopathy Neuromuscular Disease Center, Washington University Orphanet: Early-onset myopathy ...

  12. Psychological distress and personality factors in takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeijers, L; Szabó, B M; Kop, W J

    2016-01-01

    Background Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCC) is a transient condition characterised by severe left ventricular dysfunction combined with symptoms and signs mimicking myocardial infarction. Emotional triggers are common, but little is known about the psychological background characteristics of TCC. This

  13. Application of Echocardiography on Transgenic Mice with Cardiomyopathies

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    G. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies are common cardiac disorders that primarily affect cardiac muscle resulting in cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Transgenic mouse disease models have been developed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying heart failure and sudden cardiac death observed in cardiomyopathy cases and to explore the therapeutic outcomes in experimental animals in vivo. Echocardiography is an essential diagnostic tool for accurate and noninvasive assessment of cardiac structure and function in experimental animals. Our laboratory has been among the first to apply high-frequency research echocardiography on transgenic mice with cardiomyopathies. In this work, we have summarized our and other studies on assessment of systolic and diastolic dysfunction using conventional echocardiography, pulsed Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging in transgenic mice with various cardiomyopathies. Estimation of embryonic mouse hearts has been performed as well using this high-resolution echocardiography. Some technical considerations in mouse echocardiography have also been discussed.

  14. Dynamic electrocardiographic changes in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quarta, Giovanni

    2010-04-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities of depolarisation and repolarisation contribute to the diagnostic criteria for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). The development of diagnostic ECG features were investigated in a genotyped cohort with ARVC to provide more sensitive markers of early disease.

  15. Cardiomyopathies in Noonan syndrome and the other RASopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, Bruce D.; Roberts, Amy E.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome and related disorders (Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, Costello syndrome, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Noonan syndrome with loose anagen hair, and other related traits) are autosomal dominant traits. Mutations causing these disorders alter proteins relevant for signaling through RAS. Thus, these traits are now collectively called the RASopathies. While the RASopathies have pleiomorphic features, this review will focus on the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy observed in varying percentages of all of these traits. In addition, inherited abnormalities in one pathway gene, RAF1, cause pediatric-onset dilated cardiomyopathy. The pathogeneses for the RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies are being elucidated, principally using animal models, leading to genotype-specific insights into how signal transduction is perturbed. Based on those findings, small molecule therapies seem possible for RASopathy-associated cardiomyopathies. PMID:26380542

  16. Clinical usefulness of Tc-99m hexakis 2-methoxybutyl isonitrile gated SPECT in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.R.; Khan, A.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In Dilated cardiomyopathy the heart is enlarged and ventricles are dilated. Gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography is considered state of the art for myocardial perfusion imaging. A retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate patients with dilated cardiomyopathy with Tc-99m sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography to evaluate its clinical utility. Methods: A 10 year retrospective medical record review was done from 1991 to 2001 at Wake Forest University, North Carolina, USA. Eligibility criteria included a diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy and availability of coronary angiography and Tc-99m sestamibi cardiac imaging results. 26 cases were selected for the final review and inclusion in the study. The study was done with standard protocols for cardiac sestamibi imaging. Results: A total of 26 cases were included in the final analysis. Cases were divided into two main groups. Group-A included 16 patients with no correlation between Tc-99m sestamibi and cardiac catheterisation reports. Group-B included 10 patients with good correlation between the above tests. There were no significant differences between the left ventricular ejection fraction, angina history, sex distribution and diabetic status between the two groups. We applied Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and z-test to quantify the difference between the two groups. Data was tabulated and z-test was performed. The calculated p value was <0.0001. This is significantly less than the tabulated p-value at 5% level of significance, i.e., 1.96. Significant differences exist between Group-A and Group-B. Conclusion: Tc-99m sestamibi is an excellent agent for investigating myocardial perfusion in dilated cardiomyopathy. The reversible and fixed perfusion defects (small to medium sized) seen in dilated cardiomyopathy after performance of Tc-99m sestamibi gated single photon emission computed tomography imaging may not be due to coronary

  17. Possible X linked congenital mitochondrial cardiomyopathy in three families.

    OpenAIRE

    Orstavik, K H; Skjörten, F; Hellebostad, M; Hågå, P; Langslet, A

    1993-01-01

    Familial cases of childhood congestive cardiomyopathy with X linked recessive inheritance and abnormalities of heart muscle mitochondria have been previously reported. We report here three families with possible X linked congestive cardiomyopathy and specific mitochondrial abnormalities. The heart disorder presented as endocardial fibroelastosis with neonatal death in two brothers in one family, and as heart failure and death in infancy in two brothers in the other two families. In one family...

  18. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction and apical aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Oryshchyn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A case report of apical left ventricular aneurysm in patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with mid-ventricular obstruction (diagnosis and surgical treatment is presented. We revealed apical aneurysm and mid-ventricular obstruction during echocardiography and specified anatomical characteristics of aneurysm during computer tomography. There was no evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease during coronary angiography. Taking into consideration multiple cerebral infarcts, aneurysm resection and left ventricular plastics was performed. Electronic microscopy of myocardium confirmed the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  19. Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Treatments

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    Yan-Cun Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a lethal syndrome with a high incidence and a weighty economy burden. The pathophysiology of sepsis includes inflammation, immune dysfunction, and dysfunction of coagulation, while sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, defined as a global but reversible dysfunction of both sides of the heart induced by sepsis, plays a significant role in all of the aspects above in the pathogenesis of sepsis. The complex pathogenesis of SIC involves a combination of dysregulation of inflammatory mediators, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, disorder of calcium regulation, autonomic nervous system dysregulation, and endothelial dysfunction. The treatments for SIC include the signal pathway intervention, Chinese traditional medicine, and other specific therapy. Here, we reviewed the latest literatures on the mechanisms and treatments of SIC and hope to provide further insights to researchers and create a new road for the therapy of sepsis.

  20. Pregnancy and Cardiomyopathy After Anthracyclines in Childhood

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    Kara Annette Thompson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With advances in cancer therapy, there has been a remarkable increase in survival in children diagnosed with malignancies. Many of these children are treated with anthracyclines which are well known to cause cardiotoxicity. As more childhood cancer survivors reach childbearing age, many will choose to become pregnant. At this time, the factors associated with development of cardiomyopathy after anthracycline treatment are not clearly identified. It is possible that cardiac stress could predispose to cardiac deterioration in a patient with reduced functional reserve from prior anthracycline exposure. Pregnancy is one form of cardiovascular stress. The cardiac outcomes of pregnancy in childhood cancer survivors must be considered. In view of limited data, guidelines for pregnancy planning, management, and monitoring after cardiotoxic cancer therapy have not been established. This review summarizes the limited data available on the topic of pregnancy after anthracyclines in childhood.

  1. Multifactorial QT Interval Prolongation and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gysel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old woman collapsed while working as a grocery store cashier. CPR was performed and an AED revealed torsades de pointes (TdP. She was subsequently defibrillated resulting in restoration of sinus rhythm with a QTc interval of 544 msec. Further evaluation revealed a diagnosis of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy (TCM contributing to the development of a multifactorial acquired long QT syndrome (LQTS. The case highlights the role of TCM as a cause of LQTS in the setting of multiple risk factors including old age, female gender, hypokalemia, and treatment with QT prolonging medications. It also highlights the multifactorial nature of acquired LQTS and lends support to growing evidence of an association with TCM.

  2. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...... and m.15482T>C; p.S246P were identified. Modeling showed that the p.C93Y mutation leads to disruption of the tertiary structure of Cytb by helix displacement, interfering with protein-heme interaction. The p.S246P mutation induces a diproline structure, which alters local secondary structure and induces...... of HCM patients. We propose that further patients with HCM should be examined for mutations in MT-CYB in order to clarify the role of these variants....

  3. Dilated cardiomyopathy in cats - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jeyaraja

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two cats were brought to Madras Veterinary College Teaching Hospital with the history and clinical signs suggestive of congestive heart failure ie, coughing, exercise intolerance, dyspnea, abdominal distension etc. There was history of feeding the cat with home made diet in one case and in other with commercial dog food. Based on electrocardiographic, radiographic and echocardiographic findings, the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy was done in both the cases. The cases were managed with enalapril maleate, furosemide, dietary taurine supplementation and other supportive therapy. Among these two cases, one cat died on 2nd day of treatment and the other showed recovery after 8 days of treatment. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 226-227

  4. A Case Report of Reversible Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is mostly an idiopathic disease with a progressive and irreversible course. It carries poor prognosis and outcome. Rarely, a reversible metabolic etiology that is amenable to specific therapy is identified. Alteration in thyroid status can lead to changes in systolic and diastolic function of left ventricle. Heart is sensitive to thyroid hormone changes, and cardiac disorders are commonly associated with both hyper and hypothyroidism. Diastolic dysfunction is the most common abnormality reported in hypothyroidism. In systolic function, prolonged systolic time interval or normal cardiac function has been reported by most workers. DCM is a rare presentation of hypothyroidism. Here, we report a case of 40-year-old female diagnosed with DCM due to hypothyroidism

  5. Superior vena thrombosis with peripartum dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, R.; Hussain, S.; Kayani, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    A 30 years multiparous female with history of emergency caesarean section 10 days back was referred to us with cough, severe breathlessness at rest, orthopnea with pain in neck and arms. Clinical examination revealed signs of heart failure. Echocardiography showed ejection fraction of 15%, with no right ventricular strain. A diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy was made. Doppler ultrasound of neck veins showed bilateral internal jugular vein thrombosis. Subsequent multislice CT examination showed thrombosis of superior vena cava and both internal jugular veins (with collateral formation) and pulmonary embolism. There were no mediastinal abnormalities on the CT scan. Her thrombophilia screen and CT scan brain was normal. She was managed in collaboration with cardiologist. Following treatment with subcutaneous enoxaparin therapy and warfarin her symptoms of upper limb pain improved. She responded very well to medical therapy for heart failure with marked improvement of NYHA functional class. (author)

  6. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  7. Sress cardiomyopathy: clinical features and imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Shihua; Yan Chaowu; Jiang Shiliang; Lu Minjie; Li Shiguo; Liu Qiong; He Zuoxiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: One typical case with stress cardiomyopathy was reported and the current knowledge of the syndrome was reviewed to improve relevant knowledge. Methods: A 71-year-old female patient presented dyspnea and chest pain due to emotional stress. ECG, echocardiography, selective coronary, artery angiography, left ventriculography, 99 Tc m -MIBI single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), 18 F-FDG SPECT and MRI were performed. Results: Electrocardiogram at admission showed ST segment elevation and T wave inversion in leads V1-V4. Pathological Q wave occurred 1 week later, it disappeared 1 month later however and severe T wave inversion occurred. Normal or slightly elevated cardiac enzymes in the blood were found during the course. Left ventriculogram at admission showed left ventricular apical ballooning with LVEF of 30%. The ballooning volume was about 3/4 of left ventricular volume, without any corresponding coronary artery diseases found in coronary angiogram. The abnormal apical ballooning decreased significantly in the follow-up left ventficulogram performed one month later. The LVEF rose up to 63.6%. 99 Tc m -MIBI and 18 F-FDG SPECT showed mismatch of perfusion and metabolism in the corresponding region, indicating presence of viable myocardium. MRI showed left ventricular apical ballooning without perfusion defect and late enhancement, indicating viability of corresponding myocardium. Conclusions: Emotional stress can cause transient left ventricular apical ballooning called 'stress cardiomyopathy'. Either 99 Tc m -MIBI SPECT associated with 18 F-FDG SPECT or delayed enhancement MRI plays an important role in identification of myocardial viability, which can efficiently guide clinical treatment. (authors)

  8. Metabolic remodeling associated with subchronic doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Rui A.; Sousa, Rui P.B.; Cadete, Virgilio J.J.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Palmeira, Carlos M.M.; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2010-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Adriamycin ® ) is a potent and broad-spectrum antineoplastic agent, the clinical utility of which is restricted by a cumulative and progressive cardiomyopathy that develops with repeated dosing. Fundamental to the cardiac failure is an interference with mitochondrial respiration and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Global gene expression arrays in cardiac tissue indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by doxorubicin (DOX) is accompanied by a decreased expression of genes related to aerobic fatty acid oxidation and a corresponding increase in expression of genes involved in anaerobic glycolysis, possibly as an alternate source for ATP production. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether this is also manifest at the metabonomic level as a switch in metabolic flux in cardiac tissue, and whether this can be averted by co-administering the cardioprotective drug, dexrazoxane (DZR). 13 C-isotopomer analysis of isolated perfused hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving 6 weekly s.c. injections of 2 mg/kg DOX demonstrated a shift from the preferential oxidation of fatty acids to enhanced oxidation of glucose and lactate plus pyruvate, indicative of a compensatory shift towards increased pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Substrate-selective isotopomer analysis combined with western blots indicate an inhibition of long-chain fatty acid oxidation and not MCAD activity or fatty acyl-carnitine transport. Co-administering DZR averted many treatment-related changes in cardiac substrate metabolism, consistent with DZR being an effective cardioprotective agent against DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. This switch in substrate metabolism resembles that described for other models of cardiac failure; accordingly, this change in metabolic flux may represent a general compensatory response of cardiac tissue to imbalances in bioenergetic demand and supply, and not a characteristic unique to DOX-induced cardiac failure itself.

  9. Danon’s disease as a cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Leontyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common inherited disease of the myocardium. The causes of the disease are heterogeneous; its primary form results from mutations in the genes encoding cardiac sarcomeric proteins; its secondary (metabolic and syndromic forms develop due to mutations in the genes encoding non-sarcomeric proteins. Glycogenosis is the most common cause of the metabolic ones of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Danon’s disease (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2-cardiomyopathy is a form of glycogenosis and it is characterized by a typical triad: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, mental retardation, and skeletal myopathy. The disease occurs with mutations in the LAMP2 gene; X-linked dominant inheritance. LAMP2-cardiomyopathy does not virtually differ in its clinical manifestations from the severe form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which results from mutations in the sarcomeric protein genes. The disease is characterized by a poor progressive course with the high probability of causing sudden death or with the progression of severe heart failure. Implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator is a main method to prevent sudden cardiac death. 

  10. Dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs in human blood: causes or consequences of diabetic nephropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Charles J; Thompson, Olivia M

    2014-07-01

    Nephropathy, or kidney disease, is a major, potential complication of diabetes. We assessed the association of 6 chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, 9 chlorinated dibenzofurans and 8 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in blood with diabetic nephropathy in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (unweighted N=2588, population estimate=117,658,357). Diabetes was defined as diagnosed or undiagnosed (glycohemoglobin ≥ 6.5%) and nephropathy defined as urinary albumin to creatinine ratio >30 mg/g, representing microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria. For the 8 chemicals analyzed separately, values above the 75th percentile were considered elevated, whereas for the other 15 compounds values above the maximum limit of detection were considered elevated. Seven of 8 dioxins and dioxin-like compounds, analyzed separately, were found to be associated with diabetic nephropathy. The chemicals associated with diabetic nephropathy were: 1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran; PCB 126; PCB 169; PCB 118; and PCB 156. Three of the 8 dioxins and dioxin-like compounds; 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran and PCB 118; expressed as log-transformed continuous variables; were associated with diabetes without nephropathy. When 4 or more of the 23 chemicals were elevated the odds ratios were 7.00 (95% CI=1.80-27.20) for diabetic nephropathy and 2.13 (95% CI=0.95-4.78) for diabetes without nephropathy. Log-transformed toxic equivalency (TEQ) was associated with both diabetic nephropathy, and diabetes without nephropathy, the odds ratios were 2.35 (95% CI=1.57-3.52) for diabetic nephropathy, and 1.44 (95% CI=1.11-1.87) for diabetes without nephropathy. As the kidneys function to remove waste products from the blood, diabetic nephropathy could be either the cause or the consequence (or both) of exposure to dioxins, furans and dioxin-like PCBs. Copyright © 2014

  11. Islet-like cell aggregates generated from human adipose tissue derived stem cells ameliorate experimental diabetes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Chandra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is caused by auto immune destruction of insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Currently available treatments include transplantation of isolated islets from donor pancreas to the patient. However, this method is limited by inadequate means of immuno-suppression to prevent islet rejection and importantly, limited supply of islets for transplantation. Autologous adult stem cells are now considered for cell replacement therapy in diabetes as it has the potential to generate neo-islets which are genetically part of the treated individual. Adopting methods of islet encapsulation in immuno-isolatory devices would eliminate the need for immuno-suppressants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we explore the potential of human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells (h-ASCs to differentiate into functional islet like cell aggregates (ICAs. Our stage specific differentiation protocol permit the conversion of mesodermic h-ASCs to definitive endoderm (Hnf3β, TCF2 and Sox17 and to PDX1, Ngn3, NeuroD, Pax4 positive pancreatic endoderm which further matures in vitro to secrete insulin. These ICAs are shown to produce human C-peptide in a glucose dependent manner exhibiting in-vitro functionality. Transplantation of mature ICAs, packed in immuno-isolatory biocompatible capsules to STZ induced diabetic mice restored near normoglycemia within 3-4 weeks. The detection of human C-peptide, 1155±165 pM in blood serum of experimental mice demonstrate the efficacy of our differentiation approach. CONCLUSIONS: h-ASC is an ideal population of personal stem cells for cell replacement therapy, given that they are abundant, easily available and autologous in origin. Our findings present evidence that h-ASCs could be induced to differentiate into physiologically competent functional islet like cell aggregates, which may provide as a source of alternative islets for cell replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes.

  12. Pain sensation in human osteoarthritic knee joints is strongly enhanced by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitner, Annett; Pester, Julia; Vogel, Franziska; Marintschev, Ivan; Lehmann, Thomas; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2017-09-01

    The major burden of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is pain. Since in elder patients diabetes mellitus is an important comorbidity of OA, we explored whether the presence of diabetes mellitus has a significant influence on pain intensity at the end stage of knee OA, and we aimed to identify factors possibly related to changes of pain intensity in diabetic patients. In 23 diabetic and 47 nondiabetic patients with OA undergoing total knee arthroplasty, we assessed the pain intensity before the operation using the "Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score". Furthermore, synovial tissue, synovial fluid (SF), cartilage, and blood were obtained. We determined the synovitis score, the concentrations of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the SF and serum, and of C-reactive protein and HbA1c and other metabolic parameters in the serum. We performed multivariate regression analyses to study the association of pain with several parameters. Diabetic patients had on average a higher Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score pain score than nondiabetic patients (P Knee joints from diabetic patients exhibited on average higher synovitis scores (P = 0.024) and higher concentrations of IL-6 in the SF (P = 0.003) than knee joints from nondiabetic patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that patients with higher synovitis scores had more intense pain independent of all investigated confounders, and that the positive association between pain intensities and IL-6 levels was dependent on diabetes mellitus and/or synovitis. These data suggest that diabetes mellitus significantly increases pain intensity of knee OA, and that in diabetic patients higher pain intensities were determined by stronger synovitis.

  13. Comparative plasma lipidome between human and cynomolgus monkey: are plasma polar lipids good biomarkers for diabetic monkeys?

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    Guanghou Shui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-human primates (NHP are now being considered as models for investigating human metabolic diseases including diabetes. Analyses of cholesterol and triglycerides in plasma derived from NHPs can easily be achieved using methods employed in humans. Information pertaining to other lipid species in monkey plasma, however, is lacking and requires comprehensive experimental analysis. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the plasma lipidome from 16 cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS. We established novel analytical approaches, which are based on a simple gradient elution, to quantify polar lipids in plasma including (i glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, PC; phosphatidylethanolamine, PE; phosphatidylinositol, PI; phosphatidylglycerol, PG; phosphatidylserine, PS; phosphatidic acid, PA; (ii sphingolipids (sphingomyelin, SM; ceramide, Cer; Glucocyl-ceramide, GluCer; ganglioside mannoside 3, GM3. Lipidomic analysis had revealed that the plasma of human and cynomolgus monkey were of similar compositions, with PC, SM, PE, LPC and PI constituting the major polar lipid species present. Human plasma contained significantly higher levels of plasmalogen PE species (p<0.005 and plasmalogen PC species (p<0.0005, while cynomolgus monkey had higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acyls (PUFA in PC, PE, PS and PI. Notably, cynomolgus monkey had significantly lower levels of glycosphingolipids, including GluCer (p<0.0005 and GM(3 (p<0.0005, but higher level of Cer (p<0.0005 in plasma than human. We next investigated the biochemical alterations in blood lipids of 8 naturally occurring diabetic cynomolgus monkeys when compared with 8 healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that the plasma of human and cynomolgus monkey were of similar compositions, but contained different mol distribution of individual molecular species. Diabetic monkeys

  14. The effect of gestational diabetes on proliferation capacity and viability of human umbilical cord-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajid, Nadia; Naseem, Rashida; Anwar, Sanam Saiqa; Awan, Sana Javaid; Ali, Muhammad; Javed, Sara; Ali, Fatima

    2015-09-01

    Stomal cells derived from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cord (WJMSCs) are considered as the potential therapeutic agents for regeneration and are getting famous for stem cell banking. Our study aims to evaluate the effects of gestational diabetes on proliferation capacity and viability of WJMSCs. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cords from normal and gestational diabetic (DWJMSCs) mothers. Growth patterns of both types of cells were analyzed through MTT assay and population doubling time. Cell survival, cell death and glucose utilization were estimated through trypan blue exclusion assay, LDH assay and glucose detection assay respectively. Angiogenic ability was evaluated by immunocytochemistry and ELISA for VEGF A. Anti-cancerous potential was analyzed on HeLa cells. DWJMSCs exhibited low proliferative rate, increased population doubling time, reduced cell viability and increased cell death. Interestingly, DWJMSCs were found to have a reduced glucose utilization and anti-cancerous ability while enhanced angiogenic ability. Gestational diabetes induces adverse effects on growth, angiogenic and anti-cancerous potential of WJMSCs.

  15. Advanced Electrocardiography Can Identify Occult Cardiomyopathy in Doberman Pinschers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiljak, M.; Petric, A. Domanjko; Wilberg, M.; Olsen, L. H.; Stepancic, A.; Schlegel, T. T.; Starc, V.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, multiple advanced resting electrocardiographic (A-ECG) techniques have improved the diagnostic value of short-duration ECG in detection of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. This study investigated whether 12-lead A-ECG recordings could accurately identify the occult phase of DCM in dogs. Short-duration (3-5 min) high-fidelity 12-lead ECG recordings were obtained from 31 privately-owned, clinically healthy Doberman Pinschers (5.4 +/- 1.7 years, 11/20 males/females). Dogs were divided into 2 groups: 1) 19 healthy dogs with normal echocardiographic M-mode measurements: left ventricular internal diameter in diastole (LVIDd . 47mm) and in systole (LVIDs . 38mm) and normal 24-hour ECG recordings (100 VPCs/24h; 1/12 dogs had only abnormal 24-hour ECG recordings (>100 VPCs/24h). ECG recordings were evaluated via custom software programs to calculate multiple parameters of high-frequency (HF) QRS ECG, heart rate variability, QT variability, waveform complexity and 3-D ECG. Student's t-tests determined 19 ECG parameters that were significantly different (P canine DCM as five selected ECG parameters can with reasonable accuracy identify occult DCM in Doberman Pinschers. Future extensive clinical studies need to clarify if 12-lead A-ECG could be useful as an additional screening test for canine DCM.

  16. Correlation between total nitrite/nitrate concentrations and monoamine oxidase (types A and B) and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase enzymatic activities in human mesenteric arteries from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, S.F.; Figueiredo, I.V. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Pereira, J.S. [Instituto Português de Oncologia de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Lopes, M.C.; Caramona, M.M. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2011-11-25

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between total nitrite/nitrate concentrations (NOx) and the kinetic parameters of monoamine oxidase enzymes (MAO-A and MAO-B) and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in human mesenteric arteries. Arteries were from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic patients with sigmoid or rectum carcinoma for whom surgery was the first option and who were not exposed to neo-adjuvant therapy. Segments of human inferior mesenteric arteries from non-diabetic (61.1 ± 8.9 years old, 7 males and 5 females, N = 12) and type 2 diabetic patients (65.8 ± 6.2 years old, 8 males and 4 females, N = 12) were used to determine NOx concentrations and the kinetic parameters of MAO-A, MAO-B and SSAO by the Griess reaction and by radiochemical assay, respectively. The NOx concentrations in arteries from diabetic patients did not differ significantly from those of the non-diabetic group (10.28 ± 4.61 vs 10.71 ± 4.32 nmol/mg protein, respectively). In the non-diabetic group, there was a positive correlation between NOx concentrations and MAO-B parameters: K{sub m} (r = 0.612, P = 0.034) and V{sub max} (r = 0.593, P = 0.042), and a negative correlation with the SSAO parameters: K{sub m} (r = -0.625, P = 0.029) and V{sub max} (r = -0.754, P = 0.005). However, in the diabetic group no correlation was found between NOx concentrations and the three kinetic parameters of the enzymes. These results suggest an important function of sympathetic nerves and vascular NOx concentrations in arteries of non-diabetic patients. Thus, these results confirm the importance of a balance between oxidants and antioxidants in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis to prevent oxidative stress.

  17. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor in diabetic myocardial hypertrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study was carried out to investigate the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in diabetic cardiomyopathy in vitro. Methods: Hypoxia was induced chemically in H9C2 cells (cardiac hypertrophy model), and the cells were treated with phenylephrine (PE), deferoxamine (DFO), PE + DFO, and HIF-1α siRNA under ...

  18. A better anti-diabetic recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 21 (rhFGF21 modified with polyethylene glycol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng Huang

    Full Text Available As one of fibroblast growth factor (FGF family members, FGF21 has been extensively investigated for its potential as a drug candidate to combat metabolic diseases. In the present study, recombinant human FGF21 (rhFGF21 was modified with polyethylene glycol (PEGylation in order to increase its in vivo biostabilities and therapeutic potency. At N-terminal residue rhFGF21 was site-selectively PEGylated with mPEG20 kDa-butyraldehyde. The PEGylated rhFGF21 was purified to near homogeneity by Q Sepharose anion-exchange chromatography. The general structural and biochemical features as well as anti-diabetic effects of PEGylated rhFGF21 in a type 2 diabetic rat model were evaluated. By N-terminal sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, we confirmed that PEG molecule was conjugated only to the N-terminus of rhFGF21. The mono-PEGylated rhFGF21 retained the secondary structure, consistent with the native rhFGF21, but its biostabilities, including the resistance to physiological temperature and trypsinization, were significantly enhanced. The in vivo immunogenicity of PEGylated rhFGF21 was significantly decreased, and in vivo half-life time was significantly elongated. Compared to the native form, the PEGylated rhFGF21 had a similar capacity of stimulating glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells in vitro, but afforded a significantly long effect on reducing blood glucose and triglyceride levels in the type 2 diabetic animals. These results suggest that the PEGylated rhFGF21 is a better and more effective anti-diabetic drug candidate than the native rhFGF21 currently available. Therefore, the PEGylated rhFGF21 may be potentially applied in clinics to improve the metabolic syndrome for type 2 diabetic patients.

  19. Mechanical Defects of Muscle Fibers with Myosin Light Chain Mutants that Cause Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Roopnarine, Osha

    2003-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a disease caused by single mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, including the human myosin ventricular regulatory light chain (vRLC). The effects of four of these mutations (A13T, F18L, E22K, and P95A) in vRLC on force generation were determined as a function of Ca2+ concentration. The endogenous RLC was removed from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers, and replaced with either rat wildtype vRLC or recombinant rat vRLC (G13T, F18L, E22K, and P95A). ...

  20. Lack of an association of miR-938 SNP in IDDM10 with human type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Xiaofan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a newly discovered type of small non-protein coding RNA that function in the inhibition of effective mRNA translation, and may serve as susceptibility genes for various disease developments. The SNP rs12416605, located in human type 1 diabetes IDDM10 locus, changes the seeding sequence (UGU[G/A]CCC of miRNA miR-938 and potentially alters miR-938 targets, including IL-16 and IL-17A. In an attempt to test whether miR-938 may be a susceptibility gene for IDDM10, we assessed the possible association of the miR-938 SNP with T1D in an American Caucasian cohort of 622 patients and 723 healthy controls by TaqMan assay. Our current data do not support the association between the SNP in miR-938 and type 1 diabetes.

  1. An Overview of Plant Phenolic Compounds and Their Importance in Human Nutrition and Management of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the biosynthesis process of phenolic compounds in plants is summarized, which includes the shikimate, pentose phosphate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Plant phenolic compounds can act as antioxidants, structural polymers (lignin, attractants (flavonoids and carotenoids, UV screens (flavonoids, signal compounds (salicylic acid and flavonoids and defense response chemicals (tannins and phytoalexins. From a human physiological standpoint, phenolic compounds are vital in defense responses, such as anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. Therefore, it is beneficial to eat such plant foods that have a high antioxidant compound content, which will cut down the incidence of certain chronic diseases, for instance diabetes, cancers and cardiovascular diseases, through the management of oxidative stress. Furthermore, berries and other fruits with low-amylase and high-glucosidase inhibitory activities could be regarded as candidate food items in the control of the early stages of hyperglycemia associated with type 2 diabetes.

  2. Phase 3 Trial of Transplantation of Human Islets in Type 1 Diabetes Complicated by Severe Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Bernhard J.; Clarke, William R.; Bridges, Nancy D.; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Bellin, Melena D.; Chaloner, Kathryn; Czarniecki, Christine W.; Goldstein, Julia S.; Hunsicker, Lawrence G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Korsgren, Olle; Larsen, Christian P.; Luo, Xunrong; Markmann, James F.; Naji, Ali; Oberholzer, Jose; Posselt, Andrew M.; Rickels, Michael R.; Ricordi, Camillo; Robien, Mark A.; Senior, Peter A.; Shapiro, A.M. James; Stock, Peter G.; Turgeon, Nicole A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) and severe hypoglycemic events (SHEs) cause substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Current therapies are effective in preventing SHEs in 50–80% of patients with IAH and SHEs, leaving a substantial number of patients at risk. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of a standardized human pancreatic islet product in subjects in whom IAH and SHEs persisted despite medical treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This multicenter, single-arm, phase 3 study of the investigational product purified human pancreatic islets (PHPI) was conducted at eight centers in North America. Forty-eight adults with T1D for >5 years, absent stimulated C-peptide, and documented IAH and SHEs despite expert care were enrolled. Each received immunosuppression and one or more transplants of PHPI, manufactured on-site under good manufacturing practice conditions using a common batch record and standardized lot release criteria and test methods. The primary end point was the achievement of HbA1c transplant. RESULTS The primary end point was successfully met by 87.5% of subjects at 1 year and by 71% at 2 years. The median HbA1c level was 5.6% (38 mmol/mol) at both 1 and 2 years. Hypoglycemia awareness was restored, with highly significant improvements in Clarke and HYPO scores (P > 0.0001). No study-related deaths or disabilities occurred. Five of the enrollees (10.4%) experienced bleeds requiring transfusions (corresponding to 5 of 75 procedures), and two enrollees (4.1%) had infections attributed to immunosuppression. Glomerular filtration rate decreased significantly on immunosuppression, and donor-specific antibodies developed in two patients. CONCLUSIONS Transplanted PHPI provided glycemic control, restoration of hypoglycemia awareness, and protection from SHEs in subjects with intractable IAH and SHEs. Safety events occurred related to the infusion procedure and immunosuppression, including bleeding

  3. PKCδ inhibition normalizes the wound-healing capacity of diabetic human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaisi, Mogher; Katagiri, Sayaka; Keenan, Hillary; Park, Kyoungmin; Maeda, Yasutaka; Li, Qian; Qi, Weier; Thomou, Thomas; Eschuk, Danielle; Tellechea, Ana; Veves, Aris; Huang, Chenyu; Orgill, Dennis Paul; Wagers, Amy; King, George L

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal fibroblast function underlies poor wound healing in patients with diabetes; however, the mechanisms that impair wound healing are poorly defined. Here, we evaluated fibroblasts from individuals who had type 1 diabetes (T1D) for 50 years or more (Medalists, n = 26) and from age-matched controls (n = 7). Compared with those from controls, Medalist fibroblasts demonstrated a reduced migration response to insulin, lower VEGF expression, and less phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT), but not p-ERK, activation. Medalist fibroblasts were also functionally less effective at wound closure in nude mice. Activation of the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCδ) was increased in postmortem fibroblasts from Medalists, fibroblasts from living T1D subjects, biopsies of active wounds of living T1D subjects, and granulation tissues from mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Diabetes-induced PKCD mRNA expression was related to a 2-fold increase in the mRNA half-life. Pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKCδ or expression of a dominant-negative isoform restored insulin signaling of p-AKT and VEGF expression in vitro and improved wound healing in vivo. Additionally, increasing PKCδ expression in control fibroblasts produced the same abnormalities as those seen in Medalist fibroblasts. Our results indicate that persistent PKCδ elevation in fibroblasts from diabetic patients inhibits insulin signaling and function to impair wound healing and suggest PKCδ inhibition as a potential therapy to improve wound healing in diabetic patients.

  4. Insulin-Producing Cells Differentiated from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro Ameliorate Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Hyperglycemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xin

    Full Text Available The two major obstacles in the successful transplantation of islets for diabetes treatment are inadequate supply of insulin-producing tissue and immune rejection. Induction of the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs into insulin-producing cells (IPCs for autologous transplantation may alleviate those limitations.hMSCs were isolated and induced to differentiate into IPCs through a three-stage differentiation protocol in a defined media with high glucose, nicotinamide, and exendin-4. The physiological characteristics and functions of IPCs were then evaluated. Next, about 3 × 10(6 differentiated cells were transplanted into the renal sub-capsular space of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic nude mice. Graft survival and function were assessed by immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining and measurements of blood glucose levels in the mice.The differentiated IPCs were characterized by Dithizone (DTZ positive staining, expression of pancreatic β-cell markers, and human insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. Moreover, 43% of the IPCs showed L-type Ca2+ channel activity and similar changes in intracellular Ca2+ in response to glucose stimulation as that seen in pancreatic β-cells in the process of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Transplantation of functional IPCs into the renal subcapsular space of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice ameliorated the hyperglycemia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that transplanted IPCs sustainably expressed insulin, c-peptide, and PDX-1 without apparent apoptosis in vivo.IPCs derived from hMSCs in vitro can ameliorate STZ-induced diabetic hyperglycemia, which indicates that these hMSCs may be a promising approach to overcome the limitations of islet transplantation.

  5. Towards Early Detection and Risk Stratification of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riele, A.S.J.M. te

    2016-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is an inherited cardiomyopathy characterized by frequent ventricular arrhythmias and usually slowly progressive ventricular dysfunction. Since its initial description in 1982, sudden cardiac death (SCD) occurring in young and usually

  6. Distinct fibrosis pattern in desmosomal and phospholamban mutation carriers in hereditary cardiomyopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepehrkhouy, Shahrzad; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; van Es, René; Harakalova, Magdalena; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Dooijes, Dennis; van der Smagt, Jasper J.; Buijsrogge, Marc P.; Hauer, Richard N.W.; Goldschmeding, Roel; de Weger, Roel A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Vink, Aryan

    2017-01-01

    Background Desmosomal and phospholamban (PLN) mutations are associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Ultimately, most cardiomyopathic hearts develop significant cardiac fibrosis. Objective To compare the fibrosis patterns of desmosomal and p. Arg14del PLN–associated cardiomyopathies with the

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion and cardiac enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Nagata, Seiki; Sakakibara, Hiroshi

    1988-05-01

    Gated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 6 patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with abnormal thallium perfusion, and 12 patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The patients with ordinary hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and abnormal thickening of the septal wall and normal left ventricular dimensions, while the patients with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy had focal wall thinning (usually involving the apical-septal wall) and dilated left ventricle in addition to hypertrophied heart. The quantitative measurement for cardiac dimensions using MRI was similar to that found on echocardiography in all cases. In addition, inhomogeneous signal intensities at left ventricular wall were observed in 3 cases of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may suggest the existence of myocardial fibrosis. Gated MRI should be performed for early detection and follow-up of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, since some patients will progress from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. THE ROLE OF PARVOVIRUS B19 IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFLAMMATORY CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Shchedrina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of inflammatory cardiomyopathy is discussed. The etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory cardiomyopathy are considered with focus on the role of parvovirus B19.

  9. Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    SUBTITLE Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of DMD Associated Cardiomyopathy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Subproject 1: Muscle Stem Cell Therapy...various muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), develop progressive cardiomyopathy. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, which involves the

  10. Characterization and Long-Term Prognosis of Postmyocarditic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Compared With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Marco; Anzini, Marco; Bussani, Rossana; Artico, Jessica; Barbati, Giulia; Stolfo, Davide; Gigli, Marta; Muça, Matilda; Naso, Paola; Ramani, Federica; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-09-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) is the final common pathway of different pathogenetic processes and presents a significant prognostic heterogeneity, possibly related to its etiologic variety. The characterization and long-term prognosis of postmyocarditic dilated cardiomyopathy (PM-DC) remain unknown. This study assesses the clinical-instrumental evolution and long-term prognosis of a large cohort of patients with PM-DC. We analyzed 175 patients affected with DC consecutively enrolled from 1993 to 2008 with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) data available. PM-DC was defined in the presence of borderline myocarditis at EMB or persistent left ventricular dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis of active myocarditis at EMB. Other patients were defined as affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Analysis of follow-up evaluations was performed at 24, 60, and 120 months. We found 72 PM-DC of 175 enrolled patients (41%). Compared with IDC, patients with PM-DC were more frequently females and less frequently presented a familial history of DC. No other baseline significant differences were found. During the long-term follow-up (median 154, first to third interquartile range 78 to 220 months), patients with PM-DC showed a trend toward slower disease progression. Globally, 18 patients with PM-DC (25%) versus 49 with IDC (48%) experienced death/heart transplantation (p = 0.045). The prognostic advantage for patients with PM-DC became significant beyond 40 months of follow-up. At multivariable time-dependent Cox analysis, PM-DC was confirmed to have a global independent protective role (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.97, p = 0.04). In conclusion, PM-DC is characterized by better long-term prognosis compared with IDC. An exhaustive etiologic characterization appears relevant in the prognostic assessment of DC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Echocaridography, electrocardiography, and radiography of cats with dilatation cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and hyperyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moise, N.S.; Dietze, A.E.; Mezza, L.E.; Strickland, D.; Erb, H.N.; Edwards, N.J.

    1986-01-01

    The echocardiographic, ECG, and radiographic findings of sequentially examined cats with dilatation cardiomyopathy (DCM, n = 7), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, n = 8), and hyperthyroidism (HT, n = 20) were compared with those of healthy control cats (n = 11). Cats with DCM were easily differentiated from healthy cats by echocardiography and from cats with HCM and HT by a dilated left ventricle at end-diastole with a mean +/- SD of 2.20 +/- 0.36 cm, reduced fractional shortening (2.9% +/- 3.7%), reduced aortic amplitude (0.07 +/- 0.05 cm), reduced left ventricular wall amplitude (0.09 +/- 0.09 cm), and increased E-point septal separation (0.83 +/- 0.29 cm). The cats with HCM were most consistently recognized echocardiographically by increased left ventricular wall thickness at end-diastole (0.75 +/- 0.12 cm). Some cats with HT had abnormal echocardiograms with left ventricular wall hypertrophy. These cats could usually be differentiated from the cats with HCM because of normal or increased ventricular wall amplitude, aortic amplitude, or percentage of thickening of the left ventricular wall and interventricular septum. Left atrial enlargement (left atrial diameter greater than 1.57 cm or left atrium/aorta greater than 1.75) was commonly detected by the echocardiogram in cats with DCM, HCM, or HT. The echocardiogram was helpful in differentiating the type of cardiomyopathy (DCM, HCM, or HT) when plain thoracic radiographs indicated that cardiomegaly existed. The ECG may have indicated incorrectly that there was left ventricular enlargement in some cats with HT, and it did not indicate consistently that left ventricular enlargement existed when present in cats with DCM or HCM. The ECG was a poor indicator of left atrial enlargement in all cats

  12. Human placental growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I and -II, and insulin requirements during pregnancy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Jens; Lauszus, Finn; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2003-01-01

    between hPGH and IGF-I in type 1 diabetes mellitus has not been investigated thoroughly. Furthermore, hPGH may be involved in the development of insulin resistance during pregnancy. In this prospective, longitudinal study, 51 type 1 diabetic subjects were followed with repeated blood sampling during...... pregnancy in type 1 diabetic subjects could not be related to hPGH levels.......Human placental GH (hPGH) replaces pituitary GH during pregnancy. hPGH is correlated to serum IGF-I in normal pregnancies and in pregnancies complicated by fetoplacental disorders. In gestational diabetes and type 2 diabetes no correlation between hPGH and IGF-I has been found. The relationship...

  13. Functional convergence of Akt protein with VEGFR-1 in human endothelial progenitor cells exposed to sera from patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Mehdi; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Nourazarian, Alireza; Nouri, Mohammad; Avci, Çığır Biray; Ghaderi, Shahrooz; Alidadyani, Neda; Bagca, Bakiye Goker; Bagheri, Hesam Saghaei

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 predisposes patients to various microvascular complications. In the current experiment, the potent role of diabetes mellitus was investigated on the content of VEGFR-1, -2, Tie-1 and -2, and Akt in human endothelial progenitor cells. The gene expression profile of mTOR and Hedgehog signaling pathways were measured by PCR array. The possible crosstalk between RTKs, mTOR and Hedgehog signaling was also studied by bioinformatic analysis. Endothelial progenitor cells were incubated with serum from normal and diabetic for 7days. Compared to non-treated cells, diabetic serum-induced cell apoptosis (~2-fold) and prohibited cell migration toward bFGF (p1). ELISA analysis showed that diabetes exposed cells had increased abundance of Tie-1, -2 and VEGFR-2 and reduced amount of VEGFR-1 (p1) in diabetic cells. Western blotting showed a marked reduction in the protein level of Akt after cells exposure to serum from diabetic subjects (p1). PCR array revealed a significant stimulation of both mTOR and Hedgehog signaling pathways in diabetic cells (p1, -2 and Tie-2, but not Tie-1, are master regulators of angiogenesis. There is a crosstalk between RTKs and mTOR signaling by involving P62, GABARAPL1, and HTT genes. It seems that physical interaction and co-expression of Akt decreased the level of VEGFR-1 in diabetic cells. Regarding data from the present experiment, diabetic serum contributed to uncontrolled induction of both mTOR and Hedgehog signaling in endothelial progenitor cells. Diabetes mellitus induces mTOR pathway by involving receptor tyrosine kinases while Hedgehog stimulation is independent of these receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparing effects of insulin analogues and human insulin on nocturnal glycaemia in hypoglycaemia-prone people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P. L.; Tarnow, L.; Bay, C.

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: Treatment with insulin analogue reduces the occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia assessed by nocturnal glucose profiles in people with Type 1 diabetes prone to severe hypoglycaemia. Nocturnal glucose profiles provide a more comprehensive assessment of clinical benefit of insulin regimens......Aims: To assess the difference between analogue and human insulin with regard to nocturnal glucose profiles and risk of hypoglycaemia in people with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. Methods: A total of 72 people [46 men, mean ± sd age 54 ± 12 years, mean ± sd HbA1c 65 ± 12 mmol/mol (8.1 ± 1.1......%), mean ± sd duration of diabetes 30 ± 14 years], who participated in a 2-year randomized, crossover trial of basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir/insulin aspart or human NPH insulin/human regular insulin (the HypoAna trial) were studied for 2 nights during each treatment. Venous blood was drawn...

  16. A comparative study on the transplantation of different concentrations of human umbilical mesenchymal cells into diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Hui; Kong; Dan; Zheng; Song; Chen; Hong-Tao; Duan; Yue-Xin; Wang; Meng; Dong; Jian; Song

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of intravitreal injections of different concentrations of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells on retinopathy in rats with diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Healthy and adult male Sprague-Dawley(SD) rats were randomly assigned to a normal control group(group A), a diabetic retinopathy(DR) blank control group(group B), a high-concentration transplantation group(group C), a low-concentration transplantation group(group D) and a placebo transplantation group(group E). The expression of nerve growth factor(NGF)protein in the retinal layers was detected by immunohistochemical staining at 2, 4, 6 and 8wk.RESULTS: The expression of NGF was positive in group A and most positive in the retinal ganglion cell layer. In groups B and E, the expression of NGF was positive 2wk after transplantation and showed an increase in all layers. However, the level of expression had decreased in all layers at 4wk and was significantly reduced at 8wk. In groups C and D, the expression of NGF had increased at 2wk and continued to increase up to 8wk. The level of expression in group C was much higher than that in group D.CONCLUSION: DR can be improved by intravitreal injection of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells.High concentrations of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells confer a better protective effect on DR than low concentrations.

  17. Combination therapy of Nigella sativa and human parathyroid hormone on bone mass, biomechanical behavior and structure in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Mehmet Fatih; Kanter, Mehmet; Donmez, Senayi; Kartal, Murat Emre; Buyukbas, Sadik

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of the seeds of Nigella sativa (NS), an annual herbaceous plant of the Ranunculaceae family, have been used for many years for therapeutic purposes, including their potential anti-diabetic properties. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that combined treatment with NS and human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) is more effective than treatment with NS or hPTH alone in improving bone mass, connectivity, biomechanical behaviour and strength in insulin-dependent diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) at a single dose of 50mg/kg. The diabetic rats received NS (2ml/kg/day, i.p.), hPTH (6microg/kg/day, i.p.) or NS and hPTH combined for 4 weeks, starting 8 weeks after STZ injection. The beta-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were examined by immunohistochemical methods. In addition, bone sections of femora were processed for histomorphometry and biomechanical analysis. In diabetic rats, the beta-cells were essentially negative for insulin-immunoreactivity. NS treatment (alone or in combination with hPTH) significantly increased the area of insulin immunoreactive beta-cells in diabetic rats; however, hPTH treatment alone only led to a slightly increase in the insulin-immunoreactivity. These results suggest that NS might be used in a similar manner to insulin as a safe and effective therapy for diabetes and might be useful in the treatment of diabetic osteopenia.

  18. Proteome analysis reveals phosphorylation of ATP synthase beta -subunit in human skeletal muscle and proteins with potential roles in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Larsen, Peter Mose

    2003-01-01

    quantitate a large number of proteins and their post-translational modifications simultaneously and is a powerful tool to study polygenic diseases like type 2 diabetes. Using this approach on human skeletal muscle biopsies, we have identified eight potential protein markers for type 2 diabetes in the fasting...... synthase beta-subunit phosphoisoform in diabetic muscle correlated inversely with fasting plasma glucose levels. These data suggest a role for phosphorylation of ATP synthase beta-subunit in the regulation of ATP synthesis and that alterations in the regulation of ATP synthesis and cellular stress proteins...

  19. Acute myocardial infarction and stress cardiomyopathy following the Christchurch earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christina; Elliott, John; Troughton, Richard; Frampton, Christopher; Smyth, David; Crozier, Ian; Bridgman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Christchurch, New Zealand, was struck by 2 major earthquakes at 4:36 am on 4 September 2010, magnitude 7.1 and at 12:51 pm on 22 February 2011, magnitude 6.3. Both events caused widespread destruction. Christchurch Hospital was the region's only acute care hospital. It remained functional following both earthquakes. We were able to examine the effects of the 2 earthquakes on acute cardiac presentations. Patients admitted under Cardiology in Christchurch Hospital 3 week prior to and 5 weeks following both earthquakes were analysed, with corresponding control periods in September 2009 and February 2010. Patients were categorised based on diagnosis: ST elevation myocardial infarction, Non ST elevation myocardial infarction, stress cardiomyopathy, unstable angina, stable angina, non cardiac chest pain, arrhythmia and others. There was a significant increase in overall admissions (pearthquake. This pattern was not seen after the early afternoon February earthquake. Instead, there was a very large number of stress cardiomyopathy admissions with 21 cases (95% CI 2.6-6.4) in 4 days. There had been 6 stress cardiomyopathy cases after the first earthquake (95% CI 0.44-2.62). Statistical analysis showed this to be a significant difference between the earthquakes (pearthquake triggered a large increase in ST elevation myocardial infarction and a few stress cardiomyopathy cases. The early afternoon February earthquake caused significantly more stress cardiomyopathy. Two major earthquakes occurring at different times of day differed in their effect on acute cardiac events.

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after a dancing session: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Ammar A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Stress-induced (Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare form of cardiomyopathy which presents in a manner similar to that of acute coronary syndrome. This sometimes leads to unnecessary thrombolysis therapy. The pathogenesis of this disease is still poorly understood. We believe that reporting all cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy will contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Here, we report a patient who, in the absence of any recent stressful events in her life, developed the disease after a session of dancing. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian woman presented with features suggestive of acute coronary syndrome shortly after a session of dancing. Echocardiography and a coronary angiogram showed typical features of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and our patient was treated accordingly. Eight weeks later, her condition resolved completely and the results of echocardiography were totally normal. Conclusions Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, though transient, is a rare and serious condition. Although it is commonly precipitated by stressful life events, these are not necessarily present. Our patient was enjoying one of her hobbies (that is, dancing when she developed the disease. This case has particular interest in medicine, especially for the specialties of cardiology and emergency medicine. We hope that it will add more information to the literature about this rare condition.

  1. Effect of Artocarpus heterophyllus and Asteracanthus longifolia on glucose tolerance in normal human subjects and in maturity-onset diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, M R; Wickramasinghe, N; Thabrew, M I; Ariyananda, P L; Karunanayake, E H

    1991-03-01

    Investigations were carried out to evaluate the effects of hot-water extracts of Artocarpus heterophyllus leaves and Asteracanthus longifolia whole plant material on the glucose tolerance of normal human subjects and maturity-onset diabetic patients. The extracts of both Artocarpus heterophyllus and Asteracanthus longifolia significantly improved glucose tolerance in the normal subjects and the diabetic patients when investigated at oral doses equivalent to 20 g/kg of starting material.

  2. Exosomal DMBT1 from human urine-derived stem cells facilitates diabetic wound repair by promoting angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yuan; Rao, Shan-Shan; Ren, Lu; Hu, Xiong-Ke; Tan, Yi-Juan; Hu, Yin; Luo, Juan; Liu, Yi-Wei; Yin, Hao; Huang, Jie; Cao, Jia; Wang, Zhen-Xing; Liu, Zheng-Zhao; Liu, Hao-Ming; Tang, Si-Yuan; Xu, Ran; Xie, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds represent one of the most common complications of diabetes and need advanced treatment strategies. Exosomes are key mediators of cell paracrine action and can be directly utilized as therapeutic agents for tissue repair and regeneration. Here, we explored the effects of exosomes from human urine-derived stem cells (USC-Exos) on diabetic wound healing and the underlying mechanism. Methods: USCs were characterized by flow cytometry and multipotent differentiation potential analyses. USC-Exos were isolated from the conditioned media of USCs and identified by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. A series of functional assays in vitro were performed to assess the effects of USC-Exos on the activities of wound healing-related cells. Protein profiles in USC-Exos and USCs were examined to screen the candidate molecules that mediate USC-Exos function. The effects of USC-Exos on wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were tested by measuring wound closure rates, histological and immunofluorescence analyses. Meanwhile, the role of the candidate protein in USC-Exos-induced regulation of angiogenic activities of endothelial cells and diabetic wound healing was assessed. Results: USCs were positive for CD29, CD44, CD73 and CD90, but negative for CD34 and CD45. USCs were able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. USC-Exos exhibited a cup- or sphere-shaped morphology with a mean diameter of 51.57 ± 2.93 nm and positive for CD63 and TSG101. USC-Exos could augment the functional properties of wound healing-related cells including the angiogenic activities of endothelial cells. USC-Exos were enriched in the proteins that are involved in regulation of wound healing-related biological processes. Particularly, a pro-angiogenic protein called deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) was highly expressed in USC-Exos. Further functional assays showed that DMBT1 protein was required for USC

  3. Diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Skiadopoulos, Dionysios

    2013-01-01

    This theses on Diabetes Mellitus aims at giving an insight at various aspects of this chronic disease and the risk factors that lead to it; the varius ways it develops in the human body; the old and new approaches to treatment, both from a pharmacological and a non- pharmacologiacal point of view; ways to prevent and to manage the diabetes complications; how to improve the live of the diabetic patients who are faced with not only physical but also psychological problems; statistical data from...

  4. Cardiac norepinephrine kinetics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brush, J.E. Jr.; Eisenhofer, G.; Garty, M.; Stull, R.; Maron, B.J.; Cannon, R.O. III; Panza, J.A.; Epstein, S.E.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the uptake and release of norepinephrine in the cardiac circulation and other regional vascular beds in 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and in 10 control subjects during simultaneous infusion of tracer-labeled norepinephrine and isoproterenol. Cardiac neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was assessed by comparing regional removal of tracer-labeled norepinephrine with that of tracer-labeled isoproterenol (which is not a substrate for neuronal uptake) and by the relation between production of dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), an exclusively intraneuronal metabolite of norepinephrine, and regional spillover of norepinephrine. Cardiac extraction of norepinephrine averaged 59 +/- 17% in the patients with HCM, significantly less than in the control subjects (79 +/- 13%, p less than 0.05), whereas cardiac extraction of isoproterenol was similar in the two groups (13 +/- 23% versus 13 +/- 14%), indicating that neuronal uptake of norepinephrine was decreased in the patients with HCM. The cardiac arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine was significantly larger in the patients with HCM than in the control subjects (73 +/- 77 versus 13 +/- 50 pg/ml, p less than 0.05), as was the product of the arteriovenous difference in norepinephrine and coronary blood flow (7.3 +/- 7.3 versus 0.8 +/- 3.0 ng/min, p less than 0.05)

  5. Cardiomyopathy in Patients With Hereditary Bullous Epidermolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, A; Vicente, A; Bartrons, J; Prada, F; Fortuny, C; González-Enseñat, M A

    In recent decades, an association has been reported between epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DC). DC is typically in an advanced phase when detected, leading to a poorer prognosis. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of DC in patients with EB seen in Hospital San Joan de Déu in Barcelona, Spain, between May 1986 and April 2015. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional chart-review study in which we recorded the type and main subtypes of EB and the presence or absence of DC. Fifty-seven patients with EB were found, 19 with EB simplex, 10 with junctional EB, 27 with dystrophic EB (14 dominant dystrophic and 13 recessive dystrophic), and just 1 with Kindler syndrome. DC was detected in only 2 patients with recessive dystrophic EB. Twenty-three patients had presented factors that could have had a causal relationship with the potential onset of DC. DC is a possible complication of EB, particularly in recessive dystrophic EB. Periodic follow-up should be performed to make an early diagnosis and start treatment. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Syncope in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Leontyeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy children aged 7 to 17 years with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM were examined; among them there were 11 syncope patients and 5 presyncope patients. The screening program included standard electrocardiography (ECG, Doppler echocardiogra-phy, 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring, and an incremental exercise testing (Bruce treadmill test. The markers of myocardial electrical instability were determined. In the children with HCM, syncope was established to be heterogeneous; it had an arrhythmogenic origin and, in most cases, occurred in the presence of tachyarrhythmia (44% or bradyarrythmia (25%; its vasovagal genesis was probable in one third of the examinees. The children with syncope were typified by the asymmetric, obstructive form of HCM, at the same tone there was most commonly left ventricular hypertrophy concurrent with left atrial enlargement. 24-hour Holter monitoring showed that bradycardia was prevalent in the patients, 3 patients were found to have more than 2-second cardiac rhythm pauses caused by second-degree atrioventricular block in 1 case or by sick sinus syndrome in 2. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was noted in two patients. The children with syncope were typified by the signs of myocardial electrical instability as a reduction in the early phase of heart rate turbulence and by impaired QT/RR interval adaptation as hyperadaptation. The paper presents the developed management tactics for children with syncope and indications for the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator, a pacemaker, or an ECG loop recorder.

  7. Exploring digenic inheritance in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Eva; Volpato, Claudia Béu; Motta, Benedetta Maria; Blankenburg, Hagen; Picard, Anne; Pramstaller, Peter; Casella, Michela; Rauhe, Werner; Pompilio, Giulio; Meraviglia, Viviana; Domingues, Francisco S; Sommariva, Elena; Rossini, Alessandra

    2017-12-08

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is an inherited genetic disorder, characterized by the substitution of heart muscle with fibro-fatty tissue and severe ventricular arrhythmias, often leading to heart failure and sudden cardiac death. ACM is considered a monogenic disorder, but the low penetrance of mutations identified in patients suggests the involvement of additional genetic or environmental factors. We used whole exome sequencing to investigate digenic inheritance in two ACM families where previous diagnostic tests have revealed a PKP2 mutation in all affected and some healthy individuals. In family members with PKP2 mutations we determined all genes that harbor variants in affected but not in healthy carriers or vice versa. We computationally prioritized the most likely candidates, focusing on known ACM genes and genes related to PKP2 through protein interactions, functional relationships, or shared biological processes. We identified four candidate genes in family 1, namely DAG1, DAB2IP, CTBP2 and TCF25, and eleven candidate genes in family 2. The most promising gene in the second family is TTN, a gene previously associated with ACM, in which the affected individual harbors two rare deleterious-predicted missense variants, one of which is located in the protein's only serine kinase domain. In this study we report genes that might act as digenic players in ACM pathogenesis, on the basis of co-segregation with PKP2 mutations. Validation in larger cohorts is still required to prove the utility of this model.

  8. Genetic bases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Rampazzo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is a heart muscle disease in which the pathological substrate is a fibro-fatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium. The major clinical features are different types of arrhythmias with a left branch block pattern. ARVC shows autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Recessive forms were also described, although in association with skin disorders. Ten genetic loci have been discovered so far and mutations were reported in five different genes. ARVD1 was associated with regulatory mutations of transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGFβ3, whereas ARVD2, characterized by effort-induced polymorphic arrhythmias, was associated with mutations in cardiac ryanodine receptor-2 (RYR2. All other mutations identified to date have been detected in genes encoding desmosomal proteins: plakoglobin (JUP which causes Naxos disease (a recessive form of ARVC associated with palmoplantar keratosis and woolly hair; desmoplakin (DSP which causes the autosomal dominant ARVD8 and plakophilin-2 (PKP2 involved in ARVD9. Desmosomes are important cell-to-cell adhesion junctions predominantly found in epidermis and heart; they are believed to couple cytoskeletal elements to plasma membrane in cell-to-cell or cell-to-substrate adhesions.

  9. EBCT in diagnosis on primary cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangmin; Zhou Xuhui; Meng Quanfei; Li Weiduo; Peng Qian; Tan Zhiyu

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of electron beam CT (EBCT) in primary cardiomyopathy (PCM). Methods: EBCT including coronary scanning and heart movie study was performed in 15 patients. The diagnosis of PCM was established by clinical and imaging findings or/and pathologic examination. Results: BECT findings related to the classification of PCM drawn up by WHO/ISFC were as follows: (1) dilated PCM (8 cases): dilated left ventricle (LV) was found in 7 of 8 cases and dilated right ventricle (RV) in the remaining one. Hypokinetic contraction of the LV wall with (250 ± 101) ml LVEDV and (18.9 ±6.6)% LVEF presented in the patients with dilated LV. (2) Hypertrophic PCM (5 cases): Hypertrophic ventricular septum (16.5 ± 2.3) mm was demonstrated in all cases, hypertrophy of the LV wall or the apex in 3 of 5 cases, and stenosis of the LV outflow tract in 2 cases. (3) Restrictive PCM (2 cases): Thickening of endocardium with lower density than cardiac muscle, reduced RV, obliteration of apex, hypokinetic contraction of the RV wall, and dilatation of right atrium (RA) with parietal thrombus formation of RA was identified in one patient. Both the LV and the RV were involved, with enlargement of atrium. Conclusion: The findings of PCM on EBCT seem to reflect pathologic and functional changes of PCM, and may be useful for diagnosis and classification of PCM

  10. Epidemiology of cardiomyopathy - A clinical and genetic study of dilated cardiomyopathy: The EPOCH-D study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumi Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM is a genetic disorder where a heterogeneous group of cardiac-muscles are involved and is characterized by ventricular dilatation, impaired systolic function, reduced myocardial contractility with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF less than 40%. Our study aims to report the Demographic, Clinical and Genetic profile of Indian Dilated Cardiomyopathy patients. Methodology: All patients were recruited with prior written informed consent and are of Indian origin. Results: In a total of 80 DCM patients, the prevalence was higher among males. In males, mean age of onset was comparatively less than females. In this cohort, 40% had familial inheritance. Sixty two percent of DCM patients belong to NYHA functional class II with ejection fraction (EF ranging between 21-30% and, around one third of the patients had atrial fibrillation (AF. Genetic screening revealed a novel splice site mutation LMNA (c.639+ G>C and a rare variant MYH7 (c.2769 C>T in a patient and insilico analysis of both variants suggested functional changes that were considered pathogenic. We report 3% and 4% occurance of variants, each in LMNA and MYH7, where as reported frequencies of these genes are 6% LMNA and 4% MYH7. Conclusions: DCM is often familial and all possible candidate genes should be screened to identify mutations. Such type of exercise may help in the identification of mechanistic pathways. Next generation sequencing platforms may play an important role in this respect in future.

  11. Effects of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts on diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Jong-Seok; Han, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Hyup-Woo; Dhong, Eun-Sang

    2017-07-01

    A previous study demonstrated that human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hUCB-MSCs) have superior wound-healing activity compared with fibroblasts in vitro. However, wound healing in vivo is a complex process that involves multiple factors. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of hUCB-MSCs and fibroblasts on diabetic wound healing in vivo. This study especially focused on collagen synthesis and angiogenesis, which are considered to be the important factors affecting diabetic wound healing. Porous polyethylene discs were loaded with either fibroblasts or hUCB-MSCs, and a third group, which served as a control, was not loaded with cells. The discs were then implanted in the back of diabetic mice. During the first and the second week after implantation, the discs were harvested, and collagen level and microvascular density were compared. In terms of collagen synthesis, the hUCB-MSC group showed the highest collagen level (117.7 ± 8.9 ng/mL), followed by the fibroblast group (83.2 ± 5.2 ng/mL) and the no-cell group (60.0 ± 4.7 ng/mL) in the second week after implantation. In terms of angiogenesis, the microvascular density in the hUCB-MSC group was 56.8 ± 16.4, which was much higher than that in the fibroblast group (14.3 ± 4.0) and the no-cell group (5.7 ± 2.1) in the second week after implantation. These results demonstrate that hUCB-MSCs are superior to fibroblasts in terms of their effect on diabetic wound healing in vivo. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel expression platform for the production of diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase (hGAD65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Denis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65 is a key autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, having much potential as an important marker for the prediction and diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, and for the development of novel antigen-specific therapies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, recombinant production of hGAD65 using conventional bacterial or mammalian cell culture-based expression systems or nuclear transformed plants is limited by low yield and low efficiency. Chloroplast transformation of the unicellular eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may offer a potential solution. Results A DNA cassette encoding full-length hGAD65, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast rbcL promoter and 5'- and 3'-UTRs, was constructed and introduced into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by particle bombardment. Integration of hGAD65 DNA into the algal chloroplast genome was confirmed by PCR. Transcriptional expression of hGAD65 was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Immunoblotting verified the expression and accumulation of the recombinant protein. The antigenicity of algal-derived hGAD65 was demonstrated with its immunoreactivity to diabetic sera by ELISA and by its ability to induce proliferation of spleen cells from NOD mice. Recombinant hGAD65 accumulated in transgenic algae, accounts for approximately 0.25–0.3% of its total soluble protein. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the potential value of C. reinhardtii chloroplasts as a novel platform for rapid mass production of immunologically active hGAD65. This demonstration opens the future possibility for using algal chloroplasts as novel bioreactors for the production of many other biologically active mammalian therapeutic proteins.

  13. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  14. Metastases of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Misdiagnosed as Isolated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Assunta; De Masi, Roberto; Orlando, Stefania; Metrangolo, Antonio; Zecca, Vittorio; Morciano, Giancarlo; De Donno, Antonella; Bagordo, Francesco; Piccinni, Giancarlo

    At present, cardiac metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma is rarely mentioned in the literature. We report a hepatocellular carcinoma patient with cardiac metastasis misdiagnosed as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 2011. Two years later, on presentation of syncope, an abnormal ventricular septal size was recorded by ultrasound scan, and was subsequently shown by magnetic resonance imaging to be a tumour lesion. A myocardial biopsy confirmed infiltration of hepatocellular carcinoma. This observation underlines the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma cardiac metastasis, manifested in its infiltrative form as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, we suggest that the ultrasound appearance of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients should be seen as a "red flag" and recommend the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging assessment of transplant candidates.

  15. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng J. Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

  16. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncer, M.; Gumrukcuoglu, H.A.; Ekim, H.; Gunes, Y.; Simsek, H.

    2010-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively uncommon inherited disease. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is also uncommonly observed, which often occurs in pregnant or post partum women but is rare in men. This report describes a 38 years old man with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed SCAD leading to acute inferior myocardial infarction. After emergent appendectomy operation at another hospital, he was immediately transferred to the Cardiology Department of our hospital due to acute myocardial infarction. He emergently underwent coronary angiography which showed a long dissection involving the right coronary. He underwent an emergent CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and he was discharged. According to our knowledge, no case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unrelated to postpartum period or oral contraceptive use has been reported so far. (author)

  17. Neonatal Transplantation Confers Maturation of PSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes Conducive to Modeling Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun-Sik Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs offer unprecedented opportunities for disease modeling and personalized medicine. However, PSC-derived cells exhibit fetal-like characteristics and remain immature in a dish. This has emerged as a major obstacle for their application for late-onset diseases. We previously showed that there is a neonatal arrest of long-term cultured PSC-derived cardiomyocytes (PSC-CMs. Here, we demonstrate that PSC-CMs mature into adult CMs when transplanted into neonatal hearts. PSC-CMs became similar to adult CMs in morphology, structure, and function within a month of transplantation into rats. The similarity was further supported by single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis. Moreover, this in vivo maturation allowed patient-derived PSC-CMs to reveal the disease phenotype of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, which manifests predominantly in adults. This study lays a foundation for understanding human CM maturation and pathogenesis and can be instrumental in PSC-based modeling of adult heart diseases. : Pluripotent stem cell (PSC-derived cells remain fetal like, and this has become a major impediment to modeling adult diseases. Cho et al. find that PSC-derived cardiomyocytes mature into adult cardiomyocytes when transplanted into neonatal rat hearts. This method can serve as a tool to understand maturation and pathogenesis in human cardiomyocytes. Keywords: cardiomyocyte, maturation, iPS, cardiac progenitor, neonatal, disease modeling, cardiomyopathy, ARVC, T-tubule, calcium transient, sarcomere shortening

  18. High-sugar intake does not exacerbate metabolic abnormalities or cardiac dysfunction in genetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Peter A; Galvao, Tatiana F; O'Shea, Karen M; Brown, Bethany H; Henderson, Reney; Riggle, Heather; Gupte, Sachin A; Stanley, William C

    2012-05-01

    A high-sugar intake increases heart disease risk in humans. In animals, sugar intake accelerates heart failure development by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) can fuel ROS production by providing reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for superoxide generation by NADPH oxidase. Conversely, G6PD also facilitates ROS scavenging using the glutathione pathway. We hypothesized that a high-sugar intake would increase flux through G6PD to increase myocardial NADPH and ROS and accelerate cardiac dysfunction and death. Six-week-old TO-2 hamsters, a non-hypertensive model of genetic cardiomyopathy caused by a δ-sarcoglycan mutation, were fed a long-term diet of high starch or high sugar (57% of energy from sucrose plus fructose). After 24 wk, the δ-sarcoglycan-deficient animals displayed expected decreases in survival and cardiac function associated with cardiomyopathy (ejection fraction: control 68.7 ± 4.5%, TO-2 starch 46.1 ± 3.7%, P sugar 58.0 ± 4.2%, NS, versus TO-2 starch or control; median survival: TO-2 starch 278 d, TO-2 sugar 318 d, P = 0.133). Although the high-sugar intake was expected to exacerbate cardiomyopathy, surprisingly, there was no further decrease in ejection fraction or survival with high sugar compared with starch in cardiomyopathic animals. Cardiomyopathic animals had systemic and cardiac metabolic abnormalities (increased serum lipids and glucose and decreased myocardial oxidative enzymes) that were unaffected by diet. The high-sugar intake increased myocardial superoxide, but NADPH and lipid peroxidation were unaffected. A sugar-enriched diet did not exacerbate ventricular function, metabolic abnormalities, or survival in heart failure despite an increase in superoxide production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recurrent major depression, ataxia, and cardiomyopathy: association with a novel POLG mutation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoeven WMA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Willem MA Verhoeven1,2, Jos IM Egger1,3,4, Berry PH Kremer5, Boudewijn JHB de Pont1, Carlo LM Marcelis61Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Centre of Excellence for Neuropsychiatry, Venray, The Netherlands; 2Erasmus University Medical Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 4Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 5Department of Neurology, University Medical Centre Groningen, The Netherlands; 6Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: At present, more than 100 disease mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG have been indentified that are causally related to an array of neuropsychiatric diseases affecting multiple systems. Both autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant forms can be delineated, the latter being associated with Parkinsonism and depressive or psychotic syndromes. In this report, a middle-aged female patient with recurrent major depression with melancholic features, slowly progressive gait instability, and dilated cardiomyopathy is described. Detailed diagnostic evaluation was performed to elucidate the supposed relationship between ataxia, cardiomyopathy, and major depression with melancholia. After extensive genetic and metabolic investigation, a nucleotide substitution c.2207 A→G in the POLG gene resulting in amino acid change Asn 736Ser in exon 13 was demonstrated. This mutation was considered to be compatible with a mitochondrial disorder and implicated in the pathophysiology of the neuropsychiatric syndrome. It is concluded that this novel POLG mutation forms the most parsimonious etiological explanation for the here-described combination of ataxia, major depression, and cardiomyopathy. Therefore, in patients with a complex neuropsychiatric

  20. Immunology in the clinic review series; focus on type 1 diabetes and viruses: the enterovirus link to type 1 diabetes: critical review of human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stene, L C; Rewers, M

    2012-01-01

    OTHER THEMES PUBLISHED IN THIS IMMUNOLOGY IN THE CLINIC REVIEW SERIES Metabolic diseases, host responses, cancer, autoinflammatory diseases, allergy. The hypothesis that under some circumstances enteroviral infections can lead to type 1 diabetes (T1D) was proposed several decades ago, based initially on evidence from animal studies and sero-epidemiology. Subsequently, enterovirus RNA has been detected more frequently in serum of patients than in control subjects, but such studies are susceptible to selection bias and reverse causality. Here, we review critically recent evidence from human studies, focusing on longitudinal studies with potential to demonstrate temporal association. Among seven longitudinal birth cohort studies, the evidence that enterovirus infections predict islet autoimmunity is quite inconsistent in our interpretation, due partially, perhaps, to heterogeneity in study design and a limited number of subjects studied. An association between enterovirus and rapid progression from autoimmunity to T1D was reported by one longitudinal study, but although consistent with evidence from animal models, this novel observation awaits replication. It is possible that a potential association with initiation and/or progression of islet autoimmunity can be ascribed to a subgroup of the many enterovirus serotypes, but this has still not been investigated properly. There is a need for larger studies with frequent sample intervals and collection of specimens of sufficient quality and quantity for detailed characterization of enterovirus. More research into the molecular epidemiology of enteroviruses and enterovirus immunity in human populations is also warranted. Ultimately, this knowledge may be used to devise strategies to reduce the risk of T1D in humans. PMID:22385232

  1. β-Cell Replacement in Mice Using Human Type 1 Diabetes Nuclear Transfer Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Lina; Danzl, Nichole; Campbell, Sean R; Viola, Ryan; Williams, Damian; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Phillips, Neil; Poffenberger, Greg; Johannesson, Bjarki; Oberholzer, Jose; Powers, Alvin C; Leibel, Rudolph L; Chen, Xiaojuan; Sykes, Megan; Egli, Dieter

    2018-01-01

    β-Cells derived from stem cells hold great promise for cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Here we examine the ability of nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (NT-ESs) derived from a patient with type 1 diabetes to differentiate into β-cells and provide a source of autologous islets for cell replacement. NT-ESs differentiate in vitro with an average efficiency of 55% into C-peptide-positive cells, expressing markers of mature β-cells, including MAFA and NKX6.1. Upon transplantation in immunodeficient mice, grafted cells form vascularized islet-like structures containing MAFA/C-peptide-positive cells. These β-cells adapt insulin secretion to ambient metabolite status and show normal insulin processing. Importantly, NT-ES-β-cells maintain normal blood glucose levels after ablation of the mouse endogenous β-cells. Cystic structures, but no teratomas, were observed in NT-ES-β-cell grafts. Isogenic induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed greater variability in β-cell differentiation. Even though different methods of somatic cell reprogramming result in stem cell lines that are molecularly indistinguishable, full differentiation competence is more common in ES cell lines than in induced pluripotent stem cell lines. These results demonstrate the suitability of NT-ES-β-cells for cell replacement for type 1 diabetes and provide proof of principle for therapeutic cloning combined with cell therapy. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Human and rodent muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in diabetes related to insulin, starvation, and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, T A; Hasselbalch, S; Farrell, P A

    1994-01-01

    As determined by vanadate-facilitated [3H]ouabain binding to intact samples, semistarvation and untreated streptozotocin- or partial pancreatectomy-induced diabetes reduced rat soleus muscle Na(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase) concentration by 12-21% (P

  3. "Evaluating Causality of Gut Microbiota in Obesity and Diabetes in Humans"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnikman, Abraham S.; Gerdes, Victor E.; Nieuwdorp, Max; Herrema, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    The pathophysiology of obesity and obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is complex and driven by many factors. One of the most recently identified factors in development of these metabolic pathologies is the gut microbiota. The introduction of affordable, high-throughput

  4. Expression Profiling of Human Genetic and Protein Interaction Networks in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Bergholdt, R; Brorsson, C

    2009-01-01

    Proteins contributing to a complex disease are often members of the same functional pathways. Elucidation of such pathways may provide increased knowledge about functional mechanisms underlying disease. By combining genetic interactions in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) with protein interaction data we have...

  5. Seven mutations in the human insulin gene linked to permanent neonatal/infancy-onset diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Carlo; Porzio, Ottavia; Liu, Ming

    2008-01-01

    Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is a rare disorder usually presenting within 6 months of birth. Although several genes have been linked to this disorder, in almost half the cases documented in Italy, the genetic cause remains unknown. Because the Akita mouse bearing a mutation in the ...

  6. Reversible Stress Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Acute Coronary Syndrome with Elevated Troponin in the Absence of Regional Wall Motion Abnormalities: A Forme Fruste of Stress Cardiomyopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Anantha Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of reversible stress cardiomyopathy in a surgical patient, described here as a forme fruste due to its atypical features. It is important to recognize such unusual presentation of stress cardiomyopathy that mimics acute coronary syndrome. Stress cardiomyopathy commonly presents as acute coronary syndrome and is characterized by typical or atypical variants of regional wall motion abnormalities. We report a 60-year-old Caucasian male with reversible stress cardiomyopathy following a sternal fracture fixation. Although the patient had several typical features of stress cardiomyopathy including physical stress, ST-segment elevation, elevated cardiac biomarkers and normal epicardial coronaries, there were few features that were atypical, including unusual age, gender, absence of regional wall motion abnormalities, high lateral ST elevation, and high troponin-ejection fraction product. In conclusion, this could represent a forme fruste of stress cardiomyopathy.

  7. Concentration of free amino acids in human milk of women with gestational diabetes mellitus and healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Katharina; Bancher-Todesca, Dagmar; Graf, Thorsten; Garo, Fritz; Roth, Erich; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Worda, Christof

    2013-02-01

    It is generally agreed that breastfeeding has a positive effect on the metabolic situation in diabetic mothers. However, negative long-term effects are described for breastfed offspring of diabetic women. It is unknown if the composition of free amino acids (FAAs) in breastmilk of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) differs from that in milk of healthy women. We studied the amount of FAAs in breastmilk of women with GDM and women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Human milk samples of 68 women (21 GDM and 47 NGT) were analyzed. Contents of FAAs in milk samples, obtained within the first 4 days after delivery (colostrum) and 6 weeks later (mature milk), were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Total amounts of FAAs in colostrum and in mature milk were compared between the groups. The impact of maternal age, body mass index (BMI), gestational age at birth, birth weight, and diagnosis of GDM on the total amount of FAAs was evaluated. Overall, the total amount of FAAs increased significantly from colostrum to mature milk in both groups (pmilk (1,560 μmol/L vs. 1,730 μmol/L and 2,440 μmol/L vs. 2,723 μmol/L, respectively). No significant influence on the total amount of FAAs at both measurements of maternal age, BMI, gestational age at birth, birth weight, and diagnosis of GDM could be observed by regression analyses. The content of FAAs of human milk does not significantly differ between women with GDM and women with NGT.

  8. [Congestive cardiomyopathy in addiction to clobenzorex, an anorexigenic drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaert, P; Camblin, J; Graux, P; Anaye, B; Dutoit, A; Croccel, L

    1986-04-01

    Cardiac failure caused by high doses of amphetamine-like drugs is rare. We report a case of decompensated congestive cardiomyopathy occurring in a 29 year old woman addicted to clobenzorex (Dinintel). This patient had been taking 5 to 7 capsules per day for 5 years. No other cause of cardiac failure was detected. A rapid improvement was obtained by digitalis and diuretic therapy; no further episodes of cardiac failure were observed after one year. However, the drug could not be completely withdrawn and echocardiography has shown increasing left ventricular dilatation. The possible mechanisms of amphetamine induced myocardial toxicity are discussed and the analogy with the group of adrenergic cardiomyopathies is underlined.

  9. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Psychiatric Illness: Redefining the Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians who encounter patients in the emergency department with chest pain, palpitations, or shortness of breath may often find it difficult to differentiate diagnosis of panic attacks from acute coronary syndrome or Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy. Redefining and understanding the pathophysiological relationship of psychiatric illness including anxiety, depression, or panic attacks and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy may help clinicians implement a more effective and beneficial model of care for this affliction that is being found to be increasingly more common in today’s age.

  10. Dilated cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. An update for pediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes Bottner, Paola; Córdova Fernández, Tamara; Larraín Valenzuela, Marcos; Cruces Romero Presentación de Casos Clínicos, Pablo

    2018-06-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is the main cause of heart failure leading to heart transplant. Its prognosis is variable and depends on the etiology, the patient's age at onset, and the severity. The management of dilated cardiomyopathy is aimed at minimizing symptoms and preventing disease progression; it requires a comprehensive screening for comorbidities and the prevention of complications to improve the overall status of these children and mitigate their prognosis. Here we present a review oriented at the multidisciplinary management that pediatricians should consider when seeing these patients. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  11. Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Associated with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Koeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM is usually characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Due to the clinical symptoms which include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, and elevated myocardial markers, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is frequently mimicking ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the absence of a significant coronary artery disease. Otherwise an acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery can produce a typical Takotsubo contraction pattern. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI is frequently associated with emotional stress, but to date no cases of STEMI triggering TCM have been reported. We describe a case of a female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by TCM.

  12. A Rare Occurance with Epidermolysis Bullosa Disease: Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Cimen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a congenital and herediter vesiculobullous disease. Dystrophic form of this disease is characterized by severe malnutrition, failure to thrive, adhesions at fingers, joint contractures related with the formation of scar tissues, carcinoma of the skin, anemia, hipoalbuminemia, wound enfections and sepsis. Rarely, mortal dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in patients. In this report we present a 13 year-old pediatric patient with dilated cardiomyopathy, clinically diagnosed with Epidermolysis bullosa as well as a review of recent related literature.

  13. A murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus developed using a combination of high fat diet and multiple low doses of streptozotocin treatment mimics the metabolic characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Sayantan; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Choudhury, Yashmin

    A murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was used to compare the antidiabetic effects of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) inhibitor vildagliptin and biguanide, metformin. Swiss albino mice (n=20 males; n=25 females) were given high fat diet (HFD) ad libitum for 3weeks followed by low dose (40mgkg -1 body weight, bw daily) of streptozotocin (STZ) intraperitoneally five times from the 22nd day of treatment onwards, with HFD continued up to 26th day. Controls (n=15 males; n=15 females) were fed normal balanced diet without administration of STZ. Successful induction of diabetes mellitus was confirmed by testing for fasting blood glucose, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and intraperitoneal insulin sensitivity. Diabetic mice were administered vildagliptin (10mgkg -1 bw daily) and metformin (50mgkg -1 bw daily) orally for 4weeks. Control, diabetic, vildagliptin and metformin-treated diabetic mice were evaluated for alterations in lipid profile using blood serum and histopathology and oxidative stress using tissues including liver, kidney and heart. Diabetic mice showed significant alterations in lipid profile, tissue histopathology, impaired glucose tolerance, lower insulin sensitivity and elevated lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation, with depressed catalase activity, when compared to age and gender-matched controls. Metformin and vildagliptin ameliorated the abovementioned diabetic conditions, with vildagliptin found to be more effective. A murine model developed by the combination of HFD and multiple low dose of STZ mimics the metabolic characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans, and may be useful for antidiabetic drug screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Myocardial perfusion imaging in hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorin, B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Patients with Hyperthrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) frequently suffer from syncope and cardiac arrest which may lead to sudden death. This is most often caused by ventricular arrhythmia's in adults, however in young patients the mechanisms are thought to be different. Ischaemia may play a significant role even in young asymptomatic HCM patients. The mechanisms of ischaemic development in HCM differ from those in the 'normal' myocardium (Due to intramural small vessel abnormalities and abnormal myocellular architecture). In HCM the coronary microcirculation is most often affected and massive hypertrophy means more energy is required to promote contraction thus increasing oxygen demand and compounding the effects of any ischaemic changes. A case of a 12 year old HCM patient is presented who has symptoms of syncope associated with exercise whose mother died suddenly of cardiac arrest developed from HCM. A myocardial perfusion rest/stress study was undertaken to detect any underlying myocardial ischaemia. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy demonstrates any reduction in the microcirculation in addition to that present in the macrocirculation, unlike angiography which will only detect the latter. In this case the scan clearly showed evidence of ischaemia in the lateral wall and this may be an explanation for her episodes of syncope. We suggest an algorithm or the routine work-up of young patients with HCM which makes aggressive use of myocardial perfusion imaging to detect ischaemic changes. This may identify patients who are at higher risk and will assist with treatment decisions. We feel myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a sensitive non-invasive accurate method of detecting microcirculatory ischaemia and is thus invaluable in HCM patients

  15. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  16. Association Between Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy and Later Risk of Cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Ida; Basit, Saima; Lykke, Jacob Alexander

    2016-01-01

    disorder of pregnancy. During follow-up, 1577 women (mean age, 48.5 years at cardiomyopathy diagnosis; 2.6% with multiple pregnancies) developed cardiomyopathy. Compared with women with normotensive pregnancies (18,211,603 person-years of follow-up; n = 1408 cardiomyopathy events, 7.7/100,000 person......-years [95% CI, 7.3-8.2]), women with a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy had significantly increased rates of cardiomyopathy (in 173,062 person-years of follow-up among women with severe preeclampsia, n = 27 cardiomyopathy events; 15.6/100,000 person-years [95% CI, 10.7-22.7]; adjusted hazard......IMPORTANCE: Women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, preeclampsia in particular, have an increased risk of cardiomyopathy during the peripartum period. Whether hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are also associated with cardiomyopathy later in life is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine...

  17. OBSCN Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Haploinsufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Marston

    Full Text Available Studies of the functional consequences of DCM-causing mutations have been limited to a few cases where patients with known mutations had heart transplants. To increase the number of potential tissue samples for direct investigation we performed whole exon sequencing of explanted heart muscle samples from 30 patients that had a diagnosis of familial dilated cardiomyopathy and screened for potentially disease-causing mutations in 58 HCM or DCM-related genes.We identified 5 potentially disease-causing OBSCN mutations in 4 samples; one sample had two OBSCN mutations and one mutation was judged to be not disease-related. Also identified were 6 truncating mutations in TTN, 3 mutations in MYH7, 2 in DSP and one each in TNNC1, TNNI3, MYOM1, VCL, GLA, PLB, TCAP, PKP2 and LAMA4. The mean level of obscurin mRNA was significantly greater and more variable in healthy donor samples than the DCM samples but did not correlate with OBSCN mutations. A single obscurin protein band was observed in human heart myofibrils with apparent mass 960 ± 60 kDa. The three samples with OBSCN mutations had significantly lower levels of obscurin immunoreactive material than DCM samples without OBSCN mutations (45±7, 48±3, and 72±6% of control level.Obscurin levels in DCM controls, donor heart and myectomy samples were the same.OBSCN mutations may result in the development of a DCM phenotype via haploinsufficiency. Mutations in the obscurin gene should be considered as a significant causal factor of DCM, alone or in concert with other mutations.

  18. Development of porcine model of chronic tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paslawska, Urszula; Gajek, Jacek; Kiczak, Liliana; Noszczyk-Nowak, Agnieszka; Skrzypczak, Piotr; Bania, Jacek; Tomaszek, Alicja; Zacharski, Maciej; Sambor, Izabela; Dziegiel, Piotr; Zysko, Dorota; Banasiak, Waldemar; Jankowska, Ewa A; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2011-11-17

    There are few experimental models of heart failure (HF) in large animals, despite structural and functional similarities to human myocardium. We have developed a porcine model of chronic tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. Homogenous siblings of White Large breed swine (n=6) underwent continuous right ventricular (RV) pacing at 170 bpm; 2 subjects served as controls. In the course of RV pacing, animals developed a clinical picture of HF and were presented for euthanasia at subsequent stages: mild, moderate and end-stage HF. Left ventricle (LV) sections were analyzed histologically and relative ANP, BNP, phospholamban and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a transcript levels in LV were quantified by real time RT-PCR. In the course of RV pacing, animals demonstrated reduced exercise capacity (time of running until being dyspnoeic: 6.6 ± 0.5 vs. 2.4 ± 1.4 min), LV dilatation (LVEDD: 4.9 ± 0.4 vs. 6.7 ± 0.4 cm), impaired LV systolic function (LVEF: 69 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 %), (all baseline vs. before euthanasia, all p<0.001). LV tissues from animals with moderate and end-stage HF demonstrated local foci of interstitial fibrosis, congestion, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and atrophy, which was not detected in controls and mild HF animals. The up-regulation of ANP and BNP and a reduction in a ratio of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a and phospholamban in failing myocardium were observed as compared to controls. In pigs, chronic RV pacing at relatively low rate can be used as an experimental model of HF, as it results in a gradual deterioration of exercise tolerance accompanied by myocardial remodeling confirmed at subcellular level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Three-dimensional MR microscopy of a transgenic mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, R.W.; Strife, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Chan, C.B.; Sanbe, A.; Robbins, J. [Div. of Molecular Cardiovascular Biology, Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Dardzinski, B.J.; Dunn, S.; Schmithorst, V.; Holland, S.K. [Imaging Research Center, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Background. Scientists are now able to alter the genetics of vertebrate embryos routinely to produce animal models of human developmental diseases. However, our understanding of structural changes in these animal models is limited by current methodologies. Histological techniques, although providing great anatomic detail, display only ''static'' data (one time point only) in two dimensions. Ultrasound may be used to generate continuous time course data, but is limited by interobserver variation, limited acoustic windows, and relatively low resolution. Objective. To apply the high resolution, non-destructive, and three-dimensional acquisition capabilities of magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy to compare the hearts of normal mice versus an established transgenic mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Materials and methods. Transgenic mice exhibiting dilated cardiomyopathy were developed via the introduction of a mutated, heart-specific gene (myosin light chain). Post-mortem cardiac imaging was performed on the transgenic mice and normal controls. MR imaging was performed on a Bruker 3T imaging magnet using a custom radiofrequency coil following contrast perfusion of the atrial and ventricular chambers. Image resolution was 156 {mu}m isotropic voxels. MR images were compared to gross pathologic specimens. Imaging data were post-processed using custom software to calculate the volumes of the atria and ventricles and to display the three-dimensional morphology of the chambers and myocardium. Results. Of the seven mice scanned, four exhibited normal right atrial (average = 14.8 {mu}l {+-} 1.4), left atrial (average = 8.5 {mu}l {+-} 0.3), right ventricular (average = 12.9 {mu}l {+-} 2.7), and left ventricular (average 3.3 {mu}l {+-} 0.5) volumes. Three mice exhibited dilatation of the right and left cardiac chambers (RA average = 23.9 {mu}l {+-} 5.6; LA average = 15.9 {mu}l {+-} 4.8; RV average = 32.5 {mu}l {+-} 6.8; LV average 24.0 {mu}l {+-} 1

  20. Islet neogenesis potential of human adult stem cells and its applications in cell replacement therapy for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhonde RR

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years regenerative biology has reached to greater heights due to its therapeutic potential in treating degenerative diseases; as they are not curable by modern medicine. With the advent of research in stem cells and developmental biology the regenerative potential of adult resident stem cells is becoming clearer. The long term objective of regenerative medicine or cell therapy is to treat patients with their own stem cells. These stem cells could be derived from the diseased organs such as skin, liver, pancreas etc. or from reservoirs of multipotent stem cells such as bone marrow or cord blood.Manipulating the ability of tissue resident stem cells as well as from multipotent reservoirs such as bone marrow, umbilical cord and cord blood to give rise to endocrine cells may open new avenues in the treatment of diabetes. A better understanding of stem cell biology would almost certainly allow for the establishment of efficient and reliable cell transplantation experimental programs in the clinic. We show here that multipotent mesenchymal stem cells can be isolated from various sources such as the bone marrow, placenta, umbilical cord. Upon stimulation with specific growth factors they differentiate into islet like clusters (ILCs. When ILCs obtained from the above mentioned sources were transplanted in experimental diabetic mice, restoration of normoglycemia was observed within three weeks of transplantation with concomitant increase in the body weight. These euglycemic mice exhibited normal glucose tolerance test indicating normal utilization of glucose. Allthough the MSCs isolated from all the sources had the same characteristics; they showed significant differences in their islet differentiation potential. ILCs isolated for the human bone marrow did not show any pancreatic hormones in vitro, but upon transplantation they matured into insulin and somatostatin producing hormones. Placental MSCs as well as ILCs showed insulin trascripts

  1. The SNARE protein SNAP23 and the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c in human skeletal muscle are implicated in insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Vind, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    /cytosolic compartment in the patients with the type 2 diabetes. Expression of the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c was higher in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes. Studies in L6 cells showed that Munc18c promoted the expression of SNAP23. CONCLUSIONS: We have translated our previous in vitro results......OBJECTIVE: Our previous studies suggest that the SNARE protein synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP23) is involved in the link between increased lipid levels and insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes. The objective was to determine whether SNAP23 may also be involved in the known...... association between lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes in humans, as well as to identify a potential regulator of SNAP23. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy, insulin-sensitive control...

  2. Pancreas transplantation for treatment of generalized allergy to human insulin in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaise, J; Leonet, J; Goffin, E; Lefebvre, C; Tennstedt, D; Vandeleene, B; Buysschaert, M; Squifflet, J P

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old man with a 14-year history of type 1 diabetes, normal renal function, and mild diabetic retinopathy. The patient progressively developed a generalized allergic reaction to two insulin excipients--protamine and metacresol--with systemic manifestations of tremor, tachycardia, vertigo, shortness of breath, and short episodes of unconsciousness causing him to be out of work. In June 2003, he received a vascularized cadaveric pancreas transplant using induction with polyclonal antibodies along with tacrolimus and sirolimus but without steroids. A hyperglycemic episode following corticosteroid therapy for rejection treatment required reintroduction of insulin therapy with prompt reappearance of allergic manifestations. Now, the patient is euglycemic without insulin or allergic manifestations and a glycated hemoglobin of 6.4%.

  3. Detection of Elevated Signaling Amino Acids in Human Diabetic Vitreous by Rapid Capillary Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Jen Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated glutamate is implicated in the pathology of PDR. The ability to rapidly assess the glutamate and amino acid content of vitreous provides a more complete picture of the chemical changes occurring at the diabetic retina and may lead to a better understanding of the pathology of PDR. Vitreous humor was collected following vitrectomies of patients with PDR and control conditions of macular hole or epiretinal membrane. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to quantify glutamate and arginine. The analysis is relatively fast (<6 minutes and utilizes a poly(ethyleneoxide and sodium dodecylsulfate run buffer. Both amino acid levels show significant increases in PDR patients versus controls and are comparable to other reports. The levels of vitreal glutamate vary inversely with the degree of observed hemorrhage. The results demonstrate a rapid method for assessment of a number of amino acids to characterize the chemical changes at the diabetic retina to better understand tissue changes and potentially identify new treatments.

  4. Proteomics analysis of human skeletal muscle reveals novel abnormalities in obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Hyonson; Bowen, Benjamin P; Lefort, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    changes involving the use of proteomics was used here. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Muscle biopsies were obtained basally from lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic volunteers (n = 8 each); glucose clamps were used to assess insulin sensitivity. Muscle protein was subjected to mass spectrometry......OBJECTIVE : Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is an early phenomenon in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Studies of insulin resistance usually are highly focused. However, approaches that give a more global picture of abnormalities in insulin resistance are useful in pointing out new......-based quantification using normalized spectral abundance factors. RESULTS: Of 1,218 proteins assigned, 400 were present in at least half of all subjects. Of these, 92 were altered by a factor of 2 in insulin resistance, and of those, 15 were significantly increased or decreased by ANOVA (P

  5. Application of radionuclide techniques in evaluation of dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yueqin; Liu Xiujie; Shi Rongfang

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical significance of radionuclide techniques in differentiating dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) from ischemic cardiomyopathy (CAD-CM). Methods: 28 patients (pts) with DCM and 55 pts with CAD-CM were studied. All pts underwent 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT and 18 F-FDG myocardial metabolic PET. 73 pts had 99 Tc m -RBC radionuclide ventriculography and 68 pts had coronary angiography. Results: 23 pts (82%) with DCM showed perfusion abnormalities with mild and not segmental distribution. 52 pts (95%) with CAD-CM showed perfusion abnormalities that distributed along the coronary vessel territories. Perfusion defects were found in 4 pts (14%) with DCM and 45 pts (82%) with CAD-CM (P<0.01). The average perfusion score was 4.5 +- 2.6 in DCM and 9.5 +- 2.9 in CAD-CM, the area of perfusion diminished uptake was significantly smaller in DCM than in CAD-CM (P < 0.001). 2 pts with DCM and 18 pts with CAD-CM had metabolic defect. The patterns of perfusion/metabolic imaging showed mismatch in most pts with CAD-CM but match in pts with DCM. The LVEF in pts with DCM and CAD-CM was decreased but no significant difference between DCM and CAD-CM was observed. The RVEF in pts with DCM was significantly lower than that in pts with CAD-CM (32.4% +- 13.9% vs 40.9% +- 15.4%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: The radionuclide techniques showed to be helpful for distinguishing DCM from CAD-CM. The discriminate analysis revealed that segmental perfusion abnormality and RVEF were the most important factors for differentiation of DCM from CAD-CM

  6. Regenerative medicine for diabetes: differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into functional β-cells in vitro and their proposed journey to clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Bipasha; Katikireddy, Kishore Reddy; Shenoy, P Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases, rising globally at an alarming rate. Type 1 (juvenile diabetes) is the autoimmune version of diabetes where the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, whereas type 2 (adult onset diabetes) is caused due to insulin resistance of the cells. In either of the cases, elevated blood glucose levels are observed which leads to progressive comorbidity like renal failure, cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, etc. Metformin, sulphonyl urea group of drugs, as well as insulin injections are the available therapies. In advanced cases of diabetes, the drug alone or drug in combination with insulin injections are not able to maintain a steady level of blood glucose. Moreover, frequent insulin injections are rather cumbersome for the patient. So, regenerative medicine could be a permanent solution for fighting diabetes. Islet transplantation has been tried with a limited amount of success on a large population of diabetics because of the shortage of cadaveric pancreas. Therefore, the best proposed alternative is regenerative medicine involving human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived beta islet transplantation which can be obtained in large quantities. Efficient protocols for in vitro differentiation of hPSC into a large number of sustained insulin-producing beta cells for transplantation will be considered to be a giant leap to address global rise in diabetic cases. Although most of the protocols mimic in vivo pancreatic development in humans, considerable amount of lacuna persists for near-perfect differentiation strategies. Moreover, beta islets differentiated from hPSC have not yet been successfully translated under clinical scenario. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A small molecule inhibitor of mutant IDH2 rescues cardiomyopathy in a D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria type II mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Travins, Jeremy; Lin, Zhizhong; Si, Yaguang; Chen, Yue; Powe, Josh; Murray, Stuart; Zhu, Dongwei; Artin, Erin; Gross, Stefan; Santiago, Stephanie; Steadman, Mya; Kernytsky, Andrew; Straley, Kimberly; Lu, Chenming; Pop, Ana; Struys, Eduard A; Jansen, Erwin E W; Salomons, Gajja S; David, Muriel D; Quivoron, Cyril; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Regan, Karen S; Liu, Wei; Dang, Lenny; Yang, Hua; Silverman, Lee; Agresta, Samuel; Dorsch, Marion; Biller, Scott; Yen, Katharine; Cang, Yong; Su, Shin-San Michael; Jin, Shengfang

    2016-11-01

    D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D2HGA) type II is a rare neurometabolic disorder caused by germline gain-of-function mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), resulting in accumulation of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG). Patients exhibit a wide spectrum of symptoms including cardiomyopathy, epilepsy, developmental delay and limited life span. Currently, there are no effective therapeutic interventions. We generated a D2HGA type II mouse model by introducing the Idh2R140Q mutation at the native chromosomal locus. Idh2R140Q mice displayed significantly elevated 2HG levels and recapitulated multiple defects seen in patients. AGI-026, a potent, selective inhibitor of the human IDH2R140Q-mutant enzyme, suppressed 2HG production, rescued cardiomyopathy, and provided a survival benefit in Idh2R140Q mice; treatment withdrawal resulted in deterioration of cardiac function. We observed differential expression of multiple genes and metabolites that are associated with cardiomyopathy, which were largely reversed by AGI-026. These findings demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefit of an IDH2R140Q inhibitor in patients with D2HGA type II.

  8. Human beta-cell precursors mature into functional insulin-producing cells in an immunoisolation device: implications for diabetes cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Hao, Ergeng; Savinov, Alexei Y; Geron, Ifat; Strongin, Alex Y; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2009-04-15

    Islet transplantation is limited by the need for chronic immunosuppression and the paucity of donor tissue. As new sources of human beta-cells are developed (e.g., stem cell-derived tissue), transplanting them in a durable device could obviate the need for immunosuppression, while also protecting the patient from any risk of tumorigenicity. Here, we studied (1) the survival and function of encapsulated human beta-cells and their progenitors and (2) the engraftment of encapsulated murine beta-cells in allo- and autoimmune settings. Human islets and human fetal pancreatic islet-like cell clusters were encapsulated in polytetrafluorethylene devices (TheraCyte) and transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Graft survival and function was measured by immunohistochemistry, circulating human C-peptide levels, and blood glucose levels. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor encapsulated neonatal murine islets. Encapsulated human islet-like cell clusters survived, replicated, and acquired a level of glucose responsive insulin secretion sufficient to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Bioluminescent imaging of encapsulated murine neonatal islets revealed a dynamic process of cell death followed by regrowth, resulting in robust long-term allograft survival. Further, in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I diabetes, encapsulated primary beta-cells ameliorated diabetes without stimulating a detectable T-cell response. We demonstrate for the first time that human beta-cells function is compatible with encapsulation in a durable, immunoprotective device. Moreover, our study suggests that encapsulation of beta-cells before terminal differentiation will be a successful approach for new cell-based therapies for diabetes, such as those derived from stem cells.

  9. Human β-cell Precursors Mature Into Functional Insulin-producing Cells in an Immunoisolation Device: Implications for Diabetes Cell Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Hao, Ergeng; Savinov, Alexei Y.; Geron, Ifat; Strongin, Alex Y.; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is limited by the need for chronic immunosuppression and the paucity of donor tissue. As new sources of human β-cells are developed (e.g., stem cell-derived tissue), transplanting them in a durable device could obviate the need for immunosuppression, while also protecting the patient from any risk of tumorigenicity. Here, we studied (1) the survival and function of encapsulated human β-cells and their progenitors and (2) the engraftment of encapsulated murine β-cells in allo- and autoimmune settings. Methods Human islets and human fetal pancreatic islet-like cell clusters were encapsulated in polytetrafluorethylene devices (TheraCyte) and transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Graft survival and function was measured by immunohistochemistry, circulating human C-peptide levels, and blood glucose levels. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor encapsulated neonatal murine islets. Results Encapsulated human islet-like cell clusters survived, replicated, and acquired a level of glucose responsive insulin secretion sufficient to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Bioluminescent imaging of encapsulated murine neonatal islets revealed a dynamic process of cell death followed by regrowth, resulting in robust long-term allograft survival. Further, in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I diabetes, encapsulated primary β-cells ameliorated diabetes without stimulating a detectable T-cell response. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time that human β-cells function is compatible with encapsulation in a durable, immunoprotective device. Moreover, our study suggests that encapsulation of β-cells before terminal differentiation will be a successful approach for new cell-based therapies for diabetes, such as those derived from stem cells. PMID:19352116

  10. Dystrophic Cardiomyopathy: Complex Pathobiological Processes to Generate Clinical Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Tsuda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, and X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XL-DCM consist of a unique clinical entity, the dystrophinopathies, which are due to variable mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a common complication of dystrophinopathies, but the onset, progression, and severity of heart disease differ among these subgroups. Extensive molecular genetic studies have been conducted to assess genotype-phenotype correlation in DMD, BMD, and XL-DCM to understand the underlying mechanisms of these diseases, but the results are not always conclusive, suggesting the involvement of complex multi-layers of pathological processes that generate the final clinical phenotype. Dystrophin protein is a part of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC that is localized in skeletal muscles, myocardium, smooth muscles, and neuronal tissues. Diversity of cardiac phenotype in dystrophinopathies suggests multiple layers of pathogenetic mechanisms in forming dystrophic cardiomyopathy. In this review article, we review the complex molecular interactions involving the pathogenesis of dystrophic cardiomyopathy, including primary gene mutations and loss of structural integrity, secondary cellular responses, and certain epigenetic and other factors that modulate gene expressions. Involvement of epigenetic gene regulation appears to lead to specific cardiac phenotypes in dystrophic hearts.

  11. Penetrance of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Children Who Are Mutation Positive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, Alexa M. C.; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Blom, Nico A.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Christiaans, Imke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) at first cardiac evaluation and during follow-up and cardiac events in predictively tested children who are mutation positive. Study design The study included 119 predictively tested children who were mutation positive, with

  12. CARDIOMYOPATHIE DU POSTPARTUM: A propos de cinq cas au ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main presenting symptom was congestive heart failure with acute pulmonary edema. In all cases, the chest x-ray showed ... The treatment administered to these patients included bed rest, salt restriction, digitalics, ... The main issues concerning the management of postpartum cardiomyopathy are raised in this article.

  13. Psychological Features of Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: Report of Four Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenab, Yaser; Hashemi, Seyedeh Roghaieh; Ghaffari-Marandi, Neda; Zafarghandi, Hoda; Shahmansouri, Nazila

    2017-04-01

    Takotsubo or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is a cardiomyopathy in which the patient has a sudden onset, reversible left ventricular systolic dysfunction without any significant coronary artery disease. Four women, who were at a mean age of 64 years and suffered from chest pain exacerbated by emotional stress, were admitted as cases of acute coronary syndrome and were completely evaluated through precise history taking, physical examination, and ECG. Coronary angiography or coronary multidetector computed tomography was used to exclude significant coronary artery disease. In these patients with confirmed Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, in addition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV) criteria, a 71-item form of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-Mini-Mult-was employed for psychological assessment. The main common elevated scale was hypochondriasis. Individuals with high scores on this scale are obsessed with themselves, especially in regard to their body, and often use their disease symptoms in order to manipulate others. They are mainly passive aggressive, critical, and demanding, which stems from their lack of effective verbal abilities as a means of communication, specifically when it comes to anger or hostility expression. To the best of our knowledge, there is no available study evaluating patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy using the Mini-Mult questionnaire for psychological assessment.

  14. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: A known unknown foe of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiou, Ourania S; Douras, Alexandros; Makris, Demosthenes; Mpaka, Nikoleta; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2017-10-01

    Patients with uncontrolled asthma are at a greater risk of asthma attacks requiring emergency room visits or hospital admissions. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is potentially a significant complication in a course of status asthmaticus. We describe a 43-year-old female patient who presented with status asthmaticus that was further complicated with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Recognizing apical ballooning syndrome is challenging in patients with a history of respiratory disease because the symptoms of the last entity may complicate the diagnostic approach. It is difficult to distinguish clinically apical ballooning syndrome from the acute airway exacerbation itself. Both asthma and takotsubo cardiomyopathy share the same clinical presentation with dyspnea and chest tightness. In our patient, the electrocardiographic abnormalities, the rapidly reversible distinctive characteristics of echocardiography, and the modest elevation of serum cardiac biomarkers levels, in combination with the presence of a stress trigger (severe asthma attack), strongly supported the diagnosis of broken heart syndrome. Clinicians should re-evaluate asthma management and be aware of the complications associated with asthma attacks such as stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

  15. Characteristic adaptations of the extracellular matrix in dilated cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Vink, Aryan; Harakalova, Magdalena; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Verhaar, Marianne C; Cheng, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a relatively common heart muscle disease characterized by the dilation and thinning of the left ventricle accompanied with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Myocardial fibrosis is a major feature in DCM and therefore it is inevitable that corresponding

  16. Molecular genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Dobermann dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stabej, Polona

    2005-01-01

    Canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the myocardium associated with dilatation and impaired contraction of the ventricles. It primarily affects large and giant breed dogs with Dobermanns being one of the most frequently affected. The high prevalence of DCM in specific breeds suggests

  17. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  18. Familial occurrence of isolated non-compaction cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorsheyd, Anouk; Cramer, Maarten-Jan M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Vonken, Evert-Jan P.; van der Smagt, Jasper; van Tintelen, Peter; Hauer, Richard N. W.

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims: Isolated left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) may have an autosomal dominant or X-linked recessive inheritance. We focus on the familial occurrence of LVNC after misdiagnosing this disorder in symptomatic patients in two families. After identification of the

  19. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: from mutation to functional analysis of defective protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, P.; Vondrášek, Jiří; Škvor, J.; Brdička, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2011), s. 384-391 ISSN 0353-9504 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LN00B107 Program:LN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : myosin heavy chain * homology modeling * molecular simulation * inherited cardiomyopathies Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.796, year: 2011

  20. [Plasma selenium and peripartum cardiomyopathy in Bamako, Mali].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cénac, A; Touré, K; Diarra, M B; Sergeant, C; Jobic, Y; Sanogo, K; Dembele, M; Fayol, V; Simonoff, M

    2004-01-01

    Peripartum heart failure due to unexplained dilated cardiomyopathy is a common disorder as Savannak-Sahelian Africa. One of the many suspected risk factors identified is selenium deficiency. The purpose of this study was to measure plasma selenium levels in patients with peripartum heart failure due to cardiomyopathy in Bamako, Republic of Mali and compare data with healthy Sahalian women with the same obstetrical status. Plasma selenium was measured in a patient group consisting of 28 Malian women presenting peripartum heart failure and in a control group of 28 healthy breast-feeding Nigerien women of comparable age. The criteria for matching the two groups was parity (similar number of deliveries) since multiparity is a risk factor for peripartum cardiomyopathy. The Wilcoxon test (nonparametric) was used to compare the 2 groups considering up value < 0.05 as significant. Plasma selenium was significantly lower in patients from Mali than in controls from Niger (65 +/- 17 ng/ml vs. 78 +/- 17 ng/ml, p = 0.01). The results of this study showing lower plasma selenium in Bamako patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy than in a matching healthy control population confirms the previous data from the Niamey study.

  1. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a patient with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, Kenta; Miyaji, Kotaro; Kodera, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yoshio; Kanda, Junji; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message People with schizophrenia are at greater risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than the general population. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a recognized cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. This report discusses the necessity for close cardiac evaluation to reduce incidence of sudden death in people with schizophrenia.

  2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maron, B.J.; Tajik, A.J.; Ruttenberg, H.D.; Graham, T.P.; Atwood, G.F.; Victorica, B.E.; Lie, J.T.; Roberts, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure

  3. Pheochromocytoma presenting as takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy following delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwik-Plebanek, Katarzyna; Pęczkowska, Mariola; Klisiewicz, Anna; Wrzesiński, Kazimierz; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Niewada, Maciej; Kabat, Marek; Szperl, Małgorzata; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Lenders, Jacques W; Januszewicz, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    Diagnosis of pheochromocytoma during pregnancy can be difficult, and the tumor carries an unfavorable prognosis if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. To present a case of Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning due to pheochromocytoma following delivery. A few hours after Caesarean section, a 32-year-old Caucasian female presented with pulmonary edema followed by cardiac arrest with echocardiographic and ventriculographic evidence of reversible acute myocardial failure characteristic of Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy. A previously unrecognized adrenal pheochromocytoma was found during her clinical work-up. Left ventricle (LV) function normalized after surgical removal of the tumor, which was carried out after implementing an alpha-adrenoreceptor blockade. Hemorrhagic necrosis of the pheochromocytoma was seen on histopathologic analysis; this may have triggered the sequence of events leading to the development of Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy and hemodynamic collapse. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy related to pheochromocytoma following delivery. This emphasizes the increased cardiovascular risk if pheochromocytoma is not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner, especially during pregnancy.

  4. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Human Immunodeficency Virus positive Patients in Puerto Rico--San Juan City Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vázquez, Luis R; Martinez, José H; Rivera-Anaya, Carmen; Laboy, José; Miranda, Samayra; Mancilla, Paola; Vélez, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    The total number of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is 33 million, with 2.7 million new infections in 2007(1). Puerto Rico has an increasing prevalence trend of Diabetes Mellitus of 12.8% in 2010(3). As treatment of HIV continues to develop, and access to therapy improves, the incidence of HIV associated diabetes is bound to grow. We investigate the prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus and its associated risk factors in a determinate HIV positive population. A retrospective study, reviewing the medical records of 146 HIV positive patients. The prevalence of DM was statistically measured and a Logistic Regression with Pearson Χ2 Square and Fisher's exact test was used to assess the association between DM and its risks factors. The prevalence of DM in the studied population was 13.7% (n=20). There were 59% (n = 86) males, 43% (n = 63) of patients treated with HAART 46% (n = 67) IVDA, the mean age was 47; with 29% older than 50 years old, and 68% of the patients had a BMI of less than 25. Gender, IVDA, HAART, BMI, and age were not associated as risk factors for the prevalence of DM in the studied population. Our data revealed a higher prevalence of DM in HIV infected patients. We observed no significant association between DM and its risks factors. This raises concern for yet unrecognized risk factors contributing to a higher prevalence of the disease in this population. Results of our study alert physicians on the importance of DM screening in the HIV positive patient population.

  5. Whole-genome expression analyses of type 2 diabetes in human skin reveal altered immune function and burden of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun; Chen, Xiaopan; Shu, Jing; Lee, Chun-Ting

    2017-05-23

    Skin disorders are among most common complications associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although T2DM patients are known to have increased risk of infections and other T2DM-related skin disorders, their molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. This study aims to identify dysregulated genes and gene networks that are associated with T2DM in human skin. We compared the expression profiles of 56,318 transcribed genes on 74 T2DM cases and 148 gender- age-, and race-matched non-diabetes controls from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) database. RNA-Sequencing data indicates that diabetic skin is characterized by increased expression of genes that are related to immune responses (CCL20, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CXCL13, and CCL18), JAK/STAT signaling pathway (JAK3, STAT1, and STAT2), tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF10 and TNFSF15), and infectious disease pathways (OAS1, OAS2, OAS3, and IFIH1). Genes in cell adhesion molecules pathway (NCAM1 and L1CAM) and collagen family (PCOLCE2 and COL9A3) are downregulated, suggesting structural changes in the skin of T2DM. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, this pioneer analytic study reports comprehensive unbiased gene expression changes and dysregulated pathways in the non-diseased skin of T2DM patients. This comprehensive understanding derived from whole-genome expression profiles could advance our knowledge in determining molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of T2DM-associated skin disorders.

  6. Presence of Human Herpesvirus 6B in the Pancreas of Subjects With and Without Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Maja; Skog, Oskar

    The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) A and B in human pancreata and to search for signs of active infection in this organ of subjects with and without type 1 diabetes (T1D). Pancreata from brain-dead organ donors with and without T1D were examined for the presence of HHV6 genomic sequences by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), transcripts by reverse transcriptase-PCR, and protein by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative PCR of isolated pancreatic islets and exocrine cell clusters was used to determine the intrapancreatic location of HHV6 DNA. Human herpesvirus 6B genomic sequences were present in 1 of 2 donors who died of acute-onset T1D, 4 of 6 donors with long-standing T1D, and 9 of 12 nondiabetic donors. Higher copy numbers of HHV6B DNA were present in isolated islets than in exocrine tissue from the same donors. No signs of active HHV6 transcription were found. Human herpesvirus 6A was not present in any tested pancreas. The herein presented data demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of a latent HHV6B infection in the pancreas and islets of Langerhans. Whether this virus can contribute to disease in the pancreas remains to be determined.

  7. Vitamin D and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.; DAWSON-HUGHES, BESS

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of both types of diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammati...

  8. Left ventricular function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Ryutaro; Ifuku, Masayasu

    1985-01-01

    The present study was to investigate of left ventricular (LV) function during exercise in 26 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(HCM) usingTc-99m equilibrium angiocardiography, and to elucidate the mechanism of impaired functional reserve during exercise. In patients with HCM, LV ejection fraction decreased from 65 ± 8 (mean ± SD) % at rest to 59 ± 18 % at peak exercise, in contrast to an increase among controls (from 56 ± 9 % to 64 ± 9 %). As compared with resting values, cardiac output increased to 168 ± 24 % at peak exercise in HCM, but the increase was significantly less than that in controls (215 ± 47 %). Stroke volume decreased gradually to 83 ± 16 % during exercise in HCM, while it increased to 114 ± 10 % at an exercise level of half intensity, and it decreased slightly to 106 ± 16 % at peak exercise. LV end-systolic volume decreased among controls to 78 ± 27 % at peak exercise, but remained unchanged in HCM (118 ± 58 %). An increase in peak ejection rate at peak exercise was less in HCM than in controls (143 ± 26 % vs 170 ± 42 %). No significant differences were observed between the two groups concerning changes in indices of LV diastolic function including LV end-diastolic volume, peak filling rate or 1/3 filling rate during exercise. In the analysis of LV function curves, pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure increased to a greater extent in HCM than in controls (19 ± 6 mmHg vs 11 ± 6 mmHg); whereas, an increase in the stroke work index was less in HCM (80 ± 26 g.m/m 2 /beat vs 121 ± 21 g.m/m 2 /beat) at peak exercise. Thus, the LV function curve shifted downward and to the right in patients with HCM. The above findings indicate that LV functional reserve during exercise is impaired, especially as to systolic function in patients with HCM, while deterioration of diastolic function may be partly compromised by elevated filling pressure. (J.P.N.)

  9. Preclinical characterization of recombinant human tissue kallikrein-1 as a novel treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Kolodka

    Full Text Available Modulation of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS has been shown to have beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis and several other physiological responses relevant to the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. The importance of bradykinin and its receptors in mediating these responses is well documented, but the role of tissue kallikrein-1, the protease that generates bradykinin in situ, is much less understood. We developed and tested DM199, recombinant human tissue kallikrein-1 protein (rhKLK-1, as a potential novel therapeutic for T2D. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies suggest that DM199 increases whole body glucose disposal in non-diabetic rats. Single-dose administration of DM199 in obese db/db mice and ZDF rats, showed an acute, dose-dependent improvement in whole-body glucose utilization. Sub-acute dosing for a week in ZDF rats improved glucose utilization, with a concomitant rise in fasting insulin levels and HOMA1-%B scores. After cessation of sub-acute dosing, fasting blood glucose levels were significantly lower in ZDF rats during a drug wash-out period. Our studies show for the first time that DM199 administration results in acute anti-hyperglycemic effects in several preclinical models, and demonstrate the potential for further development of DM199 as a novel therapeutic for T2D.

  10. Clinical Features and Echocardiographic Findings in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Blesneac

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, one of the most common inherited cardiomyopathies, is a heterogeneous disease resulting from sarcomeric protein mutations, with an incidence in the adult population of 1:500. Current information on the epidemiology and outcomes of this disease in children is limited. Methods: Thirty-four children diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Pediatric Cardiology Department from Tîrgu Mureș were evaluated concerning familial and personal history, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was defined by the presence of a hypertrophied, non-dilated ventricle, in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease that could produce ventricular hypertrophy. Results: The youngest diagnosed child was a neonate, a total of 10 patients being diagnosed until 1 year of age. In 6 cases a positive familial history was found. Noonan syndrome was found in 2 cases. Only 21 patients were symptomatic, the predominant symptoms being shortness of breath on exertion with exercise limitations. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was present in 21 cases (61.7%. Twenty-four patients were on β-blocking therapy, while 4 patients underwent septal myectomy. Conclusions: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous disorder in terms of evolution, age of onset, type and extent of hypertrophy, and the risk of sudden death. It can affect children of any age. There is a need for a complex evaluation, including familial and personal anamnesis, clinical examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiography of all patients. It is highly important to develop screening strategies, including genetic testing, for an early diagnosis, especially in asymptomatic patients with a positive familial background

  11. Modeling and study of the mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy using induced pluripotent stem cells derived from individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo; Li, Yang; Han, Lu; Kaplan, Aaron D; Ao, Ying; Kalra, Spandan; Bett, Glenna C L; Rasmusson, Randall L; Denning, Chris; Yang, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD), and is characterized by progressive weakness in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Currently, dilated cardiomyopathy due to cardiac muscle loss is one of the major causes of lethality in late-stage DMD patients. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD heart, we generated cardiomyocytes (CMs) from DMD and healthy control induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). DMD iPSC-derived CMs (iPSC-CMs) displayed dystrophin deficiency, as well as the elevated levels of resting Ca(2+), mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Additionally, we found an activated mitochondria-mediated signaling network underlying the enhanced apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Furthermore, when we treated DMD iPSC-CMs with the membrane sealant Poloxamer 188, it significantly decreased the resting cytosolic Ca(2+) level, repressed caspase-3 (CASP3) activation and consequently suppressed apoptosis in DMD iPSC-CMs. Taken together, using DMD patient-derived iPSC-CMs, we established an in vitro model that manifests the major phenotypes of dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients, and uncovered a potential new disease mechanism. Our model could be used for the mechanistic study of human muscular dystrophy, as well as future preclinical testing of novel therapeutic compounds for dilated cardiomyopathy in DMD patients. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Human LT-alpha-mediated resistance to autoimmune diabetes is induced in NOD, but not NOD-scid, mice and abrogated by IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, S; Satoh, J; Takahashi, K; Sakata, Y; Nakazawa, T; Miyazaki, J; Toyota, T

    2001-01-01

    Systemic administration of human lymphotoxin-alpha (hLT-alpha) made NOD mice resistant not only to spontaneous autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus but also to cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced diabetes and diabetes transfer by diabetic NOD spleen cells (triple resistance). In this study we analyzed the mechanisms of hLT-alpha-induced resistance, focusing on (1) hLT-alpha-induced resistance in the pancreatic beta cell, (2) CY-resistant suppressor cells, (3) suppression of induction or function of effector cells for beta cell destruction, or (4) others. To examine the first possibility in vitro, a NOD-derived beta cell line (MIN6N) was pretreated with hLT-alpha and then mixed with diabetic NOD spleen cells and MIN6N cell viability was measured. Treatment with hLT-alpha did not protect MIN6N cells but rather enhanced cytotoxicity. Next NOD-scid mice were pretreated with hLT-alpha and then transferred with diabetic NOD spleen. All the recipients developed diabetes. These results excluded the first possibility. The second possibility was also excluded by a cotransfer experiment, in which diabetic NOD spleen cells were cotransferred to NOD-scid mice with nontreated or hLT-alpha-treated nondiabetic NOD spleens. There was no significant difference in diabetes incidence between the two groups. To observe the third possibility, spleen cells of hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice were transferred to NOD-scid mice. Diabetes developed in the recipients, although the onset of diabetes was slightly delayed. Finally, hLT-alpha-treated triple-resistant NOD mice developed diabetes 1 week after daily IL-12 treatment. In summary, hLT-alpha administration made NOD mice resistant to effector cells for beta cell destruction. This resistance was induced in NOD, but not in NOD-scid, mice, indicating that lymphocytes were obligatory for the resistance. However, it was not mediated by transferable suppressor cells. Because effector cells were present in hLT-alpha-treated NOD spleen and

  13. Proposal for a revised definition of dilated cardiomyopathy, hypokinetic non-dilated cardiomyopathy, and its implications for clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Yigal M; Elliott, Perry M; Arbustini, Eloisa

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Disease proposes a revised definition of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in an attempt to bridge the gap between our recent understanding of the disease spectrum and its clinical presentation in relatives, which is key for early diagnosis...

  14. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of human serum albumin and its effect on antibodies profile in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Raghav

    Full Text Available Albumin glycation and subsequent formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs correlate with diabetes and associated complications.Human Serum Albumin (HSA was modified with D-glucose for a 40 day period under sterile conditions at 37°C. Modified samples along with native HSA (unmodified were analyzed for structural modifications by UV and fluorescence, FTIR, Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS and X-ray crystallography. New-Zealand white female rabbits immunized with AGEs, represent auto-antibodies formation as assessed by competitive and direct binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Neo-epitopesagainst In-vitro formed AGEs were characterized in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (n = 50, type 1 (n = 50, gestational diabetes (n = 50 and type 2 with chronic kidney disease (CKD with eGFR level 60-89 mL/min (n = 50 from serum direct binding ELISA.Glycated-HSA showed amarked increase in hyperchromicity of 65.82%,71.98%, 73.62% and 76.63% at λ280 nm along with anincreasein fluorescence intensity of 65.82%, 71.98%, 73.62% and 76.63% in glycated-HSA compared to native. FTIR results showed theshifting of Amide I peak from 1656 cm_1 to 1659 cm_1 and Amide II peak from 1554 cm_1 to 1564 cm_1 in glycated-HSA, with anew peak appearance of carbonyl group at 1737 cm-1. LCMS chromatogram of glycated-HSA showed thepresence of carboxymethyl lysine (CML at 279.1 m/z. Immunological analysis showed high antibody titre>1:12,800 in theserum of rabbits immunized with glycated-HSA (modified with 400 mg/dL glucose and inhibition of 84.65% at anantigen concentration of 20μg/mL. Maximum serum auto-antibody titre was found in T2DM (0.517±0.086, T1DM (0.108±0.092, GDM (0.611±0.041 and T2DM+CKD (0.096±0.25 patients immunized with glycated-HSA (modified with 400 mg/dL glucose.Non-enzymatic glycosylation of HSA manifests immunological complications in diabetes mellitus due to change in its structure that enhances neo-epitopes generation.

  15. Is pancreatic polypeptide response to food ingestion a reliable index of vagal function in type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damholt, M B; Arlien-Soeborg, P; Hilsted, L

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy in diabetic patients is based on cardiovascular reflex tests. Since cardiac function may be affected by arteriosclerosis and cardiomyopathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus, alternative tests reflecting vagal nerve function, in other organ systems, are needed....... In this study the pancreatic polypeptide (PP) response to a mixed meal was evaluated in healthy subjects and in recently diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients....

  16. Role of VEGF-A in endothelial phenotypic shift in human diabetic retinopathy and VEGF-A-induced retinopathy in monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, P.; Blaauwgeers, H. G.; Vrensen, G. F.; Schlingemann, R. O.

    2001-01-01

    The endothelium-specific antigen PAL-E, associated with transport vesicles in non-barrier endothelium, is almost absent from barrier capillaries in the normal brain and retina. We have recently demonstrated that only leaking retinal capillaries in diabetic retinopathy (DR) in humans

  17. Curative Metatarsal Bone Surgery Combined with Intralesional Administration of Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor in Diabetic Neuropathic Ulceration of the Forefoot: A Prospective, Open, Uncontrolled, Nonrandomized, Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristides L. Garcia Herrera, MD, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The combination of curative metatarsal bone surgery with intralesional administration of recombinant human EGF resulted in a significant reduction in the re-epithelization time, recidivism, and development of new diabetic lesions. The safety profile was appropriate. However, more randomized, triple-blind, and placebo trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this new therapy.

  18. Quantitative GC-MS assay of citric acid from humans and db/db mice blood serum to assist the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haoxue; Yu, Xiaoyi; Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; He, Jun; Tao, Mingxue; Gu, Huilin; Yan, Caixia; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2018-03-01

    The early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is rather challenging. Our previous study suggested that citric acid is a potential marker for the early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice. For the first time, in this study, a surrogate analyte of 13 C 6 -citric acid was employed to generate calibration curves for the quantitative measurement of the endogenous citric acid in the sera of db/db mice and diabetic nephropathy patients by GC/MS after the analytes were extracted, methoximated and trimethylsilylated. The constant response factor of 13 C 6 -citric acid versus citric acid over the linear range indicated the identical ionization efficiency of these two compounds. The full validation assessments suggested that the method is sensitive, specific, reliable, reproducible and has acceptable parameters. Statistical analysis revealed cut-off citric acid concentrations of 29.24 μg/mL with a 95% confidence interval between 32.75 and 39.16 μg/mL in the diabetic nephropathy patients and 16.74 and 22.57 μg/mL in the normal controls. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves indicated accuracies of over 90% for the diagnoses of early diabetic nephropathy in both humans and db/db mice, which suggests that the serum citric acid level is potentially a biomarker that could assist in the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic and epigenetic mutations affect the DNA binding capability of human ZFP57 in transient neonatal diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglivo, Ilaria; Esposito, Sabrina; De Cesare, Lucia; Sparago, Angela; Anvar, Zahra; Riso, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Marco; Fattorusso, Roberto; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Paolo V

    2013-05-21

    In the mouse, ZFP57 contains three classical Cys2His2 zinc finger domains (ZF) and recognizes the methylated TGC(met)CGC target sequence using the first and the second ZFs. In this study, we demonstrate that the human ZFP57 (hZFP57) containing six Cys2His2 ZFs, binds the same methylated sequence through the third and the fourth ZFs, and identify the aminoacids critical for DNA interaction. In addition, we present evidences indicating that hZFP57 mutations and hypomethylation of the TNDM1 ICR both associated with Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus type 1 result in loss of hZFP57 binding to the TNDM1 locus, likely causing PLAGL1 activation. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-term tolerability of inhaled human insulin (Exubera) in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnett, A H; Lange, P; Dreyer, M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inhaled human insulin (Exubera; EXU) has shown encouraging tolerability in short-term trials. We evaluated the safety profile of EXU after long-term exposure. DESIGN: In two, open-label, 2-year studies patients poorly controlled on a sulphonylurea were randomised to adjunctive EXU...... or metformin (study 1) and patients poorly controlled on metformin were randomised to adjunctive EXU or the sulphonylurea, glibenclamide (study 2). PATIENTS: The studies included 446 (study 1) and 476 (study 2) patients with type 2 diabetes, no clinically significant respiratory disease and glycosylated....... There was no discernable effect of long-term EXU therapy on pulmonary gas exchange. Insulin antibody binding reached a plateau at 6 months and did not correlate with HbA(1c) or lung function changes. Glycaemic control was maintained over 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: Exubera was well tolerated during long-term use. Pulmonary...

  1. 5'AMP activated protein kinase expression in human skeletal muscle: effects of strength training and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Frøsig, Christian

    2005-01-01

    adaptations within the AMPK system itself. We investigated the effect of strength training and T2DM on the isoform expression and the heterotrimeric composition of the AMPK in human skeletal muscle. Ten patients with T2DM and seven healthy subjects strength trained (T) one leg for 6 weeks, while the other leg......Strength training enhances insulin sensitivity and represents an alternative to endurance training for patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) may mediate adaptations in skeletal muscle in response to exercise training; however, little is known about...... remained untrained (UT). Muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the training period. Basal AMPK activity and protein/mRNA expression of both catalytic (alpha1 and alpha2) and regulatory (beta1, beta2, gamma1, gamma2a, gamma2b and gamma3) AMPK isoforms were independent of T2DM, whereas the protein...

  2. Effectiveness of Green Tea in a Randomized Human Cohort: Relevance to Diabetes and Its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naushad Ali Toolsee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have argued that green tea could mitigate diabetes and its complications. This study investigated the phytophenolic profile of Mauritian green tea and its antioxidant propensity. The effect of green tea on the risk factors: waist-hip ratio, glucose level, arterial pressure, antioxidant status, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT in prediabetics was assessed. The experimental group consumed 3 cups of green tea daily for 14 weeks followed by a 2-week washout period. The control group followed a water regimen. Green tea contained high level of phenolics related to its antioxidant power. Green tea suppressed waist-hip ratio of women from a significant increase and suppressed mean arterial pressure of men and women from a significant decrease after week 14. It reduced ALT level in women by 13.0% (P<0.1 while increasing the antioxidant potential of men and women sera by 2.7% (P<0.1 and 5.1% (P<0.1. The study timescale may have been too short to enable demonstration of effects on fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c outcomes. Green tea regimen could form part of a healthy lifestyle that might ameliorate features of metabolic syndrome and subsequent risks for diabetes and its complications. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01248143.

  3. Intermittent fasting vs daily calorie restriction for type 2 diabetes prevention: a review of human findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnosky, Adrienne R; Hoddy, Kristin K; Unterman, Terry G; Varady, Krista A

    2014-10-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) regimens have gained considerable popularity in recent years, as some people find these diets easier to follow than traditional calorie restriction (CR) approaches. IF involves restricting energy intake on 1-3 d/wk, and eating freely on the nonrestriction days. Alternate day fasting (ADF) is a subclass of IF, which consists of a "fast day" (75% energy restriction) alternating with a "feed day" (ad libitum food consumption). Recent findings suggest that IF and ADF are equally as effective as CR for weight loss and cardioprotection. What remains unclear, however, is whether IF/ADF elicits comparable improvements in diabetes risk indicators, when compared with CR. Accordingly, the goal of this review was to compare the effects of IF and ADF with daily CR on body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese adults. Results reveal superior decreases in body weight by CR vs IF/ADF regimens, yet comparable reductions in visceral fat mass, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance. None of the interventions produced clinically meaningful reductions in glucose concentrations. Taken together, these preliminary findings show promise for the use of IF and ADF as alternatives to CR for weight loss and type 2 diabetes risk reduction in overweight and obese populations, but more research is required before solid conclusions can be reached. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of ingestive behavior and gastrointestinal motility by ghrelin in diabetic animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yen; Fujimiya, Mineko; Laviano, Alessandro; Chang, Full-Young; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2010-05-01

    Acyl ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone, is the endogenous cognate ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is involved in stimulating growth hormone release, eliciting feeding behavior, inducing adiposity and stimulating gastrointestinal motility. Ghrelin is unique for its post-translational modification of O-n-octanoylation at serine 3 through ghrelin O-acyltransferase, and is the only peripheral signal to enhance food intake. Plasma ghrelin levels manifest "biphasic changes" in diabetes mellitus (DM). In the early stage of DM, the stomach significantly increases the secretion of ghrelin into the plasma, and elevated plasma ghrelin levels are correlated with diabetic hyperphagic feeding and accelerated gastrointestinal motility. In the late stage of DM, plasma ghrelin levels may be lower, which might be linked with anorexia/muscle wasting, delayed gastrointestinal transit, and even gastroparesis. Therefore, the unique ghrelin system may be the most important player compared to the other hindgut hormones participating in the "entero-insular axis". Further studies using either knockdown or knockout of ghrelin gene products and ghrelin O-acyltransferase may unravel the pathogenesis of DM, and show benefits in combating this disease and metabolic syndrome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modulation of Ingestive Behavior and Gastrointestinal Motility by Ghrelin in Diabetic Animals and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yen Chen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Acyl ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone, is the endogenous cognate ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is involved in stimulating growth hormone release, eliciting feeding behavior, inducing adiposity and stimulating gastrointestinal motility. Ghrelin is unique for its post-translational modification of O-n-octanoylation at serine 3 through ghrelin O-acyltransferase, and is the only peripheral signal to enhance food intake. Plasma ghrelin levels manifest “biphasic changes” in diabetes mellitus (DM. In the early stage of DM, the stomach significantly increases the secretion of ghrelin into the plasma, and elevated plasma ghrelin levels are correlated with diabetic hyperphagic feeding and accelerated gastrointestinal motility. In the late stage of DM, plasma ghrelin levels may be lower, which might be linked with anorexia/muscle wasting, delayed gastrointestinal transit, and even gastroparesis. Therefore, the unique ghrelin system may be the most important player compared to the other hindgut hormones participating in the “entero-insular axis”. Further studies using either knockdown or knockout of ghrelin gene products and ghrelin O-acyltransferase may unravel the pathogenesis of DM, and show benefits in combating this disease and metabolic syndrome.

  6. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, Najla [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Mnif, Mouna [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Nozha [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Salem, Ikhlass Haj [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. {yields} We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). {yields} Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. {yields} The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  7. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kallel, Nozha; Salem, Ikhlass Haj; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We reported a patient with Wolfram syndrome and dilated cardiomyopathy. → We detected the ND1 mitochondrial m.3337G>A mutation in 3 tested tissues (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). → Long-range PCR amplification revealed the presence of multiple mitochondrial deletions in the skeletal muscle. → The deletions remove several tRNA and protein-coding genes. -- Abstract: Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions.

  8. [The child from families with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasikowa, Renata; Suchańska, Dorota; Suchańska, Danuta; Basiak, Aleksander; Noczyńska, Anna; Stasińska, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes type 1 is observed in individuals with a genetic predisposition to the disease. Observed is a 3-5 fold risk for congenital defects, therefore diabetes type 1 is one of the highest known teratogenic risk factor. The main factor responsible for the development of congenital defects is hyperglycemia. Observed are congenital defects of the central nervous system, the bones, urinary and digestive tract. Characteristic is macrosomia. Observed are hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, polycythemia, hyperbilirubinemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, respiratory disturbances. Children from families with diabetes type 1 are at high risk for the development of the disease in the newborn period, additional diseases. They must be in permanent medical control.

  9. Echocardiography Differences Between Athlete's Heart Hearth and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreso, Amir; Barakovic, Fahir; Medjedovic, Senad; Halilbasic, Amila; Klepic, Muhamed

    2015-10-01

    Among long term athletes there is always present hypertrophy of the left ventricle walls as well as increased cardiac mass. These changes are the result of the heart muscle adaptation to load during the years of training, which should not be considered as pathology. In people suffering from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), there is also present hypertrophy of the left ventricle walls and increased mass of the heart, but these changes are the result of pathological changes in the heart caused by a genetic predisposition for the development HCM of. Differences between myocardial hypertrophy in athletes and HCM are not clearly differentiated and there are always dilemmas between pathological and physiological hypertrophy. The goal of the study is to determine and compare the echocardiographic cardiac parameters of longtime athletes to patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The study included 60 subjects divided into two groups: active athletes and people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Mean values of IVSd recorded in GB is IVSd=17.5 mm (n=20, 95% CI, 16.00-19.00 mm), while a significantly smaller mean value is recorded in GA, IVSd=10.0 mm (n=40, 95% CI, 9.00-11.00 mm). The mean value of the left ventricle in diastole (LVDd) recorded in the GA is LVDd=51 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 48.00 to 52.00 mm), while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVDd value is 42 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 40.00 to 48.00 mm). The mean value of the rear wall of the left ventricle (LVPWd) recorded in the GA is LVDd=10 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 9.00-10.00 mm) while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVDd is 14 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 12.00 to 16.00 mm). The mean of the left ventricle during systole (LVSD) observed in GA is LVSD=34 mm (n=40; 95% CI, 32.00 to 36.00 mm), while in the group with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (GB) mean LVSD is 28 mm (n=20; 95% CI, 24.00 to 28.83 mm). The mean ejection fraction (EF%) observed in GA is EF=60% (n=40; 95% CI, 56.41 to 63.00%), while in

  10. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kallel, Nozha; Salem, Ikhlass Haj; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-07-29

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardiomiopatía periparto Peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Velásquez V

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available La cardiomiopatía periparto es una entidad clínica con una frecuencia variable de acuerdo con la zona en estudio. Se caracteriza por disfunción sistólica del ventrículo izquierdo y posterior aparición de síntomas de falla cardiaca, los cuales ocurren durante el último mes de gestación y los primeros meses post- parto. Su etiología aún no es clara, pero se plantean diferentes teorías, las cuales se basan en fenómenos inflamatorios, infecciosos y auto-inmunes. Recientemente, se describieron alteraciones relacionadas con el estrés oxidativo, que podrían explicar en gran medida esta patología. Su presentación clínica guarda gran similitud con las demás causas de falla cardíaca, aunque se han descrito presentaciones atípicas. Su diagnóstico requiere alto nivel de sospecha y debe considerarse en toda mujer con síntomas de falla cardíaca durante el periparto. El tratamiento convencional de la falla cardiaca crónica que incluye beta-bloqueadores, inhibidores de la enzima convertidora de angiotensina y diuréticos, además de los adelantos en el diagnóstico y manejo de la falla cardiaca aguda, permitió cambiar la historia de la enfermedad al disminuir la mortalidad y recuperar la función sistólica del ventrículo izquierdo. Las gestaciones posteriores al desarrollo de esta entidad, dependerán de la recuperación completa de la función cardíaca, sin disminuir el riesgo de recurrencia. Todavía existen múltiples preguntas por responder en áreas como etiología, factores de riesgo, tratamiento y marcadores pronósticos que permitan prevenir y manejar en forma oportuna y segura tanto a la madre como a su hijo.Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a clinical entity with a variable frequency according to the zone of the study. It is characterized by a systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle and posterior appearance of heart failure symptoms that occur during the last month of pregnancy and the first post-partum months. Its etiology

  12. GLUT12 deficiency during early development results in heart failure and a diabetic phenotype in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez-Amilburu, Vanesa; Jong-Raadsen, Susanne; Bakkers, Jeroen; Spaink, Herman P.; Marín-Juez, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies-associated metabolic pathologies (e.g., type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance) are a leading cause of mortality. It is known that the association between these pathologies works in both directions, for which heart failure can lead to metabolic derangements such as insulin

  13. GLUT12 deficiency during early development results in heart failure and a diabetic phenotype in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez-Amilburu, Vanesa; Jong-Raadsen, Susanne; Bakkers, Jeroen; Spaink, Herman P; Marín-Juez, Rubén

    Cardiomyopathies-associated metabolic pathologies (e.g., type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance) are a leading cause of mortality. It is known that the association between these pathologies works in both directions, for which heart failure can lead to metabolic derangements such as insulin

  14. Iatrogenic Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Secondary to Norepinephrine by Continuous Infusion for Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Vieira; Bárbara Batista; Tiago Tribolet de Abreu

    2018-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a condition characterized by transient left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction, with a possible direct causal role of catecholamine in its pathophysiology. We present a case of a woman with shock and adrenal insufficiency in whom Takotsubo cardiomyopathy developed after treatment with norepinephrine. This case confirms the direct causal role of catecholamine in the pathophysiology of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. An 82-year-old woman presented with asthenia...

  15. RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY AND SECONDARY CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN A MCDOWELL'S CARPET PYTHON (MORELIA SPILOTA MCDOWELLI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilliger, Lionel; Chetboul, Valérie; Damoiseaux, Cécile; Nicolier, Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiography is an established and noninvasive diagnostic tool used in herpetologic cardiology. Various cardiac lesions have been previously described in reptiles with the exception of restrictive cardiomyopathy. In this case report, restrictive cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure associated with left atrial and sinus venosus dilation were diagnosed in a 2-yr-old captive lethargic McDowell's carpet python ( Morelia spilota mcdowelli), based on echocardiographic, Doppler, and histopathologic examinations. This cardiomyopathy was also associated with thrombosis within the sinus venosus.

  16. Diabetes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  17. Echomorphology of cardiomyopathy: review of 217 cases from 1999 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Ilyas, H.; Fawad, A.; Hameed, A.; Fazli, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study echocardiogram features of different types of cardiomyopathy presenting over a 12 year period at a single centre in Peshawar. Methods: The series comprised a retrospective review of 13,788 consecutive echocardiograms carried out at the Muhammadi Hospital International Medical Research Centre, Hayatabad, Peshawar, from January 1999 to December 2010. Patients were split into two: Group I with paediatric and adolescent cases (0-18 years) and Group II with adults (>18 years). In the adult group, women with peripartum cardiomyopathy were subdivided into two groups of 18-30 years and 30 to 44 years. Standard Echo B and M modes and Doppler parameters were recorded to ascertain the diagnoses of common primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. Patients with myocarditis with chambers dilatation and global dysfunction, and cardiopathy associated with major cardiovascular diseases were excluded. SPSS 14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 217 (1.57%) cases. There were 144 (66%) cases of dilated cardiomyopathy with a mean age of 13+-14.8 years; 17 (8%) cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with a mean age of 12+-11.5 years; and 7 (3%) cases of restrictive cardiomyopathy with a mean age of 31+-7.8 years. Primary cardiac amyloidosis was confirmed in 9 (4%) cases, and peripartum cardiomyopathy in 25 (11%) females. Rare subtypes were found in 15 (7%) cases. Conclusion: DCM was the most frequently diagnosed subtype of cardiomyopathy followed by HCM in both the adult and paediatric age groups. (author)

  18. Expression and functional assessment of candidate type 2 diabetes susceptibility genes identify four new genes contributing to human insulin secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatou K. Ndiaye

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified >100 loci independently contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D risk. However, translational implications for precision medicine and for the development of novel treatments have been disappointing, due to poor knowledge of how these loci impact T2D pathophysiology. Here, we aimed to measure the expression of genes located nearby T2D associated signals and to assess their effect on insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Methods: The expression of 104 candidate T2D susceptibility genes was measured in a human multi-tissue panel, through PCR-free expression assay. The effects of the knockdown of beta-cell enriched genes were next investigated on insulin secretion from the human EndoC-βH1 beta-cell line. Finally, we performed RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq so as to assess the pathways affected by the knockdown of the new genes impacting insulin secretion from EndoC-βH1, and we analyzed the expression of the new genes in mouse models with altered pancreatic beta-cell function. Results: We found that the candidate T2D susceptibility genes' expression is significantly enriched in pancreatic beta cells obtained by laser capture microdissection or sorted by flow cytometry and in EndoC-βH1 cells, but not in insulin sensitive tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of seven T2D-susceptibility genes (CDKN2A, GCK, HNF4A, KCNK16, SLC30A8, TBC1D4, and TCF19 with already known expression and/or function in beta cells changed insulin secretion, supporting our functional approach. We showed first evidence for a role in insulin secretion of four candidate T2D-susceptibility genes (PRC1, SRR, ZFAND3, and ZFAND6 with no previous knowledge of presence and function in beta cells. RNA-seq in EndoC-βH1 cells with decreased expression of PRC1, SRR, ZFAND6, or ZFAND3 identified specific gene networks related to T2D pathophysiology. Finally, a positive correlation between the expression of Ins2 and the

  19. Investigations on the method of in vitro accumulation measurements of 14C phenylalanine on human small intestine biopsies, illustrated by the example of Diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenneck, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed, by which actively transported substrates can accumulationarily be measured out in vitro on biopsy material. The applicability of this method as index for an active transport performance could then be examined on the example of a control group with sound small intestine and on patients with diabetes mellitus. In order to complete this parameter of the transport function, the specific saccharase activity in the overall homogenate of the mucous membrane was determined. The basis of this determination were the previous investigations on the experimental diabetes mellitus, in which morphologic and functional alterations had been detected. The various influences are discussed, which may be important for the detected alterations. However, a comparison with the results obtained in animal experiments is possible only to a very limited extent, since the situation in human diabetes mellitus is very complicated. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Increased myosin heavy chain-beta with atrial expression of ventricular light chain-2 in canine cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Geraldine A; Bicer, Sabahattin; Hamlin, Robert L; Yamaguchi, Mamoru; Reiser, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a naturally occurring disease in humans and dogs. Human studies have shown increased levels of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-beta in failing ventricles and the left atria (LA) and of ventricular light chain (VLC)-2 in the right atria in dilated cardiomyopathy. This study evaluates the levels of MHC-beta in all heart chambers in prolonged canine right ventricular pacing. In addition, we determined whether levels of VLC2 were altered in these hearts. Failing hearts demonstrated significantly increased levels of MHC-beta in the right atria, right atrial appendage, LA, left atrial appendage (LAA), and right ventricle compared with controls. Significant levels of VLC2 were detected in the right atria of paced hearts. Differences in MHC-beta expression were observed between the LA and the LAA of paced and control dogs. MHC-beta expression was significantly greater in the LA of paced and control dogs compared with their respective LAA. The cardiac myosin isoform shifts in this study were similar to those observed in end-stage human heart failure and more severe than those reported in less prolonged pacing models, supporting the use of this model for further study of end-stage human heart failure. The observation of consistent differences between sampling sites, especially LA versus LAA, indicates the need for rigorous sampling consistency in future studies.