WorldWideScience

Sample records for human de-amplifier system

  1. Human Resource Accounting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  2. Human Resource Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Navaz, A. S. Syed; Fiaz, A. S. Syed; Prabhadevi, C.; V.Sangeetha; Gopalakrishnan,S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper titled HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM is basically concerned with managing the Administrator of HUMAN RESOURCE Department in a company. A Human Resource Management System, refers to the systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management and information technology. It merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standa...

  3. Human Emotion Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbag Singh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of feature extraction of facial expressions with combination of neural network for the recognition of different facial emotions (happy, sad, angry, fear, surprised, neutral etc... Humans are capable of producing thousands of facial actions during communication that vary in complexity, intensity, and meaning. This paper analyses the limitations with existing system Emotion recognition using brain activity. In this paper by using an existing simulator I have achieved 97 percent accurate results and it is easy and simplest way than Emotion recognition using brain activity system. Purposed system depends upon human face as we know face also reflects the human brain activities or emotions. In this paper neural network has been used for better results. In the end of paper comparisons of existing Human Emotion Recognition System has been made with new one.

  4. Human immune system variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual's immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases.

  5. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions.......This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...

  6. Human Exposure Database System (HEDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) provides public access to data sets, documents, and metadata from EPA on human exposure. It is primarily intended for...

  7. Disorder in Complex Human System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, K. Gediz

    2011-11-01

    Since the world of human and whose life becomes more and more complex every day because of the digital technology and under the storm of knowledge (media, internet, governmental and non-governmental organizations, etc...) the simulation is rapidly growing in the social systems and in human behaviors. The formation of the body and mutual interactions are left to digital technological, communication mechanisms and coding the techno genetics of the body. Deconstruction begins everywhere. The linear simulation mechanism with modern realities are replaced by the disorder simulation of human behaviors with awareness realities. In this paper I would like to introduce simulation theory of "Disorder Sensitive Human Behaviors". I recently proposed this theory to critique the role of disorder human behaviors in social systems. In this theory the principle of realty is the chaotic awareness of the complexity of human systems inside of principle of modern thinking in Baudrillard's simulation theory. Proper examples will be also considered to investigate the theory.

  8. Human neutrophil alloantigens systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse Moritz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil alloantigens are involved in a variety of clinical conditions including immune neutropenias, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI, refractoriness to granulocyte transfusions and febrile transfusion reactions. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the characterization of the implicated antigens. Currently, seven antigens are assigned to five human neutrophil antigen (HNA systems. The HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-1c antigens have been identified as polymorphic forms of the neutrophil Fcγ receptor IIIb (CD16b, encoded by three alleles. Recently, the primary structure of the HNA-2a antigen was elucidated and the HNA-2a-bearing glycoprotein was identified as a member of the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily, which has been clustered as CD177. The HNA-3a antigen is located on a 70-95 kDa glycoprotein; however, its molecular basis is still unknown. Finally, the HNA-4a and HNA-5a antigens were found to be caused by single nucleotide mutations in the αM (CD11b and αL (CD11a subunits of the leucocyte adhesion molecules (β2 integrins. Molecular and biochemical characterization of neutrophil antigenshave expanded our diagnostic tools by the introduction of genotyping techniques and immunoassays for antibody identification. Further studies in the field of neutrophil immunology will facilitate the prevention and management of transfusion reactions and immune diseases caused by neutrophil antibodies.Os aloantígenos de neutrófilos estão associados a várias condições clínicas como neutropenias imunes, insuficiência pulmonar relacionada à transfusão (TRALI, refratariedade à transfusão de granulócitos, e reações transfusionais febris. Na última década, foi observado considerável progresso na caracterização dos aloantígenos envolvidos nestas condições clínicas. Atualmente sete antígenos estão incluídos em cinco sistemas de antígenos de neutrófilo humano (HNA. Os antígenos HNA-1a, HNA-1b e HNA-1c foram

  9. Human Systems Roadmap Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    areas produce life long disability Problem: The combination of jet fuel and high noise environment can exacerbate hearing loss Objective: Expose...Personalized Assessment, Education , and Training Systems Interfaces and Cognitive Processes Protection, Sustainment, and Warfighter...Infrastructure, & Information Distribution Statement A: Approved for Public Release 4 Personalized Assessment, Education , and Training System

  10. Human-System task integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Defence research programme Human-System Task Integration aims at acquiring knowledge for the optimal cooperation between human and computer, under the following constraints: freedom of choice in decisions to automate and multiple, dynamic task distributions. This paper describe

  11. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources......, including knowledge and skills embodied in human resources, and (2) a more ‘specific' purpose to enhance our knowledge on introduction of highly educated labour, innovation, and upgrading changes in small Danish firms. Chapter 1 establishes the relevance of this research interest, and it also states...... stemming from human resources - such as insight, understanding, creativity, and action - are inherently important to all innovation processes. The chapter also suggests a tentative conceptual and analytical framework for studying human resources and their development within a system of innovation approach...

  12. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    the research questions which are studied in the thesis.      Chapter 2 reviews relevant literature on systems of innovation, human capital, and skill-biased technological and organisational change. It is stated in the chapter that this thesis primarily refers to a system of innovation approach as its......Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources......, including knowledge and skills embodied in human resources, and (2) a more ‘specific' purpose to enhance our knowledge on introduction of highly educated labour, innovation, and upgrading changes in small Danish firms. Chapter 1 establishes the relevance of this research interest, and it also states...

  13. Examining human-system interactions: The HSYS (Human SYStem) methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, S.G.; Harbour, J.L.; Sullivan, C.; Hallbert, B.P. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    HSYS is a model-based methodology developed to examine the many factors which influence Human-SYStem interactions. HSYS is built around a linear model of human performance, called the Input-Action model, which describes five sequential steps: Input Detection, Input Understanding, Action Selection, Action Planning, and Action Execution. HSYS is structured in an hierarchical tree which presents a logical structure for examining potential areas where human performance, hardware or other system components are less than adequate. The HSYS tree consists of five major branches which correspond to the five major components of the Input-Action model. Initial validation was begun by studying accident reports via HSYS and identifying sources of error. The validation process has continued with accident investigations in operational settings. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Human Factors Considerations in System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M. (Editor); Vanbalen, P. M. (Editor); Moe, K. L. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Human factors considerations in systems design was examined. Human factors in automated command and control, in the efficiency of the human computer interface and system effectiveness are outlined. The following topics are discussed: human factors aspects of control room design; design of interactive systems; human computer dialogue, interaction tasks and techniques; guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms and highly automated environments; system engineering for control by humans; conceptual models of information processing; information display and interaction in real time environments.

  15. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  16. Human nervous system function emulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenger, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a modular, extensible, open-systems design for a multiprocessor network which emulates the major functions of the human nervous system. Interchangeable hardware/software components, a socketed software bus with plug-and-play capability and self diagnostics are included. The computer hardware is based on IEEE P996.1 bus cards. Its operating system utilizes IEEE 1275 standard software. Object oriented design techniques and programming are featured. A machine-independent high level script-based command language was created for this project. Neural anatomical structures which were emulated include the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems. Motor, sensory, autoregulatory, and higher cognitive artificial intelligence, behavioral and emotional functions are provided. The author discusses how he has interfaced this emulator to machine vision, speech recognition/speech synthesis, an artificial neural network and a dexterous hand to form an android robotic platform.

  17. A Human Body Analysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girondel Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a system for human body analysis (segmentation, tracking, face/hands localisation, posture recognition from a single view that is fast and completely automatic. The system first extracts low-level data and uses part of the data for high-level interpretation. It can detect and track several persons even if they merge or are completely occluded by another person from the camera's point of view. For the high-level interpretation step, static posture recognition is performed using a belief theory-based classifier. The belief theory is considered here as a new approach for performing posture recognition and classification using imprecise and/or conflicting data. Four different static postures are considered: standing, sitting, squatting, and lying. The aim of this paper is to give a global view and an evaluation of the performances of the entire system and to describe in detail each of its processing steps, whereas our previous publications focused on a single part of the system. The efficiency and the limits of the system have been highlighted on a database of more than fifty video sequences where a dozen different individuals appear. This system allows real-time processing and aims at monitoring elderly people in video surveillance applications or at the mixing of real and virtual worlds in ambient intelligence systems.

  18. The quantum human central neural system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Athanasios; Rekkas, John

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we present Excess Entropy Production for human aging system as the sum of their respective subsystems and electrophysiological status. Additionally, we support the hypothesis of human brain and central neural system quantumness and we strongly suggest the theoretical and philosophical status of human brain as one of the unknown natural Dirac magnetic monopoles placed in the center of a Riemann sphere.

  19. Fundamentals of systems ergonomics/human factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John R

    2014-01-01

    Ergonomics/human factors is, above anything else, a systems discipline and profession, applying a systems philosophy and systems approaches. Many things are labelled as system in today's world, and this paper specifies just what attributes and notions define ergonomics/human factors in systems terms. These are obviously a systems focus, but also concern for context, acknowledgement of interactions and complexity, a holistic approach, recognition of emergence and embedding of the professional effort involved within organization system. These six notions are illustrated with examples from a large body of work on rail human factors.

  20. Human Factors Interface with Systems Engineering for NASA Human Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past and present successes of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (HHFB) at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) in including the Human-As-A-System (HAAS) model in many NASA programs and what steps to be taken to integrate the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into NASA s Systems Engineering (SE) process. The HAAS model stresses systems are ultimately designed for the humans; the humans should therefore be considered as a system within the systems. Therefore, the model places strong emphasis on human factors engineering. Since 1987, the HHFB has been engaging with many major NASA programs with much success. The HHFB helped create the NASA Standard 3000 (a human factors engineering practice guide) and the Human Systems Integration Requirements document. These efforts resulted in the HAAS model being included in many NASA programs. As an example, the HAAS model has been successfully introduced into the programmatic and systems engineering structures of the International Space Station Program (ISSP). Success in the ISSP caused other NASA programs to recognize the importance of the HAAS concept. Also due to this success, the HHFB helped update NASA s Systems Engineering Handbook in December 2007 to include HAAS as a recommended practice. Nonetheless, the HAAS model has yet to become an integral part of the NASA SE process. Besides continuing in integrating HAAS into current and future NASA programs, the HHFB will investigate incorporating the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into the NASA SE Handbook. The HCDP goes further than the HAAS model by emphasizing a holistic and iterative human-centered systems design concept.

  1. Human Adaptive Mechatronics and Human-System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics in projects for mechatronics studies, which are 'Human Adaptive Mechatronics (HAM' and 'Human-System Modelling (HSM', are presented in this paper. The main research theme of the HAM project is a design strategy for a new intelligent mechatronics system, which enhances operators' skills during machine operation. Skill analyses and control system design have been addressed. In the HSM project, human modelling based on hierarchical classification of skills was studied, including the following five types of skills: social, planning, cognitive, motion and sensory-motor skills. This paper includes digests of these research topics and the outcomes concerning each type of skill. Relationships with other research activities, knowledge and information that will be helpful for readers who are trying to study assistive human-mechatronics systems are also mentioned.

  2. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  3. Stupid Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    The initial vision for intelligent tutoring systems involved powerful, multi-faceted systems that would leverage rich models of students and pedagogies to create complex learning interactions. But the intelligent tutoring systems used at scale today are much simpler. In this article, I present hypotheses on the factors underlying this development,…

  4. Hybrid Battery Ultracapacitor System For Human Robotic Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to develop a hybrid battery-ultra capacitor storage system that powers human-robotic systems in space missions. Space missions...

  5. NASA Human System Risk Assessment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, D.; Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA utilizes an evidence based system to perform risk assessments for the human system for spaceflight missions. The center of this process is the multi-disciplinary Human System Risk Board (HSRB). The HSRB is chartered from the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) at NASA Headquarters. The HSRB reviews all human system risks via an established comprehensive risk and configuration management plan based on a project management approach. The HSRB facilitates the integration of human research (terrestrial and spaceflight), medical operations, occupational surveillance, systems engineering and many other disciplines in a comprehensive review of human system risks. The HSRB considers all factors that influence human risk. These factors include pre-mission considerations such as screening criteria, training, age, sex, and physiological condition. In mission factors such as available countermeasures, mission duration and location and post mission factors such as time to return to baseline (reconditioning), post mission health screening, and available treatments. All of the factors influence the total risk assessment for each human risk. The HSRB performed a comprehensive review of all potential inflight medical conditions and events and over the course of several reviews consolidated the number of human system risks to 30, where the greatest emphasis is placed for investing program dollars for risk mitigation. The HSRB considers all available evidence from human research and, medical operations and occupational surveillance in assessing the risks for appropriate mitigation and future work. All applicable DRMs (low earth orbit for 6 and 12 months, deep space for 30 days and 1 year, a lunar mission for 1 year, and a planetary mission for 3 years) are considered as human system risks are modified by the hazards associated with space flight such as microgravity, exposure to radiation, distance from the earth, isolation and a closed environment. Each risk has a summary

  6. Study on Virtual Human Skeleton System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭巧; 李亦

    2004-01-01

    A solution of virtual human skeleton system is proposed. Some issues on integration of anatomical geometry, biodynamics and computer animation are studied. The detailed skeleton system model that incorporates the biodynamic and geometric characteristics of a human skeleton system allows some performance studies in greater detail than that performed before. It may provide an effective and convenient way to analyze and evaluate the movement performance of a human body when the personalized anatomical data are used in the models. An example shows that the proposed solution is effective for the stated problems.

  7. The human cutaneous chemokine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eMoser

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of the immune status, the vast majority of all lymphocytes reside in peripheral tissues whereas those present in blood only amount to a small fraction of the total. It has been estimated that T cells in healthy human skin outnumber those present in blood by at least a factor of two. How lymphocytes within these two compartments relate to each other is not well understood. However, mounting evidence suggest that the study of T cell subsets present in peripheral blood does not reflect the function of their counterparts at peripheral sites. This is especially true under steady-state conditions whereby long-lived memory T cells in healthy tissues, notably those in epithelial tissues at body surfaces, are thought to fulfil a critical immune surveillance function by contributing to the first line of defence against a series of local threats, including microbes, tumours and toxins, and by participating in wound healing. The relative scarcity of information regarding peripheral T cells and the factors regulating their localization is primarily due to inherent difficulties in obtaining healthy tissue for the extraction and study of immune cells on a routine basis. This is most certainly true for humans. Here, we review our current understanding of T cell homing to human skin and discuss candidate chemokines that may account for the tissue selectivity in this process.

  8. The NATO Unmanned Aircraft System Human Systems Integration Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    High level indicators of where human system interactions may occur • Textual descriptions of the overall human component of the system • Use cases...for specific team tasks  Type of interaction – i.e., collaborate, coordinate, supervise, etc.  Team cohesiveness indicators – i.e., trust

  9. CRESST Human Performance Knowledge Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    team processes and team outcomes. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 463-494. 0 Herl, H. E. (1995). Construct validation of an approach to modeling...system to measure content understanding. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 315-334. Johnson, R.F. (2001). Statistical measures of marksmanship (ARI...problem-solving. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 403-418. West, C. D., Pomeroy, J. R., Park, J. K., Gerstenberger, E. A., & Sandoval, J. (2000

  10. Modeling human operator involvement in robotic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    A modeling approach is presented to describe complex manned robotic systems. The robotic system is modeled as a (highly) nonlinear, possibly time-varying dynamic system including any time delays in terms of optimal estimation, control and decision theory. The role of the human operator(s) is modeled

  11. Open Marriage: Implications for Human Service Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Nena; O'Neill, George

    1973-01-01

    The authors of Open Marriage reiterate the meaning and possibilities of the open marriage concept and advance suggestions for change in the areas of residence, work, child care, and educational patterns. Human service systems must search out the universal values to be maintained in all human relationships. (Editor)

  12. Systems biology of human atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalhoub, Joseph; Sikkel, Markus B; Davies, Kerry J; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Want, Elizabeth J; Davies, Alun H

    2014-01-01

    Systems biology describes a holistic and integrative approach to understand physiology and pathology. The "omic" disciplines include genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolic profiling (metabonomics and metabolomics). By adopting a stance, which is opposing (yet complimentary) to conventional research techniques, systems biology offers an overview by assessing the "net" biological effect imposed by a disease or nondisease state. There are a number of different organizational levels to be understood, from DNA to protein, metabolites, cells, organs and organisms, even beyond this to an organism's context. Systems biology relies on the existence of "nodes" and "edges." Nodes are the constituent part of the system being studied (eg, proteins in the proteome), while the edges are the way these constituents interact. In future, it will be increasingly important to collaborate, collating data from multiple studies to improve data sets, making them freely available and undertaking integrative analyses.

  13. Human-Systems Integration Processes (HSIP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In FY12, this project removed the commercial-specific content from the Commercial Human-Systems Integration Design Processes (CHSIP), identified gaps in the...

  14. Human Systems Integration (HSI) in Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Cost/Risk Drivers The numbers in the Activities boxes correspond to the numbers In the Inputs and Outputs boxes. Tools: ● CATIA ● HSI Requirements...Technology Development Phase (Inputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME References: ● DODI 5000.02 & DODD 5000.01 ● DAG ● CJCSI...Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME Activities for Each Output: 1.0 Incorporate domain considerations into baseline

  15. Metagenomic Systems Biology of the Human Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ida

    The human microbiome is an integrated part of the human body, outnumbering the human cells by approximately a factor 10. These microorganisms are very important for human health, hence knowledge about this, ”our other genome”, has been growing rapidly in recent years. This is manly due to the adv......The human microbiome is an integrated part of the human body, outnumbering the human cells by approximately a factor 10. These microorganisms are very important for human health, hence knowledge about this, ”our other genome”, has been growing rapidly in recent years. This is manly due...... in the system. Applying the CAG clustering method to data from the human gut microbiome, we identified dependency-associations between plasmids, phages and clone-specific gene sets to their bacterial host. Connections between CRISPR-elements and phages were also observed. Additionally, the persistence of some...... bacterial species in the human gut could be predicted based on absence or presence of specific genetic modules. Based on the same CAG clustering of the human gut microbiome data, the link between bile acid degradation of bacteria in the gut and obesity was investigated. There seemed to be a slight...

  16. Human Adaptive Mechatronics and Human-System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics in projects for mechatronics studies, which are ʹHuman Adaptive Mechatronics (HAMʹ and ʹHuman‐System Modelling (HSMʹ, are presented in this paper. The main research theme of the HAM project is a design strategy for a new intelligent mechatronics system, which enhances operatorsʹ skills during machine operation. Skill analyses and control system design have been addressed. In the HSM project, human modelling based on hierarchical classification of skills was studied, including the following five types of skills: social, planning, cognitive, motion and sensory‐motor skills. This paper includes digests of these research topics and the outcomes concerning each type of skill. Relationships with other research activities, knowledge and information that will be helpful for readers who are trying to study assistive human‐mechatronics systems are also mentioned.

  17. A case for human systems neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J L

    2015-06-18

    Can the human brain itself serve as a model for a systems neuroscience approach to understanding the human brain? After all, how the brain is able to create the richness and complexity of human behavior is still largely mysterious. What better choice to study that complexity than to study it in humans? However, measurements of brain activity typically need to be made non-invasively which puts severe constraints on what can be learned about the internal workings of the brain. Our approach has been to use a combination of psychophysics in which we can use human behavioral flexibility to make quantitative measurements of behavior and link those through computational models to measurements of cortical activity through magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, we have tested various computational hypotheses about what neural mechanisms could account for behavioral enhancement with spatial attention (Pestilli et al., 2011). Resting both on quantitative measurements and considerations of what is known through animal models, we concluded that weighting of sensory signals by the magnitude of their response is a neural mechanism for efficient selection of sensory signals and consequent improvements in behavioral performance with attention. While animal models have many technical advantages over studying the brain in humans, we believe that human systems neuroscience should endeavor to validate, replicate and extend basic knowledge learned from animal model systems and thus form a bridge to understanding how the brain creates the complex and rich cognitive capacities of humans.

  18. DESIGN METHODS OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav E. Elkin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the concept of "human development" and the schematic diagram of the organizational design of regional management systems in relation to human development. Management as an organizational process in the study is considered as part of all social subsystems, specifies regularities of development and formation of new structures and functions. In the study applied the following methods: allocation of levels of models, techniques of domination, the allocation phases of the operation, the construction of generalized indicators, etc. As a result of research design problems of systems management human development revealed that the primary means of successful adaptation of organizations to changing conditions is an effective mechanism for management of human capacity, which will provide the best in current economic terms the end results that allows you to apply the concept of "innovation potential" in relation to the process of human development.

  19. Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/SP-2015-3709, Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide, also known as the "HSIPG," provides a tool for implementing HSI activities within the NASA systems engineering framework. The HSIPG is written to aid the HSI practitioner engaged in a program or project (P/P), and serves as a knowledge base to allow the practitioner to step into an HSI lead or team member role for NASA missions. Additionally, this HSIPG is written to address the role of HSI in the P/P management and systems engineering communities and aid their understanding of the value added by incorporating good HSI practices into their programs and projects. Through helping to build a community of knowledgeable HSI practitioners, this document also hopes to build advocacy across the Agency for establishing strong, consistent HSI policies and practices. Human Systems Integration (HSI) has been successfully adopted (and adapted) by several federal agencies-most notably the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-as a methodology for reducing system life cycle costs (LCCs). These cost savings manifest themselves due to reductions in required numbers of personnel, the practice of human-centered design, decreased reliance on specialized skills for operations, shortened training time, efficient logistics and maintenance, and fewer safety-related risks and mishaps due to unintended human/system interactions. The HSI process for NASA establishes how cost savings and mission success can be realized through systems engineering. Every program or project has unique attributes. This HSIPG is not intended to provide one-size-fits-all recommendations for HSI implementation. Rather, HSI processes should be tailored to the size, scope, and goals of individual situations. The instructions and processes identified here are best used as a starting point for implementing human-centered system concepts and designs across programs and projects of varying types, including

  20. Development of Human System Integration at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; McGuire, Kerry; Thompson, Shelby; Vos, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Human Systems Integration seeks to design systems around the capabilities and limitations of the humans which use and interact with the system, ensuring greater efficiency of use, reduced error rates, and less rework in the design, manufacturing and operational deployment of hardware and software. One of the primary goals of HSI is to get the human factors practitioner involved early in the design process. In doing so, the aim is to reduce future budget costs and resources in redesign and training. By the preliminary design phase of a project nearly 80% of the total cost of the project is locked in. Potential design changes recommended by evaluations past this point will have little effect due to lack of funding or a huge cost in terms of resources to make changes. Three key concepts define an effective HSI program. First, systems are comprised of hardware, software, and the human, all of which operate within an environment. Too often, engineers and developers fail to consider the human capacity or requirements as part of the system. This leads to poor task allocation within the system. To promote ideal task allocation, it is critical that the human element be considered early in system development. Poor design, or designs that do not adequately consider the human component, could negatively affect physical or mental performance, as well as, social behavior. Second, successful HSI depends upon integration and collaboration of all the domains that represent acquisition efforts. Too often, these domains exist as independent disciplines due to the location of expertise within the service structure. Proper implementation of HSI through participation would help to integrate these domains and disciplines to leverage and apply their interdependencies to attain an optimal design. Via this process domain interests can be integrated to perform effective HSI through trade-offs and collaboration. This provides a common basis upon which to make knowledgeable decisions. Finally

  1. Sex differences in the human visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanston, John E; Strother, Lars

    2017-01-02

    This Mini-Review summarizes a wide range of sex differences in the human visual system, with a primary focus on sex differences in visual perception and its neural basis. We highlight sex differences in both basic and high-level visual processing, with evidence from behavioral, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging studies. We argue that sex differences in human visual processing, no matter how small or subtle, support the view that females and males truly see the world differently. We acknowledge some of the controversy regarding sex differences in human vision and propose that such controversy should be interpreted as a source of motivation for continued efforts to assess the validity and reliability of published sex differences and for continued research on sex differences in human vision and the nervous system in general. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Human System Risk Management for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This brief abstract reviews the development of the current day approach to human system risk management for space flight and the development of the critical components of this process over the past few years. The human system risk management process now provides a comprehensive assessment of each human system risk by design reference mission (DRM) and is evaluated not only for mission success but also for long-term health impacts for the astronauts. The discipline of bioastronautics is the study of the biological and medical effects of space flight on humans. In 1997, the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) initiated the Bioastronautics Roadmap (Roadmap) as the "Critical Path Roadmap", and in 1998 participation in the roadmap was expanded to include the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) and the external community. A total of 55 risks and 250 questions were identified and prioritized and in 2000, the Roadmap was base-lined and put under configuration control. The Roadmap took into account several major advisory committee reviews including the Institute of Medicine (IOM) "Safe Passage: Astronaut care for Exploration Missions", 2001. Subsequently, three collaborating organizations at NASA HQ (Chief Health and Medical Officer, Office of Space Flight and Office of Biological & Physical Research), published the Bioastronautics Strategy in 2003, that identified the human as a "critical subsystem of space flight" and noted that "tolerance limits and safe operating bands must be established" to enable human space flight. These offices also requested a review by the IOM of the Roadmap and that review was published in October 2005 as "A Risk Reduction Strategy for Human Exploration of Space: A Review of NASA's Bioastronautics Roadmap", that noted several strengths and weaknesses of the Roadmap and made several recommendations. In parallel with the development of the Roadmap, the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) began a process in

  3. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX); Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

    2008-10-01

    A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

  4. Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    user’s location and then per- forming the (cognitive) task of Mark A. Livingston Naval Research Laboratory Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality ...00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluating Human Factors in Augmented Reality Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...the basis for situation awareness or—in combina- tion with visual cues—a navigation task. Tactile tasks. Via haptic devices, we can apply vir- tual

  5. Human behavior in online social systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, A.

    2009-06-01

    We present and study data concerning human behavior in four online social systems: (i) an Internet community of friends of over 107 people, (ii) a music community website with over 106 users, (iii) a gamers’ community server with over 5 × 106 users and (iv) a booklovers’ website with over 2.5 × 105 users. The purpose of those systems is different; however, their properties are very similar. We have found that the distribution of human activity (e.g., the sum of books read or songs played) has the form of a power law. Moreover, the relationship between human activity and time has a power-law form, too. We present a simple interest-driven model of the evolution of such systems which explains the emergence of two scaling regimes.

  6. The complement system in human cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertle, E; Stehouwer, C D A; van Greevenbroek, M M J

    2014-10-01

    The complement system has been implicated in obesity, fatty liver, diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement factors are produced in adipose tissue and appear to be involved in adipose tissue metabolism and local inflammation. Thereby complement links adipose tissue inflammation to systemic metabolic derangements, such as low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, complement has been implicated in pathophysiological mechanisms of diet- and alcohol induced liver damage, hyperglycaemia, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and fibrinolysis. In this review, we summarize current evidence on the role of the complement system in several processes of human cardiometabolic disease. C3 is the central component in complement activation, and has most widely been studied in humans. C3 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, liver dysfunction, risk of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. C3 can be activated by the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathway of complement activation; and downstream activation of C3 activates the terminal pathway. Complement may also be activated via extrinsic proteases of the coagulation, fibrinolysis and the kinin systems. Studies on the different complement activation pathways in human cardiometabolic disease are limited, but available evidence suggests that they may have distinct roles in processes underlying cardiometabolic disease. The lectin pathway appeared beneficial in some studies on type 2 diabetes and CVD, while factors of the classical and the alternative pathway were related to unfavourable cardiometabolic traits. The terminal complement pathway was also implicated in insulin resistance and liver disease, and appears to have a prominent role in acute and advanced CVD. The available human data suggest a complex and potentially causal role for the complement system in human cardiometabolic disease. Further, preferably longitudinal studies are needed to

  7. CORRELATION BETWEEN HUMAN NEEDS SYSTEM - PERSONALITY - HUMAN MOTIVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela MINICA

    2015-01-01

    The article highlights the main attributes of an economic approach of needs and preferences, with detailed focus on the correlation between meta-needs and personality, by correlating the principle of hierarchy established by Maslow with the balance theory. Adopting an integrated system of human capital motivation, which takes into account the complex aspects involved in the knowledge society, represents a managerial requirement for any organisation.

  8. CORRELATION BETWEEN HUMAN NEEDS SYSTEM - PERSONALITY - HUMAN MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela MINICA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the main attributes of an economic approach of needs and preferences, with detailed focus on the correlation between meta-needs and personality, by correlating the principle of hierarchy established by Maslow with the balance theory. Adopting an integrated system of human capital motivation, which takes into account the complex aspects involved in the knowledge society, represents a managerial requirement for any organisation.

  9. Group & Intergroup Relations in Living Human Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    investigations summarized in Table 2-1 include analyses of a broad range of system properties (cf. Adorno et al, 1950, MacKinnon, 1965; Beavers, 1977, Goffman...also characteristic of the authoritarian personality ( Adorno , et al., 1950). The balance of feeling within an underbounded system is typically less...groups being studied. 2 - 45 REFERENCES Adam R.N. and Preiss, J.J. (eds.) Human Organization Research. Homewood, Illinois: Dorsey, 1960. Adorno , T.W

  10. Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics in Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban

    2017-01-01

    The study, discovery, and application of information about human abilities, human limitations, and other human characteristics to the design of tools, devices, machines, systems, job tasks and environments for effective human performance.

  11. Visuals and Visualisation of Human Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Sindhu; Ramadas, Jayashree

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of diagrams and text in middle school students' understanding and visualisation of human body systems. We develop a common framework based on structure and function to assess students' responses across diagram and verbal modes. Visualisation is defined in terms of understanding transformations on structure and relating…

  12. Complex Systems and Human Performance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    constitute a cognitive architecture or decomposing the work flows and resource constraints that characterize human-system interactions, the modeler...also explored the generation of so-called “ fractal ” series from simple task network models where task times are the calculated by way of a moving

  13. How to Bootstrap a Human Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Arbib, Michael; Garrod, Simon

    2013-01-01

    How might a human communication system be bootstrapped in the absence of conventional language? We argue that motivated signs play an important role (i.e., signs that are linked to meaning by structural resemblance or by natural association). An experimental study is then reported in which participants try to communicate a range of pre-specified…

  14. Involving human forecasters in numerical prediction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Homar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human forecasters routinely improve upon the output from numerical weather prediction models and often have keen insight to model biases and shortcomings. This wealth of knowledge about model performance is largely untapped, however, as it is used only at the end point in the forecast process to interpret the model-predicted fields. Yet there is no reason why human forecasters cannot intervene at other earlier times in the numerical weather prediction process, especially when an ensemble forecasting system is in use. Human intervention in ensemble creation may be particularly helpful for rare events, such as severe weather events, that are not predicted well by numerical models. The USA/NOAA SPC/NSSL Spring Program 2003 tested an ensemble generation method in which human forecasters were involved in the ensemble creation process. The forecaster highlighted structures of interest and, using an adjoint model, a set of perturbations were obtained and used to generate a 32-member ensemble. The results show that this experimental ensemble improves upon the operational numerical forecasts of severe weather. The human-generated ensemble is able to provide improved guidance on high-impact weather events, but lacks global dispersion and produces unreliable forecasts for non-hazardous weather events. Further results from an ensemble constructed by combining the operational ensemble perturbations with the human-generated perturbations shows promising skill for the forecast of severe weather while avoiding the problem of limited global dispersion. The value of human beings in the creation of ensembles designed to target specific high- impact weather events is potentially large. Further investigation of the value of forecasters being part of the ensemble creation process is strongly recommended. There remains a lot to learn about how to create ensembles for short-range forecasts of severe weather, and we need to make better use of the skill and experience of

  15. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2005-10-01

    The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

  16. Dynamics of coupled human-landscape systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B. T.; McNamara, D. E.

    2007-11-01

    A preliminary dynamical analysis of landscapes and humans as hierarchical complex systems suggests that strong coupling between the two that spreads to become regionally or globally pervasive should be focused at multi-year to decadal time scales. At these scales, landscape dynamics is dominated by water, sediment and biological routing mediated by fluvial, oceanic, atmospheric processes and human dynamics is dominated by simplifying, profit-maximizing market forces and political action based on projection of economic effect. Also at these scales, landscapes impact humans through patterns of natural disasters and trends such as sea level rise; humans impact landscapes by the effect of economic activity and changes meant to mitigate natural disasters and longer term trends. Based on this analysis, human-landscape coupled systems can be modeled using heterogeneous agents employing prediction models to determine actions to represent the nonlinear behavior of economic and political systems and rule-based routing algorithms to represent landscape processes. A cellular model for the development of New Orleans illustrates this approach, with routing algorithms for river and hurricane-storm surge determining flood extent, five markets (home, labor, hotel, tourism and port services) connecting seven types of economic agents (home buyers/laborers, home developers, hotel owners/ employers, hotel developers, tourists, port services developer and port services owners/employers), building of levees or a river spillway by political agents and damage to homes, hotels or port services within cells determined by the passage or depth of flood waters. The model reproduces historical aspects of New Orleans economic development and levee construction and the filtering of frequent small-scale floods at the expense of large disasters.

  17. Integrating Spaceflight Human System Risk Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of human health and performance success during exploration missions as well as to maintain the subsequent long-term health of the crew. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. "Human System Risks" (Risks) have been identified, and approximately 30 are being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  18. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McDonald, Rob [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  19. [Immune system evolution. (From cells to humans)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belek, A S

    1992-01-01

    The great variety of cells and molecules observed in the mammalian immune system can be explained by stepwise acquisition of them during phylogeny. Self/nonself discrimination and cell-mediated immunity have been present since the early stages of evolution. Although some inducible antimicrobial molecules have been demonstrated in invertebrates, immunoglobulins appear in vertebrates. T and B cell diversity, development of the lymphoid organs, MHC molecules, complement and cytokines are the characteristics that appear through the evolution of vertebrates. Further knowledge that will be obtained from phylogenetic studies will improve our understanding of the immune system of human.

  20. Human mirror neuron system and its plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Tifei Yuan; Yin Wang; Jun Ding

    2008-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) was first discovered in non-human primates; these neurons fire when a monkey performs an action or observes another monkey (or even some people) performing that same action. Recent findings have suggested that neural rehabilitation might be achieved through the activation of the MNS in patients after stroke. We propose two major mechanisms (one involving adult neurogenesis and another involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor) that may underlie the activation, modulation and expe-rience-dependent plasticity in the MNS, for further study on promoting central nerve functional reconstruc-tion and rehabilitation of patients with central nervous system injury.

  1. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  2. Modelling the evolution of human trail systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Dirk; Keltsch, Joachim; Molnár, Péter

    1997-07-01

    Many human social phenomena, such as cooperation, the growth of settlements, traffic dynamics and pedestrian movement, appear to be accessible to mathematical descriptions that invoke self-organization. Here we develop a model of pedestrian motion to explore the evolution of trails in urban green spaces such as parks. Our aim is to address such questions as what the topological structures of these trail systems are, and whether optimal path systems can be predicted for urban planning. We use an `active walker' model that takes into account pedestrian motion and orientation and the concomitant feedbacks with the surrounding environment. Such models have previously been applied to the study of complex structure formation in physical, chemical and biological systems. We find that our model is able to reproduce many of the observed large-scale spatial features of trail systems.

  3. The interactive evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo; Swoboda, Nik

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares two explanations of the process by which human communication systems evolve: iterated learning and social collaboration. It then reports an experiment testing the social collaboration account. Participants engaged in a graphical communication task either as a member of a community, where they interacted with seven different partners drawn from the same pool, or as a member of an isolated pair, where they interacted with the same partner across the same number of games. Participants' horizontal, pair-wise interactions led "bottom up" to the creation of an effective and efficient shared sign system in the community condition. Furthermore, the community-evolved sign systems were as effective and efficient as the local sign systems developed by isolated pairs. Finally, and as predicted by a social collaboration account, and not by an iterated learning account, interaction was critical to the creation of shared sign systems, with different isolated pairs establishing different local sign systems and different communities establishing different global sign systems.

  4. Integrating spaceflight human system risk research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2017-10-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of exploration mission success and to maintain crew health, both during exploration missions and long term after return to Earth. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. ;Human System Risks; (Risks) have been identified, and 32 are currently being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  5. Model of the Human Sleep Wake System

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A model and analysis of the human sleep/wake system is presented. The model is derived using the known neuronal groups, and their various projections, involved with sleep and wake. Inherent in the derivation is the existence of a slow time scale associated with homeostatic regulation, and a faster time scale associated with the dynamics within the sleep phase. A significant feature of the model is that it does not contain a periodic forcing term, common in other models, reflecting the fact that sleep/wake is not dependent upon a diurnal stimulus. Once derived, the model is analyzed using a linearized stability analysis. We then use experimental data from normal sleep-wake systems and orexin knockout systems to verify the physiological validity of the equations.

  6. Research on Human-Robot Joint System for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The lunar exploration in China is in progress. In order to reduce human workload and costs, and conduct researches more effectively and efficiently, human-robot joint systems are necessary for lunar exploration. The concept of human-robot joint system for lunar exploration is studied in this paper. The possible collaborative ways between human and robots and the collaborative activities which can be conducted for lunar exploration are discussed. Moreover, the preliminary configuration of a human-robot joint system is presented.

  7. Dental orthopantomogram biometrics system for human identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Bhargava, Darpan; Deshpande, Ashwini

    2013-07-01

    Fingerprinting is the most widely accepted method of identification of people. But in cases of disfigured, decomposed, burnt or fragmented bodies, it is of limited value. Teeth and dental restorations on the other hand are extremely resistant to destruction by fire. They retain a number of their original characteristics, which are often unique and hence offer a possibility of rather accurate and legally acceptable identification of such remains. This study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of orthopantomography for human identification and propose a coding system for orthopantomogram (OPG), which can be utilized as an identification tool in forensic sciences.

  8. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  9. Human biomonitoring system in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerná, Milena; Spĕvácková, Vĕra; Batáriová, Andrea; Smíd, Jirí; Cejchanová, Mája; Ocadlíková, Dana; Bavorová, Hana; Benes, Bohuslav; Kubínová, Růzena

    2007-05-01

    The human biomonitoring (HBM) is an integral part of Environmental Health Monitoring System in the Czech Republic since 1994. Selected biomarkers of the internal dose (heavy metals, PCBs) and cytogenetic analysis of peripheral lymphocytes as a biomarker of the exposure/effect to/of environmental genotoxic factors are systematically followed up in the blood and urine of adults (blood donors), in children aged 8 to 10 years, and in the breast milk of nursing mothers. Selected outputs documented the declining trend of blood lead levels, with the recent reference value of 80 mg/l for men, and the rising trend of blood selenium levels in adults, but not in children. PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in human milk show a long-term downward trend, but still higher than in neighbouring countries. The frequency of aberrant cells revealed a downward trend, but the increase obtained in the last monitored period needs to be explained. Further HBM activities are required to demonstrate the corresponding trends and to reduce human exposure and health risks.

  10. Universal growth constraints of human systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Dubé, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Scale independence is a ubiquitous feature of complex systems which implies a highly skewed distribution of resources with no characteristic scale. Research has long focused on why systems as varied as protein networks, evolution and stock actions all feature scale independence. Assuming that they simply do, we focus here on describing exactly how this behavior emerges. We show that growing towards scale independence implies strict constraints: the first is the well-known preferential attachment principle and the second is a new form of temporal scaling. These constraints pave a precise evolution path, such that an instantaneous snapshot of a distribution is enough to reconstruct its past and to predict its future. We validate our approach on diverse spheres of human activities ranging from scientific and artistic productivity, to sexual relations and online traffic.

  11. A dynamic human health risk assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Umesh; Singh, Gurmit; Pant, A B

    2012-05-01

    An online human health risk assessment system (OHHRAS) has been designed and developed in the form of a prototype database-driven system and made available for the population of India through a website - www.healthriskindia.in. OHHRAS provide the three utilities, that is, health survey, health status, and bio-calculators. The first utility health survey is functional on the basis of database being developed dynamically and gives the desired output to the user on the basis of input criteria entered into the system; the second utility health status is providing the output on the basis of dynamic questionnaire and ticked (selected) answers and generates the health status reports based on multiple matches set as per advise of medical experts and the third utility bio-calculators are very useful for the scientists/researchers as online statistical analysis tool that gives more accuracy and save the time of user. The whole system and database-driven website has been designed and developed by using the software (mainly are PHP, My-SQL, Deamweaver, C++ etc.) and made available publically through a database-driven website (www.healthriskindia.in), which are very useful for researchers, academia, students, and general masses of all sectors.

  12. Unifying Human Centered Design and Systems Engineering for Human Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Guy A.; McGovernNarkevicius, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Despite the holistic approach of systems engineering (SE), systems still fail, and sometimes spectacularly. Requirements, solutions and the world constantly evolve and are very difficult to keep current. SE requires more flexibility and new approaches to SE have to be developed to include creativity as an integral part and where the functions of people and technology are appropriately allocated within our highly interconnected complex organizations. Instead of disregarding complexity because it is too difficult to handle, we should take advantage of it, discovering behavioral attractors and the emerging properties that it generates. Human-centered design (HCD) provides the creativity factor that SE lacks. It promotes modeling and simulation from the early stages of design and throughout the life cycle of a product. Unifying HCD and SE will shape appropriate human-systems integration (HSI) and produce successful systems.

  13. Launch Pad Escape System Design (Human Spaceflight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelli

    2011-01-01

    A launch pad escape system for human spaceflight is one of those things that everyone hopes they will never need but is critical for every manned space program. Since men were first put into space in the early 1960s, the need for such an Emergency Escape System (EES) has become apparent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made use of various types of these EESs over the past 50 years. Early programs, like Mercury and Gemini, did not have an official launch pad escape system. Rather, they relied on a Launch Escape System (LES) of a separate solid rocket motor attached to the manned capsule that could pull the astronauts to safety in the event of an emergency. This could only occur after hatch closure at the launch pad or during the first stage of flight. A version of a LES, now called a Launch Abort System (LAS) is still used today for all manned capsule type launch vehicles. However, this system is very limited in that it can only be used after hatch closure and it is for flight crew only. In addition, the forces necessary for the LES/LAS to get the capsule away from a rocket during the first stage of flight are quite high and can cause injury to the crew. These shortcomings led to the development of a ground based EES for the flight crew and ground support personnel as well. This way, a much less dangerous mode of egress is available for any flight or ground personnel up to a few seconds before launch. The early EESs were fairly simple, gravity-powered systems to use when thing's go bad. And things can go bad very quickly and catastrophically when dealing with a flight vehicle fueled with millions of pounds of hazardous propellant. With this in mind, early EES designers saw such a passive/unpowered system as a must for last minute escapes. This and other design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at the safety design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at

  14. Are Human and Natural Systems Decoupling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, P. R.; Ehrlich, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Typically, studies of coupled human and natural systems focus on reciprocating interactions and feedbacks between social systems and their biophysical environments. A major challenge today for CHANS scholars is to determine whether significant coupling remains or whether society is simply plunging ahead without reacting effectively to the deterioration of the environment. Thresholds for serious climate disruption are passing, toxification of Earth is proceeding apace and producing worrying symptoms, losses of vital biodiversity are at a 65 million-year high with serious consequences for ecosystem services, the epidemiological environment is deteriorating and a race is building to control water flows and extract the last high-quality resources, increasing the chances of ending civilization in an environment-wrecking nuclear war. The social system has attempted to respond to this perfect storm of problems. In the 1960s, building on much earlier work, scientists began assessing the consequences of an ever-growing human population and expanding consumption, overuse of pesticides, radioactive fallout, air and water pollution, and other environmental issues - and to recommend ameliorative steps. In the mid-1980s, biologists formed the discipline of conservation biology with the explicit purpose of stemming the hemorrhage of biodiversity. In the late 1980s, perhaps the single most important reaction to the worsening environmental situation was the development of the Montreal Protocol to preserve the vital stratospheric ozone layer. Around the same time, it dawned on the scientific community that climate disruption was going to be more immediate and dangerous than previously thought, but attempts by the world community to take mitigating steps have been pathetic. Action to deal with other dimensions of the environmental dilemma has been utterly inadequate. To see the growing disconnect, one only has to consider the attention paid in public discourse to the relatively

  15. A systems engineering view of the human in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John L.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the human as an 'engineered' system provides a starting point for determining human requirements and performance on an equivalent basis with technological systems. The human as an engineered system with performance requirements is defined to consist of four subsystems: cognitive, psychological, biomechanical, and biomedical. It is suggested that the treatment of the psychological subsystem as one that modulates the efficiency and quality of human performance offers a particular approach for examining and characterizing psychological effects.

  16. Sympathetic nervous system behavior in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Kevin P; Orr, Jeb S

    2009-02-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays an essential role in the regulation of metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. Low SNS activity has been suggested to be a risk factor for weight gain and obesity development. In contrast, SNS activation is characteristic of a number of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases that occur more frequently in obese individuals. Until recently, the relation between obesity and SNS behavior has been controversial because previous approaches for assessing SNS activity in humans have produced inconsistent findings. Beginning in the early 1990s, many studies using state of the art neurochemical and neurophysiological techniques have provided important insight. The purpose of the present review is to provide an overview of our current understanding of the region specific alterations in SNS behavior in human obesity. We will discuss findings from our own laboratory which implicate visceral fat as an important depot linking obesity with skeletal muscle SNS activation. The influence of weight change on SNS behavior and the potential mechanisms and consequences of region specific SNS activation in obesity will also be considered.

  17. Coupled Human-Atmosphere-System Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Chabay, Ilan

    2014-05-01

    minimize atmospheric release, but rather only complies with either climate or air quality requirements. Nor do current narratives promote behavioral change for the overall reduction of emissions (e.g., you can drive your diesel SUV as long as it has a low fuel consumption). This divide and thinking has not only been manifested in policy and regulations and hence media coverage, but has also shaped the public's general perception of this issue. There is no public conceptual understanding regarding humanity's modification of the atmosphere through the continuously and simultaneously released substances by almost any kind of activity and resulting impacts. Here, we propose a conceptual framework that provides a new perspective on the coupled human-atmosphere-system. It makes tangible the inherent linkages between the socio-economic system, the atmospheric physico-chemical changes and impacts, and legal frameworks for sustainable transformations at all levels. To implement HAS-thinking in decision and policy making, both salient disciplinary and interdisciplinary research and comprehensive science-society interactions in the form of transdisciplinary research are necessary. Societal transformations for the sake of a healthy human-atmosphere relationship are highly context dependent and require discussions of normative and value-related issues, which can only be solved through co-designed solutions. We demonstrate the importance of HAS-thinking by examples of sustainable development in the Arctic and Himalayan countries.

  18. An Integrated Simulation System for Human Factors Study

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ying; Bennis, Fouad; Chablat, Damien

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that virtual reality can be a useful tool for ergonomics study. The proposed integrated simulation system aims at measuring operator's performance in an interactive way for 2D control panel design. By incorporating some sophisticated virtual reality hardware/software, the system allows natural human-system and/or human-human interaction in a simulated virtual environment; enables dynamic objective measurement of human performance; and evaluates the quality of the system design in human factors perspective based on the measurement. It can also be for operation training for some 2D control panels.

  19. The immune system in the aging human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymkiewicz, Paulina Dominika; Heng, Yi Xiong; Vasudev, Anusha; Larbi, Anis

    2012-09-01

    With the improvement of medical care and hygienic conditions, there has been a tremendous increment in human lifespan. However, many of the elderly (>65 years) display chronic illnesses, and a majority requires frequent and longer hospitalization. The robustness of the immune system to eliminate or control infections is often eroded with advancing age. Nevertheless, some elderly individuals do cope better than others. The origin of these inter-individual differences may come from genetic, lifestyle conditions (nutrition, socio-economic parameters), as well as the type, number and recurrence of pathogens encountered during life. The theory we are supporting is that chronic infections, through life, will induce profound changes in the immune system probably due to unbalanced inflammatory profiles. Persistent viruses such a cytomegalovirus are not eliminated and are a driven force to immune exhaustion. Because of their age, elderly individuals may have seen more of these chronic stimulators and have experienced more reactivation episodes ultimately leading to shrinkage of their repertoire and overall immune robustness. This review integrates updates on immunity with advancing age and its impact on associated clinical conditions.

  20. Cyber-Physical Human Systems: Putting People in the Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowe, Sulayman K; Zettsu, Koji; Simmon, Eric; de Vaulx, Frederic; Bojanova, Irena

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the challenge to understand how to integrate people into a new generation of cyber-physical-human systems (CPHSs) and proposes a human service capability description model to help.

  1. Human IgE-independent systemic anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Fred D; Khodoun, Marat V; Strait, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is a rapidly developing, life-threatening, generalized or systemic allergic reaction that is classically elicited by antigen crosslinking of antigen-specific IgE bound to the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI on mast cells and basophils. This initiates signals that induce cellular degranulation with release and secretion of vasoactive mediators, enzymes, and cytokines. However, IgE-independent mechanisms of anaphylaxis have been clearly demonstrated in experimental animals. These include IgG-dependent anaphylaxis, which involves the triggering of mediator release by IgG/antigen complex crosslinking of FcγRs on macrophages, basophils, and neutrophils; anaphylaxis mediated by binding of the complement-derived peptides C3a and C5a to their receptors on mast cells, basophils, and other myeloid cells; and direct activation of mast cells by drugs that interact with receptors on these cells. Here we review the mechanisms involved in these IgE-independent forms of anaphylaxis and the clinical evidence for their human relevance. We conclude that this evidence supports the existence of all 3 IgE-independent mechanisms as important causes of human disease, although practical and ethical considerations preclude their demonstration to the degree of certainty possible with animal models. Furthermore, we cite evidence that different clinical situations can suggest different mechanisms as having a primal role in anaphylaxis and that IgE-dependent and distinct IgE-independent mechanisms can act together to increase anaphylaxis severity. As specific agents become available that can interfere with mechanisms involved in the different types of anaphylaxis, recognition of specific types of anaphylaxis is likely to become important for optimal prophylaxis and therapy.

  2. Building a Human Rights Youth Justice System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Capital Territory's Human Rights Act 2004 and the establishment of an ACT Human Rights Commission have begun to create a human rights culture in the ACT. This paper highlights the influence of this culture on the design and build of the ACT's new youth justice centre. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. Building a Human Rights Youth Justice System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Capital Territory's Human Rights Act 2004 and the establishment of an ACT Human Rights Commission have begun to create a human rights culture in the ACT. This paper highlights the influence of this culture on the design and build of the ACT's new youth justice centre. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Human Errors and Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Nowak, A. S.

    Human errors are divided in two groups. The first group contains human errors, which effect the reliability directly. The second group contains human errors, which will not directly effect the reliability of the structure. The methodology used to estimate so-called reliability distributions on ba...

  5. Human factors/ergonomics as a systems discipline? "The human use of human beings" revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollnagel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the possible future of Human factors/ergonomics (HFE) usually take the past for granted in the sense that the future of HFE is assumed to be more of the same. This paper argues that the nature of work in the early 2010s is so different from the nature of work when HFE was formulated 60-70 years ago that a critical reassessment of the basis for HFE is needed. If HFE should be a systems discipline, it should be a soft systems rather than a hard systems discipline. It is not enough for HFE to seek to improve performance and well-being through systems design, since any change to the work environment in principle alters the very basis for the change. Instead HFE should try to anticipate how the nature of work will change so that it can both foresee what work will be and propose what work should be.

  6. [The environment and human respiratory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodemowicz, Marian

    2008-01-01

    The process of gas exchange that is breathing is an important element of any person's relation with the environment. What decides about our health and life are the respiratory systems responsible for the breathing process and the quality of the air we breathe. On an average through a person's life 400 millions liters of air flows which carries pollution in the form of constant gases and liquid particles. Particles of about PM-2.5 size get into the deepest structures of the respiratory system from which they are being spread into the whole organism through circulation exerting thier toxic effect on all tissues and organs. The outdoor pollution diffuses but in certain local circumstances it increases. It was so in big ecological disasters such as in 1930 in the Mozy valley in Belgium, in 1948 in the Donory region in the USA and in 1952 smog pollution in London. On an average any human being spends indoors about 60-80% of his time. The increased concentration of pollution occurs indoors and there is a possibility of exposing oneself to ETS- Environmental Tobacco Smoke. The biggest concentration of inhaled pollution takes place when smoking tobacco. Pollution of air causes diseases of the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, tumours and others. Frequent occurrence of COPD in certain areas correlates with the level of air pollution and it significantly increases in tobacco smokers. The number and frequency of bronchial asthma and the need for hospitalization depends on air pollution. Lung cancer cases were rarely described in literature before the area of industrialization and wide spread custom of tobacco smoking. Now it is the most frequently occurred cancer in the whole world. There is an interdependence of the density of population, of the number of smoked cigarettes and of density of pollution with the number lung cancer cases. It is hoped that in the future, smoking habits will be eliminated, the use of crude oil and coal will be replaced by hydroelectric

  7. Safety Metrics for Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveson, Nancy G; Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems.This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  8. Installation of Computerized Procedure System and Advanced Alarm System in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the installation of two advanced control room technologies, an advanced alarm system and a computerized procedure system, into the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). Installation of these technologies enables future phases of this research by providing a platform to systematically evaluate the effect of these technologies on operator and plant performance.

  9. Lightness computation by the human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michael E.

    2017-05-01

    A model of achromatic color computation by the human visual system is presented, which is shown to account in an exact quantitative way for a large body of appearance matching data collected with simple visual displays. The model equations are closely related to those of the original Retinex model of Land and McCann. However, the present model differs in important ways from Land and McCann's theory in that it invokes additional biological and perceptual mechanisms, including contrast gain control, different inherent neural gains for incremental, and decremental luminance steps, and two types of top-down influence on the perceptual weights applied to local luminance steps in the display: edge classification and spatial integration attentional windowing. Arguments are presented to support the claim that these various visual processes must be instantiated by a particular underlying neural architecture. By pointing to correspondences between the architecture of the model and findings from visual neurophysiology, this paper suggests that edge classification involves a top-down gating of neural edge responses in early visual cortex (cortical areas V1 and/or V2) while spatial integration windowing occurs in cortical area V4 or beyond.

  10. The Enzymatic Antioxidant System of Human Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian O’Flaherty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ejaculated spermatozoon, as an aerobic cell, must fight against toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by its own metabolism but also by other sources such as abnormal spermatozoa, chemicals and toxicants, or the presence of leukocytes in semen. Mammalian spermatozoa are extremely sensitive to oxidative stress, a condition occurring when there is a net increase in ROS levels within the cell. Opportunely, this specialized cell has a battery of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, thioredoxins reductases, and glutathione s-transferases working in concert to assure normal sperm function. Any impairment of the antioxidant enzymatic activities will promote severe oxidative damage which is observed as plasma membrane lipid peroxidation, oxidation of structural proteins and enzymes, and oxidation of DNA bases that lead to abnormal sperm function. Altogether, these damages occurring in spermatozoa are associated with male infertility. The present review contains a description of the enzymatic antioxidant system of the human spermatozoon and a reevaluation of the role of its different components and highlights the necessity of sufficient supply of reducing agents (NADPH and reduced glutathione to guarantee normal sperm function.

  11. Organizational needs: A co-creation and human systems perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    The concept of need is embedded in economic systems. Since the concept originates in individual psychology, it is not well understood at the organizational level and other higher systemic levels. We address this gap by drawing on research on human needs, on organizations, and on value co-creation in nested human systems. We present a framework that summarizes essentials of well-being, behavior and the change dynamics of needs at individual, organizational, and ecosystemic levels of human syst...

  12. Human Metabolic Network: Reconstruction, Simulation, and Applications in Systems Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming; Chan, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Metabolism is crucial to cell growth and proliferation. Deficiency or alterations in metabolic functions are known to be involved in many human diseases. Therefore, understanding the human metabolic system is important for the study and treatment of complex diseases. Current reconstructions of the global human metabolic network provide a computational platform to integrate genome-scale information on metabolism. The platform enables a systematic study of the regulation and is applicable to a wide variety of cases, wherein one could rely on in silico perturbations to predict novel targets, interpret systemic effects, and identify alterations in the metabolic states to better understand the genotype-phenotype relationships. In this review, we describe the reconstruction of the human metabolic network, introduce the constraint based modeling approach to analyze metabolic networks, and discuss systems biology applications to study human physiology and pathology. We highlight the challenges and opportunities in network reconstruction and systems modeling of the human metabolic system. PMID:24957377

  13. Human Knowledge Resources and Interorganizational Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.K.M. Ibrahim (Mohammed); P.M.A. Ribbers (Piet); B.W.M. Bettonvil

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses how human knowledge resources affect capabilities and subsequently attainment of operational and strategic benefits. We test a conceptual model using data from two qualitative case studies and a quantitative field study. The findings indicate that human knowledge

  14. Human Knowledge Resources and Interorganizational Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.K.M. Ibrahim (Mohammed); P.M.A. Ribbers (Piet); B.W.M. Bettonvil

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analyses how human knowledge resources affect capabilities and subsequently attainment of operational and strategic benefits. We test a conceptual model using data from two qualitative case studies and a quantitative field study. The findings indicate that human knowledge posi

  15. The glutathione biotransformation system and colon carcinogenesis in human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, M.J.A.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Katan, M.B.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for a protective role of the glutathione biotransformation system in carcinogenesis is growing. However, most data on this system in relation to colorectal cancer originate from animal studies. Here we review the human data. In humans, a significant association was found between glutathione

  16. High School Students' Understanding of the Human Body System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi; Dodick, Jeff; Tripto, Jaklin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 120 tenth-grade students from 8 schools were examined to determine the extent of their ability to perceive the human body as a system after completing the first stage in their biology curriculum--"The human body, emphasizing homeostasis". The students' systems thinking was analyzed according to the STH thinking model, which roughly…

  17. Model of the human controller of a dynamic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wewerinke, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    In de last two decades considerable research effort has been devoted to the study of human involvement in dynamic systems. Especially human control behavior has been investigated, but in the restricted sense of continuous regulating against random disturbances, so as to minimize the system state dev

  18. The question of the system of protection of human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Revina S.; Pochuykina V.

    2016-01-01

    The Russian state is subject to the human rights activities through the system of state bodies, including the judiciary, as reflected in the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The authors consider the human rights function of the state, judicial protection as one of the ways of state protection of the rights and freedoms of man and citizen, study the elements of General system of protection of human rights in the Russian Federation and its Central element — the right to judicial protecti...

  19. Auto-measuring System of 3- Dimensional Human Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 尚保平; 付小莉; 尚会超

    2001-01-01

    To realize the automation of fashion industry measuring,designing and manufacturing, the auto-measurement of 3D size of human body is of great importance. The auto measurement system of 3D human body based on Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) and infrared sensors is presented in this paper. The system can measure the bare size of human body that excludes the effect of clothing quickly and accurately.

  20. Human factors systems approach to healthcare quality and patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Rivera-Rodriguez, A. Joy; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Hoonakker, Peter; Holden, Richard; Gurses, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    Human factors systems approaches are critical for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. The SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) model of work system and patient safety is a human factors systems approach that has been successfully applied in healthcare research and practice. Several research and practical applications of the SEIPS model are described. Important implications of the SEIPS model for healthcare system and process redesign are highlighted. Principles for redesigning healthcare systems using the SEIPS model are described. Balancing the work system and encouraging the active and adaptive role of workers are key principles for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. PMID:23845724

  1. Self-Powered Human-Interactive Transparent Nanopaper Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Junwen; Zhu, Hongli; Zhong, Qize; Dai, Jiaqi; Li, Wenbo; Jang, Soo-Hwan; Yao, Yonggang; Henderson, Doug; Hu, Qiyi; Hu, Liangbing; Zhou, Jun

    2015-07-28

    Self-powered human-interactive but invisible electronics have many applications in anti-theft and anti-fake systems for human society. In this work, for the first time, we demonstrate a transparent paper-based, self-powered, and human-interactive flexible system. The system is based on an electrostatic induction mechanism with no extra power system appended. The self-powered, transparent paper device can be used for a transparent paper-based art anti-theft system in museums or for a smart mapping anti-fake system in precious packaging and documents, by virtue of the advantages of adding/removing freely, having no impairment on the appearance of the protected objects, and being easily mass manufactured. This initial study bridges the transparent nanopaper with a self-powered and human-interactive electronic system, paving the way for the development of smart transparent paper electronics.

  2. Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Mount, Frances; Carreon, Patricia; Torney, Susan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Engineering and Mission Operations Directorates at NASA Johnson Space Center are combining laboratories and expertise to establish the Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations. This is a testbed for human centered design, development and evaluation of intelligent autonomous and assistant systems that will be needed for human exploration and development of space. This project will improve human-centered analysis, design and evaluation methods for developing intelligent software. This software will support human-machine cognitive and collaborative activities in future interplanetary work environments where distributed computer and human agents cooperate. We are developing and evaluating prototype intelligent systems for distributed multi-agent mixed-initiative operations. The primary target domain is control of life support systems in a planetary base. Technical approaches will be evaluated for use during extended manned tests in the target domain, the Bioregenerative Advanced Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex). A spinoff target domain is the International Space Station (ISS) Mission Control Center (MCC). Prodl}cts of this project include human-centered intelligent software technology, innovative human interface designs, and human-centered software development processes, methods and products. The testbed uses adjustable autonomy software and life support systems simulation models from the Adjustable Autonomy Testbed, to represent operations on the remote planet. Ground operations prototypes and concepts will be evaluated in the Exploration Planning and Operations Center (ExPOC) and Jupiter Facility.

  3. Mice with human immune system components as in vivo models for infections with human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämer, Patrick C; Chijioke, Obinna; Meixlsperger, Sonja; Leung, Carol S; Münz, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Many pathogens relevant to human disease do not infect other animal species. Therefore, animal models that reconstitute or harbor human tissues are explored as hosts for these. In this review, we will summarize recent advances to utilize mice with human immune system components, reconstituted from hematopoietic progenitor cells in vivo. Such mice can be used to study human pathogens that replicate in leukocytes. In addition to studying the replication of these pathogens, the reconstituted human immune system components can also be analyzed for initiating immune responses and control against these infections. Moreover, these new animal models of human infectious disease should replicate the reactivity of the human immune system to vaccine candidates and, especially, the adjuvants contained in them, more faithfully.

  4. Human factors issues for resolving adverse effects of human work underload and workload transitions in complex human-machine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    A workshop was conducted whose specific purpose was to build on earlier work of the United States National Research Council, United States Federal government agencies, and the larger human factors community to: (1) clarify human factors issues pertaining to degraded performance in advanced human-machine systems (e.g., nuclear production, transportation, aerospace) due to human work underload and workload transition, and (2) develop strategies for resolving these issues. Recent history demonstrates that: (1) humans often react adversely to their diminishing roles in advanced human-machine systems, and therefore (2) new allocation models and strategies are required if humans are to be willing and able to assume diminishing and shifting roles assigned to them in these systems, and are to accept new technologies making up these systems. Problems associated with theses diminishing and shifting human roles are characterized as work underload and workload transitions. The workshop affirmed that: (1) work underload and workload transition are issues that will have to be addressed by designers of advanced human-machine systems, especially those relying on automation, if cost, performance, safety, and operator acceptability are to be optimized, (2) human machine allocation models, standards, and guidelines which go beyond simple capability approaches will be needed to preclude or seriously diminish the work underload and workload transition problems, and (3) the 16 workload definition, measurement, situational awareness, and trust issues identified during the workshop, need resolution if these models, standards, and guidelines are to be achieved.

  5. Design and diffusion of systems for human benefit

    CERN Document Server

    Venable, John R; Bunker, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Information systems have the potential to provide human benefit in a number of areas including: improvement of education, provision of social and other services to the public, health and well-being, work-life balance, environmental sustainability, democracy and self-determination, freedom, emancipation, poverty reduction, and social equity. However, most studies within Information Systems relate to a business context rather than directly to human benefit. When dealing with human benefit, system stakeholders may have different objectives regarding a system's use, its distribution, and the way r

  6. Mice with human immune system components as in vivo models for infections with human pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Rämer, P C; Chijioke, O; Meixlsperger, S; Leung, C S; Münz, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many pathogens relevant to human disease do not infect other animal species. Therefore, animal models that reconstitute or harbour human tissues are explored as hosts for these. In this review, we will summarize recent advances to utilize mice with human immune system components, reconstituted from hematopoietic progenitor cells in vivo. Such mice can be used to study human pathogens that replicate in leucocytes. In addition to studying the replication of these pathogens, the reconstituted hu...

  7. Location Update Accuracy in Human Tracking system using Zigbee modules

    CERN Document Server

    Amutha, B

    2009-01-01

    A location and tracking system becomes very important to our future world of pervasive computing. An algorithm for accurate location information is being incorporated in the human walking model and in the blind human walking model. We want to implement an accurate location tracking mechanism using Zigbee along with GPS, we have incorporated Markov chain algorithm for establishing accuracy. Normal Human and blind human walking steps were actually taken in the known environment within our campus and the Markov chain algorithm was used for smoothening the stepwise variation in location updates. A comparison module is also implemented to show the difference between normal human and blind human walking step variations. This accuracy is used for designing a blind tracking device so that the device can be used by the blind for finding the path without obstacles. We present a system level approach to localizing and tracking Human and blind users on a basis of different sources of location information [GPS plus Zigbee...

  8. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Randall S; Kigerl, Kristina A; Marbourg, Jessica M; Gaudet, Andrew D; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-09-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rg(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in the blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI

  9. A REVIEW ON LOWER APPENDICULAR MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM OF HUMAN BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akhtaruzzaman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation engineering plays an important role in designing various autonomous robots to provide better therapeutic exercise to disabled patients. Hence it is necessary to study human musculoskeletal system and also needs to be presented in scientific manner in order to describe and analyze the biomechanics of human body motion. This review focuses on lower appendicular musculoskeletal structure of human body to represent joints and links architectures; to identify muscle attachments and functions; and to illustrate muscle groups which are responsible for a particular joint movement. Firstly, human lower skeletal structure, linking systems, joint mechanisms, and their functions are described with a conceptual representation of joint architecture of human skeleton. This section also represents joints and limbs by comparing with mechanical systems. Characteristics of ligaments and their functions to construct skeletal joints are also discussed briefly in this part. Secondly, the study focuses on muscular system of human lower limbs where muscle structure, functions, roles in moving endoskeleton structure, and supporting mechanisms are presented ellaborately. Thirdly, muscle groups are tabulated based on functions that provide mobility to different joints of lower limbs. Finally, for a particular movement action of lower extremity, muscles are also grouped and tabulated to have a better understanding on functions of individual muscle. Basically the study presents an overview of the structure of human lower limbs by characterizing and classifying skeletal and muscular systems.KEYWORDS:   Musculoskeletal system; Human lower limbs; Muscle groups; Joint motion; Biomechatronics; Rehabilitation.

  10. Human Systems Integration in Practice: Constellation Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program provided a unique testbed for Human Systems Integration (HSI) as a fundamental element of the Systems Engineering process. Constellation was the first major program to have HSI mandated by NASA's Human Rating document. Proper HSI is critical to the success of any project that relies on humans to function as operators, maintainers, or controllers of a system. HSI improves mission, system and human performance, significantly reduces lifecycle costs, lowers risk and minimizes re-design. Successful HSI begins with sufficient project schedule dedicated to the generation of human systems requirements, but is by no means solely a requirements management process. A top-down systems engineering process that recognizes throughout the organization, human factors as a technical discipline equal to traditional engineering disciplines with authority for the overall system. This partners with a bottoms-up mechanism for human-centered design and technical issue resolution. The Constellation Human Systems Integration Group (HSIG) was a part of the Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) organization within the program office, and existed alongside similar groups such as Flight Performance, Environments & Constraints, and Integrated Loads, Structures and Mechanisms. While the HSIG successfully managed, via influence leadership, a down-and-in Community of Practice to facilitate technical integration and issue resolution, it lacked parallel top-down authority to drive integrated design. This presentation will discuss how HSI was applied to Constellation, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers. This presentation will discuss how Human Systems Integration (HSI) was applied to NASA's Constellation program, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers on how to accomplish this critical function.

  11. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  12. Human Individual Differences in Military Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    experience, and literacy on job performance; Summary of HumRRO work units UTILITY and REALISTIC (Tech. Rep. 71-1). Alexandria, VA: Human Resources...Williams, R. J., & Rimland, B. Individuality. In Encyclopedia of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Psychoanalysis . New York: Van Nostrand, 1977. 26

  13. Cultural Development through Human Resource Systems Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michael

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the framework for developing a cultural human resources management (HRM) perspective. Central to this framework is modifying HRM programs to reinforce the organization's preferred practices. Modification occurs through selection, orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, career development, and compensation and…

  14. Does human cognition allow Human Factors (HF) certification of advanced aircrew systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Iain S.; Taylor, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper has examined the requirements of HF specification and certification within advanced or complex aircrew systems. It suggests reasons for current inadequacies in the use of HF in the design process, giving some examples in support, and suggesting an avenue towards the improvement of the HF certification process. The importance of human cognition to the operation and performance of advanced aircrew systems has been stressed. Many of the shortfalls of advanced aircrew systems must be attributed to over automated designs that show little consideration on either the mental limits or the cognitive capabilities of the human system component. Traditional approaches to system design and HF certification are set within an over physicalistic foundation. Also, traditionally it was assumed that physicalistic system functions could be attributed to either the human or the machine on a one to one basis. Moreover, any problems associated with the parallel needs, or promoting human understanding alongside system operation and direction, were generally equated in reality by the natural flexibility and adaptability of human skills. The consideration of the human component of a complex system is seen as being primarily based on manifestations of human behavior to the almost total exclusion of any appreciation of unobservable human mental and cognitive processes. The argument of this paper is that the considered functionality of any complex human-machine system must contain functions that are purely human and purely cognitive. Human-machine system reliability ultimately depends on human reliability and dependability and, therefore, on the form and frequency of cognitive processes that have to be conducted to support system performance. The greater the demand placed by an advanced aircraft system on the human component's basic knowledge processes or cognition, rather than on skill, the more insiduous the effects the human may have on that system. This paper discusses one

  15. Wearable Sensor System for Human Dynamics Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; Inoue, Yoshio; Shibata, Kyoko; Zheng, Rencheng

    2010-01-01

    A new wearable sensor system was developed for measuring tri-directional ground reaction force (GRF) and segment orientations. A stationary force plate can not measure more than one stride; moreover, in studies of stair ascent and descent measurements, a complex system consisting of many stationary force plates and a data fusion method must be constructed (Stacoff et al., 2005; Della and Bonato, 2007). The wearable sensor system proposed in this chapter can be applied to successive walking tr...

  16. Essential technologies for developing human and robot collaborative system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    In this study, we aim to develop a concept of new robot system, i.e., `human and robot collaborative system`, for the patrol of nuclear power plants. This paper deals with the two essential technologies developed for the system. One is the autonomous navigation program with human intervention function which is indispensable for human and robot collaboration. The other is the position estimation method by using gyroscope and TV image to make the estimation accuracy much higher for safe navigation. Feasibility of the position estimation method is evaluated by experiment and numerical simulation. (author)

  17. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  18. Patient safety - the role of human factors and systems engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety.

  19. Neuronal communication through coherence in the human motor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoffelen, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis explores the concept of neuronal communication through oscillatory synchronization. For most of the described research, we used the human motor system as a model system, in particular the cortico spinal system, in combination with non invasive recording techniques. Oscillatory

  20. A novel mouse model for stable engraftment of a human immune system and human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Strick-Marchand

    Full Text Available Hepatic infections by hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and Plasmodium parasites leading to acute or chronic diseases constitute a global health challenge. The species tropism of these hepatotropic pathogens is restricted to chimpanzees and humans, thus model systems to study their pathological mechanisms are severely limited. Although these pathogens infect hepatocytes, disease pathology is intimately related to the degree and quality of the immune response. As a first step to decipher the immune response to infected hepatocytes, we developed an animal model harboring both a human immune system (HIS and human hepatocytes (HUHEP in BALB/c Rag2-/- IL-2Rγc-/- NOD.sirpa uPAtg/tg mice. The extent and kinetics of human hepatocyte engraftment were similar between HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. Transplanted human hepatocytes were polarized and mature in vivo, resulting in 20-50% liver chimerism in these models. Human myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages developed at similar frequencies in HIS and HIS-HUHEP mice, and splenic and hepatic compartments were humanized with mature B cells, NK cells and naïve T cells, as well as monocytes and dendritic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HIS-HUHEP mice can be stably (> 5 months and robustly engrafted with a humanized immune system and chimeric human liver. This novel HIS-HUHEP model provides a platform to investigate human immune responses against hepatotropic pathogens and to test novel drug strategies or vaccine candidates.

  1. A novel mouse model for stable engraftment of a human immune system and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick-Marchand, Helene; Dusséaux, Mathilde; Darche, Sylvie; Huntington, Nicholas D; Legrand, Nicolas; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Corcuff, Erwan; Ahodantin, James; Weijer, Kees; Spits, Hergen; Kremsdorf, Dina; Di Santo, James P

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic infections by hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and Plasmodium parasites leading to acute or chronic diseases constitute a global health challenge. The species tropism of these hepatotropic pathogens is restricted to chimpanzees and humans, thus model systems to study their pathological mechanisms are severely limited. Although these pathogens infect hepatocytes, disease pathology is intimately related to the degree and quality of the immune response. As a first step to decipher the immune response to infected hepatocytes, we developed an animal model harboring both a human immune system (HIS) and human hepatocytes (HUHEP) in BALB/c Rag2-/- IL-2Rγc-/- NOD.sirpa uPAtg/tg mice. The extent and kinetics of human hepatocyte engraftment were similar between HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. Transplanted human hepatocytes were polarized and mature in vivo, resulting in 20-50% liver chimerism in these models. Human myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages developed at similar frequencies in HIS and HIS-HUHEP mice, and splenic and hepatic compartments were humanized with mature B cells, NK cells and naïve T cells, as well as monocytes and dendritic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HIS-HUHEP mice can be stably (> 5 months) and robustly engrafted with a humanized immune system and chimeric human liver. This novel HIS-HUHEP model provides a platform to investigate human immune responses against hepatotropic pathogens and to test novel drug strategies or vaccine candidates.

  2. Human Dimensions of Coral Reef Social-Ecological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. Kittinger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are among the most diverse ecosystems on the planet but are declining because of human activities. Despite general recognition of the human role in the plight of coral reefs, the vast majority of research focuses on the ecological rather than the human dimensions of reef ecosystems, limiting our understanding of social relationships with these environments as well as potential solutions for reef recovery. General frameworks for social-ecological systems (SESs have been advanced, but system-specific approaches are needed to develop a more nuanced view of human-environmental interactions for specific contexts and resource systems, and at specific scales. We synthesize existing concepts related to SESs and present a human dimensions framework that explores the linkages between social system structural traits, human activities, ecosystem services, and human well-being in coral reef SESs. Key features of the framework include social-ecological reciprocity, proximate and underlying dimensions, and the directionality of key relationships and feedback loops. Such frameworks are needed if human dimensions research is to be more fully integrated into studies of ecosystem change and the sustainability of linked SESs.

  3. Fuzzy Simulation Human Intelligent Control System Design on Gyratory Breaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen,Ruchun; Zhao,Shuling; Zhu,Jianwu; Wang,Xiaoyan

    2005-01-01

    In order to deal with the complex process that incurs serious time delay, enormous inertia and nonlinear problems,fuzzy simulation human intelligent control algorithm rules are established. The fuzzy simulation human intelligent controller and the hardware with the single-chip microcomputer are designed and the anti-interference measures to the whole system are provided.

  4. On Building Theoretical System of Human Rights with Chinese Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU HAINIAN

    2011-01-01

    @@ The ongoing discussion organized by the Human Rights magazine on building a theoretical system of human rights with Chinese characteristics is definitely of great significance.Theory guides practice.Correct theories can be turned into an immensely great material force that propels social progress.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section 862.1370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test...

  6. The human spleen. Development and role in the immune system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timens, Willem

    1988-01-01

    In the present thesis an extensive in situ characterization is given of cellular constituents of the human spleen, that play a role in the human immune system. The development of immunocompetent cells in their micro-environment was studied in early embryonic life, fetal life, infancy and childhood,

  7. Requirements engineering for human activity systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available . Office of the Chief Engineer, NASA, 2007. —. Systems Engineering Handbook. Washington, D.C.: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2007. Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, Systems and Software... and special tools necessary to perform the verification (NASA 2007). This information will also allow for proper planning and scheduling of the verification activities to be performed throughout the development and realisation of the product. Measures...

  8. Research on Human Sensory Architecture for Cyber Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhejun Kuang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available CPS is complex distributed systems, which contain computing, communications, and control. CPS is a product of the combination of physical world and the cyber world. The cyber world needs a lot of physical equipment to deal with perception and communication, then collect and transfer the information in the real environment, and by computation to forecast what might happen in future real environment, at last through the control strategy to achieve the optimal solution. In short, cyber physical system is the complex systems combination with computation system, sensory system and control system. Cyber physical system through more extensive connection, the physical world more thorough cognition, more effectively control the physical world, make the information world and the physical world closer integration, realize coordination awareness and control of the physical world. The paper through the analysis of the human perception system, build a cyber-physical fusion system based on human perception architecture. 

  9. Research on Human Sensory Architecture for Cyber Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhejun Kuang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CPS is complex distributed systems, which contain computing, communications, and control. CPS is a product of the combination of physical world and the cyber world. The cyber world needs a lot of physical equipment to deal with perception and communication, then collect and transfer the information in the real environment, and by computation to forecast what might happen in future real environment, at last through the control strategy to achieve the optimal solution. In short, cyber physical system is the complex systems combination with computation system, sensory system and control system. Cyber physical system through more extensive connection, the physical world more thorough cognition, more effectively control the physical world, make the information world and the physical world closer integration, realize coordination awareness and control of the physical world. The paper through the analysis of the human perception system, build a cyber-physical fusion system based on human perception architecture. 

  10. Human Disease Diagnosis Using a Fuzzy Expert System

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, Mir Anamul; Chowdhury, Ahsan Raja

    2010-01-01

    Human disease diagnosis is a complicated process and requires high level of expertise. Any attempt of developing a web-based expert system dealing with human disease diagnosis has to overcome various difficulties. This paper describes a project work aiming to develop a web-based fuzzy expert system for diagnosing human diseases. Now a days fuzzy systems are being used successfully in an increasing number of application areas; they use linguistic rules to describe systems. This research project focuses on the research and development of a web-based clinical tool designed to improve the quality of the exchange of health information between health care professionals and patients. Practitioners can also use this web-based tool to corroborate diagnosis. The proposed system is experimented on various scenarios in order to evaluate it's performance. In all the cases, proposed system exhibits satisfactory results.

  11. Evolution of the Human Nervous System Function, Structure, and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, André M M; Meyer, Kyle A; Santpere, Gabriel; Gulden, Forrest O; Sestan, Nenad

    2017-07-13

    The nervous system-in particular, the brain and its cognitive abilities-is among humans' most distinctive and impressive attributes. How the nervous system has changed in the human lineage and how it differs from that of closely related primates is not well understood. Here, we consider recent comparative analyses of extant species that are uncovering new evidence for evolutionary changes in the size and the number of neurons in the human nervous system, as well as the cellular and molecular reorganization of its neural circuits. We also discuss the developmental mechanisms and underlying genetic and molecular changes that generate these structural and functional differences. As relevant new information and tools materialize at an unprecedented pace, the field is now ripe for systematic and functionally relevant studies of the development and evolution of human nervous system specializations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Robotic Systems (HRS): Robonaut 2 Technologies Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the Robonaut 2 (R2) Technology Project Element within Human Robotic Systems (HRS) is to developed advanced technologies for infusion into the Robonaut 2...

  13. Relational adaptivity - enacting human-centric systems design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve

    2016-01-01

    Human centered design approaches places the experiencing human at the center of concern, situated in relation to the dynamics of the environmental condition and the variables of the system of control and sensing. Taking the approach of enacted design methods to enforce the experience...... of the inhabitant as core in human-centered design solutions, the intelligence of the connected sensors is suggested to be developed as an actual learning and self-adjusting adaptive environment, where the adaptive system is part of a negotiation with users on the qualities of the environment. We will present...... and activity, driven by detailed encounters with human centered investigations and experiential accounts. The sensor system is a test environment, using a very elaborate system design to enable extensive variations in the sensor and network parameters. But, the suggestion is, that by using this kind of high...

  14. 211 English Language, the Nigerian Education System and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Njoku: English Language, the Nigerian Education System. 212 education in Nigeria ... Human development focuses on improving the lives people lead, rather than assuming ..... for Women Empowerment and Breaking the Cycle of. Poverty”.

  15. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  16. Human Systems Integration (HSI) in Acquisition. Management Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Outputs boxes. Tools: ● CATIA ● HSI Requirements Guide ● IMPRINT Activities for Each Output: 1.0 Collect domain requirements inputs 1.1 Ensure...numbers In the Inputs and Outputs boxes. Technology Development Phase (Inputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME...Outputs boxes. Technology Development Phase (Outputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME Activities for Each Output: 1.0

  17. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  18. Dynamics of human respiratory system mycoflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Biedunkiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determing the prevalence of individual species of fungi in the respiratory systems of women and men, analysis of the dynamics of the fungi in individual sections of the respiratory system as concerns their quantity and identification of phenology of the isolated fungi coupled with an attempt at identifying their possible preferences for appearing during specific seasons of thc year. During 10 years of studies (1989- 1998. 29 species of fungi belonging: Candida, Geolrichum, Saccharomyces, Saccharomycopsis, Schizosaccharomyces, Torulopsis, Trichosporon and Aspergillus were isolated from the ontocenoses of the respiratory systems of patients at the Independent Public Center for Pulmonology and Oncology in Olsztyn. Candida albicans was a clearly dominating fungus. Individual species appeared individually, in twos or threes in a single patient, they were isolated more frequently in the spring and autumn, less frequently during the winter and summer. The largest number of fungi species were isolated from sputum (29 species, bronchoscopic material (23 species and pharyngeal swabs (15 species. Sacchoromycopsis capsularis and Trichosporon beigelii should be treated as new for the respiratory system. Biodiversity of fungi, their numbers and continous fluctuations in frequency indicate that the respiratory system ontocenose offers the optimum conditions for growth and development of the majority of the majority of yeasts - like fungi.

  19. The human histaminergic system in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ling; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-03-01

    Histaminergic neurons are exclusively located in the hypothalamic tuberomamillary nucleus, from where they project to many brain areas. The histaminergic system is involved in basic physiological functions, such as the sleep-wake cycle, energy and endocrine homeostasis, sensory and motor functions, cognition, and attention, which are all severely affected in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we present recent postmortem findings on the alterations in this system in neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), depression, and narcolepsy. In addition, we highlight the need to validate animal models for these diseases and also for Tourette's syndrome (TS) in relation to alterations in the histaminergic system. Moreover, we discuss the potential for, and concerns over, the use of novel histamine 3 receptor (H3R) antagonists/inverse agonists as treatment for such disorders.

  20. Human computer interaction issues in Clinical Trials Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starren, Justin B; Payne, Philip R O; Kaufman, David R

    2006-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly rely upon web-based Clinical Trials Management Systems (CTMS). As with clinical care systems, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues can greatly affect the usefulness of such systems. Evaluation of the user interface of one web-based CTMS revealed a number of potential human-computer interaction problems, in particular, increased workflow complexity associated with a web application delivery model and potential usability problems resulting from the use of ambiguous icons. Because these design features are shared by a large fraction of current CTMS, the implications extend beyond this individual system.

  1. High Assurance Human-Centric Decision Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    into a formal state machine model [11]. Our synthesis algo- rithm 1) identifies input and output variables from the MSCs; 2) based on the mode class... machine model with a next-state function T : s × e → s′, where s is the current system state, e a single system input (the stimulus), and s′ the new...large. Fig. 3. MSC for operator movement of a UAV’s way point. In our approach, a MSC describes a sequence of stimulus- response behaviors of a state

  2. Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tiffaney Miller

    2017-01-01

    Research results have shown that more than half of aviation, aerospace and aeronautics mishaps incidents are attributed to human error. As a part of Quality within space exploration ground processing operations, the identification and or classification of underlying contributors and causes of human error must be identified, in order to manage human error.This presentation will provide a framework and methodology using the Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART) and Human Factor Analysis and Classification System (HFACS), as an analysis tool to identify contributing factors, their impact on human error events, and predict the Human Error probabilities (HEPs) of future occurrences. This research methodology was applied (retrospectively) to six (6) NASA ground processing operations scenarios and thirty (30) years of Launch Vehicle related mishap data. This modifiable framework can be used and followed by other space and similar complex operations.

  3. Human-computer interaction and management information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Galletta, Dennis F

    2014-01-01

    ""Human-Computer Interaction and Management Information Systems: Applications"" offers state-of-the-art research by a distinguished set of authors who span the MIS and HCI fields. The original chapters provide authoritative commentaries and in-depth descriptions of research programs that will guide 21st century scholars, graduate students, and industry professionals. Human-Computer Interaction (or Human Factors) in MIS is concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. It is distinctiv

  4. Paralysis recovery in humans and model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.

    2002-01-01

    Considerable evidence now demonstrates that extensive functional and anatomical reorganization following spinal cord injury occurs in centers of the brain that have some input into spinal motor pools. This is very encouraging, given the accumulating evidence that new connections formed across spinal lesions may not be initially functionally useful. The second area of advancement in the field of paralysis recovery is in the development of effective interventions to counter axonal growth inhibition. A third area of significant progress is the development of robotic devices to quantify the performance level of motor tasks following spinal cord injury and to 'teach' the spinal cord to step and stand. Advances are being made with robotic devices for mice, rats and humans.

  5. NASA-STD-3001, Space Flight Human-System Standard and the Human Integration Design Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Boyer, Jennifer; Holubec, Keith

    2012-01-01

    NASA-STD-3001 Space Flight Human-System Standard Volume 1, Crew Health, Volume 2, Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health, and the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH) have replaced the Man-Systems Integration Standards (MSIS), NASA-STD-3000. For decades, NASA-STD-3000 was a significant contribution to human spaceflight programs and to human-systems integration. However, with research program and project results being realized, advances in technology, and the availability of new information in a variety of topic areas, the time had arrived to update this extensive suite of standards and design information. NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 contains the Agency level standards from the human and environmental factors disciplines that ensure human spaceflight operations are performed safely, efficiently, and effectively. The HIDH is organized in the same sequence and serves as the companion document to NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2, providing a compendium of human spaceflight history and knowledge. The HIDH is intended to aid interpretation of NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 standards and to provide guidance for requirement writers and vehicle and habitat designers. Keywords Human Factors, Standards, Environmental Factors, NASA

  6. NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and HIDH (Human Integration Design Handbook)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Janis; Fitts, David; Stroud, Kenneth; Boyer, Jennifer; Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reports on the review and re-issuance of the NASA Space Flight Human System Standard, Volume 2, and the Human Integration Design Handbook. These standards were last updated in 1995. The target date for the release is September 2009.

  7. How to measure thermal effects of personal cooling systems : Human, thermal manikin and human simulator study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, N.; Psikuta, A.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Rossi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects, such as cooling power and thermophysiological responses initiated upon application of a personal cooling system, can be assessed with (i) humans, (ii) a thermal manikin and (iii) a thermophysiological human simulator. In order to compare these methods, a cooling shirt (mild cooling)

  8. New Heuristics for Interfacing Human Motor System using Brain Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El-Dosuky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many new forms of interfacing human users to machines. We persevere here electric-mechanical form of interaction between human and machine. The emergence of brain-computer interface allows mind-to-movement systems. The story of the Pied Piper inspired us to devise some new heuristics for interfacing human motor system using brain waves, by combining head helmet and LumbarMotionMonitor. For the simulation we use java GridGain. Brain responses of classified subjects during training indicates that Probe can be the best stimulus to rely on in distinguishing between knowledgeable and not knowledgeable

  9. Human habitat positioning system for NASA's space flight environmental simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.; Keas, P.

    1998-01-01

    Artificial gravity by centrifugation offers an effective countermeasure to the physiologic deconditioning of chronic exposure to microgravity; however, the system requirements of rotational velocity, radius of rotation, and resultant centrifugal acceleration require thorough investigation to ascertain the ideal human-use centrifuge configuration. NASA's Space Flight Environmental Simulator (SFES), a 16-meter (52-foot) diameter, animal-use centrifuge, was recently modified to accommodate human occupancy. This paper describes the SFES Human Habitat Positioning System, the mechanism that facilitates radius of rotation variability and alignment of the centrifuge occupants with the artificial gravity vector.

  10. Human breast milk and the gastrointestinal innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakaitis, Brett M; Denning, Patricia W

    2014-06-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a large potential portal for multiple infectious agents to enter the human body. The GI system performs multiple functions as part of the neonate's innate immune system, providing critical defense during a vulnerable period. Multiple mechanisms and actions are enhanced by the presence of human breast milk. Bioactive factors found in human milk work together to create and maintain an optimal and healthy environment, allowing the intestines to deliver ideal nutrition to the host and afford protection by a variety of mechanisms.

  11. The human histaminergic system in neuropsychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Ling; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-01-01

    Histaminergic neurons are exclusively located in the hypothalamic tuberomamillary nucleus, from where they project to many brain areas. The histaminergic system is involved in basic physiological functions, such as the sleep-wake cycle, energy and endocrine homeostasis, sensory and motor functions,

  12. Representations of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Manjon, Asuncion; Angon, Yolanda Postigo

    2009-01-01

    There is no agreement about the robustness of intuitive representations of the circulatory system and their susceptibility to change by instruction. In this paper, we analyse to what extent students with varying degrees of biology instruction and different ages (High School Health Science and Social Science students and first and final year…

  13. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  14. An intrinsic GABAergic system in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Leonardo; José De Rosa, María; Bouzat, Cecilia; Esandi, María Del Carmen

    2011-01-01

    γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) is an ubiquitous neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is also present in non-neuronal cells. In this study we investigated the presence of neuronal components of the GABAergic system in lymphocytes and its functional significance. By using RT-PCR we detected mRNA expression of different components of the GABAergic system in resting and mitogen-activated lymphocytes: i) GAD67, an isoform of the enzyme that synthetizes GABA; ii) VIAAT, the vesicular protein involved in GABA storage; iii) GABA transporters (GAT-1 and GAT-2); iv) GABA-T, the enzyme that catabolizes GABA; and v) subunits that conform ionotropic GABA receptors. The presence of VIAAT protein in resting and activated cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. The functionality of GABA transporters was evaluated by measuring the uptake of radioactive GABA. The results show that [(3)H]GABA uptake is 5-fold higher in activated than in resting lymphocytes. To determine if GABA subunits assemble into functional channels, we performed whole-cell recordings in activated lymphocytes. GABA and muscimol, a specific agonist of ionotropic GABA receptors, elicit macroscopic currents in about 10-15% of the cells. Finally, by using [(3)H]thymidine incorporation assays, we determined that the presence of agonists of GABA receptor during activation inhibits lymphocyte proliferation. Our results reveal that lymphocytes have a functional GABAergic system, similar to the neuronal one, which may operate as a modulator of T-cell activation. Pharmacological modulation of this system may provide new approaches for regulation of T-cell response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell-based microfluidic platform for mimicking human olfactory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Oh, Eun Hae; Park, Tai Hyun

    2015-12-15

    Various attempts have been made to mimic the human olfactory system using human olfactory receptors (hORs). In particular, OR-expressed cell-based odorant detection systems mimic the smell sensing mechanism of humans, as they exploit endogenous cellular signaling pathways. However, the majority of such cell-based studies have been performed in the liquid phase to maintain cell viability, and liquid odorants were used as detection targets. Here, we present a microfluidic device for the detection of gaseous odorants which more closely mimics the human olfactory system. Cells expressing hOR were cultured on a porous membrane. The membrane was then flipped over and placed between two compartments. The upper compartment is the gaseous part where gaseous odorants are supplied, while the lower compartment is the aqueous part where viable cells are maintained in the liquid medium. Using this simple microfluidic device, we were able to detect gaseous odorant molecules by a fluorescence signal. The fluorescence signal was generated by calcium influx resulting from the interaction between odorant molecules and the hOR. The system allowed detection of gaseous odorant molecules in real-time, and the findings showed that the fluorescence responses increased dose-dependently in the range of 0-2 ppm odorant. In addition, the system can discriminate among gaseous odorant molecules. This microfluidic system closely mimics the human olfactory system in the sense that the submerged cells detect gaseous odorants.

  16. The Development of A Human Systems Simulation Laboratory: Strategic Direction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo; Katya le Blanc; David Gertman

    2012-07-01

    The Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) at the Idaho National Laboratory is one of few facilities of its kind that allows human factors researchers to evaluate various aspects of human performance and human system interaction for proposed reactor designs and upgrades. A basic system architecture, physical configuration and simulation capability were established to enable human factors researchers to support multiple, simultaneous simulations and also different power plant technologies. Although still evolving in terms of its technical and functional architecture, the HSSL is already proving its worth in supporting current and future nuclear industry needs for light water reactor sustainability and small modular reactors. The evolution of the HSSL is focused on continual physical and functional refinement to make it a fully equipped, reconfigurable facility where advanced research, testing and validation studies can be conducted on a wider range of reactor technologies. This requires the implementation of additional plant models to produce empirical research data on human performance with emerging human-system interaction technologies. Additional beneficiaries of this information include system designers and HRA practitioners. To ensure that results of control room crew studies will be generalizable to the existing and evolving fleet of US reactors, future expansion of the HSSL may also include other SMR plant models, plant-specific simulators and a generic plant model aligned to the current generation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and future advanced reactor designs. Collaboration with industry partners is also proving to be a vital component of the facility as this helps to establish a formal basis for current and future human performance experiments to support nuclear industry objectives. A long-range Program Plan has been developed for the HSSL to ensure that the facility will support not only the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor

  17. STUDY ON HUMAN-COMPUTER SYSTEM FOR STABLE VIRTUAL DISASSEMBLY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Qiang; Zhang Shensheng; Liu Jihong; Cao Pengbing; Zhong Yifang

    2003-01-01

    The cooperative work between human being and computer based on virtual reality (VR) is investigated to plan the disassembly sequences more efficiently. A three-layer model of human-computer cooperative virtual disassembly is built, and the corresponding human-computer system for stable virtual disassembly is developed. In this system, an immersive and interactive virtual disassembly environment has been created to provide planners with a more visual working scene. For cooperative disassembly, an intelligent module of stability analysis of disassembly operations is embedded into the human-computer system to assist planners to implement disassembly tasks better. The supporting matrix for stability analysis of disassembly operations is defined and the method of stability analysis is detailed. Based on the approach, the stability of any disassembly operation can be analyzed to instruct the manual virtual disassembly. At last, a disassembly case in the virtual environment is given to prove the validity of above ideas.

  18. Human Systems Integration Design Environment (HSIDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    quality of the resulting HSI products. 15. SUBJECT TERMS HSI , Manning Estimation and Validation , Risk Assessment, I POE, PLM , BPMN, Workflow...Life Cycle Manager ( PLM ). The web-based interface is a functionally-oriented user interface that reflects the structural components of an HSI program...The PLM provides services such as product structuring, workflow and configuration management. PLMs are complex systems that require a great deal of

  19. Leishmania major infection in humanized mice induces systemic infection and provokes a nonprotective human immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kathrin Wege

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania (L. species are the causative agent of leishmaniasis. Due to the lack of efficient vaccine candidates, drug therapies are the only option to deal with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Unfortunately, chemotherapeutic interventions show high toxicity in addition to an increased risk of dissemination of drug-resistant parasites. An appropriate laboratory animal based model is still missing which allows testing of new drug strategies in the context of human immune cells in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Humanized mice were infected subcutaneously with stationary phase promastigote L. major into the footpad. The human immune response against the pathogen and the parasite host interactions were analyzed. In addition we proved the versatility of this new model to conduct drug research studies by the inclusion of orally given Miltefosine. We show that inflammatory human macrophages get infected with Leishmania parasites at the site of infection. Furthermore, a Leishmania-specific human-derived T cell response is initiated. However, the human immune system is not able to prevent systemic infection. Thus, we treated the mice with Miltefosine to reduce the parasitic load. Notably, this chemotherapy resulted in a reduction of the parasite load in distinct organs. Comparable to some Miltefosine treated patients, humanized mice developed severe side effects, which are not detectable in the classical murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes for the first time L. major infection in humanized mice, characterizes the disease development, the induction of human adaptive and innate immune response including cytokine production and the efficiency of Miltefosine treatment in these animals. In summary, humanized mice might be beneficial for future preclinical chemotherapeutic studies in systemic (visceral leishmaniasis allowing the investigation of human immune response, side effects of the drug

  20. Human development and sustainability of energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This seminar on human development and sustainability was jointly organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and Enerdata company. This document summarises the content of the different presentations and of the minutes of the discussions that took place at the end of each topic. The different themes discussed were: 1 - Political and methodological issues related to sustainability (sustainability concept in government policy, sustainability and back-casting: lessons from EST); 2 - towards a socially viable world: thematic discussions (demography and peoples' migration; time budget and life style change - equal sex access to instruction and labour - geopolitical regional and inter-regional universal cultural acceptability; welfare, poverty and social link and economics); 3 - building up an environmentally sustainable energy world, keeping resources for future generations and preventing geopolitical ruptures (CO{sub 2} emissions; nuclear issues; land-use, noise, and other industrial risks). The memorandum on sustainability issues in view of very long term energy studies is reprinted in the appendix. The transparencies of seven presentations are attached to this document. (J.S.)

  1. Dynamic inverse models in human-cyber-physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ryan M.; Scobee, Dexter R. R.; Burden, Samuel A.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2016-05-01

    Human interaction with the physical world is increasingly mediated by automation. This interaction is characterized by dynamic coupling between robotic (i.e. cyber) and neuromechanical (i.e. human) decision-making agents. Guaranteeing performance of such human-cyber-physical systems will require predictive mathematical models of this dynamic coupling. Toward this end, we propose a rapprochement between robotics and neuromechanics premised on the existence of internal forward and inverse models in the human agent. We hypothesize that, in tele-robotic applications of interest, a human operator learns to invert automation dynamics, directly translating from desired task to required control input. By formulating the model inversion problem in the context of a tracking task for a nonlinear control system in control-a_ne form, we derive criteria for exponential tracking and show that the resulting dynamic inverse model generally renders a portion of the physical system state (i.e., the internal dynamics) unobservable from the human operator's perspective. Under stability conditions, we show that the human can achieve exponential tracking without formulating an estimate of the system's state so long as they possess an accurate model of the system's dynamics. These theoretical results are illustrated using a planar quadrotor example. We then demonstrate that the automation can intervene to improve performance of the tracking task by solving an optimal control problem. Performance is guaranteed to improve under the assumption that the human learns and inverts the dynamic model of the altered system. We conclude with a discussion of practical limitations that may hinder exact dynamic model inversion.

  2. NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubec, Keith; Connolly, Janis

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history, and development of NASA-STD-3001, NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health, and the related Human Integration Design Handbook. Currently being developed from NASA-STD-3000, this project standard currently in review will be available in two volumes, (i.e., Volume 1 -- VCrew Health and Volume 2 -- Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health) and the handbook will be both available as a pdf file and as a interactive website.

  3. A new method to evaluate human-robot system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, G.; Weisbin, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in space exploration is that of deciding what space tasks are best done with humans, with robots, or a suitable combination of each. In general, human and robot skills are complementary. Humans provide as yet unmatched capabilities to perceive, think, and act when faced with anomalies and unforeseen events, but there can be huge potential risks to human safety in getting these benefits. Robots provide complementary skills in being able to work in extremely risky environments, but their ability to perceive, think, and act by themselves is currently not error-free, although these capabilities are continually improving with the emergence of new technologies. Substantial past experience validates these generally qualitative notions. However, there is a need for more rigorously systematic evaluation of human and robot roles, in order to optimize the design and performance of human-robot system architectures using well-defined performance evaluation metrics. This article summarizes a new analytical method to conduct such quantitative evaluations. While the article focuses on evaluating human-robot systems, the method is generally applicable to a much broader class of systems whose performance needs to be evaluated.

  4. Viral infections in mice with reconstituted human immune system components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münz, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Pathogenic viruses are often difficult to study due to their exclusive tropism for humans. The development of mice with human immune system components opens the possibility to study those human pathogens with a tropism for the human hematopoietic lineage in vivo. These include HCMV, EBV, KSHV, HIV, HTLV-1, dengue virus and JC virus. Furthermore, some human pathogens, like HSV-2, adenovirus, HCV, HBV and influenza A virus, with an additional tropism for somatic mouse tissues or for additional transplanted human tissues, mainly liver, have been explored in these models. The cellular tropism of these viruses, their associated diseases and primarily cell-mediated immune responses to these viral infections will be discussed in this review. Already some exciting information has been gained from these novel chimeric in vivo models and future avenues to gain more insights into the pathology, but also potential therapies, will be outlined. Although the respective in vivo models of human immune responses can still be significantly improved, they already provide preclinical systems for in vivo studies of important viral pathogens of humans.

  5. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  6. MERIP - Design of Production Systems with focus on Human Ressources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Knudsen, Mads Kristian Lund

    1998-01-01

    The way in which the Industry has involved the human resources in production systems, has changed in last decades. Previously the human resources were mainly considered as means to link together the technical systems, while today they are key resources responsible for development, planning......", "Employee-activated Production Development - MAPU", "Integrated Production Systems - IPS" and "Strategic Development of Staff - SUM". MERIP (Human resources in production) is a continuation of this type of projects, aiming at increasing the competitive power of the companies. However MERIP scientists want...... and production. This development has been a continuos process, and it has been supported by several research- and development projects in co-operation with Danish Industry, CO industry and The Technical University of Denmark. Among the projects should be mentioned: "Development of Production systems - UPS...

  7. The sympathetic nervous system alterations in human hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-03-13

    Several articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as promoters and amplifiers of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in 2 increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves.

  8. Information systems and human error in the lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    Health system costs in clinical laboratories are incurred daily due to human error. Indeed, a major impetus for automating clinical laboratories has always been the opportunity it presents to simultaneously reduce cost and improve quality of operations by decreasing human error. But merely automating these processes is not enough. To the extent that introduction of these systems results in operators having less practice in dealing with unexpected events or becoming deskilled in problemsolving, however new kinds of error will likely appear. Clinical laboratories could potentially benefit by integrating findings on human error from modern behavioral science into their operations. Fully understanding human error requires a deep understanding of human information processing and cognition. Predicting and preventing negative consequences requires application of this understanding to laboratory operations. Although the occurrence of a particular error at a particular instant cannot be absolutely prevented, human error rates can be reduced. The following principles are key: an understanding of the process of learning in relation to error; understanding the origin of errors since this knowledge can be used to reduce their occurrence; optimal systems should be forgiving to the operator by absorbing errors, at least for a time; although much is known by industrial psychologists about how to write operating procedures and instructions in ways that reduce the probability of error, this expertise is hardly ever put to use in the laboratory; and a feedback mechanism must be designed into the system that enables the operator to recognize in real time that an error has occurred.

  9. Systems Factorial Technology Explained to Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harding, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of mental processes is at the forefront of research in cognitive psychology. However, the ability to identify the architectures responsible for specific behaviors is often quite difficult. To alleviate this difficulty, recent progress in mathematical psychology has brought forth Systems Factorial Technology (SFT; Townsend & Nozawa, 1995. Encompassing a series of analyses, SFT can diagnose and discriminate between five types of information processing architectures that possibly underlie a mental process. Despite the fact that SFT has led to new discoveries in cognitive psychology, the methodology itself remains far from intuitive to newcomers. This article therefore seeks to provide readers with a simple tutorial and a rudimentary introduction to SFT. This tutorial aims to encourage newcomers to read more about SFT and also to add it to their repertoire of analyses.

  10. Humans vs Hardware: The Unique World of NASA Human System Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, W.; Havenhill, M.; Overton, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Understanding spaceflight risks to crew health and performance is a crucial aspect of preparing for exploration missions in the future. The research activities of the Human Research Program (HRP) provide substantial evidence to support most risk reduction work. The Human System Risk Board (HSRB), acting on behalf of the Office of Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO), assesses these risks and assigns likelihood and consequence ratings to track progress. Unfortunately, many traditional approaches in risk assessment such as those used in the engineering aspects of spaceflight are difficult to apply to human system risks. This presentation discusses the unique aspects of risk assessment from the human system risk perspective and how these limitations are accommodated and addressed in order to ensure that reasonable inputs are provided to support the OCHMO's overall risk posture for manned exploration missions.

  11. Vision Systems with the Human in the Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauckhage Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The emerging cognitive vision paradigm deals with vision systems that apply machine learning and automatic reasoning in order to learn from what they perceive. Cognitive vision systems can rate the relevance and consistency of newly acquired knowledge, they can adapt to their environment and thus will exhibit high robustness. This contribution presents vision systems that aim at flexibility and robustness. One is tailored for content-based image retrieval, the others are cognitive vision systems that constitute prototypes of visual active memories which evaluate, gather, and integrate contextual knowledge for visual analysis. All three systems are designed to interact with human users. After we will have discussed adaptive content-based image retrieval and object and action recognition in an office environment, the issue of assessing cognitive systems will be raised. Experiences from psychologically evaluated human-machine interactions will be reported and the promising potential of psychologically-based usability experiments will be stressed.

  12. Cybernics fusion of human, machine and information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Cybernics plays a significant role in coping with an aging society using state-of-the-art technologies from engineering, clinical medicine and humanities. This new interdisciplinary field studies technologies that enhance, strengthen, and support physical and cognitive functions of human beings, based on the fusion of human, machine, and information systems. The design of a seamless interface for interaction between the interior and exterior of the human body is described in this book from diverse aspects such as the physical, neurophysiological, and cognitive levels. It is the first book to cover the many aspects of cybernics, allowing readers to understand the life support robotics technology for the elderly, including remote, in-home, hospital, institutional, community medical welfare, and vital-sensing systems. Serving as a valuable resource, this volume will interest not only graduate students, scientists, and engineers but also newcomers to the field of cybernics.

  13. Model-Based approaches to Human-Automation Systems Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamieson, Greg A.; Andersson, Jonas; Bisantz, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Human-automation interaction in complex systems is common, yet design for this interaction is often conducted without explicit consideration of the role of the human operator. Fortunately, there are a number of modeling frameworks proposed for supporting this design activity. However, the framewo......Human-automation interaction in complex systems is common, yet design for this interaction is often conducted without explicit consideration of the role of the human operator. Fortunately, there are a number of modeling frameworks proposed for supporting this design activity. However......, the frameworks are often adapted from other purposes, usually applied to a limited range of problems, sometimes not fully described in the open literature, and rarely critically reviewed in a manner acceptable to proponents and critics alike. The present paper introduces a panel session wherein these proponents...

  14. Towards a Fast Dynamic Model of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    4.5m for the pulmonary vascular tree. According to Guyton & Hall (2000), about 5 L is considered normal for an adult human, and the area distribution...decreases further, and even falls below the equilibrium pressure. Guyton & Hall (2000) reports that normal mean pressures are 100 mmHg in the arteries, 20...the order of 100 times faster than realtime. Five liters is considered a normal volume for an adult human circulatory system ( Guyton & Hall, 2000

  15. Histologic examination of the rat central nervous system after intrathecal administration of human beta-endorphin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hée, P.; Klinken, Leif; Ballegaard, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Neuropathology, analgesics - intrathecal, central nervous system, histology, human beta-endorphin, toxicity......Neuropathology, analgesics - intrathecal, central nervous system, histology, human beta-endorphin, toxicity...

  16. Human CD8+ T cells mediate protective immunity induced by a human malaria vaccine in human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Funakoshi, Ryota; Sheetij, Dutta; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Crisanti, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-08-31

    A number of studies have shown that CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in a mouse model. However, whether human CD8+ T cells play a role in protection against malaria remains unknown. We recently established human immune system (HIS) mice harboring functional human CD8+ T cells (HIS-CD8 mice) by transduction with HLA-A∗0201 and certain human cytokines using recombinant adeno-associated virus-based gene transfer technologies. These HIS-CD8 mice mount a potent, antigen-specific HLA-A∗0201-restricted human CD8+ T-cell response upon immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a human malaria antigen, the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), termed AdPfCSP. In the present study, we challenged AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice with transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing full-length PfCSP and found that AdPfCSP-immunized (but not naïve) mice were protected against subsequent malaria challenge. The level of the HLA-A∗0201-restricted, PfCSP-specific human CD8+ T-cell response was closely correlated with the level of malaria protection. Furthermore, depletion of human CD8+ T cells from AdPfCSP-immunized HIS-CD8 mice almost completely abolished the anti-malaria immune response. Taken together, our data show that human CD8+ T cells mediate protective anti-malaria immunity in vivo.

  17. A Conceptual Framework for Representing Human Behavior Characteristics in a System of Systems Agent-Based Survivability Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    distribution is unlimited. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR REPRESENTING HUMAN BEHAVIOR CHARACTERISTICS IN A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS AGENT-BASED SURVIVABILITY...27411 -0001 ABSTRACT A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR REPRESENTING HUMAN BEHAVIOR CHARACTERISTICS IN A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS AGENT-BASED SURVIVABILITY SIMULATION...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR REPRESENTING HUMAN BEHAVIOR CHARACTERISTICS IN A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS AGENT-BASED SURVIVABILITY

  18. Robot and Human Surface Operations on Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbin, C. R.; Easter, R.; Rodriguez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of robot and human surface operations on solar system bodies. The topics include: 1) Long Range Vision of Surface Scenarios; 2) Human and Robots Complement Each Other; 3) Respective Human and Robot Strengths; 4) Need More In-Depth Quantitative Analysis; 5) Projected Study Objectives; 6) Analysis Process Summary; 7) Mission Scenarios Decompose into Primitive Tasks; 7) Features of the Projected Analysis Approach; and 8) The "Getting There Effect" is a Major Consideration. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  19. Understanding the behavior of floodplains as human-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Baldassarre, G.; Brandimarte, L.

    2012-12-01

    Floodplains are among the most valuable ecosystems for supporting biodiversity and providing services to the environment. Moreover, they are home of approximately one-sixth of the world population as they offer favorable conditions for economic development. As a result, flood disasters currently affect more than 100 million people a year. Sadly, flood losses and fatalities are expected to increase further in many countries because of population growth as well as changes in land use and climate. Given the relevance of floodplain systems, a number of social scientists have examined how the frequency and severity of flooding often determine whether human development in floodplains is desirable or not. Meanwhile, many earth scientists have investigated the impact of human activities (e.g. land-use changes, urbanization, river training) on the frequency and magnitude of floods. In fact, as human activities change the frequency of flooding, the frequency of flooding affects human developments in floodplain areas. Yet, these dynamic interactions between floods and societies and the associated feedback mechanisms remain largely unexplored and poorly understood. As a result, we typically consider humans as external forcing (or boundary condition) without representing the feedback loops and our prediction of future trajectories are therefore extremely limited. This presentation shows a first attempt to understand the behavior of floodplains as coupled human-water systems. In particular, we analyzed a number of long time series of hydrological and population data in the Po River Basin (Italy) to explore the feedback mechanisms, reciprocal effects, surprises, and threshold mechanisms, taking place in floodplain systems. The outcomes of the study enable a better understanding of how the occurrences of floods shape human developments while, at the same time, human activities shape the magnitude and frequency of floods. The presentation also discusses the opportunities offered by

  20. Economics of human performance and systems total ownership cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onkham, Wilawan; Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    Financial costs of investing in people is associated with training, acquisition, recruiting, and resolving human errors have a significant impact on increased total ownership costs. These costs can also affect the exaggerate budgets and delayed schedules. The study of human performance economical assessment in the system acquisition process enhances the visibility of hidden cost drivers which support program management informed decisions. This paper presents the literature review of human total ownership cost (HTOC) and cost impacts on overall system performance. Economic value assessment models such as cost benefit analysis, risk-cost tradeoff analysis, expected value of utility function analysis (EV), growth readiness matrix, multi-attribute utility technique, and multi-regressions model were introduced to reflect the HTOC and human performance-technology tradeoffs in terms of the dollar value. The human total ownership regression model introduces to address the influencing human performance cost component measurement. Results from this study will increase understanding of relevant cost drivers in the system acquisition process over the long term.

  1. Human-centered design of a distributed knowledge management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkus, Susan; Walji, Muhammad; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A; Malin, Jane T; Turley, James P; Smith, Jack W; Zhang, Jiajie

    2005-02-01

    Many healthcare technology projects fail due to the lack of consideration of human issues, such as workflow, organizational change, and usability, during the design and implementation stages of a project's development process. Even when human issues are considered, the consideration is typically on designing better user interfaces. We argue that human-centered computing goes beyond a better user interface: it should include considerations of users, functions and tasks that are fundamental to human-centered computing. From this perspective, we integrated a previously developed human-centered methodology with a Project Design Lifecycle, and we applied this integration in the design of a complex distributed knowledge management system for the Biomedical Engineer (BME) domain in the Mission Control Center at NASA Johnson Space Center. We analyzed this complex system, identified its problems, generated systems requirements, and provided specifications of a replacement prototype for effective organizational memory and knowledge management. We demonstrated the value provided by our human-centered approach and described the unique properties, structures, and processes discovered using this methodology and how they contributed in the design of the prototype.

  2. MERIP - Design of Production Systems with focus on Human Ressources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Knudsen, Mads Kristian Lund

    1998-01-01

    The way in which the Industry has involved the human resources in production systems, has changed in last decades. Previously the human resources were mainly considered as means to link together the technical systems, while today they are key resources responsible for development, planning....... Those "Case-companies" will form an important basis for the development of production systems, and they will function as sparring partners for the project. MERIP will in this way be able to inform the industry about new ways in development of production systems - and suggest how the industry could...... and production. This development has been a continuos process, and it has been supported by several research- and development projects in co-operation with Danish Industry, CO industry and The Technical University of Denmark. Among the projects should be mentioned: "Development of Production systems - UPS...

  3. Guidance for human interface with artificial intelligence systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Scott S.; Woods, David D.

    1991-01-01

    The beginning of a research effort to collect and integrate existing research findings about how to combine computer power and people is discussed, including problems and pitfalls as well as desirable features. The goal of the research is to develop guidance for the design of human interfaces with intelligent systems. Fault management tasks in NASA domains are the focus of the investigation. Research is being conducted to support the development of guidance for designers that will enable them to make human interface considerations into account during the creation of intelligent systems.

  4. Modelling human decision-making in coupled human and natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feola, G.

    2012-12-01

    A solid understanding of human decision-making is essential to analyze the complexity of coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) and inform policies to promote resilience in the face of environmental change. Human decisions drive and/or mediate the interactions and feedbacks, and contribute to the heterogeneity and non-linearity that characterize CHANS. However, human decision-making is usually over-simplistically modeled, whereby human agents are represented deterministically either as dumb or clairvoyant decision-makers. Decision-making models fall short in the integration of both environmental and human behavioral drivers, and concerning the latter, tend to focus on only one category, e.g. economic, cultural, or psychological. Furthermore, these models render a linear decision-making process and therefore fail to account for the recursive co-evolutionary dynamics in CHANS. As a result, these models constitute only a weak basis for policy-making. There is therefore scope and an urgent need for better approaches to human decision-making, to produce the knowledge that can inform vulnerability reduction policies in the face of environmental change. This presentation synthesizes the current state-of-the-art of modelling human decision-making in CHANS, with particular reference to agricultural systems, and delineates how the above mentioned shortcomings can be overcome. Through examples from research on pesticide use and adaptation to climate change, both based on the integrative agent-centered framework (Feola and Binder, 2010), the approach for an improved understanding of human agents in CHANS are illustrated. This entails: integrative approach, focus on behavioral dynamics more than states, feedbacks between individual and system levels, and openness to heterogeneity.

  5. Optimal Configuration of Human Motion Tracking Systems: A Systems Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Human motion tracking systems represent a crucial technology in the area of modeling and simulation. These systems, which allow engineers to capture human motion for study or replication in virtual environments, have broad applications in several research disciplines including human engineering, robotics, and psychology. These systems are based on several sensing paradigms, including electro-magnetic, infrared, and visual recognition. Each of these paradigms requires specialized environments and hardware configurations to optimize performance of the human motion tracking system. Ideally, these systems are used in a laboratory or other facility that was designed to accommodate the particular sensing technology. For example, electromagnetic systems are highly vulnerable to interference from metallic objects, and should be used in a specialized lab free of metal components.

  6. Human Systems Interface and Plant Modernization Process: Technical Basis and Human Factors Review Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    NUREG /CR-6637 BNL- NUREG -52567 Human Systems Interface and Plant Modernization Process: Technical Basis and Human Factors Review Guidance Brookhaven...NOTICE Availability of Reference Materials Cited in NRC Publications NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regu- <http://www.nrc.gov>lations, and...sources: access NUREG -series publications and other NRCrecords in NRC’s Agencywide Document Access 1. The Superintendent of Documents and Management

  7. An Illumination Modeling System for Human Factors Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thong; Maida, James C.; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Seeing is critical to human performance. Lighting is critical for seeing. Therefore, lighting is critical to human performance. This is common sense, and here on earth, it is easily taken for granted. However, on orbit, because the sun will rise or set every 45 minutes on average, humans working in space must cope with extremely dynamic lighting conditions. Contrast conditions of harsh shadowing and glare is also severe. The prediction of lighting conditions for critical operations is essential. Crew training can factor lighting into the lesson plans when necessary. Mission planners can determine whether low-light video cameras are required or whether additional luminaires need to be flown. The optimization of the quantity and quality of light is needed because of the effects on crew safety, on electrical power and on equipment maintainability. To address all of these issues, an illumination modeling system has been developed by the Graphics Research and Analyses Facility (GRAF) and Lighting Environment Test Facility (LETF) in the Space Human Factors Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center. The system uses physically based ray tracing software (Radiance) developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, a human factors oriented geometric modeling system (PLAID) and an extensive database of humans and environments. Material reflectivity properties of major surfaces and critical surfaces are measured using a gonio-reflectometer. Luminaires (lights) are measured for beam spread distribution, color and intensity. Video camera performances are measured for color and light sensitivity. 3D geometric models of humans and the environment are combined with the material and light models to form a system capable of predicting lighting conditions and visibility conditions in space.

  8. Human mast cell mediator cocktail excites neurons in human and guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemann, M; Michel, K; Ceregrzyn, M; Zeller, F; Seidl, S; Bischoff, S C

    2005-04-01

    Neuroimmune interactions are an integral part of gut physiology and involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and functional bowel disorders. Mast cells and their mediators are important conveyors in the communication from the innate enteric immune system to the enteric nervous system (ENS). However, it is not known whether a mediator cocktail released from activated human mast cells affects neural activity in the ENS. We used the Multi-Site Optical Recording Technique to image single cell activity in guinea-pig and human ENS after application of a mast cell mediator cocktail (MCMC) that was released from isolated human intestinal mucosa mast cells stimulated by IgE-receptor cross-linking. Local application of MCMC onto individual ganglia evoked an excitatory response consisting of action potential discharge. This excitatory response occurred in 31%, 38% or 11% neurons of guinea-pig submucous plexus, human submucous plexus, or guinea-pig myenteric plexus, respectively. Compound action potentials from nerve fibres or fast excitatory synaptic inputs were not affected by MCMC. This study demonstrates immunoneural signalling in the human gut and revealed for the first time that an MCMC released from stimulated human intestinal mast cells induces excitatory actions in the human and guinea-pig ENS.

  9. Human System Simulation in Support of Human Performance Technical Basis at NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; alan mecham; william phoenix; Magdy Tawfik; Jeffrey Joe

    2010-06-01

    This paper focuses on strategies and progress toward establishing the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Human Systems Simulator Laboratory at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a consortium of Idaho State Universities. The INL is one of the National Laboratories of the US Department of Energy. One of the first planned applications for the Human Systems Simulator Laboratory is implementation of a dynamic nuclear power plant simulation (NPP) where studies of operator workload, situation awareness, performance and preference will be carried out in simulated control rooms including nuclear power plant control rooms. Simulation offers a means by which to review operational concepts, improve design practices and provide a technical basis for licensing decisions. In preparation for the next generation power plant and current government and industry efforts in support of light water reactor sustainability, human operators will be attached to a suite of physiological measurement instruments and, in combination with traditional Human Factors Measurement techniques, carry out control room tasks in simulated advanced digital and hybrid analog/digital control rooms. The current focus of the Human Systems Simulator Laboratory is building core competence in quantitative and qualitative measurements of situation awareness and workload. Of particular interest is whether introduction of digital systems including automated procedures has the potential to reduce workload and enhance safety while improving situation awareness or whether workload is merely shifted and situation awareness is modified in yet to be determined ways. Data analysis is carried out by engineers and scientists and includes measures of the physical and neurological correlates of human performance. The current approach supports a user-centered design philosophy (see ISO 13407 “Human Centered Design Process for Interactive Systems, 1999) wherein the context for task performance along with the

  10. EBV Infection of Mice with Reconstituted Human Immune System Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was discovered 50 years ago as the first candidate human tumor virus. Since then, we have realized that this human γ-herpesvirus establishes persistent infection in the majority of adult humans, but fortunately causes EBV-associated diseases only in few individuals. This is an incredible success story of the human immune system, which controls EBV infection and its transforming capacity for decades. A better understanding of this immune control would not only benefit patients with EBV-associated malignancies, but could also provide clues how to establish such a potent, mostly cell-mediated immune control against other pathogens and tumors. However, the functional relevance of EBV-specific immune responses can only be addressed in vivo, and mice with reconstituted human immune system components (huMice) constitute a small animal model to interrogate the protective value of immune compartments during EBV infection, but also might provide a platform to test EBV-specific vaccines. This chapter will summarize the insights into EBV immunobiology that have already been gained in these models and provide an outlook into promising future avenues to develop this in vivo model of EBV infection and human immune responses further.

  11. Simulation of a steady-state integrated human thermal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, F. T.; Fan, L. T.; Hwang, C. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical model of an integrated human thermal system is formulated. The system consists of an external thermal regulation device on the human body. The purpose of the device (a network of cooling tubes held in contact with the surface of the skin) is to maintain the human body in a state of thermoneutrality. The device is controlled by varying the inlet coolant temperature and coolant mass flow rate. The differential equations of the model are approximated by a set of algebraic equations which result from the application of the explicit forward finite difference method to the differential equations. The integrated human thermal system is simulated for a variety of combinations of the inlet coolant temperature, coolant mass flow rate, and metabolic rates. Two specific cases are considered: (1) the external thermal regulation device is placed only on the head and (2) the devices are placed on the head and the torso. The results of the simulation indicate that when the human body is exposed to hot environment, thermoneutrality can be attained by localized cooling if the operating variables of the external regulation device(s) are properly controlled.

  12. Linking Microbiota to Human Diseases: A Systems Biology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Tremaroli, Valentina; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2015-12-01

    The human gut microbiota encompasses a densely populated ecosystem that provides essential functions for host development, immune maturation, and metabolism. Alterations to the gut microbiota have been observed in numerous diseases, including human metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and irritable bowel syndrome, and some animal experiments have suggested causality. However, few studies have validated causality in humans and the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be elucidated. We discuss how systems biology approaches combined with new experimental technologies may disentangle some of the mechanistic details in the complex interactions of diet, microbiota, and host metabolism and may provide testable hypotheses for advancing our current understanding of human-microbiota interaction.

  13. Human factors/ergonomics as a systems discipline? "The human use of human beings" revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the possible future of Human factors/ergonomics (HFE) usually take the past for granted in the sense that the future of HFE is assumed to be more of the same. This paper argues that the nature of work in the early 2010s is so different from the nature of work when HFE was formulated...

  14. Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators’ alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

  15. Development of Life Support System Technologies for Human Lunar Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    With the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle planned to be completed in 2009, Exploration Life Support (ELS), a technology development project under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Exploration Technology Development Program, is focusing its efforts on needs for human lunar missions. The ELS Project s goal is to develop and mature a suite of Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies for potential use on human spacecraft under development in support of U.S. Space Exploration Policy. ELS technology development is directed at three major vehicle projects within NASA s Constellation Program (CxP): the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the Altair Lunar Lander and Lunar Surface Systems, including habitats and pressurized rovers. The ELS Project includes four technical elements: Atmosphere Revitalization Systems, Water Recovery Systems, Waste Management Systems and Habitation Engineering, and two cross cutting elements, Systems Integration, Modeling and Analysis, and Validation and Testing. This paper will provide an overview of the ELS Project, connectivity with its customers and an update to content within its technology development portfolio with focus on human lunar missions.

  16. A Novel Web-based Human Advisor Fuzzy Expert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Rafe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The applications of the Internet-based technologies and the concepts of fuzzy expert systems (FES have created new methods for sharing and distributing knowledge. However, there has been a general lack of investigation in the area of web-based fuzzy expert systems. In this paper, the issues associated with the design, development, and use of web-based applications from a standpoint of the benefits and challenges of development and utilization are investigated. The original theory and concepts in conventional FES are reviewed and a knowledge engineering framework for developing such systems is revised. For a human advisor to have a satisfying performance, expertise is a must. In addition, some of advisory rules are subject to change because of domain knowledge update. The human requests may have linguistic or crisp forms and a conventional expert system (ES is not able to overcome the fuzziness in the problem nature. In this research, a Web-based fuzzy expert system for Common Human Advisor (FES-CHA is developed and implemented to be used as a student advisor at the department‘s web portal. The system is implemented by using Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2010, MVC and Microsoft SQL Server 2012.

  17. Improving Human/Autonomous System Teaming Through Linguistic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    An area of increasing interest for the next generation of aircraft is autonomy and the integration of increasingly autonomous systems into the national airspace. Such integration requires humans to work closely with autonomous systems, forming human and autonomous agent teams. The intention behind such teaming is that a team composed of both humans and autonomous agents will operate better than homogenous teams. Procedures exist for licensing pilots to operate in the national airspace system and current work is being done to define methods for validating the function of autonomous systems, however there is no method in place for assessing the interaction of these two disparate systems. Moreover, currently these systems are operated primarily by subject matter experts, limiting their use and the benefits of such teams. Providing additional information about the ongoing mission to the operator can lead to increased usability and allow for operation by non-experts. Linguistic analysis of the context of verbal communication provides insight into the intended meaning of commonly heard phrases such as "What's it doing now?" Analyzing the semantic sphere surrounding these common phrases enables the prediction of the operator's intent and allows the interface to supply the operator's desired information.

  18. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DESIGN AT HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanti Yanti

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Human Resources Division of a company is a vital division. Most of the time, they perform their work manually, and therefore creating limitations to their capacity. The knowledge contained is very important for human resources development and subsequently for developing the company. In order to manage this knowledge well, the company shall require a knowledge management system. This knowledge management system would be a solution to be used for the company to manage all knowledge contained in that particular division. Phases in designing knowledge managements starts from analyzing knowledge sources of the company, knowledge identification and definition, and determining knowledge goals. Knowledge management systems contain many functions such as collecting, recording and managing the knowledge and sharing this to all related employees easily. The company may also use knowledge management systems to share and inform employees regarding updates of information, news and/or activity regarding the employees themselves. Information from knowledge management systems may also be used by employees to monitor their performance and thereby increasing it. Knowledge management systems may also help employees in their learning activities.Keywords: knowledge management, human resources, employee

  19. Linking human and natural systems in the planning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan I. Stewart; Miranda H. Mockrin; Roger B. Hammer

    2012-01-01

    Planning links human and natural systems in the urban-rural interface by engaging people in consideration of the future of natural resources. We review evolving ideas about what planning entails, who it involves, and what its outcomes should be. Sense of place, collaboration, emergent planning, and other new developments in planning are discussed. Smaller plans,...

  20. Human-centered text mining: a new software system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelmans, J.; Elzinga, P.; Neznanov, A.A.; Dedene, G.; Viaene, S.; Kuznetsov, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel human-centered data mining software system which was designed to gain intelligence from unstructured textual data. The architecture takes its roots in several case studies which were a collaboration between the Amsterdam-Amstelland Police, GasthuisZusters Antwerpen

  1. An Experimental Study of the Emergence of Human Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of human communication systems is typically investigated via 2 approaches with complementary strengths and weaknesses: naturalistic studies and computer simulations. This study was conducted with a method that combines these approaches. Pairs of participants played video games requiring communication. Members of a pair were…

  2. An Automatic Identification System of Human Skin Irritation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Fadlil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative characterization of human skin irritation is an important but difficult task. Recently, identification of human skin is still doing manually. Furthermore, manual identification of the human skin irritation sample can be very subjective. The skin irritation analysis could conducted using biochemical test, but not simple. In this research, a new approach an automatic human skin identification system base on image recognition have been developed. Skin image processed using pattern recognition methods to obtain decision of skin sample test is skin irritation or not. System design is implementation of Gray Level Histogram (GLH feature or texture Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrices (GLCM features using classifier distance metric: Manhattan distance and Euclidean distance, or Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ neural network. Combination between feature extrator and classifier methods proposed to evaluate of performance system. The experimental results show that the best accuracy namely 83.33% obtained when design system is implementation of GLH or GLCM features using LVQ neural network classifier.

  3. Human Systems Engineering: A Leadership Model for Collaboration and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Karen L.

    Human systems engineering (HSE) was created to introduce a new way of viewing collaboration. HSE emphasizes the role of leaders who welcome risk, commit to achieving positive change, and help others achieve change. The principles of HSE and its successful application to the collaborative process were illustrated through a case study representing a…

  4. Somatostatin receptors and their ligands in the human immune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.A.S.H. Dalm (Virgil)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractMaintenance of homeostasis is essential for survival of the mammalian organism. For a long time it was believed that the different systems in the human body act independently from each other to achieve this goal. However, during the last decades it has become more evident that the differ

  5. Corner Detection Based on Human Visual System Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaoguang; ZHOU Jie

    2001-01-01

    Corners are useful features in computer vision tasks.In this paper,we present an algorithm for corner detection based on a human visual system model.Experimental results proved that it ismore effective than conventional corner detector under uneven illumination conditions.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system... Test Systems § 862.1155 Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. (a) Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system intended for the early detection of pregnancy—(1) Identification. A human...

  7. A conceptual framework to evaluate human-wildlife interactions within coupled human and natural systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita T. Morzillo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Landscape characteristics affect human-wildlife interactions. However, there is a need to better understand mechanisms that drive those interactions, particularly feedbacks that exist between wildlife-related impacts, human reaction to and behavior as a result of those impacts, and how land use and landscape characteristics may influence those components within coupled human and natural systems. Current conceptual models of human-wildlife interactions often focus on species population size as the independent variable driving those interactions. Such an approach potentially overlooks important feedbacks among and drivers of human-wildlife interactions that result from mere wildlife presence versus absence. We describe an emerging conceptual framework that focuses on wildlife as a driver of human behavior and allows us to better understand linkages between humans, wildlife, and the broader landscape. We also present results of a pilot analysis related to our own ongoing study of urban rodent control behavior to illustrate one application of this framework within a study of urban landscapes.

  8. Human-computer systems interaction backgrounds and applications 3

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikowski, Juliusz; Mroczek, Teresa; Wtorek, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    This book contains an interesting and state-of the art collection of papers on the recent progress in Human-Computer System Interaction (H-CSI). It contributes the profound description of the actual status of the H-CSI field and also provides a solid base for further development and research in the discussed area. The contents of the book are divided into the following parts: I. General human-system interaction problems; II. Health monitoring and disabled people helping systems; and III. Various information processing systems. This book is intended for a wide audience of readers who are not necessarily experts in computer science, machine learning or knowledge engineering, but are interested in Human-Computer Systems Interaction. The level of particular papers and specific spreading-out into particular parts is a reason why this volume makes fascinating reading. This gives the reader a much deeper insight than he/she might glean from research papers or talks at conferences. It touches on all deep issues that ...

  9. A portable measurement system for the evaluation of human gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Filip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A tool has been developed which can be used to evaluate human gait in a more detailed manner. Its purpose is to record data from an individual during gait then categorize and analyze the intrinsic phases with neuro-fuzzy techniques. The system is simple to use, adaptive, highly mobile, and does not require calibration. The hardware consists of four accelerometers and four force sensitive resistors to record data during walking which is then prepared and collected by a digital device and PDA computer. The gait data is passed into an intelligent fuzzy inference system managed by custom defined fuzzy rules to be classified into four stance phases (heel strike, flat foot, heel lift, toe push-off, and three swing phases (initial flexion, terminal flexion, and terminal extension. After the fuzzy system was trained using data from five healthy subjects, the system's representative gait classification root mean squared error dropped from 0.2975 to 0.1200, showing a much improved ability to categorize human gait, despite its varied nature. The system represents a robust tool, which can be used in a clinical environment for the analysis of human gait in rehabilitative applications such as rule based control generation for functional electrical stimulation, and gait quality analysis.

  10. Computer aided systems human engineering: A hypermedia tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Kenneth R.; Monk, Donald L.; Cody, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The Computer Aided Systems Human Engineering (CASHE) system, Version 1.0, is a multimedia ergonomics database on CD-ROM for the Apple Macintosh II computer, being developed for use by human system designers, educators, and researchers. It will initially be available on CD-ROM and will allow users to access ergonomics data and models stored electronically as text, graphics, and audio. The CASHE CD-ROM, Version 1.0 will contain the Boff and Lincoln (1988) Engineering Data Compendium, MIL-STD-1472D and a unique, interactive simulation capability, the Perception and Performance Prototyper. Its features also include a specialized data retrieval, scaling, and analysis capability and the state of the art in information retrieval, browsing, and navigation.

  11. Flooring-systems and their interaction with furniture and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Pedersen, Lars; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2017-01-01

    Flooring-system designs may be sensitive in terms of their vibrational performance due the risk that serviceability-limit-state problems may be encountered. For evaluating the vibrational performance of a flooring system at the design stage, decisions must be made by the engineer in charge...... of computations. Passive humans and/or furniture are often present on a floor. Typically, these masses and their way of interacting with the floor mass are ignored in predictions of vibrational behaviour of the flooring system. Utilizing a shell finite-element model, the paper explores and quantifies how non...

  12. Activation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M; Jordan, Jens

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P obese subjects (P endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity.

  13. Aquarium Viromes: Viromes of Human-Managed Aquatic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiseul Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An aquarium ecosystem is home to many animal species providing conditions similar to native aquatic habitats but under highly controlled management. With a growing interest in understanding the interaction of microbiomes and resident animal health within aquarium environments, we undertook a metagenomic survey of viromes in seven aquarium systems with differing physicochemical and resident animal profiles. Our results show that a diverse array of viruses was represented in aquarium viromes, many of which were widespread in different aquarium systems (27 common viral families in all of the aquarium systems. Most viromes were dominated by DNA phages of the order Caudovirales as commonly found in other aquatic environments with average relative abundance greater than 64%. The composition and structure of aquarium viromes were associated with controlled system parameters, including nitrate, salinity, and temperature as well as resident animal profiles, indicating the close interaction of viromes with aquarium management practices. Furthermore, finding human associated viruses in a touch exhibit suggested that exposure of aquarium systems to human contact may lead to introduction of human cutaneous viruses into aquaria. This is consistent with the high abundance of skin microflora on the palms of healthy individuals and their detection in recreational waters, such as swimming pools. Lastly, assessment of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in aquarium viromes revealed a unique signature of ARGs in different aquarium systems with trimethoprim being the most common. This is the first study to provide vital information on viromes and their unique relationships with management practices in a human-built and controlled aquarium environment.

  14. NASA Technology Area 07: Human Exploration Destination Systems Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Alexander, Leslie; Landis, Rob; Linne, Diane; Mclemore, Carole; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Brown, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) led Space Technology Roadmap definition efforts. This paper will given an executive summary of the technology area 07 (TA07) Human Exploration Destination Systems (HEDS). These are draft roadmaps being reviewed and updated by the National Research Council. Deep-space human exploration missions will require many game changing technologies to enable safe missions, become more independent, and enable intelligent autonomous operations and take advantage of the local resources to become self-sufficient thereby meeting the goal of sustained human presence in space. Taking advantage of in-situ resources enhances and enables revolutionary robotic and human missions beyond the traditional mission architectures and launch vehicle capabilities. Mobility systems will include in-space flying, surface roving, and Extra-vehicular Activity/Extravehicular Robotics (EVA/EVR) mobility. These push missions will take advantage of sustainability and supportability technologies that will allow mission independence to conduct human mission operations either on or near the Earth, in deep space, in the vicinity of Mars, or on the Martian surface while opening up commercialization opportunities in low Earth orbit (LEO) for research, industrial development, academia, and entertainment space industries. The Human Exploration Destination Systems (HEDS) Technology Area (TA) 7 Team has been chartered by the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) to strategically roadmap technology investments that will enable sustained human exploration and support NASA s missions and goals for at least the next 25 years. HEDS technologies will enable a sustained human presence for exploring destinations such as remote sites on Earth and beyond including, but not limited to, LaGrange points, low Earth orbit (LEO), high Earth orbit (HEO), geosynchronous orbit (GEO), the Moon, near

  15. Human factors research problems in electronic voice warning system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, C. A.; Williams, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The speech messages issued by voice warning systems must be carefully designed in accordance with general principles of human decision making processes, human speech comprehension, and the conditions in which the warnings can occur. The operator's effectiveness must not be degraded by messages that are either inappropriate or difficult to comprehend. Important experimental variables include message content, linguistic redundancy, signal/noise ratio, interference with concurrent tasks, and listener expectations generated by the pragmatic or real world context in which the messages are presented.

  16. Cognitive approach to human-centered systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert M.

    1996-04-01

    User requirements and system cognitive quality are considered in relation to the integration of new technology, in particular for aiding cognitive functions. Intuitive interfaces and display design matching user mental models and memory schema are identified as human-centered design strategies. Situational awareness is considered in terms of schema theory and perceptual control. A new method for measuring cognitive compatibility is described, and linked to the SRK taxonomy of human performance, in order to provide a framework for analyzing and specifying user cognitive requirements.

  17. Development and implication of a human-volcano system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachri, Syamsul; Stötter, Johann; Monreal, Matthias; Sartohadi, Junun

    2014-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the complexity of human-environment systems, models help to define, quantify, describe, or simulate complex interactions. With regards to the human-volcano system, we develop a conceptual model in order to assist analysis of its two basic elements, the physical and the social environment. A field survey of the human environment interaction of two of the most active volcanic areas in Indonesia (Mt. Merapi and Mt. Bromo) and a corresponding literature review from other case studies was carried out. A differentiated understanding of human interaction with hazard potential elements within the human-volcano system is the main focus of the model development. We classified volcanic processes and effects as three pairs of dichotomies: positive or negative impacts, on society or environment in an indirect or direct way. Each volcanically induced process or effect characterized accordingly leads to eight distinct process/effect classes. They are positive direct effects on society (PDS); positive direct effects on natural resources (PDN); positive indirect effects on society (PIS); positive indirect effects on natural resources (PIN); negative direct effects on society (NDS); negative direct effects on natural resources (NDN); negative indirect effects on society (NIS) and lastly negative indirect effects on natural resources (NIN). Such differentiated view of volcanic process/effects bears several advantages. First, whereas volcanic processes have hitherto been viewed as hazards only, it becomes possible now to describe a particular process/effect in a particular context as negative or positive. Secondly, such a categorization makes it possible to account for processes of the human-volcano system that do not have a direct physical expression but are of socio-cultural relevance. Thirdly, the greater degree of differentiation that is made possible when evaluating volcanic processes has significant repercussions on the way volcanic risk must be

  18. THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM ALTERATIONS IN HUMAN HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-01-01

    A number of articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as “promoters” and “amplifiers” of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in two increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves. PMID:25767284

  19. Study of elastic system fibers in human gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Augusto Soares Machado

    Full Text Available Objective: To map the participation of the elastic system fibers of human gingiva. Methods: To conduct this study, fragments of human gingiva from ten individuals aged between 18 and 60 years, removed after periodontal surgery for prosthetic purposes, were analyzed by the histochemical and immuno-histochemical methods, to evaluate the participation of the elastic system fibers in this tissue. Results: The results demonstrated the presence of three type of elastic system fibers, that is to say, oxitalan, elaunin and elastic fibers,distributed as follows: 1 the oxitalan fibers form a network of thin fibers, located close to the basal membrane, at the level of the conjunctive tissue papillae; 2 elaunin fibers are found in close contact with the oxitalan fibers in the papillary and submaxillary regions, following the collagen fiber bundles; 3 a small quantity of elastic fibers were observed, dispersed throughout the deeper conjunctive tissue and around the blood vessels. Conclusion: The three types of elastic system fibers, that is, oxitalan, elaunin and elastic fibers are normal constituents of the extracellular matrixof human gingiva conjunctive tissue.

  20. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Human-system interfaces and procedures. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. In addition, a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists served as subject matter experts. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present report focuses on an evaluation of the human-system interfaces in relation to the treatment machines and supporting equipment (e.g., simulators, treatment planning computers, control consoles, patient charts) found in the teletherapy environment. The report also evaluates operating, maintenance and emergency procedures and practices involved in teletherapy. The evaluations are based on the function and task analysis and established human engineering guidelines, where applicable.

  1. Human applications of the INEL patient treatment planning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, F.; Wessol, D.; Atkinson, C.; Nigg, D. [Idaho National Accelerator Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-11-01

    During the past few years, murine and large animal research, as well as human studies have provided data to the point where human clinical trials have been initiated at the BMRR using BPA-F for gliomas and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) using BPA for melanomas of the extremeties. It is expected that glioma trials using BSH will proceed soon at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR) in the Netherlands. The first human glioma epithermal boron neutron capture therapy application was performed at the BMRR in the fall of 1994. This was a collaborative effort by BNL, Beth Israel Manhattan hospital, and INEL. The INEL planning system was chosen to perform dose predictions for this application.

  2. An Efficient Human Identification through MultiModal Biometric System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Meena

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Human identification is essential for proper functioning of society. Human identification through multimodal biometrics is becoming an emerging trend, and one of the reasons is to improve recognition accuracy. Unimodal biometric systems are affected by various problemssuch as noisy sensor data,non-universality, lack of individuality, lack of invariant representation and susceptibility to circumvention.A unimodal system has limited accuracy. Hence, Multimodal biometric systems by combining more than one biometric feature in different levels are proposed in order to enhance the performance of the system. A supervisor module combines the different opinions or decisions delivered by each subsystem and then make a final decision. In this paper, a multimodal biometrics authentication is proposed by combining face, iris and finger features. Biometric features are extracted by Local Derivative Ternary Pattern (LDTP in Contourlet domain and an extensive evaluation of LDTP is done using Support Vector Machine and Nearest Neighborhood Classifier. The experimental evaluations are performed on a public dataset demonstrating the accuracy of the proposed system compared with the existing systems. It is observed that, the combination of face, fingerprint and iris gives better performance in terms of accuracy, False Acceptance Rate, False Rejection Rate with minimum computation time.

  3. Human impacts on morphodynamic thresholds in estuarine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. B.; Van Maren, D. S.; Ding, P. X.; Yang, S. L.; Van Prooijen, B. C.; De Vet, P. L. M.; Winterwerp, J. C.; De Vriend, H. J.; Stive, M. J. F.; He, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Many estuaries worldwide are modified, primarily driven by economic gain or safety. These works, combined with global climate changes heavily influence the morphologic development of estuaries. In this paper, we analyze the impact of human activities on the morphodynamic developments of the Scheldt Estuary and the Wadden Sea basins in the Netherlands and the Yangtze Estuary in China at various spatial scales, and identify mechanisms responsible for their change. Human activities in these systems include engineering works and dredging activities for improving and maintaining the navigation channels, engineering works for flood protection, and shoreline management activities such as land reclamations. The Yangtze Estuary is influenced by human activities in the upstream river basin as well, especially through the construction of many dams. The tidal basins in the Netherlands are also influenced by human activities along the adjacent coasts. Furthermore, all these systems are influenced by global changes through (accelerated) sea-level rise and changing weather patterns. We show that the cumulative impacts of these human activities and global changes may lead to exceeding thresholds beyond which the morphology of the tidal basins significantly changes, and loses its natural characteristics. A threshold is called tipping point when the changes are even irreversible. Knowledge on such thresholds or tipping points is important for the sustainable management of these systems. We have identified and quantified various examples of such thresholds and/or tipping points for the morphodynamic developments at various spatial and temporal scales. At the largest scale (mega-scale) we consider the sediment budget of a tidal basin as a whole. A smaller scale (macro-scale) is the development of channel structures in an estuary, especially the development of two competing channels. At the smallest scale (meso-scale) we analyze the developments of tidal flats and the connecting

  4. Proteoglycan and collagen expression during human air conducting system development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Godoy-Guzmán

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The lung is formed from a bud that grows and divides in a dichotomous way. A bud is a new growth center which is determined by epithelial-mesenchymal interactions where proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM might be involved. To understand this protein participation during human lung development, we examined the expression and distribution of proteoglycans in relation to the different types of collagens during the period in which the air conducting system is installed. Using light microscopy and immunohistochemistry we evaluate the expression of collagens (I, III and VI and proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan and lumican between 8 to 10 weeks post fertilization and 11 to 14 weeks of gestational age of human embryo lungs. We show that decorin, lumican and all the collagen types investigated were expressed at the epithelium-mesenchymal interface, forming a sleeve around the bronchiolar ducts. In addition, biglycan was expressed in both the endothelial cells and the smooth muscle of the blood vessels. Thus, the similar distribution pattern of collagen and proteoglycans in the early developmental stages of the human lung may be closely related to the process of dichotomous division of the bronchial tree. This study provides a new insight concerning the participation of collagens and proteoglycans in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface during the period in which the air conducting system is installed in the human fetal lung.

  5. Ten years development of human resources in Serbian health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, Maja; Grozdanov, Jasmina; Ivanovic, Ivan; Korac, Vesna; Vasic, Milena

    2010-01-01

    A key component of any healthcare reform process is to ensure that the services are delivered by the right numbers of staff with appropriate skills and training. In 2007, public health institutions in Serbia had 2% more employees than before the economic transition. Nevertheless, the trend of the total number of employees in the Serbian health care system still preserved a mild rising trend. The most prominent changes in the structure of human resources were effectuated in the total numbers of physicians, nurses and administrative and technical staff. Development of medical science and practice in Serbia is characterized by more intensive processes of specializations, resulting in increased number of specialists among medical doctors. Health care provided in in-patient institutions still employs most of the doctors. The number of unemployed physicians, dentists and pharmacists has been rising since 2000. Another aspect that explains the rise of unemployed, university educated human resources is the rising number of graduated physicians, dentist and pharmacists. Health care policy makers may recognize the need for more integrated planning of human resources in health care, in particular, making management of human resources responsive to system needs and design, instead of vice versa.

  6. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Evolution of Multilevel Social Systems in Nonhuman Primates and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueter, Cyril C; Chapais, Bernard; Zinner, Dietmar

    2012-10-01

    Multilevel (or modular) societies are a distinct type of primate social system whose key features are single-male-multifemale, core units nested within larger social bands. They are not equivalent to fission-fusion societies, with the latter referring to routine variability in associations, either on an individual or subunit level. The purpose of this review is to characterize and operationalize multilevel societies and to outline their putative evolutionary origins. Multilevel societies are prevalent in three primate clades: papionins, Asian colobines, and hominins. For each clade, we portray the most parsimonious phylogenetic pathway leading to a modular system and then review and discuss likely socioecological conditions promoting the establishment and maintenance of these societies. The multilevel system in colobines (most notably Rhinopithecus and Nasalis) has likely evolved as single-male harem systems coalesced, whereas the multilevel system of papionins (Papio hamadryas, Theropithecus gelada) and hominins most likely arose as multimale-multifemale groups split into smaller units. We hypothesize that, although ecological conditions acted as preconditions for the origin of multilevel systems in all three clades, a potentially important catalyst was intraspecific social threat, predominantly bachelor threat in colobines and female coercion/infanticide in papionins and humans. We emphasize that female transfers within bands or genetic relationships among leader males help to maintain modular societies by facilitating interunit tolerance. We still lack a good or even basic understanding of many facets of multilevel sociality. Key remaining questions are how the genetic structure of a multilevel society matches the observed social effort of its members, to what degree cooperation of males of different units is manifest and contributes to band cohesion, and how group coordination, communication, and decision making are achieved. Affiliative and cooperative

  8. Reasoning about Human Participation in Self-Adaptive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-16

    human behavior and its interactions with Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 the system, and (ii) a formalization of the extended adaptation...the extension of the Stitch language [12] employed in the Rainbow framework for self-adaptation [19] with elements inspired from opportunity

  9. Human reproductive system disturbances and pesticide exposure in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Koifman; Rosalina Jorge Koifman; Armando Meyer

    2002-01-01

    The observation of reproductive disturbances in humans and in the wildlife has been reported in the last decade in different countries. Exposure to different chemicals possibly acting in the endocrine system or endocrine disruptors, including pesticides, has been a hypothesis raised to explain the observed changes. This paper aimed to present results of an epidemiological ecologic study carried out to explore population data on pesticides exposure in selected Brazilian states in the eighties ...

  10. Human-Centered Command and Control of Future Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    displays revealed by our recent Naïve Realism research in metacognition and visual displays (Smallman & Cook, 2011). The role of the human factors...values as comparisons for real-time values to help monitor. These work-arounds are strikingly similar to strategies used by nuclear plant operators when...monitoring (Mumaw, Roth, Vicente, & Burns, 2000). The development and use of these strategies is indicative of the shortfalls of systems in both

  11. Evasion of the human innate immune system by dengue virus

    OpenAIRE

    Pagni, Sarah; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus is a worldwide health problem, with billions of people at risk annually. Dengue virus causes a spectrum of diseases, namely dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome with the latter two being linked to death. Understanding how dengue is able to evade the immune system and cause enhanced severity of disease is the main topics of interest in the Fernandez-Sesma laboratory at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Using primary human immune cells, our group investiga...

  12. Research on an active and continuous monitoring system for human respiratory system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Continuous and dynamic measurements of human respiratory parameters are very important for vital diseases of respiratory system during mechanical ventilation. This paper analyzed the structure and mechanical properties of the human respiratory system, and designed an active intervening monitoring micro system for it. The mobile mechanism of the micro system is soft and earthworm-like movement actuated by pneumatic rubber actuator, the measurement and therapy unit of the system is an extensible mechanism with sensors in the front. The micro monitoring system can move in respiratory tract and measure the respiratory parameters in bronchium continuously. Experiments had been done in swine's respiratory tract,the results proved that the micro robot system could measure the respiratory parameters in real-time successfully and its movement was smooth in swine's respiratory tract.

  13. An Integrated Simulation Tool for Modeling the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Ken'ichi; Kitamura, Tadashi

    This paper presents an integrated simulation of the circulatory system in physiological movement. The large circulatory system model includes principal organs and functional units in modules in which comprehensive physiological changes such as nerve reflexes, temperature regulation, acid/base balance, O2/CO2 balance, and exercise are simulated. A beat-by-beat heart model, in which the corresponding electrical circuit problems are solved by a numerical analytic method, enables calculation of pulsatile blood flow to the major organs. The integration of different perspectives on physiological changes makes this simulation model applicable for the microscopic evaluation of blood flow under various conditions in the human body.

  14. Human Systems Integration (HSI) in Acquisition. Acquisition Phase Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Tools: ● CATIA ● HSI Requirements Guide ● IMPRINT Activities for Each Output: 1.0 Collect domain requirements inputs 1.1 Ensure draft system...Outputs boxes. Tools: ● NHV ● Index of Habitability ● IMPRINT, CATIA , JACK ● HSI Requirements Guide Activities for Each Output: 1.0 Provide...Phase (Inputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME References: ● DODI 5000.02 & DODD 5000.01 ● DAG ● CJCSI 3170.01 ● AFPD 63

  15. A Simulink model for the human circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabel, P; Leonhardt, S

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the mathematical simulation of the human circulatory system. The model is based on the former work of Coleman and co-workers and has been redesigned for simulation with the Matlab toolbox "Simulink". It includes the heart and the peripheral circulation, the respiratory system, the kidneys and the major neural and hormonal control mechanisms, which are necessary for maintaining homeostasis. The model contains more than 30 blocks with over 200 physiological variables, which can be accessed and plotted during the simulation.

  16. Human visual system-based smoking event detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetallah, Amjad D.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2012-06-01

    Human action (e.g. smoking, eating, and phoning) analysis is an important task in various application domains like video surveillance, video retrieval, human-computer interaction systems, and so on. Smoke detection is a crucial task in many video surveillance applications and could have a great impact to raise the level of safety of urban areas, public parks, airplanes, hospitals, schools and others. The detection task is challenging since there is no prior knowledge about the object's shape, texture and color. In addition, its visual features will change under different lighting and weather conditions. This paper presents a new scheme of a system for detecting human smoking events, or small smoke, in a sequence of images. In developed system, motion detection and background subtraction are combined with motion-region-saving, skin-based image segmentation, and smoke-based image segmentation to capture potential smoke regions which are further analyzed to decide on the occurrence of smoking events. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. As well, the developed method is capable of detecting the small smoking events of uncertain actions with various cigarette sizes, colors, and shapes.

  17. Human-Centered Design of Human-Computer-Human Dialogs in Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1998-01-01

    A series of ongoing research programs at Georgia Tech established a need for a simulation support tool for aircraft computer-based aids. This led to the design and development of the Georgia Tech Electronic Flight Instrument Research Tool (GT-EFIRT). GT-EFIRT is a part-task flight simulator specifically designed to study aircraft display design and single pilot interaction. ne simulator, using commercially available graphics and Unix workstations, replicates to a high level of fidelity the Electronic Flight Instrument Systems (EFIS), Flight Management Computer (FMC) and Auto Flight Director System (AFDS) of the Boeing 757/767 aircraft. The simulator can be configured to present information using conventional looking B757n67 displays or next generation Primary Flight Displays (PFD) such as found on the Beech Starship and MD-11.

  18. Towards a Fast Dynamic Model of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Carolyn; Green, Melissa; Boris, Jay; Oran, Elaine

    2011-11-01

    We describe a model for systems-level transport in the human circulatory system that is based on a set of equations for a one-dimensional unsteady elastic pipe flow circuit. The system is collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To drive the fluid, the contractions of a beating heart are modeled as periodic area changes of the elastic vessels. Two different models are compared, both including and neglecting fluid acceleration. Time-resolved distributions of pressure, velocity and area compare reasonably well with reference data. Increasing the rigidity of the vasculature is found to increase peak arterial pressures on the order of ten percent, and including a distributed vascular contraction to model distributed skeletal muscle contractions monotonically increases time-averaged blood flow in the veins, consistent with human physiological response. The circulatory system model presented here simulates the circulatory system on the order of one hundred times faster than real-time; that is, we can compute thousands of heartbeats per minute of CPU time.

  19. A Novel Web-based Human Advisor Fuzzy Expert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Rafe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The applications of the Internet-based technologies and the concepts of fuzzy expert systems (FES have creatednew methods for sharing and distributing knowledge. However, there has been a general lack of investigation in thearea of web-based fuzzy expert systems. In this paper, the issues associated with the design, development, and useof web-based applications from a standpoint of the benefits and challenges of development and utilization areinvestigated. The original theory and concepts in conventional FES are reviewed and a knowledge engineeringframework for developing such systems is revised. For a human advisor to have a satisfying performance, expertise isa must. In addition, some of advisory rules are subject to change because of domain knowledge update. The humanrequests may have linguistic or crisp forms and a conventional expert system (ES is not able to overcome thefuzziness in the problem nature. In this research, a Web-based fuzzy expert system for Common Human Advisor(FES-CHA is developed and implemented to be used as a student advisor at the department's web portal. Thesystem is implemented by using Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2010, MVC and Microsoft SQL Server 2012.

  20. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  1. Early Stage Disease Diagnosis System Using Human Nail Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti S. Indi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Human’s hand nail is analyzed to identify many diseases at early stage of diagnosis. Study of person hand nail color helps in identification of particular disease in healthcare domain. The proposed system guides in such scenario to take decision in disease diagnosis. The input to the proposed system is person nail image. The system will process an image of nail and extract features of nail which is used for disease diagnosis. Human nail consist of various features, out of which proposed system uses nail color changes for disease diagnosis. Here, first training set data is prepared using Weka tool from nail images of patients of specific diseases. A feature extracted from input nail image is compared with the training data set to get result. In this experiment we found that using color feature of nail image average 65% results are correctly matched with training set data during three tests conducted.

  2. Three-dimensional surface imaging system for assessing human obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bugao; Yu, Wurong; Yao, Ming; Pepper, M. Reese; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H.

    2009-10-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity suggests a need to develop a convenient, reliable, and economical tool for assessment of this condition. Three-dimensional (3-D) body surface imaging has emerged as an exciting technology for the estimation of body composition. We present a new 3-D body imaging system, which is designed for enhanced portability, affordability, and functionality. In this system, stereo vision technology is used to satisfy the requirement for a simple hardware setup and fast image acquisition. The portability of the system is created via a two-stand configuration, and the accuracy of body volume measurements is improved by customizing stereo matching and surface reconstruction algorithms that target specific problems in 3-D body imaging. Body measurement functions dedicated to body composition assessment also are developed. The overall performance of the system is evaluated in human subjects by comparison to other conventional anthropometric methods, as well as air displacement plethysmography, for body fat assessment.

  3. A 3D surface imaging system for assessing human obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B.; Yu, W.; Yao, M.; Yao, X.; Li, Q.; Pepper, M. R.; Freeland-Graves, J. H.

    2009-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity suggests a need to develop a convenient, reliable and economical tool for assessment of this condition. Three-dimensional (3D) body surface imaging has emerged as an exciting technology for estimation of body composition. This paper presents a new 3D body imaging system, which was designed for enhanced portability, affordability, and functionality. In this system, stereo vision technology was used to satisfy the requirements for a simple hardware setup and fast image acquisitions. The portability of the system was created via a two-stand configuration, and the accuracy of body volume measurements was improved by customizing stereo matching and surface reconstruction algorithms that target specific problems in 3D body imaging. Body measurement functions dedicated to body composition assessment also were developed. The overall performance of the system was evaluated in human subjects by comparison to other conventional anthropometric methods, as well as air displacement plethysmography, for body fat assessment.

  4. Distributed Human Resource Redistribution System Based on Agent and Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiangquan; Wang Ningsheng; Long Wen

    2006-01-01

    A computer system for human resource (HR) redistribution system is presented to solve the balance problem of the "surplus resources" and "surplus tasks" among a group of project units. The system architecture is designed in a compositional manner using the elements of agent technology and knowledge technology. A combination of generic agent models, ontology and knowledge provides an effective approach to address the dynamic, distributed and knowledge-intensive characters of the HR management. In the system, the broker agent acting as intermediary provides matchmaking services to the domain agents, and the individual domain agents communicate directly with each other. The HR ontology provides the semantic match of the surplus task and the surplus resource. Finally, an application example is presented to illustrate the achieved solution for a concrete scenario. This novel way offers a comprehensive HR exchange solution and is suitable for both intra-organizational and inter-organizational HR management.

  5. A multimodal emotion detection system during human-robot interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Malfaz, María; Sequeira, João; Gorostiza, Javier F; Salichs, Miguel A

    2013-11-14

    In this paper, a multimodal user-emotion detection system for social robots is presented. This system is intended to be used during human-robot interaction, and it is integrated as part of the overall interaction system of the robot: the Robotics Dialog System (RDS). Two modes are used to detect emotions: the voice and face expression analysis. In order to analyze the voice of the user, a new component has been developed: Gender and Emotion Voice Analysis (GEVA), which is written using the Chuck language. For emotion detection in facial expressions, the system, Gender and Emotion Facial Analysis (GEFA), has been also developed. This last system integrates two third-party solutions: Sophisticated High-speed Object Recognition Engine (SHORE) and Computer Expression Recognition Toolbox (CERT). Once these new components (GEVA and GEFA) give their results, a decision rule is applied in order to combine the information given by both of them. The result of this rule, the detected emotion, is integrated into the dialog system through communicative acts. Hence, each communicative act gives, among other things, the detected emotion of the user to the RDS so it can adapt its strategy in order to get a greater satisfaction degree during the human-robot dialog. Each of the new components, GEVA and GEFA, can also be used individually. Moreover, they are integrated with the robotic control platform ROS (Robot Operating System). Several experiments with real users were performed to determine the accuracy of each component and to set the final decision rule. The results obtained from applying this decision rule in these experiments show a high success rate in automatic user emotion recognition, improving the results given by the two information channels (audio and visual) separately.

  6. An evolving research agenda for human-coastal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Eli D.; Ellis, Michael A.; Brad Murray, A.; Hall, Damon M.

    2016-03-01

    Within the broad discourses of environmental change, sustainability science, and anthropogenic Earth-surface systems, a focused body of work involves the coupled economic and physical dynamics of developed shorelines. Rapid rates of change in coastal environments, from wetlands and deltas to inlets and dune systems, help researchers recognize, observe, and investigate coupling in natural (non-human) morphodynamics and biomorphodynamics. This same intrinsic quality of fast-paced change also makes developed coastal zones exemplars of observable coupling between physical processes and human activities. In many coastal communities, beach erosion is a natural hazard with economic costs that coastal management counters through a variety of mitigation strategies, including beach replenishment, groynes, revetments, and seawalls. As cycles of erosion and mitigation iterate, coastline change and economically driven interventions become mutually linked. Emergent dynamics of two-way economic-physical coupling is a recent research discovery. Having established a strong theoretical basis, research into coupled human-coastal systems has passed its early proof-of-concept phase. This paper frames three major challenges that need resolving in order to advance theoretical and empirical treatments of human-coastal systems: (1) codifying salient individual and social behaviors of decision-making in ways that capture societal actions across a range of scales (thus engaging economics, social science, and policy disciplines); (2) quantifying anthropogenic effects on alongshore and cross-shore sediment pathways and long-term landscape evolution in coastal zones through time, including direct measurement of cumulative changes to sediment cells resulting from coastal development and management practices (e.g., construction of buildings and artificial dunes, bulldozer removal of overwash after major storms); and (3) reciprocal knowledge and data exchange between researchers in coastal

  7. Multibiological life support system experiments with humans partially involved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Dawei; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu

    To establish bioregenerative life support system in lunar or mars bases in the future, manned stimulation experiments including several kinds of creatures are needed to be conducted first. Gas exchange relation, element transfer and transformation principles, etc. between human beings and the multibiological system composed of plants, animals, Chlorella vulgaris and so on must be investigated in order to place different organisms with appropriate numbers and proportions. This research cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) in the Closed Integrative Cultivating System (CICS) of the Integrative Experimental Sys-tem (IES) with Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in the Plate Photo Bioreactor (PPB) of the IES. Gas exchange between testers and the IES were conducted periodically. The automotive control system of the PPB changed the illumination intensity of the photo bioreactor according to the CO2 concentration in the IES to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels by regu-lating the photosynthesis of alga. The conveyor-type cultivation method which was harvesting the biggest batch of lettuce and silkworms through the mass exchange chamber of IES every four days and transferring the smallest batch of lettuce and silkworms into the system; carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with nutrient liquid replenished into the system was implemented in the experiments. In terms of gas circulation, CO2 /O2 concentration changes in the system with trace gas contaminants (CH4 , NH3 and C2 H4 ) were measured. As to the mass transfer and transformation, element (C, H, O, N) contents, height, crown width and biomasses of lettuce in different developing stages, silkworms' bioconversion rates, alga's biomass changes, the amount and community change trends of the microorganism in different positions of the system, the quality of condensates gained under different running conditions and so on were studied. Results showed

  8. Experiences in the application of human factors engineering to human-system interface modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba Alonso, Pedro; Fernandez Illobre, Luis; Ortega Pascual, Fernando [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain). Simulation and Control Rooms Div.

    2015-07-15

    Almost all the existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) include plans to modernize their existing Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems and associated Human System Interfaces (HSIs), due to obsolescence problems. Tecnatom, S.A. has been participating in modernization programs in NPPs to help them to plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and associated I and C and HSIs. The application of Human Factors Engineering (HFE) in modernization programs is nowadays unavoidable. This is because is becoming a regulatory requirement, and also because it is needed to ensure that any plant modification, involving the modernization of I and C and HSI, is well designed to improve overall plant operations, reliability, and safety. This paper shows some experiences obtained during the application of HFE to the modernization of these HSIs. The experience applying HFE in modernizations and design modifications show a positive effect, improving the associated HSIs, with the acceptability of the final user.

  9. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamanda

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16% between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva.

  10. Blackmailing: the keystone in the human mating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watve Milind G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human mating system is characterized by bi-parental care and faithful monogamy is highly valued in most cultures. Marriage has evolved as a social institution and punishment for extra pair mating (EPM or adultery is common. However, similar to other species with bi-parental care, both males and females frequently indulge in EPM in secrecy since it confers certain gender specific genetic benefits. Stability of faithful monogamy is therefore a conundrum. We model human mating system using game theory framework to study the effects of factors that can stabilize or destabilize faithful committed monogamy. Results Although mate guarding can partly protect the genetic interests, we show that it does not ensure monogamy. Social policing enabled by gossiping is another line of defense against adultery unique to humans. However, social policing has a small but positive cost to an individual and therefore is prone to free riding. We suggest that since exposure of adultery can invite severe punishment, the policing individuals can blackmail opportunistically whenever the circumstances permit. If the maximum probabilistic benefit of blackmailing is greater than the cost of policing, policing becomes a non-altruistic act and stabilizes in the society. We show that this dynamics leads to the coexistence of different strategies in oscillations, with obligate monogamy maintained at a high level. Deletion of blackmailing benefit from the model leads to the complete disappearance of obligate monogamy. Conclusions Obligate monogamy can be maintained in the population in spite of the advantages of EPM. Blackmailing, which makes policing a non-altruistic act, is crucial for the maintenance of faithful monogamy. Although biparental care, EPM, mate guarding and punishment are shared by many species, gossiping and blackmailing make the human mating system unique.

  11. Social Intelligence in a Human-Machine Collaboration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Morishima, Yasunori; Yamada, Ryota; Brave, Scott; Maldonado, Heidy; Nass, Clifford; Kawaji, Shigeyasu

    In this information society of today, it is often argued that it is necessary to create a new way of human-machine interaction. In this paper, an agent with social response capabilities has been developed to achieve this goal. There are two kinds of information that is exchanged by two entities: objective and functional information (e.g., facts, requests, states of matters, etc.) and subjective information (e.g., feelings, sense of relationship, etc.). Traditional interactive systems have been designed to handle the former kind of information. In contrast, in this study social agents handling the latter type of information are presented. The current study focuses on sociality of the agent from the view point of Media Equation theory. This article discusses the definition, importance, and benefits of social intelligence as agent technology and argues that social intelligence has a potential to enhance the user's perception of the system, which in turn can lead to improvements of the system's performance. In order to implement social intelligence in the agent, a mind model has been developed to render affective expressions and personality of the agent. The mind model has been implemented in a human-machine collaborative learning system. One differentiating feature of the collaborative learning system is that it has an agent that performs as a co-learner with which the user interacts during the learning session. The mind model controls the social behaviors of the agent, thus making it possible for the user to have more social interactions with the agent. The experiment with the system suggested that a greater degree of learning was achieved when the students worked with the co-learner agent and that the co-learner agent with the mind model that expressed emotions resulted in a more positive attitude toward the system.

  12. Developing seventh grade students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raved, Lena; Yarden, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Developing systems thinking skills in school can provide useful tools to deal with a vast amount of medical and health information that may help learners in decision making in their future lives as citizen. Thus, there is a need to develop effective tools that will allow learners to analyze biological systems and organize their knowledge. Here, we examine junior high school students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system. A model was formulated for developing teaching and learning materials and for characterizing students' systems thinking skills. Specifically, we asked whether seventh grade students, who studied about the human circulatory system, acquired systems thinking skills, and what are the characteristics of those skills? Concept maps were used to characterize students' systems thinking components and examine possible changes in the students' knowledge structure. These maps were composed by the students before and following the learning process. The study findings indicate a significant improvement in the students' ability to recognize the system components and the processes that occur within the system, as well as the relationships between different levels of organization of the system, following the learning process. Thus, following learning students were able to organize the systems' components and its processes within a framework of relationships, namely the students' systems thinking skills were improved in the course of learning using the teaching and learning materials.

  13. Human-centered design of human-computer-human dialogs in aerospace systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    The second six months of this grant saw further development of GT-CATS, the Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System, and progress on research exploring tutoring concepts for tutors for mode management. The latter included data analysis and a preliminary paper summarizing the development and evaluation of the VNAV Tutor. A follow-on to the VNAV Tutor is planned. Research in this direction will examine the use of OFMspert and GT-CATS to create an 'intelligent' tutor for mode management, a more extensive domain of application than only vertical navigation, and alternative pedagogy, such as substituting focused 'cases' of reported mode management situations rather than lessons defined by full LOFT scenarios.

  14. Extending human proprioception to cyber-physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kevin; Robinson, Ethan; Dickstein, Leah; Hahn, Heidi A.; Cattaneo, Alessandro; Mascareñas, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in computational cognition, there are many cyber-physical systems where human supervision and control is desirable. One pertinent example is the control of a robot arm, which can be found in both humanoid and commercial ground robots. Current control mechanisms require the user to look at several screens of varying perspective on the robot, then give commands through a joystick-like mechanism. This control paradigm fails to provide the human operator with an intuitive state feedback, resulting in awkward and slow behavior and underutilization of the robot's physical capabilities. To overcome this bottleneck, we introduce a new human-machine interface that extends the operator's proprioception by exploiting sensory substitution. Humans have a proprioceptive sense that provides us information on how our bodies are configured in space without having to directly observe our appendages. We constructed a wearable device with vibrating actuators on the forearm, where frequency of vibration corresponds to the spatial configuration of a robotic arm. The goal of this interface is to provide a means to communicate proprioceptive information to the teleoperator. Ultimately we will measure the change in performance (time taken to complete the task) achieved by the use of this interface.

  15. Human-inspired sound environment recognition system for assistive vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Vidal, Eduardo; Fredes Zarricueta, Ernesto; Auat Cheein, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The human auditory system acquires environmental information under sound stimuli faster than visual or touch systems, which in turn, allows for faster human responses to such stimuli. It also complements senses such as sight, where direct line-of-view is necessary to identify objects, in the environment recognition process. This work focuses on implementing human reaction to sound stimuli and environment recognition on assistive robotic devices, such as robotic wheelchairs or robotized cars. These vehicles need environment information to ensure safe navigation. Approach. In the field of environment recognition, range sensors (such as LiDAR and ultrasonic systems) and artificial vision devices are widely used; however, these sensors depend on environment constraints (such as lighting variability or color of objects), and sound can provide important information for the characterization of an environment. In this work, we propose a sound-based approach to enhance the environment recognition process, mainly for cases that compromise human integrity, according to the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Our proposal is based on a neural network implementation that is able to classify up to 15 different environments, each selected according to the ICF considerations on environment factors in the community-based physical activities of people with disabilities. Main results. The accuracy rates in environment classification ranges from 84% to 93%. This classification is later used to constrain assistive vehicle navigation in order to protect the user during daily activities. This work also includes real-time outdoor experimentation (performed on an assistive vehicle) by seven volunteers with different disabilities (but without cognitive impairment and experienced in the use of wheelchairs), statistical validation, comparison with previously published work, and a discussion section where the pros and cons of our system are evaluated. Significance

  16. Human-inspired sound environment recognition system for assistive vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Eduardo González; Zarricueta, Ernesto Fredes; Cheein, Fernando Auat

    2015-02-01

    The human auditory system acquires environmental information under sound stimuli faster than visual or touch systems, which in turn, allows for faster human responses to such stimuli. It also complements senses such as sight, where direct line-of-view is necessary to identify objects, in the environment recognition process. This work focuses on implementing human reaction to sound stimuli and environment recognition on assistive robotic devices, such as robotic wheelchairs or robotized cars. These vehicles need environment information to ensure safe navigation. In the field of environment recognition, range sensors (such as LiDAR and ultrasonic systems) and artificial vision devices are widely used; however, these sensors depend on environment constraints (such as lighting variability or color of objects), and sound can provide important information for the characterization of an environment. In this work, we propose a sound-based approach to enhance the environment recognition process, mainly for cases that compromise human integrity, according to the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Our proposal is based on a neural network implementation that is able to classify up to 15 different environments, each selected according to the ICF considerations on environment factors in the community-based physical activities of people with disabilities. The accuracy rates in environment classification ranges from 84% to 93%. This classification is later used to constrain assistive vehicle navigation in order to protect the user during daily activities. This work also includes real-time outdoor experimentation (performed on an assistive vehicle) by seven volunteers with different disabilities (but without cognitive impairment and experienced in the use of wheelchairs), statistical validation, comparison with previously published work, and a discussion section where the pros and cons of our system are evaluated. The proposed sound-based system is very efficient

  17. Programmable System on Chip Distributed Communication and Control Approach for Human Adaptive Mechanical System

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad A.M. Faudzi; Suzumori, K

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Communication and control are two main components in any Mechatronics system. They can be designed either by centralized or decentralized approach. Both approaches can be chosen based on application designed and specific requirements of the designer. In this study, decentralized or normally called distributed approach was selected to solved communication and control of a human adaptive mechanical system namely Intelligent Chair Tools (ICT). The ICT seating system is powered...

  18. Smart sensor systems for human health breath monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G W; Xu, J C; Biaggi-Labiosa, A M; Laskowski, D; Dutta, P K; Mondal, S P; Ward, B J; Makel, D B; Liu, C C; Chang, C W; Dweik, R A

    2011-09-01

    Breath analysis techniques offer a potential revolution in health care diagnostics, especially if these techniques can be brought into standard use in the clinic and at home. The advent of microsensors combined with smart sensor system technology enables a new generation of sensor systems with significantly enhanced capabilities and minimal size, weight and power consumption. This paper discusses the microsensor/smart sensor system approach and provides a summary of efforts to migrate this technology into human health breath monitoring applications. First, the basic capability of this approach to measure exhaled breath associated with exercise physiology is demonstrated. Building from this foundation, the development of a system for a portable asthma home health care system is described. A solid-state nitric oxide (NO) sensor for asthma monitoring has been identified, and efforts are underway to miniaturize this NO sensor technology and integrate it into a smart sensor system. It is concluded that base platform microsensor technology combined with smart sensor systems can address the needs of a range of breath monitoring applications and enable new capabilities for healthcare.

  19. Human capital flight challenges within an equitable health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udonwa, N E

    2007-01-01

    The issue of human capital flight has been discussed at different forums with a consensus opinion that it has its merits and demerits to equitable health system. Most often one nation becomes a substantial net exporter of talent, leaving the provider nation at risk of depleting its natural supply of talent. This paper looks into the historical perspective of human capital flight or "brain drain", and its burden. It attempts to elucidate the various causes and suggested solutions. The paper's objective is to educate colleagues on the conceptual and contextual imperatives of the issue. Using a convenient sample of key informants who were medical colleagues in Nigeria relevant information was sourced from these colleagues, documents from the postgraduate medical college of Nigeria and the internet on maters relating to human capital flight and brain drain. Every year, thousands of qualified doctors, and other professionals leave Nigeria tempted by significantly higher wages, brighter prospects for employment and education, stability, food security. It appears that the potential exposure to different working conditions, resources and professional environments can be of advantage to the country, should Nigeria be able to recall these professionals. It also appears that necessary economic reforms that make staying at home rewarding, that is--good leadership, and policy planning that seriously looks into rural development, among other issues, are keys ingredients to reversing the trend in order to ensure a more equitable health system.

  20. Human-System Integration Scorecard Update to VB.Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Blaze D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to create Human-System Integration (HSI) scorecard software, which could be utilized to validate that human factors have been considered early in hardware/system specifications and design. The HSI scorecard is partially based upon the revised Human Rating Requirements (HRR) intended for NASA's Constellation program. This software scorecard will allow for quick appraisal of HSI factors, by using visual aids to highlight low and rapidly changing scores. This project consisted of creating a user-friendly Visual Basic program that could be easily distributed and updated, to and by fellow colleagues. Updating the Microsoft Word version of the HSI scorecard to a computer application will allow for the addition of useful features, improved easy of use, and decreased completion time for user. One significant addition is the ability to create Microsoft Excel graphs automatically from scorecard data, to allow for clear presentation of problematic areas. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rational and benefits of creating the HSI scorecard software, the problems and goals of project, and future work that could be done.

  1. Computational Hemodynamic Simulation of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim. Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    A computational hemodynamics approach is presented to simulate the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Numerical techniques relevant to hemodynamics issues are introduced to non-Newtonian modeling for flow characteristics governed by red blood cells, distensible wall motion due to the heart pulse, and capillary bed modeling for outflow boundary conditions. Gravitational body force terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effects of gravity on internal flows. Six-type gravity benchmark problems are originally presented to provide the fundamental understanding of gravitational effects on the human circulatory system. For code validation, computed results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data for non-Newtonian flows in a carotid bifurcation model and a curved circular tube, respectively. This computational approach is then applied to the blood circulation in the human brain as a target problem. A three-dimensional, idealized Circle of Willis configuration is developed with minor arteries truncated based on anatomical data. Demonstrated is not only the mechanism of the collateral circulation but also the effects of gravity on the distensible wall motion and resultant flow patterns.

  2. Information systems on human resources for health: a global review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Patricia L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although attainment of the health-related Millennium Development Goals relies on countries having adequate numbers of human resources for health (HRH and their appropriate distribution, global understanding of the systems used to generate information for monitoring HRH stock and flows, known as human resources information systems (HRIS, is minimal. While HRIS are increasingly recognized as integral to health system performance assessment, baseline information regarding their scope and capability around the world has been limited. We conducted a review of the available literature on HRIS implementation processes in order to draw this baseline. Methods Our systematic search initially retrieved 11 923 articles in four languages published in peer-reviewed and grey literature. Following the selection of those articles which detailed HRIS implementation processes, reviews of their contents were conducted using two-person teams, each assigned to a national system. A data abstraction tool was developed and used to facilitate objective assessment. Results Ninety-five articles with relevant HRIS information were reviewed, mostly from the grey literature, which comprised 84 % of all documents. The articles represented 63 national HRIS and two regionally integrated systems. Whereas a high percentage of countries reported the capability to generate workforce supply and deployment data, few systems were documented as being used for HRH planning and decision-making. Of the systems examined, only 23 % explicitly stated they collect data on workforce attrition. The majority of countries experiencing crisis levels of HRH shortages (56 % did not report data on health worker qualifications or professional credentialing as part of their HRIS. Conclusion Although HRIS are critical for evidence-based human resource policy and practice, there is a dearth of information about these systems, including their current capabilities. The absence of

  3. Characterizing the human postural control system using detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresa Blázquez, M.; Anguiano, Marta; de Saavedra, Fernando Arias; Lallena, Antonio M.; Carpena, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis is used to study the behaviour of the time series of the position of the center of pressure, output from the activity of a human postural control system. The results suggest that these trajectories present a crossover in their scaling properties from persistent (for high frequencies, short-range time scale) to anti-persistent (for low frequencies, long-range time scale) behaviours. The values of the scaling exponent found for the persistent parts of the trajectories are very similar for all the cases analysed. The similarity of the results obtained for the measurements done with both eyes open and both eyes closed indicate either that the visual system may be disregarded by the postural control system, while maintaining quiet standing, or that the control mechanisms associated with each type of information (visual, vestibular and somatosensory) cannot be disentangled with this technique.

  4. Developing Seventh Grade Students’ Systems Thinking Skills in the Context of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raved, Lena; Yarden, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Developing systems thinking skills in school can provide useful tools to deal with a vast amount of medical and health information that may help learners in decision making in their future lives as citizen. Thus, there is a need to develop effective tools that will allow learners to analyze biological systems and organize their knowledge. Here, we examine junior high school students’ systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system. A model was formulated for developing teaching and learning materials and for characterizing students’ systems thinking skills. Specifically, we asked whether seventh grade students, who studied about the human circulatory system, acquired systems thinking skills, and what are the characteristics of those skills? Concept maps were used to characterize students’ systems thinking components and examine possible changes in the students’ knowledge structure. These maps were composed by the students before and following the learning process. The study findings indicate a significant improvement in the students’ ability to recognize the system components and the processes that occur within the system, as well as the relationships between different levels of organization of the system, following the learning process. Thus, following learning students were able to organize the systems’ components and its processes within a framework of relationships, namely the students’ systems thinking skills were improved in the course of learning using the teaching and learning materials. PMID:25520948

  5. Presence of Saccharomycopsis capsularis in the human respiratory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dynowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The following paper represents a fragment of studies on the dynamics of microflora in the human respiratory system with a particular focus on new species developing in that ontocoenosis. Saccharomycopsis capsularus amounts to 6.7% of all the isolated fungi. The isolates were obtained from sputum (41.9%, bronchoscopic material (18.6% and the pharyngeal, nasal and oral swabs representing jointly 39.5% of the positive results. Almost twice as many isolates were obtained from women (66.3% as from men (33.7%. The fungi were most frequently found in the spring and autumn, more rarely in the winter, the rarest in the summer. Appearance of S. capsularis in the human body is, most probably, a consequence of its increased expansiveness in the external environment. So far it has been isolated from the soil, pollens of some tropical plants and from water reservoirs contaminated with municipal sewage.

  6. Human reproductive system disturbances and pesticide exposure in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koifman Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of reproductive disturbances in humans and in the wildlife has been reported in the last decade in different countries. Exposure to different chemicals possibly acting in the endocrine system or endocrine disruptors, including pesticides, has been a hypothesis raised to explain the observed changes. This paper aimed to present results of an epidemiological ecologic study carried out to explore population data on pesticides exposure in selected Brazilian states in the eighties and human reproductive outcomes in the nineties. Pearson correlation coefficients were ascertained between available data pesticides sales in eleven states in Brazil in 1985 and selected further reproductive outcomes or their surrogates. Moderate to high correlations were observed to infertility, testis, breast, prostate and ovarian cancer mortality. Despite the restrains of ecologic studies to establish cause-effect relationships, the observed results are in agreement with evidence supporting a possible association between pesticides exposure and the analyzed reproductive outcomes.

  7. Influence of prebiotics on the human immune system (GALT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodera, Pawel

    2008-06-01

    Prebiotics have great potential to improve human health in specific intestinal disorders. The knowledge about the influence of prebiotics on the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) for the improvement of human health is still growing. This paper reviews the latest evidence for the immunity-enhancing effects of prebiotics. Prebiotics, include inulin, fructooligosaccharides, mannosoligosaccharides, and arabinogalactans, are a therapeutic nutritional preparation used for the gut function favoring growth of normal bacterial flora and impedes growth of pathogenic organisms. There is convincing preliminary data to suggest that the consumption of prebiotics can modulate immune parameters in GALT, secondary lymphoid tissues and peripheral circulation. There is increasing evidence that the newly described prebiotics and innovative means of administration can modulate various properties of the immune system, including those of the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). Authors of recently published patents showed new mechanisms for immuno-modulation, and the ultimate impact on immunological health of prebiotics.

  8. Plasticity and stability of the visual system in human achiasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Michael B; Kaule, Falko R; Levin, Netta; Masuda, Yoichiro; Kumar, Anil; Gottlob, Irene; Horiguchi, Hiroshi; Dougherty, Robert F; Stadler, Joerg; Wolynski, Barbara; Speck, Oliver; Kanowski, Martin; Liao, Yaping J; Wandell, Brian A; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2012-08-09

    The absence of the optic chiasm is an extraordinary and extreme abnormality in the nervous system. The abnormality produces highly atypical functional responses in the cortex, including overlapping hemifield representations and bilateral population receptive fields in both striate and extrastriate visual cortex. Even in the presence of these large functional abnormalities, the effect on visual perception and daily life is not easily detected. Here, we demonstrate that in two achiasmic humans the gross topography of the geniculostriate and occipital callosal connections remains largely unaltered. We conclude that visual function is preserved by reorganization of intracortical connections instead of large-scale reorganizations of the visual cortex. Thus, developmental mechanisms of local wiring within cortical maps compensate for the improper gross wiring to preserve function in human achiasma.

  9. New enhancement of infrared image based on human visual system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianhe Yu; Qiuming Li; Jingmin Dai

    2009-01-01

    Infrared images are firstly analyzed using the multifractal theory so that the singularity of each pixel can be extracted from the images. The multifractal spectrum is then estimated, which can reflect overall characteristic of an infrared image. Thus the edge and texture of an infrared image can be accurately extracted based on the singularity of each pixel and the multifractal spectrum. Finally the edge pixels are classified and enhanced in accordance with the sensitivity of human visual system to the edge profile of an infrared image. The experimental results obtained by this approach are compared with those obtained by other methods. It is found that the proposed approach can be used to highlight the edge area of an infrared image to make an infrared image more suitable for observation by human eyes.

  10. A HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING PROCESS TO SUPPORT HUMAN-SYSTEM INTERFACE DESIGN IN CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, C.; Joe, J.; Boring, R.

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program is to sustain operation of the existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) through a multi-pathway approach in conducting research and development (R&D). The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) System Technologies pathway conducts targeted R&D to address aging and reliability concerns with legacy instrumentation and control (I&C) and other information systems in existing U.S. NPPs. Control room modernization is an important part following this pathway, and human factors experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been involved in conducting R&D to support migration of new digital main control room (MCR) technologies from legacy analog and legacy digital I&C. This paper describes a human factors engineering (HFE) process that supports human-system interface (HSI) design in MCR modernization activities, particularly with migration of old digital to new digital I&C. The process described in this work is an expansion from the LWRS Report INL/EXT-16-38576, and is a requirements-driven approach that aligns with NUREG-0711 requirements. The work described builds upon the existing literature by adding more detail around key tasks and decisions to make when transitioning from HSI Design into Verification and Validation (V&V). The overall objective of this process is to inform HSI design and elicit specific, measurable, and achievable human factors criteria for new digital technologies. Upon following this process, utilities should have greater confidence with transitioning from HSI design into V&V.

  11. Human behavior research and the design of sustainable transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, James J.

    2011-09-01

    Transport currently represents approximately 19% of the global energy demand and accounts for about 23% of the global carbon dioxide emissions (IEA 2009). As the demand for mobility is expected to continue to increase in the coming decades, the stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels will require the evolution of transport, along with power generation, building design and manufacturing. The continued development of these sectors will need to include changes in energy sources, energy delivery, materials, infrastructure and human behavior. Pathways to reducing carbon from the transport sector have unique challenges and opportunities that are inherent to the human choices and behavioral patterns that mold the transportation systems and the associated energy needs. Technology, government investment, and regulatory policies have a significant impact on the formulation of transportation infrastructure; however, the role of human behavior and public acceptance on the efficiency and effectiveness of transport systems should not be underestimated. Although developed, rapidly developing, and underdeveloped nations face different challenges in the establishment of transport infrastructure that can meet transport needs while achieving sustainable carbon dioxide emissions, the constraints that establish the domain of possibilities are closely related for all nations. These constraints include capital investment, fuel supplies, power systems, and human behavior. Throughout the world, there are considerable efforts directed at advancing and optimizing the financing of sustainable infrastructures, the production of low carbon fuels, and the production of advanced power systems, but the foundational work on methods to understand human preferences and behavior within the context of transport and the valuation of reductions in carbon dioxide emissions is greatly lagging behind. These methods and the associated understanding of human behavior and the willingness to pay for

  12. Human Exploration of the Solar System by 2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that the U.S., in concert with private entities and international partners, set itself on a course to accomplish human exploration of the solar system by the end of this century. This is a strikingly bold vision intended to revitalize the aspirations of HSF in service to the security, economic, and scientific interests of the nation. Solar system distance and time scales impose severe requirements on crewed space transportation systems, however, and fully realizing all objectives in support of this goal will require a multi-decade commitment employing radically advanced technologies - most prominently, space habitats capable of sustaining and protecting life in harsh radiation environments under zero gravity conditions and in-space propulsion technologies capable of rapid deep space transits with earth return, the subject of this paper. While near term mission destinations such as the moon and Mars can be accomplished with chemical propulsion and/or high power SEP, fundamental capability constraints render these traditional systems ineffective for solar system wide exploration. Nuclear based propulsion and alternative energetic methods, on the other hand, represent potential avenues, perhaps the only viable avenues, to high specific power space transport evincing reduced trip time, reduced IMLEO, and expanded deep space reach. Here, very long term HSF objectives for solar system wide exploration are examined in relation to the advanced propulsion technology solution landscape including foundational science, technical/engineering challenges, and developmental prospects.

  13. Field Guide for Designing Human Interaction with Intelligent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Thronesbery, Carroll G.

    1998-01-01

    The characteristics of this Field Guide approach address the problems of designing innovative software to support user tasks. The requirements for novel software are difficult to specify a priori, because there is not sufficient understanding of how the users' tasks should be supported, and there are not obvious pre-existing design solutions. When the design team is in unfamiliar territory, care must be taken to avoid rushing into detailed design, requirements specification, or implementation of the wrong product. The challenge is to get the right design and requirements in an efficient, cost-effective manner. This document's purpose is to describe the methods we are using to design human interactions with intelligent systems which support Space Shuttle flight controllers in the Mission Control Center at NASA/Johnson Space Center. Although these software systems usually have some intelligent features, the design challenges arise primarily from the innovation needed in the software design. While these methods are tailored to our specific context, they should be extensible, and helpful to designers of human interaction with other types of automated systems. We review the unique features of this context so that you can determine how to apply these methods to your project Throughout this Field Guide, goals of the design methods are discussed. This should help designers understand how a specific method might need to be adapted to the project at hand.

  14. The Human Thioredoxin System: Modifications and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Isaac Hashemy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin system, comprising thioredoxin (Trx, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR and NADPH, is one of the major cellular antioxidant systems, implicated in a large and growing number of biological functions. Trx acts as an oxidoreductase via a highly conserved dithiol/disulfide motif located in the active site (-Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-Lys-. Different factors are involved in the regulation of Trx activity, including its expression level, localization, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications and some chemical inhibitors. Mammalian TrxRs are selenoproteins which have a –Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- N-terminal active site, as well as a C-terminal selenium-containing active site. Besides two Cys-residues in the redox-regulatory domain of cytosolic Trx (Trx1, human Trx1 has three additional Cys-residues. Post-translational modifications of human Trx1 which are involved in the regulation of its activity can happen via modification of Cys-residues including thiol oxidation, glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation or via modification of other amino acid residues such as nitration of Tyr-49. Because of the numerous functions of the thioredoxin system, its inhibition (mainly happens via the targeting TrxR can result in major cellular consequences, which are potentially pro-oxidant in nature, leading to cell death via necrosis or apoptosis if overexpression of Trx and other antioxidative enzymes can not recuperate cell response. Considering this feature, several anticancer drugs have been used which can inhibit TrxR. Elevated levels of Trx and/or TrxR have been reported in many different human malignancies, positively correlated with aggressive tumor growth and poor prognosis. Moreover, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects of Trx are reasons to study its clinical application as a drug.

  15. Tissue-engineered microenvironment systems for modeling human vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourovskaia, Anna; Fauver, Mark; Kramer, Gregory; Simonson, Sara; Neumann, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The high attrition rate of drug candidates late in the development process has led to an increasing demand for test assays that predict clinical outcome better than conventional 2D cell culture systems and animal models. Government agencies, the military, and the pharmaceutical industry have started initiatives for the development of novel in-vitro systems that recapitulate functional units of human tissues and organs. There is growing evidence that 3D cell arrangement, co-culture of different cell types, and physico-chemical cues lead to improved predictive power. A key element of all tissue microenvironments is the vasculature. Beyond transporting blood the microvasculature assumes important organ-specific functions. It is also involved in pathologic conditions, such as inflammation, tumor growth, metastasis, and degenerative diseases. To provide a tool for modeling this important feature of human tissue microenvironments, we developed a microfluidic chip for creating tissue-engineered microenvironment systems (TEMS) composed of tubular cell structures. Our chip design encompasses a small chamber that is filled with an extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding one or more tubular channels. Endothelial cells (ECs) seeded into the channels adhere to the ECM walls and grow into perfusable tubular tissue structures that are fluidically connected to upstream and downstream fluid channels in the chip. Using these chips we created models of angiogenesis, the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and tumor-cell extravasation. Our angiogenesis model recapitulates true angiogenesis, in which sprouting occurs from a "parent" vessel in response to a gradient of growth factors. Our BBB model is composed of a microvessel generated from brain-specific ECs within an ECM populated with astrocytes and pericytes. Our tumor-cell extravasation model can be utilized to visualize and measure tumor-cell migration through vessel walls into the surrounding matrix. The described technology can be used

  16. Loss of Thiol Repair Systems in Human Cataractous Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Xing, Kui-Yi; Fan, Yin-Chuan; Libondi, Teodosio; Lou, Marjorie F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the thiol repair systems of thioltransferase (TTase) and thioredoxin (Trx) and oxidation-damaged proteins in human cataractous lenses. Methods. Cataractous lenses in humans (57–85 years of age) were classified into cortical, nuclear, mixed, mature, and hypermature cataract types by using a lens opacity classification system, and were obtained by extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) procedure. Cortical and nuclear cataracts were grouped by decreasing order of visual acuity into optical chart reading (R), counting fingers (CF), hand motion (HM), and light perception (LP). ECCE lens homogenate was analyzed for glutathione (GSH) level and enzyme activities of TTase, glutathione reductase (GR), Trx, and thioredoxin reductase (TR). Cortical and nuclear cataractous lenses (8 of each) with visual acuity better than HM were each dissected into cortical and nuclear portions for measurement of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PD) activity. Clear lenses (in humans 49–71 years of age) were used as control. Results. Compared with control, all cataractous lenses lost more than 80% GSH and 70% GR; TR and Trx activity; and 40% to 70% TTase activity, corroborated with the loss in visual acuity. Among cataracts with R and CF visual acuity, cortical cataract lost more cortical G3PD activity (18% of control) than that of nuclear cataract (50% of control), whereas GSH depletion and TTase inactivation were similar in both cataracts. Conclusions. Thiol repair systems were damaged in all types of cataracts. Cortical and nuclear cataracts showed differential G3PD inactivation in the cortex, implying those 2 type of cataracts might be formed through different mechanisms. PMID:25537203

  17. JPEG2000 COMPRESSION CODING USING HUMAN VISUAL SYSTEM MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Jiang; Wu Chengke

    2005-01-01

    In order to apply the Human Visual System (HVS) model to JPEG2000 standard,several implementation alternatives are discussed and a new scheme of visual optimization isintroduced with modifying the slope of rate-distortion. The novelty is that the method of visual weighting is not lifting the coefficients in wavelet domain, but is complemented by code stream organization. It remains all the features of Embedded Block Coding with Optimized Truncation (EBCOT) such as resolution progressive, good robust for error bit spread and compatibility of lossless compression. Well performed than other methods, it keeps the shortest standard codestream and decompression time and owns the ability of VIsual Progressive (VIP) coding.

  18. Role of Estrogens on Human Male Reproductive System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo Rochira; Lucia Zirilli; Bruno Madeo; Antonio Balestrieri; Cesare Carani; Antonio R. M. Granata

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on estrogen role on human male physiology. Biological estrogen actions on male reproductive system are summarized with particular regard to the effects of congenital estrogen deprivation in men. The effects of estrogen on spermatogenesis, hormonal secretion and gonadotropin feedback and on sexual behavior are discussed. It is remarked that the role of estrogens in male reproduction is a very recent acquisition in reproductive endocrinology, but it promises new future fields of research to be investigated as well as the possible disclosure of new strategies in clinical practice.

  19. Human Systems Integration (HSI) in Acquisition. HSI Domain Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Activities boxes correspond to the numbers In the Inputs and Outputs boxes. Tools: ● CATIA ● HSI Requirements Guide ● IMPRINT Activities for Each Output...Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA ● IPME References: ● DODI 5000.02 & DODD 5000.01 ● DAG ● CJCSI 3170.01 ● AFPD 63-1/AFPD 20-1 ● AFI 63-101 & AFI 63...correspond to the numbers In the Inputs and Outputs boxes. Technology Development Phase (Outputs) Human Systems Integration Tools: ● IMPRINT ● CATIA

  20. Human-System Interfaces (HSIs) in Small Modular Reactors (SMRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques V Hugo

    2014-10-01

    This book chapter describes the considerations for the selection of advanced human–system interfaces (HSIs) for the new generation of nuclear power plants. The chapter discusses the technologies that will be needed to support highly automated nuclear power plants, while minimising demands for numbers of operational staff, reducing human error and improving plant efficiency and safety. Special attention is paid to the selection and deployment of advanced technologies in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The chapter closes with an examination of how technologies are likely to develop over the next 10–15 years and how this will affect design choices for the nuclear industry.

  1. Mapping genetic influences on the corticospinal motor system in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheeran, B J; Ritter, C; Rothwell, J C

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that genetic variations account for a certain amount of variance in the acquisition and maintenance of different skills. Until now, several levels of genetic influences were examined, ranging from global heritability estimates down to the analysis...... of the contribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and variable number tandem repeats. In humans, the corticospinal motor system is essential to the acquisition of fine manual motor skills which require a finely tuned coordination of activity in distal forelimb muscles. Here we review recent brain mapping...

  2. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Robust system for human airway-tree segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael W.; Gibbs, Jason D.; Higgins, William E.

    2008-03-01

    Robust and accurate segmentation of the human airway tree from multi-detector computed-tomography (MDCT) chest scans is vital for many pulmonary-imaging applications. As modern MDCT scanners can detect hundreds of airway tree branches, manual segmentation and semi-automatic segmentation requiring significant user intervention are impractical for producing a full global segmentation. Fully-automated methods, however, may fail to extract small peripheral airways. We propose an automatic algorithm that searches the entire lung volume for airway branches and poses segmentation as a global graph-theoretic optimization problem. The algorithm has shown strong performance on 23 human MDCT chest scans acquired by a variety of scanners and reconstruction kernels. Visual comparisons with adaptive region-growing results and quantitative comparisons with manually-defined trees indicate a high sensitivity to peripheral airways and a low false-positive rate. In addition, we propose a suite of interactive segmentation tools for cleaning and extending critical areas of the automatically segmented result. These interactive tools have potential application for image-based guidance of bronchoscopy to the periphery, where small, terminal branches can be important visual landmarks. Together, the automatic segmentation algorithm and interactive tool suite comprise a robust system for human airway-tree segmentation.

  4. Eye movement-invariant representations in the human visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Shinji; Huth, Alexander G; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Gallant, Jack L

    2017-01-01

    During natural vision, humans make frequent eye movements but perceive a stable visual world. It is therefore likely that the human visual system contains representations of the visual world that are invariant to eye movements. Here we present an experiment designed to identify visual areas that might contain eye-movement-invariant representations. We used functional MRI to record brain activity from four human subjects who watched natural movies. In one condition subjects were required to fixate steadily, and in the other they were allowed to freely make voluntary eye movements. The movies used in each condition were identical. We reasoned that the brain activity recorded in a visual area that is invariant to eye movement should be similar under fixation and free viewing conditions. In contrast, activity in a visual area that is sensitive to eye movement should differ between fixation and free viewing. We therefore measured the similarity of brain activity across repeated presentations of the same movie within the fixation condition, and separately between the fixation and free viewing conditions. The ratio of these measures was used to determine which brain areas are most likely to contain eye movement-invariant representations. We found that voxels located in early visual areas are strongly affected by eye movements, while voxels in ventral temporal areas are only weakly affected by eye movements. These results suggest that the ventral temporal visual areas contain a stable representation of the visual world that is invariant to eye movements made during natural vision.

  5. Complex-tone pitch representations in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica

    ) listeners and the effect of musical training for pitch discrimination of complex tones with resolved and unresolved harmonics. Concerning the first topic, behavioral and modeling results in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) indicated that temporal envelope cues of complex tones...... for the individual pitch-discrimination abilities, the musically trained listeners still allocated lower processing effort than did the non-musicians to perform the task at the same performance level. This finding suggests an enhanced pitch representation along the auditory system in musicians, possibly as a result......Understanding how the human auditory system processes the physical properties of an acoustical stimulus to give rise to a pitch percept is a fascinating aspect of hearing research. Since most natural sounds are harmonic complex tones, this work focused on the nature of pitch-relevant cues...

  6. Water: Challenges at the Intersection of Human and Natural Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futrell, J.H.; Gephart, R. E.; Kabat-Lensch, E.; McKnight, D. M.; Pyrtle, A.; Schimel, J. P.; Smyth, R. L.; Skole, D. L. Wilson, J. L.; Gephart, J. M.

    2005-09-01

    There is a growing recognition about the critical role water plays in sustaining people and society. This workshop established dialog between disciplinary scientists and program managers from diverse backgrounds in order to share perspectives and broaden community understanding of ongoing fundamental and applied research on water as a complex environmental problem. Three major scientific themes emerged: (1) coupling of cycles and process, with emphasis on the role of interfaces; (2) coupling of human and natural systems across spatial and temporal scales; and (3) prediction in the face of uncertainty. In addition, the need for observation systems, sensors, and infrastructure; and the need for data management and synthesis were addressed. Current barriers to progress were noted as educational and institutional barriers and the integration of science and policy.

  7. Spatial resolution of human RPC-PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, M.; Crespo, P.; Mendes, L.; Ferreira, N.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fonte, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the spatial resolution of a human wide axial field of view RPC-PET system was studied. It was verified that physical processes involving the detection of 511 keV photons do not degrade the spatial resolution, compared with that attainable with systems based on inorganic scintillation crystals coupled to photomultiplier tubes. Considering the photon acollinearity effect, a detector depth-of-interaction resolution of 3.44 mm, and detector readout binnings of 1.0 and 2.0 mm, the spatial resolutions computed as the mean of full width at half maximum of point spread functions in three orthogonal directions (X, Y, and Z) were 1.4±0.0 and 2.1±0.1 mm, respectively. The corresponding mean spatial resolutions computed as the full width at tenth maximum were 3.9±0.4 and 4.8±0.3 mm, respectively.

  8. An Embedded System for Tracking Human Motion and Humanoid Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-June Tsai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is using embedded CPU to develop a human motion tracking system and construct a motion replication interface for a humanoid robot. In the motion tracking system, we use a CPLD (Complex Programmable Logic Device which is built in a central control unit (CCU to generate synchronous signals for all the periphery devices and control the data flow from CCD boards to a PC via a USB chip. An embedded DSP on the CCD board is adopted to control the CCD exposure and conduct image processing. The peak position of exposure was computed by the on-board DSP within sub-pixel accuracy. In the construction of a motion replication interface, the same CCU is used to generate the PWM signals to drive the motors of the humanoid robot. All of the respective firmware coding methods are discussed in this article.

  9. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  10. Integrated Design and Analysis Environment for Safety Critical Human-Automation Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Flight deck systems, like many safety critical systems, often involve complex interactions between multiple human operators, automated subsystems, and physical...

  11. 78 FR 43258 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records, State-31

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Act; System of Records: Human Resources Records, State-31 SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Department of State proposes to amend an existing system of records, Human Resources Records, State- 31... filed with the Office of Management and Budget. The amended system description, ``Human...

  12. Hierarchical Recognition Scheme for Human Facial Expression Recognition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hameed Siddiqi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, human facial expressions recognition (FER has emerged as an important research area. Several factors make FER a challenging research problem. These include varying light conditions in training and test images; need for automatic and accurate face detection before feature extraction; and high similarity among different expressions that makes it difficult to distinguish these expressions with a high accuracy. This work implements a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis-based facial expressions recognition (HL-FER system to tackle these problems. Unlike the previous systems, the HL-FER uses a pre-processing step to eliminate light effects, incorporates a new automatic face detection scheme, employs methods to extract both global and local features, and utilizes a HL-FER to overcome the problem of high similarity among different expressions. Unlike most of the previous works that were evaluated using a single dataset, the performance of the HL-FER is assessed using three publicly available datasets under three different experimental settings: n-fold cross validation based on subjects for each dataset separately; n-fold cross validation rule based on datasets; and, finally, a last set of experiments to assess the effectiveness of each module of the HL-FER separately. Weighted average recognition accuracy of 98.7% across three different datasets, using three classifiers, indicates the success of employing the HL-FER for human FER.

  13. NATO Symposium on Human Detection and Diagnosis of System Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Rouse, William

    1981-01-01

    This book includes all of the papers presented at the NATO Symposium on Human Detection and Diagnosis of System Failures held at Roskilde, Denmark on August 4-8, 1980. The Symposium was sponsored by the Scientific Affairs Division of NATO and the Rise National Laboratory of Denmark. The goal of the Symposium was to continue the tradition initiated by the NATO Symposium on Monitoring Behavior and Supervisory Control held in Berchtesgaden, F .R. Germany in 1976 and the NATO Symposium on Theory and Measurement of Mental Workload held in Mati, Greece in 1977. To this end, a group of 85 psychologists and engineers coming from industry, government, and academia convened to discuss, and to generate a "state-of-the-art" consensus of the problems and solutions associated with the human IS ability to cope with the increasing scale of consequences of failures within complex technical systems. The Introduction of this volume reviews their findings. The Symposium was organized to include brief formal presentations of pape...

  14. Augmented Robotics Dialog System for Enhancing Human-Robot Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martín, Fernando; Castro-González, Aĺvaro; Luengo, Francisco Javier Fernandez de Gorostiza; Salichs, Miguel Ángel

    2015-07-03

    Augmented reality, augmented television and second screen are cutting edge technologies that provide end users extra and enhanced information related to certain events in real time. This enriched information helps users better understand such events, at the same time providing a more satisfactory experience. In the present paper, we apply this main idea to human-robot interaction (HRI), to how users and robots interchange information. The ultimate goal of this paper is to improve the quality of HRI, developing a new dialog manager system that incorporates enriched information from the semantic web. This work presents the augmented robotic dialog system (ARDS), which uses natural language understanding mechanisms to provide two features: (i) a non-grammar multimodal input (verbal and/or written) text; and (ii) a contextualization of the information conveyed in the interaction. This contextualization is achieved by information enrichment techniques that link the extracted information from the dialog with extra information about the world available in semantic knowledge bases. This enriched or contextualized information (information enrichment, semantic enhancement or contextualized information are used interchangeably in the rest of this paper) offers many possibilities in terms of HRI. For instance, it can enhance the robot's pro-activeness during a human-robot dialog (the enriched information can be used to propose new topics during the dialog, while ensuring a coherent interaction). Another possibility is to display additional multimedia content related to the enriched information on a visual device. This paper describes the ARDS and shows a proof of concept of its applications.

  15. How healthy is the human-ocean system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, Wilfried; Quaas, Martin F.; Visbeck, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Halpern et al (2012 An index to assess the health and benefits of the global ocean Nature 488 11397) propose a detailed measure of the state of the human-ocean system against ten societal goals. They devote less attention to the normative foundation of the index, which is crucial for assessing the overall health of the human-ocean system, notably when it comes to aggregation of potentially conflicting goals. Social choice theory provides several possible functional forms for assessing the compound change in various goals. The one chosen by Halpern et al, the arithmetical mean, is not only a specific but also an extreme case. It implicitly allows for unlimited substitution. A one-unit reduction in one goal can be fully offset by a one-unit increase in another with the same weighting factor. For that reason, the current index satisfies an extremely weak sustainability concept. We show that the results in Halpern et al are not robust when one adopts a strong sustainability concept. The overall health score of the ocean decreases, the ranking of the various coastal states changes substantially, and the assessment of sustainable development needs to be partially reversed.

  16. A Novel Parametric Model For The Human Respiratory System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Mihaela IONESCU

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to present some recent results in an ongoing research project between Ghent University and Chess Medical Technology Company Belgium. The overall aim of the project is to provide a fast method for identification of the human respiratory system in order to allow for an instantaneously diagnosis of the patient by the medical staff. A novel parametric model of the human respiratory system as well as the obtained experimental results is presented in this paper. A prototype apparatus developed by the company, based on the forced oscillation technique is used to record experimental data from 4 patients in this paper. Signal processing is based on spectral analysis and is followed by the parametric identification of a non-linear mechanistic model. The parametric model is equivalent to the structure of a simple electrical RLC-circuit, containing a non-linear capacitor. These parameters have a useful and easy-to-interpret physical meaning for the medical staff members.

  17. Characteristic parameters of electromagnetic signals from a human heart system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xin-Yuan; Pei Liu-Qing; Wang Yin; Zhang Su-Ming; Gao Hong-Lei; Dai Yuan-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic field of a human heart system is a bioelectromagnetic field. Electrocardiography (ECG)and magnetocardiography (MCG)are both carriers of electromagnetic information about the cardiac system, and they are nonstationary signals. In this study, ECG and MCG data from healthy subjects are acquired;the MCG data are captured using a high-T, radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUIDs)and the QRS complexes in these data are analysed by the evolutionary spectrum analysis method. The results show that the quality factor Q and the central frequency fz of the QRS complex evolutionary spectrum are the characteristic parameters (CHPs)of ECG and MCG in the time-frequency domain. The confidence intervals of the mean values of the CHPs are estimated by the Student t distribution method in mathematical statistics. We believe that there are threshold ranges of the mean values of Q and fz for healthy subjects. We have postulated the following criterion:if the mean values of CHPs are in the proper ranges, the cardiac system is in a normal condition and it possesses the capability of homeostasis. In contrast, if the mean values of the CHPs do not lie in the proper ranges, the homeostasis of the cardiac system is lacking and some cardiac disease may follow. The results and procedure of MCG CHPs in the study afford a technological route for the application of HTc rf SQUIDs in cardiology.

  18. Systemic fungal infections in patients with human inmunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cerdeira, C; Arenas, R; Moreno-Coutiño, G; Vásquez, E; Fernández, R; Chang, P

    2014-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. In immunocompromised patients, primary pulmonary infection can spread to the skin and meninges. Clinical manifestations appear in patients with a CD4(+) lymphocyte count of less than 150 cells/μL. Coccidioidomycosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii. It can present as diffuse pulmonary disease or as a disseminated form primarily affecting the central nervous system, the bones, and the skin. Cryptococcosis is caused by Cryptococcus neoformans (var. neoformans and var. grubii) and Cryptococcus gattii, which are members of the Cryptococcus species complex and have 5 serotypes: A, B, C, D, and AD. It is a common opportunistic infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, even those receiving antiretroviral therapy. Histopathologic examination and culture of samples from any suspicious lesions are essential for the correct diagnosis of systemic fungal infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  19. Human System Risk Management - Tools of our Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark

    2009-01-01

    The risk of infectious disease to select individuals has historically been difficult to predict in either spaceflight or on Earth with health care efforts relying on broad-based prevention and post-infection treatment. Over the past 10 years, quantitative microbial risk assessment evaluations have evolved to formalize the assessment process and quantify the risk. This process of hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and risk characterization has been applied by the water and food safety industries to address the public health impacts associated with the occurrence of and human exposure to pathogens in water and food for the development of preventive strategies for microbial disease. NASA is currently investigating the feasibility of using these techniques to better understand the risks to astronauts and refine their microbiological requirements. To assess these techniques, NASA began an evaluation of the potable water system on the International Space Station to determine how the microbial risk from water consumption during flight differed from terrestrial sources, such as municipal water systems. The ultimate goal of this work is to optimize microbial requirements which would minimize unnecessary cargo and use of crew time, while still protecting the health of the crew. Successful demonstration of this risk assessment framework with the water system holds the potential to maximize the use of available resources during spaceflight missions and facilitate investigations into the evaluation of other routes of infection, such as through the spaceflight foods system.

  20. Human System Risk Management - Tools of our Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark

    2009-01-01

    The risk of infectious disease to select individuals has historically been difficult to predict in either spaceflight or on Earth with health care efforts relying on broad-based prevention and post-infection treatment. Over the past 10 years, quantitative microbial risk assessment evaluations have evolved to formalize the assessment process and quantify the risk. This process of hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response assessment, and risk characterization has been applied by the water and food safety industries to address the public health impacts associated with the occurrence of and human exposure to pathogens in water and food for the development of preventive strategies for microbial disease. NASA is currently investigating the feasibility of using these techniques to better understand the risks to astronauts and refine their microbiological requirements. To assess these techniques, NASA began an evaluation of the potable water system on the International Space Station to determine how the microbial risk from water consumption during flight differed from terrestrial sources, such as municipal water systems. The ultimate goal of this work is to optimize microbial requirements which would minimize unnecessary cargo and use of crew time, while still protecting the health of the crew. Successful demonstration of this risk assessment framework with the water system holds the potential to maximize the use of available resources during spaceflight missions and facilitate investigations into the evaluation of other routes of infection, such as through the spaceflight foods system.

  1. Human immune system mice: current potential and limitations for translational research on human antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Patton, John; Manser, Tim

    2011-12-01

    It has recently become possible to generate chimeric mice durably engrafted with many components of the human immune system (HIS mice). We have characterized the maturation and function of the B cell compartment of HIS mice. The antibody response of HIS mice to T cell-dependent B cell antigens is limited, and contributing factors may be the general immaturity of the B cell compartment, infrequent helper T cells selected on human MHC class II antigens, and incomplete reconstitution of secondary lymphoid organs and their microenvironments. In contrast, HIS mice generate protective antibody responses to the bacterium Borrelia hermsii, which acts as a T cell-independent antigen in mice, but do not respond to purified polysaccharide antigens (PPS). We speculate that the anti-B. hermsii response of HIS mice is derived from an abundant B cell subset that may be analogous to B1 B cells in mice. We suggest that failure of HIS mice to respond to PPS is due to the lack of a B cell subset that may originate from adult bone marrow and is highly dependent on human interleukin-7 for development.

  2. Hantavirus-induced pathogenesis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobak, Lidija; Raftery, Martin J; Voigt, Sebastian; Kühl, Anja A; Kilic, Ergin; Kurth, Andreas; Witkowski, Peter; Hofmann, Jörg; Nitsche, Andreas; Schaade, Lars; Krüger, Detlev H; Schönrich, Günther

    2015-06-01

    Hantaviruses are emerging zoonotic pathogens that can cause severe disease in humans. Clinical observations suggest that human immune components contribute to hantavirus-induced pathology. To address this issue we generated mice with a humanized immune system. Hantavirus infection of these animals resulted in systemic infection associated with weight loss, decreased activity, ruffled fur and inflammatory infiltrates of lung tissue. Intriguingly, after infection, humanized mice harbouring human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted human CD8+ T cells started to lose weight earlier (day 10) than HLA class I-negative humanized mice (day 15). Moreover, in these mice the number of human platelets dropped by 77 % whereas the number of murine platelets did not change, illustrating how differences between rodent and human haemato-lymphoid systems may contribute to disease development. To our knowledge this is the first description of a humanized mouse model of hantavirus infection, and our results indicate a role for human immune cells in hantaviral pathogenesis.

  3. Immunodeficient mouse model for human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human immune systems provide an exciting model to study human immunobiology in an in vivo setting without placing patients at risk. The essential parameter for creation of these "humanized models" is engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that will allow for optimal development of human immune systems. However, there are a number of strategies to generate humanized mice and specific protocols can vary significantly among different laboratories. Here we describe a protocol for the co-implantation of human HSC with autologous fetal liver and thymic tissues into immunodeficient mice to create a humanized model with optimal human T cell development. This model, often referred to as the Thy/Liv or BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) mouse, develops a functional human immune system, including HLA-restricted human T cells, B cells, and innate immune cells.

  4. An Active Stereo Vision System Based on Neural Pathways of Human Binocular Motor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-zhang Gu; Makoto Sato; Xiao-lin Zhang

    2007-01-01

    An active stereo vision system based on a model of neural pathways of human binocular motor system is proposed. With this model, it is guaranteed that the two cameras of the active stereo vision system can keep their lines of sight fixed on the same target object during smooth pursuit. This feature is very important for active stereo vision systems, since not only 3D reconstruction needs the two cameras have an overlapping field of vision, but also it can facilitate the 3D reconstruction algorithm. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method, some software simulations are done to demonstrate the same target tracking characteristic in a virtual environment apt to mistracking easily. Here, mistracking means two eyes track two different objects separately. Then the proposed method is implemented in our active stereo vision system to perform real tracking task in a laboratory scene where several persons walk self-determining. Before the proposed model is implemented in the system, mistracking occurred frequently. After it is enabled, mistracking never occurred. The result shows that the vision system based on neural pathways of human binocular motor system can reliably avoid mistracking.

  5. Design and Evaluation of Human System Interfaces (HSIs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In the safe operation of nuclear power plants and other complex process industries the performance of the control room crews plays an important role. In this respect a well-functioning and well-designed Human-System Interface (HSI) is crucial for safe and efficient operation of the plant. It is therefore essential that the design, development and evaluation of both control rooms and HSI-solutions are conducted in a well-structured way, applying sound human factors principles and guidelines in all phases of the HSI development process. Many nuclear power plants around the world are currently facing major modernisation of their control rooms. In this process computerised, screen-based HSIs replace old conventional operator interfaces. In new control rooms, both in the nuclear field and in other process industries, fully digital, screen-based control rooms are becoming the standard. It is therefore of particular importance to address the design and evaluation of screen-based HSIs in a systematic and consistent way in order to arrive at solutions which take proper advantage of the possibilities for improving operator support through the use of digital, screen-based HSIs, at the same time avoiding pitfalls and problems in the use of this technology. The Halden Reactor Project, in cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, organised an International Summer School on ''Design and Evaluation of Human-System Interfaces (HSIs)'' in Halden, Norway in the period August 25th - 29th, 2003. The Summer School addressed the different steps in design, development and evaluation of HSIs, and the human factors principles, standards and guidelines which should be followed in this process. The lectures comprised both theoretical background, as well as examples of good and bad HSI design, thereby providing practical advice in design and evaluation of operator interfaces and control room solutions to the participants in the Summer School. This CD contains the

  6. Ergonomics and human factors: the paradigms for science, engineering, design, technology and management of human-compatible systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, W

    2005-04-15

    This paper provides a theoretical perspective on human factors and ergonomics (HFE), defined as a unique and independent discipline that focuses on the nature of human-artefact interactions, viewed from the unified perspective of the science, engineering, design, technology and management of human-compatible systems. Such systems include a variety of natural and artificial products, processes and living environments. The distinguishing features of the contemporary HFE discipline and profession are discussed and a concept of ergonomics literacy is proposed. An axiomatic approach to ergonomics design and a universal measure of system-human incompatibility are also introduced. It is concluded that the main focus of the HFE discipline in the 21st century will be the design and management of systems that satisfy human compatibility requirements.

  7. Adapting MRI systems to propel and guide microdevices in the human blood circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S; Mathieu, J B; Felfoul, O; Macicior, H; Beaudoin, G; Soulez, G; Yahia, L H

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems are widely used to gather noninvasively images of the interior of the human body. This paper suggests that an MRI system can be seen beyond being just a tool for imaging purpose but one that can propel and guide special microdevices in the human body to perform specific medical tasks. More specifically, an MRI system can potentially be used to image the region of interest, propel a microdevice through the generation of magnetic gradients, determine the location of the device, compute the corrective actions through feedback control algorithms and adjust the generation of the magnetic gradients accordingly to navigate such a microdevice in a preplanned path. This paper presents an introductory description of the proposed techniques, the main issues to consider, and some preliminary data indicating the validity of this approach.

  8. Generation of Immunodeficient Mice Bearing Human Immune Systems by the Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasgur, Suheyla; Aryee, Ken Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice are being used as recipients of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for in vivo analyses of human immune system development and function. The development of several stocks of immunodeficient Prkdc (scid) (scid), or recombination activating 1 or 2 gene (Rag1 or Rag2) knockout mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the IL2 receptor gamma chain (IL2rγ), has greatly facilitated the engraftment of human HSC and enhanced the development of functional human immune systems. These "humanized" mice are being used to study human hematopoiesis, human-specific immune therapies, human-specific pathogens, and human immune system homeostasis and function. The establishment of these model systems is technically challenging, and levels of human immune system development reported in the literature are variable between laboratories. The use of standard protocols for optimal engraftment of HSC and for monitoring the development of the human immune systems would enable more direct comparisons between humanized mice generated in different laboratories. Here we describe a standard protocol for the engraftment of human HSC into 21-day-old NOD-scid IL2rγ (NSG) mice using an intravenous injection approach. The multiparameter flow cytometry used to monitor human immune system development and the kinetics of development are described.

  9. Developing a Prototype ALHAT Human System Interface for Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Robert L.; Chua, Zarrin K.; Heino, Todd A.; Strahan, Al; Major, Laura; Duda, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project is to safely execute a precision landing anytime/anywhere on the moon. This means the system must operate in any lighting conditions, operate in the presence of any thruster generated regolith clouds, and operate without the help of redeployed navigational aids or prepared landing site at the landing site. In order to reach this ambitious goal, computer aided technologies such as ALHAT will be needed in order to permit these landings to be done safely. Although there will be advanced autonomous capabilities onboard future landers, humans will still be involved (either onboard as astronauts or remotely from mission control) in any mission to the moon or other planetary body. Because many time critical decisions must be made quickly and effectively during the landing sequence, the Descent and Landing displays need to be designed to be as effective as possible at presenting the pertinent information to the operator, and allow the operators decisions to be implemented as quickly as possible. The ALHAT project has established the Human System Interface (HSI) team to lead in the development of these displays and to study the best way to provide operators enhanced situational awareness during landing activities. These displays are prototypes that were developed based on multiple design and feedback sessions with the astronaut office at NASA/ Johnson Space Center. By working with the astronauts in a series of plan/build/evaluate cycles, the HSI team has obtained astronaut feedback from the very beginning of the design process. In addition to developing prototype displays, the HSI team has also worked to provide realistic lunar terrain (and shading) to simulate a "out the window" view that can be adjusted to various lighting conditions (based on a desired date/time) to allow the same terrain to be viewed under varying lighting terrain. This capability will be critical to determining the

  10. Certification of COTS Software in NASA Human Rated Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products in safety critical systems has been seen as a promising acquisition strategy to improve mission affordability and, yet, has come with significant barriers and challenges. Attempts to integrate COTS software components into NASA human rated flight systems have been, for the most part, complicated by verification and validation (V&V) requirements necessary for flight certification per NASA s own standards. For software that is from COTS sources, and, in general from 3rd party sources, either commercial, government, modified or open source, the expectation is that it meets the same certification criteria as those used for in-house and that it does so as if it were built in-house. The latter is a critical and hidden issue. This paper examines the longstanding barriers and challenges in the use of 3rd party software in safety critical systems and cover recent efforts to use COTS software in NASA s Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) project. It identifies some core artifacts that without them, the use of COTS and 3rd party software is, for all practical purposes, a nonstarter for affordable and timely insertion into flight critical systems. The paper covers the first use in a flight critical system by NASA of COTS software that has prior FAA certification heritage, which was shown to meet the RTCA-DO-178B standard, and how this certification may, in some cases, be leveraged to allow the use of analysis in lieu of testing. Finally, the paper proposes the establishment of an open source forum for development of safety critical 3rd party software.

  11. Carbon-climate-human interactions in an integrated human-Earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, K. V.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Jones, A. D.; Shi, X.

    2016-12-01

    The C4MIP and CMIP5 results highlighted large uncertainties in climate projections, driven to a large extent by limited understanding of the interactions between terrestrial carbon-cycle and climate feedbacks, and their associated uncertainties. These feedbacks are dominated by uncertainties in soil processes, disturbance dynamics, ecosystem response to climate change, and agricultural productivity, and land-use change. This research addresses three questions: (1) how do terrestrial feedbacks vary across different levels of climate change, (2) what is the relative contribution of CO2 fertilization and climate change, and (3) how robust are the results across different models and methods? We used a coupled modeling framework that integrates an Integrated Assessment Model (modeling economic and energy activity) with an Earth System Model (modeling the natural earth system) to examine how business-as-usual (RCP 8.5) climate change will affect ecosystem productivity, cropland extent, and other aspects of the human-Earth system. We find that higher levels of radiative forcing result in higher productivity growth, that increases in CO2 concentrations are the dominant contributors to that growth, and that our productivity increases fall in the middle of the range when compared to other CMIP5 models and the AgMIP models. These results emphasize the importance of examining both the anthropogenic and natural components of the earth system, and their long-term interactive feedbacks.

  12. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-09-09

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person's interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks.

  13. S5-4: Formal Modeling of Affordance in Human-Included Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhun Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of it being necessary for humans to consider modeling, analysis, and control of human-included systems, it has been considered a challenging problem because of the critical role of humans in complex systems and of humans' capability of executing unanticipated actions–both beneficial and detrimental ones. Thus, to provide systematic approaches to modeling human actions as a part of system behaviors, a formal modeling framework for human-involved systems in which humans play a controlling role based on their perceptual information is presented. The theory of affordance provides definitions of human actions and their associated properties; Finite State Automata (FSA based modeling is capable of mapping nondeterministic humans into computable components in the system representation. In this talk, we investigate the role of perception in human actions in the system operation and examine the representation of perceptual elements in affordance-based modeling formalism. The proposed framework is expected to capture the natural ways in which humans participate in the system as part of its operation. A human-machine cooperative manufacturing system control example and a human agent simulation example will be introduced for the illustrative purposes at the end of the presentation.

  14. Modeling Sustainability: Population, Inequality, Consumption, and Bidirectional Coupling of the Earth and Human Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motesharrei, Safa; Rivas, Jorge; Kalnay, Eugenia; Asrar, Ghassem R.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Cane, Mark A.; Colwell, Rita R.; Feng, Kuishuang; Franklin, Rachel S.; Hubacek, Klaus; Miralles-Wilhelm, Fernando; Miyoshi, Takemasa; Ruth, Matthias; Sagdeev, Roald; Shirmohammadi, Adel; Shukla, Jagadish; Srebric, Jelena; Yakovenko, Victor M.; Zeng, Ning

    2016-12-11

    Over the last two centuries, the impact of the Human System has grown dramatically, becoming strongly dominant within the Earth System in many different ways. Consumption, inequality, and population have increased extremely fast, especially since about 1950, threatening to overwhelm the many critical functions and ecosystems of the Earth System. Changes in the Earth System, in turn, have important feedback effects on the Human System, with costly and potentially serious consequences. However, current models do not incorporate these critical feedbacks. We argue that in order to understand the dynamics of either system, Earth System Models must be coupled with Human System Models through bidirectional couplings representing the positive, negative, and delayed feedbacks that exist in the real systems. In particular, key Human System variables, such as demographics, inequality, economic growth, and migration, are not coupled with the Earth System but are instead driven by exogenous estimates, such as United Nations population projections. This makes current models likely to miss important feedbacks in the real Earth–Human system, especially those that may result in unexpected or counterintuitive outcomes, and thus requiring different policy interventions from current models. The importance and imminence of sustainability challenges, the dominant role of the Human System in the Earth System, and the essential roles the Earth System plays for the Human System, all call for collaboration of natural scientists, social scientists, and engineers in multidisciplinary research and modeling to develop coupled Earth–Human system models for devising effective science-based policies and measures to benefit current and future generations.

  15. Development of a hydraulic model of the human systemic circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, M. K.; Dharmalingham, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical and numeric models of the human circulation are constructed for a number of objectives, including studies and training in physiologic control, interpretation of clinical observations, and testing of prosthetic cardiovascular devices. For many of these purposes it is important to quantitatively validate the dynamic response of the models in terms of the input impedance (Z = oscillatory pressure/oscillatory flow). To address this need, the authors developed an improved physical model. Using a computer study, the authors first identified the configuration of lumped parameter elements in a model of the systemic circulation; the result was a good match with human aortic input impedance with a minimum number of elements. Design, construction, and testing of a hydraulic model analogous to the computer model followed. Numeric results showed that a three element model with two resistors and one compliance produced reasonable matching without undue complication. The subsequent analogous hydraulic model included adjustable resistors incorporating a sliding plate to vary the flow area through a porous material and an adjustable compliance consisting of a variable-volume air chamber. The response of the hydraulic model compared favorably with other circulation models.

  16. Effects of aging on nitrergic system in human basal nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lopes dos Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a gaseous molecule that plays a role in a number of physiologic processes. The available evidence suggests that NO is a major neurotransmitter involved in motor control and emotion/behavior modulation. To investigate the distribution and morphology of the nitrergic system in human basal nuclei, we studied samples from the striatum, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra and pedunculopontine nucleus of 20 human brains from subjects without neurologic/psychiatric diseases. The samples were stained for NADPH-diaphorase using histochemistry and for neuronal NO synthase using immunohistochemistry. We then analyzed the nitrergic neuronal density and its morphometric parameters. Our data demonstrated that: (I the most posterior regions of the striatum exhibit a higher neuronal density; (II the limbic cortex-associated areas of the striatum exhibit higher neuronal density than other functional subdivisions; (III approximately 90% of the neurons in the subthalamic nucleus express NO; (IV the pedunculopontine nucleus exhibits a massive nitrergic neuronal density; (V in the globus pallidus, there is a marked presence of NO neurons in the medial medullary lamina; and (VI nitrergic neurons were not detected in the substantia nigra. Aging did not change the neuronal density or the morphometric parameters of nitrergic neurons in the analyzed nuclei.

  17. Workshop on Human Activity at Scale in Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Melissa R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aziz, H. M. Abdul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coletti, Mark A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kennedy, Joseph H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nair, Sujithkumar S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Omitaomu, Olufemi A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-26

    Changing human activity within a geographical location may have significant influence on the global climate, but that activity must be parameterized in such a way as to allow these high-resolution sub-grid processes to affect global climate within that modeling framework. Additionally, we must have tools that provide decision support and inform local and regional policies regarding mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. The development of next-generation earth system models, that can produce actionable results with minimum uncertainties, depends on understanding global climate change and human activity interactions at policy implementation scales. Unfortunately, at best we currently have only limited schemes for relating high-resolution sectoral emissions to real-time weather, ultimately to become part of larger regions and well-mixed atmosphere. Moreover, even our understanding of meteorological processes at these scales is imperfect. This workshop addresses these shortcomings by providing a forum for discussion of what we know about these processes, what we can model, where we have gaps in these areas and how we can rise to the challenge to fill these gaps.

  18. Performance Evaluation of Wavelet Based on Human Visual System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡海平; 莫玉龙

    2002-01-01

    We have constructed a compactly supported biorthogonal wavelet that approximates the modulation transfer function(MTF) of human visual system in the frequency domain.In this paper,we evaluate performance of the constructed wavelet,and compare it with the widely used Daubechies9-7,Daubechies 9-3 and GBCW-9-7 wavelets.The result shows that coding performance of the constructed wavelet is better than Daubechies9-3,and is competitive with Daubechies 9-7 and GBCW-9-7 wavelets.Like Dauechies 9-3 wavelet,the filter coefficients of the constructed waveklet are all dyadic fractions,and the tap is less than Daubechies 9-7 and GBOW 9-7,It has an attractive feature in the realization of discrete wavelet transform.

  19. Relationship between Human Aging Muscle and Oxidative System Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Doria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a complex process that in muscle is usually associated with a decrease in mass, strength, and velocity of contraction. One of the most striking effects of ageing on muscle is known as sarcopenia. This inevitable biological process is characterized by a general decline in the physiological and biochemical functions of the major systems. At the cellular level, aging is caused by a progressive decline in mitochondrial function that results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by the addition of a single electron to the oxygen molecule. The aging process is characterized by an imbalance between an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species in the organism and the antioxidant defences as a whole. The goal of this review is to examine the results of existing studies on oxidative stress in aging human skeletal muscles, taking into account different physiological factors (sex, fibre composition, muscle type, and function.

  20. Human activity recognition based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Jose Antonio; Angelov, Plamen; Ledezma, Agapito; Sanchis, Araceli

    2010-10-01

    Environments equipped with intelligent sensors can be of much help if they can recognize the actions or activities of their users. If this activity recognition is done automatically, it can be very useful for different tasks such as future action prediction, remote health monitoring, or interventions. Although there are several approaches for recognizing activities, most of them do not consider the changes in how a human performs a specific activity. We present an automated approach to recognize daily activities from the sensor readings of an intelligent home environment. However, as the way to perform an activity is usually not fixed but it changes and evolves, we propose an activity recognition method based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

  1. Aerosol deposition in the human respiratory system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts were made to develop mathematical models for the deposition of aerosols in the human respiratory system. Expressions were obtained for the mean deposition efficiency for nasal inspiration, nasal expiration, and mouth inspiration. A determination was made of statistical properties associated with each deposition efficiency due to intersubject and intrasubject variabilities. Expressions were then derived for head deposition with combined nose and mouth breathing. In the lung, deposition is a result primarily of impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion. While there was no adequate model for impaction, several deposition formulae for sedimentation were derived as well as ones for diffusion. Studies were also made of the particle charge effect, as the electrostatic image force on a particle contributes to its deposition. There is, however, a threshold charge per particle below which the particle charge has no effect on deposition. Deposition data on ultrafine particles is scarce due to the difficulties in conducting proper experiments.

  2. Space Medicine in the Human System Integration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of integration of space medicine in the human system of lunar exploration. There is a review of historical precedence in reference to lunar surface operations. The integration process is reviewed in a chart which shows the steps from research to requirements development, requirements integration, design, verification, operations and using the lessons learned, giving more information and items for research. These steps are reviewed in view of specific space medical issues. Some of the testing of the operations are undertaken in an environment that is an analog to the exploration environment. Some of these analog environments are reviewed, and there is some discussion of the benefits of use of an analog environment in testing the processes that are derived.

  3. Skeletal muscle vasodilation during systemic hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-01-15

    In humans, the net effect of acute systemic hypoxia in quiescent skeletal muscle is vasodilation despite significant reflex increases in muscle sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. This vasodilation increases tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery to maintain tissue oxygen consumption. Although several mechanisms may be involved, we recently tested the roles of two endothelial-derived substances during conditions of sympathoadrenal blockade to isolate local vascular control mechanisms: nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs). Our findings indicate that 1) NO normally plays a role in regulating vascular tone during hypoxia independent of the PG pathway; 2) PGs do not normally contribute to vascular tone during hypoxia, however, they do affect vascular tone when NO is inhibited; 3) NO and PGs are not independently obligatory to observe hypoxic vasodilation when assessed as a response from rest to steady-state hypoxia; and 4) combined NO and PG inhibition abolishes hypoxic vasodilation in human skeletal muscle. When the stimulus is exacerbated via combined submaximal rhythmic exercise and systemic hypoxia to cause further red blood cell (RBC) deoxygenation, skeletal muscle blood flow is augmented compared with normoxic exercise via local dilator mechanisms to maintain oxygen delivery to active tissue. Data obtained in a follow-up study indicate that combined NO and PG inhibition during hypoxic exercise blunts augmented vasodilation and hyperemia compared with control (normoxic) conditions by ∼50%; however, in contrast to hypoxia alone, the response is not abolished, suggesting that other local substances are involved. Factors associated with greater RBC deoxygenation such as ATP release, or nitrite reduction to NO, or both likely play a role in regulating this response.

  4. Human Outer Solar System Exploration via Q-Thruster Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, B. Kent; White, Harold G.

    2014-01-01

    Propulsion technology development efforts at the NASA Johnson Space Center continue to advance the understanding of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QThruster), a form of electric propulsion. Through the use of electric and magnetic fields, a Q-thruster pushes quantum particles (electrons/positrons) in one direction, while the Qthruster recoils to conserve momentum. This principle is similar to how a submarine uses its propeller to push water in one direction, while the submarine recoils to conserve momentum. Based on laboratory results, it appears that continuous specific thrust levels of 0.4 - 4.0 N/kWe are achievable with essentially no onboard propellant consumption. To evaluate the potential of this technology, a mission analysis tool was developed utilizing the Generalized Reduced Gradient non-linear parameter optimization engine contained in the Microsoft Excel® platform. This tool allowed very rapid assessments of "Q-Ship" minimum time transfers from earth to the outer planets and back utilizing parametric variations in thrust acceleration while enforcing constraints on planetary phase angles and minimum heliocentric distances. A conservative Q-Thruster specific thrust assumption (0.4 N/kWe) combined with "moderate" levels of space nuclear power (1 - 2 MWe) and vehicle specific mass (45 - 55 kg/kWe) results in continuous milli-g thrust acceleration, opening up realms of human spaceflight performance completely unattainable by any current systems or near-term proposed technologies. Minimum flight times to Mars are predicted to be as low as 75 days, but perhaps more importantly new "retro-phase" and "gravity-augmented" trajectory shaping techniques were revealed which overcome adverse planetary phasing and allow virtually unrestricted departure and return opportunities. Even more impressively, the Jovian and Saturnian systems would be opened up to human exploration with round-trip times of 21 and 32 months respectively including 6 to 12 months of

  5. Psychosocial and Cultural Modeling in Human Computation Systems: A Gamification Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Haack, Jereme N.; Butner, R. Scott

    2013-11-20

    “Gamification”, the application of gameplay to real-world problems, enables the development of human computation systems that support decision-making through the integration of social and machine intelligence. One of gamification’s major benefits includes the creation of a problem solving environment where the influence of cognitive and cultural biases on human judgment can be curtailed through collaborative and competitive reasoning. By reducing biases on human judgment, gamification allows human computation systems to exploit human creativity relatively unhindered by human error. Operationally, gamification uses simulation to harvest human behavioral data that provide valuable insights for the solution of real-world problems.

  6. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-31

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  7. Autonomous facial recognition system inspired by human visual system based logarithmical image visualization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qianwen; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    Autonomous facial recognition system is widely used in real-life applications, such as homeland border security, law enforcement identification and authentication, and video-based surveillance analysis. Issues like low image quality, non-uniform illumination as well as variations in poses and facial expressions can impair the performance of recognition systems. To address the non-uniform illumination challenge, we present a novel robust autonomous facial recognition system inspired by the human visual system based, so called, logarithmical image visualization technique. In this paper, the proposed method, for the first time, utilizes the logarithmical image visualization technique coupled with the local binary pattern to perform discriminative feature extraction for facial recognition system. The Yale database, the Yale-B database and the ATT database are used for computer simulation accuracy and efficiency testing. The extensive computer simulation demonstrates the method's efficiency, accuracy, and robustness of illumination invariance for facial recognition.

  8. Addressing Human System Risks to Future Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, W. H.; Francisco, D. R.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is contemplating future human exploration missions to destinations beyond low Earth orbit, including the Moon, deep-space asteroids, and Mars. While we have learned much about protecting crew health and performance during orbital space flight over the past half-century, the challenges of these future missions far exceed those within our current experience base. To ensure success in these missions, we have developed a Human System Risk Board (HSRB) to identify, quantify, and develop mitigation plans for the extraordinary risks associated with each potential mission scenario. The HSRB comprises research, technology, and operations experts in medicine, physiology, psychology, human factors, radiation, toxicology, microbiology, pharmacology, and food sciences. Methods: Owing to the wide range of potential mission characteristics, we first identified the hazards to human health and performance common to all exploration missions: altered gravity, isolation/confinement, increased radiation, distance from Earth, and hostile/closed environment. Each hazard leads to a set of risks to crew health and/or performance. For example the radiation hazard leads to risks of acute radiation syndrome, central nervous system dysfunction, soft tissue degeneration, and carcinogenesis. Some of these risks (e.g., acute radiation syndrome) could affect crew health or performance during the mission, while others (e.g., carcinogenesis) would more likely affect the crewmember well after the mission ends. We next defined a set of design reference missions (DRM) that would span the range of exploration missions currently under consideration. In addition to standard (6-month) and long-duration (1-year) missions in low Earth orbit (LEO), these DRM include deep space sortie missions of 1 month duration, lunar orbital and landing missions of 1 year duration, deep space journey and asteroid landing missions of 1 year duration, and Mars orbital and landing missions of 3 years duration. We then

  9. Thermal vision based intelligent system for human detection and tracking in mobile robot control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirić Ivan T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the authors in thermal vision based mobile robot control. The most important segment of the high level control loop of mobile robot platform is an intelligent real-time algorithm for human detection and tracking. Temperature variations across same objects, air flow with different temperature gradients, reflections, person overlap while crossing each other, and many other non-linearities, uncertainty and noise, put challenges in thermal image processing and therefore the need of computationally intelligent algorithms for obtaining the efficient performance from human motion tracking system. The main goal was to enable mobile robot platform or any technical system to recognize the person in indoor environment, localize it and track it with accuracy high enough to allow adequate human-machine interaction. The developed computationally intelligent algorithms enables robust and reliable human detection and tracking based on neural network classifier and autoregressive neural network for time series prediction. Intelligent algorithm used for thermal image segmentation gives accurate inputs for classification. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR35005

  10. Subject,Object and Target Systems of Rural Human Resource Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    From subject,object and target subsystems,we analyze the rural human resource development system.The subject system includes government,education and training organizations,society,and rural human resource itself.Different development subject bears different responsibility.Object system includes farmers engaged in farming,farmer workers,rural unemployed people,rural students,rural left-behind people,and other people in rural areas.Different development object has different features.Development target system includes raising quality of rural human resource,keeping reasonable population size,optimizing structure of rural human resource,and improving vitality of rural human resource,etc.

  11. Solar Power System Evaluated for the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    2000-01-01

    The electric power system is a crucial element of any mission for the human exploration of the Martian surface. The bulk of the power generated will be delivered to crew life support systems, extravehicular activity suits, robotic vehicles, and predeployed in situ resource utilization (ISRU) equipment. In one mission scenario, before the crew departs for Mars, the ISRU plant operates for 435 days producing liquefied methane and oxygen for ascent-stage propellants and water for crew life support. About 200 days after ISRU production is completed, the crew arrives for a 500-day surface stay. In this scenario, the power system must operate for a total of 1130 days (equivalent to 1100 Martian "sols"), providing 400 MW-hr of energy to the ISRU plant and up to 18 kW of daytime user power. A photovoltaic power-generation system with regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage has been under study at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The conceptual power system is dominated by the 4000- m2 class photovoltaic array that is deployed orthogonally as four tent structures, each approximately 5 m on a side and 100-m long. The structures are composed of composite members deployed by an articulating mast, an inflatable boom, or rover vehicles, and are subsequently anchored to the ground. Array panels consist of thin polymer membranes with thin-film solar cells. The array is divided into eight independent electrical sections with solar cell strings operating at 600 V. Energy storage is provided by regenerative fuel cells based on hydrogen-oxygen proton exchange membrane technology. Hydrogen and oxygen reactants are stored in gaseous form at 3000 psi, and the water produced is stored at 14.7 psi. The fuel cell operating temperature is maintained by a 40-m2 deployable pumped-fluid loop radiator that uses water as the working fluid. The power management and distribution (PMAD) architecture features eight independent, regulated 600-Vdc channels. Power management and

  12. A new microcontroller-based human brain hypothermia system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapidere, Metin; Ahiska, Raşit; Güler, Inan

    2005-10-01

    Many studies show that artificial hypothermia of brain in conditions of anesthesia with the rectal temperature lowered down to 33 degrees C produces pronounced prophylactic effect protecting the brain from anoxia. Out of the methods employed now in clinical practice for reducing the oxygen consumption by the cerebral tissue, the most efficacious is craniocerebral hypothermia (CCH). It is finding even more extensive application in cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, neurorenimatology and many other fields of medical practice. In this study, a microcontroller-based designed human brain hypothermia system (HBHS) is designed and constructed. The system is intended for cooling and heating the brain. HBHS consists of a thermoelectric hypothermic helmet, a control and a power unit. Helmet temperature is controlled by 8-bit PIC16F877 microcontroller which is programmed using MPLAB editor. Temperature is converted to 10-bit digital and is controlled automatically by the preset values which have been already entered in the microcontroller. Calibration is controlled and the working range is tested. Temperature of helmet is controlled between -5 and +46 degrees C by microcontroller, with the accuracy of +/-0.5 degrees C.

  13. Characterization of human antiviral adaptive immune responses during hepatotropic virus infection in HLA-transgenic human immune system mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Horwitz, Joshua A; Labitt, Rachael N; Donovan, Bridget M; Vega, Kevin; Budell, William C; Koo, Gloria C; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Humanized mice have emerged as a promising model to study human immunity in vivo. Although they are susceptible to many pathogens exhibiting an almost exclusive human tropism, human immune responses to infection remain functionally impaired. It has recently been demonstrated that the expression of HLA molecules improves human immunity to lymphotropic virus infections in humanized mice. However, little is known about the extent of functional human immune responses in nonlymphoid tissues, such as in the liver, and the role of HLA expression in this context. Therefore, we analyzed human antiviral immunity in humanized mice during a hepatotropic adenovirus infection. We compared immune responses of conventional humanized NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient (NSG) mice to those of a novel NOD SCID IL-2Rγ-deficient strain transgenic for both HLA-A*0201 and a chimeric HLA-DR*0101 molecule. Using a firefly luciferase-expressing adenovirus and in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we demonstrate a human T cell-dependent partial clearance of adenovirus-infected cells from the liver of HLA-transgenic humanized mice. This correlated with liver infiltration and activation of T cells, as well as the detection of Ag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. When infected with a hepatitis C virus NS3-expressing adenovirus, HLA-transgenic humanized mice mounted an HLA-A*0201-restricted hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD8(+) T cell response. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the generation of partial functional antiviral immune responses against a hepatotropic pathogen in humanized HLA-transgenic mice. The adenovirus reporter system used in our study may serve as simple in vivo method to evaluate future strategies for improving human intrahepatic immune responses in humanized mice.

  14. Representing humans in system security models: An actor-network approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    System models to assess the vulnerability of information systems to security threats typically represent a physical infrastructure (buildings) and a digital infrastructure (computers and networks), in combination with an attacker traversing the system while acquiring credentials. Other humans are ge

  15. Representing humans in system security models: An actor-network approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter

    2011-01-01

    System models to assess the vulnerability of information systems to security threats typically represent a physical infrastructure (buildings) and a digital infrastructure (computers and networks), in combination with an attacker traversing the system while acquiring credentials. Other humans are ge

  16. Systems lifecycle cost-effectiveness the commercial, design and human factors of systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The pressure to minimize expenditure and provide value for money from reduced resources means that complex projects have to encompass a wide range of often conflicting issues and interests. Systems Lifecycle Cost-Effectiveness shows how to manage the difficulties that can arise. Massimo Pica presents a variety of models for calculating cost, benefits and risk in projects, and explains how the human factors associated with a system's design and consequent value are as important as the technical costs associated with its construction or creation. This comprehensive text can be used by students,

  17. Integrated modeling of natural and human systems - problems and initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, H.; Giles, J.; Gunnink, J.; Hughes, A.; Moore, R. V.; Peach, D.

    2009-12-01

    Governments and their executive agencies across the world are facing increasing pressure to make decisions about the management of resources in light of population growth and environmental change. In the UK and the Netherlands, for example, groundwater is becoming a scarce resource for large parts of its most densely populated areas. At the same time river and groundwater flooding resulting from high rainfall events are increasing in scale and frequency and sea level rise is threatening the defences of coastal cities. There is also a need for affordable housing, improved transport infrastructure and waste disposal as well as sources of renewable energy and sustainable food production. These challenges can only be resolved if solutions are based on sound scientific evidence. Although we have knowledge and understanding of many individual processes in the natural sciences it is clear that a single science discipline is unable to answer the questions and their inter-relationships. Modern science increasingly employs computer models to simulate the natural, economic and human system. Management and planning requires scenario modelling, forecasts and “predictions”. Although the outputs are often impressive in terms of apparent accuracy and visualisation, they are inherently not suited to simulate the response to feedbacks from other models of the earth system, such as the impact of human actions. Geological Survey Organisations (GSO) are increasingly employing advances in Information Technology to visualise and improve their understanding of geological systems. Instead of 2 dimensional paper maps and reports many GSOs now produce 3 dimensional geological framework models and groundwater flow models as their standard output. Additionally the British Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of the Netherlands have developed standard routines to link geological data to groundwater models, but these models are only aimed at solving one specific part of the earth

  18. Assessment of three human in vitro systems in the generation of major human excretory and circulating metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvie, Deepak; Obach, R Scott; Kang, Ping; Prakash, Chandra; Loi, Cho-Ming; Hurst, Susan; Nedderman, Angus; Goulet, Lance; Smith, Evan; Bu, Hai-Zhi; Smith, Dennis A

    2009-02-01

    An early understanding of key metabolites of drugs is crucial in drug discovery and development. As a result, several in vitro models typically derived from liver are frequently used to study drug metabolism. It is presumed that these in vitro systems provide an accurate view of the potential in vivo metabolites and metabolic pathways. However, no formal analysis has been conducted to validate their use. The goal of the present study was to conduct a comprehensive analysis to assess if the three commonly used in vitro systems, pooled human liver microsomes, liver S-9 fraction, and hepatocytes, adequately predict in vivo metabolic profiles for drugs. The second objective was to compare the overall capabilities of these three systems to generate in vivo metabolic profiles. Twenty-seven compounds in the Pfizer database and 21 additional commercially available compounds of diverse structure and routes of metabolism for which the human ADME data was available were analyzed in this study to assess the performance of the in vitro systems. The results suggested that all three systems reliably predicted human excretory and circulating metabolite profiles. Furthermore, the success in predicting primary metabolites and metabolic pathways was high (>70%), but the predictability of secondary metabolites was less reliable in the three systems. Thus, the analysis provides sufficient confidence in using in vitro systems to reliably produce primary in vivo human metabolites and supports their application in early discovery to identify metabolic spots for optimization of metabolic liabilities anticipated in humans in vivo. However, the in vitro systems cannot solely mitigate the risk of disproportionate circulating metabolites in humans and may need to be supplemented with metabolic profiling of plasma samples from first-in-human studies or early human radiolabeled studies.

  19. human immunodeficiency virus and the nervous system: an update ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    recognition in. 1981. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrolentivirus causing ... syndrome (AIDS) and eventual death. The origin of HIV in humans lies in its evolution from the simian ... brain barrier (BBB) or the blood CSF.

  20. Building a Human Resource System. Marketing Community Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Karen S.

    1990-01-01

    The coordination of human resources is a fundamental part of the community education process. It may also be the community educator's most effective marketing strategy. Four models for human resource programs are informational, participatory, advisory, and educational. (JOW)

  1. System Ethics: New Approach to Guarantee Human Rights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE YING

    2011-01-01

    @@ Respect for and protection of human rights is an issue of common concern nowadays.In 2004, China added "The state respects and protects human rights"to Article 33 of its Constitution in the form of amendment.

  2. Research Workshop on Expert Judgment, Human Error, and Intelligent Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Barry G.

    1993-01-01

    This workshop brought together 20 computer scientists, psychologists, and human-computer interaction (HCI) researchers to exchange results and views on human error and judgment bias. Human error is typically studied when operators undertake actions, but judgment bias is an issue in thinking rather than acting. Both topics are generally ignored by the HCI community, which is interested in designs that eliminate human error and bias tendencies. As a result, almost no one at the workshop had met...

  3. Metric Selection for Evaluation of Human Supervisory Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Conceptual model of human-supervisory control (modified from Pina , Cummings et al. (2008...42  4 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Human supervisory control metric classes ( Pina , Donmez...literature in terms of human- autonomous vehicle interaction (Crandall & Cummings, 2007; Olsen & Goodrich, 2003; Pina , Cummings, Crandall, & Della Penna

  4. A Human Factors Perspective on Alarm System Research and Development 2000 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curt Braun; John Grimes; Eric Shaver; Ronald Boring (Principal Investigator)

    2011-09-01

    By definition, alarms serve to notify human operators of out-of-parameter conditions that could threaten equipment, the environment, product quality and, of course, human life. Given the complexities of industrial systems, human machine interfaces, and the human operator, the understanding of how alarms and humans can best work together to prevent disaster is continually developing. This review examines advances in alarm research and development from 2000 to 2010 and includes the writings of trade professionals, engineering and human factors researchers, and standards organizations with the goal of documenting advances in alarms system design, research, and implementation.

  5. Design Concept of Human Interface System for Risk Monitoring for Proactive Trouble Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidekazu, Yoshikawa; Ming, Yang; Zhijian, Zhang

    2011-01-01

    A new concept is first proposed of distributed human interface system to integrate both operation and maintenance of nuclear power plant. Then, a method of constructing human interface system is introduced by integrating the plant knowledge database system based on Multilevel Flow Model (MFM) wit...

  6. A Model-based Framework for Risk Assessment in Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems. This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions. Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  7. 2D and 3D Mechanobiology in Human and Nonhuman Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kristin M; Islam, Md Mydul; LeDuc, Philip R; Steward, Robert

    2016-08-31

    Mechanobiology involves the investigation of mechanical forces and their effect on the development, physiology, and pathology of biological systems. The human body has garnered much attention from many groups in the field, as mechanical forces have been shown to influence almost all aspects of human life ranging from breathing to cancer metastasis. Beyond being influential in human systems, mechanical forces have also been shown to impact nonhuman systems such as algae and zebrafish. Studies of nonhuman and human systems at the cellular level have primarily been done in two-dimensional (2D) environments, but most of these systems reside in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Furthermore, outcomes obtained from 3D studies are often quite different than those from 2D studies. We present here an overview of a select group of human and nonhuman systems in 2D and 3D environments. We also highlight mechanobiological approaches and their respective implications for human and nonhuman physiology.

  8. Human-rating Automated and Robotic Systems - (How HAL Can Work Safely with Astronauts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroff, Lynn; Dischinger, Charlie; Fitts, David

    2009-01-01

    Long duration human space missions, as planned in the Vision for Space Exploration, will not be possible without applying unprecedented levels of automation to support the human endeavors. The automated and robotic systems must carry the load of routine housekeeping for the new generation of explorers, as well as assist their exploration science and engineering work with new precision. Fortunately, the state of automated and robotic systems is sophisticated and sturdy enough to do this work - but the systems themselves have never been human-rated as all other NASA physical systems used in human space flight have. Our intent in this paper is to provide perspective on requirements and architecture for the interfaces and interactions between human beings and the astonishing array of automated systems; and the approach we believe necessary to create human-rated systems and implement them in the space program. We will explain our proposed standard structure for automation and robotic systems, and the process by which we will develop and implement that standard as an addition to NASA s Human Rating requirements. Our work here is based on real experience with both human system and robotic system designs; for surface operations as well as for in-flight monitoring and control; and on the necessities we have discovered for human-systems integration in NASA's Constellation program. We hope this will be an invitation to dialog and to consideration of a new issue facing new generations of explorers and their outfitters.

  9. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen.

  10. An Integrated Human System Interaction (HSI) Framework for Human-Agent Team Collaboration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA commitment to a human presence in space exploration results in the interaction of humans with challenging environments in space, on lunar, and on planetary...

  11. Characterization of Evidence for Human System Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Rossi, M.; Riccio, G.; Romero, E.; Francisco, D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the kinds of evidence available and using the best evidence to answer a question is critical to evidenced-based decision-making, and it requires synthesis of evidence from a variety of sources. Categorization of human system risks in spaceflight, in particular, focuses on how well the integration and interpretation of all available evidence informs the risk statement that describes the relationship between spaceflight hazards and an outcome of interest. A mature understanding and categorization of these risks requires: 1) sufficient characterization of risk, 2) sufficient knowledge to determine an acceptable level of risk (i.e., a standard), 3) development of mitigations to meet the acceptable level of risk, and 4) identification of factors affecting generalizability of the evidence to different design reference missions. In the medical research community, evidence is often ranked by increasing confidence in findings gleaned from observational and experimental research (e.g., "levels of evidence"). However, an approach based solely on aspects of experimental design is problematic in assessing human system risks for spaceflight. For spaceflight, the unique challenges and opportunities include: (1) The independent variables in most evidence are the hazards of spaceflight, such as space radiation or low gravity, which cannot be entirely duplicated in terrestrial (Earth-based) analogs, (2) Evidence is drawn from multiple sources including medical and mission operations, Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH), spaceflight research (LSDA), and relevant environmental & terrestrial databases, (3) Risk metrics based primarily on LSAH data are typically derived from available prevalence or incidence data, which may limit rigorous interpretation, (4) The timeframe for obtaining adequate spaceflight sample size (n) is very long, given the small population, (5) Randomized controlled trials are unattainable in spaceflight, (6) Collection of personal and

  12. Accidental human laser retinal injuries from military laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Bruce E.; Zwick, Harry; Molchany, Jerome W.; Lund, David J.; Gagliano, Donald A.

    1996-04-01

    The time course of the ophthalmoscopic and functional consequences of eight human laser accident cases from military laser systems is described. All patients reported subjective vision loss with ophthalmoscopic evidence of retinal alteration ranging from vitreous hemorrhage to retinal burn. Five of the cases involved single or multiple exposures to Q-switched neodymium radiation at close range whereas the other three incidents occur over large ranges. Most exposures were within 5 degrees of the foveola, yet none directly in the foveola. High contrast visual activity improved with time except in the cases with progressive retinal fibrosis between lesion sites or retinal hole formation encroaching the fovea. In one patient the visual acuity recovered from 20/60 at one week to 20/25 in four months with minimal central visual field loss. Most cases showed suppression of high and low spatial frequency contrast sensitivity. Visual field measurements were enlarged relative to ophthalmoscopic lesion size observations. Deep retinal scar formation and retinal traction were evident in two of the three cases with vitreous hemorrhage. In one patient, nerve fiber layer damage to the papillo-macular bundle was clearly evident. Visual performance measured with a pursuit tracking task revealed significant performance loss relative to normal tracking observers even in cases where acuity returned to near normal levels. These functional and performance deficits may reflect secondary effects of parafoveal laser injury.

  13. Human-Robot Interface over the Web Based Intelligent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desa Hazry

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research extends the capability for the new technology platform by Remote Data Inspection System (RDIS server from Furukawa Co., Ltd. Enabling the integration of standard Hypertext Markup Language (HTML programming and RDIS tag programming to create a user-friendly “point-and-click” web-based control mechanism. The integration allows the users to send commands to mobile robot over the Internet. Web-based control enables human to extend his action and intelligence to remote locations. Three mechanisms for web-based controls are developed: Manual remote control, continuous operation event and autonomous navigational control. In the manual remote control the user is fully responsible for the robot action and the robot do not use any sophisticated algorithms. The continuous operation event is the extension of the basic movement of a manual remote control mechanism. In the autonomous navigation control, the user has more flexibility to tell the robot to carry out specific tasks. Using this method, mobile robot can be controlled via the web, from any places connected to the network without constructing specific infrastructures for communication.

  14. Fate of human viruses in groundwater recharge systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Landry, E.F.

    1980-03-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to determine the ability of a well-managed tertiary effluent-recharge system to return virologically acceptable water to the groundwater aquifer. The study assessed the quality of waters renovated by indigenous recharge operations and investigated a number of virus-soil interrelationships. The elucidation of the interactions led to the establishment of basin operating criteria for optimizing virus removal. Raw influents, chlorinated tertiary effluents, and renovated wastewater from the aquifer directly beneath a uniquely designed recharge test basin were assayed on a weekly basis for the presence of human enteroviruses and coliform bacteria. High concentrations of viruses were routinely isolated from influents but were isolated only on four occasions from tertiary-treated sewage effluents. In spite of the high quality effluent being recharged, viruses were isolated from the groundwater observation well, indicating their ability to penetrate the unsaturated zone. Results of poliovirus seeding experiments carried out in the test basin clearly indicated the need to operate recharge basins at low (e.g. 1 cm/h) infiltration rates in areas having soil types similar to those found at the study site. The method selected for reducing the test basin infiltration rate involved clogging the basin surface with settled organic material from highly turbid effluent. Alternative methods for slowing infiltration rates are discussed in the text.

  15. Prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 infection in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Shipeng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For decades, scientists have tried to understand the environmental factors involved in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, in which viral infections was included. Previous studies have identified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV to incite SLE. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, another member of the gammaherpesvirus family, shares a lot in common with EBV. The characteristics of HHV-8 make it a well-suited candidate to trigger SLE. Results In the present study, serum samples from patients (n = 108 with diagnosed SLE and matched controls (n = 122 were collected, and the prevalence of HHV-8 was compared by a virus-specific nested PCR and a whole virus enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA. There was significant difference in the prevalence of HHV-8 DNA between SLE patients and healthy controls (11 of 107 vs 1 of 122, p = 0.001; significant difference was also found in the detection of HHV-8 antibodies (19 of 107 vs 2 of 122, p We also detected the antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1. Both patients and controls showed high seroprevalence with no significant difference (106 of 107 vs 119 of 122, p = 0.625. Conclusion Our finding indicated that there might be an association between HHV-8 and the development of SLE.

  16. Human fetal bone cells in delivery systems for bone engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Diene M H; Scaletta, Corinne; Jaccoud, Sandra; Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Pioletti, Dominique P; Jaques, Bertrand; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to culture human fetal bone cells (dedicated cell banks of fetal bone derived from 14 week gestation femurs) within both hyaluronic acid gel and collagen foam, to compare the biocompatibility of both matrices as potential delivery systems for bone engineering and particularly for oral application. Fetal bone cell banks were prepared from one organ donation and cells were cultured for up to 4 weeks within hyaluronic acid (Mesolis®) and collagen foams (TissueFleece®). Cell survival and differentiation were assessed by cell proliferation assays and histology of frozen sections stained with Giemsa, von Kossa and ALP at 1, 2 and 4 weeks of culture. Within both materials, fetal bone cells could proliferate in three-dimensional structure at ∼70% capacity compared to monolayer culture. In addition, these cells were positive for ALP and von Kossa staining, indicating cellular differentiation and matrix production. Collagen foam provides a better structure for fetal bone cell delivery if cavity filling is necessary and hydrogels would permit an injectable technique for difficult to treat areas. In all, there was high biocompatibility, cellular differentiation and matrix deposition seen in both matrices by fetal bone cells, allowing for easy cell delivery for bone stimulation in vivo. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Generation of human antigen-specific monoclonal IgM antibodies using vaccinated "human immune system" mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D Becker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Passive transfer of antibodies not only provides immediate short-term protection against disease, but also can be exploited as a therapeutic tool. However, the 'humanization' of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs is a time-consuming and expensive process that has the inherent drawback of potentially altering antigenic specificity and/or affinity. The immortalization of human B cells represents an alternative for obtaining human mAbs, but relies on the availability of biological samples from vaccinated individuals or convalescent patients. In this work we describe a novel approach to generate fully human mAbs by combining a humanized mouse model with a new B cell immortalization technique. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After transplantation with CD34+CD38⁻ human hematopoietic progenitor cells, BALB/c Rag2⁻/⁻IL-2Rγc⁻/⁻ mice acquire a human immune system and harbor B cells with a diverse IgM repertoire. "Human Immune System" mice were then immunized with two commercial vaccine antigens, tetanus toxoid and hepatitis B surface antigen. Sorted human CD19+CD27+ B cells were retrovirally transduced with the human B cell lymphoma (BCL-6 and BCL-XL genes, and subsequently cultured in the presence of CD40-ligand and IL-21. This procedure allows generating stable B cell receptor-positive B cells that secrete immunoglobulins. We recovered stable B cell clones that produced IgM specific for tetanus toxoid and the hepatitis B surface antigen, respectively. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This work provides the proof-of-concept for the usefulness of this novel method based on the immunization of humanized mice for the rapid generation of human mAbs against a wide range of antigens.

  18. MARIKA - A model revision system using qualitative analysis of simulations. [of human orientation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groleau, Nicolas; Frainier, Richard; Colombano, Silvano; Hazelton, Lyman; Szolovits, Peter

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes portions of a novel system called MARIKA (Model Analysis and Revision of Implicit Key Assumptions) to automatically revise a model of the normal human orientation system. The revision is based on analysis of discrepancies between experimental results and computer simulations. The discrepancies are calculated from qualitative analysis of quantitative simulations. The experimental and simulated time series are first discretized in time segments. Each segment is then approximated by linear combinations of simple shapes. The domain theory and knowledge are represented as a constraint network. Incompatibilities detected during constraint propagation within the network yield both parameter and structural model alterations. Interestingly, MARIKA diagnosed a data set from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Vestibular Laboratory as abnormal though the data was tagged as normal. Published results from other laboratories confirmed the finding. These encouraging results could lead to a useful clinical vestibular tool and to a scientific discovery system for space vestibular adaptation.

  19. Personal values and value systems of humanities students and workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Křeménková

    2015-01-01

    = .433.Subsequently we analyzed the preference of values depending on the student´s school results. Pearson’s ?2analyses indicated that there si no significant differences among students divided into groups according to the school results, ?2 (12 = 10.695, p = .555. Finally we analyzed the preference of values depending on the type of work. Pearson’s ?2analyses indicated that there si no significant differences among workers divided into groups according to the type of work, ?2 (12 = 12.456, p = .410. Discussion: Analysis confirmed differences in the preference of values depending on the gender and type of employment. These correspond with the results of earlier studies (cf. Rokeach, 1973; Broek & Moor, 1994; Inglehart, 1997; Hitlin & Piliavin, 2004; Schwartz & Rubel-Lifschitz, 2005, 2009; Schwartz, 2006; Hofmann-Towfigh, 2007. It appears that differences in the values ranking in relation to gender are conditioned by various social conditions, education and individual experiences. The last two research questions were focused on the preference of values depending on the study results and the type of employment. In both cases, the mentioned groups showed no significant differences. Thus, we assume that these factors do not affect the preference of specific values. Value orientation is thus more likely to be tied to a deeper personal characteristics or external determinants in socialization. The study results, as well as the choice of a particular job has probably been effected by different motivational factors than those who activate behavior in the direction of preference selected values. Conclussion: The concept of values is still an important issue in contemporary psychology. Although today's Western society is very focused on performance and the current trend tends to support other than the humanities, we believe that the analysis of the structure of values and value system of the humanities is also important because of the large number of students and staff

  20. It is time to talk about people: a human-centered healthcare system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgi Lea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Examining vulnerabilities within our current healthcare system we propose borrowing two tools from the fields of engineering and design: a Reason's system approach 1 and b User-centered design 23. Both approaches are human-centered in that they consider common patterns of human behavior when analyzing systems to identify problems and generate solutions. This paper examines these two human-centered approaches in the context of healthcare. We argue that maintaining a human-centered orientation in clinical care, research, training, and governance is critical to the evolution of an effective and sustainable healthcare system.

  1. It is time to talk about people: a human-centered healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searl, Meghan M; Borgi, Lea; Chemali, Zeina

    2010-11-26

    Examining vulnerabilities within our current healthcare system we propose borrowing two tools from the fields of engineering and design: a) Reason's system approach 1 and b) User-centered design 23. Both approaches are human-centered in that they consider common patterns of human behavior when analyzing systems to identify problems and generate solutions. This paper examines these two human-centered approaches in the context of healthcare. We argue that maintaining a human-centered orientation in clinical care, research, training, and governance is critical to the evolution of an effective and sustainable healthcare system.

  2. Signed language and human action processing: evidence for functional constraints on the human mirror-neuron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David P; Knapp, Heather Patterson

    2008-12-01

    In the quest to further understand the neural underpinning of human communication, researchers have turned to studies of naturally occurring signed languages used in Deaf communities. The comparison of the commonalities and differences between spoken and signed languages provides an opportunity to determine core neural systems responsible for linguistic communication independent of the modality in which a language is expressed. The present article examines such studies, and in addition asks what we can learn about human languages by contrasting formal visual-gestural linguistic systems (signed languages) with more general human action perception. To understand visual language perception, it is important to distinguish the demands of general human motion processing from the highly task-dependent demands associated with extracting linguistic meaning from arbitrary, conventionalized gestures. This endeavor is particularly important because theorists have suggested close homologies between perception and production of actions and functions of human language and social communication. We review recent behavioral, functional imaging, and neuropsychological studies that explore dissociations between the processing of human actions and signed languages. These data suggest incomplete overlap between the mirror-neuron systems proposed to mediate human action and language.

  3. When the human viral infectome and diseasome networks collide: towards a systems biology platform for the aetiology of human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Chassey Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection is a major challenge towards the discovery of new antiviral drugs and susceptibility factors of human diseases. New advances in the field are expected from systems-level modelling and integration of the incessant torrent of high-throughput "-omics" data. Results Here, we describe the Human Infectome protein interaction Network, a novel systems virology model of a virtual virus-infected human cell concerning 110 viruses. This in silico model was applied to comprehensively explore the molecular relationships between viruses and their associated diseases. This was done by merging virus-host and host-host physical protein-protein interactomes with the set of genes essential for viral replication and involved in human genetic diseases. This systems-level approach provides strong evidence that viral proteomes target a wide range of functional and inter-connected modules of proteins as well as highly central and bridging proteins within the human interactome. The high centrality of targeted proteins was correlated to their essentiality for viruses' lifecycle, using functional genomic RNAi data. A stealth-attack of viruses on proteins bridging cellular functions was demonstrated by simulation of cellular network perturbations, a property that could be essential in the molecular aetiology of some human diseases. Networking the Human Infectome and Diseasome unravels the connectivity of viruses to a wide range of diseases and profiled molecular basis of Hepatitis C Virus-induced diseases as well as 38 new candidate genetic predisposition factors involved in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conclusions The Human Infectome and Diseasome Networks described here provide a unique gateway towards the comprehensive modelling and analysis of the systems level properties associated to viral infection as well as candidate genes potentially involved in the molecular aetiology

  4. Bio-inspired nourishing relationship between human and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    This paper discuses on the adaptive systems in the near future from the viewpoint of nourishing relationship. Based on the assumption that the social system is so-called "system of systems," managing adaptive systems within the social system puts emphasis rather on relationship among systems than on each element of systems with the help of ecological approach to systems science. Inspired by natural biological systems, the relationship between adaptive systems and users are formalized as a mutual nurturing, then this paper discusses on principle of designing such relationship.

  5. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems: Human factors design methodology and integration plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, S. M.

    1980-06-01

    The nuclear waste retrieval system intended to be used for the removal of storage canisters (each canister containing a spent fuel rod assembly) located in an underground salt bed depository is discussed. The implementation of human factors engineering principles during the design and construction of the retrieval system facilities and equipment is reported. The methodology is structured around a basic system development effort involving preliminary development, equipment development, personnel subsystem development, and operational test and evaluation. Examples of application of the techniques in the analysis of human tasks, and equipment required in the removal of spent fuel canisters is provided. The framework for integrating human engineering with the rest of the system development effort is documented.

  6. Constellation Program Human-System Integration Requirements. Revision E, Nov. 19, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dory, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The Human-Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR) in this document drive the design of space vehicles, their systems, and equipment with which humans interface in the Constellation Program (CxP). These requirements ensure that the design of Constellation (Cx) systems is centered on the needs, capabilities, and limitations of the human. The HSIR provides requirements to ensure proper integration of human-to-system interfaces. These requirements apply to all mission phases, including pre-launch, ascent, Earth orbit, trans-lunar flight, lunar orbit, lunar landing, lunar ascent, Earth return, Earth entry, Earth landing, post-landing, and recovery. The Constellation Program must meet NASA's Agency-level human rating requirements, which are intended to ensure crew survival without permanent disability. The HSIR provides a key mechanism for achieving human rating of Constellation systems.

  7. Human-interpretable feature pattern classification system using learning classifier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Toktam; Kukenys, Ignas; Browne, Will N; Zhang, Mengjie

    2014-01-01

    Image pattern classification is a challenging task due to the large search space of pixel data. Supervised and subsymbolic approaches have proven accurate in learning a problem's classes. However, in the complex image recognition domain, there is a need for investigation of learning techniques that allow humans to interpret the learned rules in order to gain an insight about the problem. Learning classifier systems (LCSs) are a machine learning technique that have been minimally explored for image classification. This work has developed the feature pattern classification system (FPCS) framework by adopting Haar-like features from the image recognition domain for feature extraction. The FPCS integrates Haar-like features with XCS, which is an accuracy-based LCS. A major contribution of this work is that the developed framework is capable of producing human-interpretable rules. The FPCS system achieved 91 [Formula: see text] 1% accuracy on the unseen test set of the MNIST dataset. In addition, the FPCS is capable of autonomously adjusting the rotation angle in unaligned images. This rotation adjustment raised the accuracy of FPCS to 95%. Although the performance is competitive with equivalent approaches, this was not as accurate as subsymbolic approaches on this dataset. However, the benefit of the interpretability of rules produced by FPCS enabled us to identify the distribution of the learned angles-a normal distribution around [Formula: see text]-which would have been very difficult in subsymbolic approaches. The analyzable nature of FPCS is anticipated to be beneficial in domains such as speed sign recognition, where underlying reasoning and confidence of recognition needs to be human interpretable.

  8. Human Dimensions in Future Battle Command Systems: A Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    on technology pedagogy while emphasizing professional self- and group- developments and experiential training. The training and education courses...technology with the human in-the-loop and partly operational in the level of autonomy with no human involvement. In both cases, information in BCS... pedagogy while emphasizing professional self- and group- developments and experiential training. The training and education courses should be

  9. Space Flight Human System Standards (SFHSS). Volume 2; Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Factors" and Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Fitts, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the standards for space flight hardware based on human capabilities and limitations. The contents include: 1) Scope; 2) Applicable documents; 3) General; 4) Human Physical Characteristics and Capabilities; 5) Human Performance and Cognition; 6) Natural and Induced Environments; 7) Habitability Functions; 8) Architecture; 9) Hardware and Equipment; 10) Crew Interfaces; 11) Spacesuits; 12) Operatons: Reserved; 13) Ground Maintenance and Assembly: Reserved; 14) Appendix A-Reference Documents; 15) Appendix N-Acronyms and 16) Appendix C-Definition. Volume 2 is supported by the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH)s.

  10. Sperm protein 17 is expressed in human nervous system tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frezza Eldo E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human sperm protein 17 (Sp17 is a highly conserved protein that was originally isolated from a rabbit epididymal sperm membrane and testis membrane pellet. It has recently been included in the cancer/testis (CT antigen family, and shown to be expressed in multiple myeloma and ovarian cancer. We investigated its immunolocalisation in specimens of nervous system (NS malignancies, in order to establish its usefulness as a target for tumour-vaccine strategies. Methods The expression of Sp17 was assessed by means of a standardised immunohistochemical procedure [(mAb/antigen MF1/Sp17] in formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded surgical specimens of NS malignancies, including 28 neuroectodermal primary tumours (6 astrocytomas, 16 glioblastoma multiforme, 5 oligodendrogliomas, and 1 ependymoma, 25 meningeal tumours, and five peripheral nerve sheath tumours (4 schwannomas, and 1 neurofibroma,. Results A number of neuroectodermal (21% and meningeal tumours (4% were found heterogeneously immunopositive for Sp17. None of the peripheral nerve sheath tumours was immunopositive for Sp17. The expression pattern was heterogeneous in all of the positive samples, and did not correlate with the degree of malignancy. Conclusion The frequency of expression and non-uniform cell distribution of Sp17 suggest that it cannot be used as a unique immunotherapeutic target in NS cancer. However, our results do show the immunolocalisation of Sp17 in a proportion of NS tumour cells, but not in their non-pathological counterparts. The emerging complex function of Sp17 makes further studies necessary to clarify the link between it and immunopositive cells.

  11. A Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) Examination of Commercial Vessel Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    experienced workers, such as in an apprenticeship . The amount of conscious decision- making or cognitive thinking is higher than in rule-based...human-machine interaction : an approach to cognitive engineering . North-Holland: Elsevier Science. Rasmussen, J. (1983). Skills, rules, and... Engineering HFWG Human Factors Working Group HSI Human Systems Integration IMO International Maritime Organization IIC Investigator-in-Charge

  12. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV ope

  13. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV ope

  14. Experience in system design for human-robot teaming in urban search & rescue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Janíček, M.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Zender, H.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Neerincx, M.A.; Diggelen, J. van; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Svoboda, T.; Petriček, T.; Pirri, F.; Giannni, M.; Papadakis, P.; Sinha, A.; Balmer, P.; Tomatis, N.; WOrst, R.; Linder, T.; Surmann, H.; Tretyakov, V.; Corrao, S.; Pratzler-Wanczura, S.; Sulk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes experience with applying a user-centric design methodology in developing systems for human-robot teaming in Urban Search & Rescue. A human-robot team consists of several robots (rovers/UGVs, microcopter/UAVs), several humans at an off-site command post (mission commander, UGV

  15. A conceptual connectivity framework for understanding geomorphic change in human-impacted fluvial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöppl, Ronald; Keesstra, Saskia; Maroulis, Jerry

    2017-04-01

    Human-induced landscape change is difficult to predict due to the complexity inherent in both geomorphic and social systems as well as due to emerging coupling relationships between them. To better understand system complexity and system response to change, connectivity has become an important research paradigm within various disciplines including geomorphology, hydrology and ecology. With the proposed conceptual connectivity framework on geomorphic change in human-impacted fluvial systems a cautionary note is flagged regarding the need (i) to include and to systematically conceptualise the role of different types of human agency in altering connectivity relationships in geomorphic systems and (ii) to integrate notions of human-environment interactions to connectivity concepts in geomorphology to better explain causes and trajectories of landscape change. Underpinned by case study examples, the presented conceptual framework is able to explain how geomorphic response of fluvial systems to human disturbance is determined by system-specific boundary conditions (incl. system history, related legacy effects and lag times), vegetation dynamics and human-induced functional relationships (i.e. feedback mechanisms) between the different spatial dimensions of connectivity. It is further demonstrated how changes in social systems can trigger a process-response feedback loop between social and geomorphic systems that further governs the trajectory of landscape change in coupled human-geomorphic systems.

  16. Hierarchical analytical and simulation modelling of human-machine systems with interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braginsky, M. Ya; Tarakanov, D. V.; Tsapko, S. G.; Tsapko, I. V.; Baglaeva, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The article considers the principles of building the analytical and simulation model of the human operator and the industrial control system hardware and software. E-networks as the extension of Petri nets are used as the mathematical apparatus. This approach allows simulating complex parallel distributed processes in human-machine systems. The structural and hierarchical approach is used as the building method for the mathematical model of the human operator. The upper level of the human operator is represented by the logical dynamic model of decision making based on E-networks. The lower level reflects psychophysiological characteristics of the human-operator.

  17. For a Socialist Theoretical System for Human Rights with Chinese Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU CHUNDE

    2011-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ.The Necessity and Feasibility for Developing a Socialist Theoretical System for Human Rights with Chinese Characteristics Development of such a system is needed to ensure success of the social transformation and transition ongoing up in China.

  18. Metrics for Systems Thinking in the Human Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    potential to contain systems thinking and thereby exhibit the characteristics required of good system-of- systems decision making . However, this...methodology is that grading a training corpus is a time- consuming and subjective process , and that larger training sets are required for larger and more...Dirichlet allocation, machine learning, natural language processing , systems approach, systems thinking, text analysis, topic model, unsupervised

  19. Homo ludens in the loop playful human computation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The human mind is incredible. It solves problems with ease that will elude machines even for the next decades. This book explores what happens when humans and machines work together to solve problems machines cannot yet solve alone. It explains how machines and computers can work together and how humans can have fun helping to face some of the most challenging problems of artificial intelligence. In this book, you will find designs for games that are entertaining and yet able to collect data to train machines for complex tasks such as natural language processing or image understanding. You wil

  20. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-18

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  1. Design of a New Audio Watermarking System Based on Human Auditory System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, D.H. [Maqtech Co., Ltd., (Korea); Shin, S.W.; Kim, J.W.; Choi, J.U. [Markany Co., Ltd., (Korea); Kim, D.Y. [Bucheon College, Bucheon (Korea); Kim, S.H. [The University of Seoul, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust digital copyright-protection technique based on the concept of human auditory system. First, we propose a watermarking technique that accepts the various attacks such as, time scaling, pitch shift, add noise and a lot of lossy compression such as MP3, AAC, WMA. Second, we implement audio PD(portable device) for copyright protection using proposed method. The proposed watermarking technique is developed using digital filtering technique. Being designed according to critical band of HAS(human auditory system), the digital filters embed watermark without nearly affecting audio quality. Before processing of digital filtering, wavelet transform decomposes the input audio signal into several signals that are composed of specific frequencies. Then, we embed watermark in the decomposed signal (0kHz-11kHz) by designed band-stop digital filter. Watermarking detection algorithm is implemented on audio PD(portable device). Proposed watermarking technology embeds 2bits information per 15 seconds. If PD detects watermark '11', which means illegal song, PD displays 'Illegal Song' message on LCD, skips the song and plays the next song. The implemented detection algorithm in PD requires 19 MHz computational power, 7.9kBytes ROM and 10kBytes RAM. The suggested technique satisfies SDMI(secure digital music initiative) requirements of platform3 based on ARM9E core. (author). 9 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Multi-modal human-machine interface of a telerobotic system for remote arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Haichao; Gao Hongming; Wu Lin; Zhang Guangjun

    2008-01-01

    In telerobotic system for remote welding, human-machine interface is one of the most important factor for enhancing capability and efftciency. This paper presents an architecture design of human-machine interface for welding telerobotic system: welding multi-modal human-machine interface. The human-machine interface integrated several control modes, which are namely shared control, teleteaching, supervisory control and local autonomous control. Space mouse, panoramic vision camera and graphics simulation system are also integrated into the human-machine interface for welding teleoperation. Finally, weld seam tracing and welding experiments of U-shape seam are performed by these control modes respectively. The results show that the system has better performance of human-machine interaction and complexity environment welding.

  3. Postures and Motions Library Development for Verification of Ground Crew Human Systems Integration Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mariea Dunn; Dischinger, Charles; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft and launch vehicle ground processing activities require a variety of unique human activities. These activities are being documented in a Primitive motion capture library. The Library will be used by the human factors engineering in the future to infuse real to life human activities into the CAD models to verify ground systems human factors requirements. As the Primitive models are being developed for the library the project has selected several current human factors issues to be addressed for the SLS and Orion launch systems. This paper explains how the Motion Capture of unique ground systems activities are being used to verify the human factors analysis requirements for ground system used to process the STS and Orion vehicles, and how the primitive models will be applied to future spacecraft and launch vehicle processing.

  4. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars

    2003-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, di...

  5. Personal values and value systems of humanities students and workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lucie Křeménková

    2015-01-01

    Problem: The aim of this paper is to analyze the value orientation of university students and workers in humanities and then determine possible differences between these groups in the context of branches...

  6. [Design and trial of computer test system for experiment courses of human parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua; Ling, Jin; Su, Shui-Lian; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Qiong-Jun

    2011-06-01

    Based on the traditional experimental test of human parasitology, a reform was conducted to avoid the shortage of specimens and a disclosure of test questions. An experimental test system of human parasitology based on client/server (C/S) structure was therefore developed. This practicable system can increase the efficiency and fairness of examination and reduce cost.

  7. Looking beyond - socialization tactics : The role of human resource systems in the socialization process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batistic, S.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research questions whether the association between socialization tactics and human resource systems has been properly explored. Based on theory, we present a framework that links socialization tactics and human resource systems for various groups of newcomers. In doing so, we contribute to

  8. A rapid algorithm for realistic human reaching and its use in a virtual reality system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Ann; Pandya, Abhilash; Goldsby, Michael; Maida, James

    1994-01-01

    The Graphics Analysis Facility (GRAF) at JSC has developed a rapid algorithm for computing realistic human reaching. The algorithm was applied to GRAF's anthropometrically correct human model and used in a 3D computer graphics system and a virtual reality system. The nature of the algorithm and its uses are discussed.

  9. Human NK cells of mice with reconstituted human immune system components require preactivation to acquire functional competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strowig, Till; Chijioke, Obinna; Carrega, Paolo; Arrey, Frida; Meixlsperger, Sonja; Rämer, Patrick C; Ferlazzo, Guido; Münz, Christian

    2010-11-18

    To investigate human natural killer (NK)-cell reactivity in vivo we have reconstituted human immune system components by transplantation of human hematopoietic progenitor cells into NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null) mice. We demonstrate here that this model allows the development of all NK-cell subsets that are also found in human adult peripheral and cord blood, including NKp46(+)CD56(-) NK cells. Similar to human cord blood, NK cells from these reconstituted mice require preactivation by interleukin-15 to reach the functional competence of human adult NK cells. Mainly the terminally differentiated CD16(+) NK cells demonstrate lower reactivity without this stimulation. After preactivation, both CD16(+) and CD16(-) NK cells efficiently produce interferon-γ and degranulate in response to stimulation with NK cell-susceptible targets, including K562 erythroleukemia cells. NK-cell lines, established from reconstituted mice, demonstrate cytotoxicity against this tumor cell line. Importantly, preactivation can as well be achieved by bystander cell maturation via poly I:C stimulation in vitro and injection of this maturation stimulus in vivo. Preactivation in vivo enhances killing of human leukocyte antigen class I negative tumor cells after their adoptive transfer. These data suggest that a functional, but resting, NK-cell compartment can be established in immune-compromised mice after human hematopoietic progenitor cell transfer.

  10. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Human factors design methodology and integration plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, S.M.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of the recommended activities and methods to be employed by a team of human factors engineers during the development of a nuclear waste retrieval system. This system, as it is presently conceptualized, is intended to be used for the removal of storage canisters (each canister containing a spent fuel rod assembly) located in an underground salt bed depository. This document, and the others in this series, have been developed for the purpose of implementing human factors engineering principles during the design and construction of the retrieval system facilities and equipment. The methodology presented has been structured around a basic systems development effort involving preliminary development, equipment development, personnel subsystem development, and operational test and evaluation. Within each of these phases, the recommended activities of the human engineering team have been stated, along with descriptions of the human factors engineering design techniques applicable to the specific design issues. Explicit examples of how the techniques might be used in the analysis of human tasks and equipment required in the removal of spent fuel canisters have been provided. Only those techniques having possible relevance to the design of the waste retrieval system have been reviewed. This document is intended to provide the framework for integrating human engineering with the rest of the system development effort. The activities and methodologies reviewed in this document have been discussed in the general order in which they will occur, although the time frame (the total duration of the development program in years and months) in which they should be performed has not been discussed.

  11. 3D and 4D atlas system of living human body structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, N; Takatsu, A; Hattori, A; Ezumi, T; Oda, S; Yanai, T; Tominaga, H

    1998-01-01

    A reference system for accessing anatomical information from a complete 3D structure of the whole body "living human", including 4D cardiac dynamics, was reconstructed with 3D and 4D data sets obtained from normal volunteers. With this system, we were able to produce a human atlas in which sectional images can be accessed from any part of the human body interactively by real-time image generation.

  12. Unmanned Aerial Systems: Air Force and Army Should Improve Strategic Human Capital Planning for Pilot Workforces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS Air Force and Army Should Improve Strategic Human Capital Planning for Pilot Workforces...Should Improve Strategic Human Capital Planning for Pilot Workforces What GAO Found The Air Force and the Army have not fully applied four of the five...key principles for effective strategic human capital planning for managing pilots of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) that are important for resolving

  13. The perspective crops for the bioregenerative human life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonskiy, Vadim; Polonskaya, Janna

    The perspective crops for the bioregenerative human life support systems V.I. Polonskiy, J.E. Polonskaya aKrasnoyarsk State Agrarian University, 660049, Krasnoyarsk, Russia In the nearest future the space missions will be too long. In this case it is necessary to provide the crew by vitamins, antioxidants, and water-soluble dietary fibers. These compounds will be produced by higher plants. There was not enough attention at present to increasing content of micronutrients in edible parts of crops candidates for CELSS. We suggested to add the new crops to this list. 1. Barley -is the best crop for including to food crops (wheat, rice, soybean). Many of the health effects of barley are connected to dietary fibers beta-glucan of barley grains. Bar-ley is the only seed from cereals including wheat with content of all eight tocopherols (vitamin E, important antioxidant). Barley grains contain much greater amounts of phenolic compounds (potential antioxidant activities) than other cereal grains. Considerable focus is on supplement-ing wheat-based breads with barley to introduce the inherent nutritional advantages of barley flour, currently only 20We have selected and tested during 5 generations two high productive barley lines -1-K-O and 25-K-O. Our investigations (special breeding program for improving grain quality of barley) are in progress. 2. Volatile crops. Young leaves and shoots of these crops are edible and have a piquant taste. A lot of organic volatile compounds, oils, vitamins, antioxidants are in their biomass. These micronutrients are useful for good appetite and health of the crew. We have investigated 11 species: basil (Ocimum basilicum), hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis), marjoram (Origanum majorana), sweet-Mary (Melissa officinalis), common thyme (Thymus vulgaris), creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum), summer savory (Satureja hortensis), catnip (Nepeta cataria), rue (Ruta graveolens), coriander (Coriandrum Ativum), sulfurwort (Levisticum officinale). These

  14. Renewable building energy systems and passive human comfort solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omer, Abdeen Mustafa [17 Juniper Court, Forest Road West, Nottingham NG7 4EU (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    With environmental protection posing as the number one global problem, man has no choice but to reduce his energy consumption. One way to accomplish this is to resort to passive and low-energy systems to maintain thermal comfort in buildings. The conventional and modern designs of wind towers can successfully be used in hot arid regions to maintain thermal comfort (with or without the use of ceiling fans) during all hours of the cooling season, or a fraction of it. Climatic design is one of the best approaches to reduce the energy cost in buildings. Proper design is the first step of defence against the stress of the climate. Buildings should be designed according to the climate of the site, reducing the need for mechanical heating or cooling. Hence maximum natural energy can be used for creating a pleasant environment inside the built envelope. Technology and industry progress in the last decade diffused electronic and informatics' devices in many human activities, and also in building construction. The utilisation and operating opportunities components, increase the reduction of heat losses by varying the thermal insulation, optimise the lighting distribution with louver screens and operate mechanical ventilation for coolness in indoor spaces. In addition to these parameters the intelligent envelope can act for security control and became an important part of the building domotic revolution. Application of simple passive cooling measure is effective in reducing the cooling load of buildings in hot and humid climates. Fourty-three percent reductions can be achieved using a combination of well-established technologies such as glazing, shading, insulation, and natural ventilation. More advanced passive cooling techniques such as roof pond, dynamic insulation, and evaporative water jacket need to be considered more closely. The building sector is a major consumer of both energy and materials worldwide, and that consumption is increasing. Most industrialised

  15. Informal Justice Systems: Charting a Course for Human Rights-Based Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrigan, Fergus; McKay, Anne Louise; Kristiansen, Annali;

    Providing accessible justice is a state obligation under international human rights standards, but this obligation does not require that all justice be provided through formal justice systems. If done in ways to respect and uphold human rights, the provision of justice through informal justice...... systems is not against human rights standards and can be a mechanism to enhance the fulfilment of human rights obligations by delivering accessible justice to individuals and communities where the formal justice system does not have the capacity or geographical reach. This study seeks to identify how...... engagement with informal justice systems can build greater respect and protection for human rights. It highlights the considerations that development partners should have when assessing whether to implement programmes involving informal justice systems, the primary consideration being that engagement...

  16. Programmable System on Chip Distributed Communication and Control Approach for Human Adaptive Mechanical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad A.M. Faudzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Communication and control are two main components in any Mechatronics system. They can be designed either by centralized or decentralized approach. Both approaches can be chosen based on application designed and specific requirements of the designer. In this study, decentralized or normally called distributed approach was selected to solved communication and control of a human adaptive mechanical system namely Intelligent Chair Tools (ICT. The ICT seating system is powered by thirty six intelligent pneumatic actuators to facilitate investigation of chair shapes from spring and damping effect of seating and backrest surface. Three studies are proposed from the sitting experiments namely chair shapes, chair spring and chair damping properties. Approach: PSoC microcontroller was selected based on its features of having configurable analog and digital blocks. Its flexible modules and programmable peripherals ease designer in designing the communication and control of ICT in improved and faster way. Three protocols of USB, SPI and I2C were used for the communication system of ICT using PSoC. Flow charts of each communication protocols algorithms were discussed. On the other hand, the control system used PSoC’s ADC and counter modules to read inputs of pressure and encoder respectively. PWM module is used to control the valve and data communication was achieved using I2C module. Block diagram of unified control was discussed for further understandings of the control algorithms. Results: The PSoC specification, development design and experimental evaluation of ICT system are presented and discussed. Three studies of chair shapes, chair spring property and chair damping property from sitting experiment were shown. Conclusion/Recommendations: The PSoC microcontroller selection was discussed and application of its distributed communication and control was successfully applied to ICT. This distributed approach can be applied to other

  17. Crew systems: integrating human and technical subsystems for the exploration of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, M. M.; Harrison, A. A.; Summit, J.

    1994-01-01

    Space exploration missions will require combining human and technical subsystems into overall "crew systems" capable of performing under the rigorous conditions of outer space. This report describes substantive and conceptual relationships among humans, intelligent machines, and communication systems, and explores how these components may be combined to complement and strengthen one another. We identify key research issues in the combination of humans and technology and examine the role of individual differences, group processes, and environmental conditions. We conclude that a crew system is, in effect, a social cyborg, a living system consisting of multiple individuals whose capabilities are extended by advanced technology.

  18. Safety Characteristics in System Application Software for Human Rated Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and its industry and international partners are embarking on a bold and inspiring development effort to design and build an exploration class space system. The space system is made up of the Orion system, the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) system. All are highly coupled together and dependent on each other for the combined safety of the space system. A key area of system safety focus needs to be in the ground and flight application software system (GFAS). In the development, certification and operations of GFAS, there are a series of safety characteristics that define the approach to ensure mission success. This paper will explore and examine the safety characteristics of the GFAS development.

  19. Dynamic systems and inferential information processing in human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Karl; Fink, Bernhard; Renninger, LeeAnn

    2002-12-01

    Research in human communication on an ethological basis is almost obsolete. The reasons for this are manifold and lie partially in methodological problems connected to the observation and description of behavior, as well as the nature of human behavior itself. In this chapter, we present a new, non-intrusive, technical approach to the analysis of human non-verbal behavior, which could help to solve the problem of categorization that plagues the traditional approaches. We utilize evolutionary theory to propose a new theory-driven methodological approach to the 'multi-unit multi-channel modulation' problem of human nonverbal communication. Within this concept, communication is seen as context-dependent (the meaning of a signal is adapted to the situation), as a multi-channel and a multi-unit process (a string of many events interrelated in 'communicative' space and time), and as related to the function it serves. Such an approach can be utilized to successfully bridge the gap between evolutionary psychological research, which focuses on social cognition adaptations, and human ethology, which describes every day behavior in an objective, systematic way.

  20. Human capital in the German urban system – Patterns of concentration and specialisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Growe

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the knowledge economy human capital plays a crucial role in various economic processes and thus also in spatial development. But human capital is an economic resource that is distributed unequally in space. Some regions show a higher density of human capital than others. This paper discusses questions relating to the spatial concentration and specialisation of human capital in the German urban system. Due to an increasing interest in human capital the questions are asked, where is human capital located in the German urban system and how does the distribution change over time. The paper relates to geographical theories of concentration and specialisation. It will be shown that human capital is a heterogeneous category containing different occupational groups showing different spatial patterns. Some display increasing spatial disparities; others are fairly balanced over space.

  1. An Integrated Human System Interaction (HSI) Framework for Human-Agent Team Collaboration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As space missions become more complex and as mission demands increase, robots, human-robot mixed initiative teams and software autonomy applications are needed to...

  2. Human factors programs for high-level radioactive waste handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pond, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Human Factors is the discipline concerned with the acquisition of knowledge about human capabilities and limitations, and the application of such knowledge to the design of systems. This paper discusses the range of human factors issues relevant to high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) management systems and, based on examples from other organizations, presents mechanisms through which to assure application of such expertise in the safe, efficient, and effective management and disposal of high-level waste. Additionally, specific attention is directed toward consideration of who might be classified as a human factors specialist, why human factors expertise is critical to the success of the HLRW management system, and determining when human factors specialists should become involved in the design and development process.

  3. Child human trafficking victims: challenges for the child welfare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Rowena; Berger Cardoso, Jodi

    2010-08-01

    Since the passing of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act in 2000 and its reauthorization by President George Bush in 2008, federal, state and community efforts in identifying and providing services for victims of human trafficking have significantly improved. However, most of the research and resources for trafficking victims have been directed towards adults rather than children. Researchers agree that there is a growing number of sexually exploited and trafficked children in the United States yet few programs emphasize the unique experiences and special needs of this population. This article examines commercial sexual exploitation of children; differentiates the needs and problems between child prostitution and victims of human trafficking; reviews and critiques current treatment practices; and summarizes challenges and successes in working with child victims of human trafficking, offering practice and policy recommendations.

  4. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics: combat performance-shaping factors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2006-01-01

    The US military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives. To support this goal, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has undertaken a program of HPM as an integral augmentation to its system-of-system (SoS) analytics capabilities. The previous effort, reported in SAND2005-6569, evaluated the effects of soldier cognitive fatigue on SoS performance. The current effort began with a very broad survey of any performance-shaping factors (PSFs) that also might affect soldiers performance in combat situations. The work included consideration of three different approaches to cognition modeling and how appropriate they would be for application to SoS analytics. This bulk of this report categorizes 47 PSFs into three groups (internal, external, and task-related) and provides brief descriptions of how each affects combat performance, according to the literature. The PSFs were then assembled into a matrix with 22 representative military tasks and assigned one of four levels of estimated negative impact on task performance, based on the literature. Blank versions of the matrix were then sent to two ex-military subject-matter experts to be filled out based on their personal experiences. Data analysis was performed to identify the consensus most influential PSFs. Results indicate that combat-related injury, cognitive fatigue, inadequate training, physical fatigue, thirst, stress, poor perceptual processing, and presence of chemical agents are among the PSFs with the most negative impact on combat performance.

  5. Probing Human NK Cell Biology Using Human Immune System (HIS) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Di Santo, James P

    2016-01-01

    Our incomplete understanding of the mechanisms that orchestrate human lymphocyte differentiation and condition human immune responses is in part due to the limited access to normal human tissue samples that can inform on these complex processes. In addition, in vitro culture conditions fail to recapitulate the three-dimensional microenvironments that influence cell-cell interactions and impact on immune outcomes. Small animals provide a preclinical model to dissect and probe immunity and over the past decades, development of immunodeficient hosts that can be engrafted with human hematopoietic precursors and mature cells have led to the development of new in vivo models to study human lymphocyte development and function. Natural killer (NK) cells are implicated in the recognition and elimination of pathogen-infected and transformed cells and belong to a family of diverse innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) that provide early immune defense against disease. Here, we summarize the use of humanized mouse models for the study of NK cell and group 1 ILCs and their respective roles in immunity and tissue homeostasis.

  6. Evidence for a histaminergic system in the human testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Martin; Frungieri, Monica B; Gonzalez-Calvar, Silvia; Meineke, Viktor; Köhn, Frank M; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2005-04-01

    The complete lack of information about mast cells as a source of histamine and potential target cells for histamine in human testes prompted us to investigate these issues in testes of fertile and infertile patients using a combination of laser microdissection, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistochemistry. We show for the first time the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in histamine synthesis-histidine decarboxylase-by human testicular mast cells and the expression of the histamine (H) receptors 1 (H1) and 2 (H2) by germinal, interstitial, and peritubular cells in the testes of fertile and infertile patients.

  7. Human Systems Integration: Unmanned Aircraft Control Station Certification Plan Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This document provides guidance to the FAA on important human factors considerations that can be used to support the certification of a UAS Aircraft Control Station (ACS). This document provides a synopsis of the human factors analysis, design and test activities to be performed to provide a basis for FAA certification. The data from these analyses, design activities, and tests, along with data from certification/qualification tests of other key components should be used to establish the ACS certification basis. It is expected that this information will be useful to manufacturers in developing the ACS Certification Plan,, and in supporting the design of their ACS.

  8. Role of human operator in closed loop control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Bhattacharyya

    1955-04-01

    Full Text Available This article gives a brief account of a particular aspect of human engineering which aims at improving the efficiency of working of a complicated machine itself, but by improving upon the machine itself, but by simplifying the operating procedures for the operator who has to run the machine. A human operator has been treated like a servocontrolled machine. It has been stressed also that probably a man and machine are basically different; the former often acts in peculiar ways whereas, the latter generally behaves in a manner bound by its design which is extremely flexible in the case of a man.

  9. Sensor and Display Human Factors Based Design Constraints for Head Mounted and Tele-Operation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Etienne-Cummings

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For mobile imaging systems in head mounted displays and tele-operation systems it is important to maximize the amount of visual information transmitted to the human visual system without exceeding its input capacity. This paper aims to describe the design constraints on the imager and display systems of head mounted devices and tele-operated systems based upon the capabilities of the human visual system. We also present the experimental results of methods to improve the amount of visual information conveyed to a user when trying to display a high dynamic range image on a low dynamic range display.

  10. A Mathematical Model of the Human Respiratory Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhorn, Howard T.; Benton, Richard; Ross, Richard; Guyton, Arthur C.

    1965-01-01

    The respiratory system exhibits the properties of a control system of the regulator type. Equations describing this biological control system have been derived. Transient and steady-state solutions for various CO2 and O2 step input disturbances were obtained utilizing a digital computer and are compared with experimental results. The effectiveness of the respiratory system as a regulator is investigated. Further extensions of the model are suggested. PMID:14284328

  11. Localized Knowledge based System for Human Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adane Nega Tarekegn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available —Knowledge based system can be designed to solve complex medical problems. It incorporates the expert‟s knowledge that has been coded into facts, rules, heuristics and procedures. Incorporation of local languages with the knowledge based system allows endusers communicate with the system in a simpler and easier way. In this study a localized knowledge based system is developed for TB disease diagnosis using Ethiopian national language. To develop the localized knowledge based system, tacit knowledge is acquired from domain experts using interviewing techniques and explicit knowledge is captured from documented sources using relevant documents analysis method. Then the acquired knowledge is modeled using decision tree structure that represents concepts and procedures involved in diagnosis of disease. Production rules are used to represent domain knowledge. The localized knowledge based system is developed using SWI Prolog version 6.4.1 programming language. Prolog supports natural language processing feature to localize the system. As a result, the system is implemented using Amharic language (the national language of Ethiopia user interface. With Localization, users at remote areas and users who are not good in foreign languages are benefited enormously. The system is tested and evaluated to ensure that whether the performance of the system is accurate and the system is usable by physicians and patients. The average performance of the localized knowledge based system has registered 81.5%.

  12. Expert System Shells: Tools to Aid Human Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Jack R.; Wilson, Brent G.

    1987-01-01

    Examines expert system shells and the role a microcomputer-based expert system can play as an intelligent job aid. Characteristics of traditional and automated job aids techniques are described, and the role of instructional designers in developing expert systems within organizations is discussed. (Author/LRW)

  13. HFE (Human Factors Engineering) Technology for Navy Weapon System Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    uncovering of improved propulsion systems, sensors , weapons, etc., by industry or governr-ient agencies, may in.tiate the development of a new weapon system...needs. (No. A-109) _L a f. Tailor an acquisition stratagy for each program, as soon as the agency decides to solict alternative system design concepto

  14. Human Factors and Data Fusion as Part of Control Systems Resilience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I. Gertman

    2009-05-01

    Human performance and human decision making is counted upon as a crucial aspect of overall system resilience. Advanced control systems have the potential to provide operators and asset owners a wide range of data, deployed at different levels that can be used to support operator situation awareness. However, the sheer amount of data available can make it challenging for operators to assimilate information and respond appropriately. This paper reviews some of the challenges and issues associated with providing operators with actionable state awareness and argues for the over arching importance of integrating human factors as part of intelligent control systems design and implementation. It is argued that system resilience is improved by implementing human factors in operations and maintenance. This paper also introduces issues associated with resilience and data fusion and highlights areas in which human factors including field studies hold promise.

  15. System diagnostics of the human capital state of the Russianregions: conceptual approach and assessmentresults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inessa Alexandrovna Gurban

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper outlines evolution of human capital theory. It provides a methodological approachfor measuringthe level of human capital development in the regions of Russian Federation. The approach suggested enables to determine the qualitative state of human capital in each region, to find out the reasons underpinning the current situation, to asses regions’ contribution to the overall national human capital, to develop someindividual approach to forming another quality human capital and its managing foreach territory. The methodology afforded theinstrumentwarebased on the qualimetricanalysis, whichuses the natural estimates (indicators of an object. A system of indicators simulating the human capital state puts forward the following modules: demographic, educational, labor, research and sociocultural. The tool offered allows differentiation of the Russian regions into the levels of human capital state. The 2011 rating of Russian regions according to the human capital state is given.

  16. Human Dignity in Law – A Case Study of the Polish Legal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Butrymowicz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human dignity is one of the most fundamental ideas in the entire international human rights system. As from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in 1948, the concept of the human dignity become used as a tool to protect the basic needs of humans. The other formal instruments of international human rights also make reference to dignity. Whereas international law widely accepted the inherence of dignity, controversies still arise around the source of the dignity. Polish lawmakers, on the other hand, have no doubt about the fact the concept of dignity comes from natural law. Poland, in her Constitution, refers to the teaching of John Paul II about the source, value and meaning of human dignity. There is no doubt that concept of human dignity, even when it is controversial, is the most widely accepted by all religions and political society in the world.

  17. Human Factors in Software Development Processes: Measuring System Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahão, Silvia; Baldassarre, Maria Teresa; Caivano, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Software Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction look at the development process from different perspectives. They apparently use very different approaches, are inspired by different principles and address different needs. But, they definitively have the same goal: develop high quality software...

  18. A Software Framework for Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a software framework we designed and implemented for the development and research in the area of multimodal human-computer interface. The proposed framework is based on publish / subscribe architecture, which allows developers and researchers to conveniently configure, test and

  19. [Latent infection of human herpes virus in hematopoietic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Song, Yu-Hua

    2008-12-01

    Up to date, eight types of human herpes viruses have been identified, all of which are ubiquitous, and usually establish latent infection in the host after primary infection. Since most of the herpes viruses are maintained in an asymptomatic form, they are often neglected. However, under some circumstances, these herpes viruses can cause fatal or severe diseases. Furthermore, the association of herpes viruses with hematopoietic malignancies is attracting researchers' attention. With the extensive development of hematopoietic stem cell and organ transplantation, reports regarding transplantation failure and complication caused by infection of human herpes virus has been increasing. Cytokine storm was firstly suggested as the mechanism of graft-versus-host diseases. In recent years, which has also been applied in the pathogenesis research of inflammation, and is supposed to play an important role in severe virus infection. In this paper, through discussing the possible role of latent infection of human herpes virus in the failure or complication of bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in refractory leukemia, the function and significance of latent infection of human herpes virus and the cytokine storm it caused were investigated.

  20. CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The CHI Papers and Notes program is continuing to grow along with many of our sister conferences. We are pleased that CHI is still the leading venue for research in human-computer interaction. CHI 2013 continued the use of subcommittees to manage the review process. Authors selected the subcommit...

  1. A Software Framework for Multimodal Human-Computer Interaction Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a software framework we designed and implemented for the development and research in the area of multimodal human-computer interface. The proposed framework is based on publish / subscribe architecture, which allows developers and researchers to conveniently configure, test and

  2. Synthesizing Soft Systems Methodology and Human Performance Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Glen; Winiecki, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Human performance technology (HPT), like other concepts, models, and frameworks that we use to describe the world in which we live and the way we organize ourselves to accomplish valuable activities, is built from paradigms that were fresh and relevant at the time it was conceived and from the fields of study from which it grew. However, when the…

  3. Wearable human body joint and posture measuring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunias, P.; Gransier, R.; Jin, A.; Statham, A.; Willems, P.

    2011-01-01

    In many medical applications, especially the orthopaedic setting, ambulatory, monitoring of human joint angles could be of substantial value to improving rehabilitation strategies and unravelling the pathomechanics of many degenerative joint diseases (e.g. knee osteoarthritis). With the ageing of th

  4. Designing for Humans in Autonomous Systems: Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    directs its activity towards achieving goals” (Russell and Norvig , 2009, p. 34). The advantage of an executive paradigm is that the human (executive...Frontiers Series. Taylor and Francis: London, 2013; pp 185–208. Russell, S. J.; Norvig , P. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, 3rd ed.; Upper

  5. Situational Analysis: Centerless Systems and Human Service Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Bronfenbrenner's ecological model is a conceptual framework that continues to contribute to human service practices. In the current article, the author describes the possibilities for practice made intelligible by drawing from this framework. She then explores White's "Web of Praxis" model as an important extension of this approach, and proceeds…

  6. Situational Analysis: Centerless Systems and Human Service Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Bronfenbrenner's ecological model is a conceptual framework that continues to contribute to human service practices. In the current article, the author describes the possibilities for practice made intelligible by drawing from this framework. She then explores White's "Web of Praxis" model as an important extension of this approach, and proceeds…

  7. The development and evaluation of guidelines for the review of advanced human-system interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US); Wachtel, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (US). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    1992-12-31

    Advanced control rooms for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes a general approach to advanced human-system interface review, development of human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems, and the results of a guideline test and evaluation program.

  8. Destination Deimos: A Design Reference Architecture for Initial Human Exploration of the Mars System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, James S.; Adamo, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    The two biggest challenges to successful human operations in interplanetary space are flight dynamics, constrained by the cold hard physics of the rocket equation, and bioastronautics, the psychophysiological realities of human adaptation, or lack thereof, to the deep space environment. Without substantial innovation in project/mission architecture and vehicle design, human exploration of the Mars system could be problematic for decades. Although a human landing on Mars is inevitable, humans-in-the-loop telerobotic exploration from the outer Martian moon Deimos is the best way to begin. Precursor robotic missions for reconnaissance and local site preparation will be required.

  9. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = systemic lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  10. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars; Kristiansen, Troels Z; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Surendranath, Vineeth; Niranjan, Vidya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T K B; Gronborg, Mads; Ibarrola, Nieves; Deshpande, Nandan; Shanker, K; Shivashankar, H N; Rashmi, B P; Ramya, M A; Zhao, Zhixing; Chandrika, K N; Padma, N; Harsha, H C; Yatish, A J; Kavitha, M P; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Suresh, Shubha; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R; Chandran, Sreenath; Krishna, Subhalakshmi; Joy, Mary; Anand, Sanjeev K; Madavan, V; Joseph, Ansamma; Wong, Guang W; Schiemann, William P; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Huang, Lily; Khosravi-Far, Roya; Steen, Hanno; Tewari, Muneesh; Ghaffari, Saghi; Blobe, Gerard C; Dang, Chi V; Garcia, Joe G N; Pevsner, Jonathan; Jensen, Ole N; Roepstorff, Peter; Deshpande, Krishna S; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Hamosh, Ada; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2003-10-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, disease associations, tissue expression, and subcellular localization were extracted from the literature for a nonredundant set of 2750 human proteins. Almost all the information was obtained manually by biologists who read and interpreted >300,000 published articles during the annotation process. This database, which has an intuitive query interface allowing easy access to all the features of proteins, was built by using open source technologies and will be freely available at http://www.hprd.org to the academic community. This unified bioinformatics platform will be useful in cataloging and mining the large number of proteomic interactions and alterations that will be discovered in the postgenomic era.

  11. An Integrated Model of the Human Cardiopulmonary System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of the systemic and pulmonic circulations, baroreflex control of arterial pressure, airway and lung mechanics, as well as, gas transport at...study is based on the multi-compartment model of the canine circulation that contains descriptions of heart, systemic circulation and pulmonic ...systemic and pulmonic circulatory loop consists of a group of resistive and elastic vessel segments. (c) The nonlinear pressure- volume (P-V

  12. Methodological Approach for Performing Human Reliability and Error Analysis in Railway Transportation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio De Felice

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, billions of dollars are being spent annually world wide to develop, manufacture, and operate transportation system such trains, ships, aircraft, and motor vehicles. Around 70 to 90 percent oftransportation crashes are, directly or indirectly, the result of human error. In fact, with the development of technology, system reliability has increased dramatically during the past decades, while human reliability has remained unchanged over the same period. Accordingly, human error is now considered as the most significant source of accidents or incidents in safety-critical systems. The aim of the paper is the proposal of a methodological approach to improve the transportation system reliability and in particular railway transportation system. The methodology presented is based on Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA and Human Reliability Analysis (HRA.

  13. The development of system components to provide proprioceptive and tactile information to the human for future telepresence systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ammon K.

    1992-01-01

    System components are presented that are being implemented to augment teleoperated systems by providing both force and tactile information to the human operator. The concept proposed is the control of a manipulator to perform tasks; i.e., flight line maintenance and repair of combat aircraft or satellites while under the control of a human operator at a remote location to maintain mission effectiveness in a hostile environment. The human would control the motion of the manipulator via a master system with information from the remote site being fed back by direct stimulation of the humans sensory mechanisms or by graphic interpretation of displays. We are interested in providing the operator feedback of position, force, auditory, vision, and tactile information to aide in the human's cognitive ability to control the manipulator. This sensory information from the remote site would then be presented to the operator in such a manner as to enhance his performance while providing him a sense of being present at the remote location, this is known as telepresence. Also discussed is the research done by the Human Sensory Feedback (HSF) facility at the Armstrong Laboratory to provide tactile and proprioceptive feedback to the operator. The system components of this system includes tactile sensor and stimulators, dexterous robotic hands, and the control of positioning and operating industrial robots with exoskeletal mechanisms.

  14. A cellular model system of differentiated human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Kristensen, S R; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select an effective and stable protocol for the differentiation of human satellite cells (Sc) and to identify the optimal time period for the experimental use of differentiated human Sc-cultures. In order to identify the differentiation conditions which give a good...... survival of myotubes and a high grade of differentiation, Sc-cultures were induced to differentiate in media supplemented with either 2% fetal calf serum (FCS) 2% horse serum (HS) or 10% HS. Based on higher CK-activities in cultures differentiating in FCS-supplemented media compared to horse sera, fetal......-cultures in the period from day 4 to 8 after induction of differentiation as only minor differentation-related changes will take place in the cells during this period of time....

  15. System of Rewards - Instrument of Fundamental Human Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Ph.D.Gheorghita Caprarescu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Although not the only nor the most important factor of human motivation, reward remainsone of the oldest visible, direct and rapid tools for behavioral targeting to work towards a convergence ofindividual objectives with the group and organizational. Recognized as instrumental value right from thebeginning of civilization, projections of various cultures and religions - happiness and eternal life, Heaven,Nirvana - reward was to influence gift mentality, behavior and attitudes of individual plan at the company.In organizations, changes in rewards was a marked evolution of the human resources. If the initial rewardwas positive (money and praise and negative (punishment and blamu, and maximum value was of materialand financial subsequently reward was restricted only positive side, broadening the scope of the moral -whose spiritual values are increasingly appreciated, the more so as they have become, in fact, inexhaustible,as form, volume and ways of expression.

  16. Human-directed local autonomy for motion guidance and coordination in an intelligent manufacturing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, W. A.; Kawamura, Kazuhiko; Wilkes, Don M.

    1997-12-01

    This paper discusses the problem of integrating human intelligence and skills into an intelligent manufacturing system. Our center has jointed the Holonic Manufacturing Systems (HMS) Project, an international consortium dedicated to developing holonic systems technologies. One of our contributions to this effort is in Work Package 6: flexible human integration. This paper focuses on one activity, namely, human integration into motion guidance and coordination. Much research on intelligent systems focuses on creating totally autonomous agents. At the Center for Intelligent Systems (CIS), we design robots that interact directly with a human user. We focus on using the natural intelligence of the user to simplify the design of a robotic system. The problem is finding ways for the user to interact with the robot that are efficient and comfortable for the user. Manufacturing applications impose the additional constraint that the manufacturing process should not be disturbed; that is, frequent interacting with the user could degrade real-time performance. Our research in human-robot interaction is based on a concept called human directed local autonomy (HuDL). Under this paradigm, the intelligent agent selects and executes a behavior or skill, based upon directions from a human user. The user interacts with the robot via speech, gestures, or other media. Our control software is based on the intelligent machine architecture (IMA), an object-oriented architecture which facilitates cooperation and communication among intelligent agents. In this paper we describe our research testbed, a dual-arm humanoid robot and human user, and the use of this testbed for a human directed sorting task. We also discuss some proposed experiments for evaluating the integration of the human into the robot system. At the time of this writing, the experiments have not been completed.

  17. Survey of Human Systems Integration (HSI) Tools for USCG Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    libertymmhtables.libertymutual.com/CM_LMTablesWeb/ pdf /LibertyMutualTables.pdf Liberty Mutual (2004). Manual Materials Handling Guidelines. Survey of HSI Tools for USCG...cogn-feb20. pdf https://dspace.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/1880/46646/1/2008-904-17. pdf http://human-factors.arc.nasa.gov/ihi/research_groups/air-ground...Complete analysis utilities and user interface are included with the tool. Availability, Cost, and Contact Information: Siemens PLM Software

  18. Human Systems IAC Gateway. Volume 11, Number 4, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Cockpit Displays VI: Displays for Defense Applications, Proceedings of the SPIE 3690, 103–114. with glasses (stereoscopic) and without ( autostereoscopic ...applications • protocols for compiling accurate, reliable databases • human factors and ergonomics applications • 3D scanner demo. Register online at...integrated such as a non-CRT display, 3D visuals, 3D audio, ANR, and integrated NBC protection. Head-borne weight must be reduced and the performance of the

  19. Holistic Modeling for Human-Autonomous System Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Dekker  and  Woods,  1999;   Hollnagel,  2003;   Klein ,  2000;   Klein ,  et  al.,  1989;  Lewis  and  Wharton,  1997...complexities  of  human  perception,  cognition,   emotions ,   and  decision-­‐making.  Second,  the  CHAS  model  requires

  20. Characterization of an In Vitro Human Breast Epithelial Organoid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    terminally dif- inhibit, to terminally differentiate, or to apoptose (11). ferentiated cells and progenitor cells with functional Cancer has been...Lastly, in view of the potential of using human stem induced to terminally differentiate or apoptose by cer- cells for tissue regeneration (20), the...the same signal as the mother terminally differentiate and readily apoptose and lack stem cell before division. On the other hand, when the

  1. Mirror neurons and mirror systems in monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2008-06-01

    Mirror neurons are a distinct class of neurons that transform specific sensory information into a motor format. Mirror neurons have been originally discovered in the premotor and parietal cortex of the monkey. Subsequent neurophysiological (TMS, EEG, MEG) and brain imaging studies have shown that a mirror mechanism is also present in humans. According to its anatomical locations, mirror mechanism plays a role in action and intention understanding, imitation, speech, and emotion feeling.

  2. Decision support system for monitoring environmental-human interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari-Edalat, Farideh; Abdi, M Reza

    2009-06-01

    The specific aim of this study is to investigate popular attitudes toward trees. The paper is involved the understanding of biophilia tendencies with respect to people's views in an urban area. Biophilia is considered as the idea insisting on the dependency of human identity on his relationship with nature. The biophilia fundamental tendencies were explored to establish a biological framework for valuing and affiliating the natural world. Accordingly, the nine tendencies i.e. utilitarian, naturalistic, ecologistic-scientific, aesthetic, symbolic, humanistic, moralistic, dominionistic, and negativistic were investigate to find out how people relate to the nature especially trees. The investigation was based on a quantitative interview which was applied to the public population in the Liverpool urban parks. Data collected from the designed questionnaire was followed by analysis of the data to identify people's attitudes towards trees. The results indicated how important the physical appeal and beauty of trees was for the people and also showed the people's emotional attachments to trees. Furthermore, a decision support model was proposed to evaluate human instincts and preferences in relation to their surrounding areas using the Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP). The proposed model composed the environmental factors and the biophilia tendencies as the criteria of evaluating environmental-human interactions. A case study was then conducted in Liverpool parks to examine theses interactions. The data gathered was used as the input to the AHP model for the attribute analysis. The AHP model would enable environment managers to compose the relevant information via a link between human feelings about urban trees, and environmental factors for monitoring purposes and performance analysis.

  3. Behind Human Error: Cognitive Systems, Computers and Hindsight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    squeeze became on the powers of the operator.... And as Norbert Wiener noted some years later (1964, p. 63): The gadget-minded people often have the...for one exception see Woods and Elias , 1988). This failure to develop representations that reveal change and highlight events in the monitored...Woods, D. D., and Elias , G. (1988). Significance messages: An inte- gral display concept. In Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Human

  4. Integrating the human element into the systems engineering process and MBSE methodology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, Michael Samir.

    2013-12-01

    In response to the challenges related to the increasing size and complexity of systems, organizations have recognized the need to integrate human considerations in the beginning stages of systems development. Human Systems Integration (HSI) seeks to accomplish this objective by incorporating human factors within systems engineering (SE) processes and methodologies, which is the focus of this paper. A representative set of HSI methods from multiple sources are organized, analyzed, and mapped to the systems engineering Vee-model. These methods are then consolidated and evaluated against the SE process and Models-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) methodology to determine where and how they could integrate within systems development activities in the form of specific enhancements. Overall conclusions based on these evaluations are presented and future research areas are proposed.

  5. Origin of the hematopoietic system in the human embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Emmanuelle; El Omar, Reine; Tavian, Manuela

    2016-11-01

    The continuous generation of blood cells throughout life relies on the existence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) generated during embryogenesis. Given the importance of HSC transplantation in cell-based therapeutic approaches, considerable efforts have been made toward understanding the developmental origins of embryonic HSC. Adult-type HSC are first generated in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region between days 27 and 40 of human embryonic development, but an elusive blood-forming potential is present earlier in the underlying splanchnopleura. It is relatively well accepted that the HSC emerge in the AGM through a hemogenic endothelium, but the direct precursor of this cell type remains to be clearly identified. This review is intended to summarize the recent advances made to understand the origins of hematopoietic stem cells in the early human embryo. In addition, we discuss in detail the discovery of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) as a novel marker of human HSC and of prehematopoietic precursors inside the embryo. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Zebrafish Fins as a Model System for Skeletal Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Marí-Beffa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the morphogenesis of the fins of Danio rerio (zebrafish during development and regeneration suggest that a number of inductive signals involved in the process are similar to some of those that affect bone and cartilage differentiation in mammals and humans. Akimenko et al. (2002 has shown that bone morphogenetic protein-2b (BMP2b is involved in the induction of dermal bone differentiation during fin regeneration. Many other groups have also shown that molecules from the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily (TGFβ, including BMP2, are effective in promoting chondrogenesis and osteogenesis in vivo in higher vertebrates, including humans. In the present study, we review the state of the art of this topic by a comparative analysis of skeletal tissue development, regeneration and renewal processes in tetrapods, and fin regeneration in fishes. A general conclusion of this study states that lepidotrichia is a special skeletal tissue different to cartilage, bone, enamel, or dentine in fishes, according to its extracellular matrix (ECM composition. However, the empirical analysis of inducing signals of skeletal tissues in fishes and tetrapods suggests that lepidotrichia is different to any responding features with main skeletal tissues. A number of new inductive molecules are arising from fin development and regeneration studies that might establish an empirical basis for further molecular approaches to mammal skeletal tissues differentiation. Despite the tissue dissimilarity, this empirical evidence might finally lead to clinical applications to skeletal disorders in humans.

  7. Recombinant Functional Human Lactoferrin Expressed in Baculovirus System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao LIU; Yao-Zhou ZHANG; Xiang-Fu WU

    2006-01-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLf) is a multifunctional iron-binding glycoprotein. In this study, we amplified hLfcDNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from normal human mammary gland.The nucleotide sequence of the hLf was identical to the known hLf. We constructed a recombinant virus,vBm-hLf, harboring the hLfgene and exploited the BmN cells as host to produce recombinant human lactoferrin(rhLf). It was found that a recombinant protein with a molecular mass of approximately 78 kDa was expressed.Approximately 13.5 μg rhLf was purified from 1-2× 105 BmN cells infected by vBm-hLf and the rhLf proved to be biologically active. This method established in our study will pave the way for efficient production of rhLf for further application of this protein in the future.

  8. Modular knowledge systems accelerate human migration in asymmetric random environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Deem, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Migration is a key mechanism for expansion of communities. In spatially heterogeneous environments, rapidly gaining knowledge about the local environment is key to the evolutionary success of a migrating population. For historical human migration, environmental heterogeneity was naturally asymmetric in the north-south (NS) and east-west (EW) directions. We here consider the human migration process in the Americas, modelled as random, asymmetric, modularly correlated environments. Knowledge about the environments determines the fitness of each individual. We present a phase diagram for asymmetry of migration as a function of carrying capacity and fitness threshold. We find that the speed of migration is proportional to the inverse complement of the spatial environmental gradient, and in particular, we find that NS migration rates are lower than EW migration rates when the environmental gradient is higher in the NS direction. Communication of knowledge between individuals can help to spread beneficial knowledge within the population. The speed of migration increases when communication transmits pieces of knowledge that contribute in a modular way to the fitness of individuals. The results for the dependence of migration rate on asymmetry and modularity are consistent with existing archaeological observations. The results for asymmetry of genetic divergence are consistent with patterns of human gene flow. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Non-rotational aspherical models of the human optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanzana, S.; Kasprzak, H. T.; Pałucki, B.; Ţălu, Ş.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work was to define three-dimensional (3D) non-rotational aspherical parametric models for the human cornea and lens using computational geometry and CAD representations. The hyperbolic cosine based function is used for the cornea and a parametric model is used for lens modeling. Data analysis and visualization of 3D non-rotational models were made using the Rhinoceros CAD software and MATLAB software was used for numeric computation. We combined, implemented, and evaluated these models with a 3D ray-tracing in order to fully analyze the human eye model. It was found that 3D non-rotational aspherical models for the human eye could be more accurately modeled and rendered for analysis with finite element method. The objective of this study is to present and analyze mathematical models of the cornea and lens and to highlight the potential of optical applications of the eye models containing astigmatic surfaces, which are more close to the real eye than spherosymmetric eye models.

  10. ras activation in human tumors and in animal model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corominas, M.; Sloan, S.R.; Leon, J.; Kamino, Hideko; Newcomb, E.W.; Pellicer, A. (New York Univ. Medical Center, New York (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Environmental agents such as radiation and chemicals are known to cause genetic damage. Alterations in a limited set of cellular genes called proto-oncogenes lead to unregulated proliferation and differentiation. The authors have studied the role of the ras gene family in carcinogenesis using two different animal models. In one case, thymic lymphomas were induced in mice by either gamma or neutron radiation, and in the other, keratoacanthomas were induced in rabbit skin with dimethylbenzanthracene. Human keratoacanthomas similar to the ones induced in rabbits were also analyzed. They found that different types of radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons, induced different point mutations in ras genes. A novel K-ras mutation in codon 146 has been found in thymic lymphomas induced by neutrons. Keratoacanthomas induced in rabbit skin by dimethylbenzanthracene show a high frequency of H-ras-activated genes carrying a mutation in codon 61. The same is observed in human keratoacanthomas, although mutations are in both the 12th and the 61st codons of the H-ras gene. H-ras activation is less frequent in human squamous cell carcinomas than in keratoacanthomas, suggesting that ras genes could play a role in vivo in differentiation as well as in proliferation.

  11. Informal Justice Systems: Charting a Course for Human Rights-Based Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrigan, Fergus; McKay, Anne Louise; Kristiansen, Annali

    engagement with informal justice systems can build greater respect and protection for human rights. It highlights the considerations that development partners should have when assessing whether to implement programmes involving informal justice systems, the primary consideration being that engagement...... with the informal justice systems neither directly nor inadvertently reinforces existing societal or structural discrimination – a consideration that applies to working with formal justice systems as well. The study also examines the value of informal justice systems in offering, in certain contexts, flexible...

  12. IMPROVING THE SYSTEM OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN THE EDUCATIONAL SPHERE

    OpenAIRE

    L. V. Kartashova; A. E. Shklyaev

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of formation of effective system of HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT of educational institutions. On the basis of Russian and foreign experience describes the main tasks and functions of human resource management of the University. Identified key groups of factors that determine the peculiarities of of human resource management in higher education institution, depending on its strategy, life cycle development, size, market of educational services and priorities....

  13. The use of computerised personnel information systems by human resource specialists in the public sector

    OpenAIRE

    Fisk, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis examines the development of human resource management in three UK public sectors local government, the health service and higher education. The focus of the study is the problem of the lack of use of computerised personnel information systems by personnel specialists to develop the human resource management function. The literature of strategic management, human resource management and the fit between them are reviewed together with the history and the development of personnel sys...

  14. International Protection of Conscientious Objection: A Comparative Analysis of Human Rights Systems and Perspectives of the Inter- American System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carmelina Londoño Lázaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the recognition of conscientious objection in three international systems for the protection of human rights is analyzed: the Inter-American system, the European system and the United Nations system. The comparative system which is adopted allows for notifications as to common developments, the failings and some tensions which have been confronted by international organs in controversial cases. From this analysis are drawn some lessons which may serve for the guardianship of this law in the Inter- American system.

  15. Computer-Aided Decisions in Human Services: Expert Systems and Multivariate Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicoly, Fiore

    1989-01-01

    This comparison of two approaches to the development of computerized supports for decision making--expert systems and multivariate models--focuses on computerized systems that assist professionals with tasks related to diagnosis or classification in human services. Validation of both expert systems and statistical models is emphasized. (39…

  16. The Human Nervous System: A Framework for Teaching and the Teaching Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    The teaching brain is a new concept that mirrors the complex, dynamic, and context-dependent nature of the learning brain. In this article, I use the structure of the human nervous system and its sensing, processing, and responding components as a framework for a re-conceptualized teaching system. This teaching system is capable of responses on an…

  17. The Human Nervous System: A Framework for Teaching and the Teaching Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    The teaching brain is a new concept that mirrors the complex, dynamic, and context-dependent nature of the learning brain. In this article, I use the structure of the human nervous system and its sensing, processing, and responding components as a framework for a re-conceptualized teaching system. This teaching system is capable of responses on an…

  18. Assessment and Evaluation of National Human Resource Development System Competitiveness in Emerging Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, HunSeok; Seo, DongIn; Kim, JuSeuk; Yoo, SangOk; Seong, HeeChang

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed and evaluated the competitiveness of national human resource development (NHRD) systems in emerging countries with potential for growth. The literature on emerging countries and NHRD systems was reviewed. The study developed a model mechanism with forty-one indices and nine sub-components for the NHRD system assessment in…

  19. Human Factors Evaluation of the Hidalgo Equivital EQ-02 Physiological Status Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-11

    Equivital™ EQ-02 physiological status monitoring ( PSM ) system. The usability and acceptability of this system has been tested previously and generally...under CBRNE- PPE provided utility and was comfortable to wear. Thermal strain; CBRNE; PPE; physiological status monitoring; PSM ; human factors; chem...real-time physiological monitoring. The Hidalgo, Ltd. (Cambridge, UK) Equivital™ EQ-02 physiological status monitoring ( PSM ) system is a typical

  20. Assessment and Evaluation of National Human Resource Development System Competitiveness in Emerging Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, HunSeok; Seo, DongIn; Kim, JuSeuk; Yoo, SangOk; Seong, HeeChang

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed and evaluated the competitiveness of national human resource development (NHRD) systems in emerging countries with potential for growth. The literature on emerging countries and NHRD systems was reviewed. The study developed a model mechanism with forty-one indices and nine sub-components for the NHRD system assessment in…

  1. The Human Sympathetic Nervous System Response to Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, Rose Marie; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David

    2003-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is an important part of the autonomic (or automatic) nervous system. When an individual stands up, the sympathetic nervous system speeds the heart and constricts blood vessels to prevent a drop in blood pressure. A significant number of astronauts experience a drop in blood pressure when standing for prolonged periods after they return from spaceflight. Difficulty maintaining blood pressure with standing is also a daily problem for many patients. Indirect evidence available before the Neurolab mission suggested the problem in astronauts while in space might be due partially to reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify whether sympathetic activity was reduced during spaceflight. Sympathetic nervous system activity can be determined in part by measuring heart rate, nerve activity going to blood vessels, and the release of the hormone norepinephrine into the blood. Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter discharged from active sympathetic nerve terminals, so its rate of release can serve as a marker of sympathetic nervous system action. In addition to standard cardiovascular measurements (heart rate, blood pressure), we determined sympathetic nerve activity as well as norepinephrine release and clearance on four crewmembers on the Neurolab mission. Contrary to our expectation, the results demonstrated that the astronauts had mildly elevated resting sympathetic nervous system activity in space. Sympathetic nervous system responses to stresses that simulated the cardiovascular effects of standing (lower body negative pressure) were brisk both during and after spaceflight. We concluded that, in the astronauts tested, the activity and response of the sympathetic nervous system to cardiovascular stresses appeared intact and mildly elevated both during and after spaceflight. These changes returned to normal within a few days.

  2. Changes in the human blood coagulating system during prolonged hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, L. M.; Anashkin, O. D.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the coagulating system of the blood were studied in six subjects during prolonged hypokinesia. Thrombogenic properties of the blood rose in all cases on the 8th day. These changes are explained by stress reaction due to unusual conditions for a healthy person. Changes in the blood coagulating system in the group subjected to physical exercise and without it ran a practically parallel course. Apparently physical exercise is insufficient to prevent such changes that appear in the coagulating system of the blood during prolonged hypokinesia.

  3. Design Concept of Human Interface System for Risk Monitoring for Proactive Trouble Prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Zhijian; Hashim, Muhammad [Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China); Lind, Morten [Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Djibouti); Tamayama, Kiyoshi; Okusa, Kyoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tsuruga (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    A new concept is first proposed of distributed human interface system to integrate both operation and maintenance of nuclear power plant. Then, a method of constructing human interface system is introduced by integrating the plant knowledge database system based on Multilevel Flow Model (MFM) with the risk monitor to watch Defense-in Depth plant safety functions. The proposed concept is applied for a liquid metal fast reactor Monju and necessary R and D subjects are reviewed to realize human interface system for the maintenance work in Monju plant. Because of using high temperature liquid sodium as reactor coolant in Monju plant, the maintenance for Monju should utilize more automated equipment of remote control and robotics than that of light water reactor. It is necessary to design optimum task allocation between human and automated machine as the requisites for good communication design of human interface systems to support the collaboration work between workers at local workplace and the main control room. In this paper, the general issues are reviewed on how to configure the whole human interface system for helping proactive trouble prevention and risk evaluation on the basis of the presented target plant model before the concrete proposition of the hardware and software systems development to be used by both the staffs of operation and maintenance of NPP.

  4. [Study on real-time wearable monitoring system for human heat and cold stresses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuhong; Wang, Tianhao; Li, Chenming

    2013-02-01

    In order to study the way of evaluating human performance under heat and cold stresses, we developed a wearable physiological monitoring system-intelligent belt system, capable of providing real-time, continuous and dynamic monitoring of multiple physiological parameters. The system has following features: multiuser communication, high integration, strong environment adaptability, dynamic features and real time physiological monitoring ability. The system uses sensing belts and elastic belts to acquire physiological parameters, uses WIFI to build wireless network monitoring for multiuser, and uses Delphi to develop data processing software capable of real-time viewing, storagng, processing, and alerting. With four different intensity-activity trials on six subjects and compared with standard laboratory human physiological acquisition instruments, the system was proved to be able to acquire accu-rate physiological parameters such as ECG, respiration, multi-point body temperatures, and body movement. The system worked steadily and reliably. This wearable real-time monitoring system for human heat and cold stresses can solve the problem facing our country that human heat stress and cold stress monitoring technology is insufficient, provide new methods and new ways for monitoring and evaluation of human heat and cold stresses under real task or stress environment, and provide technical platform for the study on human ergonomics.

  5. Charles Darwin and the evolution of human grammatical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Hugh W; Christman, Sarah S

    2010-04-08

    Charles Darwin's evolutionary theories of animal communication were deeply embedded in a centuries-old model of association psychology, whose prodromes have most often been traced to the writings of Aristotle. His notions of frequency of occurrence of pairings have been passed down through the centuries and were a major ontological feature in the formation of associative connectivity. He focused on the associations of cause and effect, contiguity of sequential occurrence, and similarity among items. Cause and effect were often reduced to another type of contiguity relation, so that Aristotle is most often evoked as the originator of the associative bondings through similarity and contiguity, contiguity being the most powerful and frequent means of association. Contiguity eventually became the overriding mechanism for serial ordering of mental events in both perception and action. The notions of concatenation throughout the association psychology took the form of "trains" of events, both sensory and motor, in such a way that serial ordering came to be viewed as an item-by-item string of locally contiguous events. Modern developments in the mathematics of serial ordering have advanced in sophistication since the early and middle twentieth century, and new computational methods have allowed us to reevaluate the serial concatenative theories of Darwin and the associationists. These new models of serial order permit a closer comparative scrutiny between human and nonhuman. The present study considers Darwin's insistence on a "degree" continuity between human and nonhuman animal serial ordering. We will consider a study of starling birdsongs and whether the serial ordering of those songs provides evidence that they have a syntax that at best differs only in degree and not in kind with the computations of human grammatical structures. We will argue that they, in fact, show no such thing.

  6. A Human Mirror Neuron System for Language: Perspectives from Signed Languages of the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Heather Patterson; Corina, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Language is proposed to have developed atop the human analog of the macaque mirror neuron system for action perception and production [Arbib M.A. 2005. From monkey-like action recognition to human language: An evolutionary framework for neurolinguistics (with commentaries and author's response). "Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 28", 105-167; Arbib…

  7. Boundary Conditions of the High-Investment Human Resource Systems-Small-Firm Labor Productivity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Clint; Way, Sean A.; Kerr, Gerry; Thacker, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Although a few published, multiindustry, firm-level, empirical studies have linked systems of high-investment or high-performance human resource management practices to enhanced small-firm performance, this stream of strategic human resource management research is underdeveloped and equivocal. Accordingly, in this study, we use a sample of…

  8. Students' Illustrations of the Human Nervous System as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Sisika Priyani Nelum; Montplaisir, Lisa Marie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' knowledge and learning of the human nervous system (HNS) in an introductory undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course. Classroom observations, demographic data, a preinstructional unit test with drawings, and a postinstructional unit test with drawings were used to identify students'…

  9. The Approach to Development the Human Resources Intellectual Management System. Management Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Benger, Roman; Antonova, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Article suggests an approach to designing the Human Resources Intellectual Management System in order to increase Human Resources reliability, using the management methods known from the Theory of Management.. The Article examines the realization of the Subsystem of implementing management methods by the number of management procedures, executing the corresponding management method.

  10. The Approach to Development the Human Resources Intellectual Management System. Management Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Benger, Roman; Antonova, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Article suggests an approach to designing the Human Resources Intellectual Management System in order to increase Human Resources reliability, using the management methods known from the Theory of Management.. The Article examines the realization of the Subsystem of implementing management methods by the number of management procedures, executing the corresponding management method.

  11. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample of 34…

  12. Choice, Communication, and Conflict. A System's Approach to the Study of Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackoff, Russell L.

    This book presents a teleological analysis of the concepts of human behavior. Through distinctions and definitions, a model or system is developed, upon which all aspects of behavior are interrelated. The model of choice or purposeful state is discussed with its underlying concepts. Human communication and feeling, and cooperation and conflict…

  13. Boundary Conditions of the High-Investment Human Resource Systems-Small-Firm Labor Productivity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Clint; Way, Sean A.; Kerr, Gerry; Thacker, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Although a few published, multiindustry, firm-level, empirical studies have linked systems of high-investment or high-performance human resource management practices to enhanced small-firm performance, this stream of strategic human resource management research is underdeveloped and equivocal. Accordingly, in this study, we use a sample of…

  14. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample of 34…

  15. A Human Mirror Neuron System for Language: Perspectives from Signed Languages of the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Heather Patterson; Corina, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Language is proposed to have developed atop the human analog of the macaque mirror neuron system for action perception and production [Arbib M.A. 2005. From monkey-like action recognition to human language: An evolutionary framework for neurolinguistics (with commentaries and author's response). "Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 28", 105-167; Arbib…

  16. Comparative Analysis of OECD Member Countries' Competitive Advantage in National Human Resource Development System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hunseok; Choi, Yeseul; Choi, Myungweon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, evaluate, and compare the competitive advantages of the human resource development systems of advanced countries. The Global Human Resource Development Index was utilized for this study, since it has been validated through an expert panel's content review and analytic hierarchy process. Using a sample…

  17. Students' Illustrations of the Human Nervous System as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Sisika Priyani Nelum; Montplaisir, Lisa Marie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' knowledge and learning of the human nervous system (HNS) in an introductory undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course. Classroom observations, demographic data, a preinstructional unit test with drawings, and a postinstructional unit test with drawings were used to identify students'…

  18. Disease induction by human microbial pathogens in plant-model systems: potential, problems and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Belkum, van A.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Relatively simple eukaryotic model organisms such as the genetic model weed plant Arabidopsis thaliana possess an innate immune system that shares important similarities with its mammalian counterpart. In fact, some human pathogens infect Arabidopsis and cause overt disease with human symptomology.

  19. A Portfolio for Optimal Collaboration of Human and Cyber Physical Production Systems in Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Fazel; Seidenberg, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the complementarity of human and cyber physical production systems (CPPS). The discourse of complementarity is elaborated by defining five criteria for comparing the characteristics of human and CPPS. Finally, a management portfolio matrix is proposed for examining the feasibility of optimal collaboration between them. The…

  20. A Simple Dissection Method for the Conduction System of the Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Nariaki; Nakajima, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A simple dissection guide for the conduction system of the human heart is shown. The atrioventricular (AV) node, AV bundle, and right bundle branch were identified in a formaldehyde-fixed human heart. The sinu-atrial (SA) node could not be found, but the region in which SA node was contained was identified using the SA nodal artery. Gross…

  1. Implications of Human Pattern Processing for the Design of Artificial Knowledge Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    This paper presents evidence that four design principles commonly embodied in artificial knowledge systems are inconsistent with human cognitive capabilities. Because these principles are widely accepted as characteristics of human knowledge processing, common theoretical properties related to cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence which…

  2. A Simple Dissection Method for the Conduction System of the Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Nariaki; Nakajima, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    A simple dissection guide for the conduction system of the human heart is shown. The atrioventricular (AV) node, AV bundle, and right bundle branch were identified in a formaldehyde-fixed human heart. The sinu-atrial (SA) node could not be found, but the region in which SA node was contained was identified using the SA nodal artery. Gross…

  3. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle as Human-Assistant Robotics System

    CERN Document Server

    Chingtham, Tejbanta Singh; Ghose, M K; 10.1109/ICCIC.2010.5705731

    2011-01-01

    According to the American Heritage Dictionary [1],Robotics is the science or study of the technology associated with the design, fabrication, theory, and application of Robots. The term Hoverbot is also often used to refer to sophisticated mechanical devices that are remotely controlled by human beings even though these devices are not autonomous. This paper describes a remotely controlled hoverbot by installing a transmitter and receiver on both sides that is the control computer (PC) and the hoverbot respectively. Data is transmitted as signal or instruction via a infrastructure network which is converted into a command for the hoverbot that operates at a remote site.

  4. Brain Prostheses as a Dynamic System (Immortalizing the Human Brain?)

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, Vadim

    2007-01-01

    Interest in development of brain prostheses, which might be proposed to recover mental functions lost due to neuron-degenerative disease or trauma, requires new methods in molecular engineering and nanotechnology to build artificial brain tissues. We develop a Dynamic Core model to analyze complexity of damaged biological neural network as well as transition and recovery of the system functionality due to changes in the system environment. We provide a method to model complexity of physical systems which might be proposed as an artificial tissue or prosthesis. Delocalization of Dynamic Core model is developed to analyze migration of mental functions in dynamic bio-systems which undergo architecture transition induced by trauma. Term Dynamic Core is used to define a set of causally related functions and Delocalization is used to describe the process of migration. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. A holographic model is proposed to construct dynamic e...

  5. A Comparison between Human Selected, Derived and System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admpather

    Alternate biometric methods based purely on software .... The commonly adopted metrics for biometric system performance are the false rejection rate and the false acceptance rate, which respectively correspond to two popular metrics:.

  6. Human Robotic Systems (HRS): Robotic ISRU Acquisition Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During 2014, the Robotic ISRU Resource Acquisition project element will develop two technologies:Exploration Ground Data Systems (xGDS)Sample Acquisition on...

  7. Human-Systems Integration (HSI) Methodology Development for NASA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A technology with game-changing potential for crew to space system interaction will be selected to develop using the HSI Methodology created through the efforts of...

  8. Anthony Pro - Human Automation Interaction in Aerospace Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed project aims to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a data mining system designed to facilitate the interpretation of information obtained from...

  9. Acid-base homeostasis in the human system

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Acid-base regulation is a cooperative phenomena in vivo with body fluids, extracellular and intracellular buffers, lungs, and kidneys all playing important roles. The present account is much too brief to be considered a review of present knowledge of these regulatory systems, and should be viewed, instead, as a guide to the elements necessary to construct a simple model of the mutual interactions of the acid-base regulatory systems of the body.

  10. A Cognitive Systems Engineering Approach to Developing Human Machine Interface Requirements for New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fern, Lisa Carolynn

    This dissertation examines the challenges inherent in designing and regulating to support human-automation interaction for new technologies that will be deployed into complex systems. A key question for new technologies with increasingly capable automation, is how work will be accomplished by human and machine agents. This question has traditionally been framed as how functions should be allocated between humans and machines. Such framing misses the coordination and synchronization that is needed for the different human and machine roles in the system to accomplish their goals. Coordination and synchronization demands are driven by the underlying human-automation architecture of the new technology, which are typically not specified explicitly by designers. The human machine interface (HMI), which is intended to facilitate human-machine interaction and cooperation, typically is defined explicitly and therefore serves as a proxy for human-automation cooperation requirements with respect to technical standards for technologies. Unfortunately, mismatches between the HMI and the coordination and synchronization demands of the underlying human-automation architecture can lead to system breakdowns. A methodology is needed that both designers and regulators can utilize to evaluate the predicted performance of a new technology given potential human-automation architectures. Three experiments were conducted to inform the minimum HMI requirements for a detect and avoid (DAA) system for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The results of the experiments provided empirical input to specific minimum operational performance standards that UAS manufacturers will have to meet in order to operate UAS in the National Airspace System (NAS). These studies represent a success story for how to objectively and systematically evaluate prototype technologies as part of the process for developing regulatory requirements. They also provide an opportunity to reflect on the lessons learned in order

  11. Land use change and human systems dynamics: Cotacachi Ecuador 1963-2000

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoades, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation reports on a study to analyze land-use change over 40 years in Cotacachi, Ecuador, link land-use change to human system dynamics, and discuss implications for sustainability. BA-2 (SANREM-Andes Research)

  12. Improving air traffic control: Proving new tools or approving the joint human-machine system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Irene; Leroux, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    From the description of a field problem (i.e., designing decision aids for air traffic controllers), this paper points out how a cognitive engineering approach provides the milestones for the evaluation of future joint human-machine systems.

  13. WELL-POSEDNESS OF THE MODEL DESCRIBING A REPAIRABLE, STANDBY, HUMAN & MACHINE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geni Gupur

    2003-01-01

    By using the strong continuous semigroup theory of linear operators we prove the existence of a unique positive time-dependent solution of the model describing a repairable, standby, human & machine system.

  14. Information Technology, Human Resources Management Systems and Firm Performance: An Empirical Analysis from Spain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pilar Ficapal-Cusí; Joan Torrent-Sellens; Pilar Curós-Vilà

    2011-01-01

    ...) to examine the relationship between IT use, innovative human resources management systems (IHRMS) and firm’s performance. Using factor and cluster analysis, we find that only one-third of Catalan firms use IHRMS...

  15. Strategic Human Resource Metrics: A Perspective of the General Systems Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chux Gervase Iwu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measuring and quantifying strategic human resource outcomes in relation to key performance criteria is essential to developing value-adding metrics. Objectives This paper posits (using a general systems lens that strategic human resource metrics should interpret the relationship between attitudinal human resource outcomes and performance criteria such as profitability, quality or customer service. Approach Using the general systems model as underpinning theory, the study assesses the variation in response to a Likert type questionnaire with twenty-four (24 items measuring the major attitudinal dispositions of HRM outcomes (employee commitment, satisfaction, engagement and embeddedness. Results A Chi-square test (Chi-square test statistic = 54.898, p=0.173 showed that variation in responses to the attitudinal statements occurred due to chance. This was interpreted to mean that attitudinal human resource outcomes influence performance as a unit of system components. The neutral response was found to be associated with the ‘reject’ response than the ‘acceptance’ response. Value The study offers suggestion on the determination of strategic HR metrics and recommends the use of systems theory in HRM related studies. Implications This study provides another dimension to human resource metrics by arguing that strategic human resource metrics should measure the relationship between attitudinal human resource outcomes and performance using a systems perspective.

  16. Human growth and body weight dynamics: an integrative systems model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmandad, Hazhir

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human weight and height dynamics due to growth, aging, and energy balance can inform clinical practice and policy analysis. This paper presents the first mechanism-based model spanning full individual life and capturing changes in body weight, composition and height. Integrating previous empirical and modeling findings and validated against several additional empirical studies, the model replicates key trends in human growth including A) Changes in energy requirements from birth to old ages. B) Short and long-term dynamics of body weight and composition. C) Stunted growth with chronic malnutrition and potential for catch up growth. From obesity policy analysis to treating malnutrition and tracking growth trajectories, the model can address diverse policy questions. For example I find that even without further rise in obesity, the gap between healthy and actual Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) has embedded, for different population groups, a surplus of 14%-24% in energy intake which will be a source of significant inertia in obesity trends. In another analysis, energy deficit percentage needed to reduce BMI by one unit is found to be relatively constant across ages. Accompanying documented and freely available simulation model facilitates diverse applications customized to different sub-populations.

  17. Methionine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin in human sympathoadrenal system and pheochromocytoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimasa, T; Nakao, K; Ohtsuki, H; Li, S; Imura, H.

    1982-01-01

    To elucidate the physiological and pathophysiological significance of methionine- and leucine-enkephalin (Met-and Leu-enkephalin, respectively) in human sympathoadrenal system, the contents of these peptides in normal human sympathetic nervous system, adrenal medulla, and pheochromocytomas were determined by specific radioimmunoassays combined with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Met-enkephalin-LI and Leu-enkephalin-LI, respectively) were detected by radioimmunoassay in ...

  18. Design of Food Management Information System Based on Human-computer Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingkai Cui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Food safety problem is directly related with public health. This study takes the necessity of establishing food management information system as the breakthrough point, through the interpretation of the overview of human-computer interaction technology, as well as the conceptual framework of human-computer interaction, it discusses the construction of food management information system, expecting to promote China's food safety management process so as to guarantee public health guarantee.

  19. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  20. A prototype auto-human support system for spatial analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lianfa; WANG Jinfeng

    2006-01-01

    Spatial analysis is a multidisciplinary field that involves multiple influential factors, variation and uncertainty, and modeling of geospatial data is a complex procedure affected by spatial context, mechanism and assumptions. In order to make spatial modeling easier, some scholars have suggested a lot of knowledge from exploratory data analysis (EDA), specification of the model, fitness and diagnosis of the model, to interpretation of the model. Also an amount of software has improved some functionalities of spatial analysis, e.g. EDA by the dynamic link (GeoDa) and robust statistical calculation (R). However, there are few programs for spatial analysis that can automatically deal with unstructured declarative issues and uncertainty in machine modeling using the domain knowledge. Under this context, this paper suggests a prototype support system for spatial analysis that can automatically use experience and knowledge from the experts to deal with complexity and uncertainty in modeling. The knowledge base component, as the major contribution of the system, in support of the expert system shell, codes and stores declarative modeling knowledge, e.g. spatial context, mechanisms and prior knowledge to deal with declarative issues during the modeling procedure. With the open architecture, the system integrates functionalities of other components, e.g. GIS' visualization, DBMS, and robust calculation in an interactive environment. An application case of spatial sampling, design and implementation of spatial modeling with such a system is demonstrated.