WorldWideScience

Sample records for human dermatological research

  1. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staumont-Sallé, D

    2013-11-01

    In 2013, news from research has clearly shown that dermatology is bound to occupy a more important place in fundamental research. Among these evidences are an increasing number of papers devoted to "Skin" in journals with the highest impact factors and the excellence of the scientific program of the International Investigative Dermatology Meeting held in May in Edinburgh. This paper outlines a selection of scientific works published between September 2012 and August 2013 or presented as communications at the IID Meeting. This selection was made based on the quality of methods used by the authors to obtain results, and on the impact of these scientific results in terms of pathophysiological and therapeutical advances.

  2. Application of stereology to dermatological research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Kemp, Kåre;

    2009-01-01

    to dermatological research by supplying a short insight into the theoretical basis behind the technique and presenting previous dermatological studies in which stereology was an integral part. Both the theory supporting stereology and a practical approach in a dermatological setting are reviewed with the aim...... to provide the reader with the capability to better assess papers employing stereological estimators and to design stereological studies independently....

  3. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misery, L

    2012-12-01

    Dermatological research is more and more productive and its level higher and higher. Choosing the most significant articles is difficult. Mast cell plays a role in the initiation of inflammation and therefore in poorer healing. Keratinocytes derive from stem cells and progenitors, which are independent. They can be activated directly by heat through sensory proteins at their surface. The cutaneous nervous system has an organization similar to that of the most complex sensory organs. In psoriasis, denervation induces a significant plaque regression. The cerebral integration of skin appearance modulates the skin reactivity to histamine. Pruritus is linked to specific receptors in the skin, which give specific projections into the brain and are histamine-dependent or not. Atopic dermatitis may be linked to the nonspecific activation of Th2 immune system, particularly to abnormalities of the skin barrier. Skin bacteria, but not intestinal, modulate the formation of skin immunity. Raf kinases are well known in melanoma and play an important role in physiological conditions: they are not essential to the initial development of the melanocyte lineage but to maintain it. In culture, melanocytes can be dedifferentiated in melanoblasts. Sunburns are consecutive to the activation of TLR3 by UVB. ANRIL gene is involved in the polymorphism of neurofibromatosis 1 and gene RAD51B is linked to the risk of male breast cancer. MCV infection is linked to sites with sialic acid. Aging objectified by telomere shortening is accelerated by stress.

  4. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner RF Jr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard F Wagner Jr, Sharon S Raimer, Brent C Kelly Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA Abstract: Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by

  5. Dermatologic research in the Nordic countries 1989-2008--a bibliometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjersvik, Petter; Nylenna, Magne; Jemec, Gregor B E; Haraldstad, Anne-Marie

    2010-11-01

    Bibliometric methods, based on the count of articles published in scientific journals, are increasingly used to evaluate scientific productivity. Bibliometric studies may identify factors that promote or inhibit research performance. We set out to analyze dermatologic research activity in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway using bibliometric methods. We performed repetitive searches on Medline, using the PubMed interface, for the period 1989-2008. Dermatologic articles were defined as all articles in dermatologic journals plus articles in nondermatologic journals in which the address of first author included an institution of dermatology. Articles were allocated to the country of first author's address. The number of dermatologic articles from Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway was 1896 (214 per million inhabitants), 1502 (281), 1017 (196), and 249 (55), respectively. Dermatologic articles represented 1.4%, 2.3%, 1.6%, and 0.6% of each country's total number of Medline articles in English over the same period. Similar patterns were found in relation to gross domestic product, number of dermatologists, and number of medical schools. After 2000, the yearly number of dermatologic articles from Denmark increased and that from Finland decreased, whereas the numbers from Sweden and Norway remained relatively stable. Despite similarities in social and economic conditions in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Norway, there are great differences in dermatologic research activity in the four countries, with Denmark performing best and Norway poorest. Historical and cultural factors may partly explain these differences. © 2010 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. The promising potential role of ketones in inflammatory dermatologic disease: a new frontier in treatment research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Daren A; McDaniel, Brianna; Crane, Jonathan

    2017-01-24

    The ketogenic diet has been shown to be beneficial for numerous diseases across different organ systems, but a dearth of information exists regarding these benefits for skin disease. Here, we searched the literature for known mechanisms behind inflammation in dermatologic disease and correlated that with suggested mechanisms of anti-inflammatory activity of ketones and a ketogenic state in the human body to observe how ketones and ketosis might aid in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases based on these mechanisms. Specifically, we found that ketones modulate the NRPL3 inflammasome, augment anti-oxidation against reactive oxygen species through various direct and indirect means, and may influence mTOR activity, which are all involved in inflammatory dermatologic diseases to an extent. This evidence shows that ketones and the ketogenic diet may have a promising role in the dermatologist's disease treatment repertoire. Our goal is to provide a novel direction for research in the role of a ketogenic diet and even exogenous ketone therapy in the treatment of inflammatory dermatologic disease.

  7. The Reporting of Observational Research Studies in Dermatology Journals A Literature-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langan, Sinead; Schmitt, Jochen; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Svensson, Ake; von Elm, Erik; Williams, Hywel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the quality of reporting in observational studies in dermatology. Data Sources: Five dermatology journals-the Archives of Dermatology, the British Journal of Dermatology, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, and Acta Derma

  8. The Reporting of Observational Research Studies in Dermatology Journals A Literature-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langan, Sinead; Schmitt, Jochen; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Svensson, Ake; von Elm, Erik; Williams, Hywel

    Objective: To assess the quality of reporting in observational studies in dermatology. Data Sources: Five dermatology journals-the Archives of Dermatology, the British Journal of Dermatology, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, and Acta

  9. Human herpesviruses 6, 7, and 8 from a dermatologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolz, Michael M; Sciallis, Gabriel F; Pittelkow, Mark R

    2012-10-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) have frequently been suspected as etiologic agents or cofactors in cutaneous disease. However, clearly established associations are rare. Investigations into an etiologic association between HHVs and cutaneous disease are complicated by the ubiquity and nearly universal prevalence of some herpesviruses. This article summarizes the associations between cutaneous disease and HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8. In addition to a personal library of references, the PubMed database of biomedical literature was searched using the following Medical Subject Heading terms: HHV-6, HHV-7, and HHV-8, each in conjunction with cutaneous manifestations, virology, epidemiology, dermatopathology, and therapeutics, between 1998 and March 2011. Free-text searches with known or suspected disease associations were added for broader coverage. The results have been summarized to provide a practical review for the physician likely to encounter cutaneous diseases. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dermatology on instagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Boyers, Lindsay; Quest, Tyler; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-07-15

    The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram. The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram. In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched. None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram. Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups. This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact.

  11. Human Demodex Mite: The Versatile Mite of Dermatological Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaiz Anwar Rather

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Demodex mite is an obligate human ecto-parasite found in or near the pilo-sebaceous units. Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are two species typically found on humans. Demodex infestation usually remains asymptomatic and may have a pathogenic role only when present in high densities and also because of immune imbalance. All cutaneous diseases caused by Demodex mites are clubbed under the term demodicosis or demodicidosis, which can be an etiological factor of or resemble a variety of dermatoses. Therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion about the etiological role of Demodex in various dermatoses can help in early diagnosis and appropriate, timely, and cost effective management.

  12. Human demodex mite: the versatile mite of dermatological importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Parvaiz Anwar; Hassan, Iffat

    2014-01-01

    Demodex mite is an obligate human ecto-parasite found in or near the pilo-sebaceous units. Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis are two species typically found on humans. Demodex infestation usually remains asymptomatic and may have a pathogenic role only when present in high densities and also because of immune imbalance. All cutaneous diseases caused by Demodex mites are clubbed under the term demodicosis or demodicidosis, which can be an etiological factor of or resemble a variety of dermatoses. Therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion about the etiological role of Demodex in various dermatoses can help in early diagnosis and appropriate, timely, and cost effective management.

  13. Applications of nuclear microprobe analysis to dermatological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallon, Jan; Forslind, Bo; Werner-Linde, Ylva; Yang, C.; Utui, R. J.; Elfman, M.; Malmqvist, K. G.; Kristiansson, P.; Sjöland, K. A.

    1997-07-01

    The elemental distributions over epidermal skin cross sections as revealed by nuclear microprobe analysis on cryo-sections from human skin provides new insight into the physiology of skin. Recently interest has been focused on the end stage of epidermal differentiation, the programmed cell death, occurring in the uppermost layer of the viable epidermis, the stratum granulosum. Calcium is one of the important messengers that controls the events of this programmed cell death, which shares a number of characteristics with apoptosis. We have previously shown that the Ca-gradient over normal skin cross sections is compatible with the finding from cell culture of epidermal cells which need a minimum level of 0.1 mM (Ca 2+) to develop a normal stratum corneum. To gain more information from the large number of data assessed during the actual analysis we have applied multivariate statistical analysis to the complete dataset obtained at NMP analyses. This statistical method reveals covariation of several elements and in addition provides a means to interpret the quantitative data in a meaningful biological context.

  14. The UK clinical research network - has it been a success for dermatology clinical trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlesworth Lisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the successful introduction of five topic-specific research networks in the UK, the Comprehensive Local Research Network (CLRN was established in 2008 in order to provide a blanket level of support across the whole country regardless of the clinical discipline. The role of the CLRN was to facilitate recruitment into clinical trials, and to encourage greater engagement in research throughout the National Health Service (NHS. Methods This report evaluates the impact of clinical research networks in supporting clinical trials in the UK, with particular reference to our experiences from two non-commercial dermatology trials. It covers our experience of engaging with the CLRN (and other research networks using two non-commercial dermatology trials as case studies. We present the circumstances that led to our approach to the research networks for support, and the impact that this support had on the delivery of these trials. Results In both cases, recruitment was boosted considerably following the provision of additional support, although other factors such as the availability of experienced personnel, and the role of advertising and media coverage in promoting the trials were also important in translating this additional resource into increased recruitment. Conclusions Recruitment into clinical trials is a complex task that can be influenced by many factors. A world-class clinical research infrastructure is now in place in England (with similar support available in Scotland and Wales, and it is the responsibility of the research community to ensure that this unique resource is used effectively and responsibly.

  15. Cosmetic Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards study tools Online Learning Center Meetings and events Make a difference Career planning Media Relations Toolkit AAD apps Academy meeting Chronic urticaria—for members Chronic urticaria—for public Dermatology World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC ...

  16. Dermatologic nondisease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, J A

    1996-07-01

    Dermatologic nondisease is a relatively common problem presenting to dermatologists with rich symptomatology in important body image areas such as the face, scalp, and genital area. There is no objective dermatologic change present on examination. The most common psychiatric disease present is depression. Suicide is common, especially in women with perceived facial problems.

  17. American academy of dermatology cardiovascular research technologies 2013 american college of cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Walter

    2013-05-01

    Dermatology topics include agents for psoriasis, urticaria, and infantile hemangiomas. The pros and cons of antiplatelet drugs prasugrel (Effient) and ticagrelor (Brilinta) are discussed, and an investigational agent, cangrelor, shows promise in reducing ischemic events when compared with clopidogrel (Plavix).

  18. Poverty, dignity, and forgotten skin care: dermatology in the stream of human mobile population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Skin diseases represent the greatest public health care problem in all developing countries. Tropical diseases tend to cluster in poor populations and often are defined as "neglected" because the investments made to combat them seem negligible compared with the massive amounts expended globally on the health problems of developed countries. After reviewing the worldwide situation, this article explains the principles of community dermatology and discusses the work of the San Gallicano Institute in Rome, which has developed a model for reducing the number of people suffering from dermatologic and other diseases and has established the first dermatologic hospital in Ethiopia.

  19. Korean Dermatological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, B I

    1998-12-01

    The Korean Dermatological Association (KDA) was founded on October 27, 1945. The first annual meeting was held on November 15, 1947, and meetings have been held twice a year since 1975. The KDA 50th Annual Spring Meeting was on April 15-16, 1998. Korean Journal of Dermatology, the official journal of the KDA, was first published in 1960 and has been published bimonthly since 1978. Annals of Dermatology (Seoul), the English journal, was first published in 1989 and has been published quarterly since 1995. The American residency and specialty board system was introduced in 1954. Board specialty examination of dermatology candidates by the KDA requires four years of residency. Three hundred and twenty residents are now in the training course in the fifty-nine resident training approved hospitals this year. KDA has seven regional dermatological societies; Seoul, Pusan, Taegu, Honam, Chungchong, Jeonbuk, and Kangwon. KDA has had eleven research subcommittees since 1981. There are two associated societies of the KDA; the Korean Society for Investigative Dermatology was founded in 1991, and the Korean Society for Medical Mycology was founded in 1994. The Korea-Japan Joint Meeting of Dermatology has been held every two years since 1979 and the Korea-China Joint Meeting of Dermatology and Mycology has been held since 1996. About three hundred papers were presented at the 49th Annual Autumn Meeting on October 21-23, 1997. These included special lectures, invited lectures, educational lectures, oral presentations, and posters. About five hundred dermatologists participated in that meeting. KDA joined the International League of Dermatological Societies in 1973 with forty-seven members. There are around 1200 members of the KDA including 320 residents in 1998.

  20. In vivo confocal microscopy of human skin: a new design for cosmetology and dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuff, P; Gonnord, G; Piérard, G E; Lévéque, J L

    1996-08-01

    In-depth exploration of cellular structures in living human skin in situ is possible with the tandem scanning microscope (TSM). However, the rigid design of the microscope limited observations to the arms, hands, and fingers. A mobile version allowing the investigation of any parts of the body has been designed. The head containing the Nipkow disk and the optical path were the only part saved from the original TSM. This prototype can be used to observe, in real time, the different skin structures down to a depth of 200 microns and to measure the thickness of the different layers with micron precision level. The hydration of the stratum corneum (SC) could be assessed. For example, lengthy immersion of the hand in water led to an increase in SC thickness without affecting that of the living epidermis. Occlusive patch tests also showed that water and, even more so. propylene glycol, led to transient swelling of the SC. In dermatology, the example of psoriasis illustrated the value of the TSM for describing, measuring, and assessing pathologic skin changes. The availability of this noninvasive method for observing changes with time in a given skin site should prove useful for monitoring treatment efficacy. This tool opens up new insight for the investigation of cutaneous pathophysiology.

  1. Aerospace dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  2. Aerospace Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Gp Capt Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  3. Molecular Phylogenetic Diversity of Dermatologic and Other Human Pathogenic Fusaria from Hospitals in Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty-eight fusaria isolated from 52 Italian patients between 2004 and 2007 were subject to multilocus DNA sequence typing to characterize the spectrum of species and circulating sequence types (STs) associated with dermatological infections, especially onychomycoses and paronychia, and other fusari...

  4. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work in your practice Promote your practice with marketing tools from the ASDS Branding Campaign. Free and ... new clinical research projects through its Cutting Edge Research Grant program. Learn ... methods. Copyright © 1971–2016. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery ( ...

  5. Large organic aerosols in a human exposure chamber : Applications in occupational dermatology and lung medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to large organic aerosol particles may cause respiratory and skin reactions. The use of human exposure chambers offers possibilities for experimental exposure challenges carried out with patients, in research and for investigations of the effects of exposure on the skin and in the respiratory tract. The present aim was to study the performance of modern human whole-body exposure chambers during generation of large organic particles, and to develop and test new me...

  6. Stem cells in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today.

  7. Donkey dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephen D

    2013-12-01

    Donkeys (Equus asinus) are a species used throughout the world primarily as beasts of burden, but occasionally for other functions, as a meat source or as pets. Although closely related to other equids, they have some unique features of their own with regard to dermatologic disease. This article highlights some of the various dermatoses seen or reported in donkeys, as well as some comparisons with horses when prevalence, presentation, or treatment may differ.

  8. Dermatologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Simón Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic emergencies represent about 8–20% of the diseases seen in the Emergency Department of hospitals. It is often a challenge for primary care physicians to differentiate mundane skin ailments from more serious, life threatening conditions that require immediate intervention. In this review we included the following conditions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrosis, pemphigus vulgaris, toxic shock syndrome, fasciitis necrotising, angioedema/urticaria, meningococcemia, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  9. Bibliometrics, dermatology and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek R

    2008-09-01

    Although the fields of bibliometrics and citation analysis have existed for many years, relatively few studies have specifically focused on the dermatological literature. This article reviews citation-based research in the dermatology journals, with a particular interest in manuscripts that have included Contact Dermatitis as part of their analysis. Overall, it can be seen that the rise of bibliometrics during the mid-20th century and its subsequent application to dermatology has provided an interesting insight into the progression of research within our discipline. Further investigation of citation trends and top-cited papers in skin research periodicals would certainly help complement the current body of knowledge.

  10. From frog integument to human skin: dermatological perspectives from frog skin biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Roubos, Eric W; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Vaudry, Hubert; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Pattwell, David M; Maderson, Paul F A; Paus, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    For over a century, frogs have been studied across various scientific fields, including physiology, embryology, neuroscience, (neuro)endocrinology, ecology, genetics, behavioural science, evolution, drug development, and conservation biology. In some cases, frog skin has proven very successful as a research model, for example aiding in the study of ion transport through tight epithelia, where it has served as a model for the vertebrate distal renal tubule and mammalian epithelia. However, it has rarely been considered in comparative studies involving human skin. Yet, despite certain notable adaptations that have enabled frogs to survive in both aquatic and terrestrial environments, frog skin has many features in common with human skin. Here we present a comprehensive overview of frog (and toad) skin ontogeny, anatomy, cytology, neuroendocrinology and immunology, with special attention to its unique adaptations as well as to its similarities with the mammalian integument, including human skin. We hope to provide a valuable reference point and a source of inspiration for both amphibian investigators and mammalian researchers studying the structural and functional properties of the largest organ of the vertebrate body.

  11. Dermatologic Microsutures Using Human Hair: A Useful Technique in Cutaneous Stitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Azrak, Mohammed; Ogawa, Rei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Facial wounds are challenging for dermatologic surgeons, particularly traumatic facial wounds, because they can yield disfiguring scars. To obtain good results, narrow needles and sutures are needed. Hair filaments have a very small diameter (0.06-0.1 mm) and could serve as suture threads for facial wounds. Objective: To determine the aesthetic outcomes by using autologous hair to suture facial wounds. Patients and Methods: This case series study examined the aesthetic outcomes of all consecutive female patients with traumatic facial wounds who underwent autologous hair-based stitching in 2009-2016. Autologous hair ampoules were generated from an insulin needle. Micro instruments were used for wound stitching. Results: In total, 54 females (mean age, 10.8; range, 3-45) years had 56 traumatic wounds. Mean wound length was 3.6 (range, 1-12) cm. Injury depth varied from cutaneous-only to muscle involvement. Suturing yielded good edge coaptation, nice healing, and excellent aesthetic outcomes; the scars were often scarcely visible. Suture marks were not detected. Cutaneous reactions did not occur. Conclusion: Autologous hair can serve as a thread for closing facial wounds. It is low cost and thus suitable in settings characterized by facility and equipment limitations. It is also suitable for the battlefield.

  12. Garlic in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L. fam. Alliaceae) is one of the best-researched, best-selling herbal remedies and is also commonly used for treating various health problems. Garlic is widely known for its biological properties and plays an important role as an antioxidant. The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize all dermatologic-oriented in vitro and in-vivo experiments and clinical trials on garlic preparations. Extensive literatures search was carried out and twenty three studies were...

  13. Garlic in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Nader Pazyar; Amir Feily

    2011-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L. fam. Alliaceae) is one of the best-researched, best-selling herbal remedies and is also commonly used for treating various health problems. Garlic is widely known for its biological properties and plays an important role as an antioxidant. The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize all dermatologic-oriented in vitro and in-vivo experiments and clinical trials on garlic preparations. Extensive literatures search was carried out and twenty three studies were...

  14. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a large...

  15. Research Techniques Made Simple: The Application of CRISPR-Cas9 and Genome Editing in Investigative Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Joan Ramon; Johnson, Jodi L; Chien, Wade W

    2016-09-01

    Designer nucleases have gained widespread attention for their ability to precisely modify genomic DNA in a programmable manner. These genome-editing nucleases make double-stranded breaks at specified loci, and desired changes can be made to modify, ablate, or excise target genes. This technology has been used widely to develop human disease models in laboratory animals and to study gene functions by silencing, activating, or modifying them. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a bacterially derived programmable nuclease termed clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) has revolutionized the field because of its versatility and wide applicability. In this article, we discuss various modalities used to achieve genome editing with an emphasis on CRISPR-Cas9. We discuss genome-editing strategies to either repair or ablate target genes, with emphasis on their applications for investigating dermatological diseases. Additionally, we highlight preclinical studies showing the potential of genome editing as a therapy for congenital blistering diseases and as an antimicrobial agent, and we discuss limitations and future directions of this technology.

  16. Human phthiriasis. Can dermoscopy really help dermatologists? Entodermoscopy: a new dermatological discipline on the edge of entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanni, G

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of human phtiriasis (often referred to as the "crab" or the "pubic louse") can be more difficult than other types of pediculosis (Pediculus corporis and Pediculus capitis) because this insect has a smaller body of 1.2 x 0.8 mm, may be lighter in color, not as mobile and therefore harder to see to the naked eye. Can dermoscopy aid to perform a better analysis of the skin? The clinical experience developed in two patients gives an affirmative answer, moreover adding useful information of insect and its eggs already known to entomologists but never used in dermatological diagnosis. The identification in vivo can distinguish Phthirus pubis from other skin signs while the conical shape of the operculum and the wide fixing sleeve of egg to hair, tells what species of louse is infesting, even if the insect is unavailable or nits are elsewhere from the pubic area. Entodermoscopy, provided that dermatologists have some knowledge of entomology, therefore promises advantages over standard microscopic examination.

  17. Dermatologic Surgical Instruments: A History and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sumul A; Kampp, Jeremy T

    2017-01-01

    Dermatologic surgery requires precision and accuracy given the delicate nature of procedures performed. The use of the most appropriate instrument for each action helps optimize both functionality and cosmetic outcome. To review the history of surgical instruments used in dermatology, with a focus on mechanism and evolution to the instruments that are used in current practice. A comprehensive literature search was conducted via textbook and journal research for historic references while review of current references was conducted online using multiple search engines and PubMed. There are a number of articles that review instruments in dermatology, but this article adds a unique perspective in classifying their evolution, while also presenting them as levers that serve to increase human dexterity during the course of surgery. Surgical instruments allow fine manipulation of tissue, which in turn produces optimal outcomes. Surgical tools have been around since the dawn of man, and their evolution parallels the extent to which human civilization has specialized over time. This article describes the evolution of instruments from the general surgical armamentaria to the specialized tools that are used today.

  18. Consumer Empowerment in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Heather E.; Busse, Kristine L.; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Health care consumers increasingly confront and collaborate with their medical providers. We describe consumer success in other medical fields and in dermatology, especially dermatologic disease advocacy and improving dermatologist-patient interactions. PMID:19254661

  19. American Academy of Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards study tools Online Learning Center Meetings and events Make a difference Career planning Media Relations Toolkit AAD apps Academy meeting Chronic urticaria—for members Chronic urticaria—for public Dermatology World Dialogues in Dermatology JAAD Mohs AUC ...

  20. Molecular Phylogenetic Diversity of Dermatologic and Other Human Pathogenic Fusarial Isolates from Hospitals in Northern and Central Italy▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migheli, Quirico; Balmas, Virgilio; Harak, Henry; Sanna, Silvana; Scherm, Barbara; Aoki, Takayuki; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-eight fusaria isolated from 50 Italian patients between 2004 and 2007 were subject to multilocus DNA sequence typing to characterize the spectrum of species and circulating sequence types (STs) associated with dermatological infections, especially onychomycoses and paronychia, and other fusarioses in northern and central Italy. Sequence typing revealed that the isolates were nearly evenly divided among the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC; n = 18), the F. oxysporum species complex (FOSC; n = 20), and the Gibberella (Fusarium) fujikuroi species complex (GFSC; n = 20). The three-locus typing scheme used for members of the FSSC identified 18 novel STs distributed among six phylogenetically distinct species, yielding an index of discrimination of 1.0. Phylogenetic analysis of the FOSC two-locus data set identified nine STs, including four which were novel, and nine isolates of ST 33, the previously described widespread clonal lineage. With the inclusion of eight epidemiologically unrelated ST 33 isolates, the FOSC typing scheme scored a discrimination index of 0.787. The two-locus GFSC typing scheme, which was primarily designed to identify species, received the lowest discrimination index, with a score of 0.492. The GFSC scheme, however, was used to successfully identify 17 isolates as F. verticillioides, 2 as F. sacchari, and 1 as F. guttiforme. This is the first report that F. guttiforme causes a human mycotic infection, which was supported by detailed morphological analysis. In addition, the results of a pathogenicity experiment revealed that the human isolate of F. guttiforme was able to induce fusariosis of pineapple, heretofore its only known host. PMID:20107100

  1. Spa therapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS. DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals.

  2. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. 878.4630 Section 878.4630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic...

  3. RHODIOLA ROSEA: STATUS OF RESEARCH AND POSSIBILITIES FOR COSMECEUTICAL AND DERMATOLOGICAL DRUGS PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Stepanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodiola rosea is one of the most popular adaptogene agents. Apart from adaptogene, it has the whole range of other pharmaceutical properties: antioxidant, nootropic, antidepressant, immunomodulatory, and other. Russian industry manufactures liquid extract of Rhodiola rosea, as well as food BAS based on the Rhodiola rosea, but there are no dosage forms for external use.The purpose of this work is to analyze scientific information about general characteristics of the pharmacological activity and possible use of Rhodiola rosea in external drugs and cosmetics.Methods. The following resources were used for general characteristic of Rhodiola rosea, its pharmacological properties, particularly the usage of Rhodiola rosea in medical and cosmetic practices, as well prospects of its external use: eLIBRARY, PubMed, Cyberleninca, ResearchGate, information from manufacturers and dealers web-pages.Results. Rhodiola drugs are considered prospective agents for depressions therapy, Parkinson disease treatment, memory, attention defects, for arrhythmia prevention, stamina increase, and stress level decrease in sport and space medicine, for acceptability and efficiency improvement of chemo- and radiotherapy, as immunostimulatory agent. Nowadays in the Russian Federation Rhodiola rosea liquid extract is used as a tonic agent and is prescribed for over-fatigue in healthy persons, and for the sick, weakened as the result of a long-term treatment. Literature has sufficient amount of data about possible effect of biologically active substances of Rhodiola rosea at external use: antioxidant and antimicrobial, bleaching, UV-protective, metabolism stimulating.Conclusion. Thus, the data obtained give evidence about the prospect of Rhodiola use in cosmeceutics and prove the experience of its traditional use for withering and fat skin treatment, as well as acne.

  4. The dermatology acting internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, John B; Raimer, Sharon S; Wagner, Richard F

    2011-07-15

    Acting internships are an important component of modern day medical school curriculum. Several specialties outside of internal medicine now offer acting internship experiences to fourth year medical students. We have found that a dermatology acting internship is a valuable experience for fourth year medical students who are interested in pursuing a residency in dermatology. Our experience with the dermatology acting internship over the 2010-2011 academic year is described.

  5. Dermatologic therapy in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Kelly H

    2015-03-01

    Patients present during pregnancy with a variety of dermatologic conditions, most of which can be treated conservatively with topical medication by a primary obstetrician if he or she is familiar with common treatment options. Patients with moderate to severe forms of dermatologic disease or those requiring systemic therapy should be treated in consultation with a dermatologist. Dermatologic surgery can be performed safely in the second trimester using local anesthesia if needed.

  6. Clinical comparison of human and canine atopic dermatitis using human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009): proposal of provisional diagnostic criteria for canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Yuri; Nagata, Masahiko; Murayama, Nobuo; Nanko, Hiroko; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease encountered in both humans and dogs. Canine AD can be used in the analysis of naturally occurring AD; however, details of clinical comparison have been lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare those clinical features using the human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009). Fifty-one dogs with canine AD were evaluated by the human criteria. Prior to this study, canine AD was basically diagnosed by the fulfillment of two authentic canine AD criteria and a positive reaction against Dermatophagoides farinae in serum immunoglobulin E levels and/or in intradermal tests. Among the human AD criteria items, behavior corresponding to pruritus was observed in all 51 dogs. Skin lesions corresponding to eczematous dermatitis were seen in 50 dogs, and symmetrical distribution of skin lesions was noted in all 51 dogs. A chronic or chronically relapsing course was observed in 50 dogs. Based on these results, the concordance rate for the criteria was 96% (49/51). Differential diagnoses of AD were also investigated in the same manner. The concordance rate for the criteria was 0% (0/69) in scabies, 2% (1/50) in pyoderma, 0% (0/50) in demodicosis, 0% (0/9) in cutaneous lymphoma, 0% (0/2) in ichthyosis, 25% (2/7) in flea allergy, 48% (24/50) in seborrheic dermatitis and 75% (3/4) in food allergy. Canine AD is thus indicated as a valuable counterpart to human AD in clinical aspects. In addition, the human AD criteria could be applicable, with some modification, as provisional diagnostic criteria for canine AD.

  7. Garlic in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Pazyar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. fam. Alliaceae is one of the best-researched, best-selling herbal remedies and is also commonly used for treating various health problems. Garlic is widely known for its biological properties and plays an important role as an antioxidant. The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize all dermatologic-oriented in vitro and in-vivo experiments and clinical trials on garlic preparations. Extensive literatures search was carried out and twenty three studies were included. The results suggest that oral administration of garlic is effective on immunologic properties, cutaneous microcirculation, protection against UVB and cancer treatment. Additionally, topical application of garlic extract can potentially be effective on psoriasis, alopecia areata, keloid scar, wound healing, cutaneous corn, viral and fungal infection, leishmaniasis, skin aging and rejuvenation. Clinical effectiveness of oral and topical garlic extract is not sufficiently and meticulously explored as so far.

  8. Human Research Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strategically, the HRP conducts research and technology development that: 1) enables the development or modification of Agency-level human health and performance...

  9. Safety of Topical Dermatologic Medications in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Viral M; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2016-07-01

    Dermatologic drugs should be employed with caution in women of childbearing age who are pregnant or considering pregnancy. Topical drugs have little systemic absorption. Therefore, they are deemed safer than oral or parenteral agents and less likely to harm the fetus. However, their safety profile must be assessed cautiously, as there is limited available data. In this article, we aggregate human and animal studies and provide recommendations on using topical dermatologic medications in pregnancy. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):830-834.

  10. Vitamin E in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Mohammad Abid; Hassan, Iffat

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology. PMID:27559512

  11. Yoga for dermatologic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalat, Sheila

    2015-04-01

    As both a dermatology resident and yoga instructor, I find the potential correlation between the 2 disciplines to be interesting and a growing topic of attention in the media today. With the rising trend of practicing yoga, which encompasses physical postures, breathing exercises, and meditation or mindfulness, it is inevitable that patients will inquire about the benefits of yoga in managing dermatologic problems. In this column, I will discuss the dermatologic manifestations of stress as well as the known health benefits of yoga as described in the literature so that residents may offer an objective opinion about yoga in response to patient inquiries.

  12. Sonography of Dermatologic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortsman, Ximena

    2017-09-01

    Dermatologic conditions may be the subjects of potential emergency consultations, and the knowledge of their sonographic appearance can facilitate an early diagnosis and management. In this pictorial essay, the sonographic dermatologic anatomy, technique, and conditions that can be supported by a prompt sonographic diagnosis are reviewed. The sonographic signs that may help diagnose these entities are discussed with a practical approach. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Smart phones and apps application in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Önder

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones are a device that is more than just a phone and more than a personel digital assistant.Nowadays a phone is as a powerful handheld computer,camera,video recorder,media player,GPS receiver,MP3 player,radio and as well as a communication tool. Smartphones (mobile phones with advanced computing capability are rapidly gaining new use with the advent of dowloadable applications known as ‘Apps’. There are a lot of medical apps avaliable.Dermatology themed smartphone apps were provided as reference materials,illustrated databases of common skin conditions for accessing online versions of popular dermatology textbook and journals;dermatology based questionnairs; including disease severity scoring calculators and /or providing automated photo analysers for skin lesions / as an electronic dermoscopy. Most of the apps applications are free of charge and can be easily dowloaded to smartphones. Furthermore the possibility to send and save both text and images by this technology seems perfectly tailored to dermatology.Recently electronic teaching and learning via smartphones are becoming very popular for medical students aswell. However there is relatively little research on medical uses and potential roles of them in dermatology.This article summarizes the curent trends in the ‘smartphone market’ and takes a glance at some dermatology apps ‘which are currently available.

  14. Probiotics in dermatologic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa; Marquez-Barba, María Fernanda; Sriram, Krishnan

    2016-03-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that beneficially affect the host when administered in adequate amounts. They have an excellent safety profile. Probiotics have been used as immunomodulators in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to summarize the available evidence concerning the use of different strains of probiotics in dermatology practice. We conducted a literature review of English and Spanish publications listed in standard databases (PubMed, Ovid, Google Scholar, Medline, and EBSCO), between 1994 and 2015 using the words "probiotics" and "dermatology." We found ∼70 studies containing these criteria and selected 42 in which probiotics were used for dermatologic purposes. We found enough evidence to recommend the use of probiotics in specific conditions in dermatology practice, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. Further well-designed, large population based trials are needed to validate the use of probiotics in dermatology practice, including innovative therapies to rebuild skin barrier defects, protection against microbial colonization, and restoration of immunologic balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 75 FR 36101 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee... Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee scheduled for June 28, 2010, is cancelled. This meeting...

  17. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and References View This Section What is a dermatologic surgeon? Part of a progressive medical subspecialty, ASDS ... of the 2017 ASDS Consumer Survey on Cosmetic Dermatologic Procedures are now available to be shared with ...

  18. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Director Organization Reports & Publications Español The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds ... Landscape Social Media Videos Image Gallery Fact Sheets Human Genome Project Clinical Studies Genomic Careers DNA Day Calendar ...

  19. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Hubert M; Joseph, Aaron K

    2017-06-01

    Ergonomic practice increases the productivity, quality, and longevity of the dermatologic surgeon. When used properly, magnification devices can be ergonomic and beneficial additions to the dermatologic surgeon's practice. Herein, we review the available magnification options for the dermatologic surgeon and evaluate the options based on cost, design, and functional advantages and disadvantages. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon may be a useful tool for a healthier, more efficient, and higher-quality practice.

  20. [What's new in pediatric dermatology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruani, A

    2015-12-01

    The years 2014-2015 have been rich in paediatric dermatology news in varied areas. Randomized controlled trials including children have been performed, especially in the fields of vascular anomalies, infectiology and immuno-allergology; new classifications and guidelines have been established; scientific research has made new discoveries, including the molecular basis of pediatric nevi and melanoma; epidemiologic works on risk factors have highlighted the need for dermatologists to be aware of prevention (sun prevention but also obesity); and finally, the many publications have taken into account psychological issues in children, such as quality of life, pain, observance or acceptance.

  1. "Natural" ingredients in cosmetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Leslie; Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Friedman, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Recently, both clinical and bench research has begun to provide scientific validation for the use of certain botanical ingredients. Related findings regarding proposed biological mechanisms of action have translated into clinical practice. Botanical compounds for which dermatologic and cosmetic applications have emerged include: olive oil, chamomile, colloidal oatmeal, oat kernal extract, feverfew, acai berry, coffee berry, curcumin, green tea, pomegranate, licorice, paper mulberry, arbutin, and soy. Many of these botanical sources offer biologically active components that require further in vitro and in vivo investigation in order for us to properly educate ourselves, and our patients, regarding over-the-counter products based on these ingredients.

  2. [What's new in paediatric dermatology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantin, P

    2014-12-01

    Regular analysis of the major journals in dermatology and paediatrics has been used to select forty articles which are representative of the past year in paediatric dermatology. This selection is not exhaustive but rather reflects the interests of the author and also the dominant topics in paediatric dermatology in 2013-2014.

  3. Mecanismos de acción de la inmunoglobulina humana en las enfermedades dermatológicas pediátricas Action mechanisms of human immunoglobulin in pediatric dermatological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain R. Rodríguez Orozco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de inmunomoduladores en dermatología pediátrica ha devenido necesidad de la práctica clínica contemporánea. Por otro lado, el continuo descubrimiento de moléculas involucradas en la fisiopatología de muchas enfermedades dermatológicas asociadas a trastornos inmunológicos obliga a revisar continuamente las aplicaciones de estos. El presente trabajo propone mostrar algunos mecanismos de acción que justifican el uso de la inmunoglobulina humana en algunas enfermedades dermatológicas pediátricas y facilita al médico la discusión sobre la conveniencia del uso de estas a la luz de la fisiopatología actual de estas enfermedades y del estado del paciente.The use of immunomodulators in pediatric dermatology has turned into a need of contemporary clinical practice. On the other hand, the continuous discovery of molecules involved in the physiopathology of many dermatological diseases associated with immunological disorders leads to the constant review of the application of these immunomodulators. This paper is aimed at showing some action mechanisms that justify the use of human immunoglobulin in some pediatric dermatological diseases and allows physicians to discuss the convenience of its utilization in the light of the present physiopathology of these diseases and of the patient’s state.

  4. Dermatologic manifestations of fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniosz, Valerie; Wetter, David A; Godar, Desiree A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the common dermatologic diagnoses and skin-related symptoms in a cohort of patients with fibromyalgia seen in a tertiary referral center. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients with a fibromyalgia diagnosis from January 1 to December 31, 2008, whose diagnosis was confirmed in the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Charts were reviewed for dermatologic conditions and cutaneous symptoms. Demographic and clinical data were collected to assess the frequency of skin-related issues in patients with fibromyalgia. Of 2,233 patients screened, 845 patients met the inclusion criteria of having a confirmed diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Among these fibromyalgia patients, various dermatologic conditions and cutaneous problems were identified, including hyperhidrosis in 270 (32.0 %), burning sensation of the skin or mucous membranes in 29 (3.4 %), and various unusual cutaneous sensations in 14 (1.7 %). Pruritus without identified cause was noted by 28 patients (3.3 %), with another 16 patients (1.9 %) reporting neurotic excoriations, prurigo nodules, or lichen simplex chronicus. Some form of dermatitis other than neurodermatitis was found in 77 patients (9.1 %). Patients with fibromyalgia may have skin-related symptoms associated with their fibromyalgia. No single dermatologic diagnosis appears to be overrepresented in this population, with the exception of a subjective increase in sweating.

  5. Paradoxes in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavmurthy A Adya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many paradoxical phenomena related to clinical, immunological, and therapeutic dermatology have been described. While some of them can be explained logically, the cause for others can only be speculated. Whenever encountered in clinical practice, background knowledge of such paradoxes may be useful to the clinician.

  6. Neoprene splinting: dermatological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, E B; Callinan, N; Hank, M; Lewis, E J; Schousboe, J T; Ytterberg, S R

    1998-01-01

    Occupational therapists are expanding their use of custom and commercial soft splints fabricated from neoprene (polychloroprene), but little has been written regarding dermatological issues associated with this material. Skin contact with neoprene poses two dermatological risks: allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat). Allergic reaction to neoprene is generally ascribed to the accelerants used to manufacture the man-made rubber, specifically thiourea compounds and mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT). Symptoms of neoprene-related ACD include itching, skin eruptions, swelling, and hemorrhages into the skin. Miliaria rubra creates small, red, elevated, inflammatory papules and a tingling, burning sensation. Although neoprene hypersensitivity is rare, its incidence may grow as neoprene becomes a more commonly used material. It is recommended that therapists screen patients for a history of dermatological reactions to neoprene or other materials containing thiourea compounds or MBT and educate patients to discontinue splint use if dermatological symptoms develop. Therapists are also encouraged to notify splint manufacturers regarding all ACD reactions.

  7. [Bestiaries in clinical dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, N

    2016-01-01

    Metaphors have always played a role in the medical tradition and in dermatology too. Beyond their initially playful aspect, metaphors offer a way of rapidly identifying a lesion and of linking it to one or more diseases. They also play a role in the education of medical students and residents by making it easier to memorise different diseases. Herein we discuss "animal" metaphors.

  8. Antioxidants in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Varadraj V; Pankaj Shukla; Naveen Narayanshetty Kikkeri

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer′s disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  9. Antioxidants in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj V Pai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer′s disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  10. Antioxidants in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Pai, Varadraj V.; Pankaj Shukla; Naveen Narayanshetty Kikkeri

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidants neutralize free radicals produced by various environmental insults such as ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoke and air pollutants, thereby preventing cellular damage. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants is known in diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. Herein we discuss the effects of oxidative stress on the skin and role of antioxidants in dermatology.

  11. Usefulness of Cochrane intervention reviews for the practicing dermatologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad

    2013-09-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration produces systematic, evidence-based reviews of clinically relevant topics in medicine, including those relevant to dermatologic surgery. To assess the utility of Cochrane reviews for practicing dermatologic surgeons. Search of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on February 20, 2012 for topics relevant to dermatologic surgery. Assessment of clinical recommendations with regard to their likelihood to affect medical decision-making in clinical dermatologic surgery. Fifteen Cochrane reviews met the search criteria; three offered positive conclusions regarding the comparative effectiveness of different therapies for the same indications. Cochrane reviews offer outstandingly complete evidence-based summaries of their topics. As such, the methodology of Cochrane reviews is a model for reviews in dermatologic surgery. Because of the dearth of high-level evidence in dermatologic surgery, the ability of Cochrane reviews to provide specific recommendations remains limited. Furthermore, dermatologic surgery may be inherently difficult to study because of the rapid evolution of procedures, intraprocedure complexity and variation, difficulties inherent in randomizing patients to interventions, and intersurgeon skill variation. That being said, the dermatologic surgery literature continues to improve and grow, and investigators are now broaching the special challenges associated with research in this area. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  13. 77 FR 8262 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of the meeting of the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic... that a meeting of the Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee would be held on February 27...

  14. The Role of Diet in Dermatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahu Yorulmaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Like other living organisms, humans also depend upon foods in order to maintain their life. Serving as a source of energy, foods are not only crucial for our survival, but also they give pleasure to our sense of taste. There are so many disease fighting foods that are proven to prevent and cure illnesses like cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, heart attack, and infections. On the other hand, foods can also play role in the development of some kind of illnesses. Dermatitis herpetiformis is the prototypic dermatological disease that there are certain data indicating foods have a definite role in its etiopathogenesis. Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, pemphigus, acne, allergic contact dermatitis and urticaria are the other dermatological diseases that foods are implicated in their development. In this review, we discussed the etiopathogenesis and relation of foods with the development of most common diseases in dermatological practice.

  15. Dermatologic Manifestations of Systemic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Maryn Anne; Isamah, Nwamaka; Northway, Rebecca M

    2015-12-01

    Dermatologic complaints are encountered frequently by the primary care provider. Patients often are required as well as want to see their primary care provider before referral to a specialist. Therefore, primary care providers must be skilled in a variety of topics including dermatology. Certain dermatologic manifestations are associated with, or indicative of, systemic diseases. Primary care providers must be knowledgeable in diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of dermatologic conditions, as well as when to appropriately refer. This article reviews common dermatologic manifestations of systemic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Possibilities of modern photography in dermatology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galkina E.M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

     

     

    The purpose of the article was to research necessary conditions for creating high — quality images which allow to display all features of pathological process on skin more complete and authentically. That is also an integral part of modern dermatology. The usage of photographic documentation is necessary to improve students’ training, for doctor’s practical activities using the experience of the clinic, creating medical literature, and it is a unique and valuable contribution to diagnostics of dermatological diseases.

  17. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini;

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a lar...... number of applications in the fields of non-melanoma skin cancer, malignant melanomas, psoriasis and dermatitis, infestations, bullous skin diseases, tattoos, nails, haemangiomas, and other skin diseases. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)...

  18. [LED lights in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, C; Pelletier-Aouizerate, M; Cartier, H

    2017-01-16

    The use in dermatology of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) continues to be surrounded by controversy. This is due mainly to poor knowledge of the physicochemical phases of a wide range of devices that are difficult to compare to one another, and also to divergences between irrefutable published evidence either at the level of in vitro studies or at the cellular level, and discordant clinical results in a variety of different indications: rejuvenation, acne, wound healing, leg ulcers, and cutaneous inflammatory or autoimmune processes. Therapeutic LEDs can emit wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet, through visible light, to the near infrared (247-1300 nm), but only certain bands have so far demonstrated any real value. We feel certain that if this article remains factual, then readers will have a different, or at least more nuanced, opinion concerning the use of such LED devices in dermatology.

  19. Image compression for dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, John P.; Sneiderman, Charles; Colaianni, Joseph; Hood, Antoinette F.

    1990-07-01

    Color 35mm photographic slides are commonly used in dermatology for education, and patient records. An electronic storage and retrieval system for digitized slide images may offer some advantages such as preservation and random access. We have integrated a system based on a personal computer (PC) for digital imaging of 35mm slides that depict dermatologic conditions. Such systems require significant resources to accommodate the large image files involved. Methods to reduce storage requirements and access time through image compression are therefore of interest. This paper contains an evaluation of one such compression method that uses the Hadamard transform implemented on a PC-resident graphics processor. Image quality is assessed by determining the effect of compression on the performance of an image feature recognition task.

  20. [Network Research on Human Papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Paniagua, Ramón; Furuya, María ElenaYuriko

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the research in important health questions at a national and institutional levels, the Human Papillomavirus Research Network of the Health Research Coordination of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social offers this supplement with the purpose of assisting patients that daily look for attention due to the human papillomavirus or to cervical cancer.

  1. Self Inflicted Dermatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul H. Aydemir

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This group of diseases are characterised with the aggravated types of stress releasing behaviors like scratching, picking, squeezing, and sucking. Lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, neurotic excoriations, trichotillomani, and onychotillomani are the diseases in this group. Depression, anxiety, and obsesif compulsive disease are the main underlying psychologic diseases. They need a skillfull psychiatric approach in addition to dermatologic treatment, and should be treated with patience in a long duration.

  2. Nocebo effect in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Sonthalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocebo effect, originally denoting the negative counterpart of the placebo phenomenon, is now better defined as the occurrence of adverse effects to a therapeutic intervention because the patient expects them to develop. More commonly encountered in patients with a past negative experience, this effect stems from highly active processes in the central nervous system, mediated by specific neurotransmitters and modulated by psychological mechanisms such as expectation and conditioning. The magnitude of nocebo effect in clinical medicine is being increasingly appreciated and its relevance encompasses clinical trials as well as clinical practice. Although there is hardly any reference to the term nocebo in dermatology articles, the phenomenon is encountered routinely by dermatologists. Dermatology patients are more susceptible to nocebo responses owing to the psychological concern from visibility of skin lesions and the chronicity, unpredictable course, lack of ′permanent cure′ and frequent relapses of skin disorders. While finasteride remains the prototypical drug that displays a prominent nocebo effect in dermatologic therapeutics, other drugs such as isotretinoin are also likely inducers. This peculiar phenomenon has recently been appreciated in the modulation of itch perception and in controlled drug provocation tests in patients with a history of adverse drug reactions. Considering the conflict between patients′ right to information about treatment related adverse effects and the likelihood of nocebo effect stemming from information disclosure, the prospect of ethically minimizing nocebo effect remains daunting. In this article, we review the concept of nocebo effect, its postulated mechanism, relevance in clinical dermatology and techniques to prevent it from becoming a barrier to effective patient management.

  3. Ethical considerations in dermatologic photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakdawala, Nikita; Fontanella, Demian; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-01-01

    In dermatology, clinical photographs are an essential component of patient care, enabling clinicians to document changes in skin pathology over time. Recent advances in digital technology and the electronic medical record have revolutionized clinical photography; however, these advances bring with them new ethical, legal, and social concerns. Photographs, more than other forms of documentation, have the potential to make patients uncomfortable. The act of photography, especially for those images requiring exposure of the genital area or the entire body, can be an uncomfortable experience for patients, necessitating the clinician and photographer to take an empathic stance in this setting. The Internet has elicited an increasing, and a very real, concern for patients about possible distribution and use of images outside of their individual care. The clinician and staff can allay these fears by professionally and empathetically addressing their concerns. In addition, it is important that patients receive appropriate informed consent about clinical photographs and the potential use of the images in their care, education, and research. Given the multitude of methods for recording clinical photographs, combined with the increasing complexity of image storage, standardization becomes a critical tool in providing consistency among images and achieving more equitable and efficacious care. To achieve this goal and improve the baseline standard of continuity of care for dermatological practices, we review the role of photographs, develop a model for patient consent, and establish standards for photography so as to provide the most ethical care for the patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Performance Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Biochemistry:Improvements in energy metabolism, muscular strength and endurance capacity have a basis in biochemical and molecular adaptations within the human body....

  5. Genetic risk factors for human susceptibility to infections of relevance in dermatology Fatores de risco genético para a suscetibilidade humana à infecções de relevância em dermatologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Felipe Jardim Sardinha

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the pre-microbiological era, it was widely accepted that diseases, today known to be infectious, were hereditary. With the discovery of microorganisms and their role in the pathogenesis of several diseases, it was suggested that exposure to the pathogen was enough to explain infection. Nowadays, it is clear that infection is the result of a complex interplay between pathogen and host, therefore dependant on the genetic make-up of the two organisms. Dermatology offers several examples of infectious diseases in different stages of understanding of their molecular basis. In this review, we summarize the main advances towards dissecting the genetic component controlling human susceptibility to infectious diseases of interest in dermatology. Widely investigated diseases such as leprosy and leishmaniasis are discussed from the genetic perspective of both host and pathogen. Others, such as rare mycobacterioses, fungal infections and syphilis, are presented as good opportunities for research in the field of genetics of infection.INTRODUÇÃO: Durante a era pré-microbiológica, era comum a visão de que doenças, hoje sabidamente infecciosas, eram hereditárias. Com a descoberta dos microorganismos e seu papel na patogênese de diversas patologias, chegou-se a propor que a exposição ao patógeno era condição suficiente para explicar infecção. Hoje, está claro que infecção é o resultado de uma complexa interação entre patógeno e hospedeiro, dependendo portanto, em última análise, do make-up genético de ambos os organismos. A dermatologia oferece diversos exemplos de doenças infecciosas em diferentes graus de entendimento de suas bases moleculares. Nesta revisão, resumimos os principais avanços na direção da dissecção do componente genético controlando suscetibilidade do ser humano a doenças infecciosas de importância na dermatologia. Doenças amplamente estudadas, como a hanseníase e a leishmaniose, s

  6. Surveillance of employees involved in coal-derived materials research with emphasis on the dermatologic portion of the surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, A.S. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Special surveillance of employees involved in coal-derived materials research was begun in February, 1975. These evaluations were in addition to the basic medical surveillance of all employees at ORNL. Included in this health assessment are laboratory studies every 18 months of all employees followed by a physical exam by a physician or P.A. for employees 45 years and older. Physician exams are performed every 36 months for employees under age 45. This presentation covers the details and findings of the special skin surveillance program. 3 refs.

  7. Diversity in the dermatology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Jorge A; Pandya, Amit G

    2016-12-01

    The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, and minorities are projected to represent the majority of our population in the near future. Unfortunately, health disparities still exist for these groups, and inequalities have also become evident in the field of dermatology. There is currently a lack of diversity within the dermatology workforce. Potential solutions to these health care disparities include increasing cultural competence for all physicians and improving diversity in the dermatology workforce. ©2016 Frontline Medical Communications.

  8. Biomechanics in dermatology: Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Haber, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Biomechanics is increasingly being recognized as an important research area in dermatology. To highlight only a few examples, biomechanics has contributed to the development of novel topical therapies for aesthetic and medical purposes, enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of plantar melanoma, and provided insight into the epidemiology of psoriatic disease. This article summarizes the findings from recent studies to demonstrate the important role that biomechanics may have in dermatologic disease and therapy and places these biomechanical findings in a clinical context for the practicing physician. In addition, areas for future biomechanics research and development in dermatology are discussed.

  9. Researching Human Rights in Prisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Naylor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines two issues: the author’s recent research on the capacity of prisons to incorporate human rights considerations into their routine management; and the methods employed in this research in prisons in two Australian jurisdictions. The first element examines the impact of formal human rights instruments on prison management and on the lived experiences of prisoners, and the potential for the practical application of human rights obligations in this environment. The second gives closer analysis to the specific use of qualitative methodologies in carrying out this research, and the potential implications of methodology for subsequent acceptance of research findings by governments.

  10. Iontophoresis in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai Reena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Iontophoresis is the process of increasing the penetration of drugs into the skin by application of an electric current. The drug is applied under an electrode of the same charge as the drug, and a return electrode opposite in charge to the drug is placed at a neutral site on the body surface. Electrical energy assists the movement of ions across the skin using the principle "like charges repel each other and opposite charges attract". In this article, we discuss the mechanism, principles, factors influencing iontophoresis and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  11. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  12. Balneotherapy in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Hagit; Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2003-01-01

    Balneotherapy and spa therapy emerged as an important treatment modality in the 1800s, first in Europe and then in the United States. Balneotherapy involves immersion of the patient in mineral water baths or pools. Today, water therapy is being practiced in many countries. Examples of unique and special places for balneotherapy are the Dead Sea in Israel, the Kangal hot spring in Turkey, and the Blue Lagoon in Iceland. Bathing in water with a high salt concentration is safe, effective, and pleasant for healing and recovery. This approach needs no chemicals or potentially harmful drugs. There are almost no side effects during and after treatment, and there is a very low risk to the patient's general health and well-being. Mineral waters and muds are commonly used for the treatment of various dermatologic conditions. The major dermatologic diseases that are frequently treated by balneotherapy with a high rate of success are psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. The mechanisms by which broad spectrums of diseases are alleviated by spa therapy have not been fully elucidated. They probably incorporate chemical, thermal, mechanical, and immunomodulatory effects. The major importance of balneotherapy and spa therapy both individually and as complements to other therapies lies in their potential effectiveness after standard medical treatments have failed to give comfort to these patients.

  13. Comparative Healthcare: Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drs Gilbert Shia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the body anddermatological problems are among the more commonailments to aflict mankind. The care of patients with skincompalints are an excellent backdrop in which to comparemedicine as practiced in China with what is available toAustralias. The approach to most conditions is very similarwhether you live in Beijing or Hobart. However there arealso marked differences, in China acupuncture, herbalmedicine and therapeutic massage are integral parts ofeveryday medical practice, and are promoted by thegovernment. Dermatology is an area where a traditionalherbalist would attract as many patients as an orthodoxdermatologist. For me there are some marked differencesin the way care is organised as is demonstrated in themanagement of the patient with chronic leg ulcers. Theauthors state that such patients are more likely to bereferred to a dermatologist in China because generalpractice has yet to establish itself fully as a specialty. Onthe other hand in Australia such patients are much morelikely to be managed almost exclusively in primary carewith the support of the community nursing services.Indeed as the Australian author states the wait for aroutine appointment with a dermatologist may be severalmonths. It is also intriguing to read about Formula A101an herbal lotion being promoted in China as a treatmentfor a variety of dermatological and other ailments. As withprevious articles in this series the views expressed arethose of the authors and do not necessarily represent theviews of the AMJ or any other official body.

  14. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery dermatologic surgery drug and device nomenclature recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Dover, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    There is a lack of consensus regarding appropriate nomenclature for drugs and devices used in surgical and cosmetic dermatology. To develop a rules-based system for naming drugs and devices commonly used in dermatologic surgery that generates identifiers and modifiers that are clear, complete, and brief. Using an iterative modified consensus process, five subject-area work groups of the ASDS Lexicon Task Force were charged with developing standard terminology for the drugs and devices subsumed under their topic. A subcommittee comprising the chairs of the workgroups initially developed the general rules that guided the consensus process; subsequently, this subcommittee merged the 5 resulting documents into a single work product. Two external reviewers with expertise in dermatologic drugs and devices reviewed the final document for errors and omissions. General characteristics sought in systematic names included: brevity, clarity, non-overlapping (mutually exclusive) nature, within-class similarity, preservation of current usage when possible, and potential for inclusion of future refinements. Naming of drugs and devices in dermatologic surgery can be improved to increase comprehensibility and utility in both clinical and research contexts. Particularly for devices, the use of systematic names can reduce repeated mention of proprietary names in scientific discourse. Any naming system should be amenable to modification, correction, and the continual incorporation of novel agents. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dapsone in dermatology and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozel, Gottfried; Blasum, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Dapsone (4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone) is an aniline derivative belonging to the group of synthetic sulfones. In 1937 against the background of sulfonamide era the microbial activity of dapsone has been discovered. Shortly thereafter, the use of dapsone to treat non-pathogen-caused diseases revealed alternate antiinflammatory mechanisms that initially were elucidated by inflammatory animal models. Thus, dapsone clearly has dual functions of both: antimicrobial/antiprotozoal effects and anti-inflammatory features similarly to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The latter capabilities primarily were used in treating chronic inflammatory disorders. Dapsone has been investigated predominantly by in vitro methods aiming to get more insights into the effect of dapsone to inflammatory effector cells, cytokines, and/or mediators, such as cellular toxic oxygen metabolism, myoloperoxidase-/halogenid system, adhesion molecules, chemotaxis, membrane-associated phospholipids, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor α, lymphocyte functions, and tumor growth. Moreover, attention has been paid to mechanisms by which dapsone mediates effects in more complex settings like impact of lifespan, stroke, glioblastoma, or as anticonvulsive agent. Additionally, there are some dermatological investigations in human being using dapsone and its metabolites (e.g., leukotriene B4-induced chemotaxis, ultraviolet-induced erythema). It could be established that dapsone metabolites by their own have anti-inflammatory properties. Pharmacology and mechanisms of action are determining factors for clinical use of dapsone chiefly in neutrophilic and/or eosinophilic dermatoses and in chronic disorders outside the field of dermatology. The steroid-sparing effect of dapsone is useful for numerous clinical entities. Future avenues of investigations will provide more information on this fascinating and essential agent.

  16. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Lina Ma; Jun Yu; Zhang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation.

  17. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dong; Ma, Lina; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation. PMID:25712261

  18. Coal tar in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Aben, K.K.H.; Van Der Valk, P.G.M.; Van Houtum, J.L.M.; Van De Kerkhof, P.C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Dermatology

    2007-07-01

    Coal tar is one of the oldest treatments for psoriasis and eczema. It has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antipruritic and antimitotic effects. The short-term side effects are folliculitis, irritation and contact allergy. Coal tar contains carcinogens. The carcinogenicity of coal tar has been shown in animal studies and studies in occupational settings. There is no clear evidence of an increased risk of skin tumors or internal tumors. Until now, most studies have been fairly small and they did not investigate the risk of coal tar alone, but the risk of coal tar combined with other therapies. New, well-designed, epidemiological studies are necessary to assess the risk of skin tumors and other malignancies after dermatological use of coal tar.

  19. Morgellons in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2010-04-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is the most frequent delusional disorder in dermatology. In DP there is a fixed belief of a usually skin-related invasion or infestation by a number of alleged infectious species (usually parasites and bacteria), whose identity has varied over the decades. Since 2002 worldwide an increasing number of patients have complained of unverifiable fibers and filaments in or on the skin, associated with numerous nonspecific complaints (arthralgias, altered cognitive function and extreme fatigue). This entity has been named "Morgellons disease" by the patients themselves, although medical evidence for its existence is lacking. As an example, we discuss a 55-year-old woman who complained of Morgellons disease and was treated as if she had DP. Currently the delusional assumption of infestation with Morgellons should be considered as a new type of DP with some kind of inanimate material. We therefore recommend in case of DP including Morgellons the use of the broader term "delusional infestation".

  20. Market Analysis in the Field of Dermatology: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak PD; Shah DB; Maheshwari DG

    2015-01-01

    The importance of skin has increased in the recent years. High range of population is willing to treat various dermatological diseases due to awareness. An increase in pollution, stress and lack of nutrition, skin disorders are increasing at a rapid pace, especially in India. This leads the companies to shift their focus more on the dermatological segment which may lead them towards good business opportunities. A long term impact in the field of Research &Development will make newer and newer...

  1. Dermatology and HIV/AIDS in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS have greatly complicated dermatologic disease and the required care in most regions of Africa. Opportunistic infections, ectoparasites, Kaposi sarcoma, and skin manifestations of systemic infections are exceedingly common in patients with HIV/AIDS. Dermatologists have contributed significantly to our knowledge base about HIV/AIDS and have played an important educational role regarding the clinical manifestations historically. Because of the increased burden of skin disease in Africa due to the HIV/AIDS epidemic we must redouble our efforts to provide dermatology education to care providers in Africa. We review the burden of skin disease in Africa, how it relates to HIV/AIDS and global infectious disease, current educational strategies in Africa to address this need, and suggest potential solutions to move these efforts forward.

  2. Zinc Therapy in Dermatology: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts, inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea, pigmentary disorders (melasma, and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma. Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc.

  3. Reasons for choosing Dermatology as a career choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawan Abdulaziz Aldahash

    2016-01-01

    Results: A total of six (3% students were considering Dermatology as their first choice, while it was the second choice for seven students (4.7%. Of the participants, 118 (60.8% found ′the difficulty of getting into a Dermatology residency programme′ to be the least attractive factor. Factors that significantly attracted medical students to consider Dermatology as a career choice were the appeal of being a dermatologist, how dermatologists lead a satisfying family life, reliance on clinical diagnostic skills and research opportunities in Dermatology (P = 0.004, 0.024, 0.039 and 0.010, respectively. Conclusions: A variety of factors influenced the medical students of KSAU-HS when choosing a future specialty. Identification of these factors can help medical student mentors and residency training programme directors to motivate students choose specialties that are limited in our nation.

  4. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the

  5. Patient perspectives on medical photography in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Marie C; Wu, Timothy; Haimovic, Adele; Kaplan, Rachel; Sanchez, Miguel; Cohen, David; Leger, Elizabeth A; Stein, Jennifer A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical photography enhances medical care, research, and teaching. Empirical data are needed to guide best practices regarding dermatologic photography. To investigate patient opinion about clinical photography and identify demographic factors that influence these opinions. Four hundred patients representing a broad range of ages, self-identified ethnic/racial groups, and socioeconomic levels were recruited from 4 dermatology settings in New York City. Patients were administered a survey about perceptions of photography, willingness to allow photographs to be used in a variety of settings, preferences for photographer and photographic equipment, and methods of consent. Eighty-eight percent of patients agreed that photography enhanced their quality of care. Most patients would allow their photographs to be used for medical, teaching, and research purposes with significantly more acceptance when patients were not identifiable. Patients preferred photographs taken by a physician rather than a nurse or student, photographers of the same gender, clinic-owned cameras to personal cameras or cell phones, and written consent to verbal consent. There were significant racial/ethnicity and age-related variations in responses, with white and older patients being more permissive than other groups. We use the results of this study to recommend best practices for photography in dermatology.

  6. Protecting human subjects in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orticio, Lily P

    2009-01-01

    The quest for advancing scientific knowledge through human experimentations using vulnerable groups is traced back to ancient history, when Herophilus performed vivisections on prisoners. The violation of the rights of human subjects through the 20th century led to the formulation of the Nuremberg Code in 1947 and the Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. In the United States, the most infamous was the Tuskegee public health study that resulted in the enactment of the National Research Act that authorized the creation of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects in Biomedical and Behavioral Research in 1974. In spite of existing federal regulations, the system of protecting human subjects is still flawed. Transparency of conflict ofinterest, clarity, and strict adherence to institutional guidelines are critical in safeguarding the rights and safety of human subjects and the integrity of research. Education on ethics and emerging complex ethical issues, global awareness, and governmental cooperation and sanctions are important steps in addressing the inadequacies in protecting the most vulnerable populations in experimentations worldwide. Investigators must always remember that the primary safeguards of protecting human life rest in their hands.

  7. Acitretin in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acitretin, a synthetic retinoid has gradually replaced etretinate in today′s dermatologic practice because of its more favorable pharmacokinetics. Acitretin over the past 20 years has proven useful in a number of difficult-to-treat hyperkeratotic and inflammatory dermatoses and nonmelanoma skin cancers. It is effective both as monotherapy and in combination with other drugs for hyperkeratotic disorders. It is considered to be an established second line treatment for psoriasis and exerts its effect mainly due to its antikeratinizing, antiinflammatory, and antiproliferative effect. Its antineoplastic properties make it a useful agent for cancer prophylaxis. Evidence-based efficacy, side-effect profile, and approach to the use of acitretin would be discussed in this review. In addition to its approved uses, the various off label uses will also be highlighted in this section. Since its use is limited by its teratogenic potential and other adverse effects, including mucocutaneous effects and hepatotoxicity, this review would summarize the contraindications and precautions to be exercised before prescribing acitretin.

  8. Immunofluorescence in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Chhabra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct immunofluorescence (DIF and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF tests on skin biopsy are being done mostly in academic teaching hospitals. These tests provide a useful diagnostic aid to dermatologists. Immunohistology and serology can, in conjunction with histology, provide considerable help in delineation and diagnosis of various skin disorders as well as systemic diseases with skin involvement, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus. Immunofluorescence (IF studies have now become an invaluable supplement to clinical and histological examination in a variety of dermatological diseases. These skin diseases now include not only bullous and connective tissue disorders, vasculitides, and conditions such as lichen planus, but also the scaling dermatoses, notably psoriasis. In this review article, we share our experience of providing such a diagnostic facility for more than 30 years in a large tertiary care health center in North India and also help to outline the conditions, which can be diagnosed confidently, and others where IF can help in confirming a diagnosis or the immune component of the disease. The article also deals with handling of skin biopsy specimens and interpretation of biopsy findings on DIF and IIF examination.

  9. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müzeyyen Gönül

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.”

  10. Novel approach to utilizing electronic health records for dermatologic research: developing a multi-institutional federated data network for clinical and translational research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Reddy, Shalini B; Garg, Amit

    2012-05-15

    The implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the United States has created new opportunities for research using automated data extraction methods. A large amount of information from the EHR can be utilized for clinical and translational research. To date, a number of institutions have the capability of extracting clinical data from EHR to create local repositories of de-identified data amenable to research queries through the Informatics for Integrated Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) platform. Collaborations among institutions sharing a common i2b2 platform hold exciting opportunities for research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. With the automated extraction of patient-level data from multiple institutions, this novel informatics network has the ability to address high-priority research questions. With commitment to high-quality data through applied algorithms for cohort identification and validation of outcomes, the creation of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Integrated Research Data Network (PIONEER) will make a significant contribution to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis research.

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cells in dermatology: potentials, advances, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilousova, Ganna; Roop, Dennis R

    2014-11-03

    The discovery of methods for reprogramming adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility of producing truly personalized treatment options for numerous diseases. Similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), iPSCs can give rise to any cell type in the body and are amenable to genetic correction by homologous recombination. These ESC properties of iPSCs allow for the development of permanent corrective therapies for many currently incurable disorders, including inherited skin diseases, without using embryonic tissues or oocytes. Here, we review recent progress and limitations of iPSC research with a focus on clinical applications of iPSCs and using iPSCs to model human diseases for drug discovery in the field of dermatology.

  12. Surgical smoke in dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganesyan, Gagik; Eimpunth, Sasima; Kim, Silvia Soohyun; Jiang, Shang I Brian

    2014-12-01

    Potential dangers associated with smoke generated during electrosurgery have been described. However, the use of smoke management in dermatology is unknown. There is no objective data showing the amount or the composition of the smoke generated in dermatologic surgeries. To assess the use of smoke management in dermatologic surgery and provide data on the amount and chemical composition of surgical smoke. A total of 997 surveys were sent to dermatologic surgeons across the United States to assess the use of smoke management. Amounts and concentrations of particulates and chemical composition were measured during electrosurgery using a particulate meter and the Environmental Protection Agency-standardized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Thirty-two percent of the surgeons responded to the survey, and 77% of the respondents indicated no use of smoke management at all. Only approximately 10% of surgeons reported consistent use of smoke management. Active electrosurgery produced significant amounts of particulates. In addition, surgical smoke contained high concentrations of known carcinogens, such as benzene, butadiene, and acetonitrile. Surgical smoke contains toxic compounds and particulates. Most dermatologic surgeons do not use smoke management within their practices. Raising the awareness of the potential risks can help increase the use of smoke management.

  13. Dermatologic Surgery and Dermatologic Oncology as an Essential Part of the Modern Dermatology in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchernev, Georgi; Lozev, Ilia; Lotti, Torello; Wollina, Uwe; Gianfaldoni, Serena; Guarneri, Claudio; Lotti, Jacopo; França, Katlein; Batashki, Atanas; Chokoeva, Anastasiya

    2017-07-25

    Dermatosurgery and dermatooncology are an integral part of dermatology as a speciality, and this postulate is strictly respected in a high percentage of European dermatological units. Due to the fact that a number of other specialties interweave with the subject of therapy - the surgical treatment of the patient with skin tumors, the positioning of dermatosurgery as part of dermatology is generally controversial (according to some), and at the same time is often the subject of a number of debates and conflicts. These include maxillofacial surgeons, plastic surgeons, regenerative and reconstructive surgeons, surgical and medical oncologist, etc. The advantages of these specialities are mainly based on good medical practice and good surgical techniques that are applied. In contrast, their disadvantages are based on the lack of good awareness of the initial surgical approach as well as the need for time-adjusted and accurately performed additional surgical interventions which should befurthermore careful scheduled with the relevant oncology units. Losing this thread, in practice, it turns out that we are losing the patients themselves or, looking laconically, we are working with reduced efficiency and effectiveness. Although for the last 15 years the positions of these sub-sectors in Bulgaria had been underdeveloped, a certain ascent has been observed nowadays or from a couple of years ago. This advance is undoubtedly due to the influence of the German Dermatological School, presented by Prof. Dr. Uwe Wollina, Head of Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology in Dresden, Germany, as well as due to other respected representative of the Italian Dermatological School - in the face of Prof. Dr. Torello Lotti, Head of the Dermatology Unit at G Marconi University of Rome, Italy.

  14. 76 FR 71349 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  15. 75 FR 26264 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  16. 76 FR 30176 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...

  17. Nose: Applied aspects in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dammaningala Venkataramaiah Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents.

  18. Probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Yim, Elizabeth; Keri, Jonette E

    2014-10-01

    The rapid increase in the medical use of probiotics and prebiotics in recent years has confirmed their excellent safety profile. As immune modulators, they have been used in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. We review the literature regarding the use of probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology. Probiotics and prebiotics appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants, but their role in atopic dermatitis treatment is controversial. Their role in acne, wound healing, and photoprotection is promising, but larger trials are needed before a final recommendation can be made. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 48 CFR 207.172 - Human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compliance with 32 CFR Part 219, Protection of Human Subjects; and (b) Must have a Human Research Protection... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Human research. 207.172... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Acquisition Plans 207.172 Human research. Any...

  20. Clinical photography in the dermatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, William K; Lebovitz, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Photography has been accepted for decades as a standard means for documenting dermatologic conditions and as an adjunct to their treatment, in both medical practice and research. The emergence of low-cost easy-to-use digital imaging systems has made good-quality photography more accessible to practitioners, while providing improved functionality in the clinical environment. Primary concerns are controlling lighting and positioning to provide a clear record of the patients skin condition and maintaining consistency over time to assure meaningful comparison of clinical end points.

  1. Practice and Educational Gaps in Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Abigail; Sobanko, Joseph F; Alam, Murad

    2016-07-01

    This article identifies gaps in the practice of cosmetic dermatology and cosmetics education, and how to overcome these limitations. There is a rapid development of new devices and procedures, with limited data, patient-reported outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research from which to develop best cosmetic practice. There is a need for increased research and funding dedicated to these goals, improved and convenient training for staff to adopt new devices/procedures, and continuous evolution of databases to pool outcome data and develop outcome sets. Resident education can be improved by dedicated resident cosmetic clinics, didactic teaching from visiting professors, attendance of cosmetic dermatology courses and meetings, and encouraging postresidency training.

  2. Eponyms in dermatology literature linked to Otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahed Aqeel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In some disorders, there are symptoms or signs shared by dermatology and ears, nose and throat (ENT specialty. It is also known that there are eponyms in dermatology and ENT. The aim in this short communication is to shed some lights on the eponyms in dermatology literature linked to ENT.

  3. Dermatological legal claims in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Sachiko; Isogawa, Naoyuki; Ushiro, Shin; Ayuzawa, Junko; Furue, Masutaka

    2008-07-01

    Health-care safety management has recently been highlighted for patient safety. However, specialist-based risks in clinical settings have hardly been discussed in Japan so far. A review of dermatological legal claims may delineate these risks. This study examined court precedents from the databases "Courts in Japan" and LEX/DB. Thirty-four dermatology-related civil cases were found from 1968-2006. Of the 34 cases, 32 (94%) were judged and two (6%) were retried. Of these 32 cases, 11 (34%) were appealed to higher courts. Among the 34 litigations, the defendants of eight (23%) were dermatology specialists, 20 (59%) were non-dermatologists and six (18%) of unknown specialty. The defendants' negligence was determined at either level in court in 25 of the 34 cases. The negligence in these 25 cases was categorized into five groups: (i) delayed diagnosis (none); (ii) complication during diagnosis procedure (one, 4%); (iii) inappropriate treatment (nine, 36%); (iv) complication during treatment procedure (10, 40%); and (v) insufficient informed consent (five, 20%). The present study may help to improve strategies for health-care safety management in the dermatological field in Japan.

  4. Dermatology on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyers, Lindsay N; Quest, Tyler; Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-06-15

    YouTube, reaches upwards of six billion users on a monthly basis and is a unique source of information distribution and communication. Although the influence of YouTube on personal health decision-making is well established, this study assessed the type of content and viewership on a broad scope of dermatology related content on YouTube. Select terms (i.e. dermatology, sun protection, skin cancer, skin cancer awareness, and skin conditions) were searched on YouTube. Overall, the results included 100 videos with over 47 million viewers. Advocacy was the most prevalent content type at 24% of the total search results. These 100 videos were "shared" a total of 101,173 times and have driven 6,325 subscriptions to distinct YouTube user pages. Of the total videos, 35% were uploaded by or featured an MD/DO/PhD in dermatology or other specialty/field, 2% FNP/PA, 1% RN, and 62% other. As one of the most trafficked global sites on the Internet, YouTube is a valuable resource for dermatologists, physicians in other specialties, and the general public to share their dermatology-related content and gain subscribers. However, challenges of accessing and determining evidence-based data remain an issue.

  5. Human Factors Research and Nuclear Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, Neville P., Ed.; Huey, Beverly M., Ed.

    The Panel on Human Factors Research Needs in Nuclear Regulatory Research was formed by the National Research Council in response to a request from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC asked the research council to conduct an 18-month study of human factors research needs for the safe operation of nuclear power plants. This report…

  6. Market Analysis in the Field of Dermatology: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak PD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of skin has increased in the recent years. High range of population is willing to treat various dermatological diseases due to awareness. An increase in pollution, stress and lack of nutrition, skin disorders are increasing at a rapid pace, especially in India. This leads the companies to shift their focus more on the dermatological segment which may lead them towards good business opportunities. A long term impact in the field of Research &Development will make newer and newer innovations in the field to dermatology. Moreover, due to more consciousness in the skincare segment the market rise has occurred. The urban people are getting more exposed towards dermatologists and have their treatments done with them to assure safety and efficacy and get their desired results. They are being highly satisfied. The rural population is also getting aware about the skin conditions and is referring towards Over the Counter Cosmetic products as they are cost effective. This article focuses on the cosmetic industry mainly focusing on the dermatological market internationally as well as in India, the problems faced to market such products at a global level, leading industries, leading therapeutic segments, successful drugs in derma and issues with the dermatological drugs industry.

  7. Human Tissue Research: Who Owns the Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Allen B.

    1987-01-01

    Ownership issues in the results of research generally and of human tissue research specifically are explored. While acknowledging some uncertainty in the law, it is found that human tissue may be lawfully accessed for research and that use of human tissue does not modify the general allocation of interests. (MSE)

  8. Ethical Considerations in Human Movement Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Steve

    1995-01-01

    Highlights ethical issues for human subject research, identifying principles that form the construct of a code of research ethics and evaluating against this construct past human experimentation and current research in human movement studies. The efficacy of legislation and self-regulation is examined. Particular attention is given to the context…

  9. Understanding the cost of dermatologic care: A survey study of dermatology providers, residents, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Aaron J; Mann, Julianne A; Carlberg, Valerie M; Kimball, Alexa B; Musty, Michael J; Simpson, Eric L

    2017-04-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology recommends dermatologists understand the costs of dermatologic care. This study sought to measure dermatology providers' understanding of the cost of dermatologic care and how those costs are communicated to patients. We also aimed to understand the perspectives of patients and dermatological trainees on how cost information enters into the care they receive or provide. Surveys were systematically developed and distributed to 3 study populations: dermatology providers, residents, and patients. Response rates were over 95% in all 3 populations. Dermatology providers and residents consistently underestimated the costs of commonly recommended dermatologic medications but accurately predicted the cost of common dermatologic procedures. Dermatology patients preferred to know the cost of procedures and medications, even when covered by insurance. In this population, the costs of dermatologic medications frequently interfered with patients' ability to properly adhere to prescribed regimens. The surveyed population was limited to the northwestern United States and findings may not be generalizable. Cost estimations were based on average reimbursement rates, which vary by insurer. Improving dermatology providers' awareness and communication of the costs of dermatologic care might enhance medical decision-making, improve adherence and outcomes, and potentially reduce overall health care expenditures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A gender gap in the dermatology literature? Cross-sectional analysis of manuscript authorship trends in dermatology journals during 3 decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feramisco, Jamison D; Leitenberger, Justin J; Redfern, Shelley I; Bian, Aihua; Xie, Xian-Jin; Resneck, Jack S

    2009-01-01

    Despite a dramatic influx of female dermatologists during the last 30 years, women in academic dermatology departments remain relatively clustered in junior faculty positions. Research in other specialties showing a disparity in the academic productivity of women has led to many hypotheses regarding factors that may place them at a competitive disadvantage. It is unknown, however, whether similar differences in academic productivity might also serve as barriers to advancement in dermatology, or whether any productivity gap actually exists in this specialty that experienced a more substantial entry of women. Because publication in peer-reviewed journals is one of the core measures of academic productivity used in the promotion process, we evaluated trends in the prevalence of female authorship in top dermatology journals during the last 3 decades. We conducted an observational study of trends in the sex distribution of US authors in 3 prestigious general dermatology journals (in 1976, 1986, 1996, and 2006) and 3 subspecialty dermatology journals (in 2006 only). Journals were chosen based on published impact factors and citation half-lives. During the last 3 decades, the proportion of women authoring manuscripts in the 3 major general dermatology journals increased from 12% to 48% of US-affiliated first authors (P job descriptions or opportunities, differences in career aspirations, a lack of institutional support or flexibility, or gender bias) may be associated with the ongoing reduced advancement of women to senior academic dermatology ranks relative to their male colleagues, and further research is warranted to explore these possibilities.

  11. Absence of HTLV-1/2 infection and dermatological diseases in Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Leny Nascimento da Motta; Moraes, Márcia Poinho Encarnação de; Tamegão-Lopes, Bruna; Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues de; Machado, Paulo Roberto de Lima; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Talhari, Sinésio

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2) infection is heterogeneous across different populations. We tested the hypothesis that HTLV-1/2 infection occurs more often in dermatological patients. A total of 1,091 patients from a tropical dermatology clinic were tested for HTLV-1/2. In parallel, 6865 first-time blood donors from the same geographic area were screened for HTLV-1/2; HTLV-1/2 positive blood donors underwent dermatological examinations. The prevalence of HTLV-1/2 in first-time blood donors was 0.14%. No co-occurrence of HTLV-1/2 infection and dermatological conditions was observed. Our results challenge the hypothesis that HTLV-1/2 infection occurs more often in dermatological patients.

  12. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  13. Dermatology resources on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Dean D; Wainwright, Brent D

    2012-09-01

    Both patients and medical professionals are increasingly accessing the Internet for health information. Today's Web enables features that facilitate information sharing in a social and collaborative manner, thus transforming the way we access data and communicate with our patients and colleagues. The visual nature of the field of dermatology lends itself to the use of the Internet for reference and educational purposes. To generate a list of Web sites commonly used by academic dermatologists, the authors polled the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Dermatology Program Directors for their top 3 Web resources. The purpose of this article is to identify resources used by dermatologists as well as patients and examine factors that can influence Internet search results. Concerns regarding professionalism in the era of social media are also explored. As the volume of health information on the Internet continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be aware of what is available in cyberspace. Reference and learning tools for the physician, learning and support tools for the patient, and physician Internet presence are key aspects of modern dermatology practice.

  14. Jojoba in dermatology: a succinct review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazyar, N; Yaghoobi, R; Ghassemi, M R; Kazerouni, A; Rafeie, E; Jamshydian, N

    2013-12-01

    Phytomedicine has been successfully used in dermatology horizon for thousands of years. Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is a long-lived, drought resistant, perennial plant with interesting economic value as it is processed for liquid wax production. The jojoba plant produces esters of long-chain alcohols and fatty acids (waxes) as a seed lipid energy reserve. The liquid wax is an important substrate for a variety of industrial applications and is used in skin treatment preparations. The oil from the jojoba plant is the main biological source of wax esters and has a multitude of potential applications. The review of literatures suggest that jojoba has anti-inflammatory effect and it can be used on a variety of skin conditions including skin infections, skin aging, as well as wound healing. Moreover, jojoba has been shown to play a role in cosmetics formulas such as sunscreens and moisturizers and also enhances the absorption of topical drugs. The intention of the review is to summarize the data regarding the uses of jojoba in dermatology for readers and researchers.

  15. 78 FR 47699 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary..., Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), engaged in research misconduct in research... research misconduct by plagiarizing significant portions from research grant application R21 AR061881...

  16. Human Subjects Issues in AIDS Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ronald, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six articles are presented on the use of human subjects in research on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Topics include the ethics of human experimentation, female and pediatric AIDS patients, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and AIDS among correctional inmates, community-based AIDS research, and clinical trials of HIV…

  17. 75 FR 45130 - Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research Without an Investigational New Drug Application; Availability... the availability of a draft guidance for industry and researchers entitled ``The Radioactive...

  18. Human Research Program Integrated Research Plan. Revision A January 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Integrated Research Plan (IRP) describes the portfolio of Human Research Program (HRP) research and technology tasks. The IRP is the HRP strategic and tactical plan for research necessary to meet HRP requirements. The need to produce an IRP is established in HRP-47052, Human Research Program - Program Plan, and is under configuration management control of the Human Research Program Control Board (HRPCB). Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) is essential to enabling extended periods of space exploration because it provides knowledge and tools to mitigate risks to human health and performance. Risks include physiological and behavioral effects from radiation and hypogravity environments, as well as unique challenges in medical support, human factors, and behavioral or psychological factors. The Human Research Program (HRP) delivers human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. Without HRP results, NASA will face unknown and unacceptable risks for mission success and post-mission crew health. This Integrated Research Plan (IRP) describes HRP s approach and research activities that are intended to address the needs of human space exploration and serve HRP customers and how they are integrated to provide a risk mitigation tool. The scope of the IRP is limited to the activities that can be conducted with the resources available to the HRP; it does not contain activities that would be performed if additional resources were available. The timescale of human space exploration is envisioned to take many decades. The IRP illustrates the program s research plan through the timescale of early lunar missions of extended duration.

  19. Distinction between forensic evidence and dermatological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, U; Boy, D; Rothaupt, D; Büttner, A

    2015-07-01

    The external examination after death requires knowledge in forensics/pathology, dermatology, as well as associated diseases and age-related alterations of the skin. This article highlights some findings with forensic evidence versus dermatological findings. The lectures in forensic medicine should be structured interdisciplinarily, especially to dermatology, internal medicine, surgery, pathology, and toxicology in order to train the overlapping skills required for external and internal postmortem examinations.

  20. Fumaric acid esters in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumaric acid esters (FAE are substances of interest in dermatology. FAE exert various activities on cutaneous cells and cytokine networks. So far only a mixture of dimethylfumarate (DMF and three salts of monoethylfumarate (MEF have gained approval for the oral treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis in Germany. DMF seems to be the major active component. There is evidence that FAE are not only effective and safe in psoriasis but granulomatous non-infectious diseases like granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica and sarcoidosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest some activity in malignant melanoma as well.

  1. Dermatological laser treatment. Dermatologisk laserbehandling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moerk, N.J.; Austad, J. (Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)); Helland, S. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway)); Thune, P. (Ullevaal Sykehus, Oslo (Norway)); Volden, G. (University and Regional Hospital, Trondheim (Norway)); Falk, E. (University and Regional Hospital, Tromsoe (Norway))

    1991-10-01

    The article reviews the different lasers used in dermatology. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of naevus flammeus (''portwine stain'') where lasers are the treatment of choice. Argon laser and pulsed dye laser are the main lasers used in vascular skin diseases, and the article focuses on these two types. Copper-vapour laser, neodymium-YAG laser and CO{sub 2} laser are also presented. Information is provided about the availability of laser technology in the different health regions in Norway. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Dermatologic manifestations of infective endocarditis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rafael Tomaz; Tiberto, Larissa Rezende; Bello, Viviane Nardin Monte; Lima, Margarete Aparecida Jacometo; Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, infective endocarditis still shows considerable morbidity and mortality rates. The dermatological examination in patients with suspected infective endocarditis may prove very useful, as it might reveal suggestive abnormalities of this disease, such as Osler’s nodes and Janeway lesions. Osler’s nodes are painful, purple nodular lesions, usually found on the tips of fingers and toes. Janeway lesions, in turn, are painless erythematous macules that usually affect palms and soles. We report a case of infective endocarditis and highlight the importance of skin examination as a very important element in the presumptive diagnosis of infective endocarditis.

  3. Novelty detection in dermatological images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel

    2003-01-01

    The problem of novelty detection is considered for at set of dermatological image data. Different points of view are analyzed in detail. First, novelty detection is treated as a contextual classification problem. Different learning phases can be detected when the sample size is increased....... The detection of the emergence a new class is considered here. A model that estimates the minimal amount of information required to recognize structure in the data as a function of class separability is also proposed. Secondly, texture alteration detection is considered a novelty detection problem...

  4. Uterus transplantation: animal research and human possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, Mats; Diaz-Garcia, Cesar; Hanafy, Ash; Olausson, Michael; Tzakis, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Uterus transplantation research has been conducted toward its introduction in the human as a treatment of absolute uterine-factor infertility, which is considered to be the last frontier to conquer for infertility research. In this review we describe the patient populations that may benefit from uterus transplantation. The animal research on uterus transplantation conducted during the past two decades is summarized, and we describe our views regarding a future research-based human attempt.

  5. Lasers in dermatology--a critical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R R

    2000-11-01

    Lasers are accepted for treating nevus of Ota, other pigmented lesions, hair removal, vascular lesions, leg veins, tattoos, and for skin resurfacing. These are photothermal treatments, in which certain skin "targets" are heated, followed by selective wound healing. Small pigmented targets such as the dermal melanocytes in nevus of Ota, are best treated with short (laser pulses. Large targets, such as hair follicles, have long thermal relaxation times and are best treated with longer pulses. In general, the ideal pulse duration is about equal to the thermal relaxation time for pigmented targets. However, sometimes the actual target is not pigmented and is at some distance from a pigmented structure. For example the follicular stem cells, which are not pigmented, line the outer root sheath far away from the pigmented hair shaft. These cells appear to be an important target for permanent hair destruction. Pulses longer than the thermal relaxation time of the hair shaft allow heat conduction and better damage of follicular stem cells. Epidermal cooling works far better with pulses longer than about 10 ms, delivered through a cold medium (e.g., cold sapphire in contact with the skin). Thus, the combination of cooling and long near-infrared laser pulses allows safe and effective pigmented hair removal in all skin types. In contrast, epidermal protection from short pulses is best with dynamic pre-cooling (e.g., cryogen spray), for example during portwine stain treatment. A major challenge for the future of photothermal laser treatments is to develop ways of treating non-pigmented skin "targets". New uses for lasers are emerging. Diagnostic laser imaging and spectroscopy will soon emerge in dermatology. A near-infrared laser confocal microscope provides histology-like images of human skin. Imaging is painless and takes only a few minutes. Lesions including melanoma, basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, microvascular and inflammatory lesions, dermatophytes, verrucae, etc

  6. Preface [to: Practical Pediatric Dermatology: Controversies in Diagnosis and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Oranje (Arnold); N. Al-Mutairi (Nawaf); T. Shwayder (Tor)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractPediatric dermatology is a young field that combines dermatologic and pediatric skills and expertises. Knowledge of dermatology and pediatrics is necessary for optimal care of children with skin diseases. A multidisciplinary approach in which there is cooperation between

  7. Applications of nanotechnology in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLouise, Lisa A

    2012-03-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintentional nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature suggest that the positive benefit of engineered nanoparticles for use in cosmetics and as tools for understanding skin biology and curing skin disease outweigh potential toxicity concerns. Discoveries reported in this journal are highlighted. This review begins with a general introduction to the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This is followed by a discussion of the current state of understanding of nanoparticle skin penetration and their use in three therapeutic applications. Challenges that must be overcome to derive clinical benefit from the application of nanotechnology to skin are discussed last, providing perspective on the significant opportunity that exists for future studies in investigative dermatology.

  8. Therapeutic Audit Of Dermatological Prescriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thawani V.R

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological prescribing trends in outdoor patients attending Dermatology Clinic of Govt. Medical College Hospital, Nagpur were studied. In all 190 prescriptions were audited to find number of drugs per prescription, use of generic/brand names, dosage forms, frequency, duration of treatment, dose and categorywise drug consumption. The age and sex distributions of patients and disease distribution were also studied. Polypharmacy was found to be widely prevalent. More drugs were prescribed by brand names than generic. Dosage form, frequency and duration were mentioned in most of the prescriptions; however, doses of the drugs were not, in majority. The major drugs in the prescriptions were antihistaminics followed by antimicrobials , steroids and vitamins. Not much difference was found in sexes attending the Clinic. There were more female patients of acne vulgaris, disseminated lupus erythematosus and Hansen’s disease. More males suffered from scables and tinea infections. There were 4 patients who were prescribed drugs without diagnosis. Except in some cases, the prescribing was relational.

  9. Integrated Extravehicular Activity Human Research Plan: 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercromby, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Multiple organizations within NASA as well as industry and academia fund and participate in research related to extravehicular activity (EVA). In October 2015, representatives of the EVA Office, the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD), and the Human Research Program (HRP) at NASA Johnson Space Center agreed on a formal framework to improve multi-year coordination and collaboration in EVA research. At the core of the framework is an Integrated EVA Human Research Plan and a process by which it will be annually reviewed and updated. The over-arching objective of the collaborative framework is to conduct multi-disciplinary cost-effective research that will enable humans to perform EVAs safely, effectively, comfortably, and efficiently, as needed to enable and enhance human space exploration missions. Research activities must be defined, prioritized, planned and executed to comprehensively address the right questions, avoid duplication, leverage other complementary activities where possible, and ultimately provide actionable evidence-based results in time to inform subsequent tests, developments and/or research activities. Representation of all appropriate stakeholders in the definition, prioritization, planning and execution of research activities is essential to accomplishing the over-arching objective. A formal review of the Integrated EVA Human Research Plan will be conducted annually. Coordination with stakeholders outside of the EVA Office, CTSD, and HRP is already in effect on a study-by-study basis; closer coordination on multi-year planning with other EVA stakeholders including academia is being actively pursued. Details of the preliminary Integrated EVA Human Research Plan are presented including description of ongoing and planned research activities in the areas of: physiological and performance capabilities; suit design parameters; EVA human health and performance modeling; EVA tasks and concepts of operations; EVA informatics; human-suit sensors; suit

  10. Basic Science Research and the Protection of Human Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiseman, Elisa

    2001-03-01

    Technological advances in basic biological research have been instrumental in recent biomedical discoveries, such as in the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and heart disease. However, many of these advances also raise several new ethical challenges. For example, genetic research may pose no physical risk beyond that of obtaining the initial blood sample, yet it can pose significant psychological and economic risks to research participants, such as stigmatization, discrimination in insurance and employment, invasion of privacy, or breach of confidentiality. These harms may occur even when investigators do not directly interact with the person whose DNA they are studying. Moreover, this type of basic research also raises broader questions, such as what is the definition of a human subject, and what kinds of expertise do Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) need to review the increasingly diverse types of research made possible by these advances in technology. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC), a presidentially appointed federal advisory committee, has addressed these and other ethical, scientific and policy issues that arise in basic science research involving human participants. Two of its six reports, in particular, have proposed recommendations in this regard. "Research Involving Human Biological Materials: Ethical and Policy Guidance" addresses the basic research use of human tissues, cells and DNA and the protection of human participants in this type of research. In "Ethical and Policy Issues in the Oversight of Human Research" NBAC proposes a definition of research involving human participants that would apply to all scientific disciplines, including physical, biological, and social sciences, as well as the humanities and related professions, such as business and law. Both of these reports make it clear that the protection of research participants is key to conducting ethically sound research. By ensuring that all participants in

  11. Aloe vera in dermatology: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feily, A; Namazi, M R

    2009-02-01

    Aloe vera Linne or aloe barbadensis Miller is a succulent from the Aloe family (400 different species), a tropical plant which is easily grown in hot and dry climates and widely distributed in Asia, Africa and other tropical areas. The use of aloe vera is being promoted for a large variety of conditions. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize all dermatology-oriented in vitro and in vivo experiments and clinical trials on aloe vera preparations. Extensive literature search were carried out to identify all in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on the subject. Data were extracted from these in a predefined standardized manner. Forty studies were located. The results suggest that oral administration of aloe vera in mice is effective on wound healing, can decrease the number and size of papillomas and reduce the incidence of tumors and leishmania parasitemia by >90% in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Topical application of aloe vera is not an effective prevention for radiation-induced injuries and has no sunburn or suntan protection. It can be effective for genital herpes, psoriasis, human papilloma virus, seborrheic dermatitis, aphthous stomatitis, xerosis, lichen planus, frostbite, burn, wound healing and inflammation. It can also be used as a biological vehicle and an anti-microbial and antifungal agent and also as a candidate for photodynamic therapy of some kinds of cancer. Even though there are some promising results with the use of aloe vera for diverse dermatologic conditions, clinical effectiveness of oral and topical aloe vera is not sufficiently and meticulously explored as yet.

  12. Regional Dermatology Training Centre in Moshi, Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 No. 7. Regional Dermatology Training Centre in Moshi, Tanzania – pursuing a dream ... little training in the management of skin disease.[1] ... through lack of trained personnel or resources ... With time, other facilities such as a library, a pharmaceutical compounding ... of information on dermatology and STIs in a tropical ...

  13. Elementary lesions in dermatological semiology: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardili, Renata Nahas; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies in the terminology of elementary lesions persist when texts from Dermatology and Semiology books are compared, which can cause some confusion in both the teaching of undergraduate medical students and the learning acquired by professionals in the field. This review aims to compare and clarify the differences in the description of elementary lesions by many authors, used as references for specialists in dermatology.

  14. Human Research Program Integrated Research Plan. Revision C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Crew health and performance are critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) is essential to enabling extended periods of space exploration because it provides knowledge and tools to mitigate risks to human health and performance. Risks include physiological effects from radiation and hypogravity environments, as well as unique challenges in medical support, human factors, and behavioral or psychological factors. The Human Research Program (HRP) delivers human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. Without HRP results, NASA will face unknown and unacceptable risks for mission success and post-mission crew health. This Integrated Research Plan (IRP) describes (1) HRP's approach and research activities that are intended to address the needs of human space exploration and serve HRP customers and (2) the method of integration for risk mitigation. The scope of the IRP is limited to the activities that can be conducted with the resources available to the HRP; it does not contain activities that would be performed if additional resources were available. The timescale of human space exploration is envisioned to take many decades. The IRP illustrates the program s research plan through the timescale of early lunar missions of extended duration.

  15. Human Research and Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, James

    2008-01-01

    The disavowal of positivist science by many educational researchers has resulted in a deepening polarization of research agendas and an epistemological divide that appears increasingly difficult to span. Despite a turning away from science altogether by some, and thus toward various forms of poststructuralist inquiry, this has not held back the…

  16. Alternative uses of dermoscopy in general dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Papakonstantinou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be an effective diagnostic tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis not only of skin tumors but also of various general dermatological disorders. The use of dermoscopy has offered a new morphological dimension supporting the diagnosis and clinical follow-up of several dermatological conditions. Within the last years, dermoscopy is gaining ground in general dermatology as well. Among the large spectrum of skin infections, specific dermoscopic patterns have been described for common skin infections such as viral warts, molluscum contagiosum, scabies, and pediculosis, as well as for tinea nigra, tungiasis, and cutaneous larva migrans. Also, common skin disorders such as psoriasis, pityriasis rosea or lichen planus show characteristic dermoscopic patterns. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analyzing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological   disorders grouped according to their clinical characteristics.

  17. Mapping Frontier Research in the Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whereas the classical sciences were organized around academic disciplines, knowledge production today is increasingly interdisciplinary and distributed across a variety of societal sectors. Classical disciplines have not only specialized and multiplied; they are increasingly interacting with extra...... of impact and styles of reasoning, both in classical and interdisciplinary fields of the humanities. From this perspective, a more composite picture of human culture, language and history can emerge from humanities research. It goes beyond the picture of rational agents, and situates human interaction...

  18. Human Subjects Research and the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitskey, Beth W.; Thomsen, Marshall

    2012-01-01

    Physics Education Research is a form of social science research in that it uses human subjects. As physicists we need to be aware of the ethical and legal ramifications of performing this research, taking into account the fundamental differences between working with substances and working with people. For several decades, the federal government…

  19. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Population-Wide Wait Times for Patients Seeking Medical vs. Cosmetic Dermatologic Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Geeta; Goldberg, Hanna R; Barense, Morgan D; Bell, Chaim M

    2016-01-01

    Though previous work has examined some aspects of the dermatology workforce shortage and access to dermatologic care, little research has addressed the effect of rising interest in cosmetic procedures on access to medical dermatologic care. Our objective was to determine the wait times for Urgent and Non-Urgent medical dermatologic care and Cosmetic dermatology services at a population level and to examine whether wait times for medical care are affected by offering cosmetic services. A population-wide survey of dermatology practices using simulated calls asking for the earliest appointment for a Non-Urgent, Urgent and Cosmetic service. Response rates were greater than 89% for all types of care. Wait times across all types of care were significantly different from each other (all P dermatologic care and shorter wait times and less variation for Cosmetic care. Wait times were significantly longer in regions with lower dermatologist density. Provision of Cosmetic services did not increase wait times for Urgent care. These findings suggest an overall dermatology workforce shortage and a need for a more streamlined referral system for dermatologic care.

  20. Dermatology in the new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jayakar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatology in the new millennium will have to focus on the demands, hopes, and satisfaction of those who look at themselves as having skin liaments. Governments may modify this by declaring some unperceived needs as important and therefore fundable and others as unimportant. Hopefully there should be equity, the women will be equal to men, and poor countries equal to the rich. The importance of skin to the individual will not diminish and hopefully will be better recognized by funding agencies. The costs of treating skin diseases will always be an issue, and the case for treating skin diseases will have to be made in the competitive world of much life threatening disease. Dermatologists may themselves opt out of treating conditions which governance deems important. An example would be all breaks in surface continuity of the skin which other professions might wish to take over as leg ulcers, the diabetic foot ulcer, the pressure sore, or burns.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of dermatological antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, C S; Leitch, A E; Tidman, M J

    2015-12-01

    Topical antiseptics are frequently used in dermatological management, yet evidence for the efficacy of traditional generic formulations is often largely anecdotal. We tested the in vitro bactericidal activity of four commonly used topical antiseptics against Staphylococcus aureus, using a modified version of the European Standard EN 1276, a quantitative suspension test for evaluation of the bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants and antiseptics. To meet the standard for antiseptic effectiveness of EN 1276, at least a 5 log10 reduction in bacterial count within 5 minutes of exposure is required. While 1% benzalkonium chloride and 6% hydrogen peroxide both achieved a 5 log10 reduction in S. aureus count, neither 2% aqueous eosin nor 1 : 10 000 potassium permanganate showed significant bactericidal activity compared with control at exposure periods of up to 1 h. Aqueous eosin and potassium permanganate may have desirable astringent properties, but these results suggest they lack effective antiseptic activity, at least against S. aureus.

  2. Interdepartmental Dermatology: Characteristics and Impact of Dermatology Inpatient Referrals at a Teaching Hospital in Eastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Satyendra Nath; Podder, Indrasish; Saha, Abanti; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dermatology is primarily considered to be an outpatient-centered specialty. However, several inpatient admissions to other specialties require dermatologic consultation for optimum management. Aims: To analyze the causes of inpatient dermatology referrals, departments sending referrals, and impact of dermatology consultation on patient management. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study by analyzing the records of 486 patient referrals over a 4-year period. The demographic details, specialties requesting consultation, cause of referral, and dermatological advice have been recorded and analyzed. Results: Dermatology consultation changed the dermatologic diagnosis and treatment of almost two-thirds of patients. General medicine requested the maximum number of referrals, “skin rash” being the most common cause for referral. Accurate diagnosis on referrals was provided by only 30.2% of nondermatologists. Common dermatological disorders were often misdiagnosed by these physicians, and dermatology referrals had significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent management of these patients. Conclusion: While dermatologic referral leads to improved patient care, there is a need for better training of nondermatologists enabling them to recognize and treat common dermatoses. PMID:28216722

  3. 78 FR 8148 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... fellow, Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), engaged in research misconduct..., grant R01 NS052123. ORI found that the Respondent engaged in research misconduct by falsifying data...

  4. Fruit Flies Help Human Sleep Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Fruit Flies Help Human Sleep Research Past Issues / Summer 2007 ... courtesy of NIGMS Neuroscientist Chiara Cirelli uses experimental fruit flies to study sleep. Although it may be tough ...

  5. Use of optical skin phantoms for calibration of dermatological lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Sekowska, A.; Marchwiński, M.; Galla, S.; Cenian, A.

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of dermatological diseases can be efficiently treated using laser heating. Nevertheless, before the new laser is introduced into clinical practice, its parameters and ability to interact with human skin have to be carefully examined. In order to do that optical skin phantoms can be used. Such phantoms closely imitate the scattering and absorption properties of real human skin tissue along with its thermal properties, such as capacitance and conductivity specific heat. We have fabricated a range of optical tissue phantoms based on polyvinylchloride-plastisol PVC-P with varying optical properties, including the absorption, scattering and density of the matrix material. We have utilized a pre-clinical dermatological laser system with a 975 nm diode laser module. A range of laser settings were tested, such as laser pulse duration, laser power and number of pulses. We have studied laser irradiation efficiency on fabricated optical tissue phantoms. Measurements of the temporal and spatial temperature distribution on the phantoms' surface were performed using thermographic imaging. The comparison of results between tissues' and phantoms' optical and thermal response prove that they can be used for approximate evaluation of laser heating efficiency. This study presents a viable approach for calibration of dermatological lasers which can be utilized in practice.

  6. Paraneoplastic dermatological manifestation of gastrointestinal malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyubomir A Dourmishev; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Numerous dermatological disorders have been associated with underlining malignancies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Such cutaneous manifestations might have an important diagnostic value if they are the sole expressions of otherwise asymptomatic carcinomas. The recognition of some typical paraneoplastic dermatologic disorders can lead to the prompt diagnosis of the underlying malignancy, timely administration of therapy, and ultimately, better prognosis. In this review we discuss the most common paraneoplastic dermatological syndromes from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist. We also outline a comprehensive practical approach for the evaluation for occult malignancy in patients presenting with cutaneous findings potentially associated with GI cancers.

  7. Updating freeze: Aligning animal and human research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, M.A.; Oitzl, M.S.; Roelofs, K.

    2014-01-01

    Freezing is widely used as the main outcome measure for fear in animal studies. Freezing is also getting attention more frequently in human stress research, as it is considered to play an important role in the development of psychopathology. Human models on defense behavior are largely based on anim

  8. Educational Research: The Importance of the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard

    2015-01-01

    It is one sign of the lack of understanding of the value of the humanities, to educational research and inquiry as well as to our world more widely, that such justifications of them as are offered frequently take a crudely instrumental form. The humanities (which in this essay are not distinguished from the arts) are welcomed insofar as they are…

  9. Research on disaster prevention by human factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bok Youn; Kang, Chang Hee; Kang, Sun Duck; Jo, Young Do [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Mining, by its very nature, requires workers and technology to function in an unpredictable environment that can not easily be engineered to accommodate human factors. Miners' physical and cognitive capabilities are sometimes stretched to the point that 'human error' in performance result. Mine safety researchers estimate that 50-85% of all mining injuries are due, in large part, to human error. Further research suggests that the primary causes of these errors in performance lie outside the individual and can be minimized by improvements in equipment design, work environments, work procedures and training. The human factors research is providing the science needed to determine which aspects of the mining environment can be made more worker-friendly and how miners can work more safely in environments that can not be improved. Underground mines have long been recognized as an innately hazardous and physically demanding work environment. Recently, mining is becoming a more complicated process as more sophisticated technologies are introduced. The more complicated or difficult the tasks to be performed, the more critical it is to have a systematic understanding of the humans, the technology, the environments, and how they interact. Human factors is a key component in solving most of today's mine safety and health problems. Human factors research primarily centered around solving problems in the following four areas: 1) How mining methods and equipment affect safety, 2) Evaluating the fit between miner's physical capabilities and the demands of their job, 3) Improving miner's ability to perceive and react to hazards, 4) Understanding how organizational and managerial variables influence safety. Human factor research was begun during the World war II. National Coal Board (British Coal) of Great Britain commenced ergonomics in 1969, and Bureau of Mine of United States started human factor researches in same year. Japan has very short history

  10. Human research ethics committees in technical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, David; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Pont, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey of the top 50 technical universities in the world shows that, where not specifically mandated by law, most technical universities do not employ ethics committees to review human studies. As the domains of basic and applied sciences expand, ethics committees are increasingly needed to guide and oversee all such research regardless of legal requirements. We offer as examples, from our experience as an ethics committee in a major European technical university, ways in which such a committee provides needed services and can help ensure more ethical studies involving humans outside the standard medical context. We provide some arguments for creating such committees, and in our supplemental article, we provide specific examples of cases and concerns that may confront technical, engineering, and design research, as well as outline the general framework we have used in creating our committee.

  11. Selecting measures for human factors research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantowitz, B H

    1992-08-01

    Selecting measures is a necessary component of human factors research. Proper selection must take into account the representation problem (how is the assignment of numbers to objects or phenomena justified?) and the uniqueness problem (to what degree is this assignment unique?). Other key human factors measurement issues include subject representativeness, variable representativeness, and setting representativeness. It is difficult to create a single measure that captures essential characteristics of complex systems. Several examples illustrate how theory can guide measurement selection in such diverse human factors research as vigilance, turning off warning alarms, information requirements for military command centers, subjective workload, heart-rate signal analysis, and heat stress in nuclear power plants.

  12. Human Experimentation: Impact on Health Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacalis, T. Demetri; Griffis, Kathleen

    1980-01-01

    The problems of the use of humans as subjects of medical research and the protection of their rights are discussed. Issues include the use of informed consent, the evaluation of risks and benefits, and the review of research plans by a committee. (JD)

  13. Research in the Humanities: Ideals and Idols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombrich, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    Research in the humanities should be done in areas of interest, under circumstances conducive to intellectual study and should not be undertaken for the purposes of gathering all information on a subject, for the purpose of seeking the novel, in order to apply the latest research tools, or totally because the subject is being taught and…

  14. The history of dermatology at the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika E. Reid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is little written about the history of women in dermatology. In this paper, we summarize the information obtained from archival records from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, one of the first medical schools for women, where several of the early prominent women in dermatology obtained their medical degrees and practiced. Among others, graduates include Rose Hirschler, MD, and Margaret Gray Wood, MD. The school and its graduates made important contributions to dermatology and to the advancement of women in the field. The history of women in dermatology is not well documented, and this historical research provides background in the biographies of pioneering women in an effort to preserve and honor their important work.

  15. Surgical site infections in dermatologic surgery: etiology, pathogenesis, and current preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Karim; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after dermatologic surgery continue to represent undesirable complications that affect patients in several aspects. The etiology and pathogenesis of SSIs are not completely understood, and as a result, current preventative measures are debatable. To review and summarize the current available literature specific to SSIs in dermatologic surgery. The pathogenesis of SSIs, factors contributing to SSIs, current preventative guidelines, and evidence supporting their use are explored. A review of the medical literature. Most measures used to prevent SSIs in dermatologic surgery are based on studies of wounds in general surgery. Evidence specific to dermatologic surgery is scarce. More research related to the pathogenesis of SSIs is needed to establish effective preventative measures that are key to reducing incidences of SSIs.

  16. Human Research Program: 2010 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    2010 was a year of solid performance for the Human Research Program in spite of major changes in NASA's strategic direction for Human Spaceflight. Last year, the Program completed the final steps in solidifying the management foundation, and in 2010 we achieved exceptional performance from all elements of the research and technology portfolio. We transitioned from creating building blocks to full execution of the management tools for an applied research and technology program. As a team, we continue to deliver the answers and technologies that enable human exploration of space. While the Agency awaits strategic direction for human spaceflight, the Program is well positioned and critically important to helping the Agency achieve its goals.

  17. The logistics of an inpatient dermatology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology represents a unique challenge as caring for hospitalized patients with skin conditions is different from most dermatologists' daily outpatient practice. Declining rates of inpatient dermatology participation are often attributed to a number of factors, including challenges navigating the administrative burdens of hospital credentialing, acclimating to different hospital systems involving potential alternate electronic medical records systems, medical-legal concerns, and reimbursement concerns. This article aims to provide basic guidelines to help dermatologists establish a presence as a consulting physician in the inpatient hospital-based setting. The emphasis is on identifying potential pitfalls, problematic areas, and laying out strategies for tackling some of the challenges of inpatient dermatology including balancing financial concerns and optimizing reimbursements, tracking data and developing a plan for academic productivity, optimizing workflow, and identifying metrics to document the impact of an inpatient dermatology consult service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  18. Integrated Extravehicular Activity Human Research Plan: 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Ross, Amy J.; Cupples, J. Scott; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Norcross, Jason R.; Chappell, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organizations within NASA and outside of NASA fund and participate in research related to extravehicular activity (EVA). In October 2015, representatives of the EVA Office, the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD), and the Human Research Program (HRP) at NASA Johnson Space Center agreed on a formal framework to improve multi-year coordination and collaboration in EVA research. At the core of the framework is an Integrated EVA Human Research Plan and a process by which it will be annually reviewed and updated. The over-arching objective of the collaborative framework is to conduct multi-disciplinary cost-effective research that will enable humans to perform EVAs safely, effectively, comfortably, and efficiently, as needed to enable and enhance human space exploration missions. Research activities must be defined, prioritized, planned and executed to comprehensively address the right questions, avoid duplication, leverage other complementary activities where possible, and ultimately provide actionable evidence-based results in time to inform subsequent tests, developments and/or research activities. Representation of all appropriate stakeholders in the definition, prioritization, planning and execution of research activities is essential to accomplishing the over-arching objective. A formal review of the Integrated EVA Human Research Plan will be conducted annually. External peer review of all HRP EVA research activities including compilation and review of published literature in the EVA Evidence Report is will also continue at a frequency determined by HRP management. Coordination with stakeholders outside of the EVA Office, CTSD, and HRP is already in effect on a study-by-study basis; closer coordination on multi-year planning with other EVA stakeholders including academia is being actively pursued. Details of the current Integrated EVA Human Research Plan are presented including description of ongoing and planned research activities in the areas of

  19. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberg AL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Anna Lei Lamberg,1 Henrik Sølvsten,2 Ulrikke Lei,3 Gabrielle Randskov Vinding,3 Ida Marie Stender,4 Gregor Borut Ernst Jemec,5 Tine Vestergaard,6 Henrik Thormann,7 Merete Hædersdal,8 Tomas Norman Dam,9 Anne Braae Olesen10 1Dermatology Clinic, Grenaa, Central Denmark Region, 2Dermatology Clinic, Aalborg, North Denmark Region, 3Department of Dermato-Allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Gentofte, 4Dermatology Clinic, Charlottenlund, Capital Region of Denmark, 5Department of Dermatology, Roskilde Hospital, Health Sciences Faculty, University of Copenhagen, Roskilde, Zealand Region, 6Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 7Dermatology Clinic, Vejle, Region of Southern Denmark, 8Department of Dermatology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Capital Region of Denmark, 9Dermatology Clinic, Nykøbing Falster, Zealand Region, 10Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Aarhus, Aarhus, Central Denmark Region, Denmark Aim of database: The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. Study population: The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC, squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Main variables: Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and

  20. Derivation of marker gene signatures from human skin and their use in the interpretation of the transcriptional changes associated with dermatological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Barbara B; Nirmal, Ajit J; Headon, Denis J; Akbar, Arne N; Mabbott, Neil A; Freeman, Tom C

    2017-04-01

    Numerous studies have explored the altered transcriptional landscape associated with skin diseases to understand the nature of these disorders. However, data interpretation represents a significant challenge due to a lack of good maker sets for many of the specialized cell types that make up this tissue, whose composition may fundamentally alter during disease. Here we have sought to derive expression signatures that define the various cell types and structures that make up human skin, and demonstrate how they can be used to aid the interpretation of transcriptomic data derived from this organ. Two large normal skin transcriptomic datasets were identified, one RNA-seq (n = 578), the other microarray (n = 165), quality controlled and subjected separately to network-based analyses to identify clusters of robustly co-expressed genes. The biological significance of these clusters was then assigned using a combination of bioinformatics analyses, literature, and expert review. After cross comparison between analyses, 20 gene signatures were defined. These included expression signatures for hair follicles, glands (sebaceous, sweat, apocrine), keratinocytes, melanocytes, endothelia, muscle, adipocytes, immune cells, and a number of pathway systems. Collectively, we have named this resource SkinSig. SkinSig was then used in the analysis of transcriptomic datasets for 18 skin conditions, providing in-context interpretation of these data. For instance, conventional analysis has shown there to be a decrease in keratinization and fatty metabolism with age; we more accurately define these changes to be due to loss of hair follicles and sebaceous glands. SkinSig also highlighted the over-/under-representation of various cell types in skin diseases, reflecting an influx in immune cells in inflammatory disorders and a relative reduction in other cell types. Overall, our analyses demonstrate the value of this new resource in defining the functional profile of skin cell types and

  1. Elementary lesions in dermatological semiology: literature review*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardili, Renata Nahas; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies in the terminology of elementary lesions persist when texts from Dermatology and Semiology books are compared, which can cause some confusion in both the teaching of undergraduate medical students and the learning acquired by professionals in the field. This review aims to compare and clarify the differences in the description of elementary lesions by many authors, used as references for specialists in dermatology. PMID:27828637

  2. Corrective camouflage in pediatric dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Aurora; Dall'Oglio, Federica; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A; Janniger, Camila K

    2007-02-01

    Many dermatologic diseases, including vitiligo and other pigmentary disorders, vascular malformations, acne, and disfiguring scars from surgery or trauma, can be distressing to pediatric patients and can cause psychological alterations such as depression, loss of self-esteem, deterioration of quality of life, emotional distress, and, in some cases, body dysmorphic disorder. Corrective camouflage can help cover cutaneous unaesthetic disorders using a variety of water-resistant and light to very opaque products that provide effective and natural coverage. These products also can serve as concealers during medical treatment or after surgical procedures before healing is complete. Between May 2001 and July 2003. corrective camouflage was used on 15 children and adolescents (age range, 7-16 years; mean age, 14 years). The majority of patients were girls. Six patients had acne vulgaris; 4 had vitiligo; 2 had Becker nevus; and 1 each had striae distensae, allergic contact dermatitis. and postsurgical scarring. Parents of all patients were satisfied with the cosmetic cover results. We consider corrective makeup to be a well-received and valid adjunctive therapy for use during traditional long-term treatment and as a therapeutic alternative in patients in whom conventional therapy is ineffective.

  3. Dermatologic and otorhinolaryngologic manifestations in leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leishmaniasis is an extremely important parasitic disease as regards epidemiology, and, in such a disease, man is an occasional host to the Leishmania protozoon. Some of the major clinical, visceral and integumentary features are the mucocutaneous ways that can harm face and upper airways and even cause deforming lesions, leading to a functional impairment. Objective: Review the main dermatologic and otorhinolaryngologic manifestations in leishmaniasis. Methods: It was based on the Virtual Health Library (BVS, by entering the following keywords: Leishmaniasis, mucocutaneous leishmaniasis, nasal mucosa, and nose. References dated from 1999 to 2008 have been regarded. Final Comments: It is about a zoonosis, in which the human being is an occasional host attacked by Lutzomya or Phlebotomus insects that are, in turn, infected by the Leishmania parasite, and the early diagnosis of a leishmania-related lesion is essential, especially when a nasopharyngeal impairment is evident, with a view to preventing deformities or functional harms. The evaluation of cutaneous and/or mucosa lesions and the accurate definition of leishmaniasis diagnosis given by either dermatologists or otorhinolaryngologists enables the proper treatment to be implemented and the subsequent reduction in the disease dissemination.

  4. Dermatological Manifestations of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome Are Common and Diverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Anindita; Culbertson, Collin; Morgenshtern, Karen; DePold Hohler, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a syndrome of orthostatic intolerance in the setting of excessive tachycardia with orthostatic challenge, and these symptoms are relieved when recumbent. Apart from symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, there are many other comorbid conditions such as chronic headache, fibromyalgia, gastrointestinal disorders, and sleep disturbances. Dermatological manifestations of POTS are also common and range widely from livedo reticularis to Raynaud's phenomenon. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to 26 patients with POTS who presented to the neurology clinic. They were asked to report on various characteristics of dermatological symptoms, with their answers recorded on a Likert rating scale. Symptoms were considered positive if patients answered with "strongly agree" or "agree", and negative if they answered with "neutral", "strongly disagree", or "disagree". Results The most commonly reported symptom was rash (77%). Raynaud's phenomenon was reported by over half of the patients, and about a quarter of patients reported livedo reticularis. The rash was most commonly found on the arms, legs, and trunk. Some patients reported that the rash could spread, and was likely to be pruritic or painful. Very few reported worsening of symptoms on standing. Conclusions The results suggest that dermatological manifestations in POTS vary but are highly prevalent, and are therefore of important diagnostic and therapeutic significance for physicians and patients alike to gain a better understanding thereof. Further research exploring the underlying pathophysiology, incidence, and treatment strategies is necessary. PMID:26610893

  5. Dermatological Manifestations of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome Are Common and Diverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Deb, Anindita; Culbertson, Collin; Morgenshtern, Karen; DePold Hohler, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a syndrome of orthostatic intolerance in the setting of excessive tachycardia with orthostatic challenge, and these symptoms are relieved when recumbent. Apart from symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, there are many other comorbid conditions such as chronic headache, fibromyalgia, gastrointestinal disorders, and sleep disturbances. Dermatological manifestations of POTS are also common and range widely from livedo reticularis to Raynaud's phenomenon. Questionnaires were distributed to 26 patients with POTS who presented to the neurology clinic. They were asked to report on various characteristics of dermatological symptoms, with their answers recorded on a Likert rating scale. Symptoms were considered positive if patients answered with "strongly agree" or "agree", and negative if they answered with "neutral", "strongly disagree", or "disagree". The most commonly reported symptom was rash (77%). Raynaud's phenomenon was reported by over half of the patients, and about a quarter of patients reported livedo reticularis. The rash was most commonly found on the arms, legs, and trunk. Some patients reported that the rash could spread, and was likely to be pruritic or painful. Very few reported worsening of symptoms on standing. The results suggest that dermatological manifestations in POTS vary but are highly prevalent, and are therefore of important diagnostic and therapeutic significance for physicians and patients alike to gain a better understanding thereof. Further research exploring the underlying pathophysiology, incidence, and treatment strategies is necessary.

  6. THE APIPHYTOTHERAPY WITH PROACTIVATOR IN THE VETERINARY DERMATOLOGY AND SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SICEANU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this clinical study consisted in evaluation of the therapeutic effects of the propolis extract used in different disorders at company animals, thus being improved the palette of the apitherapeutical products used in veterinary purposes. The experiments were carried out on company animals (two experimental groups during the 2007-2008 period, in the frame of the Veterinary Medicine Faculty – Bucharest and the University - Spiru Haret, at the veterinary departments: Parasitology, Dermatology and Surgery. The raw propolis was collected from the bee colonies belonging to the Institute of the Beekeeping Research & Development– Bucharest and the apiphytotherapeutical product based on propolis was obtained in the Apitherapy sector of the same Institute. In a first stage were obtained the antiparasite, dermatological and surgical veterinary product PROACTIVATOR based on propolis alcoholic extract and Aloe vera gel. The experiments consisted in administration of the obtained preparation in different disorders on the experimental groups as: dermatological (plagues, chemical and physical burns, parasitological (extern parasites: scabies supra infected or not and in veterinary surgery (as a protective layer applied on the sutured plague. In dermatologic disorders the effects of the PROACTIVATOR product were established by way of clinical periodical examinations until the total recover were done. In external parasites and connected disorders it was established the repellent or killing effect of the preparation on the infestation with parasites and the degree of control in the correlated infections. In skin tissue surgery it was established the cicatrising effect in sutured plagues and the anaesthesic local effect. The established of the studied preparation efficiency was similar as those used in classical treatments with synthesis products. The advantage of the utilization of PROACTIVATOR eliminates the toxic and cumulative effects

  7. Collaborative Research in the Digital Humanities

    CERN Document Server

    Deegan, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration within digital humanities is both a pertinent and a pressing topic as the traditional mode of the humanist, working alone in his or her study, is supplemented by explicitly co-operative, interdependent and collaborative research. This is particularly true where computational methods are employed in large-scale digital humanities projects. This book, which celebrates the contributions of Harold Short to this field, presents fourteen essays by leading authors in the digital humanities. It addresses several issues of collaboration, from the multiple perspectives of institutions, pro

  8. Integrating Spaceflight Human System Risk Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of human health and performance success during exploration missions as well as to maintain the subsequent long-term health of the crew. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. "Human System Risks" (Risks) have been identified, and approximately 30 are being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  9. Dermatological face of Syrian civil war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahime İnci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The frequency and variety of dermatological diseases significantly changed after 2011 in the regions where the Syrian refugees migrated because of the civil war in Syria where is bordered by our country. To reveal these changing, the demographic and dermatological data of the Syrian refugees were retrospectively examined in faculty of medicine, department of dermatology of our city where a significant amount of Syrian refugees have been living. Materials and Methods: A total of 326 refugees immigrated to our city and have been living in tent cities, and applied to our department between September 2012-July 2014 were included to our study. Age, gender, dermatological and laboratory findings were retrospectively examined. Skin diseases were examined in 16 groups according to the their frequency. The patients were divided into 4 age groups as 0-20, 21-40, 41-60 and, 61 and over; three most common diseases for each age group were analyzed. Results: Of 326 patients, 126 (38.7% were males, 200 (61.3% were females and the difference was significant in term of gender. The age range of the patients was 0 to 77 years, and the mean age was 21.6±10.5. The majority of patients were in 0-20 age group. Dermatological infectious diseases were the most frequent diseases group and cutaneous leishmaniasis was the most diagnosed dermatological disease among patients. Conclusion: Preventive health care services should be performed to prevent dermatological infectious diseases which are commonly seen in Syrian refugees, especially cutaneous leishmaniasis which is already endemic in our country, and limitations to reach physicians of these patients should be amended.

  10. Interior Design Research: A Human Ecosystem Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Denise A.

    1992-01-01

    The interior ecosystems model illustrates effects on the human organism of the interaction of the natural, behavioral, and built environment. Examples of interior lighting and household energy consumption show the model's flexibility for organizing study variables in interior design research. (SK)

  11. Interior Design Research: A Human Ecosystem Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Denise A.

    1992-01-01

    The interior ecosystems model illustrates effects on the human organism of the interaction of the natural, behavioral, and built environment. Examples of interior lighting and household energy consumption show the model's flexibility for organizing study variables in interior design research. (SK)

  12. Integrating spaceflight human system risk research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2017-10-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of exploration mission success and to maintain crew health, both during exploration missions and long term after return to Earth. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. ;Human System Risks; (Risks) have been identified, and 32 are currently being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  13. Research on Chinese Visible Human Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShaoxiang

    2003-01-01

    “Visible Human Project (VHP)” was initiated by US National Library of Medicine in 1989, and in August 1991, the library signed a contract with Health Science Center of the University of Col-orado to formally carry out the project. According-ly, research team at the University of Colorado col-lected a structural data set of human body after obtaining successive sectiona/ images. A digital image data set of a complete human male cadaver was acquired and made available for public use in November 1994, which aroused worldwide enthu-siasm in this field, and remarkable social and eco-nomic benefit has been gained. Thereafter, some countries initiated their visible human project one after another. Korea started 5-year“Visible Kore-an Human (VKH)” project (Mar. 2000--Feb.2005) in 2000, and the first data set derived from apatient with cerebroma was acquired in 2001. Chi-na began its project in 1999. The first data set of Chinese visible human was obtained at The Third Military Medical University in October 2002. Before that, by utilizing data made public by US VHP, Chi-nese scientists in informatics had exerted them-selves on preliminary work to pave the way for fur-ther achievement. Now that VHP research is such a promising scientific field to meet the need of digital era and will be increasingly common in many areas related with structure and function of human body,the deployment of Chinese Visible Human Project(CVHP) is of great strategic significance with re-gard to science and technology.

  14. Serendipity and its role in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arijit Coondoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents.

  15. Serendipity and its role in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents.

  16. Brazilian Society of Dermatology against leprosy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Society of Dermatology promoted a national campaign against leprosy in 2012, involving their State Regional, Accredited Services of Dermatology and Referral Services in Leprosy. Consisted of clarification to the population about the disease and a day of medical voluntary service. Ninety services (57 Accredited Services and 33 Reference Services) participated, distributed in 23 states. The campaign examined 3,223 people and 421 new cases were diagnosed, 54,4% female, 74,3% between 19 and 64 years and 8,3% in children under 15 years. Of the 217 classified cases, 58,5% was paucibacillary and 41,5% was multibacillary. The results were posted on the Brazilian Society of Dermatology website. PMID:27438217

  17. Oatmeal in dermatology: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazyar, Nader; Yaghoobi, Reza; Kazerouni, Afshin; Feily, Amir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials on oatmeal preparations and their uses in dermatology. Literature searches have been carried out to collect in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials on this subject. The results suggest that oatmeal possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and its administration is effective on a variety of dermatologic inflammatory diseases such as pruritus, atopic dermatitis, acneiform eruptions, and viral infections. Additionally, oatmeal plays a role in cosmetics preparations and skin protection against ultraviolet rays. Although some promising results citing the use of oatmeal to treat numerous dermatologic conditions have been found, the complete efficacy of oatmeal has not been sufficiently explored. This paper proposes accurate and useful information concerning the use of oatmeal in clinical practice to dermatologists.

  18. Oatmeal in dermatology: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Pazyar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials on oatmeal preparations and their uses in dermatology. Literature searches have been carried out to collect in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials on this subject. The results suggest that oatmeal possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and its administration is effective on a variety of dermatologic inflammatory diseases such as pruritus, atopic dermatitis, acneiform eruptions, and viral infections. Additionally, oatmeal plays a role in cosmetics preparations and skin protection against ultraviolet rays. Although some promising results citing the use of oatmeal to treat numerous dermatologic conditions have been found, the complete efficacy of oatmeal has not been sufficiently explored. This paper proposes accurate and useful information concerning the use of oatmeal in clinical practice to dermatologists.

  19. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the extent...

  20. International Space Station Research Benefits for Humanity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Johnson-Green, Perry; Buckley, Nicole; Karabadzhak, George; Nakamura, Tai; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Fuglesang, Christer; Sabbagh, Jean; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The ISS partnership has seen a substantial increase in research accomplished, crew efforts devoted to research, and results of ongoing research and technology development. The ISS laboratory is providing a unique environment for research and international collaboration that benefits humankind. Benefits come from the engineering development, the international partnership, and from the research results. Benefits can be of three different types: scientific discovery, applications to life on Earth, and applications to future exploration. Working across all ISS partners, we identified key themes where the activities on the ISS improve the lives of people on Earth -- not only within the partner nations, but also in other nations of the world. Three major themes of benefits to life on earth emerged from our review: benefits to human health, education, and Earth observation and disaster response. Other themes are growing as use of the ISS continues. Benefits to human health range from advancements in surgical technology, improved telemedicine, and new treatments for disease. Earth observations from the ISS provide a wide range of observations that include: marine vessel tracking, disaster monitoring and climate change. The ISS participates in a number of educational activities aimed to inspire students of all ages to learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics. To date over 63 countries have directly participated in some aspect of ISS research or education. In summarizing these benefits and accomplishments, ISS partners are also identifying ways to further extend the benefits to people in developing countries for the benefits of humankind.

  1. Human Hallucinogen Research: Guidelines for Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W.; Richards, William A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2010-01-01

    There has recently been a renewal of human research with classical hallucinogens (psychedelics). This paper first briefly discusses the unique history of human hallucinogen research, and then reviews the risks of hallucinogen administration and safeguards for minimizing these risks. Although hallucinogens are relatively safe physiologically and are not considered drugs of dependence, their administration involves unique psychological risks. The most likely risk is overwhelming distress during drug action (“bad trip”), which could lead to potentially dangerous behavior such as leaving the study site. Less common are prolonged psychoses triggered by hallucinogens. Safeguards against these risks include the exclusion of volunteers with personal or family history of psychotic disorders or other severe psychiatric disorders, establishing trust and rapport between session monitors and volunteer before the session, careful volunteer preparation, a safe physical session environment, and interpersonal support from at least two study monitors during the session. Investigators should probe for the relatively rare hallucinogen persisting perception disorder in follow up contact. Persisting adverse reactions are rare when research is conducted along these guidelines. Incautious research may jeopardize participant safety and future research. However, carefully conducted research may inform the treatment of psychiatric disorders, and may lead to advances in basic science. PMID:18593734

  2. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective study in a neurological setup, which included data from hospital dermatology consultation request forms over a period of one year. The data included demographic profile of the patient investigation where needed, neurological diagnosis and final dermatological diagnosis. The data was analyzed using SPSS. Results: A total of 285 patients who were requested for consultation were included in the study. Face was the commonest site of involvement (19.6%. Laboratory examination of referred patients revealed abnormal blood counts in 2% cases, renal function tests in 0.7% and urine in 0.4% cases. CT scan showed abnormal findings in 65.6% patients. The most common drug used in these patients was phenytoin (29.1%. The most common dermatological diagnosis was Infection and Infestation (34.7% followed by eczema (46.6%. Drug rash was seen in 3.9% cases. Out of which one had phenytoin induced Steven Johnson syndrome. Skin biopsy was done in 5 patients. Topicals was advised in 80%. Upon discharge 10% of inpatients didn’t require any follow-up. The patients who were followed up after 4 weeks, about 48% had their symptoms resolved with topicals and oral treatment as required. About 38% required more than two follow ups due to chronic course of the diseases. Conclusions: This present study discussed about various manifestations of skin disorders in a neurological set up and emphasizes the role of dermatologist in treating skin problems both in outpatient as well as inpatient

  3. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...

  4. [Ethical principles in human scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1994-07-01

    Hippocrates was the first physician to use the scientific method to find rational and not religious or mythic causes, for the etiology of diseases. Hippocrates and Aristoteles did not dare to dissect the human body. Afterwards however, many scientists such as Herophilus, Erasitastrus, Vesalus and Fallopio, performed experiments in human beings using vivisection. According to that age's ideas, there was no cruelty in performing vivisection in criminals, since useful knowledge for the progress of medicine and relief of diseases was obtained. Only during the nineteenth century and with Claude Bernard (1865), the ethical principles of systematic scientific research in humans were defined. These principles were violated by nazi physicians during Hitler's dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945). As a response to these horrors, the Ethical Codes of Nuremberg (1947) and Geneva (1948), that reestablished all the strength of Hippocratic principles, were dictated. The Nuremberg rules enact that a research subject must give a voluntary consent, that the experiment must by necessary and exempt of death risk, that the research must be qualified and that the experiment must be discontinued if there is a risk for the subject. The Geneva statement is a modernized hippocratic oath that protects patient's life above all. These classical rules, in force at the present time, are the essential guides that must be applied by physicians and researchers.

  5. [The use of lasers in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, C; Pirard, D; del Marmol, V; Berlingin, E

    2013-01-01

    Albert Einstein is undoubtedly the father of lasers. But it is not until 1964 that the first dermatological lasers were introduced. The Nd-YAG laser, the CO2 laser were developed by Kumar Patel. In a 40 year period lasers not only were diversified but have also become safer and miniaturized. This article hopes to strengthen general practionners' and specialist's knowledge of the different categories of available lasers. The most frequently used ones are ablative lasers (CO2-Erbium), vascular lasers (Nd-YAG, KTP, pulsed dye laser) and the pigment lasers (Q-Switched Nd-YAG, Alexandrite). A description of these lasers and their indications in dermatology will be discussed.

  6. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W;

    2015-01-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis......, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project....

  7. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  8. Usability: Human Research Program - Space Human Factors and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina L.

    2009-01-01

    The Usability project addresses the need for research in the area of metrics and methodologies used in hardware and software usability testing in order to define quantifiable and verifiable usability requirements. A usability test is a human-in-the-loop evaluation where a participant works through a realistic set of representative tasks using the hardware/software under investigation. The purpose of this research is to define metrics and methodologies for measuring and verifying usability in the aerospace domain in accordance with FY09 focus on errors, consistency, and mobility/maneuverability. Usability metrics must be predictive of success with the interfaces, must be easy to obtain and/or calculate, and must meet the intent of current Human Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR). Methodologies must work within the constraints of the aerospace domain, be cost and time efficient, and be able to be applied without extensive specialized training.

  9. Three Typical Dermatological Cases Treated by Dr. Li Yueping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Shaoqiong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Dr. Li Yueping has been engaged in dermatological clinic for more than 40 years, accumulating rich experience in treating dermatological diseases. The following is three typical cases she gave successful treatment.

  10. Future directions in human-environment research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Emilio F; Lopez, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Human-environment research in the 21st century will need to change in major ways. It will need to integrate the natural and the social sciences; it will need to engage stakeholders and citizens in the design of research and in the delivery of science for the benefit of society; it will need to address ethical and democratic goals; and it will need to address a myriad of important theoretical and methodological challenges that continue to impede progress in the advance of sustainability science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. RESEARCH ON HUMAN RESOURCES MOTIVATION AND SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan-Bela FARKAS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many research studies on the human resources performance of the educational system have proved that pupils/students’ educational success depends, to a high degree, on the level of human resource motivation, as well as on their degree of professional satisfaction. Teachers’ who show a high level of motivation, both intrinsic and extrinsic, invest more into their activity, are more creative and more efficient in problem solving. The paper debates the results of an empirical study regarding the influence of pre-university teachers’ motivation and satisfaction regarding the general work conditions on their work performance by measuring the present motivation and satisfaction level. Furthermore, the determinant factors of their satisfaction with the work place are determined and analyzed. Finally, based on the statistical data process we will conclude and debate on the research hypothesis validation and the empirical model related to motivation – satisfaction – performance interdependences.

  12. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  13. Historia de la dermatología en Costa Rica History of dermatology in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Jaramillo Antillón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: En la historia de la medicina, la dermatología tiene grandes contribuciones, sin embargo, para nuestro país existen pocos datos que documenten los apartes de estos excelentes dermatólogos en la salud pública costarricense. Se realizó este estudio, con el objetivo de presentar una revisión histórica del desarrollo de la dermatología en Costa Rica. Materiales y métodos: Se realizaron entrevistas personales y a familiares de los que se mencionan en el documento. Se revisaron memorias de congresos y publicaciones de revistas nacionales e internacionales. Resultados: La dermatología clínica en Costa Rica,se inició en el Hospital San Juan de Dios. El Dr. Emilio Echeverría y Aguilar fue el primer dermatólogo en Costa Rica. El que más influencia tuvo en el desarrollo de la dermatología tropical fue el Dr. Antonio Peña Chavarría. El Dr. Julio César Ovares Arias se destacó como primer Presidente del Colegio de Médicos y Cirujano y primer Director Médico de la Caja Costarricense del Seguro Social. El Dr. Elfrén Solano Aguilar fue el primer profesor de dermatología, en la Universidad de Costa Rica. El Dr. Orlando Jaramillo Antillón creó el primer programa de posgrado en dermatología. Conclusiones: La dermatología ha cambiado mucho, se inició luchando contra las enfermedades tropicales y nutricionales, actualmente luchamos con el alarmante aumento del cáncer de la piel, enfermedades autoinmunes, síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida y enfermedades iatrogénicas medicamentosas. Hemos aprendido de aquellos que nos precedieron en esta especialidad y debemos aprender para poder practicar la ciencia y el arte de la dermatología modernaIntroduction: Throughout medical history, dermatology has made great contributions, although for our country there is little data concerning the contributions made by the excellent dermatologists in Costa Rican public health care. Materials and methods: In order to obtain this

  14. Self-inflicted lesions in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gieler, Uwe; Consoli, Sylvie G; Tomás-Aragones, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    The terminology, classification, diagnosis and treatment of self-inflicted dermatological lesions are subjects of open debate. The present study is the result of various meetings of a task force of dermatologists, psychiatrists and psychologists, all active in the field of psychodermatology, aimed...

  15. Sources of Observer Variation in Dermatologic Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Geoffrey R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the effects of similarity to prior examples in predicting errors in dermatologic diagnosis. Two interpretations about the acquisition of expertise are independent cues and instance-based categorization. The subjects (N=16) were first-year family medicine residents from McMaster University (Ontario). (MLW)

  16. Biosimilar medicines in dermatology: key aspects.

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo Hernáez, María Begoña

    2013-01-01

    Article reproduced (or made available) with permission of Practical Dermatology®, www.practicaldermatology.com. En el artículo se recoge la aplicación de los medicamentos biosimilares biotecnológicos) en patologías dermatológicas.

  17. Challenges of Research and Human Capital Development in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikwe, Christian K.; Ogidi, Reuben C.; Nwachukwu, K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper discussed the challenges of research and human capital development in Nigeria. Research and human capital development are critical to the development of any nation. Research facilitates human capital development. A high rating in human capital development indices places a country among the leading countries of the world. The paper…

  18. Applications of platelet-rich plasma in dermatology: A critical appraisal of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M D; Bashir, S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous blood-derived product enriched in platelets, growth factors, chemokines and cytokines. Initial applications were predominantly in musculoskeletal and maxillofacial fields, however in recent years, it has been used for a range of dermatological indications including wound healing, fat grafting, alopecia, scar revision and dermal volume augmentation. Here, we critically appraise the literature relating to the usage of PRP within Dermatology. We have evaluated in vitro data, preclinical animal studies and human trials. We conclude that, whilst the literature may be consistent with a modest benefit for specific indications, there is not sufficient evidence supporting the efficacy of PRP to justify a role in routine dermatological practice at the present time. However, since PRP is generally well tolerated with few reported complications, further study may be justified in the context of organized trials.

  19. Bioinformatics Approaches for Human Gut Microbiome Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The human microbiome has received much attention because many studies have reported that the human gut microbiome is associated with several diseases. The very large datasets that are produced by these kinds of studies means that bioinformatics approaches are crucial for their analysis. Here, we systematically reviewed bioinformatics tools that are commonly used in microbiome research, including a typical pipeline and software for sequence alignment, abundance profiling, enterotype determination, taxonomic diversity, identifying differentially abundant species/genes, gene cataloging, and functional analyses. We also summarized the algorithms and methods used to define metagenomic species and co-abundance gene groups to expand our understanding of unclassified and poorly understood gut microbes that are undocumented in the current genome databases. Additionally, we examined the methods used to identify metagenomic biomarkers based on the gut microbiome, which might help to expand the knowledge and approaches for disease detection and monitoring.

  20. From Plenck (d. 1807) to Dohi (d. 1931) and today: Austrian influence on Japanese dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubar, K; Schmidt, C; Kokert, B

    1994-04-01

    The Vienna surgeon Joseph Plenck first listed individual skin lesions, some of which we consider primary efflorescences today. He wrote many more treatises, relating to different areas of medicine, most of which reached Japan. One century later Keizo Dohi wrote, that Plenck's oeuvre will remain unforgotten in the history of dermatology, for his importance, in general and for the close relation to the development of medicine and dermatology in Japan. A search for Japanese translations of Plenck's books could prove that. Dohi himself wanted to become a surgeon but changed his plans and enrolled in Moriz Kaposi's (1837-1902) department in Vienna as a postgraduate student in 1893. Sifting through Dohi's textbook and papers, the importance of the Hebra-Kaposi School for Japan is again explicitly stated by the Japanese master, who founded the Japanese Dermatological Society in December of 1900 and the disciplines's journal in 1901. The language of publication was German. Dohi's first paper appeared in the Archiv für Dermatologie und Syphilis in 1896, in German. In recent years Austrian dermatology has become influential again in dermatological research after a mid century low. A series of investigators have spent sabbatical years or postgraduate training at the former Hebra-Kaposi Department in Vienna. Their scientific achievements were mainly in the field of immunobiology of the skin. A list of publications and their authors is presented.

  1. Identifying randomized clinical trials in Spanish-language dermatology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, G; Pardo, H; Sánchez, S; Bonfill, X

    2015-06-01

    The necessary foundation for good clinical practice lies in knowledge derived from clinical research. Evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) is the pillar on which decisions about therapy are based. To search exhaustively and rigorously to identify RCTs in dermatology journals published in Spanish. We located dermatology journals through the following search engines and indexes: PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, Periódica, Latindex, Índice Médico Español, C-17, IBECS, EMBASE, and IMBIOMED. We also sought information through dermatology associations and dermatologists in countries where Spanish was the usual language of publication, and we searched the Internet (Google). Afterwards we searched the journals electronically and manually to identify RCTs in all available volumes and issues, checking from the year publication started through 2012. Of 28 journals identified, we included 21 in the search. We found a total of 144 RCTs published since 1969; 78 (54%) were in Latin American journals and 66 (46%) were in Spanish journals. The most frequent disease contexts for RCTs in Spanish journals were psoriasis, mycoses, and acne vulgaris. In Latin American journals, the most frequent disease contexts were common warts, mycoses, acne vulgaris, and skin ulcers on the lower limbs. Manual searches identified more RCTs than electronic searches. Manual searches found a larger number of RCTs. Relatively fewer RCTs are published in Spanish and Latin American journals than in English-language journals. Internet facilitated access to full texts published by many journals; however, free open access to these texts is still unavailable and a large number of journal issues are still not posted online. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of dermatologic adverse events induced by targeted therapies on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Cécile; Bungener, Catherine; Razavi, Darius; Mateus, Christine; Routier, Emilie; Lanoy, Emilie; Verschoore, Michèle; Robert, Caroline; Dauchy, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Investigations about the impact of dermatologic adverse events on quality of life in the context of targeted therapies are quite recent and results vary in some dimensions. This article aims to summarize the existing data and to clarify needs in terms of clinical management and future research. A literature review was done with Pubmed, Medline, Scopus and PsycInfo databases and it combined the empirical studies published in English and in French over the past ten years. Dermatologic adverse events globally have a low to moderate impact on quality of life, mainly in the physical and emotional domains. Reasons for inter-individual variations in adjustment and long-term impact are still not well known. Making quality of life assessments systematic, making early referrals of patients to dermatology consultations and giving more attention to individual experience were identified as measures that could help prevent deterioration in quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Constructing a knowledge-based database for dermatological integrative medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeeyoung; Jo, Yunju; Bae, Hyunsu; Hong, Moochang; Shin, Minkyu; Kim, Yangseok

    2013-01-01

    Recently, overuse of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs has produced incurable dermatological health problems. Traditional medical approaches have been studied for alternative solutions. However, accessing relevant information is difficult given the differences in information for western medicine (WM) and traditional medicine (TM). Therefore, an integrated medical information infrastructure must be utilized to bridge western and traditional treatments. In this study, WM and TM information was collected based on literature searches and information from internet databases on dermatological issues. Additionally, definitions for unified terminology and disease categorization based on individual cases were generated. Also a searchable database system was established that may be a possible model system for integrating both WM and TM medical information on dermatological conditions. Such a system will yield benefits for researchers and facilitate the best possible medical solutions for patients. The DIMI is freely available online.

  4. The use of ciclosporin A in veterinary dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalik, Marcel; Thoday, Keith L; van den Broek, Adri H M

    2012-08-01

    Ciclosporin A (CsA) has potent immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory activity that has been exploited in human medicine to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs and to manage atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Over the past decade, CsA has been employed more frequently in veterinary dermatology and its value in the management of several canine and feline dermatoses is now well established. CsA inhibits calcineurin phosphatase, suppressing T cell activation and the synthesis of T cell cytokines consequently impairing the activity of B cells, antigen-presenting cells, mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. The pharmacokinetics of CsA are similar in humans, dogs and cats and the drug has a wide safety margin in dogs, cats and rabbits. Adverse effects, principally transient vomiting and soft faeces/diarrhoea, may be seen shortly after instituting treatment but often resolve despite continuing treatment. Gingival hyperplasia and cutaneous effects such as hirsutism may occur after prolonged treatment.

  5. [Contemporary dermatological methods of treating hirsutism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabuzek, Krzysztof; Sikorska, Patrycja; Szkudłapski, Dawid; Oleszczyk, Paulina; Juśko, Maciej; Kozłowski, Michał; Madej, Paweł; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Hirsutism is a symptom of excessive androgen secretion in women, which in recent years is becoming more common. It is a problem of physical, mental and social background and patients always require application of an appropriate therapy. In addition to medical therapy, there are also other forms of treatment of hirsutism. These include the dermatological treatment using mechanical methods of removing unwanted hair. The aim of this work is to systematize the existing knowledge about treatment of hirsutism and suggest different patterns of treatment. Dermatological treatment is a very important complement to drug therapy. Its use allows for more rapid achievement of an external effect, and thus to improve the patients compliance. Due to the variety of symptoms in patients population therapy should be adapted to the needs of every patient.

  6. Generic drugs in dermatology: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Michael; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-03-01

    In part I, we discussed new drug development, reviewed the history of the generic drug industry, described how generic drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and defined the concepts of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence. Herein, we explore various factors impacting generic drug use across the different parties involved: the prescriber, the pharmacist, the patient, and the payer. We also include original cost analysis of dermatologic brand name and generic drugs and show the potential cost savings that can be achieved through generic substitution. We conclude with a review of the data addressing potential differences in the effectiveness of brand name versus generic drugs in dermatology. The cost of brand name and generic medications is highly variable by pharmacy, state, and payer. We used one source (www.drugstore.com) as an example and for consistency across all medications discussed herein. Prices included here may not reflect actual retail prices across the United States.

  7. Therapeutic potential of biosimilars in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of biologic therapy has revolutionized the treatment of many chronic diseases, including several dermatological disorders. Biological agents promise to satisfy medical needs previously unmet by conventional medicines. Unfortunately, these agents are expensive and out of reach for the majority of patients who need them. Biosimilars are copies of the innovator biological agents and represent an important advance in the field of biological therapeutics. Although they are similar to the original biologic, differences in terms of structure, efficacy, safety and immunogenicity remain a concern. Thus, biosimilars cannot be regarded as bio-generics. Awareness of the key differences between a biosimilar and its reference biological agent is essential for optimal treatment and safety of patients. The increasing availability of biosimilars provides patients and doctors with less expensive alternatives and increases the accessibility of biologic therapy to needy patients. In this review, we discuss the concept of biosimilars, the need for appropriate regulatory pathways and their current status in dermatology.

  8. Dermatological treatment during pregnancy and lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilianna Kulczycka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Since wellbeing and health have become fashionable and widespread polypragmasia is popular, adverse drug reactions are a particularly important medical problem. Pregnant women as well as breast-feeding mothers need very particular care from the physician. Treatment during pregnancy or lactation is a more complicated issue not only because it concerns at least two persons, but also because of the many anatomical and functional differences between the adult and fetus or newborn organism. The safety aspects of dermatological treatment during pregnancy and lactation are presented. Both topical and systemic treatment, mainly for bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic dermatoses and acne, alopecia, psoriasis, and autoimmunological processes, are discussed. Moreover, the most recent methods of dermatological treatment are mentioned taking into consideration their safety during pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, the traditional drug classification made by the United States Food and Drug Administration as well as the most modern division, which is under construction, are presented.

  9. [Digital photograph storage systems in clinical dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberner, R; Contestí, T

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, digital photography has consolidated its role in clinical dermatology. In view of the quality and low cost of current equipment and the simplicity of digital storage, almost all dermatologists now use digital photography, which is also extremely versatile and readily applicable to teaching. However, to maximize its full potential, image retrieval must be available at any time and with the patient present. This requires a suitable storage system that may vary according to the characteristics of each center. Dermatologists must also find time to maintain and organize the digital archives. The present article describes current options in digital image storage and retrieval, ranging from multidepartmental picture archiving and communication systems at one end to image management freeware at the other, and also including dedicated dermatology software.

  10. Lasers in dermatology: a selective historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, J G; Parrish, J A

    1985-10-01

    Lasers have been used in dermatology for over 20 years. Multiple lesions including port wine stains, decorative tattoos, malignant tumors, and keloids have been treated with various lasers. Initial therapy exploited the laser property of spatial confinement of an extremely high energy density to create a localized thermal effect. With increased understanding of laser technology, skin optics, and laser-tissue interactions, other laser properties such as monochromaticity and pulsewidth variability have been exploited to even further confine damage to pathologic tissue while maximally sparing surrounding normal tissue. This increased knowledge has led to a vast improvement in the results of dermatologic laser therapy. Despite this, laser therapy still remains a surgical art, with wound healing playing a large part in the final outcome.

  11. Health-related quality of life in dermatology: measurement, interpretation and application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, C.A.C.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis consists of three parts. The aim of part one, ‘Measurement of health-related quality of life in dermatology’, was to contribute to the quality of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measurement in dermatological research and clinical practice. The aim of part two, ‘Interpretation of h

  12. Soft tissue augmentation in dermatology - 2009 update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Gold

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of products available to dermatologists for soft tissue augmentation has grown significantly over the past several years in the US. This manuscript will review the various hyaluronic acid fillers and other Food and Drug Administration -approved products we are utilizing for our patients in the rejuvenation process. It is hoped that through this article clinicians will feel more comfortable using these products in their everyday practice of dermatology.

  13. Digital image compression in dermatology: format comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, F; Vaccaro, M; Guarneri, C

    2008-09-01

    Digital image compression (reduction of the amount of numeric data needed to represent a picture) is widely used in electronic storage and transmission devices. Few studies have compared the suitability of the different compression algorithms for dermatologic images. We aimed at comparing the performance of four popular compression formats, Tagged Image File (TIF), Portable Network Graphics (PNG), Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG), and JPEG2000 on clinical and videomicroscopic dermatologic images. Nineteen (19) clinical and 15 videomicroscopic digital images were compressed using JPEG and JPEG2000 at various compression factors and TIF and PNG. TIF and PNG are "lossless" formats (i.e., without alteration of the image), JPEG is "lossy" (the compressed image has a lower quality than the original), JPEG2000 has a lossless and a lossy mode. The quality of the compressed images was assessed subjectively (by three expert reviewers) and quantitatively (by measuring, point by point, the color differences from the original). Lossless JPEG2000 (49% compression) outperformed the other lossless algorithms, PNG and TIF (42% and 31% compression, respectively). Lossy JPEG2000 compression was slightly less efficient than JPEG, but preserved image quality much better, particularly at higher compression factors. For its good quality and compression ratio, JPEG2000 appears to be a good choice for clinical/videomicroscopic dermatologic image compression. Additionally, its diffusion and other features, such as the possibility of embedding metadata in the image file and to encode various parts of an image at different compression levels, make it perfectly suitable for the current needs of dermatology and teledermatology.

  14. Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cells in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moioli, Eduardo K; Bolotin, Diana; Alam, Murad

    2017-05-01

    Clinically relevant regenerative medicine is still in its early stages of development. Difficulties in regenerating large-scale and complex structures, the lack of safety data, and the paucity of clinical trials have slowed the process of technological advance. To familiarize the clinician with techniques available in the laboratory and experimental approaches being tested clinically. In addition, a layout is discussed for how dermatologists can lead the way in bringing regenerative medicine to clinical reality. This article reviews the relevant literature on regenerative medicine for dermatological applications and discusses findings and techniques in a clinically relevant context. Multiple cell-free and cell-based approaches for regenerating dermatologic tissues have been reported in the basic science and clinical literature. These are reviewed in the order of complexity. Incremental steps are needed to apply the principles of regenerative medicine to simple medical problems first. Such a stepwise approach would commence, for example, with creation of single-function tissues that could fill soft-tissue defects and proceed to the development of fully functional skin grafts. Likewise, cell-free approaches can build the foundation for the more technically demanding cell-based strategies that are likely necessary for achieving the ultimate goal of regenerative dermatology.

  15. A study of mortality in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Pradeep

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Certain dermatological conditions are life-threatening and can cause mortality. The aim of this study is to find out the dermatological diseases leading to death in our indoor patients. METHODS: A record-based retrospective descriptive study of dermatology cases who died during the period of 1995 to 2001. RESULTS: The total number of cases analyzed was thirty-seven. There were 24 males and 13 females. The maximum number of deaths occurred in the age group 61-70. Vesiculobullous disorders were the commonest cause of death, found in 18 cases (48.6%, followed by drug reactions in 5 (13.5%, malignancies in 5 (13.5% and collagen vascular disease in 2 cases ((5.40%. Pemphigus was the commonest fatal vesiculobullous disorder (13 cases - 35.13%, and toxic epidermal necrolysis the commonest drug reaction (3 cases - 8.10%. CONCLUSION: Area of skin involvement, electrolyte imbalance and septicemia were important factors leading to death in pemphigus and toxic epidermal necrolysis. We advocate that such patients should be managed in burns unit or ICU units.

  16. Recent Advances In Topical Therapy In Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Thappa Devinder

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available With changing times various newer topical agents are introduced in the field of dermatology. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are immunisuppressants, which are effective topically and are tried in the management of atopic dermatitis as well as other disorders including allergic contact dermatitis, atrophic lichen planus, pyoderma gangrenosum. Imiquimod, an immune response modifier, is presently in use for genital warts but has potentials as anti- tumour agent and in various other dermatological conditions when used topically. Tazarotene is a newer addition to the list of topical reginoids, which is effective in psoriasis and has better effect in combination with calcipotriene, phototherapy and topical costicosteroids. Tazarotene and adapelene are also effective in inflammatory acne. Calcipotriol, a vitamin D analogue has been introduced as a topical agent in the treatment of psoriasis. Steroid components are also developed recently which will be devoid of the side effects but having adequate anti-inflammatory effect. Topical photodynamic therapy has also a wide range of use in dermatology. Newer topical agents including cidofovir, capsaicin, topical sensitizers, topical antifungal agents for onychomycosis are also of use in clinical practice. Other promising developments include skin substitutes and growth factors for wound care.

  17. Disease severity scoring systems in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemal Bilaç

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scoring systems have been developed to interpret the disease severity objectively by evaluating the parameters of the disease. Body surface area, visual analogue scale, and physician global assessment are the most frequently used scoring systems for evaluating the clinical severity of the dermatological diseases. Apart from these scoring systems, many specific scoring systems for many dermatological diseases, including acne (acne vulgaris, acne scars, alopecia (androgenetic alopecia, tractional alopecia, bullous diseases (autoimmune bullous diseases, toxic epidermal necrolysis, dermatitis (atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, dyshidrotic eczema, hidradenitis suppurativa, hirsutismus, connective tissue diseases (dermatomyositis, skin involvement of systemic lupus erythematosus (LE, discoid LE, scleroderma, lichen planoplaris, mastocytosis, melanocytic lesions, melasma, onychomycosis, oral lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris, psoriatic arthritis, nail psoriasis, sarcoidosis, urticaria, and vitiligo, have also been developed. Disease severity scoring methods are ever more extensively used in the field of dermatology for clinical practice to form an opinion about the prognosis by determining the disease severity; to decide on the most suitable treatment modality for the patient; to evaluate the efficacy of the applied medication; and to compare the efficiency of different treatment methods in clinical studies.

  18. Safety of cosmetic dermatologic procedures during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kachiu C; Korgavkar, Kaveri; Dufresne, Raymond G; Higgins, H William

    2013-11-01

    Safety of cosmetic procedures in pregnant women has not been extensively studied. Maternal and fetal health risks are important to consider in any procedure performed. With the increasing popularity of cosmetic procedures, dermatologic surgeons will be faced with scenarios necessitating knowledge regarding the safety of such procedures during pregnancy. Furthermore, dermatologic surgeons may inadvertently perform cosmetic procedures during the first trimester, before the patient is aware of the pregnancy. To investigate the safety of cosmetic procedures during pregnancy and the postpartum period. A literature search of PubMed and Google Scholar was conducted of all English-language articles published from 1960 through 2012. Definitive recommendations on the safety of procedures such as chemical peels, injectables, fillers, and most laser therapies during pregnancy cannot be made. The safety of onabotulinum toxin usage is well documented in the neurology literature, although isolated events of miscarriage have been reported with high doses of toxin in women with a previous history of miscarriage. Carbon dioxide laser therapy for genital condylomas has considerable evidence supporting its safety during pregnancy. There is a lack of controlled trials addressing the safety of cosmetic procedures during pregnancy and postpartum periods. It is advisable to delay elective cosmetic procedures until after the baby is born. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. ASDS Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery Fellowship Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Abigail; Arndt, Kenneth A; Avram, Mathew M; Brown, Mariah R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Fabi, Sabrina G; Friedmann, Daniel P; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldberg, David J; Goldman, Mitchel P; Green, Jeremy B; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Jones, Derek H; Kilmer, Suzanne L; McDaniel, David H; Obagi, Suzan; Ortiz, Arisa E; Rohrer, Thomas E; Taylor, Mark B; Torres, Abel; Weinkle, Susan H; Weiss, Margaret A; Weiss, Eduardo T; Weiss, Robert A; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-10-01

    The American Council of Graduate Medical Education, which oversees much of postgraduate medical education in the United States, has championed the concept of "milestones," standard levels of achievement keyed to particular time points, to assess trainee performance during residency. To develop a milestones document for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDS) fellowship program. An ad hoc milestone drafting committee was convened that included members of the ASDS Accreditation Work Group and program directors of ASDS-approved Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDC) fellowship training programs. Draft milestones were circulated through email in multiple rounds until consensus was achieved. Thirteen milestones were developed in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas, with 8 of these being patient-care milestones. Additional instructions for milestone administration more specific to the CDS fellowship than general ACGME instructions were also approved. Implementation of semiannual milestones was scheduled for the fellowship class entering in July 2018. Milestones are now available for CDS fellowship directors to implement in combination with other tools for fellow evaluation.

  20. Dermatologic manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy T; Zane, Lee T

    2007-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10% of reproductive-aged women and is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women. The disorder is commonly characterized by elevated levels of androgen and insulin. Women with PCOS may present with a range of signs and symptoms, and face increased risks of reproductive, metabolic, cardiovascular, psychologic, and neoplastic sequelae, particularly if the condition is left unrecognized or untreated. The clinical definition of PCOS has changed in recent years and includes as one of its cardinal criteria the dermatologic manifestations of hyperandrogenism, chiefly hirsutism, acne vulgaris, and androgenetic alopecia. Acanthosis nigricans, a cutaneous sign of hyperinsulinemia, may also be present. These dermatologic features may provide early clinical clues to recognition of PCOS, and treatment of these cutaneous conditions may improve the patient's quality of life and psychologic well-being. The effects of androgen on pilosebaceous units in the skin can vary by anatomic location, producing pathophysiologic effects on hair growth and differentiation, sebaceous gland size and activity, and follicular keratinization. Treatment modalities may include hormonal therapy intended to modulate androgen production and action as well as non-hormonal therapies directed toward specific dermatologic conditions.

  1. A Framework for Human Microbiome Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    microbiome ) exist throughout the human body, with fundamental roles in human health and disease . The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human...roles in human health and disease . The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project Consortium has established a population...human health and disease . The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Human Microbiome Project Consortium has established a population-scale

  2. Biopolymers as transdermal drug delivery systems in dermatology therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavaraj, K H; Johnsy, George; Navya, M A; Rashmi, R; Siddaramaiah

    2010-01-01

    The skin is considered a complex organ for drug delivery because of its structure. Drug delivery systems are designed for the controlled release of drugs through the skin into the systemic circulation, maintaining consistent efficacy and reducing the dose of the drugs and their related side effects. Transdermal drug delivery represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of novel drug delivery. The excellent impervious nature of the skin is the greatest challenge that must be overcome for successful drug delivery. Today, polymers have been proven to be successful for long-term drug delivery applications as no single polymer can satisfy all of the requirements. Biopolymers in the field of dermal application are rare and the mechanisms that affect skin absorption are almost unknown. Biopolymers are widely used as drug delivery systems, but as such the use of biopolymers as drug delivery systems in dermatologic therapy is still in progress. Commonly used biopolymers include hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrogels, polyurethane, collagen, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), chitosan, proteins and peptides, pectin, siRNAs, and hyaluronic acid. These new and exciting methods for drug delivery are already increasing the number and quality of dermal and transdermal therapies. This article reviews current research on biopolymers and focuses on their potential as drug carriers, particularly in relation to the dermatologic aspects of their use.

  3. Human-Robot Interaction Directed Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Aniko; Cross, Ernest V., II; Chang, Mai Lee

    2014-01-01

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) is a discipline investigating the factors affecting the interactions between humans and robots. It is important to evaluate how the design of interfaces and command modalities affect the human's ability to perform tasks accurately, efficiently, and effectively when working with a robot. By understanding the effects of interface design on human performance, workload, and situation awareness, interfaces can be developed to appropriately support the human in performing tasks with minimal errors and with appropriate interaction time and effort. Thus, the results of research on human-robot interfaces have direct implications for the design of robotic systems. This DRP concentrates on three areas associated with interfaces and command modalities in HRI which are applicable to NASA robot systems: 1) Video Overlays, 2) Camera Views, and 3) Command Modalities. The first study focused on video overlays that investigated how Augmented Reality (AR) symbology can be added to the human-robot interface to improve teleoperation performance. Three types of AR symbology were explored in this study, command guidance (CG), situation guidance (SG), and both (SCG). CG symbology gives operators explicit instructions on what commands to input, whereas SG symbology gives operators implicit cues so that operators can infer the input commands. The combination of CG and SG provided operators with explicit and implicit cues allowing the operator to choose which symbology to utilize. The objective of the study was to understand how AR symbology affects the human operator's ability to align a robot arm to a target using a flight stick and the ability to allocate attention between the symbology and external views of the world. The study evaluated the effects type of symbology (CG and SG) has on operator tasks performance and attention allocation during teleoperation of a robot arm. The second study expanded on the first study by evaluating the effects of the type of

  4. New tattoo approaches in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene

    2014-01-01

    Tattoos have fascinated mankind for centuries. Although these body marks were once considered to be permanent, technical and scientific progress in recent years has made it possible to remove tattoos by various treatment modalities. Contemporary technology involves the use of nonablative quality-switched lasers, which are considered to be the gold-standard treatment option for the removal of unwanted tattoo ink. Current research in the field of tattoo removal is focused on faster lasers and more effective targeting of tattoo pigment particles including picosecond laser devices, multi-pass treatments, dermal scatter reduction, application of imiquimod, and the use of microencapsulated tattoo ink.

  5. Is dermatologic usage of coal tar carcinogenic? A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pion, I.A.; Koenig, K.L.; Lim, H.W. [New York VA Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Coal tar ointments have been used for decades in the treatment of various dermatoses, most notably eczema and psoriasis. Occupational exposure to coal tar poses an increased risk of developing cutaneous malignancies. The evidence of an increased risk of skin cancer in humans, as a result of dermatologic usage of tar, however, is conflicting. A consensus on the carcinogenicity of tar was sought. The existing literature (in vitro, animal and human studies) on this subject was reviewed. The carcinogenicity of coal tar was clearly demonstrated by in vitro and animal studies, and appears to be potentiated by concomitant use of ultraviolet radiation. Systemic absorption of mutagens from topically applied tar has been demonstrated in humans. Epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have not definitively shown an increase in skin cancer with therapeutic use of tar. Conclusive evidence for the carcinogenicity of tar used in dermatologic practice is lacking. Further controlled studies are necessary. 49 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Psychological symptoms and quality of life of dermatology outpatients and hospitalized dermatology patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Zachariae, Claus; Ibsen, Hans Henning

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare psychological symptoms and health-related quality of life of dermatology patients and healthy controls. The sample consisted of 333 consecutively recruited patients from four dermatology outpatient clinics, 172 hospitalized dermatological patients from...... and older patients, and patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis were more distressed than patients with urticaria and eczemas. Disease-related impairment of quality of life was the main predictor of psychological symptoms, when controlling for diagnosis, age, gender, disease duration and disease...... severity. Although older age was associated with fewer psychological symptoms, our data suggest that skin disease affects quality of life equally in young and older patients. The findings highlight the importance of recognizing disease-related psychological problems and possible psychiatric comorbidity...

  7. An innovative approach to enhance dermatology competencies for advanced practice nurses: service–learning with a migrant farm worker health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Elizabeth A; Connor, Ann; Howett, Maeve

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a novel service–learning opportunity for graduate nursing students that promotes competency in dermatology. A hybrid service–learning course with online didactic content is described, along with tools for evaluation of dermatology competencies. Student evaluation of the course is discussed, and selected research articles are reviewed. Advanced practice nursing and medical education frequently does not adequately prepare primary care providers to be competent in the assessment and management of dermatologic conditions. Embedding dermatology content in a service–learning program can optimize the provision of care, strengthen competencies in dermatology and inter-professional care, and allow students to gain a deeper understanding of the population with which they work. The innovative service–learning program presented is a model for advanced practice nursing education. Tools for evaluating clinical competency and courses often need validation. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. [Prominent personalities from the tropical dermatology field in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein Alva, Zuño

    2014-01-01

    This article pays tribute to three Peruvian medical personalities: José Neyra Ramirez (1929-2012), Abelardo Tejada (1931-2013) and Oscar Romero Rivas (1929-2011), highlighting their valuable contributions to the field of Tropical Dermatology and Health Medicine that benefited public health and Peruvian medical education. The article mentions the formation of a group of young researchers called “The Anacoretas”, including professors Hugo Pesce, Enrique Encinas, Juan Francisco Valegas in Lima; and Enerst Nausk and Victor Manchego in Germany, who, with the support of the Peruvian and German governments promoted and created the first university research center of Tropical Medicine on the Pacific Coast of Latin America called Daniel A. Carrion Tropical Medicine Institute at Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima (TMI/UNMSM).

  9. Nanotechnology and dermatology education in the United States: data from a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam; Nasir, Adnan

    2011-09-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline with important implications for consumers, patients, physicians and investigators. In an era when nanotechnology is being both incorporated into educational requirements for medical fields such as radiology and oncology and vigorously pursued and developed by cosmeceutical companies, dermatology is falling behind. A survey was conducted to ascertain knowledge, attitudes and perception of nanotechnology in dermatology teaching programs. To ascertain baseline knowledge, attitudes and preceptions regarding nanotechnology among dermatology trainees, dermatology investigators and dermatology faculty in US academic medical centers, an online survey was sent out to random members of the dermatology community and data analyzed (100 participants, 23% response rate). Participants responded to a questionnaire on a five-point scale ranging from strongly disagree, disagree, uncertain, agree, to strongly agree. Due to the low response rate, strongly disagree/disagree and strongly agree/agree values were combined and compared to uncertain responses. Approximately equal numbers of faculty vs. chief residents responded to the survery (52% vs. 47.75%, respectively). The majority of respondents had not previously attended any educational activity on nanotechnology (69.57%). The majority of participants agreed that more education on nanotechnology for dermatologists is needed (78.26% agreed vs. 21.74% uncertain) and that it should be incorporated into the residency training curriculum (60.87% agree vs. 13.04% disagree). Participants mostly agreed that nanotechnology research can contribute to better fundamental understanding of skin disease (78.26%), to advances in the diagnosis of skin disease (73.91%) and to therapies (78.26%). Participants mostly agreed that more research is needed (82.60%) and that this research should be funded (78.26%). Not surprisingly, respondents were uncertain with respect to issues of nanotechnology safety both

  10. Electronic collaboration in dermatology resident training through social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Natalie M; McGuire, April L; Carroll, Bryan T

    2017-04-01

    The use of online educational resources and professional social networking sites is increasing. The field of dermatology is currently under-utilizing online social networking as a means of professional collaboration and sharing of training materials. In this study, we sought to assess the current structure of and satisfaction with dermatology resident education and gauge interest for a professional social networking site for educational collaboration. Two surveys-one for residents and one for faculty-were electronically distributed via the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery and Association of Professors of Dermatology (APD) listserves. The surveys confirmed that there is interest among dermatology residents and faculty in a dermatology professional networking site with the goal to enhance educational collaboration.

  11. Information Presentation: Human Research Program - Space Human Factors and Habitability, Space Human Factors Engineering Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kristina L.; Sandor, Aniko; Thompson, Shelby G.; Kaiser, Mary K.; McCann, Robert S.; Begault, D. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Beutter, B. R.; Wenzel, E. M.; Godfroy, M.; Stone, L. S.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers atJohnson Space Center and Ames Research Center. T

  12. Superficial Head and Neck Anatomy for Dermatologic Surgery: Critical Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Steven; Bennett, Richard G

    2015-10-01

    Thorough understanding of head and neck anatomy is useful and necessary for dermatologic surgery. To highlight pertinent head and neck anatomic structures that are encountered during dermatologic surgery and correlate these with common surgical problems. Important anatomic structures and regional cutaneous anatomy are discussed and illustrated. Several important anatomic structures exist within the head and neck that can influence surgical outcomes. Anatomic knowledge is helpful to the dermatologic surgeon to optimize reconstructive outcomes.

  13. Knowledge and Behavior Regarding Cosmetics in Koreans Visiting Dermatology Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Soyun; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Nack In; Ro, Young Suck; Kim, Joung Soo; Park, Young Min; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Weon Ju; Kim, Dong Kun; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Sang Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background Cosmetics can affect the skin condition profoundly, and yet no survey has been performed in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. Objective To assess knowledge and consumer behavior regarding cosmetics in Koreans visiting dermatology clinics. Methods A questionnaire consisting of 43 questions concerning demographics and use/knowledge/selection/purchase of cosmetics was given to patients and accompanying persons who visited dermatologic clinics in university and private clinic setti...

  14. Topical aspects of nuclear medical diagnostics in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrenberg, O.

    1985-09-09

    The diagnostic value of soft tissue and bone scintigraphy in various dermatological diseases is discussed. We received new knowledge about frequency, dimension and validity of psoriatic osteoarthropathia by using scintigraphic methods. Bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than clinical and radiological investigation and there is an earlier detection of arthropathy in psoriasis. Whole body scintigraphy using bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals has proven to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in the detection of bone and joint involvement in collagen diseases. These methods can also be of great value in the evaluation and clinical management of diseases with possible generalized or multiple bone lesions (e. g. syphilis; dermatomyositis; sarcoidosis; malignant melanoma). Since the discovery of hybridoma technique for the production of monoclonal antibodies it became apparent that this new class of immunoglobulins may represent a new useful tool in the diagnosis and in the therapy of malignant diseases. In this paper we discuss the application of murine and human monoclonal antibodies in experimental and clinical oncology.

  15. Neutrophil extracellular traps in dermatology: Caught in the NET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jochen H O; Enk, Alexander H

    2016-10-01

    Neutrophil, or polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) constitute the most abundant type of leucocytes in peripheral human blood. One of the major advances in the last decade was the discovery of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation: a process by which neutrophils externalize web-like chromatin strands decorated with antimicrobial peptides. These structures were soon implicated in immune defense and auto-immunity alike and now link neutrophils to the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases of dermatological relevance. Currently, NET formation is mainly subdivided into suicidal and vital NETosis. Controversy exists regarding the capacity of NETs to kill pathogens, and little is known about the way NETs are formed in vivo. Here, we discuss the current terminology, methods for NET quantification, pathways leading to NET formation, and the role of NETs in systemic and cutaneous immune defense and auto-immunity, with a focus on psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Historical evolution of the Brazilian Annals of Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho; Vallarelli, Andrelou Fralete Ayres; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; Reis, Vitor Manoel da Silva

    2012-02-01

    In this special edition in celebration of the centennial of the Brazilian Society of Dermatology, the authors take a retrospective look at printed Brazilian dermatology from the very beginning onward, showing evidence of descriptive dermatology with rich discussions, illustrations and advertisements of medications much used at the time, such as bismuth for the treatment of syphilis, before the discovery of penicillin. This retrospective covers up to the current days, when publications in the Brazilian Annals of Dermatology have reached the modern era in electronics, science and layout as well.

  17. Cleansers and their role in various dermatological disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    2011-01-01

    ... into it. In dermatological disorders like acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, photoaging, 'sensitive skin', occupational dermatosis cleansers may have a beneficial role along with other therapeutic measures...

  18. Dermatologic Features of Classic Movie Villains: The Face of Evil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croley, Julie Amthor; Reese, Vail; Wagner, Richard F

    2017-06-01

    Dichotomous dermatologic depictions of heroes and villains in movies have been used since the silent film age. To evaluate the hero-villain skin dichotomy in film by (1) identifying dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American film villains, (2) comparing these dermatologic findings to the all-time top 10 American film heroes quantitatively and qualitatively, and (3) analyzing dermatologic portrayals of film villains in depth. In this cross-sectional study, dermatologic findings for film heroes and villains in mainstream media were identified and compared quantitatively using a χ2 test with α dermatologic findings of the top 10 film villains and of the top 10 film heroes. Six (60%) of the all-time top 10 American film villains have dermatologic findings, including cosmetically significant alopecia (30%), periorbital hyperpigmentation (30%), deep rhytides on the face (20%), multiple facial scars (20%), verruca vulgaris on the face (20%), and rhinophyma (10%). The top 10 villains have a higher incidence of significant dermatologic findings than the top 10 heroes (60% vs 0%; P = .03). Dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American villains are used in film to highlight the dichotomy of good and evil, which may foster a tendency toward prejudice in our society directed at those with skin disease.

  19. Review of human hand microbiome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds-Wilson, Sarah L; Nurinova, Nilufar I; Zapka, Carrie A; Fierer, Noah; Wilson, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances have increased our understanding of the human microbiome, including the skin microbiome. Despite the importance of the hands as a vector for infection transmission, there have been no comprehensive reviews of recent advances in hand microbiome research or overviews of the factors that influence the composition of the hand microbiome. A comprehensive and systematic database search was conducted for skin microbiome-related articles published from January 1, 2008 to April 1, 2015. Only primary research articles that used culture-independent, whole community analysis methods to study the healthy hand skin microbiome were included. Eighteen articles were identified containing hand microbiome data. Most focused on bacteria, with relatively little reported on fungi, viruses, and protozoa. Bacteria from four phyla were found across all studies of the hand microbiome (most to least relative abundance): Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes. Key factors that impacted the hand microbiome composition included temporal and biogeographical dynamics, as well as intrinsic (age, gender) and extrinsic (product use, cohabitants, pet-ownership) variables. There was more temporal variability in the composition of the hand microbiome than in other body sites, making identification of the "normal" microbiome of the hands challenging. The microbiome of the hands is in constant flux as the hands are a critical vector for transmitting microorganisms between people, pets, inanimate objects and our environments. Future studies need to resolve methodological influences on results, and further investigate factors which alter the hand microbiome including the impact of products applied to hands. Increased understanding of the hand microbiome and the skin microbiome in general, will open the door to product development for disease prevention and treatment, and may lead to other applications, including novel diagnostic and forensic approaches.

  20. Differential network analysis in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan; Datta, Somnath; Datta, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    A complex disease like cancer is hardly caused by one gene or one protein singly. It is usually caused by the perturbation of the network formed by several genes or proteins. In the last decade several research teams have attempted to construct interaction maps of genes and proteins either experimentally or reverse engineer interaction maps using computational techniques. These networks were usually created under a certain condition such as an environmental condition, a particular disease, or a specific tissue type. Lately, however, there has been greater emphasis on finding the differential structure of the existing network topology under a novel condition or disease status to elucidate the perturbation in a biological system. In this review/tutorial article we briefly mention some of the research done in this area; we mainly illustrate the computational/statistical methods developed by our team in recent years for differential network analysis using publicly available gene expression data collected from a well known cancer study. This data includes a group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a group with acute myeloid leukemia. In particular, we describe the statistical tests to detect the change in the network topology based on connectivity scores which measure the association or interaction between pairs of genes. The tests under various scores are applied to this data set to perform a differential network analysis on gene expression for human leukemia. We believe that, in the future, differential network analysis will be a standard way to view the changes in gene expression and protein expression data globally and these types of tests could be useful in analyzing the complex differential signatures.

  1. Dermatologic conditions in teenage adolescents in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henshaw EB

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eshan B Henshaw,1 Olayinka A Olasode,2 Evelyn E Ogedegbe,3 Imaobong Etuk4 1Dermatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, 2Department of Dermatology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, 3Cedarcrest Hospital, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, 4Department of Pediatrics, University of Calabar, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria Background: Skin disorders are common in adolescents, and the impact on quality of life can be enormous, particularly when viewed against the backdrop of the visibility of skin diseases and the psychologically vulnerable period of adolescence. However, few studies have documented the magnitude of skin disorders in this subset of individuals. We therefore estimated the point prevalence and pattern of dermatologic conditions in adolescents attending various secondary schools in Calabar, Southern Nigeria. Methods: Using a structured questionnaire, relevant sociodemographic information was obtained from 1,447 teenage adolescents from eight secondary schools. Thereafter, a whole body examination was conducted to determine the presence and types of skin disorders seen. Results: Skin diseases were seen in 929 students. The point prevalence was higher in males (72.1% than in females (58.3%. Private schools had a higher prevalence than public schools. The six most common dermatoses were acne vulgaris, pityriasis versicolor, nevi, tinea, miliaria, and keloid/hypertrophic scars, and accounted for over 80% of the dermatoses seen. Conclusion: The point prevalence of dermatoses in senior secondary school adolescents was 64.2%. Although a large number of skin disorders were observed, only a handful accounted for a significant proportion of the diseases seen. This increases the ease of training community health workers in the recognition and treatment of common skin diseases. Age, race, and climatic factors are important determinants of skin diseases in adolescents in

  2. Ethinylestradiol/Chlormadinone acetate: dermatological benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Tapia, Aurora; Sancho Pérez, Blanca

    2011-09-06

    Acne vulgaris, hirsutism, seborrhea and female pattern hair loss (FPHL) are common disorders of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). In some women with hyperandrogenemia, an excess of androgens at the PSU can lead to the development of these dermatological manifestations. These manifestations can cause many psychiatric and psychological implications, such as social fears and anxiety, and can adversely affect quality of life. High androgen levels at the PSU as a possible underlying cause of acne vulgaris, hirsutism, seborrhea and FPHL supports the rationale for using combined oral contraceptives for the management of these conditions in women. The purpose of this review is to describe these dermatological manifestations of the PSU and the management of these conditions through the use of the oral contraceptive ethinylestradiol/chlormadinone acetate (EE/CMA). EE/CMA 0.03/2 mg is a combined monophasic contraceptive pill with anti-androgenic properties. It is approved in Europe for contraception and has been investigated in phase III trials for the treatment of acne. EE/CMA was better than placebo and similar to another low-dose oral contraceptive (ethinylestradiol/levonorgestrel) in improving symptoms of acne in two phase III randomized controlled trials in patients with mild to moderate papulopustular acne. In addition, in trials investigating the contraceptive efficacy of EE/CMA, limited data suggest that there were also improvements in hirsutism, FPHL and seborrhea in small subgroups of patients. EE/CMA has a good safety profile. The most commonly reported adverse events are breast tenderness/pain, headache/migraine and nausea. Evidence in the literature indicates that the use of EE/CMA for the treatment of dermatological disorders under the control of androgens may be a valid treatment option. Further investigation is warranted.

  3. Google searches help with diagnosis in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Montassar; Feroz, Kaliyadan

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have tried to assess the usefulness of Google search as a diagnostic aid. The results were discordant and have led to controversies. To investigate how often Google search is helpful to reach correct diagnoses in dermatology. Two fifth-year students (A and B) and one demonstrator (C) have participated as investigators in this paper. Twenty-five diagnostic dermatological cases were selected from all the clinical cases published in the Web only images in clinical medicine from March 2005 to November 2009. The main outcome measure of our paper was to compare the number of correct diagnoses provided by the investigators without, and with Google search. Investigator A gave correct diagnoses in 9/25 (36%) cases without Google search, his diagnostic success after Google search was 18/25 (72%). Investigator B results were 11/25 (44%) correct diagnoses without Google search, and 19/25 (76%) after this search. For investigator C, the results were 12/25 (48%) without Google search, and 18/25 (72%) after the use of this tool. Thus, the total correct diagnoses provided by the three investigators were 32 (42.6%) without Google search, and 55 (73.3%) when using this facility. The difference was statistically significant between the total number of correct diagnoses given by the three investigators without, and with Google search (p = 0.0002). In the light of our paper, Google search appears to be an interesting diagnostic aid in dermatology. However, we emphasize that diagnosis is primarily an art based on clinical skills and experience.

  4. Pharmacokinetics-Based Approaches for Bioequivalence Evaluation of Topical Dermatological Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Sam G; Franz, Thomas J; Lehman, Paul A; Lionberger, Robert; Chen, Mei-Ling

    2015-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic approach has accelerated the development of high-quality generic medicines with extraordinary cost savings, transforming the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare system in the USA. While this is true for systemically absorbed drug products, the availability of generic versions of topical dermatological products remains constrained due to the limited methods accepted for bioequivalence evaluation of these products. The current review explores the possibility of developing appropriate bioequivalence approaches based on pharmacokinetic principles for topical dermatological products. This review focuses on the strengths and limitations of the three most promising pharmacokinetics-based methods to evaluate the performance and bioequivalence of topical dermatological products, which include in vivo skin stripping, in vivo microdialysis, and in vitro permeation testing (IVPT) with excised human skin. It is hoped that recent advances in pharmaceutical and regulatory science will facilitate the development of robust bioequivalence approaches for these dosage forms, enable more efficient methodologies to compare the performance of new drug products in certain pre-approval or post-approval change situations, and promote the availability of high-quality generic versions of topical dermatological products.

  5. Opioid pain medication use after dermatologic surgery: a prospective observational study of 212 dermatologic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, KaLynne; Curtis, Julia; Larsen, Brooke; Calder, Scott; Duffy, Keith; Bowen, Glen; Hadley, Michael; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2013-03-01

    To better understand postoperative opioid use after dermatologic surgery. Prospective observational study. Academic dermatology department. The study included 212 adults (1) who were undergoing a single skin excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery), (2) who consented to participate,and (3) who were able to be reached by telephone on postoperative day 3 or 4. Patients who did not meet these criteria and those referred to another physician for further surgical treatment or repair were excluded. The study examined(1) the incidence of opioid prescription after dermatologic surgery, (2) the percentage of prescribed opioid pain medications used in the postoperative period, and (3) patient and surgical characteristics associated with opioid pain medication prescription and use. Opioids were prescribed to 72 of the 212 patients(34%). Twenty-five of the 72 patients (35%) who were prescribed opioids did not use them. Forty-nine of 57 patients (86%) who filled an opioid prescription had leftover pills, and 26 of the 49 patients (53%) planned to keep them. Only maximum pain score was significantly associated with opioid use. Opioids were over prescribed after dermatologic surgery. Patients who had left over opioids did not dispose of them properly, which could lead to potential misuse and abuse.

  6. Alitretinoin in dermatology-An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Kumar Bubna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alitretinoin is a pan retinoic acid agonist. It was initially used as 0.1% gel in the management of localized Kaposi′s sarcoma. At present, the use of systemic alitretinoin has proved extremely efficacious in the management of recalcitrant chronic hand eczema. Furthermore, there have been other retinoid responsive dermatosis that have demonstrated remission post usage of systemic alitretinoin. With a better toxicity profile, compared to the other systemic retinoids, alitretinoin could be considered a valuable treatment option in the near future for the treatment of these dermatologic disorders.

  7. [Dermatologic aspects of SAPHO-syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károlyi, Z; Harhai, I; Erós, N

    2001-08-19

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) as a new disease entity was first described in 1987. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of pustular dermatoses together with aseptic osteoarticular lesions. The bone involvement includes hyperostosis, aseptic osteomyelitis or arthritis of the anterior chest wall, sacroiliac joints or long bones. Skin diseases include acne conglobata or acne fulminans, palmoplantar pustulosis and hidradenitis suppurativa. Authors describe the dermatological relationship of SAPHO syndrome reporting their 7 cases (3 acne fulminans, 4 palmoplantar pustulosis). Authors draw attention to the isotretinoin therapy as a possible provoking factor of the articular symptoms, and they emphasize the diagnostic role of bone scintigraphy.

  8. Environmental Health Research Involving Human Subjects: Ethical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Resnik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the ethical issues that arise in environmental health research with human subjects, such as minimizing risks to subjects, balancing benefits and risks in research, intentional exposure studies with human subjects, protecting third parties in research, informing subjects about environmental hazards, communicating health information to subjects, and protecting privacy and confidentiality.

  9. Human-Computer Interaction and Information Management Research Needs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In a visionary future, Human-Computer Interaction HCI and Information Management IM have the potential to enable humans to better manage their lives through the use...

  10. Protections for Subjects in Human Research with Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    All pesticide research using human subjects must meet our strict protective standards before we would consider using them in evaluating pesticides. EPA's regulation “Protections for Subjects in Human Research” was promulgated in 2006 and amended in 2013.

  11. Social justice and research using human biological material: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    commercial medical research that uses human biological material, such as blood samples or other ... and provide that a person from whose body human biological material is withdrawn for .... part of investigators and institutions. This could be ...

  12. Development of shampoo, soap and ointment formulated by green synthesised silver nanoparticles functionalised with antimicrobial plants oils in veterinary dermatology: treatment and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, Sunita Dashrath; Bawaskar, Manisha Subrashrao; Gade, Aniket Krishnarao; Rai, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Many scientists have focused their research on the role of nanotechnology for the control of human pathogens, but there are also many topical pathogens present in animals, which infect animals and transfer to humans. Topical therapy is extremely important for the management of dermatological condition in animals. Therefore, the present study aims to evaluate the efficacy of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in combination with herbal oils against animal skin infections which may be responsible for causing infections in human beings. Here, the authors synthesised and characterised the AgNPs from Azadirachta indica. The oils were extracted from medicinal plants including Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon martini, Eucalyptus globules, A. indica and Ocimum sanctum and the antifungal and antibacterial activity of plant oils along with AgNPs were evaluated. An excision wound model was used for the study of wound healing activity in rabbits. AgNPs functionalised oil has demonstrated remarkable antimicrobial activity against pathogens present on the skin of animals. The nano-functionalised antimicrobial oils were used in the formulation of shampoo, soap and ointment for veterinary dermatology. Antimicrobial products of plant origin with AgNPs are valuable, safe and have a specific role in controlling diseases. The authors believe that this approach will be a good alternative therapy to solve the continuous antibiotic resistance developed by many bacterial pathogens and will be utilised in various animal contacting areas in medicine.

  13. Human subject research for engineers a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    de Winter, Joost C F

    2017-01-01

    This Brief introduces engineers to the main principles in ethics, research design, statistics, and publishing of human subject research. In recent years, engineering has become strongly connected to disciplines such as biology, medicine, and psychology. Often, engineers (and engineering students) are expected to perform human subject research. Typical human subject research topics conducted by engineers include human-computer interaction (e.g., evaluating the usability of software), exoskeletons, virtual reality, teleoperation, modelling of human behaviour and decision making (often within the framework of ‘big data’ research), product evaluation, biometrics, behavioural tracking (e.g., of work and travel patterns, or mobile phone use), transport and planning (e.g., an analysis of flows or safety issues), etc. Thus, it can be said that knowledge on how to do human subject research is indispensable for a substantial portion of engineers. Engineers are generally well trained in calculus and mechanics, but m...

  14. Genetic Modification of Preimplantation Embryos: Toward Adequate Human Research Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo mo...

  15. Autophagy: A brief overview in perspective of dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Nagar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, literally meaning “self-eating,” is an intracellular catabolic process of delivering cytosol and/or its specific content to the lysosomes for degradation.The resulting macromolecular constituents are recycled and utilized again by the cells. Basal level autophagy plays an important role in cellular homeostasis through the elimination of the old or damaged organelles, as well as aggregated intracellular proteins. Autophagy refers to sequestration of intact organelles along with a portion of cytosol, into a double-or multi-membrane structure known as phagophore, which elongates, and after closure, forms a vesicular structure known as the autophagosome. Subsequently, the mature autophagosome fuses with a lysosome, thereby forming a single membrane structure, an autolysosome. Autophagy plays a critical role in inflammation, autoimmunity and cellular differentiation. Skin serves as the first line of defense against a variety of environmental insults and autophagy is thought to be a form of an endogenous defense mechanism against such environmental derangements. Autophagy has been linked with keratinocyte differentiation and melanocyte survival, as well as with the pathogenesis of diverse skin disorders including systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, psoriasis, vitiligo, infectious skin diseases and cancer. Autophagy has been one of the most studied phenomena in cell biology and pathophysiology, and given its broad clinical implications, has become a major target for drug discovery. The last decade has seen a substantial upsurge in autophagy-related research and publications; still, the dermatology literature appears to be less initiated. Autophagy will probably change our understanding of dermatological disorders/medicines. Hence, a basic knowledge of autophagy is a prerequisite to understand the developments in the field of autophagy-related research.

  16. Epidemiological Study of Common Dermatological Disorders in Western Nepal: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokhrel Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin diseases and their complications are a major burden on the health system of many nations. Since there is a paucity of data regarding the epidemiological status among the local population at the different parts of Nepal which are geographically distinct from each other, the present study was conducted to meet the need of an hour. Aim and Objectives: To identify and compare the pattern of dermatological diseases in the outpatients reporting to a medical camp that was organized at three distinct part of Nepal. Material and Methods: All cases with dermatological complaints attending the medical camp were included in the study after thorough examination. Data were collected, tabulated and analyzed statistically. Results: Out of 1,045 dermatological cases, who reported to the camp, 45.3% (mean age 26.3±30.3 were males and 54.7% (mean age 31.8±45.5 were females with the maximum number of disorders present in patients under the age group 16 to 30 years (33.6% for all the study groups. Non-infective conditions (55.8% outweighed infective conditions (36.8%. Conclusion: The identification of these diseases which are usually neglected by the community is important for proper diagnosis, treatment and for dermatologic education and research as well.

  17. Computer science security research and human subjects: emerging considerations for research ethics boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Elizabeth; Aycock, John; Dexter, Scott; Dittrich, David; Hvizdak, Erin

    2011-06-01

    This paper explores the growing concerns with computer science research, and in particular, computer security research and its relationship with the committees that review human subjects research. It offers cases that review boards are likely to confront, and provides a context for appropriate consideration of such research, as issues of bots, clouds, and worms enter the discourse of human subjects review.

  18. Human Research Program Science Management: Overview of Research and Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of research and development activities of NASA's Human Research Science Management Program is presented. The topics include: 1) Human Research Program Goals; 2) Elements and Projects within HRP; 3) Development and Maintenance of Priorities; 4) Acquisition and Evaluation of Research and Technology Proposals; and 5) Annual Reviews

  19. Dermatology relevance to graduates from the Universidade Estadual de Campinas Medical School*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugão, Ariel Falbel; de Caldas, Tânia Alencar; de Castro, Eneida Lazzarini; Pereira, Elisabete Monteiro de Aguiar; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Some research indicates that physicians do not dominate the expected dermatological content for the proper exercise of the profession. This fact compromises their diagnostic and therapeutic performance, generating unnecessary costs. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to evaluate the relevance of Dermatology and the knowledge acquired in the specialty during the undergraduate course in clinical practice of graduates at the State University of Campinas Medical School (FCM/UNICAMP). METHOD A questionnaire with 22 closed questions and two open ones was electronically sent to physicians who had graduated more than 10 years ago and others for less than 10 years. In the first group, physicians were trained by the same curriculum and in the second group there were subjects trained by the old and the new curriculum. RESULTS Of the 126 respondents, 83% had completed a specialization course. Among all, 82% did not study dermatology after graduation. The majority considered that Dermatology has high relevance in clinical practice, regardless of the group. There was a statistically significant difference between non-dermatologist doctors graduated for more than 10 years and those graduated for less than 10 years regarding confidence about lesion diagnosis, diagnostic investigation and treatment of skin diseases. Physicians who have graduated for a longer time feel more insecure in relation to patients with dermatoses. Concerning contributions offered by graduation program completion they prioritized outpatient care, ability to diagnose, knowledge of pathology, research and knowledge of lesions. CONCLUSION This study has shown that Dermatology is relevant in medical practice and more recent graduates from the FCM/UNICAMP feel less insecure when treating a patient with dermatoses. PMID:26560207

  20. Genetic modification of preimplantation embryos: toward adequate human research policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects.

  1. Generic drugs in dermatology: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, Michael; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2012-03-01

    The cost of health care in the United States is increasing. In order to help control these rising costs, all parties involved in the delivery of health care, including dermatologists, need to be part of the solution of ethically reducing the cost of delivery of care. One potential means of meeting this goal is to increase the use of generic medications in daily practice. Generic medications can offer equally efficacious therapy at significantly lower prices, which can translate into large scale savings for the individual patient, the payer, and the overall health care system. Herein we provide an overview of new drug development, review the history of the generic drug industry, describe how generic drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and define the concepts of bioequivalence and therapeutic equivalence. In part II, we explore various factors impacting generic drug use, provide cost analyses of dermatologic brand name and generic drugs, and review data addressing potential differences in the effectiveness of brand name versus generic drugs in dermatology. The cost of brand name and generic medications is highly variable by pharmacy, state, and payer. We used one source (www.drugstore.com) as an example and for consistency across all medications discussed herein. Prices included here may not reflect actual retail prices across the United States.

  2. Discriminative power of visual attributes in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotis, Ioannis; Visser, Margaretha; Jonkman, Marcel; Petkov, Nicolai

    2013-02-01

    Visual characteristics such as color and shape of skin lesions play an important role in the diagnostic process. In this contribution, we quantify the discriminative power of such attributes using an information theoretical approach. We estimate the probability of occurrence of each attribute as a function of the skin diseases. We use the distribution of this probability across the studied diseases and its entropy to define the discriminative power of the attribute. The discriminative power has a maximum value for attributes that occur (or do not occur) for only one disease and a minimum value for those which are equally likely to be observed among all diseases. Verrucous surface, red and brown colors, and the presence of more than 10 lesions are among the most informative attributes. A ranking of attributes is also carried out and used together with a naive Bayesian classifier, yielding results that confirm the soundness of the proposed method. proposed measure is proven to be a reliable way of assessing the discriminative power of dermatological attributes, and it also helps generate a condensed dermatological lexicon. Therefore, it can be of added value to the manual or computer-aided diagnostic process. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Distance transform for automatic dermatologic images composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana, C.; Pellacani, G.; Seidenari, S.; Cucchiara, R.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we focus on the problem of automatically registering dermatological images, because even if different products are available, most of them share the problem of a limited field of view on the skin. A possible solution is then the composition of multiple takes of the same lesion with digital software, such as that for panorama images creation. In this work, to perform an automatic selection of matching points the Harris Corner Detector is used, and to cope with outlier couples we employed the RANSAC method. Projective mapping is then used to match the two images. Given a set of correspondence points, Singular Value Decomposition was used to compute the transform parameters. At this point the two images need to be blended together. One initial assumption is often implicitly made: the aim is to merge two rectangular images. But when merging occurs between more than two images iteratively, this assumption will fail. To cope with differently shaped images, we employed the Distance Transform and provided a weighted merging of images. Different tests were conducted with dermatological images, both with standard rectangular frame and with not typical shapes, as for example a ring due to the objective and lens selection. The successive composition of different circular images with other blending functions, such as the Hat function, doesn't correctly get rid of the border and residuals of the circular mask are still visible. By applying Distance Transform blending, the result produced is insensitive of the outer shape of the image.

  4. [Nitrous oxide - oxygen analgesia in aesthetic dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosner, M

    2013-06-01

    Local anaesthesia often is insufficient for more extensive procedures. Instead of general anaesthesia or sedation, pediatricians, gynaecologists and dentists increasingly use nitrous oxide (N2O). This study evaluates the suitability of this form of anesthesia in dermatology. In 24 patients (18 w, 6 m, mean age 49 y.) N2O/O2 inhalation (Livopan®) was used during 46 procedures with indications including fractional RF/wrinkle reduction, IPL/rosacea, q-sw. laser/tattoos and hemosiderosis as well as fractional Er:Glass laser for scars and hypopigmentation. In 26 procedures subjective pain intensity was measured (visual analogue scale 0-10). With N2O the treatment pain was lowered from 6.6 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.7 (median, p = 0.000). 23/24 patients chose N2O for their next treatment. Beside euphoria, fatigue, slight drowsiness, dizziness, nausea or change in auditory perception, no other side effects occurred. The pronounced analgesia, the easy self-administration, the fast onset and complete recovery after a few minutes and the low ratio of side effects make the N2O/O2 inhalation to an ideal addendum in the management of larger painful procedures in dermatology as long as contraindications and safety precautions are respected.

  5. Dermatologic conditions in internationally adopted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Whitaker-Worth, MD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Over 200,000 children have been adopted into United States (US families from abroad since the year 2000. Health care providers who care for children adopted internationally should be aware of the spectrum of illnesses seen in this population, and should be prepared to encounter potentially unusual situations. An appreciation for the unique pre-adoption exposures and vulnerabilities inherent in international adoption is critical for proper diagnosis and treatment of this heterogeneous group of children. It is important to consider the impact of potential early childhood stressors such as nutritional, sensory, and emotional deprivation, trauma and abuse, as well as prenatal exposures to drugs, alcohol, and infectious diseases. Providers must also take into account international variation in health care practices, including immunization, treatment, surgical, and hygiene standards. The differential diagnosis for cutaneous eruptions in children adopted internationally is broad and must encompass endemic systemic illnesses with skin manifestations, such as measles, tuberculosis, leprosy, and congenital syphilis, and primary dermatologic diseases such as scabies and bacterial and fungal infections. The importance of maintaining a broad differential and open mind when addressing the dermatologic needs of these children cannot be overemphasized.

  6. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries.

  7. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  8. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  9. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  10. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa: Potential for Infertility ResearchDavid Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3 1Reproductive ...

  11. Research on Human-Robot Joint System for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The lunar exploration in China is in progress. In order to reduce human workload and costs, and conduct researches more effectively and efficiently, human-robot joint systems are necessary for lunar exploration. The concept of human-robot joint system for lunar exploration is studied in this paper. The possible collaborative ways between human and robots and the collaborative activities which can be conducted for lunar exploration are discussed. Moreover, the preliminary configuration of a human-robot joint system is presented.

  12. History of the Chinese Society of Dermatology: an overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-zhong; ZHANG Xue-jun

    2009-01-01

    @@ The history of Dermatology in China can be traced back to the middle of the 19th century when missionary doctors from America and Europe introduced Western medicine to China and established several hospitals where dermatology either as a division or as a group in the department of medicine.

  13. Quantifying and characterizing adverse events in dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jenna L; Lee, Yun Sun; Solomon, James A; Patel, Nikita; Shutty, Brandon; Davis, Scott A; Robins, Douglas N; Williford, Philip M; Feldman, Steven R; Pearce, Daniel J

    2013-06-01

    Although office-based dermatologic procedures are generally considered safe, there is a lack of prospective data on the rate of adverse events (AEs) associated with these procedures. To determine the frequency of AEs after dermatologic surgery and to characterize the most commonly encountered AEs. A web-based interface was designed to track AEs with the input of four dermatologic surgeons. Patient demographic and operative data were collected at the time of the dermatologic surgery procedure. AEs occurring at any time during the data collection period were logged according to an a priori categorization scheme. The AE rate was 2.0% in this series of 2,418 subjects undergoing dermatologic surgery from February 1 through December 14, 2010. The most commonly reported AEs were suspicion of infection (64%), postoperative hemorrhage (20%), and wound dehiscence (8%). Suspicion of infection was slightly less frequent in subjects who received prophylactic preoperative antibiotics (0.4%) than in those who did not (1.5%, p = .07). There were no serious AEs and no deaths. AEs are uncommon after office-based dermatologic surgery procedures. Preoperative antibiotics may further decrease the infection rate after dermatologic surgery, but the risks and benefits must be weighed given the already low AE rate. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Space Human Factors: Research to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Human Factors has been instrumental in preventing potential on-orbit hazards and increasing overall crew safety. Poor performance & operational learning curves on-orbit are mitigated. Human-centered design is applied to optimize design and minimize potentially hazardous conditions, especially with larger crew sizes and habitat constraints. Lunar and Mars requirements and design developments are enhanced, based on ISS Lessons Learned.

  15. [Counseling in dermatology and cosmetology at pharmacies in Ouagadougou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamba, Pascal; Sieba, Ibrahim; Faye, Ousmane; Traoré-Barro, Fatou; Traoré, Adama

    2007-01-01

    In Burkina Faso as in other underdeveloped countries, access to health care in general and dermatology care in particular remains difficult. This situation puts pharmacies on the front line for providing counselling. We undertook a cross-sectional descriptive study of the pharmacies of Ouagadougou from October 1, 2002, through April 1, 2003. Our objective was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatological and cosmetic counselling. The study included 75.5% of all pharmacies and 150 service providers. Prevalence of dermatology counseling was considered moderate, as was the availability and use of dermatology products. Service providers did not know most of the common dermatology disorders and offered inappropriate advice and products. This study shows the gap between the need for counselling from pharmacies and its satisfaction. It also underlines the necessity of reorganization in this domain.

  16. [Antibiotic prophylaxis in dermatologic and soft tissue surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, T; Napp, M; Maier, S

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, over half a million operations are done in dermatologic surgery in a hospital setting every year, as well as a less well quantified number of procedures in private offices. In spite of this large number, specific guidelines concerning the use of perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery are sparse. In contrast to procedures in general, visceral or gynecological surgery, general guidelines on perioperative antibiotics issued by the Paul-Ehrlich Institutes and the AWMF do not specifically consider dermatologic operations. Several surveys indicate that familiarity with current recommendations on perioperative antibiotics is suboptimal and resulted in a considerable overuse of perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery. Given the increasing antimicrobial resistance among important pathogens and the inherent risks of antibiotic administration, the decision for the use of prophylactic antibiotics should be based on the individual risk profile of the patient and of the surgical procedure. In the following, we will critically discuss the evidence for perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery.

  17. 76 FR 58023 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  18. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,...

  19. 77 FR 28888 - National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, ] Rockville,...

  20. Reimagining Human Research Protections for 21st Century Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietz, Matthew; Bae, Deborah; Bigby, Barbara; Devereaux, Mary; Fowler, James; Waldo, Ann; Weibel, Nadir; Patrick, Kevin; Klemmer, Scott; Melichar, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Background Evolving research practices and new forms of research enabled by technological advances require a redesigned research oversight system that respects and protects human research participants. Objective Our objective was to generate creative ideas for redesigning our current human research oversight system. Methods A total of 11 researchers and institutional review board (IRB) professionals participated in a January 2015 design thinking workshop to develop ideas for redesigning the IRB system. Results Ideas in 5 major domains were generated. The areas of focus were (1) improving the consent form and process, (2) empowering researchers to protect their participants, (3) creating a system to learn from mistakes, (4) improving IRB efficiency, and (5) facilitating review of research that leverages technological advances. Conclusions We describe the impetus for and results of a design thinking workshop to reimagine a human research protections system that is responsive to 21st century science. PMID:28007687

  1. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Juliane; Merfort, Irmgard; Schempp, Christoph M

    2010-01-01

    Botanical extracts and single compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics but also in over-the-counter drugs and food supplements. The focus of the present review is on controlled clinical trials with botanicals in the treatment of acne, inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, UV-induced skin damage, skin cancer, alopecia, vitiligo, and wounds. Studies with botanical cosmetics and drugs are discussed, as well as studies with botanical food supplements. Experimental research on botanicals was considered to a limited extent when it seemed promising for clinical use in the near future. In acne therapy, Mahonia, tea tree oil, and Saccharomyces may have the potential to become standard treatments. Mahonia, Hypericum, Glycyrrhiza and some traditional Chinese medicines appear promising for atopic dermatitis. Some plant-derived substances like dithranol and methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen) [in combination with UVA] are already accepted as standard treatments in psoriasis; Mahonia and Capsicum (capsaicin) are the next candidates suggested by present evidence. Oral administration and topical application of antioxidant plant extracts (green and black tea, carotenoids, coffee, and many flavonoids from fruits and vegetables) can protect skin from UV-induced erythema, early aging, and irradiation-induced cancer. Hair loss and vitiligo are also traditional fields of application for botanicals. According to the number and quality of clinical trials with botanicals, the best evidence exists for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, i.e. atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. However, many more controlled clinical studies are needed to determine the efficacy and risks of plant-derived products in dermatology. Safety aspects, especially related to sensitization and photodermatitis, have to be taken into account. Therefore, clinicians should not only be informed of the beneficial effects but also the specific adverse effects of botanicals used for dermatologic disorders and

  2. Technology and Technique Standards for Camera-Acquired Digital Dermatologic Images: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Elizabeth A; Tokay, Barbara A; Jewell, Sarah T; Marchetti, Michael A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-08-01

    Photographs are invaluable dermatologic diagnostic, management, research, teaching, and documentation tools. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standards exist for many types of digital medical images, but there are no DICOM standards for camera-acquired dermatologic images to date. To identify and describe existing or proposed technology and technique standards for camera-acquired dermatologic images in the scientific literature. Systematic searches of the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were performed in January 2013 using photography and digital imaging, standardization, and medical specialty and medical illustration search terms and augmented by a gray literature search of 14 websites using Google. Two reviewers independently screened titles of 7371 unique publications, followed by 3 sequential full-text reviews, leading to the selection of 49 publications with the most recent (1985-2013) or detailed description of technology or technique standards related to the acquisition or use of images of skin disease (or related conditions). No universally accepted existing technology or technique standards for camera-based digital images in dermatology were identified. Recommendations are summarized for technology imaging standards, including spatial resolution, color resolution, reproduction (magnification) ratios, postacquisition image processing, color calibration, compression, output, archiving and storage, and security during storage and transmission. Recommendations are also summarized for technique imaging standards, including environmental conditions (lighting, background, and camera position), patient pose and standard view sets, and patient consent, privacy, and confidentiality. Proposed standards for specific-use cases in total body photography, teledermatology, and dermoscopy are described. The literature is replete with descriptions of obtaining photographs of skin disease, but universal imaging standards have not been developed

  3. Most Common Dermatologic Topics Published in Five High-Impact General Medical Journals, 1970–2012: Melanoma, Psoriasis, Herpes Simplex, Herpes Zoster, and Acne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young M; Namavar, Aram A; Wu, Jashin J

    2014-01-01

    Context: General practitioners frequently encounter skin diseases and are accustomed to diagnosing the most common dermatologic conditions. Objective: We sought to determine the most common dermatologic topics published in five high-impact general medical journals (New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association, British Medical Journal (now The BMJ), and Annals of Internal Medicine). Design: We conducted an independent search of the Thomson Reuters’ Science Citation Index for common dermatologic topics, limited to the period 1970 to 2012. Main Outcome Measure: Total number of publications dealing with each dermatologic topic considered. Results: The five most common dermatologic topics published were melanoma, psoriasis, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, and acne. Melanoma and psoriasis were the top two dermatologic topics published in each journal except for Annals of Internal Medicine. Conclusions: Internists frequently diagnose herpes simplex, herpes zoster, and acne, which are also common dermatologic topics published. Although internists infrequently diagnose melanoma and psoriasis, they are major topics for general medical journals because of their increased community awareness, major advancements in therapeutic research, and their nondermatologic manifestations. PMID:25662523

  4. Most common dermatologic topics published in five high-impact general medical journals, 1970-2012: melanoma, psoriasis, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, and acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young M; Namavar, Aram A; Wu, Jashin J

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners frequently encounter skin diseases and are accustomed to diagnosing the most common dermatologic conditions. We sought to determine the most common dermatologic topics published in five high-impact general medical journals (New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association, British Medical Journal (now The BMJ), and Annals of Internal Medicine). We conducted an independent search of the Thomson Reuters’ Science Citation Index for common dermatologic topics, limited to the period 1970 to 2012. Total number of publications dealing with each dermatologic topic considered. The five most common dermatologic topics published were melanoma, psoriasis, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, and acne. Melanoma and psoriasis were the top two dermatologic topics published in each journal except for Annals of Internal Medicine. Internists frequently diagnose herpes simplex, herpes zoster, and acne, which are also common dermatologic topics published. Although internists infrequently diagnose melanoma and psoriasis, they are major topics for general medical journals because of their increased community awareness, major advancements in therapeutic research, and their nondermatologic manifestations.

  5. NAS Human Factors Safety Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts an integrated program of research on the relationship of factors concerning individuals, work groups, and organizations as employees perform...

  6. Human embryonic stem cell research: ethical and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J A

    2001-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells to replace damaged cells and tissues promises future hope for the treatment of many diseases. However, many countries now face complex ethical and legal questions as a result of the research needed to develop these cell-replacement therapies. The challenge that must be met is how to permit research on human embryonic tissue to occur while maintaining respect for human life generally.

  7. Resident Research Fundamentals Course Human Research Curves in the Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-27

    Division may pay for your basic journal publishing charges (to include costs for tables and black and white photos). We cannot pay for reprints. If you...SGS R&D: Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP): Defense Medical Research & Development Program (DMROP): NIH; Congressionally Directed...30 days before final clearance Is required to publish/present your materials. If you have any questions or concerns. please contact the S9 CRD

  8. Formulation Patents and Dermatology and Obviousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Liu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Most patents covering dermatologic products contain patent claims directed to the pharmaceutical formulation of the product. Such patents, known as formulation patents, are vulnerable to attacks based on the legal argument that the formulations covered are obvious over formulations already known prior to the filing of the patent application. Because obviousness is an important concept in patent law, recent court cases concerning obviousness and formulation patents were examined and discussed below. Courts have ruled that patent claims are obvious when features of the claimed formulation are found in the prior art, even if the features or characteristics of the formulation are not explicitly disclosed in the prior art. However, patentees have successfully overcome obviousness challenges where there were unexpected results or properties and/or the prior art taught away from the claimed invention.

  9. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents...... a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. STUDY POPULATION: The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen......'s disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. MAIN VARIABLES: Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables...

  10. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases.

  11. Dermatologic Manifestations of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayiner, Mehmet; Golabi, Pegah; Farhat, Freba; Younossi, Zobair M

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with various extrahepatic manifestations, including dermatologic involvement mostly caused by immune complexes. Mixed cryoglobulinemia has a strong relationship with HCV with 95% of these patients being infected with HCV. Lichen planus is a disease of the squamous epithelium and may affect any part of the skin, with 4% to 24% of patients with lichen planus reported to have chronic HCV infection. Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common form of porphyria, and it is thought that HCV interferes with iron stores, which can promote porphyria cutanea tarda. Finally, necrolytic acral erythema is a rare, psoriasis-like disease closely associated with HCV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. Animal Models and Bone Histomorphometry: Translational Research for the Human Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of animal models to research and inform bone morphology, in particular relating to human research in bone loss as a result of low gravity environments. Reasons for use of animal models as tools for human research programs include: time-efficient, cost-effective, invasive measures, and predictability as some model are predictive for drug effects.

  14. [Feminine acne: dermatologic disease or endocrine disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vexiau, P; Chivot, M

    2002-01-01

    Acne is a problem of the pilo-sebaceous follicle caused by the conjunction of three factors: seborrhea, follicle obstruction, and follicle inflammation. The key element, seborrhea, is under androgenic control. Acne in women is also influenced by developments and modifications in genital life, as well as by hormonal contraceptive and replacement therapies. Acne is rare prior to puberty, when it may indicate endocrine disease. At puberty, acne is quasi-physiological, because of the relative hyperandrogenism induced by the andrenarche preceding pubarche, as well as by the relative shortage of estrogens and progesterone during the first menstrual cycles. Other signs of hyperandrogenism, such as menstrual cycle difficulties and excess weight, which favor a hormonal origin, must be sought in cases of persistent or late-onset acne in adults. There is a mirror image of puberty during the peri-menopausal period, but with decreased seborrhea, so acne is rare. Finally, a tumoral origin must be sought in the rare cases of acne occurring after menopause. Hormonal investigation of acne should not be systematic, but is justified during prepuberty when other symptoms are associated with acne that resists well-conducted dermatological treatment. The therapeutic approach should be primarily dermatological, but hormone-oriented treatment should be considered when such therapy fails, or in the presence of other signs of hyperandrogenism. Sometimes the association of isotretinoin and an anti-androgen treatment are necessary to effectively treat such acne. Finally, particular attention must be paid to contraceptive therapies and hormone treatments, which can induce or aggravate acne, especially during the peri-menopausal period.

  15. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Stender, Ida Marie; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Vestergaard, Tine; Thormann, Henrik; Hædersdal, Merete; Dam, Tomas Norman; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. Study population The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen’s disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Main variables Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and complications are registered at two follow-up visits at 3 months (between 0 and 6 months) and 12 months (between 6 and 15 months) after treatment. Descriptive data In 2014, 11,522 patients with 17,575 tumors were registered in the database. Of tumors with a histological diagnosis, 13,571 were BCCs, 840 squamous cell carcinomas, 504 Bowen’s disease, and 173 keratoakanthomas. Conclusion The NMSC database encompasses detailed information on the type of tumor, a variety of prognostic factors, treatment modalities, and outcomes after treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance. PMID:27822110

  16. Field and laboratory methods in human milk research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth M; Aiello, Marco O; Fujita, Masako; Hinde, Katie; Milligan, Lauren; Quinn, E A

    2013-01-01

    Human milk is a complex and variable fluid of increasing interest to human biologists who study nutrition and health. The collection and analysis of human milk poses many practical and ethical challenges to field workers, who must balance both appropriate methodology with the needs of participating mothers and infants and logistical challenges to collection and analysis. In this review, we address various collection methods, volume measurements, and ethical considerations and make recommendations for field researchers. We also review frequently used methods for the analysis of fat, protein, sugars/lactose, and specific biomarkers in human milk. Finally, we address new technologies in human milk research, the MIRIS Human Milk Analyzer and dried milk spots, which will improve the ability of human biologists and anthropologists to study human milk in field settings.

  17. Lesões dermatológicas em pacientes infectados pelo vírus linfotrópico humano de células T do tipo 1 (HTLV-1 Dermatologic lesions in patients infected with the human T-cell lymphotropic vírus type 1 (HTLV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandack Nobre

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available O vírus linfotrópico humano de células T do tipo 1 (HTLV-1 é o primeiro retrovírus isolado do ser humano. Descreveu-se, em pouco tempo, o seu papel etiológico em algumas doenças, com destaque para a leucemia/linfoma de células T do adulto (ATLL, a mielopatia associada ao HTLV-1/paraparesia espástica tropical (HAM/TSP e a uveíte associada ao HTLV-1 (HAU. Na década de 90, o HTLV-1 foi associado a eczema grave da infância, conhecido como dermatite infecciosa (DI. Desde então, diversos outros tipos de lesões cutâneas têm sido observados em pacientes infectados pelo HTLV-1, em especial, nos doentes de HAM/TSP ou de ATLL. Porém, mesmo portadores assintomáticos do vírus apresentam doenças dermatológicas. Excetuando-se a dermatite infecciosa, não há lesão da pele específica da infecção pelo HTLV-1. Aqui, os autores apresentam as principais lesões dermatológicas descritas em pacientes infectados pelo HTLV-1, destacando o valor epidemiológico e clínico desses achados.Human T-cell Lymphotropic vírus type I (HTLV-1 was the first human retrovírus described. Some time after its discovery a group of diseases were related to this vírus, such as, adult T-cell leukemia lymphoma (ATLL, HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP and HTLV-1 associated uveitis (HAU. In the nineties, HTLV-1 was associated to a severe eczema of children, called infective dermatitis (ID. Since then, several other skin manifestations have been observed in HTLV-1-infected individuals, particularly in patients with ATLL or HAM/TSP. However, according to some reports, dermatologic lesions are also common in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. Besides ID, all other skin lesions reported are nonspecific. The aim of this review is to outline the dermatologic manifestations reported in HTLV-1 infected patients, emphasizing the clinical and epidemiological value of these findings.

  18. Research Workshop on Expert Judgment, Human Error, and Intelligent Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Barry G.

    1993-01-01

    This workshop brought together 20 computer scientists, psychologists, and human-computer interaction (HCI) researchers to exchange results and views on human error and judgment bias. Human error is typically studied when operators undertake actions, but judgment bias is an issue in thinking rather than acting. Both topics are generally ignored by the HCI community, which is interested in designs that eliminate human error and bias tendencies. As a result, almost no one at the workshop had met...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4810 - Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... plastic surgery and in dermatology. 878.4810 Section 878.4810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4810 Laser surgical instrument for use in general and plastic surgery and...

  20. Research on automatic human chromosome image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Delie; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Human chromosome karyotyping is one of the essential tasks in cytogenetics, especially in genetic syndrome diagnoses. In this thesis, an automatic procedure is introduced for human chromosome image analysis. According to different status of touching and overlapping chromosomes, several segmentation methods are proposed to achieve the best results. Medial axis is extracted by the middle point algorithm. Chromosome band is enhanced by the algorithm based on multiscale B-spline wavelets, extracted by average gray profile, gradient profile and shape profile, and calculated by the WDD (Weighted Density Distribution) descriptors. The multilayer classifier is used in classification. Experiment results demonstrate that the algorithms perform well.

  1. Stem Cells: A Renaissance in Human Biology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-16

    The understanding of human biology and how it relates to that of other species represents an ancient quest. Limited access to human material, particularly during early development, has restricted researchers to only scratching the surface of this inherently challenging subject. Recent technological innovations, such as single cell "omics" and human stem cell derivation, have now greatly accelerated our ability to gain insights into uniquely human biology. The opportunities afforded to delve molecularly into scarce material and to model human embryogenesis and pathophysiological processes are leading to new insights of human development and are changing our understanding of disease and choice of therapy options.

  2. Which Dermatological Conditions Present to an Emergency Department in Australia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Lai-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives. There is minimal data available on the types of dermatological conditions which present to tertiary emergency departments (ED. We analysed demographic and clinical features of dermatological presentations to an Australian adult ED. Methods. The St. Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne (SVHM ED database was searched for dermatological presentations between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011 by keywords and ICD-10 diagnosis codes. The lists were merged, and the ICD-10 codes were grouped into 55 categories for analysis. Demographic and clinical data for these presentations were then analysed. Results. 123 345 people presented to SVHM ED during the 3-year period. 4817 (3.9% presented for a primarily dermatological complaint. The most common conditions by ICD-10 diagnosis code were cellulitis (n=1741, 36.1%, allergy with skin involvement (n=939, 19.5%, boils/furuncles/pilonidal sinuses (n=526, 11.1%, eczema/dermatitis (n=274, 5.7%, and varicella zoster infection (n=161, 3.3%. Conclusion. The burden of dermatological disease presenting to ED is small but not insignificant. This information may assist in designing dermatological curricula for hospital clinicians and specialty training organisations as well as informing the allocation of dermatological resources to ED.

  3. Use of topical antibiotics as prophylaxis in clean dermatologic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levender, Michelle M; Davis, Scott A; Kwatra, Shawn G; Williford, Phillip M; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-03-01

    Topical antibiotics are not indicated for routine postoperative care in clean dermatologic procedures, but may be widely used. We sought to describe topical antibiotic use in clean dermatologic surgical procedures in the United States. The 1993 to 2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database was queried for visits in which clean dermatologic surgery was performed. We analyzed provider specialty, use of topical antibiotics, and associated diagnoses. Use of topical antibiotic over time was analyzed by linear regression. An estimated 212 million clean dermatologic procedures were performed between 1993 and 2007; topical antibiotics were reported in approximately 10.6 million (5.0%) procedures. Dermatologists were responsible for 63.3% of dermatologic surgery procedures and reported use of topical antibiotic prophylaxis in 8.0 million (6.0%). Dermatologists were more likely to use topical antibiotic prophylaxis than nondermatologists (6.0% vs 3.5%). Use of topical antibiotic prophylaxis decreased over time. Data were limited to outpatient procedures. The assumption was made that when topical antibiotics were documented at procedure visits they were being used as prophylaxis. Topical antibiotics continue to be used as prophylaxis in clean dermatologic procedures, despite being ineffective for this purpose and posing a risk to patients. Although topical antibiotic use is decreasing, prophylactic use should be eliminated. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Practice models and roles of physician extenders in dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Emily P; Hanke, C William; Kimball, Alexa Boer

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of physician extenders (PEs) has increased significantly in dermatologic surgery over the last decade. An analysis was performed of the staff in dermatologic surgery practices, roles of PEs, and level of supervision. Mohs fellowship-trained (MMSFT) dermatologic surgeons were more likely to employ registered nurses (n=85, 73.9%) than non-fellowship-trained (NMMSFT) surgeons (n=65, 50.0%, pdermatology patients, but NMMSFT surgeons were twice as likely as MMSFT surgeons to have their PEs involved in performing or assisting with cosmetic procedures. MMSFT surgeons (38.5%) were twice as likely to have direct supervision of their PEs as NMMSFT surgeons (16.1%, p=.01). PEs are highly prevalent in dermatologic surgery practices and are playing direct roles in the delivery of dermatologic care. Promoting patient safety through appropriate extender supervision and reporting of patient outcomes are highly needed as this sector of the dermatologic surgery workforce continues to expand. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  5. Introduction of Basic Dermatologic Ultrasound in Undergraduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfageme, F; Cerezo, E; Fernandez, I S; Aguilo, R; Vilas-Sueiro, A; Roustan, G

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Teaching ultrasound procedures to undergraduates has recently been proposed to improve the quality of medical education. We address the impact of applying standardized dermatologic ultrasound teaching to our undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Medical students were offered an additional theoretical and practical seminar involving hands-on ultrasound dermatologic ultrasound during their mandatory dermatology practical training. The students' theoretical knowledge and dermatologic ultrasoud skills were tested with a multiple choice questionnaire extracted from Level 1 Spanish Society of Ultrasound Dermatologic Ultrasound accreditation exam before and after the course. After the course, the students were asked to answer a course evaluation questionnaire Results: The multiple-choice question scores after the course showed statistically significant improvement (5.82 vs. 8.71%; Pdermatologic and ultrasound knowledge, and indicated that they wanted more sonographic hands-on training in both dermatologic ultrasound and other medical fields. Conclusion: Using both objective and subjective methods, we showed that the introduction of standardized ultrasound training programs in undergraduate medical education can improve both students' understanding of the technique and the quality of medical education in dermatology.

  6. A systematic review of reporting in randomized controlled trials in Dermatologic Surgery: Jadad scores, power analysis, and sample size determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Rauf, Mutahir; Ali, Sana; Nodzenski, Michael; Minkis, Kira

    2014-12-01

    Dermatologic surgery is a fruitful research area that has spawned numerous randomized control trials (RCTs). To assess the quality of reporting of randomization, blinding, sample size, and power analysis in RCTs published in the journal Dermatologic Surgery. Randomized control trials published in Dermatologic Surgery between 1995 and 2012 were assessed regarding the quality of trial reporting. Data extraction performed independently by 2 data extractors. Dramatic increases in the numbers of RCTs in dermatologic surgery were noted in successive 5-year periods, from 39 in 1995 to 1999 to 66 in 2000 to 2004 and 131 in 2005 to 2009. The median Jadad score for articles from 1995 to 1999 was 1 and was 2 for articles since 2000. Subjects per study were 20 during 1995 to 1999, 25.5 from 2000 to 2004, and over 30 since 2005. Power analysis with sample size determination was reported in 0 articles during 1995 to 1999; greater than 13% of articles since 2005. Alpha level was specified for 37% of RCTs from 1995 to 1999 and 64% to 70% since 2005. During the last 20 years, the number of RCTs in Dermatologic Surgery has grown rapidly, almost doubling every 5 years, because the number of subjects per study has also increased and the quality of reporting has significantly improved.

  7. Human dignity and consent in research biobanking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-02

    Dec 2, 2012 ... Research biobanking raises numerous ethical questions.1 This ... ethical and legal reflections on the notion of informed consent in ... Faculty of Theology and Philosophy, Australian Catholic University, Brisbane, Australia.

  8. The ethics of cloning and human embryo research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Madeleine

    2002-01-01

    The successful cloning experiments that led to Dolly in 1997 have raised many ethical and policy questions. This paper will focus on cloning research in human embryonic cells. The possible gains of the research will be judged against the moral issues of doing research on a person. This paper concludes that while the embryo has some moral status, its moral status is outweighed by the multitude of benefits that embryonic stem cell research will bring to humanity. Policy suggestions are given for dealing with this new and developing field of stem cell research.

  9. [Research on humans suffering from dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmchen, H

    2015-09-01

    The urgent necessity for dementia research is justified by the prevalence and increase in dementia associated with the demographic changes, for which no causal treatment is available; however, during the progressive course dementia destroys the capacity for self-determination of persons affected and thereby an essential prerequisite for participation in research, i.e. a valid consent to a research intervention. Accordingly, not only sufficient information about all issues which are relevant for decision making by potential participants but also a flawless assessment of the capacity to consent are important; however, currently this is not satisfactorily possible. This article attempts to answer questions associated with these problems, such as how consent can be established, including that of a surrogate for consent of potential research participants by whom consent is no longer possible. In a second section the benefit-risk evaluation, which is also underdeveloped, will be dealt with using two concrete research examples, a diagnostic and a therapeutic research intervention for patients with dementia.

  10. What’s Wrong with Human/Nonhuman Chimera Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Insoo

    2016-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is poised to lift its funding moratorium on research involving chimeric human/nonhuman embryos, pending further consideration by an NIH steering committee. The kinds of ethical concerns that seem to underlie this research and chimera research more generally can be adequately addressed. PMID:27574863

  11. Ethical Issues in the Use of Humans for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashaw, W. L.

    The APA Ethical Principles, the University of Georgia policy, standard research texts, and research literature on specific methodologies, all in relation to ethical issues in human research, are discussed. The 10 APA principles state, in essence, that the investigator is responsible for what happens, that confidentiality and the protection of the…

  12. Human genome program report. Part 2, 1996 research abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  13. Human Genome Program Report. Part 2, 1996 Research Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains Part 2 of a two-part report to reflect research and progress in the US Department of Energy Human Genome Program from 1994 through 1996, with specified updates made just before publication. Part 2 consists of 1996 research abstracts. Attention is focused on the following: sequencing; mapping; informatics; ethical, legal, and social issues; infrastructure; and small business innovation research.

  14. Research Dissemination in Creative Arts, Humanities and the Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazeley, Pat

    2006-01-01

    An ethnographic case study of issues related to research performance and promotion of research was conducted within the Creative and Performing Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (AHSS) disciplines of a regional university. The purpose of the study was to explore a variety of ways in which the research work of those disciplines could be made…

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and PPAR agonists: the 'future' in dermatology therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S; Rawat, Ritu

    2015-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors and comprise three different isoforms namely PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARβ/δ with PPARβ/δ being the predominant subtype in human keratinocytes. After binding with specific ligands, PPARs regulate gene expression, cell growth and differentiation, apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and tumorogenesis. PPARs also modulate a wide variety of skin functions including keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal barrier formation, wound healing, melanocyte proliferation, and sebum production. Recent studies have shown the importance of PPARs in the pathogenesis of many dermatological disorders. Clinical trials have suggested possible role of PPAR agonists in the management of various dermatoses ranging from acne vulgaris, psoriasis, hirsutism, and lipodystrophy to cutaneous malignancies including melanoma. This article is intended to be a primer for dermatologists in their understanding of clinical relevance of PPARs and PPAR agonists in dermatology therapeutics.

  16. Misnomers in dermatology: Time to change and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath Hulmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the misnomers encountered in dermatology have arisen from lack of understanding of the underlying etiopathogenesis, histopathology and/or concepts. Some misnomers are due to imprecise translations from word of origin, etymological bungles and/or factual errors. It is very important for the residents and practitioners of dermatology to update and change the old misnomers with relevant names to avoid confusion and misunderstanding. In this article, we have listed all the misnomers in dermatology and suggested the appropriate names as indicated.

  17. Autoinflammatory diseases in dermatology: CAPS, TRAPS, HIDS, FMF, Blau, CANDLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shivani V; Leslie, Kieron S

    2013-07-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases, including CAPS, TRAPS, HIDS, FMF, Blau, and CANDLE, have unique dermatologic presentations that can be a clue to diagnosis. Although these conditions are rare, the morbidity and mortality can be severe, and well-informed physicians can place these conditions in their differential diagnosis when familiar with the dermatologic manifestations. This review article presents a brief overview of each condition, clues to diagnosis that focus of dermatologic manifestations and clinical images, basic laboratory tests and follow-up, a brief review of treatments, and concludes with an overview for these autoinflammatory conditions and their differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Platelet-rich plasma in dermatology: Boon or a bane?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshdeep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent spurt in application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. However, the details regarding use of PRP in various dermatological indications ranging from hair restoration to chronic ulcers are dispersed in literature, herein we have tried to focus all under one heading. Overall, PRP seems to be a promising therapeutic modality but the level of evidence as of now, from the available published data is low. This review will also stimulate readers to carry out well designed, larger population based trials, so as to validate its use in dermatology practice.

  19. Dermatologic surgery emergencies: Complications caused by occlusion and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkis, Kira; Whittington, Adam; Alam, Murad

    2016-08-01

    While the overall incidence of emergencies in dermatologic surgery is low, emergent situations can occasionally pose a risk to patients undergoing such procedures. The clinical importance of several types of emergences related to vascular occlusion, hypertension, and hypotension are reviewed, and relevant epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, work-up, management, and prevention are discussed. Early detection of these emergencies can mitigate or forestall associated adverse outcomes, thereby allowing the outstanding record of safety of dermatologic surgery to continue. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient expectations and performance measures in dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erica H

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has increasingly played an important role in quality-of-care reforms and health care delivery. In dermatologic surgery, patient expectations of procedures and the outcomes are important determinants of satisfaction. Identification of the patient's met and unmet expectations through patient-reported outcome measures may enable a better understanding of the patient's perspective and improve communication and the delivery of care. Performance measures report on the quality of care being delivered. Performance measures currently being implemented into dermatologic practices may have a role in demonstrating the "quality" of dermatologic surgery procedures in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Therapies and nursing care of women with vulvar dermatologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Deborah; Kwon, Yanghee

    2014-01-01

    Vulvar dermatologic disorders are common among women, and prevalence increases with age. Treatment can provide women with symptomatic relief and can halt further progression of disease. Numerous therapies are available, and nurses who work with women across the life span should have an understanding of vulvar dermatologic disorders and therapeutic modalities. We provide an overview of general vulvar care, four vulvar dermatologic disorders, and common treatment modalities including topical and systemic pharmacologic management. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  2. Quality of life among dermatology patients: a systematic review of investigations using qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanminder; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Kornmehl, Heather; Armstrong, April W

    2017-07-13

    Quality of life may be assessed using quantitative or qualitative methods. Quantitative methods are commonly used in research settings; however, they may fail to capture the full range of patient experiences and impact on quality of life. Qualitative methods may be used to address this limitation. In this systematic review, we aim to synthesize data from articles utilizing qualitative methods to assess quality of life in dermatology patients. We performed a systematic review search using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS databases. The search was conducted using the following search criteria: ("Dermatology" [MeSH]) AND ("Quality of Life" [MeSH]), AND ("Qualitative Research" [MeSH]), searching literature spanning from January 1, 1946- October 5, 2016. The systematic review of 15 articles included 533 dermatology patients. Patients expressed frustration over the unpredictability of disease symptoms and having to compensate for the subsequent limitations by altering their daily routines. Patients also reported profound helplessness due to chronic skin disease and social isolation in an effort to hide their disease. Patients noted the patient-provider relationship as a source of support and information exchange, with the goal to form easy to use treatment plans that met both physician and patient expectations. Qualitative assessment of patient quality of life can provide new insights into the patient experience and the impact of their skin disease. Qualitative methodology may capture meaningful information that may be overlooked by quantitative methods, and it should be included in quality of life research.

  3. Biological therapy for dermatological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippi, Maddalena; Pica, Roberta; De Nitto, Daniela; Paoluzi, Paolo

    2013-05-16

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The advent of biological drugs has significantly changed the management of these conditions. Skin manifestations are not uncommon in IBD. Among the reactive lesions (immune-mediated extraintestinal manifestations), erythema nodosum (EN) and pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) are the two major cutaneous ills associated with IBD, while psoriasis is the dermatological comorbidity disease observed more often. In particular, in the last few years, anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents have been successfully used to treat psoriasis, especially these kinds of lesions that may occur during the treatment with biological therapies. The entity of the paradoxical manifestations has been relatively under reported as most lesions are limited and a causal relationship with the treatment is often poorly understood. The reason for this apparent side-effect of the therapy still remains unclear. Although side effects may occur, their clinical benefits are undoubted. This article reviews the therapeutic effects of the two most widely used anti-TNF-α molecules, infliximab (a fusion protein dimer of the human TNF-α receptor) and adalimumab (a fully human monoclonal antibody to TNF-α), for the treatment of the major cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD (EN, PG and psoriasis).

  4. MARINE ACCIDENTS RESEARCHED THROUGH HUMAN FACTOR PRISMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav M Ćorović

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We are aware of a large number of marine accidents that result in numerous casualties and even deaths and substantial negative environmental effects. The objective of this paper is to indicate factors that contribute to human errors which is identified as the most frequent cause to marine accidents. Despite rapid technological development and safety legislation, this paper identifies the human factor as the waekest link in maritime safety system. This analysis could lead to decrease of vessel accidents. In addition, starting from the European Maritime Safety Agency data and by linear regression model application, we have obtained the trend of number of ships involved in marine accidents as well as the trend of lives lost in marine accidents  in and around European Union waters.

  5. Adult human brain cell culture for neuroscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Hannah M; Dragunow, Mike

    2010-06-01

    Studies of the brain have progressed enormously through the use of in vivo and in vitro non-human models. However, it is unlikely such studies alone will unravel the complexities of the human brain and so far no neuroprotective treatment developed in animals has worked in humans. In this review we discuss the use of adult human brain cell culture methods in brain research to unravel the biology of the normal and diseased human brain. The advantages of using adult human brain cells as tools to study human brain function from both historical and future perspectives are discussed. In particular, studies using dissociated cultures of adult human microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons are described and the applications of these types of study are evaluated. Alternative sources of human brain cells such as adult neural stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and slice cultures of adult human brain tissue are also reviewed. These adult human brain cell culture methods could benefit basic research and more importantly, facilitate the translation of basic neuroscience research to the clinic for the treatment of brain disorders. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Research (AIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-15

    Polonis V, Corts K, Hoc"en-Lewis C, Eddy G. Production of functionally defective HIV-l reverse transcriptase can be initiated by a human peripheral blood... Interamericana , Mexico-Buenos Aires - Madrid. 1989. Ruiz Manuscript 1989 Ruiz NM, Ramirez-Rhonda CH. Tratamiento quirurjico de endocarditis. Chapter in...M.D.; Editorial Interamericana , Mexico-Buenos Aires - Madrid, 1989. Ruiz Manuscript 1989 Rivera G, Ruiz NM. Principios generales en el tratemiento

  7. Research on Normal Human Plantar Pressure Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xi Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FSR400 pressure sensor, nRF905 wireless transceiver and MSP40 SCM are used to design the insole pressure collection system, LabVIEW is used to make HMI of data acquisition, collecting a certain amount of normal human foot pressure data, statistical analysis of pressure distribution relations about five stages of swing phase during walking, using the grid closeness degree to identify plantar pressure distribution pattern recognition, and the algorithm simulation, experimental results demonstrated this method feasible.

  8. The path to modernity: a personal testimony to the restructuring of the Department of Dermatology, Vargas Hospital, Caracas, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdel-Vegas, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1950s and early1960s, there was a concerted effort to modernize teaching, training, and patient care in the Vargas Hospital of Caracas, Venezuela. The above included the development of research in the frame of postgraduate training. This effort was to be helped by USA funds and institutions but could only be achieved by the work of Venezuelans, sharing a vision of progress. Dermatology spearheaded this initiative, and the fruit of this was the exponential development of Venezuelan Dermatology and the creation of the National Institute of Dermatology on the grounds of the Vargas Hospital. The purpose of this contribution is to review these events that happened more than half a century ago from my own perspective. I sincerely hope that these lines could serve as an inspiration to the younger generations that toil today under less-than-favorable conditions. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 75 FR 10488 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NHGRI MAP Review... Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; LRP 2010 Teleconference. Date: April 7,...

  10. 77 FR 61770 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Medicine RFAs..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: October 4, 2012. David...

  11. 78 FR 20933 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel Loan Repayment Program... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Room 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville,...

  12. 76 FR 35223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Sequencing Centers...D, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research...

  13. 77 FR 60706 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed.... Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Special Emphasis... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of...

  14. 75 FR 52538 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Date: November 19-20..., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute,...

  15. 75 FR 8374 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Revolutionary..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076,...

  16. 78 FR 68856 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes...

  17. 78 FR 14806 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel: Clinically Relevant... grant applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 4th Floor Conference Room,...

  18. Ethics, standards, and procedures of animal and human chronobiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touitou, Yvan; Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    The majority of research papers published in Chronobiology International report the findings of investigations conducted on laboratory animals and human beings. The editors and the readers of the journal expect the authors of submitted manuscripts to have made an important contribution to biological rhythm and related research through the ethical conduct of investigations and unbiased and accurate reporting of findings. Authors of scientific papers are required to disclose any potential conflict of interest. The journal accepts only papers that are original work, no part of which has been submitted for publication elsewhere, except as brief abstracts. The journal and its editors endorse the compliance of investigators to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki of the World Medical Association, which relate to the conduct of ethical research on human beings, and the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research of the National Research Council, which relate to the conduct of ethical research on laboratory and other animals. The peer review of manuscripts by Chronobiology International thus includes judgment as to whether or not the investigative methods conform to the standards of good research practice. This article updates the ethical policies, standards, and procedures for manuscripts submitted to Chronobiology International that involve human and animal biological rhythm research, both from the perspective of the criteria of quality chronobiology investigation and from the perspective of humane and ethical research on human beings and animals.

  19. Promoting translational research in human and veterinary medical virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-07-26

    Translational research serves as a bench-to-field "translation" of basic scientific research into practical diagnostic procedures and therapies useful in human and veterinary clinical services. The productivity of translational research involving infectious diseases relevant to both human and animal health (e.g., influenza diagnosis and epidemiology using emerging molecular detection and identification methods) can be maximized when both human and veterinary medical virology disciplines are integrated. Influenza viruses are continually evolving through site-specific mutation and segment reassortment, and these processes occur in all potential carrier species - including birds, humans, and many agriculturally important animals. This evolutionary plasticity occasionally allows "novel" influenzas to move from animal hosts to humans, potentially causing destructive pandemics; therefore, a rapid laboratory technique that can detect and identify "novel" influenza viruses is clinically and epidemiologically desirable. A technique-focused translational research approach is pursued to enhance detection and characterization of emerging influenza viruses circulating in both humans and other animal hosts. The PLEX-ID System, which incorporates multi-locus PCR and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry, uses deliberately nonspecific primers that amplify all known variants (all H/N subtypes) of influenza virus, including human, other mammalian, and avian influenzas, and is therefore likely to generate analyzable amplicons from any novel influenza that might emerge in any host. Novel technology development and implementation such as the PLEX-ID System forms a key component of human and veterinary medical virology translational research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Justice in human research ethics. A conceptual and practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Ian; Thomson, Colin J H

    2013-03-01

    One of the core values to be applied by a body reviewing the ethics of human research is justice. The inclusion of justice as a requirement in the ethical review of human research is relatively recent and its utility had been largely unexamined until debates arose about the conduct of international biomedical research in the late 1990s. The subsequent amendment of authoritative documents in ways that appeared to shift the meaning of conceptions of justice generated a great deal of controversy. Another difficulty has been that both the theory and the substance of justice that are applied by researchers or reviewers can be frequently seen to be subjective. Both the concept of justice--hether distributive or commutative--and what counts as a just distribution or exchange--are given different weight and meanings by different people. In this paper, the origins and more recent debates about the requirement to consider justice as a criterion in the ethical review of human research are traced, relevant conceptions of justice are distinguished, and the manner in which they can be applied meaningfully in the ethical review of all human research is identified. We also explain the way that these concepts are articulated in, and the intent and function of, specific paragraphs of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007). The National Statement identifies a number of issues that should be considered when a human research ethics committee is reviewing the justice aspects of an application. We provide guidance to researchers as to how they can show that there is a fair distribution of burdens and benefits in the participant experience and the research outcomes. We also provide practical guidance to researches on how to think through issues of justice so that they can demonstrate that the design of their research projects meets this ethical requirement.

  1. Human embryonic stem cell research debates: a confucian argument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, D F-C

    2005-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research can bring about major biomedical breakthroughs and thus contribute enormously to human welfare, yet it raises serious moral problems because it involves using human embryos for experiment. The "moral status of the human embryo" remains the core of such debates. Three different positions regarding the moral status of the human embryo can be categorised: the "all" position, the "none" position, and the "gradualist" position. The author proposes that the "gradualist" position is more plausible than the other two positions. Confucius's moral principle of jen, which proposes a unique theory of "love of gradation", and the principle of yi, which advocates "due treatment for persons", are then explored. The author then argues that our moral obligations to do good to other living organisms, persons, and our families are different. Putting together the "gradualist" position on the human embryo, and Confucius's theories of "love of gradation" and "due treatment for persons", the author concludes that the early embryo has less ethical significance than the later fetus and adult human. The moral obligation we have toward persons is clearer and stronger than that which we have toward human embryos. Embryo research is justifiable if it brings enormous welfare to human persons that cannot be otherwise achieved. The "love of gradation" requires us, however, to extend love and respect towards other entities according to their different status. We should therefore be very cautious in using human embryos for research, acknowledging the gradualist nature of their moral status.

  2. Reflections on relationships between national and world events and development of dermatology. Venezuela as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio

    2013-11-01

    From a personal vantage, the author tries to understand evolution of medicine and dermatology as relating to political, ideological,and economic factors.He analyzes the evolution of Venezuelan Dermatology research and practice from 1936 to present, relating it to the events that have taken place in that country during this period and integrating the latter to events in the world. There is a close relationship between Venezuelan and US history particularly since the late nineteen-thirties.Physicians in general and dermatologists in particular should not dismiss or just bear the events that take place in the society as a whole. They should try to influence them by acting in harmony with forces that propitiate freedom, rule of law, free inquiry, and meritocracy.

  3. Dermatological problems following spinal cord injury in Korean patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zee-A; Choi, Ja Young; Ko, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify dermatological conditions following spinal cord injury (SCI) and analyze these conditions in relation to various characteristics of SCI. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital of Korea, Rehabilitation Center, Spinal Cord Unit. Participants Patients treated for SCI who were referred to dermatology for dermatological problems, 2000–2012. Results Of the 1408 SCI patients treated at the spinal cord unit, 253 patients with SCI were identified to have been referred to dermatology for skin problems and a total of 335 dermatological conditions were diagnosed. The most common dermatological finding was infectious (n = 123, 36.7%) followed by eczematous lesions (n = 109, 32.5%). Among the infectious lesions, fungal infection (n = 76, 61.8%) was the most common, followed by bacterial (n = 27, 21.9%) lesions. Seborrheic dermatitis (n = 59, 64.1%) was the most frequent eczematous lesion. Ingrown toenail occurred more frequently in tetraplegics whereas vascular skin lesions occurred more commonly in patients with paraplegia (P < 0.05). Xerotic dermatitis showed a higher occurrence within 12 months of injury rather than thereafter (P < 0.05). Of these, 72.4% of the infectious and 94.7% of the fungal skin lesions manifested below the neurological level of injury (NLI; P < 0.001) and 61.5% of the eczematous lesions and 94.9% of seborrheic dermatitis cases occurred above the NLI (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in dermatological diagnoses between patients with neurologically complete and incomplete SCI. Conclusion The most common dermatological condition in patients with SCI among those referred to dermatology was fungal infection, followed by seborrheic dermatitis. Although dermatological problems after SCI are not critical in SCI outcome, they negatively affect the quality of life. Patients and caregivers should be educated about appropriate skin care and routine

  4. An Important Aspect of Pediatric Dermatology: the Parental View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Saniç

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study aims primarily to evaluate parents of children aged 0-17 years living in Aydın for their knowledge, beliefs and behavior regarding paediatric skin disease, their attitudes about seeking treatment and their therapy preferences.Metarials and Methods: The questionnaire used in this study consisted of a total of 33 questions including information regarding demographics, opinions about dermatology and dermatological diseases, dermatological diseases of children and their treatment. 312 parents of children aged 0-17 and registered at the 2nd Health Office of the municipality of Aydın were interviewed during a house visit. Results: 92.9% of the questionnaires were answered by mothers. Dermatoses most commonly named were fungal disease (41.6%, eczema (32.4% and psoriasis (20.6%. The relationship between patient’s education level and number of known dermatological diseases was found to be statistically significant. Preference to be seen by a dermatologist increased as the level of parental education increased. Stress and psychological disorders were thought to be causes of skin diseases by 75.7% of parents and 55.8% of parents stated that low personal hygiene could yield dermatological diseases. Conclusion: This study has shown that knowledge about dermatology and dermatological diseases among parents is scarce and erroneous beliefs/therapeutic approaches to dermatological disease are common. The results of this study indicate the necessity of eradicating these beliefs and of advising parents to consult a dermatologist in case of skin problems of themselves or their children. In addition, our findings may provide a database for education of parents about skin diseases.

  5. Evaluation of the educational climate for specialty trainees in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, J M R; Passi, V

    2016-06-01

    Dermatology specialty trainees (STs) in the United Kingdom (UK) are few in number and will join a thinly spread national consultant body. It is of paramount importance to deliver training programmes of the highest quality for these doctors, central to which is the establishment and maintenance of an educational climate conducive to learning. To conduct a pilot study to evaluate the educational climate for dermatology STs in one UK deanery (West Midlands). Secondary analysis of published data was performed, from the UK's General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey, and the Job Evaluation Survey Tool (JEST) administered by the West Midlands deanery. A modified online version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) was circulated among dermatology STs. The GMC's survey data show that UK dermatology STs rated their training highly in comparison with undifferentiated UK postgraduate trainees. West Midlands dermatology STs (n = 22) scored very similarly to UK dermatology STs. The JEST gave broadly encouraging results, with 21/22 (95%) happy to recommend their posts to colleagues. The modified PHEEM yielded a global mean score of 96.5/152, attracting the descriptor 'more positive than negative but room for improvement'. Despite inherent methodological limitations, the GMC, JEST and modified PHEEM surveys have revealed useful comparative triangulated data which allows the conclusion that West Midlands dermatology STs seem to be training in a favourable educational climate. This represents an important facet of the quality assurance process for medical education, and allows insight into areas which may require improvement. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  7. DermO; an ontology for the description of dermatologic disease

    KAUST Repository

    Fisher, Hannah M.

    2016-06-13

    Background There have been repeated initiatives to produce standard nosologies and terminologies for cutaneous disease, some dedicated to the domain and some part of bigger terminologies such as ICD-10. Recently, formally structured terminologies, ontologies, have been widely developed in many areas of biomedical research. Primarily, these address the aim of providing comprehensive working terminologies for domains of knowledge, but because of the knowledge contained in the relationships between terms they can also be used computationally for many purposes. Results We have developed an ontology of cutaneous disease, constructed manually by domain experts. With more than 3000 terms, DermO represents the most comprehensive formal dermatological disease terminology available. The disease entities are categorized in 20 upper level terms, which use a variety of features such as anatomical location, heritability, affected cell or tissue type, or etiology, as the features for classification, in line with professional practice and nosology in dermatology. Available in OBO flatfile and OWL 2 formats, it is integrated semantically with other ontologies and terminologies describing diseases and phenotypes. We demonstrate the application of DermO to text mining the biomedical literature and in the creation of a network describing the phenotypic relationships between cutaneous diseases. Conclusions DermO is an ontology with broad coverage of the domain of dermatologic disease and we demonstrate here its utility for text mining and investigation of phenotypic relationships between dermatologic disorders. We envision that in the future it may be applied to the creation and mining of electronic health records, clinical training and basic research, as it supports automated inference and reasoning, and for the broader integration of skin disease information with that from other domains.

  8. Human memory research: Current hypotheses and new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Jaeger

    Full Text Available Abstract Research on human memory has increased significantly in the last few decades. Inconsistencies and controversies inherent to such research, however, are rarely articulated on published reports. The goal of the present article is to present and discuss a series of open questions related to major topics on human memory research that can be addressed by future research. The topics covered here are visual working memory, recognition memory, emotion and memory interaction, and methodological issues of false memories studies. Overall, the present work reveals a series of open questions and alternative analysis which could be useful for the process of hypothesis generation, and consequently for the design and implementation of future research on human memory.

  9. Imunossupressores na Dermatologia Immunosuppressive agents in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lopes Bressan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Os imunossupressores são drogas que agem na divisão celular e têm propriedades anti-inflamatórias. Sendo assim, são essencialmente prescritos na prevenção de rejeição de transplantes e no tratamento das doenças autoimunes e inflamatórias crônicas, que, na Dermatologia, têm a psoríase como maior representante. Nesta sessão serão descritas as principais drogas imunossupressoras, com orientações para seu manejo adequado.Immunosupressants are drugs that act in cell division and have anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, they are essentially prescribed in the prevention of transplant rejection and in the treatment of autoimmune disorders and chronic inflammatory diseases, whose main example in Dermatology is psoriasis. In this work the most important immunosuppressive drugs and orientation to properly administer them are going to be described.

  10. Body dysmorphic disorder in the dermatology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblenzer, Caroline S

    Body dysmorphic disorder is primarily a psychiatric disorder, in which the patient believes that some normal or very near normal aspect of his or her physical appearance is distorted or ugly. Should there be a minor abnormality, it is grossly exaggerated in the mind of the patient, causing feelings of shame and embarrassment and leading daily to spending hours at the mirror, or any reflecting surface, as the patient tries to conceal or remove the perceived abnormality through the development of ritualistic behavior. Although other organs can be involved-for example, the shape of the nose or a portion of an ear- the skin, hair, and nails are most commonly involved, while the patient constantly seeks reassurance about appearance from friends and family. There is a broad spectrum of severity in body dysmorphic disorder, ranging from obsessional worry to frank delusion, and the psychiatric comorbidities-anxiety, depression, and personality disorder-are prominent parts of the picture. Unfortunately, the psychiatric comorbidities and the negative impact on every aspect of the patient's life may not be recognized by dermatologists and other non-psychiatric physicians, so that effective treatment is often not instituted or appropriate referrals made. This paper describes the incidence, possible etiologies, and clinical picture of body dysmorphic disorder in dermatology patients and discusses interpersonal approaches that may permit appropriate treatment or referral to take place. Specific treatments and prognosis are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scientific Merit Review of Directed Research Tasks Within the NASA Human Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The Human Research Program is instrumental in developing and delivering research findings, health countermeasures, and human systems technologies for spacecraft. :HRP is subdivided into 6 research entities, or Elements. Each Element is charged with providing the Program with knowledge and capabilities to conduct research to address the human health and performance risks as well as advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures. Project: An Element may be further subdivided into Projects, which are defined as an integrated set of tasks undertaken to deliver a product or set of products

  12. Optimizing education on the inpatient dermatology consultative service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    A consultative dermatology service plays an important role in patient care and education in the hospital setting. Optimizing education in balance with high-quality dermatology consultative services is both a challenge and an opportunity for dermatology consultation teams. There is an emergence of new information about how dermatology can best be taught in the hospital, much of which relies on principles of workplace learning as well as the science of how learning and teaching best happen in work settings. These best practices are summarized in this narrative review with integrated discussion of concepts from outpatient dermatology education and lessons learned from other inpatient teaching models. In addition, consultative dermatology curricula should utilize a blended curriculum model comprised of patient care and active learning and self-study modalities. Specific educational methods will discuss 2 strategies: (1) direct patient-care activities (ie, bedside teaching rounds) and (2) nonpatient care activities (ie, case presentations, didactic sessions, online modules, and reading lists). ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  13. Simulation in dermatologic surgery: a new paradigm in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Luke; Toren, Kristen; Bingham, Jonathan; Marquart, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Simulation-based training has become popular in many surgical residencies for acquiring procedural skills, but simulator use is rare in dermatologic training. To evaluate the perceived efficacy of obtaining dermatologic procedural skills using simulators. Opinions of dermatology residents and staff regarding simulator use were assessed using questionnaires completed after a 2-day surgical symposium in which participants were instructed on and practiced with simulators and cadavers. Overall, 93.9% strongly agreed that simulators are helpful in acquiring procedural skills. More than three-quarters of participants agreed that simulators are useful in acquiring, refining, assessing, and learning these skills. Many participants further thought that simulator use would be beneficial in learning anatomy and trouble-shooting techniques. An overwhelming majority of those surveyed believed that training on simulators would be helpful in learning various dermatologic procedures; 90.9% of participants thought that training using simulators should be, at least in part, a mandatory component of residency. It was felt that this training should be conducted at the beginning of residency, with additional with sessions held throughout training. Simulation offers an excellent model for the acquisition and assessment of dermatologic procedural skills. Cost and availability of instructors remain obstacles. Further studies are required to evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of these models. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Research of Human Postural Balance Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Griškevičius

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In present article postural balance between subjects with stroke and healthy subjects, is being investigated with eyes opened and eyes closed. In the research participated 30 healthy subjects and 15 subjects with stroke. At the same time two experimental measurements were performed – postural balance was measured using balance platform and oscillations of the centre of mass were observed using two-axial accelerometer. It was noted, that amplitudes of subjects with stroke were larger almost two times than control group’s of healthy subjects. It was find out, that ratios of pressure distribution on both left and right legs are in range from 1 to 0.9 for healthy subjects, and ratios below 0.9 are common for subjects with stroke. When subjects were standing with eyes closed, sway amplitudes were higher and the ratios of load distribution on left and right legs were lower.Article in Lithuanian

  15. Recent technology products from Space Human Factors research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, James P.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of the NASA Space Human Factors program and the research carried out concerning human factors are discussed with emphasis given to the development of human performance models, data, and tools. The major products from this program are described, which include the Laser Anthropometric Mapping System; a model of the human body for evaluating the kinematics and dynamics of human motion and strength in microgravity environment; an operational experience data base for verifying and validating the data repository of manned space flights; the Operational Experience Database Taxonomy; and a human-computer interaction laboratory whose products are the display softaware and requirements and the guideline documents and standards for applications on human-computer interaction. Special attention is given to the 'Convoltron', a prototype version of a signal processor for synthesizing the head-related transfer functions.

  16. Dermatologic Findings in 61 Mutation-Positive Individuals with Cardio-facio-cutaneous Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D.H.; McKenzie, J.; Frieden, I.J.; Rauen, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The RASopathies are a class of human genetic syndromes that are caused by germline mutations in genes which encode components of the Ras/MAPK pathway. Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, congenital heart defects, and abnormalities of the skin and hair. Objective To systematically characterize the spectrum of dermatologic findings in mutation-positive individuals with cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome. Methods Dermatologic surveys were designed by the authors and distributed to the study participants through CFC International or directly by the authors (KAR and DHS) between July 2006 and August 2009. A second follow up survey was collected between December 2007 and August 2009. When available, digital images and medical records of the participants were obtained. Study participants included individuals with CFC who have a mutation in BRAF, MEK1, MEK2 or KRAS. Results Individuals with CFC have a variety of dermatologic manifestations caused by dysregulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in development. Numerous acquired melanocytic nevi were one of the most striking features; greater than 50 nevi were reported by 23 % (14/61) of participants and of those, greater than 100 nevi were reported by 36% (5/14). Keratosis pilaris was reported in 80% (49/61) of cases. Ulerythema ophryogenes was common occurring in 55/61 (90%). Infantile hemangiomas occurred at a greater frequency, 26% (16/61), as compared to the general population. Conclusions CFC syndrome has a complex dermatologic phenotype with many cutaneous features, some of which allow it to be differentiated from the other Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes. Multiple café au lait macules and papillomata were not identified in this CFC cohort helping to distinguish CFC from other RASopathies, such as neurofibromatosis type 1 and Costello syndrome. PMID:21062266

  17. Researching Human Experience: video intervention/prevention assessment (VIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Patashnick

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Human experience is a critical subject for research. By discussing Video Intervention/Prevention Assessment (VIA, a patient-centered health research method where patients teach their clinicians about living with a chronic condition through the creation of visual illness narratives, this paper examines the value of qualitative inquiry and why human experience rarely is investigated directly. An analysis of a sample VIA data is presented to demonstrate how, by utilizing grounded theory and qualitative analysis, one can derive rich and unique information from human experience.

  18. Crowds for Clouds : Recent Trends in Humanities Research Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristel, Conny; Blanke, Tobias; Romary, Laurent; Benardou, Agiati; Champion, Erik; Dallas, Costis; Hughes, Lorna

    2016-01-01

    Humanities have convincingly argued that they need transnational research opportunities and through the digital transformation of their disciplines also have the means to proceed with it on an up to now unknown scale. The digital transformation of research and its resources means that many of the ar

  19. Teaching and Learning Children's Human Rights: A Research Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantefors, Lotta; Quennerstedt, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The study presented in this paper is a research synthesis examining how issues relating to the teaching and learning of children's human rights have been approached in educational research. Drawing theoretically on the European Didaktik tradition, the purpose of the paper is to map and synthesise the educational interest in children's rights…

  20. Promotion of research in human reproduction: global needs and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathalla, M F

    1988-01-01

    The WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction was established in 1972, to respond to a global expansion in research needs in human reproduction, especially in the area of fertility regulation. The Programme's limited resources come from voluntary contributions by governments and international agencies. The emphasis is always on the needs of developing countries. The Programme has to keep the field under continuous review, and to direct its limited resources to the major unmet needs. This paper presents, from a global perspective, the needs and priorities in the promotion of research in human reproduction. It is emphasized that research has to be backed up by political commitment and resources if it is to have an impact on reproductive health. The role of determinants of health, other than and beyond the medical services, has also to be recognized. Promotion of research in human reproduction, to serve developing country needs, has to move into two directions. One is the mobilization of a global effort to develop and test technologies, where the available technologies are not satisfactory to meet the needs and where the research is slackening. The second is the strengthening of in-country resources for research to deal with country-specific problems and to enable countries to utilize, to the best, available technologies.

  1. An Emerging Theoretical Perspective for Research in Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    The emergence of a new theoretical framework for research in human development is discussed. The theoretical perspective is contrasted with the classical laboratory experiment, which produces ecologically invalid research because of the restrictions of the artificial laboratory environment. The emerging framework enhances ecological validity by…

  2. Demystifying the IRB: Human Subjects Research in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Maura A.

    2010-01-01

    Many academic librarians are interested in pursuing research studies that involve students, faculty, and other library patrons; these projects must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB). This article reviews federal requirements and regulations for human subjects research and explains the IRB application process. The author discusses…

  3. Crowds for Clouds : Recent Trends in Humanities Research Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristel, Conny; Blanke, Tobias; Romary, Laurent; Benardou, Agiati; Champion, Erik; Dallas, Costis; Hughes, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    Humanities have convincingly argued that they need transnational research opportunities and through the digital transformation of their disciplines also have the means to proceed with it on an up to now unknown scale. The digital transformation of research and its resources means that many of the ar

  4. The Impact and Future of Arts and Humanities Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneworth, Paul; Gulbrandsen, Magnus; Hazelkorn, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on original international research by a cross-European social science team, this book makes an important contribution to the discussion about the future of arts and humanities research. It explores the responses of these fields to the growing range of questions being asked about the value, i

  5. Humanism and its critiques in nursing research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael

    2009-07-01

    This paper raises for debate the issue of how humanist ideas have been taken up by nurse scholars, particularly in research literature. Many nurses from the mid-1970s onwards have described and promoted humanism as an appropriate philosophical basis for nursing practice and research. This has been partly in an attempt to sharply differentiate the profession from medicine, and later, managerialism, which have been represented as reductionist and failing to adequately respond to the whole patient. A summary of definitions of humanism and critiques of humanism in broad philosophical literature is followed by an examination and critique of literature appearing in PubMed published within nursing scholarship from 1976 to 2007 which discusses or promotes humanism in nursing practice or research. Writers have attempted to enhance the importance of nursing by associating it with the humanistic project of accepting responsibility for realizing our human potential. They have promoted a version of research which is qualitative and centres on understanding individual lifeworlds of research participants because of a strong valuing of the experiences and perspectives of the individual. Much of the literature on this topic describes this humanism in dualistic contrast to medico-scientific reductionism and objectivity. Some of the presentations of humanistic nursing lack rigour and can be seen as doing little more than reproducing professional ideology. Scholars and others in the field of nursing could take the trouble to submit these ideologies to proper scrutiny.

  6. Governing the postmortem procurement of human body material for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, Kristof; Capitaine, Laura; Pennings, Guido; Sterckx, Sigrid

    2015-03-01

    Human body material removed post mortem is a particularly valuable resource for research. Considering the efforts that are currently being made to study the biochemical processes and possible genetic causes that underlie cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, it is likely that this type of research will continue to gain in importance. However, post mortem procurement of human body material for research raises specific ethical concerns, more in particular with regard to the consent of the research participant. In this paper, we attempt to determine which consent regime should govern the post mortem procurement of body material for research. In order to do so, we assess the various arguments that could be put forward in support of a duty to make body material available for research purposes after death. We argue that this duty does in practice not support conscription but is sufficiently strong to defend a policy of presumed rather than explicit consent.

  7. On The Research of Foreign and Domestic Human Capital Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fuzhu

    2005-01-01

    Human Capital Theory came into being in the middle and later periods of the 20th century.A lot of achievements have been made on the research in its connotation, measures of the value, investment and income, function mechanism and so on, by foreign scholars. In recent 10 years of the new Millennium ahernation, the "steal business effect" and the structure of human capital on the mechanism of economic rise has become the two emphasis in current foreign Human Capital Theory's research. On the basis of foreign researches and Chinese situations, domestic scholars have enriched and developed it, but there are many disparities in its methods, aspects and levels between foreign and domestic researches.

  8. Application of multiphoton microscopy in dermatological studies: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Yew

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance.

  9. Challenging research on human subjects: justice and uncompensated harms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Ethical challenges to certain aspects of research on human subjects are not uncommon; examples include challenges to first-in-human trials (Chapman in J Clin Res Bioethics 2(4):1-8, 2011), certain placebo controlled trials (Anderson in J Med Philos 31:65-81, 2006; Anderson and Kimmelman in Kennedy Inst Ethics J 20(1):75-98, 2010) and "sham" surgery (Macklin in N Engl J Med 341:992-996, 1999). To date, however, there are few challenges to research when the subjects are competent and the research is more than minimal risk with no promise of direct benefit. The principal reason given for allowing research that is more than minimal risk without benefit is that we should respect the autonomy of competent subjects. I argue that though the moral intuitions informing respect for autonomy are sound, there is another set of intuitions regarding what we take to be just treatment of another when one agent knowingly causes or allows suffering on another agent. I argue that concerns generated by commutative justice serve as limitations on permissible research. I highlight our intuitions informing this notion of justice by appealing to work done on theodicy; what counts as a morally sufficient reason for God to allow suffering in humans is applicable also to the researcher-subject relationship. I conclude that all human subjects who are exposed to more than minimal risk research should enjoy the same actual protections (e.g., subpart D) as those given subjects who cannot consent.

  10. Discrete-cosine-transform-based image compression applied to dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, John P.; Sneiderman, Charles; Rivera, Christopher

    1991-05-01

    The research reported in this paper concerns an evaluation of the impact of compression on the quality of digitized color dermatologic images. 35 mm slides of four morphologic types of skin lesions were captured at 1000 pixels per inch (ppi) in 24 bit RGB color, to give an approximate 1K X 1K image. The discrete cosine transform (DCT) algorithm, was applied to the resulting image files to achieve compression ratios of about 7:1, 28:1, and 70:1. The original scans and the decompressed files were written to a 35 mm film recorder. Together with the original photo slides, the slides resulting from digital images were evaluated in a study of morphology recognition and image quality assessment. A panel of dermatologists was asked to identify the morphology depicted and to rate the image quality of each slide. The images were shown in a progression from highest level of compression to original photo slides. We conclude that the use of DCT file compression yields acceptable performance for skin lesion images since differences in morphology recognition performance do not correlate significantly with the use of original photos versus compressed versions. Additionally, image quality evaluation does not correlate significantly with level of compression.

  11. The development of a Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) questionnaire to assess dermatologic symptoms associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (FACT-EGFRI-18).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lynne I; Berg, Sara R; Gandhi, Mona; Hlubocky, Fay J; Webster, Kimberly; Aneja, Monika; Cella, David; Lacouture, Mario E

    2013-04-01

    Dermatologic toxicities from epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs) are common, disrupt health-related quality of life (HRQL), and lead to dose reduction or discontinuation of potentially life-saving cancer therapy. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-EGFRI was developed to measure HRQL among patients receiving EGFRIs. The FACT-EGFRI was developed through the triangulation approach using the established functional assessment of chronic illness therapy method of patient questionnaire construction. This included literature review, qualitative data collection and analysis, and quantitative survey data collection on candidate items to identify the most important items related to EGFRI-induced dermatologic toxicities according to patients receiving EGFRIs and expert clinicians. Twelve expert clinicians and 20 patients were interviewed for the initial questionnaire development. Dermatologic symptoms associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors endorsed as high priority by both patients and oncologist experts were selected. The final version includes 18 items which assess the physical, emotional, social, and functional impact that skin, nail, and hair toxicities have on patients' HRQL. The FACT-EGFRI-18 measures the severity of patient-reported EGFRI-induced dermatologic toxicities and effects on HRQL and was developed using qualitative data from patients and expert clinicians. Further validation is underway. The FACT-EGFRI-18 may be useful for clinicians and researchers to quantify dermatologic toxicities from the patient perspective in standard clinical care, evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to prevent or reduce dermatologic toxicities, and to guide treatment decision making.

  12. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti‐HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV. PMID:26357639

  13. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y

    2015-06-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti-HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV.

  14. The effect of work characteristics on dermatologic symptoms in hairdressers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Pil Kyun; Lee, June-Hee; Baek, Ji Hye; Hwang, Jungho; Won, Jong-Uk; Kim, Inah; Roh, Jaehoon

    2014-01-01

    Hairdressers in Korea perform various tasks and are exposed to health risk factors such as chemical substances or prolonged duration of wet work. The objective of this study is to provide descriptive statistics on the demographics and work characteristics of hairdressers in Korea and to identify work-related risk factors for dermatologic symptoms in hairdressers. 1,054 hairdressers were selected and analyzed for this study. Independent variables were exposure to chemical substances, the training status of the hairdressers, and the main tasks required of them, and the dependent variable was the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. The relationships between work characteristics and dermatologic symptoms were evaluated by estimating odds ratios using multiple logistic regression analysis. Among the 1,054 study subjects, 212 hairdressers (20.1%) complained of dermatologic symptoms, and the symptoms were more prevalent in younger, unmarried or highly educated hairdressers. The main tasks that comprise the majority of the wet work were strictly determined by training status, since 96.5% of staff hairdressers identified washing as their main task, while only 1.5% and 2.0% of master and designer hairdressers, respectively, identified this as their main task. Multiple logistic regressions was performed to estimate odds ratios. While exposure to hairdressing chemicals showed no significant effect on the odds ratio for the incidence of dermatologic symptoms, higher odds ratios of dermatologic symptoms were shown in staff hairdressers (2.70, 95% CI: 1.32 - 5.51) and in hairdressers who perform washing as their main task (2.03, 95% CI: 1.22 - 3.37), after adjusting for general and work characteristics. This study showed that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are closely related to each other and that the training status and main tasks of hairdressers are related to the incidence of dermatologic symptoms. This suggests that in the future, regulations on working

  15. Body dysmorphic disorder in female Swedish dermatology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohede, Sabina; Wyon, Yvonne; Wingren, Gun; Wijma, Barbro; Wijma, Klaas

    2017-09-27

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are highly distressed and impaired owing to perceived defects in their physical appearance that are not noticeable to others. They are frequently concerned about their skin and often present to dermatologists rather than psychiatrists. However, BDD patients attending dermatology clinics may be at risk of not receiving an appropriate assessment and beneficial treatment. The aims of this study were to estimate the BDD prevalence rate among Swedish female dermatology patients and to assess the psychological condition of BDD patients compared to that of other dermatology patients. The occurrence of BDD was estimated using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), a validated self-report measure for BDD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and quality of life was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). The prevalence rate of BDD among female Swedish dermatology patients was 4.9% (95% CI 3.2-7.4). Anxiety (HADS A ≥ 11) was 4-fold more commonly reported by patients with positive BDD screening (48% vs. 11%), and depression (HADS D ≥ 11) was over 10-fold more common in patients with positive BDD screening (19% vs. 1.8%) (P BDD group, compared to a score of 4 in the non-BDD group (P BDD is fairly common among female Swedish dermatology patients (4.9%) and that BDD patients have high levels of depression and anxiety and severely impaired quality of life. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. Applying the community partnership approach to human biology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, Julia; Schell, Lawrence M; Cole, Tewentahawih'tha'

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary human biology research employs a unique skillset for biocultural analysis. This skillset is highly appropriate for the study of health disparities because disparities result from the interaction of social and biological factors over one or more generations. Health disparities research almost always involves disadvantaged communities owing to the relationship between social position and health in stratified societies. Successful research with disadvantaged communities involves a specific approach, the community partnership model, which creates a relationship beneficial for researcher and community. Paramount is the need for trust between partners. With trust established, partners share research goals, agree on research methods and produce results of interest and importance to all partners. Results are shared with the community as they are developed; community partners also provide input on analyses and interpretation of findings. This article describes a partnership-based, 20 year relationship between community members of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation and researchers at the University at Albany. As with many communities facing health disparity issues, research with Native Americans and indigenous peoples generally is inherently politicized. For Akwesasne, the contamination of their lands and waters is an environmental justice issue in which the community has faced unequal exposure to, and harm by environmental toxicants. As human biologists engage in more partnership-type research, it is important to understand the long term goals of the community and what is at stake so the research circle can be closed and 'helicopter' style research avoided.

  17. When is surgery research? Towards an operational definition of human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margo, C E

    2001-02-01

    The distinction between clinical practice and surgical research may seem trivial, but this distinction can become a complex issue when innovative surgeries are substituted for standard care without patient knowledge. Neither the novelty nor the risk of a new surgical procedure adequately defines surgical research. Some institutions tacitly allow the use of new surgical procedures in series of patients without informing individuals that they are participating in a scientific study, as long as no written protocol or hypothesis exists. Institutions can justify this practice by viewing human research in narrow terms as an activity outlined in a formal protocol. Application of limited definitions, however, erodes patients' rights and risks losing public confidence in how biomedical research is conducted. I propose an operational definition of human research also be recognised. Enforcing more rigid and less ambiguous guidelines of human research may curtail enrolment into some studies, but it will also protect patients from being used as subjects without their knowledge.

  18. 76 FR 65204 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Genomic Resource...: Rudy O. Pozzatti, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human...

  19. Ethical issues of the research on human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Yoshitaro

    2008-09-01

    This paper examines the debate on human embryonic stem cell (hES) research. In Japan, as in many Western countries, the moral status of the human embryo has been the main focus. There is a dichotomy between the advocates of research on hES cells and the advocates of the dignity of the embryos. Advocates of research on hES cells claim that the act of abandoning the embryo and the act of using it for research have the same moral status. Critics of research using embryos reject this position, claiming that the embryo has a status incommensurable with other values. This paper points out that the standpoint of the woman providing the embryos has been overlooked in this discussion.

  20. Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element Management Plan: Human Research Program. Revision B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsk, Peter; Baumann, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) is an applied research and technology program within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) that addresses human health and performance risk mitigation strategies in support of exploration missions. The HRP research and technology development is focused on the highest priority risks to crew health and safety with the goal of ensuring mission success and maintaining long-term crew health. Crew health and performance standards, defined by the NASA Chief Health and Medical Officer (CHMO), set the acceptable risk level for exploration missions. The HRP conducts research to inform these standards as well as provide deliverables, such as countermeasures, that ensure standards can be met to maximize human performance and mission success. The Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element was formed as part of the HRP to develop a scientifically-based, integrated approach to understanding and mitigating the health risks associated with human spaceflight. These health risks have been organized into four research portfolios that group similar or related risks. A fifth portfolio exists for managing technology developments and infrastructure projects. The HHC Element portfolios consist of: a) Vision and Cardiovascular; b) Exercise and Performance; c) Multisystem; d) Bone; and e) Technology and Infrastructure. The HHC identifies gaps associated with the health risks and plans human physiology research that will result in knowledge required to more fully understand risks and will result in validated countermeasures to mitigate risks.

  1. E-learning program for medical students in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Silveira Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dermatological disorders are common in medical practice. In medical school, however, the time devoted to teaching dermatology is usually very limited. Therefore, online educational systems have increasingly been used in medical education settings to enhance exposure to dermatology. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to develop a e-learning program for medical students in dermatology and evaluate the impact of this program on learning. METHODS: This prospective study included second year medical students at the University of Technology and Science, Salvador, Brazil. All students attended discussion seminars and practical activities, and half of the students had adjunct online seminars (blended learning. Tests were given to all students before and after the courses, and test scores were evaluated. RESULTS: Students who participated in online discussions associated with face-to-face activities (blended learning had significantly higher posttest scores (9.0 + 0.8 than those who only participated in classes (7.75+1.8, p <0.01. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that an associated online course might improve the learning of medical students in dermatology.

  2. Human rights, cultural pluralism, and international health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Patricia A

    2005-01-01

    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research conducted in resource-poor settings. I will demonstrate the potential for addressing human rights considerations in international health research with special attention to the importance of collaborative partnerships, capacity building, and respect for cultural traditions. Strengthening professional knowledge about international research ethics increases awareness of ethical concerns associated with study design and informed consent among researchers working in resource-poor settings. But this is not enough. Technological and financial resources are also necessary to build capacity for local communities to ensure that research results are integrated into existing health systems. Problematic issues surrounding the application of ethical guidelines in resource-poor settings are embedded in social history, cultural context, and the global political economy. Resolving the moral complexities requires a commitment to engaged dialogue and action among investigators, funding agencies, policy makers, governmental institutions, and private industry.

  3. Research report on human media; Human media no chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The human multimedia technology corresponding to users` subjective characteristics was researched to realize information environment producing a sense of unity with human. The human media technology realizes a human sensitive information processing model and a common database easily acceptable sensitively by various users. This technology also should be able to fairly accept and transmit individual`s information and knowledge as multimedia information, and in addition it is required to supply a virtual space with presence. In fiscal 1995, the research committee studied the concrete developmental issue for integrating these advanced fundamental technologies, and as practical images planned the prototype systems such as human media interactive plant operation, supply of environment supporting personal intelligent activities, and virtual medical center. The research committee also discussed development of space mobile media to secure energy-saving and safety of automobiles, and an environment simulation system with participation of many people. 34 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. [Human resources and health work: challenges for a research agenda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Ada Avila; Belisário, Soraya Almeida; Campos, Francisco Eduardo; D'Avila, Luciana Souza

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses several key concepts for human resources policy in health in the context of Latin America's regional integration efforts. The article focuses on different concepts of integration to emphasize the analytical distinction between regional and conceptual integration. It also presents labor and human resources concepts before discussing, in the final analysis, the challenges that a common research agenda faces in the context of current health sector reforms in Latin America. The conclusion emphasizes the need to develop a technology and research system capable of supporting the agenda for exchange between MERCOSUR member countries.

  5. Safety Assessment and Biological Effects of a New Cold Processed SilEmulsion for Dermatological Purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Raposo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is of crucial importance to evaluate the safety profile of the ingredients used in dermatological emulsions. A suitable equilibrium between safety and efficacy is a pivotal concern before the marketing of a dermatological product. The aim was to assess the safety and biological effects of a new cold processed silicone-based emulsion (SilEmulsion. The hazard, exposure, and dose-response assessment were used to characterize the risk for each ingredient. EpiSkin assay and human repeat insult patch tests were performed to compare the theoretical safety assessment to in vitro and in vivo data. The efficacy of the SilEmulsion was studied using biophysical measurements in human volunteers during 21 days. According to the safety assessment of the ingredients, 1,5-pentanediol was an ingredient of special concern since its margin of safety was below the threshold of 100 (36.53. EpiSkin assay showed that the tissue viability after the application of the SilEmulsion was 92 ± 6% and, thus considered nonirritant to the skin. The human studies confirmed that the SilEmulsion was not a skin irritant and did not induce any sensitization on the volunteers, being safe for human use. Moreover, biological effects demonstrated that the SilEmulsion increased both the skin hydration and skin surface lipids.

  6. Safety assessment and biological effects of a new cold processed SilEmulsion for dermatological purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, Sara; Salgado, Ana; Gonçalves, Lídia; Pinto, Pedro C; Urbano, Manuela; Ribeiro, Helena M

    2013-01-01

    It is of crucial importance to evaluate the safety profile of the ingredients used in dermatological emulsions. A suitable equilibrium between safety and efficacy is a pivotal concern before the marketing of a dermatological product. The aim was to assess the safety and biological effects of a new cold processed silicone-based emulsion (SilEmulsion). The hazard, exposure, and dose-response assessment were used to characterize the risk for each ingredient. EpiSkin assay and human repeat insult patch tests were performed to compare the theoretical safety assessment to in vitro and in vivo data. The efficacy of the SilEmulsion was studied using biophysical measurements in human volunteers during 21 days. According to the safety assessment of the ingredients, 1,5-pentanediol was an ingredient of special concern since its margin of safety was below the threshold of 100 (36.53). EpiSkin assay showed that the tissue viability after the application of the SilEmulsion was 92 ± 6% and, thus considered nonirritant to the skin. The human studies confirmed that the SilEmulsion was not a skin irritant and did not induce any sensitization on the volunteers, being safe for human use. Moreover, biological effects demonstrated that the SilEmulsion increased both the skin hydration and skin surface lipids.

  7. Research on Dynamic Model of the Human Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-lin; WANG Guang-quan; LU Dun-yong

    2005-01-01

    After summarizing the current situation of the research on human body modeling, a new dynamic model containing 5 equivalent masses has been proposed and the corresponding dynamic equations has been deduced too. By using this new model, more detailed information about the situation of the human body under impact and vibration can be obtained. The new model solves the problem that transmission functions of forces inside the human body can't be deduced by using 3-equivalent-mass model. It will find its usage in many applications.

  8. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    of acetylcholine-mediated functions in the skin remain to be elucidated.Thus, the benefits of DMAE in dermatology include a potential anti-inflammatory effect and a documented increase in skin firmness with possible improvement in underlying facial muscle tone. Studies are needed to evaluate the relative efficacy of DMAE compared with other skin-care regimens (e.g., topical antioxidant creams, alpha-hydroxy acids).

  9. Human Research Program: 2012 Fiscal Year Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenhauser, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Crew health and performance are critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Risks to health and performance include physiologic effects from radiation, hypogravity, and planetary environments, as well as unique challenges in medical treatment, human factors, and support of behavioral health. The scientists and engineers of the Human Research Program (HRP) investigate and reduce the greatest risks to human health and performance, and provide essential countermeasures and technologies for human space exploration. In its seventh year of operation, the HRP continued to refine its management architecture of evidence, risks, gaps, tasks, and deliverables. Experiments continued on the International Space Station (ISS), on the ground in analog environments that have features similar to those of spaceflight, and in laboratory environments. Data from these experiments furthered the understanding of how the space environment affects the human system. These research results contributed to scientific knowledge and technology developments that address the human health and performance risks. As shown in this report, HRP has made significant progress toward developing medical care and countermeasure systems for space exploration missions which will ultimately reduce risks to crew health and performance.

  10. Ethical fundamentals in human subjects research : On equipoise and human dignity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf - Verhave, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821373

    2010-01-01

    In her PhD thesis Rieke van der Graaf has studied how we can ethically justify human subjects research. In particular she has studied two ethical fundamentals that play a key role in the justification process, that of equipoise and human dignity. Equipoise is often taken to mean that

  11. Ethical fundamentals in human subjects research : On equipoise and human dignity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf - Verhave, R.

    2010-01-01

    In her PhD thesis Rieke van der Graaf has studied how we can ethically justify human subjects research. In particular she has studied two ethical fundamentals that play a key role in the justification process, that of equipoise and human dignity. Equipoise is often taken to mean that physician-resea

  12. Methodology for diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots by spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Rosas, Esperanza; Álvarez-Borrego, Josué

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a new methodology for the diagnosing of skin cancer on images of dermatologic spots using image processing is presented. Currently skin cancer is one of the most frequent diseases in humans. This methodology is based on Fourier spectral analysis by using filters such as the classic, inverse and k-law nonlinear. The sample images were obtained by a medical specialist and a new spectral technique is developed to obtain a quantitative measurement of the complex pattern found in cancerous skin spots. Finally a spectral index is calculated to obtain a range of spectral indices defined for skin cancer. Our results show a confidence level of 95.4%.

  13. [Burnout as a consequence of chronic stress in the patients suffering from dermatological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Moś, Danuta; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2009-11-01

    Topic of professional burnout has been discussed in Poland since 80'. Professional burnout is a state of emotional and physical exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress. As the stress continues, you begin to lose the interest or motivation of job, additionally burnout reduces your productivity and energy. That's why it's important to recognize the early signs of burnout and head it off. Three phases of professional burnout have been described: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. The risk of professional burnout involves especially people who are suffering from many disturbances, including dermatological diseases and carry out of professions named Human Services.

  14. Achieving hemostasis in dermatology-Part II: Topical hemostatic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie B Glick

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding is a common occurrence during any dermatologic surgery that disrupts blood vessels. The complications of excess bleeding can include delayed wound healing, hematoma formation, infection, dehiscence, and necrosis. In part one of this review, we discussed the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative management of patients undergoing dermatologic surgery. In Part two, we discuss traditional and new topical hemostatic agents used to achieve hemostasis in dermatological procedures and surgery. We will evaluate the caustic and non-caustic hemostatic agents as well as hemostatic dressings. The mechanisms of action, side effect profile, and advantages and disadvantages of the topical hemostatic agents are provided. Sources for this article were found searching the English literature in PubMed for the time period 1940 to March 2012. A thorough bibliography search was also performed and key references examined.

  15. Non-acne dermatologic indications for systemic isotretinoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Melih; Ozçelik, Sedat

    2005-01-01

    Systemic isotretinoin has been used to treat severe acne vulgaris for 20 years. However, isotretinoin also represents a potentially useful choice of drugs in many dermatologic diseases other than acne vulgaris. Diseases such as psoriasis, pityriasis rubra pilaris, condylomata acuminata, skin cancers, rosacea, hidradenitis suppurativa, granuloma annulare, lupus erythematosus and lichen planus have been shown to respond to the immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities of the drug. Isotretinoin also helps prevent skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. A combination of systemic isotretinoin and interferon-alpha-2a may provide a more potent effect than isotretinoin alone in the prevention and treatment of skin cancers.Systemic isotretinoin may be considered as an alternative drug in some dermatologic diseases unresponsive to conventional treatment modalities. However, randomized clinical trials aimed at determining the role of systemic isotretinoin therapy in dermatologic diseases other than acne vulgaris are required.

  16. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  17. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  18. Management of egfr tki–induced dermatologic adverse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosky, B.; Leighl, N.B.; Rothenstein, J.; Sangha, R.; Stewart, D.; Papp, K.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) pathway has become standard practice for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Compared with chemotherapy, egfr tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tkis) have been associated with improved efficacy in patients with an EGFR mutation. Together with the increase in efficacy comes an adverse event (ae) profile different from that of chemotherapy. That profile includes three of the most commonly occurring dermatologic aes: acneiform rash, stomatitis, and paronychia. Currently, no randomized clinical trials have evaluated the treatments for the dermatologic aes that patients experience when taking egfr tkis. Based on the expert opinion of the authors, some basic strategies have been developed to manage those key dermatologic aes. Those strategies have the potential to improve patient quality of life and compliance and to prevent inappropriate dose reductions. PMID:25908911

  19. Identifying and Managing Local Anesthetic Allergy in Dermatologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Ramin; Serota, Marc; Brown, Mariah

    2016-02-01

    Local anesthetic (LA) allergy is a concern for dermatologic surgeons given the large number of procedures performed yearly with LAs. Many patients also have anxiety about past or potential anesthesia allergy. This article will review the symptoms of IgE-mediated allergic reactions, the prevalence of IgE-mediated LA allergy, discuss common mimics of LA, and propose a practical approach for diagnostic and therapeutic options for LA allergy for the dermatologic surgeon in practice. A literature search of Pubmed using keywords "lidocaine," "local anesthetic," "hypersensitivity," and "allergy" was performed. Amide anesthetics result in the most reports of true local anesthetic immediate hypersensitivity. True IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to local anesthesia is very rare. Dermatologic surgeons should be aware of the symptoms of anesthetic allergy and its mimickers, as well as how to manage allergic reactions in their clinical practice.

  20. A ten-year comparison of women authorship in U.S. dermatology literature, 1999 vs. 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shali Zhang, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Women are entering medicine at increasing rates, particularly in dermatology. In this study, we compared women’s influence and status in academic dermatology with that of men by examining authorship roles in peer-reviewed dermatology literature. We examined the literature in 2009 and compared that to 10 years prior (1999. A total of 1399 articles were reviewed, 594 of which met study criteria and were included in statistical analysis. There was a marked increase in senior female authorship over a decade (22% vs. 38%, p < 0.001. Female first authorship increased as well (41% vs. 51%, p < 0.001. In contrast, changes in male senior and first authorship were not statistically significant. Federal funding for female senior authors increased over a decade (19% vs. 37%, p = 0.05, and female senior authors in the 2009 cohort were more likely to hold a dual MD/PhD degree (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.04 or pure PhD degree (11% vs. 27%, p = 0.04. Women are approaching parity with men in terms of authorship in the dermatology literature, and additional research training and attainment of federal funding have helped women publish as senior authors.

  1. A 3D-psoriatic skin model for dermatological testing: The impact of culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Duque-Fernandez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate representation of the human tissue environment during a preclinical screen can result in inaccurate predictions of compound effects. Consequently, pharmaceutical investigators are searching for preclinical models that closely resemble original tissue for predicting clinical outcomes.The current research aims to compare the impact of using serum-free medium instead of complete culture medium during the last step of psoriatic skin substitute reconstruction. Skin substitutes were produced according to the self-assembly approach.Serum-free conditions have no negative impact on the reconstruction of healthy or psoriatic skin substitutes presented in this study regarding their macroscopic or histological appearances. ATR-FTIR results showed no significant differences in the CH2 bands between psoriatic substitutes cultured with or without serum, thus suggesting that serum deprivation did not have a negative impact on the lipid organization of their stratum corneum. Serum deprivation could even lead to a better organization of healthy skin substitute lipids. Percutaneous analyses demonstrated that psoriatic substitutes cultured in serum-free conditions showed a higher permeability to hydrocortisone compared to controls, while no significant differences in benzoic acid and caffeine penetration profiles were observed.Results obtained with this 3D-psoriatic skin substitute demonstrate the potential and versatility of the model. It could offer good prediction of drug related toxicities at preclinical stages performed in order to avoid unexpected and costly findings in the clinic.Together, these findings offer a new approach for one of the most important challenges of the 21st century, namely, prediction of drug toxicity.•Impact of serum-free conditions during psoriatic skin substitutes reconstruction.•Lipids disorganization of healthy and psoriatic skin substitutes.•Permeation profiles of healthy skin substitutes.•Permeation profiles of

  2. Intervention Research and Its Influence on Nonintervention Research in Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunyoung; Chae, Chungil

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify how intervention research weighed in nonintervention research in the field of human resource development (HRD) by examining the number, citation frequency and use of experimental studies in HRD academic journals. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 2,700 articles published between 1990 and 2014…

  3. Focus on CSIR research in water resources: water and human health research in CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genthe, Bettina

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Water and Human Health team researches water related science to address the CSIR’s mandate, national priorities and to improve quality of life for all. The overall aim of the research is to achieve a sustainable balance between the use of water...

  4. Guidelines for Performing Dermatologic Ultrasound Examinations by the DERMUS Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortsman, Ximena; Alfageme, Fernando; Roustan, Gaston; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Martorell, Antonio; Catalano, Orlando; Scotto di Santolo, Maria; Zarchi, Kian; Bouer, Marcio; Gonzalez, Claudia; Bard, Robert; Mandava, Anitha; Gaitini, Diana

    2016-03-01

    To support standardization for performing dermatologic ultrasound examinations. An international working group, called DERMUS (Dermatologic Ultrasound), was formed, composed of physicians who have been working on a regular basis and publishing in peer-reviewed articles on dermatologic ultrasound. A questionnaire on 5 critical issues about performance of the examinations was prepared and distributed by e-mail. The areas of discussion included technical aspects, main areas of application, minimum number of examinations per year required for assessing competence, qualifications of the personnel in charge of the examination, and organization of courses. Final recommendations were approved on the basis of the agreement of more than 50% of the members. The minimum frequency recommended for performing dermatologic examinations was 15 MHz. Routine use of color Doppler ultrasound and the performance of spectral curve analysis for assessing the main vascularity of lesions were suggested. Three-dimensional reconstructions were considered optional. The main dermatologic applications were benign tumors, skin cancer, vascular anomalies, cosmetic field, nail disorders, and inflammatory diseases. The minimum number of examinations per year suggested by the group for assessing competence was 300. A physician and not a sonographer was recommended to be the person in charge of performing the examination. On course organization, a minimum of 2 levels of complexity (basic and advanced) was suggested. There is a need to standardize the performance and quality of dermatologic ultrasound examinations. The present guidelines written by an international group of specialists in the field may support this objective. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  5. Review of Dermatology Associations and Their Functions on Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Gizlent

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Associations are the most important constituents of occupational organizations. The objective of this study was to determine dermatology associations and to investigate their structures and functions. Material and Method: Dermatology associations were reached through the internet via a search engine (www.google.com by entering the keywords “international, Asian, European, African, and the other nationalities and races” and “dermatology, cutaneous, skin, nail, hair, skin biology, cosmetic, laser, photobiology, dermoscopy, teledermatology, dermatoallergy, dermatoimmunology, sexually transmitted disease, dermatovenerology, dermatooncology, dermatosurgery, dermatologic imaging, dermatopathology, physchodermatology” and “foundation, association, society, organization”. The associations were classified into four groups according to the entities on the particular website and publication language. Associations were searched on the “International League of Dermatology Societies (ILDS” website in order to investigate membership status. Furthermore, we investigated history, aim, administrative structure, revenue sources, the number of members, membership requirements and benefits, training activities, periodicals, scientific working groups and social activities. Results: One hundred ninety-four associations worldwide have been determined. The countries with a significant number of associations were the United States of America - 22, Turkey - 14, Italy - 11 and England - 9. Fifty-three associations worldwide were international and 141 were national. The countries with a higher number of international associations were the United States of America - 12 and Germany - 5. There were 72 associations with an english website, 17 with a website in both english and local language, 53 with a website in only local language, 52 without a website. From Turkey, only one association had a website in english, but none of them were

  6. Psychiatric morbidity in dermatology patients: Frequency and results of consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan Muammer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatological patients quite commonly depict psychiatric morbidity. PURPOSES: To study the psychiatric morbidity among skin patients of our clinic. METHODS: In the present study, the patients who were treated in the Dermatology Clinic of Inonu University Medical Faculty were evaluated retrospectively. The age, gender, marital status, habits, dermatological and systemic diseases, previously used drugs, current therapy and psychiatric diagnosis of each patient were recorded. FINDINGS: Of 636 patients involved in the study, 15.3% had psychopathological problems, which were depression (32.0%, adjustment difficulty (15.5%, anxiety (13.4%, psychosomatic disorders (10.3%, obsessive-compulsive disorder and conversion (5.1%, dysthymic disorder (4.1%, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (2.1%, panic attack (1.0%, premenstrual syndrome, schizophrenia, somatization disorder, insomnia, alcohol dependency, bipolar affective disorder, mental retardation, agoraphobia, social phobia and dementia. The dermatological diseases defined for the patients with psychopathology diagnosis were chronic urticaria (25.8%; psoriasis (15.5%; alopecia areata, totalis and iniversalis (11.3%; acute urticaria, neurodermatitis and Behcet′s disease (5.1%; atopic dermatitis and drug eruptions (4.1%; pemphigus (3.1%; angioedema, contact dermatitis and generalized pruritus (2.1%; folliculitis and the others (1.0%. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric morbidity has an affect on the course of dermatological diseases. When required, psychiatric consultation should be sought by dermatology clinics and patients should be followed with the cooperation of dermatologists and psychiatrists. LIMITATION: The indoor-based study had not included any control group and any domicillary patient.

  7. An integrated approach to rotorcraft human factors research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Hartzell, E. James; Voorhees, James W.; Bucher, Nancy M.; Shively, R. Jay

    1988-01-01

    As the potential of civil and military helicopters has increased, more complex and demanding missions in increasingly hostile environments have been required. Users, designers, and manufacturers have an urgent need for information about human behavior and function to create systems that take advantage of human capabilities, without overloading them. Because there is a large gap between what is known about human behavior and the information needed to predict pilot workload and performance in the complex missions projected for pilots of advanced helicopters, Army and NASA scientists are actively engaged in Human Factors Research at Ames. The research ranges from laboratory experiments to computational modeling, simulation evaluation, and inflight testing. Information obtained in highly controlled but simpler environments generates predictions which can be tested in more realistic situations. These results are used, in turn, to refine theoretical models, provide the focus for subsequent research, and ensure operational relevance, while maintaining predictive advantages. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of research are described along with examples of experimental results.

  8. Why a True Account of Human Development Requires Exemplar Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, William; Colby, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This chapter uses moral psychology to illustrate why exemplar methods are essential for building a valid, complete understanding of key domains of human development. Social psychological, economic, and biological-evolutionary paradigms for studying morality rely on samples drawn from the general population. This research reveals a bleak picture of…

  9. Narratives in Teaching and Research for Justice and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Audrey; Zhu, Juanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history individual and collective narratives have been used in struggles for justice. We draw on Sen's theory of justice to examine the potential of narratives in teaching and researching for social justice. Human rights are presented as powerful ethical claims that can be critically examined by learners to consider their rights and…

  10. Applying Organizational Commitment and Human Capital Theories to Emigration Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhohlyad, Olga; McLean, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to bring some additional insight into the issue of emigration by establishing a relationship between emigration and psychic return of citizens to their human capital investment in the country. Design/methodology/approach: The article adopts a quantitative research strategy. It applies organizational commitment and human…

  11. Neuroscience in ergonomics and human factors research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van; Brouwer, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the possible application of neuroscientific knowledge in human factors research and pratice. Can this knowledge be implemented to improve the design and evaluation of systems and functional environments? Or - to take it one step further - could it bring about the integration of

  12. Research on Sexual Orientation and Human Development: A Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Bonnie R.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of research over the past 25 years on sexual orientation and its effects on human development, concluding that gay and lesbian interests and behavior appear to result from a complex interplay of genetic, prenatal, and environmental influences. Notes that gender identity develops early, especially for males, and is difficult…

  13. A large human centrifuge for exploration and exploitation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.W.A. van Loon; J.P. Baeyens; J. Berte; S. Blanc; L. ter Braak; K. Bok; J. Bos; R. Boyle; N. Bravenoer; M. Eekhoff; A. Chouker; G. Clement; P. Cras; E. Cross; M.A. Cusaud; M. De Angelis; C. de Dreu; T. Delavaux; R. Delfos; C. Poelma; P. Denise; D. Felsenberg; K. Fong; C. Fuller; S. Grillner; E. Groen; J. Harlaar; M. Heer; N. Heglund; H. Hinghofer-Szalkay; N. Goswami; M. Hughes-Fulford; S. Iwase; J.M. Karemaker; B. Langdahl; D. Linarsson; C. Lüthen; M. Monici; E. Mulder; M. Narici; P. Norsk; W. Paloski; G.K. Prisk; M. Rutten; P. Singer; D. Stegeman; A. Stephan; G.J.M. Stienen; P. Suedfeld; P. Tesch; O. Ullrich; R. van den Berg; P. Van de Heyning; A. Delahaye; J. Veyt; L. Vico; E. Woodward; L.R. Young; F. Wuyts

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses concepts regarding the development of an Altered Gravity Platform (AGP) that will serve as a research platform for human space exploration. Space flight causes a multitude of physiological problems, many of which are due to gravity level transitions. Going from Earth’s gravity t

  14. Emotional Intelligence Research within Human Resource Development Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnia, Forouzan; Nafukho, Fredrick Muyia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review and synthesize pertinent emotional intelligence (EI) research within the human resource development (HRD) scholarship. Design/methodology/approach: An integrative review of literature was conducted and multiple electronic databases were searched to find the relevant resources. Using the content…

  15. Applying Organizational Commitment and Human Capital Theories to Emigration Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhohlyad, Olga; McLean, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to bring some additional insight into the issue of emigration by establishing a relationship between emigration and psychic return of citizens to their human capital investment in the country. Design/methodology/approach: The article adopts a quantitative research strategy. It applies organizational commitment and human…

  16. 75 FR 37813 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ..., Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), or Julia Gorey, J.D., Executive Director, SACHRP; U.S...-8141; fax: 240-453-6909; e-mail address: Julia.Gorey@hhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the... as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations, should notify the...

  17. Narratives in Teaching and Research for Justice and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Audrey; Zhu, Juanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history individual and collective narratives have been used in struggles for justice. We draw on Sen's theory of justice to examine the potential of narratives in teaching and researching for social justice. Human rights are presented as powerful ethical claims that can be critically examined by learners to consider their rights and…

  18. Why a True Account of Human Development Requires Exemplar Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, William; Colby, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This chapter uses moral psychology to illustrate why exemplar methods are essential for building a valid, complete understanding of key domains of human development. Social psychological, economic, and biological-evolutionary paradigms for studying morality rely on samples drawn from the general population. This research reveals a bleak picture of…

  19. A survey of dermatology resident education in cosmetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Joslyn S; Adgerson, Cheri N; Anderson, Bryan E

    2013-02-01

    The demands for cosmetic procedures are increasing. Dermatologists perform many of these procedures, therefore adequate education and training during residency is important. Surveys demonstrate dermatology residents desire more training even while faculty members believe this has already become a more prominent feature of resident education. We sought to assess the time and methods dedicated to education and training of cosmetic procedures in dermatology residency. A 26-question survey was developed and electronically distributed in May 2010 to dermatology program directors via the Association of Professors of Dermatology list-serve with their approval. Program directors were asked to forward the e-mail to their instructors of cosmetic/procedural dermatology, and chief residents. Responses were anonymous. A total of 86 responses were collected. In all, 67% (n = 54) of respondents had formal lectures focusing on cosmetic dermatology. Lecture topics reported by more than 50% of respondents included botulinum toxin injection, lasers, soft tissue augmentation, chemical peels, and sclerotherapy. Topics such as dermabrasion, liposuction, and scar revision were less commonly taught. The most commonly encountered and performed procedures were botulinum toxin injection and lasers (100%, n = 86); 98.8% (n = 85) encounter soft tissue augmentation and 95.4% (n = 82) encounter both chemical peels and sclerotherapy. Resident experience performing procedures as the first assistant or as the first surgeon varied widely. The limitations of this study are that the data were subjectively reported so results may differ from the true amount of time spent in any activity. The data may be biased by the population that responded as they may have strong opinions supporting or opposing training in cosmetic procedures. The data also may have been skewed by the small percentage of participants who were instructors of cosmetic dermatology (21%), chief residents (20%), and others respondents (8

  20. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  1. [Dermatologic manifestation of undesirable effects of drugs (excluding cytostatic drugs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villette, B; Rybojad, M; Puissant, A

    1989-01-01

    Medications, consumed more and more frequently as a result of self-medication or prescribed under medical supervision, have multiple side effects, including dermatological ones. In fact, the latter represent the primary cause of drug intolerance. However, the diagnosis is not always made easily and is based upon standardized norms defined by pharmacology control centers. Fixed pigmented eruptions are the only erythema solely of drug-induced origin. Failure to recognize a drug-induced dermatological manifestation can be fatal if the drug is taken again, as in the case of toxic epidermal necrolysis.

  2. CLEANSERS AND THEIR ROLE IN VARIOUS DERMATOLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    2011-01-01

    The art of cleansing has progressed immensely over several thousand years from simply scraping the skin to an exercise in relaxation and improvement in the skin's health and appearance in the present day. Soaps – the basic cleansing agent has also undergone a sea change in its evolution with many variants and newer constituents being incorporated into it. In dermatological disorders like acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, photoaging, ‘sensitive skin’, occupational dermatosis cleansers may have a beneficial role along with other therapeutic measures. With the advent of aesthetic dermatology, the act of cleansing and the use of various cleansing agents prior to aesthetic procedures has also assumed significance. PMID:21572782

  3. [Hannover synthetic moulages. A singular collection of dermatologic teaching models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnalke, T

    1987-12-01

    Dermatological moulages rapidly lost their importance during the 1950s. The disadvantages of the classical moulage materials, plaster of Paris and wax, are pointed out. In the 1960s and 1970s modern plastics were introduced to moulage technology at the Linden Dermatological Clinic in Hannover. Silicon-caoutchouc and Vestolit-PVC were the substances used. This paper describes how the Hannover collection of plastic models was assembled and presents its current status. Wax and plastic models are set against each other in the illustrations.

  4. Cleansers and their role in various dermatological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The art of cleansing has progressed immensely over several thousand years from simply scraping the skin to an exercise in relaxation and improvement in the skin′s health and appearance in the present day. Soaps - the basic cleansing agent has also undergone a sea change in its evolution with many variants and newer constituents being incorporated into it. In dermatological disorders like acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, photoaging, ′sensitive skin′, occupational dermatosis cleansers may have a beneficial role along with other therapeutic measures. With the advent of aesthetic dermatology, the act of cleansing and the use of various cleansing agents prior to aesthetic procedures has also assumed significance.

  5. Community engagement and the human infrastructure of global health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Katherine F; Kolopack, Pamela; Merritt, Maria W; Lavery, James V

    2014-12-13

    Biomedical research is increasingly globalized with ever more research conducted in low and middle-income countries. This trend raises a host of ethical concerns and critiques. While community engagement (CE) has been proposed as an ethically important practice for global biomedical research, there is no agreement about what these practices contribute to the ethics of research, or when they are needed. In this paper, we propose an ethical framework for CE. The framework is grounded in the insight that relationships between the researcher and the community extend beyond the normal bounds of the researcher-research participant encounter and are the foundation of meaningful engagement. These relationships create an essential "human infrastructure" - a web of relationships between researchers and the stakeholder community-i.e., the diverse stakeholders who have interests in the conduct and/or outcomes of the research. Through these relationships, researchers are able to address three core ethical responsibilities: (1) identifying and managing non-obvious risks and benefits; (2) expanding respect beyond the individual to the stakeholder community; and (3) building legitimacy for the research project. By recognizing the social and political context of biomedical research, CE offers a promising solution to many seemingly intractable challenges in global health research; however there are increasing concerns about what makes engagement meaningful. We have responded to those concerns by presenting an ethical framework for CE. This framework reflects our belief that the value of CE is realized through relationships between researchers and stakeholders, thereby advancing three distinct ethical goals. Clarity about the aims of researcher-stakeholder relationships helps to make engagement programs more meaningful, and contributes to greater clarity about when CE should be recommended or required.

  6. Human cloning, stem cell research. An Islamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqeel, Aida I

    2009-12-01

    The rapidly changing technologies that involve human subjects raise complex ethical, legal, social, and religious issues. Recent advances in the field of cloning and stem cell research have introduced new hopes for the treatment of serious diseases. But this promise has raised many complex questions. This field causes debate and challenge, not only among scientists but also among ethicists, religious scholars, governments, and politicians. There is no consensus on the morality of human cloning, even within specific religious traditions. In countries in which religion has a strong influence on political decision making, the moral status of the human embryo is at the center of the debate. Because of the inevitable consequences of reproductive cloning, it is prohibited in Islam. However, stem cell research for therapeutic purposes is permissible with full consideration, and all possible precautions in the pre-ensoulment stages of early fetus development, if the source is legitimate.

  7. EPM - The European Facility for human physiology research on ISS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieschel, Mats; Nasca, Rosario; Junk, Peter; Gerhard, Ingo

    2002-07-01

    The European Physiology Modules (EPM) Facility is one of the four major Space Station facilities being developed within the framework of ESA's Microgravity Facilities for Columbus (MFC) programme. In order to allow a wide spectrum of physiological studies in weightlessness conditions, the facility provides the infrastructure to accommodate a variable set of scientific equipment. The initial EPM configuration supports experiments in the fields of neuroscience, bone & muscle research, cardiovascular research and metabolism. The International Space Life Science Working Group (ISLSWG) has recommended co-locating EPM with the 2 NASA Human Research Facility racks.

  8. The human hair: from anatomy to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoli, Barbara; Rinaldi, Fabio; Labanca, Mauro; Sorbellini, Elisabetta; Trink, Anna; Guanziroli, Elena; Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi F

    2014-03-01

    Hair is a unique character of mammals and has several functions, from protection of the skin to sexual and social communication. In literature, there are various studies about hair that take into consideration different aspects within many fields of science, including biology, dermatology, cosmetics, forensic sciences, and medicine. We carried out a search of studies published in PubMed up to 2013. In this review, we summarized the principal anatomical and physiological aspects of the different types of human hair, and we considered the clinical significance of the different structures and the distribution of the hair in the human body. This review could be the basis for improvement and progression in the field of hair research. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Human factors research in Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry creation of safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horie, Yasuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    To prevent accident of nuclear power plant, Human Factors Center was built in the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in July 1987. It developed an evaluation method of human error cases and an application method of human factors information. Now it continues analysis and application of human factors information, development of training/work support tools and research/experiment of human behavior. Japan-Human Performance Evaluation System (J-HPES) was developed as an analytical system for analysis and evaluation of human factors related to the trouble and for using the result as the common property by storage the analytical results. J-HPES has a standard procedure consisted of collecting and analyzing data and proposing the countermeasures. The analytical results are arranged by 4 kinds of charts by putting into the form of a diagram. Moreover, it tries to find the causes with indirect and potential causes. Two kinds of materials, Caution Report and Human Factors Precept by means of Illustrations, are published. People can gain access to HFC database by URL http://criepi.denken.or.jp/CRIEPI/HFC/DB. To prevent these accidents, creation of human factors culture has been required. Five kinds of teaching materials and the training method are developed. (S.Y.)

  10. Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Human Beings In Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Maria Rita Garbi; Guilhem, Dirce; Lolas, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective Diagnose ethical conduct in research involving human beings in Brazil and the last 10 years of activity by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Health Department - Federal District - CEP/SES/DF. Methods This work was based on a documentary research, descriptive and retrospective. It examined the database containing records of cases brought before the CEP/SES/DF, corresponding the period of June 1997 to December 2007. Results were generated in Excel program, version 2007. Results CEP/SES/DF has presented increasing number of research projects submitted to appreciation (n = 1129), composing: 90.4% approved 1.7% disapproved, 7.4% removed/filed and 0.5% excluded. Of these projects, 83% belonged to Group III, 18% multi-centered projects and 10% protocols with foreign participation. Time for approval has decreased over the years (30 to 60 days). Frequent pendencies: End of Free and Informed Consent (30%), Cover Sheet (25%), Methodology (20%), Curriculum vitae (12%), Budget (9%), and Others (4%). Conclusion The assessment of the CEP/SES/DF activities, during a ten-year period has shown its commitment to the legitimacy of research ethics review and scientific production SES/DF. There were some weaknesses such as difficulty in monitoring the accompaniment of the research; interruption of works due to adverse drug reaction; gaps or errors in the protocol submitted by the researcher. These situations are the achieving targets for the elaboration of specific criteria. PMID:20981277

  11. Examining the Social Benefits Principle in Research with Human Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B

    2016-07-04

    The idea that research with human participants should benefit society has become firmly entrenched in various regulations, policies, and guidelines, but there has been little in-depth analysis of this ethical principle in the bioethics literature. In this paper, I distinguish between strong and weak versions and the social benefits principle and examine six arguments for it. I argue that while it is always ethically desirable for research with human subjects to offer important benefits to society (or the public), the reasonable expectation of substantial public benefit should be a necessary condition for regarding research as ethical only when (a) it imposes more than minimal risks on non-consenting subjects; or (b) it is supported by public resources.

  12. Using non-human primates to benefit humans: research and organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David; Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido

    2014-11-01

    Emerging biotechnology may soon allow the creation of genetically human organs inside animals, with non-human primates (henceforth simply "primates") and pigs being the best candidate species. This prospect raises the question of whether creating organs in primates in order to then transplant them into humans would be more (or less) acceptable than using them for research. In this paper, we examine the validity of the purported moral distinction between primates and other animals, and analyze the ethical acceptability of using primates to create organs for human use.

  13. Human subjects protection issues in QUERI implementation research: QUERI Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie Mona

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Subjects protections approaches, specifically those relating to research review board oversight, vary throughout the world. While all are designed to protect participants involved in research, the structure and specifics of these institutional review boards (IRBs can and do differ. This variation affects all types of research, particularly implementation research. Methods In 2001, we began a series of inter-related studies on implementing evidence-based collaborative care for depression in Veterans Health Administration primary care. We have submitted more than 100 IRB applications, amendments, and renewals, and in doing so, we have interacted with 13 VA and University IRBs across the United States (U.S.. We present four overarching IRB-related themes encountered throughout the implementation of our projects, and within each theme, identify key challenges and suggest approaches that have proved useful. Where applicable, we showcase process aids developed to assist in resolving a particular IRB challenge. Results There are issues unique to implementation research, as this type of research may not fit within the traditional Human Subjects paradigm used to assess clinical trials. Risks in implementation research are generally related to breaches of confidentiality, rather than health risks associated with traditional clinical trials. The implementation-specific challenges discussed are: external validity considerations, Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, risk-benefit issues, the multiple roles of researchers and subjects, and system-level unit of analysis. Discussion Specific aspects of implementation research interact with variations in knowledge, procedures, and regulatory interpretations across IRBs to affect the implementation and study of best methods to increase evidence-based practice. Through lack of unambiguous guidelines and local liability concerns, IRBs are often at risk of applying both variable and inappropriate or

  14. Development of a Dermatology Diagnostic Techniques Teaching Session: A Nine-Step Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Robin M; Shell, Linda G

    2017-08-16

    Creating effective learning experiences for veterinary clinical skills and procedures can be a challenging task. Drawing from both medical and veterinary education literature and personal experiences as practicing veterinarians and educators, the authors share nine key steps that describe the development process of a pre-clinical veterinary clinical skills teaching session. Relevant research and pedagogical principles supporting the effectiveness of the proposed nine-step process were identified and discussed. The aims of this article were to describe the development of a dermatology techniques teaching session and to provide the reader with a structured approach that can be used as a template to design or audit other clinical skills teaching sessions.

  15. The use of a digital imaging system in a dermatologic surgery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M A; Goldstein, G D

    1997-01-01

    Digital imaging systems are now commercially available, reasonably affordable, and much improved in quality. To present our 2-year experience with a digital imaging system in Mohs and dermatologic surgery practice and to inform readers of the equipment needed, its cost, uses, advantages, and disadvantages compared with conventional photography. The advantages of a digital imaging system include quality images, easy storage and retrieval, and cost-effectiveness. The disadvantages are few: a substantial initial investment and the training of office personnel in its use and maintenance. Uses include monitoring nevomelanocytic lesions, surgical photo documentation, medical records, and a photographic research database.

  16. How informative is the mouse for human gut microbiota research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Loan Anh; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Liston, Adrian; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota of the human gut is gaining broad attention owing to its association with a wide range of diseases, ranging from metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity and type 2 diabetes) to autoimmune diseases (such as inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes), cancer and even neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). Having been increasingly used in biomedical research, mice have become the model of choice for most studies in this emerging field. Mouse models allow perturbations in gut microbiota to be studied in a controlled experimental setup, and thus help in assessing causality of the complex host-microbiota interactions and in developing mechanistic hypotheses. However, pitfalls should be considered when translating gut microbiome research results from mouse models to humans. In this Special Article, we discuss the intrinsic similarities and differences that exist between the two systems, and compare the human and murine core gut microbiota based on a meta-analysis of currently available datasets. Finally, we discuss the external factors that influence the capability of mouse models to recapitulate the gut microbiota shifts associated with human diseases, and investigate which alternative model systems exist for gut microbiota research.

  17. How informative is the mouse for human gut microbiota research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Loan Anh Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiota of the human gut is gaining broad attention owing to its association with a wide range of diseases, ranging from metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity and type 2 diabetes to autoimmune diseases (such as inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes, cancer and even neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism. Having been increasingly used in biomedical research, mice have become the model of choice for most studies in this emerging field. Mouse models allow perturbations in gut microbiota to be studied in a controlled experimental setup, and thus help in assessing causality of the complex host-microbiota interactions and in developing mechanistic hypotheses. However, pitfalls should be considered when translating gut microbiome research results from mouse models to humans. In this Special Article, we discuss the intrinsic similarities and differences that exist between the two systems, and compare the human and murine core gut microbiota based on a meta-analysis of currently available datasets. Finally, we discuss the external factors that influence the capability of mouse models to recapitulate the gut microbiota shifts associated with human diseases, and investigate which alternative model systems exist for gut microbiota research.

  18. A Research Roadmap for Computation-Based Human Reliability Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Groth, Katrina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research through the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to extend the life of the currently operating fleet of commercial nuclear power plants. The Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) research pathway within LWRS looks at ways to maintain and improve the safety margins of these plants. The RISMC pathway includes significant developments in the area of thermalhydraulics code modeling and the development of tools to facilitate dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). PRA is primarily concerned with the risk of hardware systems at the plant; yet, hardware reliability is often secondary in overall risk significance to human errors that can trigger or compound undesirable events at the plant. This report highlights ongoing efforts to develop a computation-based approach to human reliability analysis (HRA). This computation-based approach differs from existing static and dynamic HRA approaches in that it: (i) interfaces with a dynamic computation engine that includes a full scope plant model, and (ii) interfaces with a PRA software toolset. The computation-based HRA approach presented in this report is called the Human Unimodels for Nuclear Technology to Enhance Reliability (HUNTER) and incorporates in a hybrid fashion elements of existing HRA methods to interface with new computational tools developed under the RISMC pathway. The goal of this research effort is to model human performance more accurately than existing approaches, thereby minimizing modeling uncertainty found in current plant risk models.

  19. 75 FR 52537 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  20. 75 FR 2148 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group, Genome Research Review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  1. 78 FR 56905 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; H3AFRICA ELSI Research.... Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Suite 3055, 5635 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD...

  2. 78 FR 24223 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd floor Conf. Room 3146, 5635 Fishers...

  3. 76 FR 3643 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial Review Group; Genome Research Review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January...

  4. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html.

  5. Tissue-engineered models of human tumors for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Drug toxicity often goes undetected until clinical trials, which are the most costly and dangerous phase of drug development. Both the cultures of human cells and animal studies have limitations that cannot be overcome by incremental improvements in drug-testing protocols. A new generation of bioengineered tumors is now emerging in response to these limitations, with potential to transform drug screening by providing predictive models of tumors within their tissue context, for studies of drug safety and efficacy. An area that could greatly benefit from these models is cancer research. Areas covered In this review, the authors first describe the engineered tumor systems, using Ewing's sarcoma as an example of human tumor that cannot be predictably studied in cell culture and animal models. Then, they discuss the importance of the tissue context for cancer progression and outline the biomimetic principles for engineering human tumors. Finally, they discuss the utility of bioengineered tumor models for cancer research and address the challenges in modeling human tumors for use in drug discovery and testing. Expert opinion While tissue models are just emerging as a new tool for cancer drug discovery, they are already demonstrating potential for recapitulating, in vitro, the native behavior of human tumors. Still, numerous challenges need to be addressed before we can have platforms with a predictive power appropriate for the pharmaceutical industry. Some of the key needs include the incorporation of the vascular compartment, immune system components, and mechanical signals that regulate tumor development and function. PMID:25662589

  6. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms.

  7. Human dimensions in cyber operations research and development priorities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, James Chris; Silva, Austin Ray; Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Bradshaw, Jeffrey [Institute for Human and Machine Cognition

    2012-11-01

    Within cyber security, the human element represents one of the greatest untapped opportunities for increasing the effectiveness of network defenses. However, there has been little research to understand the human dimension in cyber operations. To better understand the needs and priorities for research and development to address these issues, a workshop was conducted August 28-29, 2012 in Washington DC. A synthesis was developed that captured the key issues and associated research questions. Research and development needs were identified that fell into three parallel paths: (1) human factors analysis and scientific studies to establish foundational knowledge concerning factors underlying the performance of cyber defenders; (2) development of models that capture key processes that mediate interactions between defenders, users, adversaries and the public; and (3) development of a multi-purpose test environment for conducting controlled experiments that enables systems and human performance measurement. These research and development investments would transform cyber operations from an art to a science, enabling systems solutions to be engineered to address a range of situations. Organizations would be able to move beyond the current state where key decisions (e.g. personnel assignment) are made on a largely ad hoc basis to a state in which there exist institutionalized processes for assuring the right people are doing the right jobs in the right way. These developments lay the groundwork for emergence of a professional class of cyber defenders with defined roles and career progressions, with higher levels of personnel commitment and retention. Finally, the operational impact would be evident in improved performance, accompanied by a shift to a more proactive response in which defenders have the capacity to exert greater control over the cyber battlespace.

  8. Bringing humanity into view: action research with Qatar's ambulance service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Gill; Wiggins, Liz

    2017-08-21

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to argue for the widening of attention in healthcare improvement efforts, to include an awareness of the humanity of people who work in the sector and an appreciation of the part human connection plays in engagement around good quality work. Theoretical frameworks and research approaches which draw on action-based, interpretive and systemic thinking are proposed, as a complement to current practices. Design/methodology/approach The paper describes the early stages of an action research (AR) project, which used the appreciative inquiry "4D" framework to conduct participative inquiry in Hamad Medical Corporation's ambulance service in Qatar, in which staff became co-researchers. Findings The co-researchers were highly motivated to work with improvement goals as a result of their participation in the AR. They, and their managers, saw each other and the work in new ways and discovered that they had much to offer. Research limitations/implications This was a small-scale pilot project, from which findings must be considered tentative. The challenges of establishing good collaboration across language, culture and organisational divides are considerable. Practical implications Appreciative and action-oriented inquiry methods can serve not only to find things out, but also to highlight and give value to aspects of humanity in the workplace that are routinely left invisible in formal processes. This, in turn, can help with quality improvement. Originality/value This paper is a challenge to the orthodox way of viewing healthcare organisations, and improvement processes within them, as reliant on control rather than empowerment. An alternative is to actively include the agency, sense-making capacity and humanity of those involved.

  9. Integrating human factors research and surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouhed, Daniel; Gewertz, Bruce; Wiegmann, Doug; Catchpole, Ken

    2012-12-01

    To provide a review of human factors research within the context of surgery. We searched PubMed for relevant studies published from the earliest available date through February 29, 2012. The search was performed using the following keywords: human factors, surgery, errors, teamwork, communication, stress, disruptions, interventions, checklists, briefings, and training. Additional articles were identified by a manual search of the references from the key articles. As 2 human factors specialists, a senior clinician, and a junior clinician, we carefully selected the most appropriate exemplars of research findings with specific relevance to surgical error and safety. Seventy-seven articles of relevance were selected and reviewed in detail. Opinion pieces and editorials were disregarded; the focus was solely on articles based on empirical evidence, with a particular emphasis on prospectively designed studies. The themes that emerged related to the development of human factors theories, the application of those theories within surgery, a specific interest in the concept of flow, and the theoretical basis and value of human-related interventions for improving safety and flow in surgery. Despite increased awareness of safety, errors routinely continue to occur in surgical care. Disruptions in the flow of an operation, such as teamwork and communication failures, contribute significantly to such adverse events. While it is apparent that some incidence of human error is unavoidable, there is much evidence in medicine and other fields that systems can be better designed to prevent or detect errors before a patient is harmed. The complexity of factors leading to surgical errors requires collaborations between surgeons and human factors experts to carry out the proper prospective and observational studies. Only when we are guided by this valid and real-world data can useful interventions be identified and implemented.

  10. The Stegman Papers: biography of a leader in dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redbord, Kelley P; Hanke, C William

    2012-06-01

    The Stegman Papers is a biography of Dr. Samuel J. Stegman. The papers were collected by Dr. Stegman during his lifetime as a dermatologic surgeon and leader. The manuscript includes a time line of Dr. Stegman's life and listing of his accomplishments, including significant publications.

  11. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  12. Platelet rich plasma in dermatology and aesthetic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Platelet rich plasma is a promising therapy in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. In this article we will discuss the pros and cons of platelet rich plasma (PRP and the usage of PRP in aesthetics. PRP is especially used for conditions like facial and neck rejuvenation, fine lines and wrinkles, abdominal striae and facial scarring.

  13. Dermatologic Toxicities in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Multikinase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaby-Sandy, Beth; Grande, Carolyn; Viale, Pamela Hallquist

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapies have produced significant treatment advances for patients diagnosed with a variety of tumor types. These therapies are associated with unique dermatologic toxicities that may hamper treatment efforts and cause significant discomfort for patients. Prevention and management of these toxicities can allow patients to remain on therapy and hence receive maximum clinical benefit from the drug. PMID:25031940

  14. Off-label uses of etanercept in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Tirado-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    The blockade of TNF receptor (etanercept main effect has been successfully used in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, among other rheumatologic diseases. The only approved indication for etanercept in dermatological disease is plaque psoriasis; however, the literature is full of case reports and case series where etanercept was used off-label, sometimes successfully. We review some of these indications.

  15. [Research progress on free radicals in human body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q B; Xu, F P; Wei, C X; Peng, J; Dong, X D

    2016-08-10

    Free radicals are the intermediates of metabolism, widely exist in the human bodies. Under normal circumstances, the free radicals play an important role in the metabolic process on human body, cell signal pathway, gene regulation, induction of cell proliferation and apoptosis, so as to maintain the normal growth and development of human body and to inhibit the growth of bacteria, virus and cancer. However, when organic lesion occurs affected by external factors or when equilibrium of the free radicals is tipped in the human body, the free radicals will respond integratedly with lipids, protein or nucleic acid which may jeopardize the health of human bodies. This paper summarizes the research progress of the free radicals conducted in recent years, in relations to the perspective of the types, origins, test methods of the free radicals and their relationship with human's health. In addition, the possible mechanisms of environmental pollutants (such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) mediating oxidative stress and free radicals scavenging in the body were also summarized.

  16. Robotics for recombinant DNA and human genetics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In October of 1989, molecular biologists throughout the world formally embarked on ultimately determining the set of genetic instructions for a human being. Called by some the Manhattan Project'' a molecular biology, pursuit of this goal is projected to require approximately 3000 man years of effort over a 15-year period. The Humane Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort that has the goal of analyzing the structure of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the location of all human genes. The Department of Energy (DOE) has designated three of its national laboratories as centers for the Human Genome Project. These are Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). These laboratories are currently working on different, but complementary technology development areas in support of the Human Genome Project. The robotics group at LANL is currently working at developing the technologies that address the problems associated with physical mapping. This article describes some of these problems and discusses some of the robotics approaches and engineering tolls applicable to their solution. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Integrating social sciences and humanities in interdisciplinary research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Budtz

    2016-01-01

    Recent attempts to integrate the social sciences and humanities (SSH) in funding for interdisciplinary research have been challenged by a number of barriers. In funding programmes, such as the EU Horizon 2020, the SSH are absent in most calls for contributions. This article revisits the main policy...... drivers for embedding SSH research in interdisciplinary research. By analysing recent policy initiatives, the article shows how policymakers across the world continue to be ambivalent regarding the role of the SSH. While many stakeholders acknowledge the need to integrate SSH research in solving key...... societal challenges, such as climate change, migration or national security, funding for SSH is limited and tends to focus on strategic interventions and instrumental solutions. By accounting for the diversity of interdisciplinary collaborations the article recommends a more context-sensitive approach...

  18. Evaluation of dermatologic emergeny patients: An unicentral prospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Köşlü

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: The definition of emergent diseases includes potentially risky diseases that need urgent medical intervention. Diagnostic and therapeutic processes are managed mostly at ourpatient setting in dermatology. Therefore, it is unclear that which diseases are real emergencies and which patients apply urgently. There are a few studies assessing this topic. Our aim was to evaluate patients referred to our clinic urgently, and to review the concept of ‘‘real dermatologic emergency’’ by comparing dermatologic emergency patients and outpatients. Material and Method: A total of 800 patients (400 urgent patients, 400 outpatients were included. Demographic features, complaints, disease duration and severity, whether the disease occurs for the first time were questionned, application time and diagnosis were recorded. The opinions of patients and physicians were inquired about why they thought that the disease was emergent. Results: Most common skin diseases were acute urticaria-angioedema, contact dermatitis, and insect bite in emergency patients; acne vulgaris, verruca and tinea pedis in outpatients. Itching was more common in emergency patients. Emergency patients' complaints were more severe than those of outpatients. Patients who experience disease first time applied to emergency service more than others. Emergency patients had a shorter disease duration than outpatients. Patients and physicians revealed different reasons and criteria about the urgency of the diseases. 93.5% of patients and 49% of physicians thought that existing disease was emergent. Conclusion: Our data reveal that the concept of dermatologic emergency is unsettled. It changes according to socio-cultural, personal features and to the present health system. Determination of the main criteria of the definition of “dermatologic urgent”, and training of dermatologists, emergency centers’physicians and also of patients in this regard seem to be a necessity

  19. Impact factors of dermatological journals for 1991 – 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemec Gregor BE

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact factors of scientific journals are interesting but not unproblematic. It is speculated that the number of journals in which citations can be made correlates with the impact factors in any given speciality. Methods Using the Journal Citation Report (JCR for 1997, a bibliometric analysis was made to assess the correlation between the number of journals available in different fields of clinical medicine and the top impact factor. A detailed study was made of dermatological journals listed in the JCR 1991–2000, to assess the relevance of this general survey. Results Using the 1997 JCR definitions of speciality journals, a significant linear correlation was found between the number of journals in a given field and the top impact factor of that field (rs = 0.612, p Studying the trend for dermatological journals 1991 to 2000 a similar pattern was found. Significant correlations were also found between total number of journals and mean impact factor (rs = 0.793, p = 0.006, between the total number of journals and the top impact factor (rs = 0.759, p = 0.011 and between the mean and the top impact factor (rs = 0.827, p = 0.003. Conclusions The observations suggest that the number of journals available predict the top impact factor. For dermatology journals the top and the mean impact factor are predicted. This is in good agreement with theoretical expectations as more journals make more print-space available for more papers containing citations. It is suggested that new journals in dermatology should be encouraged, as this will most likely increase the impact factor of dermatological journals generally.

  20. Proceeding of human exoskeleton technology and discussions on future research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Xie, Hanxing; Li, Weilin; Yao, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    After more than half a century of intense efforts, the development of exoskeleton has seen major advances, and several remarkable achievements have been made. Reviews of developing history of exoskeleton are presented, both in active and passive categories. Major models are introduced, and typical technologies are commented on. Difficulties in control algorithm, driver system, power source, and man-machine interface are discussed. Current researching routes and major developing methods are mapped and critically analyzed, and in the process, some key problems are revealed. First, the exoskeleton is totally different from biped robot, and relative studies based on the robot technologies are considerably incorrect. Second, biomechanical studies are only used to track the motion of the human body, the interaction between human and machines are seldom studied. Third, the traditional developing ways which focused on servo-controlling have inborn deficiency from making portable systems. Research attention should be shifted to the human side of the coupling system, and the human ability to learn and adapt should play a more significant role in the control algorithms. Having summarized the major difficulties, possible future works are discussed. It is argued that, since a distinct boundary cannot be drawn in such strong-coupling human-exoskeleton system, the more complex the control system gets, the more difficult it is for the user to learn to use. It is suggested that the exoskeleton should be treated as a simple wearable tool, and downgrading its automatic level may be a change toward a brighter research outlook. This effort at simplification is definitely not easy, as it necessitates theoretical supports from fields such as biomechanics, ergonomics, and bionics.

  1. Automotive Technology and Human Factors Research: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyuki Akamatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the history of automotive technology development and human factors research, largely by decade, since the inception of the automobile. The human factors aspects were classified into primary driving task aspects (controls, displays, and visibility, driver workspace (seating and packaging, vibration, comfort, and climate, driver’s condition (fatigue and impairment, crash injury, advanced driver-assistance systems, external communication access, and driving behavior. For each era, the paper describes the SAE and ISO standards developed, the major organizations and conferences established, the major news stories affecting vehicle safety, and the general social context. The paper ends with a discussion of what can be learned from this historical review and the major issues to be addressed. A major contribution of this paper is more than 180 references that represent the foundation of automotive human factors, which should be considered core knowledge and should be familiar to those in the profession.

  2. Why aging research? The moral imperative to retard human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Colin

    2010-06-01

    The American philosopher John Rawls describes a fair system of social cooperation as one that is both rational and reasonable. Is it rational and reasonable for societies that (1) are vulnerable to diverse risks of morbidity (e.g., cancer, heart disease) and mortality and (2) are constrained by limited medical resources, to prioritize aging research? In this paper I make the case for answering "yes" on both accounts. Focusing on a plausible example of an applied gerontological intervention (i.e., an antiaging pharmaceutical), I argue that the goal of decelerating the rate of human aging would be a more effective strategy for extending the human health span than the current strategy of just tackling each specific disease of aging. Furthermore, the aspiration to retard human aging is also a reasonable aspiration, for the principle that underlies it (i.e., the duty to prevent harm) is one that no one could reasonably reject.

  3. Identification and management of mental health issues by dermatologic surgeons: a survey of American Society for Dermatologic Surgery members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Sobanko, Joseph F; Beer, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologists have long been interested in mental health issues of their patients. Some psychosocial distress likely motivates the pursuit of cosmetic dermatologic treatments. However, a percentage of patients seeking treatment suffer from significant psychopathology, such as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which may contraindicate treatment. To assess dermatologic surgeons' strategies for identification and management of mental health issues among patients seeking cosmetic procedures. A survey was sent to 2,855 practicing members of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery by e-mail. Two hundred sixty members completed the survey (9.1%). Approximately, 60% of respondents indicated that they ask new patients about psychiatric treatment history, and 92% reported that they have declined to provide a cosmetic treatment because of concerns about mental health status. Most (94%) indicated that they were aware of BDD, and 62% indicated that they refused to treat a patient believed to have BDD. Respondents estimated that 13% of new patients had BDD and 63% considered BDD to be a contraindication to treatment. Approximately 60% of dermatologic surgeons inquire about the mental health issues of their cosmetic patients. Most are aware of BDD, but less than two-thirds consider it a contraindication to treatment.

  4. Specialized dermatological care for marginalized populations and education at the primary care level: is community dermatology a feasible proposal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Roberto; Chavez-Lopez, Guadalupe; Estrada-Chavez, Guadalupe; Paredes-Solis, Sergio

    2012-11-01

    Skin diseases have a very high frequency either in developed as well as in undeveloped countries. Guerrero, Chiapas, and Oaxaca are the most impoverished states in Mexico, where 24% of the population lacks basic health care, and only 15% are estimated to have access to specialists. Community Dermatology program was founded in 1991 with the intention of improving the dermatological health of remote, marginalized inhabitants of the state of Guerrero. The program consists of a two-day visit to a pre-selected community; the first day includes a basic dermatology training course for local providers, and day 2 is a "Jornada",which means a day of free medical consultation and treatment. Pityriasis albus Cloasma, vitiligo, and acne continue to be the most frequent diagnosed primary disorders, as in rural areas occupational obligations include prolonged sun exposure. The experience and success of Community Dermatology over the last 20 years has demonstrated that this model of healthcare delivery and instruction is economically feasible, provides practical and quantifiable benefits for the communities served, and could be emulated by other disciplines within medicine.

  5. Challenges of metabolomics in human gut microbiota research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Kirill S; Maier, Tanja V; Walker, Alesia; Heinzmann, Silke S; Forcisi, Sara; Martinez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The review highlights the role of metabolomics in studying human gut microbial metabolism. Microbial communities in our gut exert a multitude of functions with huge impact on human health and disease. Within the meta-omics discipline, gut microbiome is studied by (meta)genomics, (meta)transcriptomics, (meta)proteomics and metabolomics. The goal of metabolomics research applied to fecal samples is to perform their metabolic profiling, to quantify compounds and classes of interest, to characterize small molecules produced by gut microbes. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are main technologies that are applied in fecal metabolomics. Metabolomics studies have been increasingly used in gut microbiota related research regarding health and disease with main focus on understanding inflammatory bowel diseases. The elucidated metabolites in this field are summarized in this review. We also addressed the main challenges of metabolomics in current and future gut microbiota research. The first challenge reflects the need of adequate analytical tools and pipelines, including sample handling, selection of appropriate equipment, and statistical evaluation to enable meaningful biological interpretation. The second challenge is related to the choice of the right animal model for studies on gut microbiota. We exemplified this using NMR spectroscopy for the investigation of cross-species comparison of fecal metabolite profiles. Finally, we present the problem of variability of human gut microbiota and metabolome that has important consequences on the concepts of personalized nutrition and medicine.

  6. The Trustworthiness Deficit in Postgenomic Research on Human Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sarah S

    2015-01-01

    In the past, work on racial and ethnic variation in brain and behavior was marginalized within genetics. Against the backdrop of genetics' eugenic legacy, wide consensus held such research to be both ethically problematic and methodologically controversial. But today it is finding new opportunistic venues in a global, transdisciplinary, data-rich postgenomic research environment in which such a consensus is increasingly strained. The postgenomic sciences display worrisome deficits in their ability to govern and negotiate standards for making postgenomic claims in the transdisciplinary space between human population variation research, studies of intelligence, neuroscience, and evolutionary biology. Today some researchers are pursuing the genomics of intelligence on a newly grand scale. They are sequencing large numbers of whole genomes of people considered highly intelligent (by varying empirical and social measures) in the hope of finding gene variants predictive of intelligence. Troubling and at times outlandish futurist claims accompany this research. Scientists involved in this research have openly discussed the possibility of marketing prenatal tests for intelligence, of genetic engineering or selective embryo implantation to increase the likelihood of a high-IQ child, and of genotyping children to guide their education. In this permissive and contested environment, what would trustworthy research on the genomics of high intelligence look like?

  7. Paternalism and utilitarianism in research with human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B

    2015-03-01

    In this article I defend a rule utilitarian approach to paternalistic policies in research with human participants. Some rules that restrict individual autonomy can be justified on the grounds that they help to maximize the overall balance of benefits over risks in research. The consequences that should be considered when formulating policy include not only likely impacts on research participants, but also impacts on investigators, institutions, sponsors, and the scientific community. The public reaction to adverse events in research (such as significant injury to participants or death) is a crucial concern that must be taken into account when assessing the consequences of different policy options, because public backlash can lead to outcomes that have a negative impact on science, such as cuts in funding, overly restrictive regulation and oversight, and reduced willingness of individuals to participate in research. I argue that concern about the public reaction to adverse events justifies some restrictions on the risks that competent, adult volunteers can face in research that offers them no significant benefits. The paternalism defended here is not pure, because it involves restrictions on the rights of investigators in order to protect participants. It also has a mixed rationale, because individual autonomy may be restricted not only to protect participants from harm but also to protect other stakeholders. Utility is not the sole justification for paternalistic research policies, since other considerations, such as justice and respect for individual rights/autonomy, must also be taken into account.

  8. Eli Lilly and Company's bioethics framework for human biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campen, Luann E; Therasse, Donald G; Klopfenstein, Mitchell; Levine, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Current ethics and good clinical practice guidelines address various aspects of pharmaceutical research and development, but do not comprehensively address the bioethical responsibilities of sponsors. To fill this void, in 2010 Eli Lilly and Company developed and implemented a Bioethics Framework for Human Biomedical Research to guide ethical decisions. (See our companion article that describes how the framework was developed and implemented and provides a critique of its usefulness and limitations.) This paper presents the actual framework that serves as a company resource for employee education and bioethics deliberations. The framework consists of four basic ethical principles and 13 essential elements for ethical human biomedical research and resides within the context of our company's mission, vision and values. For each component of the framework, we provide a high-level overview followed by a detailed description with cross-references to relevant well regarded guidance documents. The principles and guidance described should be familiar to those acquainted with research ethics. Therefore the novelty of the framework lies not in the foundational concepts presented as much as the attempt to specify and compile a sponsor's bioethical responsibilities to multiple stakeholders into one resource. When such a framework is employed, it can serve as a bioethical foundation to inform decisions and actions throughout clinical planning, trial design, study implementation and closeout, as well as to inform company positions on bioethical issues. The framework is, therefore, a useful tool for translating ethical aspirations into action - to help ensure pharmaceutical human biomedical research is conducted in a manner that aligns with consensus ethics principles, as well as a sponsor's core values.

  9. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  10. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  11. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  12. An evolving research agenda for human-coastal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Eli D.; Ellis, Michael A.; Brad Murray, A.; Hall, Damon M.

    2016-03-01

    Within the broad discourses of environmental change, sustainability science, and anthropogenic Earth-surface systems, a focused body of work involves the coupled economic and physical dynamics of developed shorelines. Rapid rates of change in coastal environments, from wetlands and deltas to inlets and dune systems, help researchers recognize, observe, and investigate coupling in natural (non-human) morphodynamics and biomorphodynamics. This same intrinsic quality of fast-paced change also makes developed coastal zones exemplars of observable coupling between physical processes and human activities. In many coastal communities, beach erosion is a natural hazard with economic costs that coastal management counters through a variety of mitigation strategies, including beach replenishment, groynes, revetments, and seawalls. As cycles of erosion and mitigation iterate, coastline change and economically driven interventions become mutually linked. Emergent dynamics of two-way economic-physical coupling is a recent research discovery. Having established a strong theoretical basis, research into coupled human-coastal systems has passed its early proof-of-concept phase. This paper frames three major challenges that need resolving in order to advance theoretical and empirical treatments of human-coastal systems: (1) codifying salient individual and social behaviors of decision-making in ways that capture societal actions across a range of scales (thus engaging economics, social science, and policy disciplines); (2) quantifying anthropogenic effects on alongshore and cross-shore sediment pathways and long-term landscape evolution in coastal zones through time, including direct measurement of cumulative changes to sediment cells resulting from coastal development and management practices (e.g., construction of buildings and artificial dunes, bulldozer removal of overwash after major storms); and (3) reciprocal knowledge and data exchange between researchers in coastal

  13. Human Rights Education and the Research Process: Action Research as a Tool for Reflection and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Celma

    2016-01-01

    Human rights education (HRE) aims to achieve a change of mindsets and social attitudes that entails the construction of a culture of respect towards those values it teaches. Although HRE is a recent field of study, its consolidation in Latin America is a fact. During the latest decades several authors have carried out research related to HRE that…

  14. Public perception of dermatologic surgery in Saudi Arabia: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHargan, Abdullah H; Al-Hejin, Nujud R; AlSufyani, Mohammed A

    2017-05-15

    Dermatologic surgery is a well established subspecialty in dermatology, but observations suggest that the public may not be aware of this field. To explore the public perception of the nature and scope of dermatologic surgery Methods: A cross-sectional online-based survey consisting of two parts was used. The first part recorded demographic data. The second part presented a series of clinical scenarios in common surgical and cosmetic procedures performed by dermatologic surgeons to determine respondents' choice among three specialties: general surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatologic surgery. A total of 1,248 responses were recorded. Seventy-four percent of respondents were female, with 80.29% between the ages of 18 and 34 years. Forty-nine percent considered dermatologic surgeons to be specialized skin surgeons and 71.63% said they would consult dermatologic surgeons for skin tumor excisions. However, plastic surgeons emerged more favorably for cosmetic procedures. For office-based procedures, 80.85% and 87.18% of respondents chose plastic surgeons for fillers and Botox® injections, respectively, compared to 15.79% and 12.02% of respondents who chose dermatologic surgeons. Although the majority of participants showed no doubt about the surgical skills of dermatologic surgeons, the responses demonstrate that the public is not aware of the full scope and practice of dermatologic surgery, especially as it pertains to cosmetic procedures. Therefore, we must educate the public about the field and branches of dermatologic surgery.

  15. Specialists are not qualified enough to recognize and define dermatologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Sibel; Artuz, Ferda

    2014-01-01

    Dermatology is a specific branch of medicine which includes dermatologic manifestations of systemic underlying diseases as well as primary cutaneous diseases. In this study, specialists' abilities of defining and diagnosing dermatologic diseases were assessed. 381 hospitalized patients who were referred to the Dermatology Clinic were reviewed via electronic medical charts. 121 of the clinicians (31.2%) made a dermatologic definition when referring their patients to dermatology. 136 of the the clinicians (35.1%) made a pre-diagnosis for their patients' dermatologic condition of which 90 (66,2%) were correct and 46 (33,8%) were non-relevant. Internists wrote a definitive dermatologic examination note significantly more often than surgeons (P=0.03). However, there was not a significant difference between internists and surgeons when we compared the ratio of correct and complete dermatologic definitions of patient condition (P=0.503). There was also no difference between surgeons and internists in terms of making a pre-diagnosis, making a correct diagnosis, and making a wrong diagnosis (P>0.05 for each comparison). In conclusion, dermatologic consultations are crucial and necessary for the improvement of patient care and treatment. Specialists lack basic skills to recognize and define dermatologic conditions they are confronted with.

  16. Dermatologic hazards from hidden contacts with penicillin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonk, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The unbridled use of penicillin after its discovery by Fleming has resulted in possible hazards to human health due to traces of the drug being present in food and other hidden sources. These hazards may include toxic effects, hypersensitivity reactions and possibly a raising of the frequency and duration of allergy to penicillin.

  17. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Z

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zain Husain,1 Tina S Alster1,2 1Department of Dermatology, Georgetown University Hospital, 2Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. Keywords: laser, intense pulsed light, treatment, dermatology, technology

  18. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O2, and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing.

  19. 78 FR 55752 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Sites for..., Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC...

  20. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed....), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Human Genome Research... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Human Genome Research...