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Sample records for human cysteine dioxygenase

  1. Structure and mechanism of mouse cysteine dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jason G.; Bailey, Lucas J.; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips, George N.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the oxidation of l-cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid. Deficiencies in this enzyme have been linked to autoimmune diseases and neurological disorders. The x-ray crystal structure of CDO from Mus musculus was solved to a nominal resolution of 1.75 Å. The sequence is 91% identical to that of a human homolog. The structure reveals that CDO adopts the typical β-barrel fold of the cupin superfamily. The NE2 atoms of His-86, -88, and -140 provide the metal binding site. The structure further revealed a covalent linkage between the side chains of Cys-93 and Tyr-157, the cysteine of which is conserved only in eukaryotic proteins. Metal analysis showed that the recombinant enzyme contained a mixture of iron, nickel, and zinc, with increased iron content associated with increased catalytic activity. Details of the predicted active site are used to present and discuss a plausible mechanism of action for the enzyme. PMID:16492780

  2. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  3. An iron-oxygen intermediate formed during the catalytic cycle of cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokov, E P; Faponle, A S; Davies, C G; Quesne, M G; Turner, R; Fellner, M; Souness, R J; Wilbanks, S M; de Visser, S P; Jameson, G N L

    2016-07-07

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a key enzyme in the breakdown of cysteine, but its mechanism remains controversial. A combination of spectroscopic and computational studies provides the first evidence of a short-lived intermediate in the catalytic cycle. The intermediate decays within 20 ms and has absorption maxima at 500 and 640 nm.

  4. Structure and mechanism leading to formation of the cysteine sulfinate product complex of a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmann, Madleen; Kumar, Suresh; Chernev, Petko; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Schnegg, Alexander; Kumar, Devesh; Dau, Holger; Limberg, Christian; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-05-11

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a unique nonheme iron enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of cysteine in the body. It contains an iron active site with an unusual 3-His ligation to the protein, which contrasts with the structural features of common nonheme iron dioxygenases. Recently, some of us reported a truly biomimetic model for this enzyme, namely a trispyrazolylborato iron(II) cysteinato complex, which not only has a structure very similar to the enzyme-substrate complex but also represents a functional model: Treatment of the model with dioxygen leads to cysteine dioxygenation, as shown by isolating the cysteine part of the product in the course of the work-up. However, little is known on the conversion mechanism and, so far, not even the structure of the actual product complex had been characterised, which is also unknown in case of the enzyme. In a multidisciplinary approach including density functional theory calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have now determined the structure of the actual sulfinato complex for the first time. The Cys-SO2 (-) functional group was found to be bound in an η(2) -O,O-coordination mode, which, based on the excellent resemblance between model and enzyme, also provides the first support for a corresponding binding mode within the enzymatic product complex. Indeed, this is again confirmed by theory, which had predicted a η(2) -O,O-binding mode for synthetic as well as the natural enzyme.

  5. Primary hepatocytes from mice lacking cysteine dioxygenase show increased cysteine concentrations and higher rates of metabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide and thiosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowska, Halina; Roman, Heather B; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Sasakura, Kiyoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Krijt, Jakub; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2014-05-01

    The oxidation of cysteine in mammalian cells occurs by two routes: a highly regulated direct oxidation pathway in which the first step is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and by desulfhydration-oxidation pathways in which the sulfur is released in a reduced oxidation state. To assess the effect of a lack of CDO on production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and thiosulfate (an intermediate in the oxidation of H2S to sulfate) and to explore the roles of both cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in cysteine desulfhydration by liver, we investigated the metabolism of cysteine in hepatocytes isolated from Cdo1-null and wild-type mice. Hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice produced more H2S and thiosulfate than did hepatocytes from wild-type mice. The greater flux of cysteine through the cysteine desulfhydration reactions catalyzed by CTH and CBS in hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice appeared to be the consequence of their higher cysteine levels, which were due to the lack of CDO and hence lack of catabolism of cysteine by the cysteinesulfinate-dependent pathways. Both CBS and CTH appeared to contribute substantially to cysteine desulfhydration, with estimates of 56 % by CBS and 44 % by CTH in hepatocytes from wild-type mice, and 63 % by CBS and 37 % by CTH in hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice.

  6. Mechanism of S-oxygenation by a cysteine dioxygenase model complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, G. Narahari

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the first computational study on a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model complex, [FeII(LN3S)]+ where LN3S is a tetradentate ligand with a bis(imino)pyridyl scaffold and a pendant arylthiolate group. The reaction mechanism of sulfur dioxygenation with O2 was examined by density functional theory (DFT) methods, and compared to results obtained for cysteine dioxygenase. The reaction proceeds via multistate reactivity patterns on competing singlet, triplet and quintet spin state surfaces. The reaction mechanism is analogous to that found for cysteine dioxygenase enzymes [Kumar, D.; Thiel, W.; de Visser, S. P. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 3869–3882], hence the computations indicate that this complex can closely mimic the enzymatic process. The catalytic mechanism starts from an iron(III)-superoxo complex and the attack of the terminal oxygen atom of the superoxo group on the sulfur atom of the ligand. Subsequently, the dioxygen bond breaks to form an iron(IV)-oxo complex with a bound sulfenato group. After reorganization the second oxygen atom is transferred to the substrate to give a sulfinic acid product. An alternative mechanism involving the direct attack of dioxygen on the sulfur, without involving any iron-oxygen intermediates, was also examined. Importantly, a significant energetic preference for dioxygen coordinating to the iron center prior to attack at sulfur was discovered and serves to elucidate the function of the metal ion in the reaction process. The computational results are in good agreement with experimental observations, and the differences and similarities of the biomimetic complex and the enzymatic CDO center are highlighted. PMID:22091701

  7. Exposition of dermatophyte Trichophyton mentagrophytes to L-cystine induces expression and activation of cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperova, Alena; Cahlikova, Romana; Kunert, Jiri; Sebela, Marek; Novak, Zdenek; Raska, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is involved in regulation of intracellular cysteine levels by catabolising the cysteine to sulphite and sulphate. In keratinolytic fungi, sulphite is actively excreted to reduce disulphide bridges in keratin before its enzymatic degradation. The pathogenicity role of CDO was confirmed in cysteine-hypersensitive and growth-defective ΔCdo mutant of Arthroderma benhamiae on hair and nails. We analysed the CDO expression regulation in T. mentagrophytes (anamorph of A. benhamiae) mycelia by determining the Cdo mRNA and CDO protein levels and by analysing the proportion of two molecular forms of CDO in response to l-cystine exposure. Cdo mRNA levels in mycelia lysates were detected by reverse-transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction and CDO protein by western blot using mouse CDO-specific hyperimmune serum. The Cdo mRNA level increased gradually 2.5-4.5 h after exposure of the mycelium to l-cystine. The CDO protein, detected as two bands of different mobility, appeared earlier in comparison to mRNA (1 h) and culminated after 24 h. More mobile form prevailed after 4.5 h. The comparison of the dynamics in the Cdo mRNA and CDO protein levels indicates that T. mentagrophytes responds to l-cystine by increased transcription and apparently decreased degradation of the CDO and by changing towards higher mobility molecular form, similar to previous reports describing mammalian analogue.

  8. Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 promotes adipogenesis via interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

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    Deng, Peng; Chen, Yi; Ji, Ning; Lin, Yunfeng; Yuan, Quan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming, E-mail: qmchen@scu.edu.cn

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) is an essential enzyme for taurine biosynthesis and the biodegradation of toxic cysteine. As previously suggested, Cdo1 may be a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation, but the role of Cdo1 in adipogenesis has yet been reported. In this study, we found that the expression of Cdo1 is dramatically elevated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs). Conversely, knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 cells and mBMSCs. Mechanistically, we found Cdo1 interacted with Pparγ in response to adipogenic stimulus. Further, depletion of Cdo1 reduced the recruitment of Pparγ to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4. Collectively, our finding indicates that Cdo1 may be a co-activator of Pparγ in adipogenesis, and may contribute to the development of disease associated with excessive adipose tissue. - Highlights: • Cdo1expression is highly up-regulated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 and mBMSCs. • Depletion of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation. • Cdo1interacts with Pparγ during adipogenesis. • Knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited Pparγ binding to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4.

  9. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

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    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  10. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide.

  11. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  12. Prognostic Significance of Promoter DNA Hypermethylation of cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1 Gene in Primary Breast Cancer.

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    Naoko Minatani

    Full Text Available Using pharmacological unmasking microarray, we identified promoter DNA methylation of cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1 gene in human cancer. In this study, we assessed the clinicopathological significance of CDO1 methylation in primary breast cancer (BC with no prior chemotherapy. The CDO1 DNA methylation was quantified by TaqMan methylation specific PCR (Q-MSP in 7 BC cell lines and 172 primary BC patients with no prior chemotherapy. Promoter DNA of the CDO1 gene was hypermethylated in 6 BC cell lines except SK-BR3, and CDO1 gene expression was all silenced at mRNA level in the 7 BC cell lines. Quantification of CDO1 methylation was developed using Q-MSP, and assessed in primary BC. Among the clinicopathologic factors, CDO1 methylation level was not statistically significantly associated with any prognostic factors. The log-rank plot analysis elucidated that the higher methylation the tumors harbored, the poorer prognosis the patients exhibited. Using the median value of 58.0 as a cut-off one, disease specific survival in BC patients with CDO1 hypermethylation showed significantly poorer prognosis than those with hypomethylation (p = 0.004. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model identified that CDO1 hypermethylation was prognostic factor as well as Ki-67 and hormone receptor status. The most intriguingly, CDO1 hypermethylation was of robust prognostic relevance in triple negative BC (p = 0.007. Promoter DNA methylation of CDO1 gene was robust prognostic indicator in primary BC patients with no prior chemotherapy. Prognostic relevance of the CDO1 promoter DNA methylation is worthy of being paid attention in triple negative BC cancer.

  13. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

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    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  14. Cysteine Cathepsins in Human Carious Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, F.D.; Minciotti, C.L.; Geraldeli, S.; Carrilho, M.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.; Nader, H.B.; Salo, T.; Tjäderhane, L.; Tersariol, I.L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in dentinal caries, and analysis of recent data demonstrates the presence of other collagen-degrading enzymes, cysteine cathepsins, in human dentin. This study aimed to examine the presence, source, and activity of cysteine cathepsins in human caries. Cathepsin B was detected with immunostaining. Saliva and dentin cysteine cathepsin and MMP activities on caries lesions were analyzed spectrofluorometrically. Immunostaining demonstrated stronger cathepsins B in carious than in healthy dentin. In carious dentin, cysteine cathepsin activity increased with increasing depth and age in chronic lesions, but decreased with age in active lesions. MMP activity decreased with age in both active and chronic lesions. Salivary MMP activities were higher in patients with active than chronic lesions and with increasing lesion depth, while cysteine cathepsin activities showed no differences. The results indicate that, along with MMPs, cysteine cathepsins are important, especially in active and deep caries. PMID:21248362

  15. Branched-chain amino acids inhibit the TGF-beta-induced down-regulation of taurine biosynthetic enzyme cysteine dioxygenase in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Asami; Ishizaki, Sonoko; Takehana, Kenji; Fujitani, Shoji; Sonaka, Ichiro; Satsu, Hideo; Shimizu, Makoto

    2014-05-01

    Taurine deficiency has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis and complications of advanced hepatic diseases. The molecular basis for a low level of taurine associated with hepatic failure is largely unknown. Using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced cirrhotic rat model, we found that the activity and expression of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), a rate-limiting enzyme in taurine synthesis, were significantly decreased in the liver of these rats. To investigate the underlying mechanisms for the suppression, we examined the effects of pathological cytokines on CDO expression in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Among the several cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), one of the key mediators of fibrogenesis, suppressed Cdo1 gene transcription through the MEK/ERK pathway. Finally, we further examined potential effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on CDO expression, as it has been reported that oral BCAA supplementation increased plasma taurine level in the patients with liver cirrhosis. BCAA, especially leucine, promoted Cdo1 gene transcription, and attenuated TGF-β-mediated suppression of Cdo1 gene expression. These results indicate that the low plasma level of taurine in advanced hepatic disease is due to decreased hepatic CDO expression, which can be partly attributed to suppressive effect of TGF-β on Cdo1 gene transcription. Furthermore, our observation that BCAA promotes Cdo1 expression suggests that BCAA may be therapeutically useful to improve hepatic taurine metabolism and further suppress dysfunctions associated with low level of taurine in hepatic diseases.

  16. Structure of the human 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene (HPD)

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    Awata, H.; Endo, F.; Matsuda, I. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)

    1994-10-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. The activity of this enzyme is expressed mainly in the liver and developmentally regulated in mammals, and a genetic deficiency in this enzyme in humans and mice leads to hereditary tyrosinemia type 3. Using human HPD cDNA as a probe, a chromosomal gene related to HPD was isolated from human gene libraries. The human HPD gene is over 30 kb long and is split into 14 exons. The extract sizes and boundaries of exon blocks were determined, and all of the splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the GT/AG rule. Analysis of the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the gene suggests that expression of the gene is regulated by hepatocyte-specific and liver-enriched transcription factors, as well as by hormones. These features of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene are similar to those of other genes that are specifically expressed in hepatocytes and that are developmentally regulated. 41 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. An investigation into possible xenobiotic-endobiotic inter-relationships involving the amino acid analogue drug, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and plasma amino acids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steventon, Glyn B; Mitchell, Stephen C; Angulo, Santigo; Barbas, Coral

    2012-05-01

    The amino acid derivative, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, is an anti-oxidant agent extensively employed as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of human pulmonary conditions. A major biotransformation route of this drug, which displays considerable variation in capacity in man, involves the oxidation of the sulfide moiety to the inactive S-oxide metabolite. Previous observations have indicated that fasted plasma L-cysteine concentrations and fasted plasma L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate ratios were correlated with the degree of sulfoxidation of this drug and that these particular parameters may be used as endobiotic biomarkers for this xenobiotic metabolism. It has been proposed also that the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, was responsible for the drug sulfoxidation. Further in this theme, the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine in 100 human volunteers was investigated with respect to it potential correlation with fasted plasma amino acid concentrations. Extensive statistical analyses showed no significant associations or relationships between the degree of drug S-oxidation and fasted plasma amino acid concentrations, especially with respect to the sulfur-containing compounds, methionine, L-cysteine, L-cysteine sulfinic acid, taurine and free inorganic sulfate, also the derived ratios of L-cysteine/L-cysteine sulfinic acid and L-cysteine/free inorganic sulfate. It was concluded that plasma amino acid levels or derived ratios cannot be employed to predict the degree of S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (or vice versa) and that it is doubtful if the enzyme, cysteine dioxygenase, has any involvement in the metabolism of this drug.

  18. Characterization of an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-like protein found in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Helen J; Sanchez-Perez, Angeles; Weiser, Silvia; Austin, Christopher J D; Astelbauer, Florian; Miu, Jenny; McQuillan, James A; Stocker, Roland; Jermiin, Lars S; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2007-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (INDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) each catalyze the first step in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. We describe the discovery of another enzyme with this activity, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-like protein (INDOL1), which is closely related to INDO and is expressed in mice and humans. The corresponding genes have a similar genomic structure and are situated adjacent to each other on human and mouse chromosome 8. They are likely to have arisen by gene duplication before the origin of the tetrapods. The expression of INDOL1 is highest in the mouse kidney, followed by epididymis, and liver. Expression of mouse INDOL1 was further localized to the tubular cells in the kidney and the spermatozoa. INDOL1 was assigned its name because of its structural similarity to INDO. We demonstrate that INDOL1 catalyses the conversion of tryptophan to kynurenine therefore a more appropriate nomenclature for the enzymes might be INDO-1 and INDO-2, or the more commonly-used abbreviations, IDO-1 and IDO-2. Although the two proteins have similar enzymatic activities, their different expression patterns within tissues and during malaria infection, suggests a distinct role for each protein. This identification of INDOL1 may help to explain the regulation of the diversity of physiological and patho-physiological processes in which the kynurenine pathway is involved.

  19. The cystine/glutamate antiporter regulates indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protein levels and enzymatic activity in human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Mildred L; D'Angelo, June A; Grimes, Zachary M; Fiebiger, Edda; Dickinson, Bonny L

    2012-11-30

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the tryptophan-catabolizing pathway and a key regulator of peripheral immune tolerance. As the suppressive effects of IDO are predominantly mediated by dendritic cells (DCs) and IDO-competent DCs promote long-term immunologic tolerance, a detailed understanding of how IDO expression and activity is regulated in these cells is central to the rational design of therapies to induce robust immune tolerance. We previously reported that the cystine/glutamate antiporter modulates the functional expression of IDO in human monocyte-derived DCs. Specifically, we showed that blocking antiporter uptake of cystine significantly increased both IDO mRNA and IDO enzymatic activity and that this correlated with impaired DC presentation of exogenous antigen to T cells via MHC class II and the cross-presentation pathway. The antiporter regulates intracellular and extracellular redox by transporting cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. Intracellular cystine is reduced to cysteine to support biosynthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione and cysteine is exported from the cell where it functions as an extracellular antioxidant. Here we show that antiporter control of IDO expression in DCs is reversible, independent of interferon-γ, regulated by redox, and requires active protein synthesis. These findings highlight a role for antiporter regulation of cellular redox as a critical control point for modulating IDO expression and activity in DCs. Thus, systemic disease and aging, processes that perturb redox homeostasis, may adversely affect immunity by promoting the generation of IDO-competent DCs.

  20. Synthesis and bioevaluation of pyrazole-benzimidazolone hybrids as novel human 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu-Ling; Lin, Hong-Yan; Ruan, Xu; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-03-06

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), an essential enzyme in tyrosine catabolism, is an important target for treating type I tyrosinemia. Inhibition of HPPD can effectively alleviate the symptoms of type I tyrosinemia. However, only one commercial HPPD inhibitor, 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl) cyclohexane-1,3-dione (NTBC), has been available for clinical use so far. In the present study, a series of novel pyrazole-benzimidazolone hybrids were designed, synthesized and evaluated as potent human HPPD inhibitors. Most of the new compounds displayed significant inhibitory activity against the recombinant human HPPD. Moreover, compound 9l was identified as the most potent candidate with IC50 value of 0.021 μM against recombinant human HPPD, about 3-fold more potent than NTBC. Thus the pyrazole-benzimidazolone hybrid has great potential to be further developed for the treatment of type I tyrosinemia.

  1. Antiparasitic and antiproliferative effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme expression in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S L; Carlin, J M; Pyati, P; Dai, W; Pfefferkorn, E R; Murphy, M J

    1994-01-01

    Studies were carried out to evaluate the proposed role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (INDO) induction in the antimicrobial and antiproliferative effects of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in human fibroblasts. The INDO cDNA coding region was cloned in the pMEP4 expression vector, containing the metallothionein (MTII) promoter in the sense (+ve) or the antisense (-ve) orientation. Human fibroblasts (GM637) stably transfected with the sense construct expressed INDO activity after treatment with CdCl2 or ZnSO4, but cells transfected with the antisense construct did not. The growth of Chlamydia psittaci was strongly inhibited in INDO +ve cells but not in INDO -ve cells after treatment with Cd2+ or Zn2+. The inhibition correlated with the level of INDO activity induced and could be reversed by the addition of excess tryptophan to the medium. The growth of Toxoplasma gondii was also strongly inhibited in INDO +ve cells but not in INDO -ve cells after treatment with Cd2+. Expression of Cd(2+)-induced INDO activity also inhibited thymidine incorporation and led to cytotoxicity in INDO +ve cells but not in INDO -ve cells. Thus, the induction of INDO activity by IFN-gamma may be an important factor in the antimicrobial and antiproliferative effects of IFN-gamma in human fibroblasts. Images PMID:8188349

  2. Resveratrol intake enhances indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdoni, Guido A; Fuchs, Dietmar; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Gostner, Johanna M

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound found in various nutrients that was shown to have immunomodulatory, anti-cancerogenic, and cardioprotective effects. The regulation of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the rate-limiting enzyme in inflammatory tryptophan metabolism, has been proposed to be involved in resveratrol's biological effects. These observations, however, rely on in vitro findings and animal studies. Therefore, we assessed the impact of resveratrol on tryptophan metabolism after oral intake in humans. Healthy volunteers were orally administrated 5g resveratrol (n=8) or placebo (n=2) in a pilot study. IDO activity was determined by analyzing plasma levels of tryptophan and kynurenine. Determination of the immune activation marker neopterin was included in the analysis. Resveratrol administration significantly reduced tryptophan levels 2.5h (presveratrol administration. This is the first evidence of a modulatory effect of orally administered resveratrol on tryptophan metabolism in humans. Since IDO has been shown to play a crucial role in immunity, cancer development and regulation of vascular tone, the modulation of this enzyme might be involved in resveratrol's diverse biological effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  3. Expression and post-translational modification of human 4-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarenstrup, Lene; Falch, Anne Marie; Jakobsen, Kirsten K; Neve, Søren; Henriksen L, Linda Ø; Tommerup, Niels; Leffers, Henrik; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPD) (EC 1.13.11.27) is a key enzyme involved in tyrosine catabolism. Congenital HPD deficiency is a rare, relatively benign condition known as hereditary type III tyrosinemia. The severe type I tyrosinemia, caused by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase which functions downstream of HPD in the tyrosine degradation pathway, is often associated with decreased expression of HPD, and interestingly, inhibition of HPD activity seems to ameliorate the clinical symptoms of type I tyrosinemia. The HPD gene was previously mapped to the chromosomal region 12q24-->qter. In the present study high-resolution chromosome mapping localized the HPD gene to 12q24.31. DNase I footprinting, revealed that four regions of the HPD promoter were protected by rat liver nuclear proteins. Computer-assisted analyses suggested that these elements might bind Sp1/AP2, HNF4, HNF3/CREB, and C/EBP, respectively. In transient transfection experiments, the proximal 271bp of the promoter conferred basal transcriptional activation in human Chang cells. Sequences in intron 1 were able to enhance the activity of this basal promoter. Finally, vaccinia virus-based expression provided evidence that HPD is subject to phosphorylation, and furthermore, allowed mapping of the HPD protein in the human keratinocyte 2D database.

  4. Assay of Cysteine in Human Serum with Quinine-Ce4+ Chemiluminescence System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive and selective chemiluminescence (CL) method was developed for the determination of cysteine. This method is based on that the weak CL of cysteine oxidized with cerium (IV) can be greatly enhanced by quinine, and the total cysteine in human serum can be detected through simply diluting with water, showing a simpler analytical characteristic.

  5. Localization of the human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) gene to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkin, D.J.; Jones, C. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (United States)); Kimbro, K.S.; Taylor, M.W. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)); Barr, B.L.; Gupta, S.L. (Hipple Cancer Research Center, Dayton, OH (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first enzyme in the catabolic pathway for tryptophan. This extrahepatic enzyme differs from the hepatic enzyme, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), in molecular as well as enzymatic characteristics, although both enzymes catalyze the same reaction: cleavage of tryptophan into N-formylkynurenine. The induction of IDO by IFN-[gamma] plays a role in the antigrowth effect of IFN-[gamma] in cell cultures and in the inhibition of intracellular pathogens, e.g., Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci. Tryptophan is also the precursor for the synthesis of serotonin, and reduced levels of tryptophan and serotonin found in AIDS patients have been correlated with the presence of IFN-[gamma] and consequent elevation of IDO activity. The IDO enzyme has been purified and characterized, and its cDNA and genomic DNA clones have been isolated and analyzed. DNA from hybrid cells containing fragments of human chromosome 8 was used to determine the regional localization of the IDO gene on chromosome 8. The hybrids R30-5B and R30-2A contain 8p11 [yields] qter and 8q13 [yields] qter, respectively. Hybrid 229-3A contains the 8pter [yields] q11. The hybrid R30-2A was negative for the IDO gene, whereas R30-5B and 229-3A were positive as analyzed by PCR and verified by Southern blotting. Only the region close to the centromere is shared by R30-5B and 229-3A hybrids. The results indicate that the IDO gene is located on chromosome 8p11 [yields] q11.

  6. Molecular basis for catalysis and substrate-mediated cellular stabilization of human tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Forouhar, Farhad; Kim, Sung-Mi; Lew, Scott; Wang, YongQiang; Karkashon, Shay; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Chiang, Bing-Yu; Hussain, Munif; Correia, Maria Almira; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) play a central role in tryptophan metabolism and are involved in many cellular and disease processes. Here we report the crystal structure of human TDO (hTDO) in a ternary complex with the substrates L-Trp and O2 and in a binary complex with the product N-formylkynurenine (NFK), defining for the first time the binding modes of both substrates and the product of this enzyme. The structure indicates that the dioxygenation reaction is initiated by a direct attack of O2 on the C2 atom of the L-Trp indole ring. The structure also reveals an exo binding site for L-Trp, located ~42 Å from the active site and formed by residues conserved among tryptophan-auxotrophic TDOs. Biochemical and cellular studies indicate that Trp binding at this exo site does not affect enzyme catalysis but instead it retards the degradation of hTDO through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. This exo site may therefore provide a novel L-Trp-mediated regulation mechanism for cellular degradation of hTDO, which may have important implications in human diseases. PMID:27762317

  7. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia.

  8. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity. PMID:23417561

  9. The different catalytic roles of the metal-binding ligands in human 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Shen, Chia-Pei; Chen, Yi-Tong; Lee, Sung-Jai; Lloyd, Matthew D; Lee, Hwei-Jen

    2016-05-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is a non-haem iron(II)-dependent oxygenase that catalyses the conversion of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) to homogentisate (HG). In the active site, a strictly conserved 2-His-1-Glu facial triad co-ordinates the iron ready for catalysis. Substitution of these residues resulted in about a 10-fold decrease in the metal binding affinity, as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, and a large reduction in enzyme catalytic efficiencies. The present study revealed the vital role of the ligand Glu(349) in enzyme function. Replacing this residue with alanine resulted in loss of activity. The E349G variant retained 5% activity for the coupled reaction, suggesting that co-ordinating water may be able to support activation of the trans-bound dioxygen upon substrate binding. The reaction catalysed by the H183A variant was fully uncoupled. H183A variant catalytic activity resulted in protein cleavage between Ile(267) and Ala(268) and the production of an N-terminal fragment. The H266A variant was able to produce 4-hydroxyphenylacetate (HPA), demonstrating that decarboxylation had occurred but that there was no subsequent product formation. Structural modelling of the variant enzyme with bound dioxygen revealed the rearrangement of the co-ordination environment and the dynamic behaviour of bound dioxygen in the H266A and H183A variants respectively. These models suggest that the residues regulate the geometry of the reactive oxygen intermediate during the oxidation reaction. The mutagenesis and structural simulation studies demonstrate the critical and unique role of each ligand in the function of HPPD, and which correlates with their respective co-ordination position.

  10. Activation of human acid sphingomyelinase through modification or deletion of C-terminal cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huawei; Edmunds, Tim; Baker-Malcolm, Jennifer; Karey, Kenneth P; Estes, Scott; Schwarz, Cordula; Hughes, Heather; Van Patten, Scott M

    2003-08-29

    One form of Niemann-Pick disease is caused by a deficiency in the enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase. During efforts to develop an enzyme replacement therapy based on a recombinant form of human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), purified preparations of the recombinant enzyme were found to have substantially increased specific activity if cell harvest media were stored for several weeks at -20 degrees C prior to purification. This increase in activity was found to correlate with the loss of the single free thiol on rhASM, suggesting the involvement of a cysteine residue. It was demonstrated that a variety of chemical modifications of the free cysteine on rhASM all result in substantial activation of the enzyme, and the modified cysteine responsible for this activation was shown to be the C-terminal residue (Cys629). Activation was also achieved by copper-promoted dimerization of rhASM (via cysteine) and by C-terminal truncation using carboxypeptidase Y. The role of the C-terminal cysteine in activation was confirmed by creating mutant forms of rhASM in which this residue was either deleted or replaced by a serine, with both forms having substantially higher specific activity than wild-type rhASM. These results indicate that purified rhASM can be activated in vitro by loss of the free thiol on the C-terminal cysteine via chemical modification, dimerization, or deletion of this amino acid residue. This method of activation is similar to the cysteine switch mechanism described previously for matrix metalloproteinases and could represent a means of posttranslational regulation of ASM activity in vivo.

  11. Covalent binding of nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue in human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Hulst, A.G.; Jansen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Covalent binding of various clinically important nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin, in vitro and in vivo, is demonstrated. A rapid method for detection of these adducts is presented, based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the adducted

  12. Refolding of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor: effect of cysteine/cystine redox system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Krishnanand; Shebannavar, Sunil; Kattavarapu, Krishna; Pokalwar, Santosh; Mishra, Maheshwari K; Chauhan, Ugam Kumari

    2012-08-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a multifunctional cytokine which is widely used for treating neutropenia in humans. Evaluation of alternative to expensive components of redox buffer (reduced and oxidized glutathione) is an important step in reducing the cost of production of human biotherapeutic proteins. In the present study, refolding of recombinant human G-CSF expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs) in E. coli was optimized using cysteine and cystine redox agents. The refolding to correct native form of G-CSF was assessed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The optimized concentrations of cysteine and cystine for correct refolding of G-CSF were found to be 2 mM and 1 mM, respectively. The correctly refolded G-CSF was detected as early as 4 h of incubation in renaturation buffer containing optimized concentrations of cysteine (2 mM) and cystine (1 mM) redox agents. Refolding of G-CSF in optimized redox system increased with increase in shuffling time. Overall, the results suggested the use of cysteine/cystine redox pair could be an alternative to the costlier redox pairs for successful refolding of G-CSF and possibly other human biotherapeutic proteins of importance.

  13. Effect of Copper on l-Cysteine/l-Cystine Influx in Normal Human Erythrocytes and Erythrocytes of Wilson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nabarun; Bhattacharjee, Debojyoti; Rout, Jayanta Kumar; Dasgupta, Anindya; Bhattacharya, Gorachand; Sarkar, Chandan; Gangopadhyaya, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Wilson's disease is a disease of abnormal copper metabolism in which free serum copper level is raised. The objective of the study was to determine, whether in Wilson disease, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx into RBC was decreased or not and the specific amino acid transporter affected by copper in normal human RBC. For l-cysteine/l-cystine influx, ten untreated cases, ten treated cases and ten age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. To study the effect of copper on l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in RBC, 15 healthy subjects were selected. RBC GSH and l-cysteine/l-cystine influx were estimated by Beautler's and Yildiz's method respectively. In untreated cases, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx and erythrocyte GSH level were decreased showing that elevated level of free copper in serum or media decreased l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in human RBC. Copper treatment inhibited L amino acid transporter in normal RBC specifically.

  14. Possible identity of IL-8 converting enzyme in human fibroblasts as a cysteine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kensaku; Sano, Emiko; Nakaki, Toshio; Naruto, Masanobu

    2003-04-01

    A converting activity was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts, which secrete 72IL-8 and 77IL-8 in treatment with IFN-beta and poly I: poly C. 77IL-8 was significantly converted to 72IL-8 by a partially purified fraction of the culture supernatant of human diploid fibroblasts. The converting activity, which was temperature-dependent and optimal at pH 6, was completely inhibited by cysteine protease inhibitors, antipain dihydrochloride and E-64, but not by other types of protease inhibitors. These data clearly show that human diploid fibroblasts are capable of processing IL-8 to produce a mature IL-8 and that the putative converting enzyme appears to be a cysteine protease.

  15. EXPRESSION AND POST-TRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION OF HUMAN 4-HYDROXY-PHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarenstrup, Lene; Falch, Anne-Marie; Jakobsen, Kirsten K.

    2002-01-01

    , HNF3/CREB, and C/EBP, respectively. In transient transfection experiments, the proximal 271 bp of the promoter conferred basal transcriptional activation in human Chang cells. Sequences in intron 1 were able to enhance the activity of this basal promoter. Finally, vaccinia virus-based expression...

  16. Three-dimensional cultures modeling premalignant progression of human breast epithelial cells: role of cysteine cathepsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Stefanie R.; Sameni, Mansoureh; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Moin, Kamiar

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in early stages of human breast cancer. To assess the potential role of cathepsin B in premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells, we employed a 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay culture model of MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and isogenic variants that replicate the in vivo phenotypes of hyperplasia (MCF10AneoT) and atypical hyperplasia (MCF10AT1). MCF10A cells developed into polarized acinar structures with central lumens. In contrast, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells form larger structures in which the lumens are filled with cells. CA074Me, a cell-permeable inhibitor selective for the cysteine cathepsins B and L, reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells in 3D culture. We detected active cysteine cathepsins in the isogenic MCF10 variants in 3D culture with GB111, a cell-permeable activity-based probe, and established differential inhibition of cathepsin B in our 3D cultures. We conclude that cathepsin B promotes proliferation and premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with studies by others showing that deletion of cathepsin B in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice, a murine model that is predisposed to development of mammary cancer, reduces malignant progression. PMID:23667900

  17. Solution oxygen-17 NMR application for observing a peroxidized cysteine residue in oxidized human SOD1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Noriko; Yoshihara, Daisaku; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Eguchi, Hironobu; Suzuki, Keiichiro

    2016-12-01

    NMR active nuclei, 1H, 13C and 15N, are usually used for determination of protein structure. However, solution 17O-NMR application to proteins is extremely limited although oxygen is an essential element in biomolecules. Proteins are oxidized through cysteine residues by two types of oxidation. One is reversible oxidation such as disulphide bonding (Cys-S-S-Cys) and the other is irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO 2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO 3H). Copper,Zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a key enzyme in the protection of cells from the superoxide anion radical. The SH group at Cys 111 residue in human SOD1 is selectively oxidized to -SO 2H and -SO 3H with atmospheric oxygen, and this oxidized human SOD1 is also suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative diseases, probably mainly via protein aggregation. Therefore, information on the structural and the dynamics of the oxidized cysteine residue would be crucial for the understanding of protein aggregation mechanism. Although the -SO 3H group on proteins cannot be directly detected by conventional NMR techniques, we successfully performed the site-specific 17O-labeling of Cys 111 in SOD1 using ^{17}it {O}2 gas and the 17O-NMR analysis for the first time. We observed clear 17O signal derived from a protein molecule and show that 17O-NMR is a sensitive probe for studying the structure and dynamics of the 17O-labeled protein molecule. This novel and unique strategy can have great impact on many research fields in biology and chemistry.

  18. Significance of redox-active cysteines in human FAD synthase isoform 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccolis, Angelica; Galluccio, Michele; Nitride, Chiara; Giancaspero, Teresa Anna; Ferranti, Pasquale; Iametti, Stefania; Indiveri, Cesare; Bonomi, Francesco; Barile, Maria

    2014-12-01

    FAD synthase (FMN:ATP adenylyl transferase, FMNAT or FADS, EC 2.7.7.2) is the last enzyme in the pathway converting riboflavin into FAD. In humans, FADS is localized in different subcellular compartments and exists in different isoforms. Isoform 2 (490-amino acids) is organized in two domains: the 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase domain, that is the FAD-forming catalytic domain, and one resembling a molybdopterin-binding (MPTb) domain, with a hypothetical regulatory role. hFADS2 contains ten Cys residues, seven of which located in the PAPS reductase domain, with a possible involvement either in FAD synthesis or in FAD delivery to cognate apo-flavoproteins. A homology model of the PAPS reductase domain of hFADS2 revealed a co-ordinated network among the Cys residues in this domain. In this model, C312 and C303 are very close to the flavin substrate, consistent with a significantly lowered FAD synthesis rate in C303A and C312A mutants. FAD synthesis is also inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents, suggesting the involvement of free cysteines in the hFADS2 catalytic cycle. Mass spectrometry measurements and titration with thiol reagents on wt hFADS2 and on several individual cysteine/alanine mutants allowed us to detect two stably reduced cysteines (C139 and C241, one for each protein domain), two stable disulfide bridges (C399-C402, C303-C312, both in the PAPS domain), and two unstable disulfides (C39-C50; C440-C464). Whereas the C39-C50 unstable disulfide is located in the MPTb domain and appears to have no catalytic relevance, a cysteine-based redox switch may involve formation and breakdown of a disulfide between C440 and C464 in the PAPS domain.

  19. Evaluation of the Effects of S-Allyl-L-cysteine, S-Methyl-L-cysteine, trans-S-1-Propenyl-L-cysteine, and Their N-Acetylated and S-Oxidized Metabolites on Human CYP Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Three major organosulfur compounds of aged garlic extract, S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC), S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMC), and trans-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine (S1PC), were examined for their effects on the activities of five major isoforms of human CYP enzymes: CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The metabolite formation from probe substrates for the CYP isoforms was examined in human liver microsomes in the presence of organosulfur compounds at 0.01-1 mM by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Allicin, a major component of garlic, inhibited CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 activity by 21-45% at 0.03 mM. In contrast, a CYP2C9-catalyzed reaction was enhanced by up to 1.9 times in the presence of allicin at 0.003-0.3 mM. SAC, SMC, and S1PC had no effect on the activities of the five isoforms, except that S1PC inhibited CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylation by 31% at 1 mM. The N-acetylated metabolites of the three compounds inhibited the activities of several isoforms to a varying degree at 1 mM. N-Acetyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-methyl-L-cysteine inhibited the reactions catalyzed by CYP2D6 and CYP1A2, by 19 and 26%, respectively, whereas trans-N-acetyl-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine showed weak to moderate inhibition (19-49%) of CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 activities. On the other hand, both the N-acetylated and S-oxidized metabolites of SAC, SMC, and S1PC had little effect on the reactions catalyzed by the five isoforms. These results indicated that SAC, SMC, and S1PC have little potential to cause drug-drug interaction due to CYP inhibition or activation in vivo, as judged by their minimal effects (IC50>1 mM) on the activities of five major isoforms of human CYP in vitro.

  20. Cysteine residues in the Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 are essential for viral infectivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, X Y; Sova, P; Chao, W; Volsky, D J

    1994-01-01

    The infectivity factor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), Vif, contains two cysteine residues which are highly conserved among animal lentiviruses. We introduced substitutions of leucine for cysteine residues in the vif gene of a full-length HIV-1 clone to analyze their roles in viral infection. Mutant viruses containing substitutions in either Cys-114, Cys-133, or both displayed a vif-negative infection phenotype similar to that of an isogeneic vif deletion mutant, namely, a cel...

  1. s-Ethyl Cysteine and s-Methyl Cysteine Protect Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Te-chun; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-09-01

    Protective effects and actions from s-ethyl cysteine (SEC) and s-methyl cysteine (SMC) for BEAS-2B cells were examined. BEAS-2B cells were pretreated with SEC or SMC at 4, 8, or 16 μmol/L, and followed by hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) treatment. Data showed that H2 O2 enhanced Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-8 expression, and declined Bcl-2 expression. However, SEC or SMC dose-dependently decreased caspase-3 expression and reserved Bcl-2 expression. H2 O2 increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lowered glutathione level, glutathione peroxide, and glutathione reductase activities in BEAS-2B cells. SEC or SMC pretreatments reduced ROS generation, and maintained glutathione redox cycle in those cells. H2 O2 upregulated the expression of both p47(phox) and gp91(phox) . SEC and SMC downregulated p47(phox) expression. SEC or SMC at 8 and 16 μmol/L decreased H2 O2 -induced release of inflammatory cytokines. H2 O2 stimulated the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase. SEC and SMC pretreatments dose-dependently downregulated NF-κB p65 and p-p38 expression. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate or SB203580 inhibited NF-κB activation and p38 phosphorylation; thus, SEC or SMC pretreatments failed to affect protein expression of these factors. These novel findings suggest that SEC or SMC could protect bronchial cells and benefit respiratory epithelia stability and functions.

  2. Expression of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase and production of kynurenine pathway metabolites in triple transgenic mice and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wu

    Full Text Available To assess the role of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD, the expression and localization of key components of the kynurenine pathway including the key regulatory enzyme tryptophan 2,3 dioxygenase (TDO, and the metabolites tryptophan, kynurenine, kynurenic acid, quinolinic acid and picolinic acid were assessed in different brain regions of triple transgenic AD mice. The expression and cell distribution of TDO and quinolinic acid, and their co-localization with neurofibrillary tangles and senile β amyloid deposition were also determined in hippocampal sections from human AD brains. The expression of TDO mRNA was significantly increased in the cerebellum of AD mouse brain. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the density of TDO immuno-positive cells was significantly higher in the AD mice. The production of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid strongly increased in the hippocampus in a progressive and age-dependent manner in AD mice. Significantly higher TDO and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 immunoreactivity was observed in the hippocampus of AD patients. Furthermore, TDO co-localizes with quinolinic acid, neurofibrillary tangles-tau and amyloid deposits in the hippocampus of AD. These results show that the kynurenine pathway is over-activated in AD mice. This is the first report demonstrating that TDO is highly expressed in the brains of AD mice and in AD patients, suggesting that TDO-mediated activation of the kynurenine pathway could be involved in neurofibrillary tangles formation and associated with senile plaque. Our study adds to the evidence that the kynurenine pathway may play important roles in the neurodegenerative processes of AD.

  3. Cathepsin F cysteine protease of the human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porntip Pinlaor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is classified as a class I carcinogen due to the association between cholangiocarcinoma and chronic O. viverrini infection. During its feeding activity within the bile duct, the parasite secretes several cathepsin F cysteine proteases that may induce or contribute to the pathologies associated with hepatobiliary abnormalities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe the cDNA, gene organization, phylogenetic relationships, immunolocalization, and functional characterization of the cathepsin F cysteine protease gene, here termed Ov-cf-1, from O. viverrini. The full length mRNA of 1020 nucleotides (nt encoded a 326 amino acid zymogen consisting of a predicted signal peptide (18 amino acids, aa, prosegment (95 aa, and mature protease (213 aa. BLAST analysis using the Ov-CF-1 protein as the query revealed that the protease shared identity with cathepsin F-like cysteine proteases of other trematodes, including Clonorchis sinensis (81%, Paragonimus westermani (58%, Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum (52%, and with vertebrate cathepsin F (51%. Transcripts encoding the protease were detected in all developmental stages that parasitize the mammalian host. The Ov-cf-1 gene, of approximately 3 kb in length, included seven exons interrupted by six introns; the exons ranged from 69 to 267 bp in length, the introns from 43 to 1,060 bp. The six intron/exon boundaries of Ov-cf-1 were conserved with intron/exon boundaries in the human cathepsin F gene, although the gene structure of human cathepsin F is more complex. Unlike Ov-CF-1, human cathepsin F zymogen includes a cystatin domain in the prosegment region. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the fluke, human, and other cathepsin Fs branched together in a clade discrete from the cathepsin L cysteine proteases. A recombinant Ov-CF-1 zymogen that displayed low-level activity was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Although the recombinant

  4. Cysteine pK[subscript a] Depression by a Protonated Glutamic Acid in Human DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Anna C.; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Remington, Benjamin C.; Hasim, Sahar; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A. (Maryland); (UNL)

    2008-07-09

    Human DJ-1, a disease-associated protein that protects cells from oxidative stress, contains an oxidation-sensitive cysteine (C106) that is essential for its cytoprotective activity. The origin of C106 reactivity is obscure, due in part to the absence of an experimentally determined pK{sub a} value for this residue. We have used atomic-resolution X-ray crystallography and UV spectroscopy to show that C106 has a depressed pK{sub a} of 5.4 {+-} 0.1 and that the C106 thiolate accepts a hydrogen bond from a protonated glutamic acid side chain (E18). X-ray crystal structures and cysteine pK{sub a} analysis of several site-directed substitutions at residue 18 demonstrate that the protonated carboxylic acid side chain of E18 is required for the maximal stabilization of the C106 thiolate. A nearby arginine residue (R48) participates in a guanidinium stacking interaction with R28 from the other monomer in the DJ-1 dimer and elevates the pK{sub a} of C106 by binding an anion that electrostatically suppresses thiol ionization. Our results show that the ionizable residues (E18, R48, and R28) surrounding C106 affect its pK{sub a} in a way that is contrary to expectations based on the typical ionization behavior of glutamic acid and arginine. Lastly, a search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) produces several candidate hydrogen-bonded aspartic/glutamic acid-cysteine interactions, which we propose are particularly common in the DJ-1 superfamily.

  5. Cysteine pKa Depression by a Protonated Glutamic Acid in Human DJ-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Anna C.; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Remington, Benjamin C.; Hasim, Sahar; Pozharski, Edwin; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Human DJ-1, a disease-associated protein that protects cells from oxidative stress, contains an oxidation-sensitive cysteine (C106) that is essential for its cytoprotective activity. The origin of C106 reactivity is obscure, due in part to the absence of an experimentally determined pKa value for this residue. We have used atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and UV spectroscopy to show that C106 has a depressed pKa of 5.4±0.1 and that the C106 thiolate accepts a hydrogen bond from a protonated glutamic acid sidechain (E18). X-ray crystal structures and cysteine pKa analysis of several site-directed substitutions at residue 18 demonstrate that the protonated carboxylic acid sidechain of E18 is required to maximally stabilize the C106 thiolate. A nearby arginine residue (R48) participates in a guanidinium stacking interaction with R28 from the other monomer in the DJ-1 dimer and elevates the pKa of C106 by binding an anion that electrostatically suppresses thiol ionization. Our results show that the ionizable residues (E18, R48 and R28) surrounding C106 affect its pKa in a way that is contrary to expectations based on the typical ionization behavior of glutamic acid and arginine. Lastly, a search of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) produces several candidate hydrogen bonded aspartic/glutamic acid-cysteine interactions, which we propose are particularly common in the DJ-1 superfamily. PMID:18570440

  6. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a cysteine protease inhibitor from the human nematode parasite Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sanling; Dong, Jianmei; Mei, Guoqiang; Liu, Guiyun; Xu, Wei; Su, Zhong; Liu, Jinsong

    2011-02-01

    The cysteine protease inhibitor from Ascaris lumbricoides, a roundworm that lives in the human intestine, may be involved in the suppression of human immune responses. Here, the molecular cloning, protein expression and purification, preliminary crystallization and crystallographic characterization of the cysteine protease inhibitor from A. lumbricoides are reported. The rod-shaped crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.40, b = 37.52, c = 62.92 Å, β = 118.26°. The crystal diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  8. Eosinophil Granulocytes Account for Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Mediated Immune Escape in Human Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Astigiano

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, a catabolizing enzyme of tryptophan, is supposed to play a role in tumor immune escape. Its expression in solid tumors has not yet been well elucidated: IDO can be expressed by the tumor cells themselves, or by ill-defined infiltrating cells, possibly depending on tumor type. We have investigated IDO expression in 25 cases of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, we found that IDO was expressed not by tumor cells, but by normal cells infiltrating the peritumoral stroma. These cells were neither macrophages nor dendritic cells, and were identified as eosinophil granulocytes. The amount of IDO-positive eosinophils varied in different cases, ranging from a few cells to more than 50 per field at x200 magnification. IDO protein in NSCLC was enzymatically active. Therefore, at least in NSCLC cases displaying a large amount of these cells in the inflammatory infiltrate, IDO-positive eosinophils could exert an effective immunosuppressive action. On analyzing the 17 patients with adequate follow-up, a significant relationship was found between the amount of IDO-positive infiltrate and overall survival. This finding suggests that the degree of IDO-positive infiltrate could be a prognostic marker in NSCLC.

  9. Chromium speciation in human blood samples based on acetyl cysteine by dispersive liquid-liquid biomicroextraction and in-vitro evaluation of acetyl cysteine/cysteine for decreasing of hexavalent chromium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Ghazaghi, Mehri; Mousavi, Hassan Z

    2016-01-25

    A rapid and efficient method based on ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid biomicroextraction (IL-DLLBME) was used for speciation and preconcentration of Chromium (III, VI) in human blood samples before determination by electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ET-AAS). In this method, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate as a ionic liquid was dissolved in acetone as a dispersant solvent and then the binary solution was rapidly injected by a syringe into the blood samples containing Cr(III), which have already complexed by acetyl cysteine (NAC) at optimized pH. Under the optimal conditions, the linear range (LR), limit of detection (LOD) and preconcentration factor (PF) were obtained 0.03-4.4 μg L(-1), 0.005 μg L(-1) and 10 respectively (RSD cysteine (Cys) as a prodrug of NAC can decrease the concentration of Cr(VI) in blood samples and human body. Validation of methodology was confirmed by standard reference material (SRM).

  10. Mercury and zinc differentially inhibit shark and human CFTR orthologues: involvement of shark cysteine 102.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerhard J; Mehr, Ali Poyan; Sirota, Jeffrey C; Aller, Stephen G; Decker, Sarah E; Dawson, David C; Forrest, John N

    2006-03-01

    The apical membrane is an important site of mercury toxicity in shark rectal gland tubular cells. We compared the effects of mercury and other thiol-reacting agents on shark CFTR (sCFTR) and human CFTR (hCFTR) chloride channels using two-electrode voltage clamping of cRNA microinjected Xenopus laevis oocytes. Chloride conductance was stimulated by perfusing with 10 microM forskolin (FOR) and 1 mM IBMX, and then thio-reactive species were added. In oocytes expressing sCFTR, FOR + IBMX mean stimulated Cl(-) conductance was inhibited 69% by 1 microM mercuric chloride and 78% by 5 microM mercuric chloride (IC(50) of 0.8 microM). Despite comparable stimulation of conductance, hCFTR was insensitive to 1 microM HgCl(2) and maximum inhibition was 15% at the highest concentration used (5 microM). Subsequent exposure to glutathione (GSH) did not reverse the inhibition of sCFTR by mercury, but dithiothreitol (DTT) completely reversed this inhibition. Zinc (50-200 microM) also reversibly inhibited sCFTR (40-75%) but did not significantly inhibit hCFTR. Similar inhibition of sCFTR but not hCFTR was observed with an organic mercurial, p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid (pCMBS). The first membrane spanning domain (MSD1) of sCFTR contains two unique cysteines, C102 and C303. A chimeric construct replacing MSD1 of hCFTR with the corresponding sequence of sCFTR was highly sensitive to mercury. Site-specific mutations introducing the first but not the second shark unique cysteine in hCFTR MSD1 resulted in full sensitivity to mercury. These experiments demonstrate a profound difference in the sensitivity of shark vs. human CFTR to inhibition by three thiol-reactive substances, an effect that involves C102 in the shark orthologue.

  11. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  12. Cystatins - Extra- and intracellular cysteine protease inhibitors: High-level secretion and uptake of cystatin C in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Hanna; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Vogel, Lotte

    2010-01-01

    Cystatins are present in mammals, birds, fish, insects, plants, fungi and protozoa and constitute a large protein family, with most members sharing a cysteine protease inhibitory function. In humans 12 functional cystatins exist, forming three groups based on molecular organisation and distribution...

  13. Contribution of cysteine residues in the extracellular domain of the F protein of human respiratory syncytial virus to its function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melero José A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mature F protein of all known isolates of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV contains fifteen absolutely conserved cysteine (C residues that are highly conserved among the F proteins of other pneumoviruses as well as the paramyxoviruses. To explore the contribution of the cysteines in the extracellular domain to the fusion activity of HRSV F protein, each cysteine was changed to serine. Mutation of cysteines 37, 313, 322, 333, 343, 358, 367, 393, 416, and 439 abolished or greatly reduced cell surface expression suggesting these residues are critical for proper protein folding and transport to the cell surface. As expected, the fusion activity of these mutations was greatly reduced or abolished. Mutation of cysteine residues 212, 382, and 422 had little to no effect upon cell surface expression or fusion activity at 32°C, 37°C, or 39.5°C. Mutation of C37 and C69 in the F2 subunit either abolished or reduced cell surface expression by 75% respectively. None of the mutations displayed a temperature sensitive phenotype.

  14. Isolation of S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine from human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinuta, M; Ubuka, T; Yao, K; Futani, S; Fujiwara, M; Kurozumi, Y

    1992-01-01

    S-[2-Carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine (I), a proposed precursor of 3-[(carboxymethyl)thio]-3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)propanoic acid [Kinuta, Yao, Masuoka, Ohta, Teraoka & Ubuka (1991) Biochem. J. 275, 617-721], was isolated from healthy human urine by using ion-exchange column chromatography. Identification of the isolated compound with compound (I) was performed by physicochemical analyses involving i.r., m.s. and n.m.r. spectrometries as well as high-voltage paper electrophoresis, t.l.c. and paper chromatography. Compound (I) was synthesized in 80% yield by incubation of a reaction mixture containing trans-urocanic acid and 3-fold excess of cysteine at 70-75 degrees C. From these results we suggest that natural thiol compounds such as cysteine and GSH participate in the metabolism of urocanic acid, a key metabolite of L-histidine. PMID:1567378

  15. Impact of cysteine variants on the structure, activity, and stability of recombinant human α-galactosidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huawei; Honey, Denise M; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Park, Anna; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Wei, Ronnie R; Pan, Clark Q; Edmunds, Tim

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant human α-galactosidase A (rhαGal) is a homodimeric glycoprotein deficient in Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder. In this study, each cysteine residue in rhαGal was replaced with serine to understand the role each cysteine plays in the enzyme structure, function, and stability. Conditioned media from transfected HEK293 cells were assayed for rhαGal expression and enzymatic activity. Activity was only detected in the wild type control and in mutants substituting the free cysteine residues (C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S). Cysteine-to-serine substitutions at the other sites lead to the loss of expression and/or activity, consistent with their involvement in the disulfide bonds found in the crystal structure. Purification and further characterization confirmed that the C90S, C174S, and the C90S/C174S mutants are enzymatically active, structurally intact and thermodynamically stable as measured by circular dichroism and thermal denaturation. The purified inactive C142S mutant appeared to have lost part of its alpha-helix secondary structure and had a lower apparent melting temperature. Saturation mutagenesis study on Cys90 and Cys174 resulted in partial loss of activity for Cys174 mutants but multiple mutants at Cys90 with up to 87% higher enzymatic activity (C90T) compared to wild type, suggesting that the two free cysteines play differential roles and that the activity of the enzyme can be modulated by side chain interactions of the free Cys residues. These results enhanced our understanding of rhαGal structure and function, particularly the critical roles that cysteines play in structure, stability, and enzymatic activity.

  16. Dexamethasone and N-acetyl-cysteine attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced mucus expression in human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Lisa; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Steffen, Armin; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter; Hauber, Hans-Peter

    2011-04-01

    Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) induces mucus hypersecretion in airways. Therapeutic options to attenuate excessive mucus expression are sparse. To investigate the effect of steroids and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on PA-induced mucus expression. Calu-3 cells and explanted human mucosa from the upper airways were stimulated with either PA, lipopolysaccharide from alginate producing PA (smooth, sPA-LPS) or non-alginate producing PA (rough, rPA-LPS). Dexamethasone (DEX) and NAC were added in different concentrations. Expression of mucin (MUC5AC) gene and mucin protein expression was quantified using PAS (periodic acids Schiff) staining and real time PCR. PA, sPA-LPS or rPA-LPS significantly induced mucin protein and MUC5AC gene expression in Calu-3 cells and explanted mucosal tissue (P NAC significantly decreased PA-, sPA-LPS- and rPA-LPS-induced mucin protein expression both in vitro and ex vivo (P 0.05). Our data show that both an anti-inflammatory drug (DEX) and an anti-oxidative agent (NAC) can attenuate PA-induced mucus expression in human airways. These results support the use of steroids and NAC in clinical practice to treat PA-induced mucus hypersecretion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Activated human CD4+ T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth; Kongsbak, Martin; von Essen, Marina Rode; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell activation and proliferation independently of cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells.

  18. Regulation of human ADAM 12 protease by the prodomain. Evidence for a functional cysteine switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Overgaard, M T; Oxvig, C

    1999-01-01

    , with the prodomain maintaining the protease in a latent form. We now provide evidence that the latency mechanism of ADAM 12 can be explained by the cysteine switch model, in which coordination of Zn2+ in the active site of the catalytic domain by a cysteine residue in the prodomain is critical for inhibition...... of the protease. Replacing Cys179 with other amino acids results in an ADAM 12 proform that is proteolytically active, but latency can be restored by placing cysteine at other positions in the propeptide. None of the amino acids adjacent to the crucial cysteine residue is essential for blocking activity...... of the protease domain. In addition to its latency function, the prodomain is required for exit of ADAM 12 protease from the endoplasmic reticulum. Tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-1, -2, and -3 were not found to block proteolytic activity of ADAM 12, hence a physiological inhibitor of ADAM 12 protease...

  19. Molecular identification and cellular localization of a potential transport system involved in cystine/cysteine uptake in human lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Julie C; Lam, Leo; Li, Bo; Donaldson, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    In this study we have sought to identify whether cystine uptake mechanisms previously identified in the rat lens are also found in the human lens. Using a combination of reverse transcriptase PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, we show that the light chain subunit of the cystine/glutamate exchanger (XC-), xCT, and members of the glutamate transporter family (XAG) which include the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 4 (EAAT4) and the Alanine Serine Cysteine Transporter 2 (ASCT2) are all present at the transcript and protein level in human lenses. We demonstrate that in young lenses xCT, EAAT4 and ASCT2 are expressed in all regions indicating that a potential cystine uptake pathway similar to that found in the rat might also exist in human lenses. However, with increasing age, the immunolabeling for all transporters decreases, with no xCT labelling detected in the centre of old donor lenses. Our results show that XC- and EAAT4/ASCT2 may work together to mediate cystine uptake in the lens core of young human lenses. This suggests that the lens contains uptake mechanisms that are capable of accumulating cystine/cysteine in the lens centre where cysteine can be used as an antioxidant or cystine utilised as a source for protein-S-S-cysteine (PSSC) formation to buffer against oxidative stress. With increasing age, transporters in the lens core undergo age dependent post translational modifications. However, despite processing of these transporters with age, our results indicate that this cystine uptake pathway could account for the increased PSSC levels previously observed in the nucleus of older human lenses.

  20. Microdetermination of human serum albumin by differential pulse voltammetry at a L-cysteine modified silver electrode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Liyuan Lu; Yanqin Zi; Hongling Wang

    2008-07-01

    A simple and highly sensitive electrochemical method for the determination of human serum albumin (HSA) using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), based on a silver electrode modified with a self-assembled monolayer of L-cysteine, was developed. L-cysteine can be modified onto a silver electrode by covalent bonding through the sulfur to give stable and long-lived chemical electrodes. This electrode showed good sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and time stability in the determination of trace amounts of HSA by DPV technique. The detection limit can be as low as 4 × 10-17 mol/L. The optimum conditions for the determination were carefully investigated. This method had been applied to the determination of HSA in human serum samples. The results were in agreement with those given in standard method.

  1. Haemophilus ducreyi lipooligosaccharides induce expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase via type I interferons and tumor necrosis factor alpha in human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. In human inoculation experiments, most volunteers fail to clear the bacteria despite the infiltration of innate and adaptive immune cells to the infected sites. The immunosuppressive protein indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the L-tryptophan-kynurenine metabolic pathway. Tryptophan depletion and tryptophan metabolites contribute to pathogen persistence by inhibiting T cell proliferation, inducing T cell apoptosis, and promoting the expansion of FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We previously found that FOXP3(+) Treg cells are enriched in experimental lesions and that H. ducreyi induced IDO transcription in dendritic cells (DC) derived from blood of infected volunteers who developed pustules. Here, we showed that enzymatically active IDO was induced in DC by H. ducreyi. Neutralizing antibodies against interferon alpha/beta receptor 2 chain (IFNAR2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibited IDO induction. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) also inhibited IDO expression. Neither bacterial contact with nor uptake by DC was required for IDO activation. H. ducreyi culture supernatant and H. ducreyi lipooligosaccharides (LOS) induced IDO expression, which required type I interferons, TNF-α, and the three MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal regulated kinase) and NF-κB pathways. In addition, LOS-induced IFN-β activated the JAK-STAT pathway. Blocking the LOS/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway greatly reduced H. ducreyi-induced IDO production. These findings indicate that H. ducreyi-induced IDO expression in DC is largely mediated by LOS via type I interferon- and TNF-α-dependent mechanisms and the MAPK, NF-κB, and JAK-STAT pathways.

  2. Phenothiazine-based CaaX competitive inhibitors of human farnesyltransferase bearing a cysteine, methionine, serine or valine moiety as a new family of antitumoral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitriu, Gina-Mirabela; Bîcu, Elena; Belei, Dalila; Rigo, Benoît; Dubois, Joëlle; Farce, Amaury; Ghinet, Alina

    2015-10-15

    A new family of CaaX competitive inhibitors of human farnesyltransferase based on phenothiazine and carbazole skeleton bearing a l-cysteine, l-methionine, l-serine or l-valine moiety was designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated. Phenothiazine derivatives proved to be more active than carbazole-based compounds. Phenothiazine 1b with cysteine residue was the most promising inhibitor of human farnesyltransferase in the current study.

  3. The roles of cysteines in the heme domain of human soluble guanylate cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Zhong; Xiao Xiao Liu; Jie Pan; Zhong Xian Huang; Xiang Shi Tan

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a critical heme-containing enzyme involved in NO signaling.The dimerization of sGC subunits is necessary for its bioactivity and its mechanism is a striiking and an indistinct issue.The roles of heme domain cysteines of the sGC on the dimerization and heme binding were investigated herein.The site-directed mutations of three conserved cysteines (C78A,C 122A and C 174S) were studied systematically and the three mutants were characterized by gel filtration analysis,UV-vis spectroscopy and heime transfer examination.Cys78 was involved in heme binding but not referred to the dimerization,while Cys174 was demonstrated to be involved in the homodimerization.These results provide new insights into the cysteine-related dimerization regulation of sGC.

  4. Excretion of 3-Mercaptolactate-Cysteine Disulfide, Sulfate and Taurine in human Urine before and after Oral Administration of Sulfur-containing Amino Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuasa,Shigeki

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available The excretion of 3-mercaptolactate-cysteine mixed disulfide [S-(2-hydroxy-2-carboxyethylthio-L-cysteine, HCETC], sulfate and taurine in the urine of normal adults was investigated before and after oral administration of L-cysteine and related sulfur-containing amino acids. Before the loading of amino acids, the excretion (mean +/- SD per kg of body weight per day of HCETC, free sulfate and taurine was 0.096 +/- 0.042, 305.7 +/- 66.1 and 31.9 +/- 8.7 mumols, respectively. After the loading of L-cysteine (800 mumols/kg of body weight, the average excretion in the 24-h urine of HCETC increased 2-fold and that of taurine increased 1.6-fold. The average excretion of free sulfate after the L-cysteine loading was 989.4 +/- 145.1 and 388.8 +/- 51.6 mumols/kg per day in the first and second 24-h urine, respectively, indicating that the sulfur corresponding to 85% of the L-cysteine loaded was excreted as free sulfate in 24 h. Administration of L-cystine (400 mumols/kg resulted in similar results. The increase in HCETC after L-cysteine or L-cystine administration indicates that L-cysteine is metabolized in part through the transamination pathway (3-mercaptopyruvate pathway and that an equilibrium exists between the intake and excretion of sulfur in humans.

  5. Hydration and N-acetyl-l-cysteine alter the microstructure of human nail and bovine hoof: implications for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueiras-Nieto, L; Gómez-Amoza, J L; Delgado-Charro, M B; Otero-Espinar, F J

    2011-12-20

    This work aimed to (a) characterize the microstructure and porosity of human nail and bovine hoof by mercury intrusion porosimetry and SEM image analysis, (b) study the effects of hydration and of N-acetyl-l-cysteine treatment on the microstructure of both membranes, and (c) determine whether the microstructural modifications were associated with changes in drug penetration measured by standard diffusion studies. Bovine hoof surface is more porous than nail surface although there were no differences between the mean surface pore sizes. Hydration and N-acetyl-l-cysteine increased the roughness and apparent surface porosity, and the porosity determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry of both membranes. Pore-Cor™ was used to generate tridimensional structures having percolation characteristics comparable to nail and hooves. The modeled structures were horizontally banded having an inner less-porous area which disappeared upon treatment. Treatment increased the predicted permeability of the simulated structures. Triamcinolone permeation increased significantly for hooves treated N-acetyl-l-cysteine, i.e., the membranes for which microstructural and permeability changes were the largest. Thus, microstructural changes determined via mercury intrusion porosimetry and subsequently modeled by Pore-Cor™ were related to drug diffusion. Further refinement of the technique will allow fast screening of penetration enhancers to be used in ungual drug delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 is a ligand of alpha1B-glycoprotein in human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udby, Lene; Sørensen, Ole E; Pass, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Human cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3; also known as SGP28) belongs to a family of closely related proteins found in mammals and reptiles. Some mammalian CRISPs are known to be involved in the process of reproduction, whereas some of the CRISPs from reptiles are neurotoxin......-like substances found in lizard saliva or snake venom. Human CRISP-3 is present in exocrine secretions and in secretory granules of neutrophilic granulocytes and is believed to play a role in innate immunity. On the basis of the relatively high content of CRISP-3 in human plasma and the small size of the protein...... (28 kDa), we hypothesized that CRISP-3 in plasma was bound to another component. This was supported by size-exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation of plasma proteins. The binding partner was identified by mass spectrometry as alpha(1)B-glycoprotein (A1BG), which is a known plasma protein...

  7. Characterization of a novel human scavenger receptor cysteine-rich molecule SCART1 expressed by lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, D.; Fink, D. R.; Steffensen, M. A.;

    2013-01-01

    of hSCART1 in the small intestine and colon. An antibody raised against an N-terminal hSCART1 peptide stains a subset of cells in the small intestine, stomach, and gall bladder, and it also stains placental villi. In conclusion, the characterization of hSCART1 at the mRNA and protein level suggests......The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily is a group of membrane bound and secreted proteins expressed by cells of the immune system. Several members act as pattern recognition receptors that bind to conserved molecular structures of pathogens. We have previously characterized...

  8. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine Modulates Molecular Arterial Homeostasis of Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Geng-Fan; Zhu, Shao-Wei; Zhu, Shu-Gan; Li, Feng; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2016-12-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is widely expressed in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of human intracranial aneurysms (IAs), but the effect and underlying mechanism of SPARC on VSMCs during the formation and progression of IAs needs to be probed. Human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) were treated with a gradient concentrations of SPARC in vitro for different time. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, cell cycle, and cell apoptosis were used to investigate the effect of SPARC on HUASMCs. After exposure to 2 and 4 μg/ml SPARC, cell viability were 89.3 ± 2.00 %, and 87.57 ± 2.17 % (P IAs.

  9. Cysteine amide adduct formation from carboxylic acid drugs via UGT-mediated bioactivation in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, H; Toyoda, Y; Endo, T; Kobayashi, M

    2015-10-01

    Although chemical trapping has been widely used to evaluate cytochrome P450-mediated drug bioactivation, thus far, only a few in vitro-trapping studies have been performed on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-mediated drug bioactivation. In this study, we used cysteine (Cys) as trapping agent to gain new insights into the UGT-mediated bioactivation involving acyl glucuronides of carboxylic acid drugs. Diclofenac, ketoprofen and ibuprofen were incubated in human liver microsomes with UDPGA and Cys, followed by analysis using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS). The N-acyl-Cys amide adduct of diclofenac was characterized by mass analysis and was detectable even in photodiode array analysis. Our data indicated that the formation of such adducts reflects the reactivity of the corresponding acyl glucuronides. In addition, it was suggested that the adduct formation requires an N-terminal Cys moiety with both a free amine and a free thiol group, from the results using various cysteine derivatives. We propose that the S-acyl-Cys thioester adduct can form via transacylation of an acyl glucuronide and can then form to an N-acyl-Cys amide adduct through intramolecular S- to N-acyl rearrangement. This series of the reactions has important implications as a possible bioactivation mechanism for covalent binding of carboxylic acid drugs to macromolecules.

  10. Structural basis for the immunomodulatory function of cysteine protease inhibitor from human roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Guoqiang; Dong, Jianmei; Li, Zhaotao; Liu, Sanling; Liu, Yunfeng; Sun, Mingze; Liu, Guiyun; Su, Zhong; Liu, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppression associated with infections of nematode parasites has been documented. Cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) released by the nematode parasites is identified as one of the major modulators of host immune response. In this report, we demonstrated that the recombinant CPI protein of Ascaris lumbricoides (Al-CPI) strongly inhibited the activities of cathepsin L, C, S, and showed weaker effect to cathepsin B. Crystal structure of Al-CPI was determined to 2.1 Å resolution. Two segments of Al-CPI, loop 1 and loop 2, were proposed as the key structure motifs responsible for Al-CPI binding with proteases and its inhibitory activity. Mutations at loop 1 and loop 2 abrogated the protease inhibition activity to various extents. These results provide the molecular insight into the interaction between the nematode parasite and its host and will facilitate the development of anthelmintic agents or design of anti-autoimmune disease drugs.

  11. Use of recombinant Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 to identify a potent inhibitor of amebic invasion in a human colonic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Herdman, Scott; Hirata, Ken; Choi, Min-Ho; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles; Caffrey, Conor R; Hansell, Elisabeth; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Chen, Yen Ting; Roush, William R; McKerrow, James; Eckmann, Lars; Guo, Jianhua; Stanley, Samuel L; Reed, Sharon L

    2007-07-01

    Cysteine proteinases are key virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that cysteine proteinases play a central role in tissue invasion and disruption of host defenses by digesting components of the extracellular matrix, immunoglobulins, complement, and cytokines. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome project has revealed more than 40 genes encoding cysteine proteinases. We have focused on E. histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 (EhCP1) because it is one of two cysteine proteinases unique to invasive E. histolytica and is highly expressed and released. Recombinant EhCP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded to an active enzyme with a pH optimum of 6.0. We used positional-scanning synthetic tetrapeptide combinatorial libraries to map the specificity of the P1 to P4 subsites of the active site cleft. Arginine was strongly preferred at P2, an unusual specificity among clan CA proteinases. A new vinyl sulfone inhibitor, WRR483, was synthesized based on this specificity to target EhCP1. Recombinant EhCP1 cleaved key components of the host immune system, C3, immunoglobulin G, and pro-interleukin-18, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. EhCP1 localized to large cytoplasmic vesicles, distinct from the sites of other proteinases. To gain insight into the role of secreted cysteine proteinases in amebic invasion, we tested the effect of the vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors K11777 and WRR483 on invasion of human colonic xenografts. The resultant dramatic inhibition of invasion by both inhibitors in this human colonic model of amebiasis strongly suggests a significant role of secreted amebic proteinases, such as EhCP1, in the pathogenesis of amebiasis.

  12. N-Acetyl-L-Cystein downregulates beta-amyloid precursor protein gene transcription in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, R; Baysang, G; Brack, C

    2001-01-01

    The causes for the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still poorly understood, except from the fact that age is an important risk factor. The main component of the characteristic amyloid plaques in brains of AD patients are Abeta peptides, derivatives of the amyloid precursor protein APP. Oxidative stress may contribute to the aetiology of AD by dysregulation of APP metabolism. Overexpression of the APP gene could result in an increased secretion of neurotoxic Abeta peptides, while preventing the overexpression might be protective. We here report that the antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-Cystein (NAC) downregulates APP gene transcription in human neuroblastoma cells. The effect is reversible when cells are returned to NAC free medium. These results open up new possibilities for the development of therapeutic agents that intervene at the transcriptional level.

  13. 21 CFR 582.5271 - Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cysteine. 582.5271 Section 582.5271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... § 582.5271 Cysteine. (a) Product. Cysteine (L-forms). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. Thiol dioxygenase turnover yields benzothiazole products from 2-mercaptoaniline and O2-dependent oxidation of primary alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, William P; Sardar, Sinjinee; Thapa, Pawan; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Pierce, Brad S

    2017-10-01

    Thiol dioxygenases are non-heme mononuclear iron enzymes that catalyze the O2-dependent oxidation of free thiols (-SH) to produce the corresponding sulfinic acid (-SO2(-)). Previous chemical rescue studies identified a putative Fe(III)-O2(-) intermediate that precedes substrate oxidation in Mus musculus cysteine dioxygenase (Mm CDO). Given that a similar reactive intermediate has been identified in the extradiol dioxygenase 2, 3-HCPD, it is conceivable that these enzymes share other mechanistic features with regard to substrate oxidation. To explore this possibility, enzymatic reactions with Mm CDO (as well as the bacterial 3-mercaptopropionic acid dioxygenase, Av MDO) were performed using a substrate analogue (2-mercaptoaniline, 2ma). This aromatic thiol closely approximates the catecholic substrate of homoprotocatechuate of 2, 3-HPCD while maintaining the 2-carbon thiol-amine separation preferred by Mm CDO. Remarkably, both enzymes exhibit 2ma-gated O2-consumption; however, none of the expected products for thiol dioxygenase or intra/extradiol dioxygenase reactions were observed. Instead, benzothiazoles are produced by the condensation of 2ma with aldehydes formed by an off-pathway oxidation of primary alcohols added to aqueous reactions to solubilize the substrate. The observed oxidation of 1º-alcohols in 2ma-reactions is consistent with the formation of a high-valent intermediate similar to what has been reported for cytochrome P450 and mononuclear iron model complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute pantothenic acid and cysteine supplementation does not affect muscle coenzyme A content, fuel selection, or exercise performance in healthy humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin T. Wall; Francis B. Stephens; Kanagaraj Marimuthu; Dumitru Constantin-Teodosiu; Ian A. Macdonald; Paul L. Greenhaff

    2012-01-01

    ...) flux and thereby carbohydrate oxidation. Here we attempted to increase the muscle CoASH pool in humans, via pantothenic acid and cysteine feeding, in order to elucidate the role of CoASH availability on muscle fuel metabolism during exercise...

  16. Inhibitors of cysteine cathepsin and calpain do not prevent ultraviolet-B-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes and HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Bo; Baadsgaard, Ole; Skov, Lone

    2004-01-01

    Caspases, members of the cysteine protease family, execute UVB-induced apoptosis in several cell lines and keratinocytes. Several researchers investigating UVB-induced apoptosis have demonstrated a dose-dependent protective effect of the synthetic peptide caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. However, z......VAD-fmk displays a dose-dependent protective effect against UVB-induced apoptosis, even at doses higher than those required to block all known proapoptotic caspases. In addition, it is known that zVAD-fmk also inhibits other cysteine proteases including cathepsins and calpains, and these proteases have recently....... This was done by investigating the effect of the irreversible cysteine protease inhibitor zFA-fmk, the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me and the calpain inhibitor ALLN on the viability of UVB-irradiated human keratinocytes and HeLa cells. At concentrations of 10 microM and above zVAD-fmk conferred partial dose...

  17. Simultaneous measurement of N-Acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)-cysteine in human urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaotao, Zhang; Hongwei, Hou; Wei, Xiong; Qingyuan, Hu

    2014-08-01

    Acrylonitrile, possibly carcinogenic to humans, is mainly present in tobacco smoke and undergoes metabolism to form N-acetyl-S-(2-cyanoethyl)-cysteine (CEMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)-cysteine (HEMA). A method based on the direct dilution to simultaneously identify and quantify CEMA and HEMA in human urine by rapid resolution liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS-MS) was validated for assessing smoking-related acrylonitrile exposure. The recovery rates of the whole analytical procedure were 98.2-106.0% and 97.1-112.7% for HEMA and CEMA, respectively. The linear range of standard solutions was 0.5-100.0 ng/mL for CEMA and was 0.2-40.0 ng/mL for HEMA. RRLC using a small particle size column was combined with a tandem mass spectrometry system, which lowered the detection limit of analytes, reduced the ion suppression of mass and shortened the analysis time. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of 126 urine samples from smokers and nonsmokers.

  18. Effect of multiple cysteine substitutions on the functionality of human multidrug resistance protein 1 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells: identification of residues essential for function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Tam, Shui-Pang; Deeley, Roger G

    2012-07-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) is a broad-specificity membrane transporter belonging to the C branch of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. MRP1 confers resistance to various chemotherapeutic drugs and transports a wide range of conjugated organic anions. Several ABCC proteins, including MRP1, are unusual among ABC transporters in having a third membrane-spanning domain (MSD), MSD0, at their N termini. MRP1 lacking this additional MSD (ΔMRP1) is able to traffic to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and to transport a number of well characterized substrates. A cysteineless (cysless) ΔMRP1 has been expressed in yeast and reported to be functional. However, we found that trafficking of such a construct in human cells was severely compromised, and, even when expressed in insect Sf21 cells, the protein had extremely low transport activity. Therefore, we have systematically examined the effects of substituting cysteines in the four domains of ΔMRP1, initially with alanine. These studies allowed us to identify five cysteines that cannot be replaced with alanine without inactivating the protein. Substitution of two of these residues with alternative amino acids has allowed us to produce an almost cysless form of ΔMRP1 that traffics to the plasma membrane and transports leukotriene C(4), 17β-estradiol 17-β-D-glucuronide, and estrone-3-sulfate with kinetic characteristics similar to those of the wild-type protein. The distribution of the remaining Cys residues is such that the protein will provide a useful template for a variety of cysteine based mutagenesis studies.

  19. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise H; Petersson, Stine J; Sellathurai, Jeeva

    2009-01-01

    indicated a function of SPARC in skeletal muscle. We therefore found it of interest to study SPARC expression in human skeletal muscle during development and in biopsies from Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy and congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital myopathy, inclusion body myositis...... in the majority of analyzed muscle biopsies (23 of 24), mainly in mononuclear cells of which few were pax7 positive. Myotubes and regenerating myofibers also expressed SPARC. The expression-degree seemed to reflect the severity of the lesion. In accordance with these in vivo findings, primary human...

  20. Cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) supports tumor cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B J;

    1999-01-01

    The ADAMs (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) comprise a family of membrane-anchored cell surface proteins with a putative role in cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. By immunostaining, ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) was up-regulated in several human carcinomas and could be detected along the tum...

  1. Immunodiagnosis of Fasciola hepatica infection (fascioliasis) in a human population in the Bolivian Altiplano using purified cathepsin L cysteine proteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, S M; Parkinson, M; Strauss, W; Angles, R; Dalton, J P

    1998-04-01

    Cathepsin L1 (CL1), an immunogenic cysteine proteinase secreted by juvenile and adult Fasciola hepatica, was assessed for its potential as a diagnostic agent for the serologic detection of human fascioliasis. Using ELISAs, we compared the ability of liver fluke homogenates (LFH), excretory/secretory (ES) products, and CL1 to discriminate between seropositive (infected) and seronegative (noninfected) individuals within a population of 95 patients from the Bolivian Altiplano. A high prevalence of human fascioliasis has been reported in this region. The division between the seropositive and seronegative individuals was poorly defined when LFH was used as the antigen. A greater discrimination between these populations was achieved with both ES and CL1. A K-means cluster analysis using the combined ES and CL1 ELISA data identified a cluster of seropositive individuals. Cathepsin L1 detected a subset (20) of these seropositive individuals while ES detected all 26; however, ES detected nine additional individuals that were in the seronegative cluster. The ratio of the mean absorbance readings between seropositive and seronegative individuals was markedly improved by using conjugated second antibodies to IgG4, the predominant isotype elicited by infection. In these IgG4-ELISAs, CL1 again identified fewer individuals as seropositive than did ES, but improved the discrimination between the seropositive and seronegative individuals and thus provided a more conclusive diagnosis. Sera obtained from patients infected with schistosomiasis mansoni, cysticercosis, hydatidosis, and Chagas' disease were negative in these assays, which demonstrated the specificity of the IgG4-ELISA for detecting fascioliasis. Twenty of the 95 patients (21%) were seropositive for fascioliasis by the CL1 IgG4-ELISA, confirming the earlier reports of the high prevalence of disease in this region. A standardized diagnostic test for human fascioliasis, based on an ELISA that detects IgG4 responses to CL1

  2. Renal cysteine conjugate C-S lyase mediated toxicity of halogenated alkenes in primary cultures of human and rat proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Trevor A; Lock, Edward A; Rodilla, Vicente; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M

    2003-07-01

    Proximal tubular cells from human (HPT) and rat (RPT) kidneys were isolated, grown to confluence and incubated with S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)- l-cysteine (DCVC), S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)- l-cysteine (TCVC), S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)- l-cysteine (TFEC) and S-(2-chloro-1,1-difluorethyl)- l-cysteine (CDFEC), the cysteine conjugates of nephrotoxicants. The cultures were exposed to the conjugates for 12, 24 and 48 h and the toxicity determined using the MTT assay. All four conjugates caused dose-dependent toxicity to RPT cells over the range 50-1,000 microM, the order of toxicity being DCVC>TCVC>TFEC=CDFEC. The inclusion of aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA; 250 microM), an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes such as C-S lyase, afforded protection, indicating that C-S lyase has a role in the bioactivation of these conjugates. In HPT cultures only DCVC caused significant time- and dose-dependent toxicity. Exposure to DCVC (500 microM) for 48 h decreased cell viability to 7% of control cell values, whereas co-incubation of DCVC (500 microM) with AOAA (250 microM) resulted in cell viability of 71%. Human cultures were also exposed to S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-glutathione (DCVG). DCVG was toxic to HPT cells, but the onset of toxicity was delayed compared with the corresponding cysteine conjugate. AOAA afforded almost complete protection from DCVG toxicity. Acivicin (250 microM), an inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT), partially protected against DCVG (500 microM)-induced toxicity at 48 h (5% viability and 53% viability in the absence and presence of acivicin, respectively). These results suggest that DCVG requires processing by gamma-GT prior to bioactivation by C-S lyase in HPT cells. The activity of C-S lyase, using TFEC as a substrate, and glutamine transaminase K (GTK) was measured in rat and human cells with time in culture. C-S lyase activity in RPT and HPT cells decreased to approximately 30% of fresh cell values by the time the cells reached

  3. Tracing molecular and structural changes upon mucolysis with N-acetyl cysteine in human airway mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljevic, Branko; Murgia, Xabier; Schwarzkopf, Konrad; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Windbergs, Maike

    2017-07-11

    The conducting airways of the human lungs are lined by mucus, which lubricates the lung epithelium and provides a first-line protection against airborne threats. As a novel approach for visualization of the human mucus microstructure, we applied confocal Raman microscopy as a label-free and chemically selective technique. We were successfully able to chemically resolve the pulmonary surfactant from the mucus matrix and show its spatial distribution, as well as to visualize the structural changes within the freeze-dried mucus mesh upon chemical mucolysis. Subsequently, we performed rheological measurements before and after mucolysis and correlated morphology and chemical structure of the mucus with its rheological characteristics. These results do not only enrich the knowledge about the mucus microstructure, but can also, significantly contribute to rational development of future lung therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cysteine mutagenesis improves the production without abrogating antigenicity of a recombinant protein vaccine candidate for human chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Christopher A; Jones, Kathryn M; Pollet, Jeroen; Keegan, Brian; Hudspeth, Elissa; Hammond, Molly; Wei, Junfei; McAtee, C Patrick; Versteeg, Leroy; Gutierrez, Amanda; Liu, Zhuyun; Zhan, Bin; Respress, Jonathan L; Strych, Ulrich; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J

    2017-03-04

    A therapeutic vaccine for human Chagas disease is under development by the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership. The aim of the vaccine is to significantly reduce the parasite burden of Trypanosoma cruzi in humans, either as a standalone product or in combination with conventional chemotherapy. Vaccination of mice with Tc24 formulated with monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant results in a Th1 skewed immune response with elevated IgG2a and IFNγ levels and a statistically significant decrease in parasitemia following T. cruzi challenge. Tc24 was therefore selected for scale-up and further evaluation. During scale up and downstream process development, significant protein aggregation was observed due to intermolecular disulfide bond formation. To prevent protein aggregation, cysteine codons were replaced with serine codons which resulted in the production of a non-aggregated and soluble recombinant protein, Tc24-C4. No changes to the secondary structure of the modified molecule were detected by circular dichroism. Immunization of mice with wild-type Tc24 or Tc24-C4, formulated with E6020 (TLR4 agonist analog to MPLA) emulsified in a squalene-oil-in-water emulsion, resulted in IgG2a and antigen specific IFNγ production levels from splenocytes that were not significantly different, indicating that eliminating putative intermolecular disulfide bonds had no significant impact on the immunogenicity of the molecule. In addition, vaccination with either formulated wild type Tc24 or Tc24-C4 antigen also significantly increased survival and reduced cardiac parasite burden in mice. Investigations are now underway to examine the efficacy of Tc24-C4 formulated with other adjuvants to reduce parasite burden and increase survival in pre-clinical studies.

  5. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved.

  6. Cysteine peptidase and its inhibitor activity levels and vitamin E concentration in normal human serum and colorectal carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Szwed; Zygmunt Grzebieniak; Yousif Saleh; Godwin Bwire Ekonjo; Maciej Siewinski

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cysteine peptidase (CP) and its inhibitor (CPI) are a matrix protease that may be associated with colorectal carcinoma invasion and progression, and vitamin E is also a stimulator of the immunological system. Our purpose was to determine the correlation between the expression of cysteine peptidases and their endogenous inhibitors,and the level of vitamin E in sera of patients with colorectal cancer in comparison with healthy individuals.METHODS: The levels of cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors were determined in the sera of patients with primary and metastatic colorectal carcinoma and healthy individuals using fluorogenic substrate, and the level of vitamin E was determined by HPLC.RESULTS: The levels of cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors were significantly higher in the metastatic colorectal cancer patients than that in the healthy controls (P<0.05).The activity of CP increased 2.2-fold, CPI 2.8-fold and vitamin E decreased 3.4-fold in sera of patients with metastasis in comparison with controls. The level of vitamin E in healthy individuals was higher, whereas the activity of cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors associated with complexes was lower than that in patients with cancer of the digestive tract.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the serum levels of CP and their inhibitors could be an indicator of the prognosis for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Vitamin E can be administered prophylactically to prevent digestive tract neoplasmas.

  7. Roles of quaternary structure and cysteine residues in the activity of human serine racemase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-serine is an important coagonist at the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor class of glutamate receptors. It is chiefly synthesized in the CNS by serine racemase (SR. Regulation of SR activity is still poorly understood. As step toward developing reagents and methods for investigating SR in vitro, we analyzed structure-function relationships of a recombinant enzyme of human sequence. Results Michaelis-Menten kinetic analysis indicated a KM value of 14 mM and Vmax value of 3.66 μmol·mg-1·hr-1 when L-serine was used as a substrate for purified SR. Gel-filtration chromatography and protein cross-linking experiments revealed that dimer is the major oligomeric form of recombinant SR in aqueous solution, though the proportions of monomer, tetramer, and larger aggregates differed somewhat with the specific buffer used. These buffers also altered activity in a manner correlating with the relative abundance of dimer. Activity assays showed that the dimeric gel-filtration fraction held the highest activity. Chemical reduction with DTT increased the activity of SR by elevating Vmax; cystamine, a reagent that blocks sulfhydryl groups, abolished SR activity. Gel-filtration chromatography and western blot analysis indicated that DTT enhanced the recovery of noncovalent SR dimer. Conclusions These data suggest that SR is most active as a noncovalent dimer containing one or more free sulfhydryls in the enzyme's active center or a modulatory site. Buffer composition and reduction/oxidation status during preparation can dramatically impact interpretations of SR activity. These findings also highlight the possibility that SR is sensitive to oxidative stress in vivo.

  8. Engineering a Cysteine-Free Form of Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-1 for “Second Generation” Therapeutic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xue; Kumru, Ozan S.; Blaber, Sachiko I.; Middaugh, C. Russell; Li, Ling; Ornitz, David M.; Sutherland, Mason A.; Tenorio, Connie A.; Blaber, Michael (FSU); (WU-MED); (Kansas)

    2016-07-06

    Human fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1) has broad therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine but has undesirable biophysical properties of low thermostability and 3 buried cysteine (Cys) residues (at positions 16, 83, and 117) that interact to promote irreversible protein unfolding under oxidizing conditions. Mutational substitution of such Cys residues eliminates reactive buried thiols but cannot be accomplished simultaneously at all 3 positions without also introducing further substantial instability. The mutational introduction of a novel Cys residue (Ala66Cys) that forms a stabilizing disulfide bond (i.e., cystine) with one of the extant Cys residues (Cys83) effectively eliminates one Cys while increasing overall stability. This increase in stability offsets the associated instability of remaining Cys substitution mutations and permits production of a Cys-free form of FGF-1 (Cys16Ser/Ala66Cys/Cys117Ala) with only minor overall instability. The addition of a further stabilizing mutation (Pro134Ala) creates a Cys-free FGF-1 mutant with essentially wild-type biophysical properties. The elimination of buried free thiols in FGF-1 can substantially increase the protein half-life in cell culture. Here, we show that the effective cell survival/mitogenic functional activity of a fully Cys-free form is also substantially increased and is equivalent to wild-type FGF-1 formulated in the presence of heparin sulfate as a stabilizing agent. The results identify this Cys-free FGF-1 mutant as an advantageous “second generation” form of FGF-1 for therapeutic application.

  9. Human Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ligand-Interaction Motif: Transmembrane Helix 2 Cysteine, C2.59(89), as Determinant of Classical Cannabinoid Agonist Activity and Binding Pose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Peng, Yan; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Fan, Pusheng; Janero, David R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Mercier, Richard W; Sun, Xin; Ma, Xiaoyu; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2017-06-21

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R)-dependent signaling is implicated in neuronal physiology and immune surveillance by brain microglia. Selective CB2R agonists hold therapeutic promise for inflammatory and other neurological disorders. Information on human CB2R (hCB2R) ligand-binding and functional domains is needed to inform the rational design and optimization of candidate druglike hCB2R agonists. Prior demonstration that hCB2R transmembrane helix 2 (TMH2) cysteine C2.59(89) reacts with small-molecule methanethiosulfonates showed that this cysteine residue is accessible to sulfhydryl derivatization reagents. We now report the design and application of two novel, pharmacologically active, high-affinity molecular probes, AM4073 and AM4099, as chemical reporters to interrogate directly the interaction of classical cannabinoid agonists with hCB2R cysteine residues. AM4073 has one electrophilic isothiocyanate (NCS) functionality at the C9 position of its cyclohexenyl C-ring, whereas AM4099 has NCS groups at that position and at the terminus of its aromatic A-ring C3 side chain. Pretreatment of wild-type hCB2R with either probe reduced subsequent [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by ∼60%. Conservative serine substitution of any hCB2R TMH cysteine residue except C2.59(89) did not affect the reduction of [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by either probe, suggesting that AM4073 and AM4099 interact irreversibly with this TMH2 cysteine. In contrast, AM841, an exceptionally potent hCB2R megagonist and direct AM4073/4099 congener bearing a single electrophilic NCS group at the terminus of its C3 side chain, had been demonstrated to bind covalently to TMH6 cysteine C6.47(257) and not C2.59(89). Molecular modeling indicates that the AM4073-hCB2R* interaction at C2.59(89) orients this classical cannabinoid away from TMH6 and toward the TMH2-TMH3 interface in the receptor's hydrophobic binding pocket, whereas the AM841-hCB2R* interaction at C6.47(257) favors agonist orientation toward

  10. Cysteine endoprotease activity of human ribosomal protein S4 is entirely due to the C-terminal domain, and is consistent with Michaelis-Menten mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamalla, Babu; Kumar, Mahesh; Roy, Karnati R; Kumar, R Sunil; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2013-11-01

    It is known that tandem domains of enzymes can carry out catalysis independently or by collaboration. In the case of cysteine proteases, domain sequestration abolishes catalysis because the active site residues are distributed in both domains. The validity of this argument is tested here by using isolated human ribosomal protein S4, which has been recently identified as an unorthodox cysteine protease. Cleavage of the peptide substrate Z-FR↓-AMC catalyzed by recombinant C-terminal domain of human S4 (CHS4) is studied by fluorescence-monitored steady-state and stopped-flow kinetic methods. Proteolysis and autoproteolysis were analyzed by electrophoresis. The CHS4 domain comprised of sequence residues 116-263 has been cloned and ovreexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified domain is enzymatically active. Barring minor differences, steady-state kinetic parameters for catalysis by CHS4 are very similar to those for full-length human S4. Further, stopped-flow transient kinetics of pre-steady-state substrate binding shows that the catalytic mechanism for both full-length S4 and CHS4 obeys the Michaelis-Menten model adequately. Consideration of the evolutionary domain organization of the S4e family of ribosomal proteins indicates that the central domain (residues 94-170) within CHS4 is indispensable. The C-terminal domain can carry out catalysis independently and as efficiently as the full-length human S4 does. Localization of the enzyme function in the C-terminal domain of human S4 provides the only example of a cysteine endoprotease where substrate-mediated intramolecular domain interaction is irrelevant for catalytic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidant exposure induces cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1 via c-Jun/AP-1 to reduce collagen expression in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoping Qin

    Full Text Available Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources. Oxidative stress inhibits the production of collagen, the most abundant protein in skin, and thus contributes to connective tissue aging. Here we report that cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1, a negative regulator of collagen production, is markedly induced by ROS and mediates loss of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts. Conversely, antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly reduced CCN1 expression and prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen in both human dermal fibroblasts and human skin in vivo. ROS increased c-Jun, a critical member of transcription factor AP-1 complex, and increased c-Jun binding to the AP-1 site of the CCN1 promoter. Functional blocking of c-Jun significantly reduced CCN1 promoter and gene expression and thus prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen. Targeting the c-Jun/CCN1 axis may provide clinical benefit for connective tissue aging in human skin.

  12. Crystal structures of two solute receptors for L-cystine and L-cysteine, respectively, of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Haydar; Moniot, Sebastien; Licht, Anke; Scheffel, Frank; Gathmann, Stephanie; Saenger, Wolfram; Schneider, Erwin

    2012-01-20

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins that carry a variety of substrates across biological membranes at the expense of ATP. The here considered prokaryotic canonical importers consist of three entities: an extracellular solute receptor, two membrane-intrinsic proteins forming a translocation pathway, and two cytoplasmic ATP-binding subunits. The ngo0372-74 and ngo2011-14 gene clusters from the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae were predicted by sequence homology as ABC transporters for the uptake of cystine and cysteine, respectively, and chosen for structural characterization. The structure of the receptor component Ngo0372 was obtained in a ligand-free "open" conformation and in a "closed" conformation when co-crystallized with L-cystine. Our data provide the first structural information of an L-cystine ABC transporter. Dissociation constants of 21 and 33 nM for L-cystine and L-selenocystine, respectively, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In contrast, L-cystathionine and L-djenkolic acid are weak binders, while no binding was detectable for S-methyl-L-cysteine. Mutational analysis of two residues from the binding pocket, Trp97 and Tyr59, revealed that the latter is crucial for L-cystine binding. The structure of the Ngo2014 receptor was obtained in closed conformation in complex with co-purified L-cysteine. The protein binds L-cysteine with a K(d) of 26 nM. Comparison of the structures of both receptors and analysis of the ligand binding sites shed light on the mode of ligand recognition and provides insight into the tight binding of both substrates. Moreover, since L-cystine limitation leads to reduction in virulence of N. gonorrhoeae, Ngo0372 might be suited as target for an antimicrobial vaccine.

  13. Detection of meta- and ortho-cleavage dioxygenases in bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    The specific activities of the phenol-degrading enzymes phenol hydroxylase, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase ... reaction catalyzed by 2,3-dioxygenase the meta ... was defined as the initial rate of indigo formation or ... The enzyme reaction was.

  14. An iron–oxygen intermediate formed during the catalytic cycle of cysteine dioxygenase† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and computational details. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc03904a Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokov, E. P.; Faponle, A. S.; Davies, C. G.; Quesne, M. G.; Turner, R.; Fellner, M.; Souness, R. J.; Wilbanks, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a key enzyme in the breakdown of cysteine, but its mechanism remains controversial. A combination of spectroscopic and computational studies provides the first evidence of a short-lived intermediate in the catalytic cycle. The intermediate decays within 20 ms and has absorption maxima at 500 and 640 nm. PMID:27297454

  15. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase depletes tryptophan, activates general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and down-regulates key enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis in primary human CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is expressed in antigen-presenting cells and exerts immunosuppressive effects on CD4(+) T cells. One mechanism is through the inhibition of aerobic glycolysis. Another prerequisite for T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector cells is increased fatty acid (FA) synthesis. The effect of IDO on enzymes involved in FA synthesis was evaluated in primary human cells both in mixed lymphocyte reactions in the presence or not of the IDO inhibitor 1-dl-methyl-tryptophan, and in stimulated CD4(+) T cells in the presence or not of the general control non-derepressible 2 (GCN2) kinase activator tryptophanol (TRP). IDO or TRP inhibited cell proliferation. By assessing the level of GCN2 kinase or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 substrates along with a kynurenine free system we showed that IDO exerts its effect mainly through activation of GCN2 kinase. IDO or TRP down-regulated ATP-citrate lyase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase 1, key enzymes involved in FA synthesis. Also, IDO or TRP altered the expression of enzymes that control the availability of carbon atoms for FA synthesis, such as lactate dehydrogenase-A, pyruvate dehydrogenase, glutaminase 1 and glutaminase 2, in a way that inhibits FA synthesis. In conclusion, IDO through GCN2 kinase activation inhibits CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and down-regulates key enzymes that directly or indirectly promote FA synthesis, a prerequisite for CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector cell lineages. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. NOA36/ZNF330 is a conserved cystein-rich protein with proapoptotic activity in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Ivan S; Iglesias, Concepción; Benítez-Rondán, Alicia; Medina, Francisco; Martínez-Barberá, Juan Pedro; Bolívar, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Translocations of regulator proteins from or to the mitochondria are key events in apoptosis regulation. NOA36/ZNF330 is a highly evolutionary conserved protein with a characteristic cystein-rich domain. In this work we address its mitochondrial localization and we demonstrate that a blockage of endogenous NOA36/ZNF330 expression by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced apoptotic response to etoposide (ETO), camptothecin (CPT) and staurosporine (STS) but not to CH11 anti-Fas antibody or tumour-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in HeLa cells. In contrast, when ectopically expressed in the cytoplasm, NOA36/ZNF330 induces apoptotic cell death. We also found that the domain responsible for this proapoptotic activity is located its cystein-rich region. We propose that NOA36/ZNF330 is translocated from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm when apoptosis is induced and that it contributes to cytochrome c release.

  17. Oxidative stress in mammalian cells impinges on the cysteines redox state of human XRCC3 protein and on its cellular localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Girard

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, XRCC3 is one of the five Rad51 paralogs that plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR, a key pathway for maintaining genomic stability. While investigating the potential role of human XRCC3 (hXRCC3 in the inhibition of DNA replication induced by UVA radiation, we discovered that hXRCC3 cysteine residues are oxidized following photosensitization by UVA. Our in silico prediction of the hXRCC3 structure suggests that 6 out of 8 cysteines are potentially accessible to the solvent and therefore potentially exposed to ROS attack. By non-reducing SDS-PAGE we show that many different oxidants induce hXRCC3 oxidation that is monitored in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO cells by increased electrophoretic mobility of the protein and in human cells by a slight decrease of its immunodetection. In both cell types, hXRCC3 oxidation was reversed in few minutes by cellular reducing systems. Depletion of intracellular glutathione prevents hXRCC3 oxidation only after UVA exposure though depending on the type of photosensitizer. In addition, we show that hXRCC3 expressed in CHO cells localizes both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Mutating all hXRCC3 cysteines to serines (XR3/S protein does not affect the subcellular localization of the protein even after exposure to camptothecin (CPT, which typically induces DNA damages that require HR to be repaired. However, cells expressing mutated XR3/S protein are sensitive to CPT, thus highlighting a defect of the mutant protein in HR. In marked contrast to CPT treatment, oxidative stress induces relocalization at the chromatin fraction of both wild-type and mutated protein, even though survival is not affected. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the DNA repair protein hXRCC3 is a target of ROS induced by environmental factors and raise the possibility that the redox environment might participate in regulating the HR pathway.

  18. Spontaneous cytotoxic T-Cell reactivity against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Køllgaard, Tania; Andersen, Rikke Sick;

    2011-01-01

    Several lines of data have suggested a possible link between the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-like protein IDO2 and cancer. First, IDO2 expression has been described in human tumors, including renal, gastric, colon, and pancreatic tumors. Second, the apparent selective inhibition of IDO2...

  19. Structure of human Fe-S assembly subcomplex reveals unexpected cysteine desulfurase architecture and acyl-ACP-ISD11 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Seth A; Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Brignole, Edward J; Patra, Shachin; Winge, Dennis R; Drennan, Catherine L; Rutter, Jared; Barondeau, David P

    2017-07-03

    In eukaryotes, sulfur is mobilized for incorporation into multiple biosynthetic pathways by a cysteine desulfurase complex that consists of a catalytic subunit (NFS1), LYR protein (ISD11), and acyl carrier protein (ACP). This NFS1-ISD11-ACP (SDA) complex forms the core of the iron-sulfur (Fe-S) assembly complex and associates with assembly proteins ISCU2, frataxin (FXN), and ferredoxin to synthesize Fe-S clusters. Here we present crystallographic and electron microscopic structures of the SDA complex coupled to enzyme kinetic and cell-based studies to provide structure-function properties of a mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase. Unlike prokaryotic cysteine desulfurases, the SDA structure adopts an unexpected architecture in which a pair of ISD11 subunits form the dimeric core of the SDA complex, which clarifies the critical role of ISD11 in eukaryotic assemblies. The different quaternary structure results in an incompletely formed substrate channel and solvent-exposed pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor and provides a rationale for the allosteric activator function of FXN in eukaryotic systems. The structure also reveals the 4'-phosphopantetheine-conjugated acyl-group of ACP occupies the hydrophobic core of ISD11, explaining the basis of ACP stabilization. The unexpected architecture for the SDA complex provides a framework for understanding interactions with acceptor proteins for sulfur-containing biosynthetic pathways, elucidating mechanistic details of eukaryotic Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, and clarifying how defects in Fe-S cluster assembly lead to diseases such as Friedreich's ataxia. Moreover, our results support a lock-and-key model in which LYR proteins associate with acyl-ACP as a mechanism for fatty acid biosynthesis to coordinate the expression, Fe-S cofactor maturation, and activity of the respiratory complexes.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: cruzipain and membrane-bound cysteine proteinase isoform(s) interacts with human alpha(2)-macroglobulin and pregnancy zone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Adrián M; Duschak, Vilma G; Gerez de Burgos, Nelia M; Barboza, Mariana; Remedi, María S; Vides, Miguel A; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2002-02-01

    Plasmatic levels of pregnancy zone protein (PZP) increase in children with acute Chagas disease. PZP, as well as alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), are able to interact with Trypanosoma cruzi proteinases. The interaction of alpha2-M and PZP with cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi, was investigated. Several molecular changes on both alpha-M inhibitors under reaction with cruzipain were found. PAGE analysis showed: (i) formation of complexes of intermediate mobility and tetramerization of native alpha2-M and PZP, respectively; (ii) limited proteolysis of bait region in alpha2-M and PZP, and (iii) covalent binding of cruzipain to PZP and alpha2-M. Conformational and structural changes experimented by alpha-Ms correlate with modifications of the enzyme electrophoretic mobility and activity. Cruzipain-alpha-M complexes were also detected by gelatin SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using polyclonal anti-cruzipain antibodies. Concomitantly, alpha2-M and PZP impaired the activity of cruzipain towards Bz-Pro-Phe-Arg-pNA substrate. In addition, alpha-Ms were able to form covalent complexes with membrane isoforms of cysteine proteinases cross-reacting with cruzipain. The present study suggests that both human alpha-macroglobulin inhibitors could prevent or minimize harmful action of cruzipain on host's molecules and hypothetically regulate parasite functions controlled by cruzipain.

  1. Functional expression of human NKCC1 from a synthetic cassette-based cDNA: introduction of extracellular epitope tags and removal of cysteines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasekharan, Suma; Monette, Michelle Y; Forbush, Biff

    2013-01-01

    The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC) couples the movement of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions across the plasma membrane of most animal cells and thus plays a central role in cellular homeostasis and human physiology. In order to study the structure, function, and regulation of NKCC1 we have engineered a synthetic cDNA encoding the transporter with 30 unique silent restriction sites throughout the open reading frame, and with N-terminal 3xFlag and YFP tags. We show that the novel cDNA is appropriately expressed in HEK-293 cells and that the YFP-tag does not alter the transport function of the protein. Utilizing the Cl(-) -sensing capability of YFP, we demonstrate a sensitive assay of Na-K-Cl cotransport activity that measures normal cotransport activity in a fully activated transporter. In addition we present three newly developed epitope tags for NKCC1 all of which can be detected from outside of the cell, one of which is very efficiently delivered to the plasma membrane. Finally, we have characterized cysteine mutants of NKCC1 and found that whereas many useful combinations of cysteine mutations are tolerated by the biosynthetic machinery, the fully "cys-less" NKCC1 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Together these advances are expected to greatly assist future studies of NKCC1.

  2. Functional expression of human NKCC1 from a synthetic cassette-based cDNA: introduction of extracellular epitope tags and removal of cysteines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma Somasekharan

    Full Text Available The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC couples the movement of Na(+, K(+, and Cl(- ions across the plasma membrane of most animal cells and thus plays a central role in cellular homeostasis and human physiology. In order to study the structure, function, and regulation of NKCC1 we have engineered a synthetic cDNA encoding the transporter with 30 unique silent restriction sites throughout the open reading frame, and with N-terminal 3xFlag and YFP tags. We show that the novel cDNA is appropriately expressed in HEK-293 cells and that the YFP-tag does not alter the transport function of the protein. Utilizing the Cl(- -sensing capability of YFP, we demonstrate a sensitive assay of Na-K-Cl cotransport activity that measures normal cotransport activity in a fully activated transporter. In addition we present three newly developed epitope tags for NKCC1 all of which can be detected from outside of the cell, one of which is very efficiently delivered to the plasma membrane. Finally, we have characterized cysteine mutants of NKCC1 and found that whereas many useful combinations of cysteine mutations are tolerated by the biosynthetic machinery, the fully "cys-less" NKCC1 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Together these advances are expected to greatly assist future studies of NKCC1.

  3. Application of XANES profiles to X-ray spectromicroscopy for biomedical specimens: part II. Mapping oxidation state of cysteine in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takafumi; Takehara, Kouji; Shimizu, Norio; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Shinohara, Kunio; Ito, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Human hair fibers are primarily composed of keratin protein, characterized by a very high content of cysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, which ordinarily forms cystine via a disulfide bond. It is known that some cystine residues are converted to cysteic acid during permanent waving or hair coloring, although details of their distribution and extent are still unclear. In this study, by using difference in XANES profiles of cystine and cysteic acid at the S-K absorption edge, the formation of cysteic acid was confirmed for homogenized samples of permed or bleached hair. Furthermore chemical mapping of cysteic acid was performed on hair-section samples with X-ray contact microscopy. The peripheral region, cuticle, in bleached hair showed the highest content of cysteic acid compared with the other parts, while permed hair showed relatively uniform distribution. This finding suggests that perming and bleaching damage hair by different mechanisms.

  4. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme. Remarkably, we discovered IDO-specific T cells that can influence adaptive immune reactions in patients with cancer. Further, a recent phase I clinical trial demonstrated long-lasting disease stabilization without toxicity in patien...... with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were vaccinated with an IDO-derived HLA-A2-restricted epitope....

  5. Exogenous Thyropin from p41 Invariant Chain Diminishes Cysteine Protease Activity and Affects IL-12 Secretion during Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zavašnik-Bergant

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play a pivotal role as antigen presenting cells (APC and their maturation is crucial for effectively eliciting an antigen-specific immune response. The p41 splice variant of MHC class II-associated chaperone, called invariant chain p41 Ii, contains an amino acid sequence, the p41 fragment, which is a thyropin-type inhibitor of proteolytic enzymes. The effects of exogenous p41 fragment and related thyropin inhibitors acting on human immune cells have not been reported yet. In this study we demonstrate that exogenous p41 fragment can enter the endocytic pathway of targeted human immature DC. Internalized p41 fragment has contributed to the total amount of the immunogold labelled p41 Ii-specific epitope, as quantified by transmission electron microscopy, in particular in late endocytic compartments with multivesicular morphology where antigen processing and binding to MHC II take place. In cell lysates of treated immature DC, diminished enzymatic activity of cysteine proteases has been confirmed. Internalized exogenous p41 fragment did not affect the perinuclear clustering of acidic cathepsin S-positive vesicles typical of mature DC. p41 fragment is shown to interfere with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit in LPS-stimulated DC. p41 fragment is also shown to reduce the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12/p70 during the subsequent maturation of treated DC. The inhibition of proteolytic activity of lysosomal cysteine proteases in immature DC and the diminished capability of DC to produce IL-12 upon their subsequent maturation support the immunomodulatory potential of the examined thyropin from p41 Ii.

  6. Influence of protein-micelle ratios and cysteine residues on the kinetic stability and unfolding rates of human mitochondrial VDAC-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Rajkumar Maurya

    Full Text Available Delineating the kinetic and thermodynamic factors which contribute to the stability of transmembrane β-barrels is critical to gain an in-depth understanding of membrane protein behavior. Human mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel isoform 2 (hVDAC-2, one of the key anti-apoptotic eukaryotic β-barrel proteins, is of paramount importance, owing to its indispensable role in cell survival. We demonstrate here that the stability of hVDAC-2 bears a strong kinetic contribution that is dependent on the absolute micellar concentration used for barrel folding. The refolding efficiency and ensuing stability is sensitive to the lipid-to-protein (LPR ratio, and displays a non-linear relationship, with both low and high micellar amounts being detrimental to hVDAC-2 structure. Unfolding and aggregation process are sequential events and show strong temperature dependence. We demonstrate that an optimal lipid-to-protein ratio of 2600∶1 - 13,000∶1 offers the highest protection against thermal denaturation. Activation energies derived only for lower LPRs are ∼17 kcal mol(-1 for full-length hVDAC-2 and ∼23 kcal mol(-1 for the Cys-less mutant, suggesting that the nine cysteine residues of hVDAC-2 impart additional malleability to the barrel scaffold. Our studies reveal that cysteine residues play a key role in the kinetic stability of the protein, determine barrel rigidity and thereby give rise to strong micellar association of hVDAC-2. Non-linearity of the Arrhenius plot at high LPRs coupled with observation of protein aggregation upon thermal denaturation indicates that contributions from both kinetic and thermodynamic components stabilize the 19-stranded β-barrel. Lipid-protein interaction and the linked kinetic contribution to free energy of the folded protein are together expected to play a key role in hVDAC-2 recycling and the functional switch at the onset of apoptosis.

  7. Identification of novel disulfide adducts between the thiol containing leaving group of the nerve agent VX and cysteine containing tripeptides derived from human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranawetvogl, Andreas; Küppers, Jim; Gütschow, Michael; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Elsinghorst, Paul W; John, Harald

    2016-12-09

    Chemical warfare agents represent a continuous and considerable threat to military personnel and the civilian population. Such compounds are prohibited by the Chemical Weapons Convention, to which adherence by the member states is strictly controlled. Therefore, reliable analytical methods for verification of an alleged use of banned substances are required. Accordingly, current research focuses on long-term biomarkers derived from covalent adducts with biomolecules such as proteins. Recently, we have introduced a microbore liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry method allowing for the investigation of two different classes of adducts of the nerve agent VX with human serum albumin (HSA). Phosphonylated tyrosine residues and novel disulfide adducts at cysteine residues of HSA were produced by enzymatic cleavage with pronase and detected simultaneously. Notably, the thiol containing leaving group of VX (2-(diisopropylamino)ethanethiol, DPAET) formed disulfide adducts that were released as cysteine and proline containing dipeptides originating from at least two different sites of HSA. Aim of this study was to identify assumed and novel adducts of DPAET with HSA using synthetic peptide reference compounds. Two novel tripeptides were identified representing disulfide adducts with DPAET (Met-Pro-Cys-DPAET, MPC-DPAET and Asp-Ile-Cys-DPAET, DIC-DPAET). MPC-DPAET was shown to undergo partial in-source decay during electrospray ionization for MS detection thereby losing the N-terminal Met residue. This results in the more stable Pro-Cys-DPAET (PC-DPAET) dipeptide detectable as protonated ion. The limit of detection for MPC-DPAET was evaluated, revealing toxicologically relevant VX plasma concentrations. The results provide novel insights into the reactivity of VX and its endogenous targets. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. N-acetyl-L-cysteine increases MnSOD activity and enhances the recruitment of quiescent human fibroblasts to the proliferation cycle during wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Gaowei; Goswami, Monali; Kalen, Amanda L; Goswami, Prabhat C; Sarsour, Ehab H

    2016-01-01

    The rebuilding of the connective tissue during wound healing requires the recruitment of fibroblasts to the wound area as well as reentry of quiescent fibroblasts to the proliferative cycle. Whether this process can be modulated by a small molecular weight thiol antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was tested in normal human skin fibroblasts (NHFs) using a uni-directional wound healing assay. NAC treated cells demonstrated a decreased migration rate but increased number of proliferating cells recruited into the wound area post wounding. Fifteen day quiescent control and NAC treated NHFs were re-plated at a lower density and cell numbers counted at different days post-plating. Interestingly, NAC treated cells exhibited increased cellular proliferation indicated by both decreased cell population doubling time and increased S phase cells. NAC treated cells demonstrated decreased steady state levels of reactive oxygen species as well as increased protein and activity levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). NAC treatment failed to induce proliferation in quiescent cells lacking MnSOD expression. These results demonstrate that NAC enhanced the recruitment of quiescent NHFs into proliferation cycle during wound healing. Our results also suggest that the wound healing properties of NAC might be due to its ability to induce and enhance MnSOD expression and activity. Altogether, these findings suggest NAC might be potentially developed as a dietary intervention to improve tissue injury in animals and humans.

  9. Autoxidation-product-initiated dioxygenases: vanadium-based, record catalytic lifetime catechol dioxygenase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cindy-Xing; Sasaki, Yoh; Finke, Richard G

    2005-11-14

    In recent work, it was shown that V-containing polyoxometalates such as (n-Bu4N)7SiW9V3O40 or (n-Bu4N)9P2W15V3O62, as well as eight other V-containing precatalysts tested, evolve to a high activity, long catalytic lifetime (> or = 30,000-100,000 total turnovers) 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol dioxygenase, in which Pierpont's complex [VO(DBSQ)(DTBC)]2 (where DBSQ is 3,5-di-tert-butylsemiquinone and DTBC is the 3,5-di-tert-butylcatecholate dianion) was identified as a common catalyst or catalyst resting state (Yin, C.-X.; Finke, R. G. Vanadium-Based, Extended Catalytic Lifetime Catechol Dioxygenases: Evidence For a Common Catalyst. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127 (25), 9003-9013). Herein, those findings are followed up by studies aimed at answering the following questions about this record catalytic lifetime 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol dioxygenase catalyst: (i) What is the key to how V leaches from, for example, seemingly robust V-containing polyoxometalate precatalysts? (ii) What is the key to the sigmoidal, apparently autocatalytic kinetics observed? (iii) What can be learned about the underlying reactions that form [VO(DBSQ)(DTBC)]2? (iv) Finally, do the answers to (i-iii) lead to any broader insights or concepts? Key findings from the present work include the fact that the reaction involves a novel, autoxidation-product-induced dioxygenase, that is, one in which the undesired autoxidation of the 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol substrate to the corresponding benzoquinone and H2O2 turns on the desired dioxygenase catalysis via a V-leaching process which eventually yields Pierpont's complex, [VO(DBSQ)(DTBC)]2. Plausible reactions en route to [VO(DBSQ)(DTBC)]2 consistent with the kinetic data, the role of H2O2, and the relevant literature are provided. The results provide a prototype example of the little observed but likely more general concept of an autoxidation-product-initiated reaction. The results also provide considerable simplification of, and insight into, the previously

  10. Insights into the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine-capped CdTe quantum dots on the structure and activity of human serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haoyu; Yang, Xudan; Li, Meng; Han, Songlin; Liu, Yingxue [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong Province, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Tan, Xuejie [School of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Qilu University of Technology, Jinan, Shandong Province 250353 (China); Liu, Chunguang, E-mail: chunguangliu2013@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong Province, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Rutao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong Province, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a kind of nanostructured semiconductor crystals with the size range of 1–10 nm. Their unique photophysical properties and potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concern of scientists and general public. However, the interaction mechanism of QDs on human serum albumin (HSA, the vital protein in human blood) from both structural and functional perspectives is rarely reported. In the present work, effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine-capped CdTe quantum dots with fluorescence emission peak at 612 nm (QDs-612) on the conformation and function of HSA were investigated by spectroscopic methods, molecular docking study and esterase activity assay. The hydrophobic interaction between HSA and QDs-612 was spontaneous with the binding constants calculated to be 6.85×10{sup 5} L mol{sup −1} (298 K) and 8.89×10{sup 5} L mol{sup −1} (308 K). The binding of QDs-612 to HSA induced the static quenching of fluorescence and the changes of secondary structure and microenvironment of Tyr-411 residue, which resulted in serious decrease on the hydrolysis of substrate p-nitrophenylacetate in esterase activity assay of HSA. This work confirms the possibility on direct interaction of QDs-612 with HSA and obtains a possible mechanism of relationship between conformation and function of HSA. - Highlights: • The interaction between CdTe QDs (QDs-612) and HSA is spontaneous. • The predominant force of the binding is hydrophobic interaction. • The interaction changes the secondary structure of HSA. • Tyr-411 residue of HSA expose to a hydrophilic environment. • The esterase activity of HSA decreases by adding QDs-612.

  11. Cystatins--Extra- and intracellular cysteine protease inhibitors: High-level secretion and uptake of cystatin C in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Hanna; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Vogel, Lotte K; Wassélius, Johan; Ekström, Ulf; Abrahamson, Magnus

    2010-11-01

    Cystatins are present in mammals, birds, fish, insects, plants, fungi and protozoa and constitute a large protein family, with most members sharing a cysteine protease inhibitory function. In humans 12 functional cystatins exist, forming three groups based on molecular organisation and distribution in the organism. The type 1 cystatins (A and B) are known as intracellular, type 2 cystatins (C, D, E/M, F, G, S, SN and SA) extracellular and type 3 cystatins (L- and H-kininogen) intravascular proteins. The present paper is focused on the human cystatins and especially those of type 2, which are directed (with signal peptides) for cellular export following translation. Results indicating existence of systems for significant internalisation of type 2 cystatins from the extracellular to intracellular compartments are reviewed. Data showing that human neuroblastoma cell lines generally secrete high levels, but also contain high amounts of cystatin C are presented. Culturing of these cells in medium containing cystatin C at concentrations found in body fluids resulted in increased intracellular cystatin C, as a result of an uptake process. At immunofluorescence cytochemistry a pronounced vesicular cystatin C staining was observed. The simplistic denotation of the type 2 cystatins as extracellular inhibitors is thus challenged, and possible biological functions of the internalised cystatins are discussed. To illustrate the special case of high cellular cystatin content seen in cells of patients with hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy, expression vectors for wild-type and L68Q mutated cystatin C were used to transfect SK-N-BE(2) cells. Clones overexpressing the two variants showed increased secreted levels of cystatin C. Within the cells the L68Q variant appeared to mainly localise to the endoplasmic reticulum rather than to acidic vesicular organelles, indicating limitations in the transport out from the cell rather than increased uptake as explanation for the

  12. N-Acetyl Cysteine Depletes Reactive Oxygen Species and Prevents Dental Monomer-Induced Intrinsic Mitochondrial Apoptosis In Vitro in Human Dental Pulp Cells.

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    Yang Jiao

    Full Text Available To investigate the involvement of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in dental monomer-induced cytotoxicity and the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC on this process.Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs were exposed to several dental monomers in the absence or presence of NAC, and cell viability, intracellular redox balance, morphology and function of mitochondria and key indicators of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis were evaluated using various commercial kits.Dental monomers exerted dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on hDPCs. Concomitant to the over-production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and depletion of glutathione (GSH, differential changes in activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were detected. Apoptosis, as indicated by positive Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI staining and activation of caspase-3, was observed after dental monomer treatment. Dental monomers impaired the morphology and function of mitochondria, and induced intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis in hDPCs via up-regulation of p53, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. NAC restored cell viability, relieved oxidative stress and blocked the apoptotic effects of dental monomers.Dental monomers induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial intrinsic apoptosis in hDPCs. NAC could reduce the oxidative stress and thus protect hDPCs against dental monomer-induced apoptosis.

  13. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Human Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells and Restoration of Motor Function in Neonatal Rats with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

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    Dongsun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Since oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs are the target cells of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, the present study was aimed at investigating the protective effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a well-known antioxidant and precursor of glutathione, in OPCs as well as in neonatal rats. Methods. In in vitro study, protective effects of NAC on KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 OPCs were investigated via MTT assay and apoptotic signal analysis. In in vivo study, NAC was administered to rats with HIE induced by hypoxia-ischemia surgery at postnatal day 7, and their motor functions and white matter demyelination were analyzed. Results. NAC decreased KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 cells and especially suppressed apoptosis by regulating Bcl2 and p-ERK. Administration of NAC recovered motor functions such as the using ratio of forelimb contralateral to the injured brain, locomotor activity, and rotarod performance of neonatal HIE animals. It was also confirmed that NAC attenuated demyelination in the corpus callosum, a white matter region vulnerable to HIE. Conclusion. The results indicate that NAC exerts neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo by preserving OPCs, via regulation of antiapoptotic signaling, and that F3.Olig2 human OPCs could be a good tool for screening of candidates for demyelinating diseases.

  14. Heme-containing dioxygenases involved in tryptophan oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Elizabeth S; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Handa, Sandeep; Mowat, Christopher G; Raven, Emma Lloyd

    2012-04-01

    Heme iron is often used in biology for activation of oxygen. The mechanisms of oxygen activation by heme-containing monooxygenases (the cytochrome P450s) are well known, and involve formation of a Compound I species, but information on the heme-containing dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation lags far behind. In this review, we gather together information emerging recently from structural, mechanistic, spectroscopic, and computational approaches on the heme dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation. We explore the subtleties that differentiate various heme enzymes from each other, and use this to piece together a developing picture for oxygen activation in this particular class of heme-containing dioxygenases.

  15. Cysteine catabolism: a novel metabolic pathway contributing to glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Yuan, Zhigang; Johnson, Joseph J; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Chinnaiyan, Prakash

    2014-02-01

    The relevance of cysteine metabolism in cancer has gained considerable interest in recent years, largely focusing on its role in generating the antioxidant glutathione. Through metabolomic profiling using a combination of high-throughput liquid and gas chromatography-based mass spectrometry on a total of 69 patient-derived glioma specimens, this report documents the discovery of a parallel pathway involving cysteine catabolism that results in the accumulation of cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA) in glioblastoma. These studies identified CSA to rank as one of the top metabolites differentiating glioblastoma from low-grade glioma. There was strong intratumoral concordance of CSA levels with expression of its biosynthetic enzyme cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1). Studies designed to determine the biologic consequence of this metabolic pathway identified its capacity to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in glioblastoma cells, which was determined by decreased cellular respiration, decreased ATP production, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential following pathway activation. CSA-induced attenuation of oxidative phosphorylation was attributed to inhibition of the regulatory enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase. Studies performed in vivo abrogating the CDO1/CSA axis using a lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA approach resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition in a glioblastoma mouse model, supporting the potential for this metabolic pathway to serve as a therapeutic target. Collectively, we identified a novel, targetable metabolic pathway involving cysteine catabolism contributing to the growth of aggressive high-grade gliomas. These findings serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensively determine the clinical application of this metabolic pathway and its contributory role in tumorigenesis.

  16. N-Acetylglutaminoyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine (SIG-1191): an anti-inflammatory molecule that increases the expression of the aquaglyceroporin, aquaporin-3, in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José R; Webb, Corey; Rouzard, Karl; Voronkov, Michael; Huber, Kristen L; Stock, Jeffry B; Stock, Maxwell; Gordon, Joel S; Perez, Eduardo

    2017-03-01

    Isoprenylcysteine (IPC) small molecules were discovered as signal transduction modulating compounds ~25 years ago. More recently, IPC molecules have demonstrated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in a variety of dermal cells as well as antimicrobial activity, representing a novel class of compounds to ameliorate skin conditions and disease. Here, we demonstrate a new IPC compound, N-acetylglutaminoyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine (SIG-1191), which inhibits UVB-induced inflammation blocking pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production. To investigate further the previously reported hydrating potential of IPC compounds, SIG-1191 was tested for its ability to modulate aquaporin expression. Specifically, aquaporin 3 (AQP3) the most abundant aquaporin found in skin has been reported to play a key role in skin hydration, elasticity and barrier repair. Results show here for the first time that SIG-1191 increases AQP3 expression in both cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes as well as when applied topically in a three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human skin equivalent. Additionally, SIG-1191 dose dependently increased AQP3 protein levels, as determined by specific antibody staining, in the epidermis of the 3D skin equivalents. To begin to elucidate which signaling pathways SIG-1191 may be modulating to increase AQP3 levels, we used several pharmacological pathway inhibitors and determined that AQP3 expression is mediated by the Mitogen-activated protein kinase/Extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) pathway. Altogether, these data suggest SIG-1191 represents a new IPC derivative with anti-inflammatory activity that may also promote increased skin hydration based on its ability to increase AQP3 levels.

  17. "Comparison of Adult Somatic and Cysteine Proteinas Antigens of Fasciola gigantica in Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Serodiagnosis of Human Fasciolosis"

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    MB Rokni

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica and F.gigantica is one of the major public health problems in the world and in Iran. Considering that stool examination for Fasciola eggs is not a sensitive method and only 25% of infected patients pass the eggs in the faeces , and immunodiagnosis methods are more applicable for this purpose, the present study was conducted to compare the somatic (S and cysteine proteinase (CP antigens of F.gigantica in IgG-ELISA to diagnose human fasciolosis. This has been the first report on this case so far in Iran. Serum samples obtained from 178 individuals collected during the fasciolosis outbreak in 1999 in the Gilan province, northern Iran, that were coprologically positive for fasciolosis, were analyzed by IgG-ELISA for total antibody responses against (S and CP antigens from Fasciola gigantica. The cut-off points for (S and CP were 0.38 and 0.33, respectively. All cases that showed clinical manifestations of fasciolosis, were also seropositive using both (S and CP antigens whereas all 25 non-infected controls were seronegative. Therefore, the sensitivity of the test was 100% for both antigens. On the other hand the specificity of (S and CP antigens were calculated as 96.4% and 98.1%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values of the test regarding (S antigen were 97.8% and 100%, whereas these values as for CP antigen were 98.9% and 100% correspondingly. Two individuals with hydatidosis and two with toxocariasis had antibodies against (S antigen whereas concerning CP antigen, one individual with hydatidosis and another with toxocariasis showed cross reactivity against it. We have demonstrated that altogether CP antigen provide a more conclusive diagnosis as possessing lower cut-off and enabling better to discriminate between seronegative and seropositive subpopulations.This study may be useful to implement a reliable test to diagnose human fasciolosis and for seroepidmiological objectives.

  18. Molecular characterization of the gallate dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida KT2440. The prototype of a new subgroup of extradiol dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Juan; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2005-10-21

    In this work we have characterized the galA gene product from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a ring-cleavage dioxygenase that acts specifically on gallate to produce 4-oxalomesaconate. The protein is a trimer composed by three identical subunits of 47.6 kDa (419 amino acids) that uses Fe2+ as the main cofactor. The gallate dioxygenase showed maximum activity at pH 7.0, and the Km and Vmax values for gallate were 144 microM and 53.2 micromol/min/mg of protein, respectively. A phylogenetic study suggests that the gallate dioxygenase from P. putida KT2440 is the prototype of a new subgroup of type II extradiol dioxygenases that share a common ancestor with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenases and whose two-domain architecture might have evolved from the fusion of the large and small subunits of the latter. A three-dimensional model for the N-terminal domain (residues 1-281) and C-terminal domain (residues 294-420) of the gallate dioxygenase from P. putida KT2440 was generated by comparison with the crystal structures of the large (LigB) and small (LigA) subunits of the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. The expression of the galA gene was specifically induced when P. putida KT2440 cells grew in the presence of gallate. A P. putida KT2440 galA mutant strain was unable to use gallate as the sole carbon source and it did not show gallate dioxygenase activity, suggesting that the GalA protein is the only dioxygenase involved in gallate cleavage in this bacterium. This work points to the existence of a new pathway that is devoted to the catabolism of gallic acid and that remained unknown in the paradigmatic P. putida KT2440 strain.

  19. 75 FR 31790 - Determination That Cysteine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, 7.25%, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That Cysteine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, 7... determination that Cysteine Hydrochloride Injection, USP, 7.25% (Cysteine HCl), was not withdrawn from sale for... applications (ANDAs) for Cysteine HCl if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR...

  20. Characterization of expression and stability of recombinant cystein-rich protein human MT1A from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Li; Kaifeng, Shao; Dian, Yao; Lin, An; Binggen, Ru

    2005-08-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is the protein that has been shown to bind heavy metals, scavenge free radicals, protect DNA from radiation damage, and alleviate disease symptoms. However, only very limited success has been achieved in expression and production of active recombinant metallothionein. In this study, human metallothionein 1A (hMT1A) was transformed into yeast Pichia pastoris for expression with secretion of the protein into the medium. The expression system was optimized to obtain the targeted protein in active form at 335 mg per litre culture. hMT1A showed the character of extreme instability in the experiment. High concentration, aeration and heavy metal ions are the main factors affecting hMT1A stability.

  1. N-Acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA) a further product of human metabolism of acrylamide: comparison with the simultaneously excreted other mercaptuic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Eva C; Boettcher, Melanie I; Bolt, Hermann M; Drexler, Hans; Angerer, Jürgen

    2009-07-01

    The N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)-L: -cysteine (iso-GAMA) could be identified as a further human metabolite of acrylamide. In this study, we report the excretion of d(3)-iso-GAMA in human urine after single oral administration of deuterium labelled acrylamide (d(3)-AA). One healthy male volunteer ingested a dose of about 1 mg d(3)-AA which is equivalent to a dose of 13 microg/kg bodyweight. Over a period of 46 h the urine was collected and the d(3)-iso-GAMA levels analysed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The excretion of iso-GAMA begins five hours after application. It rises to a maximum concentration (c (max)) of 43 microg/l which was quantified in the urine excreted after 22 h (t (max)). The excretion pattern is parallel to that of the major oxidative metabolite N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Total recovery of iso-GAMA was about 1% of the applied dose. Together with N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L: -cysteine (AAMA) and GAMA, 57% of the applied dose is eliminated as mercapturic acids. The elimination kinetics of the three mercapturic acids of AA are compared. We show that dietary doses of acrylamide (AA) cause an overload of detoxification via AAMA and lead to the formation of carcinogenic glycidamide (GA) in the human body.

  2. Loss of ETHE1, a mitochondrial dioxygenase, causes fatal sulfide toxicity in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Viscomi, Carlo; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Di Meo, Ivano; Mineri, Rossana; Tiveron, Cecilia; Levitt, Michael D; Prelle, Alessandro; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Rimoldi, Marco; Zeviani, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is an autosomal recessive, invariably fatal disorder characterized by early-onset encephalopathy, microangiopathy, chronic diarrhea, defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain, high concentrations of C4 and C5 acylcarnitines in blood and high excretion of ethylmalonic acid in urine. ETHE1, a gene encoding a beta-lactamase-like, iron-coordinating metalloprotein, is mutated in ethylmalonic encephalopathy. In bacteria, ETHE1-like sequences are in the same operon of, or fused with, orthologs of TST, the gene encoding rhodanese, a sulfurtransferase. In eukaryotes, both ETHE1 and rhodanese are located within the mitochondrial matrix. We created a Ethe1(-/-) mouse that showed the cardinal features of ethylmalonic encephalopathy. We found that thiosulfate was excreted in massive amounts in urine of both Ethe1(-/-) mice and humans with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. High thiosulfate and sulfide concentrations were present in Ethe1(-/-) mouse tissues. Sulfide is a powerful inhibitor of COX and short-chain fatty acid oxidation, with vasoactive and vasotoxic effects that explain the microangiopathy in ethylmalonic encephalopathy patients. Sulfide is detoxified by a mitochondrial pathway that includes a sulfur dioxygenase. Sulfur dioxygenase activity was absent in Ethe1(-/-) mice, whereas it was markedly increased by ETHE1 overexpression in HeLa cells and Escherichia coli. Therefore, ETHE1 is a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase involved in catabolism of sulfide that accumulates to toxic levels in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

  3. Characterization of zinc-binding sites in human stromelysin-1: stoichiometry of the catalytic domain and identification of a cysteine ligand in the proenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salowe, S P; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Smith, C K; Kopka, I E; Hagmann, W K; Hermes, J D

    1992-05-19

    A determination of the zinc stoichiometry of the catalytic domain of the human matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 has been carried out using enzyme purified from recombinant Escherichia coli that express C-terminally truncated protein. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed that both the proenzyme (prostrom255) and the mature active form (strom255) contained nearly 2 mol of Zn/mol of protein. Full-length prostromelysin purified from a mammalian cell culture line also contained zinc in excess of 1 equiv. While zinc in prostrom255 could not be removed by dialysis against o-phenanthroline, similar treatment of mature strom255 resulted in the loss of one-half of the original zinc content. The peptidase activity of the zinc-depleted protein was reduced by greater than 85% but could be restored upon addition of Zn2+ or Co2+. Addition of a thiol-containing inhibitor to a CoZn hybrid enzyme resulted in marked spectral changes in both the visible and ultraviolet regions characteristic of sulfur ligation to Co2+. This direct evidence for an integral role in catalysis and inhibitor binding confirms the location of the exchangeable metal at the active site. To examine the environment of zinc in the proenzyme, a fully cobalt-substituted proenzyme was prepared by in vivo metal replacement. The absorbance features of dicobalt prostrom255 were consistent with metal coordination by the single cysteine present in the propeptide, although the data do not allow assignment to a particular zinc site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Noradrenaline increases intracellular glutathione in human astrocytoma U-251 MG cells by inducing glutamate-cysteine ligase protein via β3-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Kadoi, Hisatsugu; Yamamuro, Akiko; Ishimaru, Yuki; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2016-02-05

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a critical role in protecting cells from oxidative damage. Since neurons rely on the supply of GSH from astrocytes to maintain optimal intracellular GSH concentrations, the GSH concentration of astrocytes is important for the survival of neighboring neurons against oxidative stress. The neurotransmitter noradrenaline is known to modulate the functions of astrocytes and has been suggested to have neuroprotective properties in neurodegenerative diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective properties of noradrenaline, in this study, we investigated the effect of noradrenaline on the concentrations of intracellular GSH in human U-251 malignant glioma (MG; astrocytoma) cells. Treatment of the cells with noradrenaline for 24h concentration-dependently increased their intracellular GSH concentration. This increase was inhibited by a non-selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol and by a selective β3-adrenoceptor antagonist SR59230A, but not by a non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine, or by a selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol or by a selective β2-adrenoceptor antagonist butoxamine. In addition, the selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316243 increased the intracellular GSH in U-251 MG cells. Treatment of the cells with noradrenaline (10μM) for 24h increased the protein level of the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLc), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis; and this increase was inhibited by SR59230A. These results thus suggest that noradrenaline increased the GSH concentration in astrocytes by inducing GCLc protein in them via β3-adrenoceptor stimulation.

  5. N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine Affords Protection against Lead-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells

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    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although lead exposure has declined in recent years as a result of change to lead-free gasoline, several epidemiological have pointed out that it represents a medical and public health emergency, especially in young children consuming high amounts of lead-contaminated flake paints. A previous study in our laboratory indicated that lead exposure induces cytotoxicity in human liver carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress in lead-induced toxicity, and the protective effect of the anti-oxidant n-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. We hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a role in lead-induced cytotoxicity, and that NAC affords protection against this adverse effect. To test this hypothesis, we performed the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and the trypan blue exclusion test for cell viability. We also performed the thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation. Data obtained from the MTT assay indicated that NAC significantly increased the viability of HepG2 cells in a dosedependent manner upon 48 hours of exposure. Similar trend was obtained with the trypan blue exclusion test. Data generated from the thiobarbituric acid test showed a significant (p ≤ 0.05 increase of MDA levels in lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells compared to control cells. Interestingly, the addition of NAC to lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells significantly decreased cellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS, as evidenced by the decrease in lipid peroxidation byproducts. Overall, findings from this study suggest that NAC inhibits lead nitrate-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Hence, NAC may be used as a salvage therapy for lead-induced toxicity in exposed persons.

  6. Production of Human Cu,Zn SOD with Higher Activity and Lower Toxicity in E. coli via Mutation of Free Cysteine Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although, as an antioxidant enzyme, human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) can mitigate damage to cell components caused by free radicals generated by aerobic metabolism, large-scale manufacturing and clinical use of hSOD1 are still limited by the challenge of rapid and inexpensive production of high-quality eukaryotic hSOD1 in recombinant forms. We have demonstrated previously that it is a promising strategy to increase the expression levels of soluble hSOD1 so as to increase hSOD1 yields in E. coli. In this study, a wild-type hSOD1 (wtSOD1) and three mutant SOD1s (mhSOD1s), in which free cysteines were substituted with serine, were constructed and their expression in soluble form was measured. Results show that the substitution of Cys111 (mhSOD1/C111S) increased the expression of soluble hSOD1 in E. coli whereas substitution of the internal Cys6 (mhSOD1/C6S) decreased it. Besides, raised levels of soluble expression led to an increase in hSOD1 yields. In addition, mhSOD1/C111S expressed at a higher soluble level showed lower toxicity and stronger whitening and antiradiation activities than those of wtSOD1. Taken together, our data demonstrate that C111S mutation in hSOD1 is an effective strategy to develop new SOD1-associated reagents and that mhSOD1/C111S is a satisfactory candidate for large-scale production.

  7. Thiomers in noninvasive polypeptide delivery: in vitro and in vivo characterization of a polycarbophil-cysteine/glutathione gel formulation for human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Verena M; Guggi, Davide; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2004-07-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the potential of a new polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys)/glutathione (GSH) gel formulation to enhance the permeation of the model drug human growth hormone (hGH) across nasal mucosa in vitro and in vivo. The aqueous nasal gel contained PCP-Cys, GSH, and hGH in a final concentration of 0.3%, 0.5%, and 0.6% (m/v), respectively. In vitro permeation studies were performed in Ussing chambers on freshly excised bovine nasal mucosa using fluorescence-labeled dextran (molecular mass: 4.3 kDa; FD-4) and hGH (FITC-hGH). The release profile of FITC-hGH from the gel formulation and an unmodified PCP control formulation was determined. Furthermore, in vivo studies in rats were performed comparing the PCP-Cys/GSH/hGH gel with PCP/hGH control gel and physiological saline. The permeation of FD-4 and FITC-hGH across the nasal mucosa was improved two-fold and three-fold, respectively, in the presence of PCP-Cys/GSH. The PCP-Cys/GSH/hGH gel and the PCP/hGH control gel showed the same biphasic and matrix-controlled drug release. The nasal administration of the PCP-Cys/GSH/hGH gel formulation to rats resulted in a significantly increased and prolonged hGH plasma concentration-time profile versus unmodified PCP gel and physiological saline. According to these results, PCP-Cys gels might represent a promising new strategy for systemic nasal polypeptide delivery.

  8. Production of Human Cu,Zn SOD with Higher Activity and Lower Toxicity in E. coli via Mutation of Free Cysteine Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although, as an antioxidant enzyme, human Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1 can mitigate damage to cell components caused by free radicals generated by aerobic metabolism, large-scale manufacturing and clinical use of hSOD1 are still limited by the challenge of rapid and inexpensive production of high-quality eukaryotic hSOD1 in recombinant forms. We have demonstrated previously that it is a promising strategy to increase the expression levels of soluble hSOD1 so as to increase hSOD1 yields in E. coli. In this study, a wild-type hSOD1 (wtSOD1 and three mutant SOD1s (mhSOD1s, in which free cysteines were substituted with serine, were constructed and their expression in soluble form was measured. Results show that the substitution of Cys111 (mhSOD1/C111S increased the expression of soluble hSOD1 in E. coli whereas substitution of the internal Cys6 (mhSOD1/C6S decreased it. Besides, raised levels of soluble expression led to an increase in hSOD1 yields. In addition, mhSOD1/C111S expressed at a higher soluble level showed lower toxicity and stronger whitening and antiradiation activities than those of wtSOD1. Taken together, our data demonstrate that C111S mutation in hSOD1 is an effective strategy to develop new SOD1-associated reagents and that mhSOD1/C111S is a satisfactory candidate for large-scale production.

  9. Role in fast inactivation of the IV/S4-S5 loop of the human muscle Na+ channel probed by cysteine mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, H; Peter, W; Fleischhauer, R; Pika-Hartlaub, U; Malina, T; Mitrovic, N; Lehmann-Horn, F

    1997-12-01

    1. In order to investigate the role in fast inactivation of the cytoplasmic S4-S5 loop of the fourth domain (IV/S4-S5) within the alpha-subunit of the adult human muscle Na+ channel, every single amino acid from R1469 to G1486 was substituted by a cysteine and the mutants were studied by functional expression in human embryonic kidney cells (tsA201) using whole-cell patch clamping. Effects following intracellular application of the sulfhydryl reagents MTSET and MTSES on the mutants were investigated. 2. Sixteen of eighteen mutants resulted in the formation of functional channels. For P1480C and N1484C, no Na+ currents could be detected in transfected cells. In the absence of sulfhydryl reagents, F1473C and A1481C slowed fast Na+ channel inactivation by 2- and 1.5-fold, respectively, and L1482C induced a steady-state Na+ current (Iss) of 3% of peak current (Ipeak) (1% for wild-type). 3. Upon application of MTSET and MTSES, changes in fast inactivation gating occurred for most of the mutants. The most dramatic destabilizing effects on fast inactivation were observed for M1476C (9-fold slowing of inactivation; Iss/Ipeak, 3.6%; +15 mV shift in steady-state inactivation; 2- to 3-fold acceleration of recovery from inactivation), A1481C (3-fold; 14%; +20 mV; no change) and F1473C (2.5-fold; 2.4%; +8 mV; 1.5-fold). Less pronounced destabilizing effects were observed for M1477C and L1479C. Strongly stabilizing effects on the inactivated state, that is a 20-30 mV hyperpolarizing shift of the inactivation curve associated with a 3- to 4-fold decrease in the rate of recovery from inactivation, occurred for T1470C, L1471C and A1474C. Almost all effects were independent of the membrane potential; however, A1474C only reacted when cells were depolarized. Significant effects on activation were not observed. 4. We conclude that the IV/S4-S5 loop plays an important role in fast inactivation of the muscle Na+ channel and may contribute to the formation of a receptor for the putative

  10. N-acetyl-S-(N,N-diethylcarbamoyl) cysteine in rat nucleus accumbens, medial prefrontal cortex, and in rat and human plasma after disulfiram administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winefield, Robert D; Heemskerk, Anthonius A M; Kaul, Swetha; Williams, Todd D; Caspers, Michael J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; McCance-Katz, Elinore F; Lunte, Craig E; Faiman, Morris D

    2015-03-25

    Disulfiram (DSF), a treatment for alcohol use disorders, has shown some clinical effectiveness in treating addiction to cocaine, nicotine, and pathological gambling. The mechanism of action of DSF for treating these addictions is unclear but it is unlikely to involve the inhibition of liver aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2). DSF is a pro-drug and forms a number of metabolites, one of which is N-acetyl-S-(N,N-diethylcarbamoyl) cysteine (DETC-NAC). Here we describe a LCMS/MS method on a QQQ type instrument to quantify DETC-NAC in plasma and intracellular fluid from mammalian brain. An internal standard, the N,N-di-isopropylcarbamoyl homolog (MIM: 291>128) is easily separable from DETC-NAC (MIM: 263>100) on C18 RP media with a methanol gradient. The method's linear range is 0.5-500 nM from plasma and dialysate salt solution with all precisions better than 10% RSD. DETC-NAC and internal standards were recovered at better than 95% from all matrices, perchloric acid precipitation (plasma) or formic acid addition (salt) and is stable in plasma or salt at low pH for up to 24 h. Stability is observed through three freeze-thaw cycles per day for 7 days. No HPLC peak area matrix effect was greater than 10%. A human plasma sample from a prior analysis for S-(N,N-diethylcarbamoyl) glutathione (CARB) was found to have DETC NAC as well. In other human plasma samples from 62.5 mg/d and 250 mg/d dosing, CARB concentration peaks at 0.3 and 4 nM at 3 h followed by DETC-NAC peaks of 11 and 70 nM 2 h later. Employing microdialysis sampling, DETC-NAC levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and plasma of rats treated with DSF reached 1.1, 2.5 and 80 nM at 6h. The correlation between the appearance and long duration of DETC-NAC concentration in rat brain and the persistence of DSF-induced changes in neurotransmitters observed by Faiman et al. (Neuropharmacology, 2013, 75C, 95-105) is discussed.

  11. Cysteine Prevents Menopausal Syndromes in Ovariectomized Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Na-Rae; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-05-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is well known to be involved in oxidation-reduction reactions, serving as a source of sulfides in the body. Amino acids are known to improve menopausal symptoms and significantly reduce morbidity. This study aims to find an unrevealed effect of Cys with estrogenic and osteogenic actions. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice were treated with Cys daily for 8 weeks. Estrogen-related and osteoporosis-related factors were analyzed in the vagina, serum, and tibia. Cys was treated in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells and ER-positive human breast cancer Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. Cysteine administration ameliorated overweightness of the body and vaginal atrophy in the OVX mice. Cysteine increased the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 17β-estradiol in the serum of the OVX mice and improved the bone mineral density in the OVX mice. In MG-63 cells, Cys increased the proliferation, ERβ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, and estrogen response element (ERE) activity. Cysteine increased the ALP activity and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In MCF-7 cells, Cys also increased the proliferation, ERβ mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Cys has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. The novel insights gained here strongly imply the potential use of Cys as a new agent for postmenopausal women.

  12. Hemoglobin: A Nitric-Oxide Dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the hemoglobin superfamily efficiently catalyze nitric-oxide dioxygenation, and when paired with native electron donors, function as NO dioxygenases (NODs. Indeed, the NOD function has emerged as a more common and ancient function than the well-known role in O2 transport-storage. Novel hemoglobins possessing a NOD function continue to be discovered in diverse life forms. Unique hemoglobin structures evolved, in part, for catalysis with different electron donors. The mechanism of NOD catalysis by representative single domain hemoglobins and multidomain flavohemoglobin occurs through a multistep mechanism involving O2 migration to the heme pocket, O2 binding-reduction, NO migration, radical-radical coupling, O-atom rearrangement, nitrate release, and heme iron re-reduction. Unraveling the physiological functions of multiple NODs with varying expression in organisms and the complexity of NO as both a poison and signaling molecule remain grand challenges for the NO field. NOD knockout organisms and cells expressing recombinant NODs are helping to advance our understanding of NO actions in microbial infection, plant senescence, cancer, mitochondrial function, iron metabolism, and tissue O2 homeostasis. NOD inhibitors are being pursued for therapeutic applications as antibiotics and antitumor agents. Transgenic NOD-expressing plants, fish, algae, and microbes are being developed for agriculture, aquaculture, and industry.

  13. Protein cysteine modifications: (2) reactivity specificity and topics of medicinal chemistry and protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Noriyuki; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Ryo; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine (cysteinyl residue) modifications in proteins result in diversity in protein functions. The reaction specificity of a protein with a modified cysteine residue is determined by the overall conditions of the protein, including the spatial position of the cysteine residue, electrostatic interactions between cysteine residue and other charged residues, spatial interactions between the cysteine residue and a chemical compound, electrophilicity of the chemical compound, and the pH of the solution. In cysteine-dependant enzymes, each specific type of cysteine modification characterizes the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. Recently, the catalytic mechanisms of peroxiredoxins and cysteine proteases, which contain a cysteine residue(s) in their catalytic sites, have been elucidated. In the catalytic process of peroxiredoxins, a sulfenyl intermediate is formed by oxidation of the catalytic cysteine residue. On the other hand, in cysteine proteases, the catalytic cysteine residue reacts with the carboxyl carbon of a peptide substrate to form an intermediate complex via S-alkylation. In this review, we introduce the most current information on the applications of cysteine thiol chemistry for in vitro glycoprotein synthesis. Recently, a glycoprotein (monocyte chemotactic protein-3), containing an intact human complex-type sialyloligosaccharide has been chemically synthesized. The procedure used for this could have applications in the development of new protein-based drugs, including antineoplastic drugs and antibiotics. It can also potentially be applied for improving the half-life and reducing the toxicity of these drugs, and for preventing the development of multidrug resistance.

  14. A nonsense mutation in the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene (Hpd) causes skipping of the constitutive exon and hypertyrosinemia in mouse strain III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Fumio; Awata, Hisataka; Matsuda, Ichiro [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD; EC 1.13.11.27) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. Decreased activity of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase in the liver of mouse strain III is associated with tyrosinemia. We report a nucleotide substitution that generates a termination codon in exon 7 of the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene in III mice. This mutation is associated with partial exon skipping, and most of the mRNA lacks sequences corresponding to exon 7. The partial exon skipping apparently is the result of a nonsense mutation in the exon. Mouse strain III is a model for human tyrosinemia type 3 (McKusick 276710), and this train together with recently established models for tyrosinemia type 1 will facilitate studies of hereditary tyrosinemias.

  15. A nonsense mutation in the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene (Hpd) causes skipping of the constitutive exon and hypertyrosinemia in mouse strain III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, F; Awata, H; Katoh, H; Matsuda, I

    1995-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD; EC 1.13.11.27) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. Decreased activity of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase in the liver of mouse strain III is associated with tyrosinemia. We report a nucleotide substitution that generates a termination codon in exon 7 of the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene in III mice. This mutation is associated with partial exon skipping, and most of the mRNA lacks sequences corresponding to exon 7. The partial exon skipping apparently is the result of a nonsense mutation in the exon. Mouse strain III is a model for human tyrosinemia type 3 (McKusick 276710), and this strain together with recently established models for tyrosinemia type 1 will facilitate studies of hereditary tyrosinemias.

  16. The human analog of murine cystein rich protein 61 [correction of 16] is a 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 responsive immediate early gene in human fetal osteoblasts: regulation by cytokines, growth factors, and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, N; Lechner, A; Groll, C; Siggelkow, H; Hüfner, M; Köhrle, J; Jakob, F

    1998-04-01

    1Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) is a potent mediator of differentiation and maintenance of specific functions of osteoblasts. To detect novel targets for 1,25-(OH)2D3 action, we applied differential display PCR to human fetal osteoblast-like cells and identified the human analog of murine cystein rich protein 61 (hCYR61) as a 1,25-(OH)2D3-responsive immediate early gene in differentiated fetal osteoblast-like cells. The murine gene CYR61 is important for cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, and it belongs to an emerging gene family of cysteine-rich proteins. hCYR61 messenger RNA (mRNA) steady-state levels were stimulated 11-fold by 10 nM 1,25-(OH)2D3 by 1 h and declined to control levels by 4 h. This transient stimulation of hCYR61 mRNA was not inhibited by cycloheximide but was prevented by actinomycin D, indicating that the 1,25-(OH)2D3 effect involves transcriptional events and does not require de novo protein synthesis. hCYR61 mRNA stability was not influenced by 1,25(OH)2D3, whereas cycloheximide treatment stabilized hCYR61 mRNA. FCS, as well as growth factors and cytokines such as basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-1, strongly elevated hCYR61 mRNA steady-state levels within 1 h. hCYR61 mRNA was expressed also in primary human osteoblasts and osteosarcoma cell lines. Using a commercial tissue blot, hCYR61 mRNA was only observed in skeletal muscle. The fast and transient response of hCYR 61 to 1,25-(OH)2D3, serum, growth factors, and cytokines suggests an important role of hCYR61 for osteoblast function and differentiation.

  17. The mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 is required for amino acid catabolism during carbohydrate starvation and embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D; Browning, Luke W; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2014-05-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine.

  18. The Mitochondrial Sulfur Dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 Is Required for Amino Acid Catabolism during Carbohydrate Starvation and Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D.; Browning, Luke W.; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine. PMID:24692429

  19. Exploring the mechanism of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Sarah J.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chapman, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    The haem proteins TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase) and IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) are specific and powerful oxidation catalysts that insert one molecule of dioxygen into L-tryptophan in the first and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Recent crystallographic and biochemical analyses of TDO and IDO have greatly aided our understanding of the mechanisms employed by these enzymes in the binding and activation of dioxygen and tryptophan. In the present paper, we briefly discuss the function, structure and possible catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. PMID:19021508

  20. L-Cysteine metabolism and its nutritional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Yang, Guan; Duan, Jielin; Huang, Xingguo; Fang, Rejun; Li, Chongyong; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Kim, Sung Woo; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    L-Cysteine is a nutritionally semiessential amino acid and is present mainly in the form of L-cystine in the extracellular space. With the help of a transport system, extracellular L-cystine crosses the plasma membrane and is reduced to L-cysteine within cells by thioredoxin and reduced glutathione (GSH). Intracellular L-cysteine plays an important role in cellular homeostasis as a precursor for protein synthesis, and for production of GSH, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), and taurine. L-Cysteine-dependent synthesis of GSH has been investigated in many pathological conditions, while the pathway for L-cysteine metabolism to form H(2)S has received little attention with regard to prevention and treatment of disease in humans. The main objective of this review is to highlight the metabolic pathways of L-cysteine catabolism to GSH, H(2)S, and taurine, with special emphasis on therapeutic and nutritional use of L-cysteine to improve the health and well-being of animals and humans.

  1. Interaction between pyrite and cysteine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-she; WANG Zhao-hui; LI Bang-mei; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of cysteine on pyrite was studied by amounts adsorbed, FTIR and XRD measurements. The results obtained by adsorption experiment suggest that as the mass ratio of mineral to cysteine mp/mc is greater than 5, the amounts adsorbed on mineral is stable after adsorption for 15 min and cysteine adsorbing with mp/mc shows the same tendency. It can be inferred by its Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm that chemical interaction governs the entire adsorption process. The results from FTIR and XRD prove that the functional groups of cysteine appear with blue shift of their characteristic adsorption peak in FTIR spectrum; meanwhile, the lattice constant obviously decreases and the widening of crystal planes such as (210), (220) and (211) is found after cysteine adsorbing on mineral.

  2. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  3. Mutations in the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase gene are responsible for tyrosinemia type III and hawkinsinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoeda, K; Awata, H; Matsuura, T; Matsuda, I; Ploechl, E; Milovac, T; Boneh, A; Scott, C R; Danks, D M; Endo, F

    2000-11-01

    The enzyme 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) catalyzes the reaction of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid to homogentisic acid in the tyrosine catabolism pathway. A deficiency in the catalytic activity of HPD may lead to tyrosinemia type III, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by elevated levels of blood tyrosine and massive excretion of tyrosine derivatives into urine. It has been postulated that hawkinsinuria, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the excretion of 'hawkinsin,' may also be a result of HPD deficiency. Hawkinsin is a sulfur amino acid identified as (2-l-cystein-S-yl, 4-dihydroxycyclohex-5-en-1-yl)acetic acid. Patients with hawkinsinuria excrete this metabolite in their urine throughout their life, although symptoms of metabolic acidosis and tyrosinemia improve in the first year of life. We performed analyses of the HPD gene in a patient with tyrosinemia type III and two unrelated patients with hawkinsinuria. A homozygous missense mutation predicting an Ala to Val change at codon 268 (A268V) in the HPD gene was found in the patient with tyrosinemia type III. A heterozygous missense mutation predicting an Ala to Thr change at codon 33 (A33T) was found in the same HPD gene in the two patients with hawkinsinuria. These findings support the hypothesis that alterations in the structure and activity of HPD are causally related to two different metabolic disorders, tyrosinemia type III and hawkinsinuria.

  4. Shifting redox states of the iron center partitions CDO between crosslink formation or cysteine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeri, Catherine W; Ellis, Holly R

    2014-09-15

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cysteine sulfinic acid. The mammalian CDO enzymes contain a thioether crosslink between Cys93 and Tyr157, and purified recombinant CDO exists as a mixture of the crosslinked and non crosslinked isoforms. The current study presents a method of expressing homogenously non crosslinked CDO using a cell permeative metal chelator in order to provide a comprehensive investigation of the non crosslinked and crosslinked isoforms. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of purified non crosslinked CDO revealed that the iron was in the EPR silent Fe(II) form. Activity of non crosslinked CDO monitoring dioxygen utilization showed a distinct lag phase, which correlated with crosslink formation. Generation of homogenously crosslinked CDO resulted in an ∼5-fold higher kcat/Km value compared to the enzyme with a heterogenous mixture of crosslinked and non crosslinked CDO isoforms. EPR analysis of homogenously crosslinked CDO revealed that this isoform exists in the Fe(III) form. These studies present a new perspective on the redox properties of the active site iron and demonstrate that a redox switch commits CDO towards either formation of the Cys93-Tyr157 crosslink or oxidation of the cysteine substrate.

  5. Cysteine and cysteine-related signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Luis C; Aroca, M Ángeles; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    Cysteine occupies a central position in plant metabolism because it is a reduced sulfur donor molecule involved in the synthesis of essential biomolecules and defense compounds. Moreover, cysteine per se and its derivative molecules play roles in the redox signaling of processes occurring in various cellular compartments. Cysteine is synthesized during the sulfate assimilation pathway via the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine, catalyzed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL). Plant cells contain OASTLs in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytosol, resulting in a complex array of isoforms and subcellular cysteine pools. In recent years, significant progress has been made in Arabidopsis, in determining the specific roles of the OASTLs and the metabolites produced by them. Thus, the discovery of novel enzymatic activities of the less-abundant, like DES1 with L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity and SCS with S-sulfocysteine synthase activity, has provided new perspectives on their roles, besides their metabolic functions. Thereby, the research has been demonstrated that cytosolic sulfide and chloroplastic S-sulfocysteine act as signaling molecules regulating autophagy and protecting the photosystems, respectively. In the cytosol, cysteine plays an essential role in plant immunity; in the mitochondria, this molecule plays a central role in the detoxification of cyanide, which is essential for root hair development and plant responses to pathogens.

  6. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  7. Dealing with the sulfur part of cysteine: four enzymatic steps degrade l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, Saskia; Lorenz, Christin; Busch, Tjorven; Brinkkötter, Mascha; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2016-07-01

    Amino acid catabolism is essential for adjusting pool sizes of free amino acids and takes part in energy production as well as nutrient remobilization. The carbon skeletons are generally converted to precursors or intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In the case of cysteine, the reduced sulfur derived from the thiol group also has to be oxidized in order to prevent accumulation to toxic concentrations. Here we present a mitochondrial sulfur catabolic pathway catalyzing the complete oxidation of l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate. After transamination to 3-mercaptopyruvate, the sulfhydryl group from l-cysteine is transferred to glutathione by sulfurtransferase 1 and oxidized to sulfite by the sulfur dioxygenase ETHE1. Sulfite is then converted to thiosulfate by addition of a second persulfide group by sulfurtransferase 1. This pathway is most relevant during early embryo development and for vegetative growth under light-limiting conditions. Characterization of a double mutant produced from Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion lines for ETHE1 and sulfurtransferase 1 revealed that an intermediate of the ETHE1 dependent pathway, most likely a persulfide, interferes with amino acid catabolism and induces early senescence.

  8. MGC9753 gene, located within PPP1R1B-STARD3-ERBB2-GRB7 amplicon on human chromosome 17q12, encodes the seven-transmembrane receptor with extracellular six-cystein domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2003-06-01

    MYC, ERBB2, MET, FGFR2, CCNE1, MYCN, WNT2, CD44, MDM2, NCOA3, IQGAP1 and STK6 loci are amplified in human gastric cancer. It has been reported that the gene corresponding to EST H16094 is co-amplified with ERBB2 gene in human gastric cancer. Here, we identified and characterized the gene corresponding to EST H16094 by using bioinformatics. BLAST programs revealed that EST H16094 was derived from the uncharacterized MGC9753 gene. Two ORFs were predicted within human MGC9753 mRNA, and ORF1 (nucleotide position 18-980 of NM_033419.1) was predicted as the coding region of human MGC9753 mRNA based on comparative genomics. Nucleotide sequence of mouse Mgc9753 mRNA was next determined in silico by modification of AK052486 cDNA (deleting C at the nucleotide position 37). Human MGC9753 and mouse Mgc9753 proteins were 320-amino-acid seven-transmembrane receptors with the N-terminal six-cysteine domain and an N-glycosylation site (85.0% total-amino-acid identity). Human MGC9753 protein showed 90.6% total-amino-acid identity with human CAB2 aberrant protein, which lacked the third-transmembrane domain of MGC9753 due to frame shifts within ORF. Human MGC9753 gene, consisting of eight exons, were clustered with PPP1R1B, STARD3, TCAP, PNMT, ERBB2, MGC14832 and GRB7 genes within the 120-kb region. PPP1R1B, STARD3, MGC9753, ERBB2 and GRB7 genes are co-amplified in several cases of gastric cancer. This is the first report on comprehensive characterization of the amplicon around the PPP1R1B-STARD3-TCAP-PNMT-MGC9753-ERBB2-MGC14832-GRB7 locus on human chromosome 17q12.

  9. Involvement of cysteine-rich protein 61 in the epidermal growth factor-induced migration of human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Li-Han; Hsu, Sung-Po; Zhong, Wen-Bin; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most aggressive types of malignant cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ATC, and patients with thyroid carcinoma typically exhibit increased cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61). In this study, we found that EGF treatment induced cell migration, stress fiber formation, Cyr61 mRNA and protein expressions, and Cyr61 protein secretion in ATC cells. The recombinant Cyr61 protein significantly induced cell migration; however, inhibition of Cyr61 activity by a Cyr61-specific antibody abrogated EGF-induced cell migration. EGF treatment also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker protein expression, as evidenced by an increase in vimentin and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of Cyr61 expression by Cyr61 siRNA decreased cell migration and reversed the EMT-related marker protein expression. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and finally activated Cyr61 promoter plasmid activity. Our results suggest that Cyr61 is induced by EGF through the ERK/CREB signal pathway and that it plays a crucial role in the migration and invasion of ATC cells; moreover, Cyr61 might be a therapeutic target for metastatic ATC.

  10. Voltammetric Determination of Meloxicam in Pharmaceutical Formulation and Human Serum at Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified by Cysteic Acid Formed by Electrochemical Oxidation of L-cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ya Hu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of electrochemical detection of meloxicam is presented bymodification of a glassy carbon electrode with anionic layer of cysteic acid providingelectrostatic accumulation of the analyte onto the electrode surface. The modificationformed by electrochemical oxidation of L-cysteine was performed by cycling potential incysteine solution. The anodic peak current obtained at 1.088 V (vs. Ag/AgCl byvoltammetry was linearly dependent on the meloxicam concentration in the range of 4.3 ×10-8 ~ 8.5 × 10-6 M in the B-R buffer solution (0.04 M, pH 1.86 with a correlationcoefficient of 0.999. The detection limit (S/N = 3 is 1.5 × 10-9 M. The low-cost modifiedelectrode shows good sensitivity, selectivity and stability and has been applied to thedetermination of meloxicam in pharmaceutical formulation and spiked serum withsatisfactory results. The electrochemical reaction mechanism of meloxicam was discussed.

  11. The trichloroethylene metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine but not trichloroacetate inhibits pathogen-stimulated TNF-α in human extraplacental membranes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldenow, Erica; Hassan, Iman; Chames, Mark C; Xi, Chuanwu; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Extraplacental membranes define the gestational compartment and provide a barrier to infectious microorganisms ascending the gravid female reproductive tract. We tested the hypothesis that bioactive metabolites of trichloroethylene (TCE) decrease pathogen-stimulated innate immune response of extraplacental membranes. Extraplacental membranes were cultured for 4, 8, and 24h with the TCE metabolites trichloroacetate (TCA) or S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC) in the absence or presence of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to simulate infection. In addition, membranes were cocultured with DCVC and Group B Streptococcus (GBS). DCVC (5-50μM) significantly inhibited LTA-, LPS-, and GBS-stimulated cytokine release from tissue cultures as early as 4h (P≤0.05). In contrast, TCA (up to 500μM) did not inhibit LTA-stimulated cytokine release from tissue punches. Because cytokines are important mediators for host response to infectious microorganisms these findings suggest that TCE exposure could potentially modify susceptibility to infection during pregnancy.

  12. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  13. Enzymatic activity of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase produced by Gordonia polyisoprenivorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Scaramal Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the environmental conditions for enzyme activity of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C1,2O and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C2,3O produced by Gordonia polyisoprenivorans in cell-free and immobilized extracts. The optimum conditions of pH, temperature, time course and effect of ions for enzyme activity were determined. Peak activity of C1,2O occurred at pH 8.0. The isolate exhibited the highest activity of C2,3O at pH 7.0 and 8.0 for the cell-free extract and immobilized extract, respectively. This isolate exhibited important characteristics such as broad range of pH, temperature and time course for enzyme activity.

  14. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications.

  15. Structure and function of dioxygenases in histone demethylation and DNA/RNA demethylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Dong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG-dependent dioxygenases involved in histone and DNA/RNA demethylation convert the cosubstrate 2OG and oxygen to succinate and carbon dioxide, resulting in hydroxylation of the methyl group of the substrates and subsequent demethylation. Recent evidence has shown that these 2OG dioxygenases play vital roles in a variety of biological processes, including transcriptional regulation and gene expression. In this review, the structure and function of these dioxygenases in histone and nucleic acid demethylation will be discussed. Given the important roles of these 2OG dioxygenases, detailed analysis and comparison of the 2OG dioxygenases will guide the design of target-specific small-molecule chemical probes and inhibitors.

  16. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  17. INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE (IDO AND IMMUNE TOLERANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coma-del-Corral MJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is an intracellular and extrahepatic enzyme predominantly found in many cells, especially macrophages. Tryptophan degradation generates kynurenine, and this pathway of tryptophan metabolism is an effective mechanism for modulating the immune response. The IDO facilitates immune tolerance and is one of the main actors involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, including activated T cells. IDO induces production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO radicals. Several pathways involved in the regulation of immune response are regulated by redox mechanisms. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS-RNS and other redox active molecules play key roles in immunity.

  18. Degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene using genetically engineered dioxygenase producing Pseudomonas putida in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardani Gashtasb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation use to promote degradation and/or removal of contaminants into nonhazardous or less-hazardous substances from the environment using microbial metabolic ability. Pseudomonas spp. is one of saprotrophic soil bacterium and can be used for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs but this activity in most species is weak. Phenanthrene and pyrene could associate with a risk of human cancer development in exposed individuals. The aim of the present study was application of genetically engineered P. putida that produce dioxygenase for degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene in spiked soil using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method. The nahH gene that encoded catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O was cloned into pUC18 and pUC18-nahH recombinant vector was generated and transformed into wild P. putida, successfully. The genetically modified and wild types of P. putida were inoculated in soil and pilot plan was prepared. Finally, degradation of phenanthrene and pyrene by this bacterium in spiked soil were evaluated using HPLC measurement technique. The results were showed elimination of these PAH compounds in spiked soil by engineered P. putida comparing to dishes containing natural soil with normal microbial flora and inoculated autoclaved soil by wild type of P. putida were statistically significant (p0.05 but it was few impact on this process (more than 2%. Additional and verification tests including catalase, oxidase and PCR on isolated bacteria from spiked soil were indicated that engineered P. putida was alive and functional as well as it can affect on phenanthrene and pyrene degradation via nahH gene producing. These findings indicated that genetically engineered P. putida generated in this work via producing C23O enzyme can useful and practical for biodegradation of phenanthrene and pyrene as well as petroleum compounds in polluted environments.

  19. Cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) domain-specific stimulation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression through αVβ3 integrin in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhaoping; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2013-04-26

    Human skin largely comprises collagenous extracellular matrix. The hallmark of skin aging is fragmentation of collagen fibrils. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are largely responsible for collagen degradation. MMP-1, principally derived from dermal fibroblasts, is the major protease capable of initiating degradation of native fibrillar collagens. Presently, we report that CCN1, a secreted and extracellular matrix-associated protein, is elevated in aged human skin dermal fibroblasts in vivo and stimulates MMP-1 expression through functional interaction with αVβ3 integrin in human dermal fibroblasts. CCN1 contains four conserved structural domains. Our results indicate that the three N-terminal domains (IGFBP, VWC, and TSP1), but not the C-terminal CT domain, are required for CCN1 to stimulate MMP-1 expression. This stimulation is dependent on interaction between the active structural domains and αVβ3 integrin. The interaction of VWC domain with integrin αVβ3 is necessary and requires functional cooperation with adjacent IGFBP and TSP1 domains to stimulate MMP-1 expression. Finally, induction of MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts by CCN1 N-terminal domains resulted in fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils in a three-dimensional collagen lattice model. These data suggest that domain-specific interactions of CCN1 with αVβ3 integrin contribute to human skin aging by stimulating MMP-1-mediated collagen fibril fragmentation.

  20. N-acetyl cysteine protects human oral keratinocytes from Bis-GMA-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Gu, Ying-xin; Mo, Jia-ji; Shi, Jun-yu; Qiao, Shi-chong; Lai, Hong-chang

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol-A-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) released from dental resin materials causes various toxic effects on gingival epithelium. Thus the underlying mechanisms of its cytotoxicity should be elucidated for safety use. One potential cause of cell damage is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) beyond the capacity of a balanced redox regulation. In this study, we found that exposure of human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) to Bis-GMA caused apoptosis and G1/S cell cycle arrest in parallel with an increased ROS level. Moreover, Bis-GMA induced a depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential, an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, an activation of caspase-3 and altered expressions of cell cycle-related proteins (p21, PCNA, cyclinD1). Furthermore, the co-treatment of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) obviously attenuated Bis-GMA-induced toxicity. Here we also evaluated the effects of Bis-GMA on the ROS-related PI3k/Akt pathway. We found that Bis-GMA inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, whereas the amount of phosphorylated Akt was reverted to the control level in the presence of NAC. Our findings suggested that the toxic effects of Bis-GMA were related to ROS production and the antioxidant NAC effectively reduced Bis-GMA-mediated cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of the Cysteine Protease Human Cathepsin L by Triazine Nitriles: Amide⋅⋅⋅Heteroarene π-Stacking Interactions and Chalcogen Bonding in the S3 Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Maude; Ivkovic, Jakov; Martignoni, Mara; Fleuti, Marianne; Trapp, Nils; Haap, Wolfgang; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Benz, Jörg; Kuhn, Bernd; Schirmeister, Tanja; Diederich, François

    2017-02-03

    We report an extensive "heteroarene scan" of triazine nitrile ligands of the cysteine protease human cathepsin L (hCatL) to investigate π-stacking on the peptide amide bond Gly67-Gly68 at the entrance of the S3 pocket. This heteroarene⋅⋅⋅peptide bond stacking was supported by a co-crystal structure of an imidazopyridine ligand with hCatL. Inhibitory constants (Ki ) are strongly influenced by the diverse nature of the heterocycles and specific interactions with the local environment of the S3 pocket. Binding affinities vary by three orders of magnitude. All heteroaromatic ligands feature enhanced binding by comparison with hydrocarbon analogues. Predicted energetic contributions from the orientation of the local dipole moments of heteroarene and peptide bond could not be confirmed. Binding of benzothienyl (Ki =4 nm) and benzothiazolyl (Ki =17 nm) ligands was enhanced by intermolecular C-S⋅⋅⋅O=C interactions (chalcogen bonding) with the backbone C=O of Asn66 in the S3 pocket. The ligands were also tested for the related enzyme rhodesain. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A murine model for type III tyrosinemia: lack of immunologically detectable 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase enzyme protein in a novel mouse strain with hypertyrosinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, F; Katoh, H; Yamamoto, S; Matsuda, I

    1991-04-01

    We have characterized a new mutant strain of mouse that has hypertyrosinemia. The blood tyrosine level was persistently high, and increased amounts of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and its derivatives were excreted into the urine. Succinylacetone was not detected in urine samples from these mice. All the animals were apparently healthy, and there was no evidence of hepatorenal dysfunction. The hypertyrosinemia was transmitted through an autosomal recessive inheritance. Analyses of hepatic enzymes related to tyrosine metabolism revealed that 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase activity was virtually absent, while fumarylacetoacetase and tyrosine aminotransferases (cytosolic and mitochondrial forms) were normal in these mutant mice. Immunoblot analysis of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase protein in the liver indicated that the subunit protein of the enzyme was absent. It would appear that hypertyrosinemia in this mutant strain was caused by a genetic defect in 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase. These features are similar to type III tyrosinemia in humans. Analysis of this mutant strain of mouse is expected to provide valuable information on the pathogenesis of human type III tyrosinemia and can also serve as a useful system for studies on tyrosine metabolism.

  3. A novel non-heme iron-containing dioxygenase. Chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase from Phenylobacterium immobilis DSM 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R; Schmitt, S; Lingens, F

    1982-07-01

    Previously we purified an enzyme from Phenylobacterium immobilis DSM 1986, which cleaves the catechol derivative of the herbicide Chloridazon [5-amino-4-chloro-2-phenyl-3 (2H)-pyridazinone] in the meta position. The enzyme, which could be crystallized, proved in Ouchterlony double-diffusion tests to consist of a single protein species. No cross-reaction was observed with other meta-cleaving enzymes. Its light absorption spectrum showed a maximum at 279 nm (epsilon = 310 mM -1 cm -1), shoulders at 289 nm and 275 nm and a very weak band at around 430 nm (epsilon = 1.14 mM -1 cm -1). The amino acid analysis showed a slight excess of acidic amino acids, in agreement with the pl of 4.5. Surprisingly the enzyme per se is completely inactive, although it contains one non-dialysable iron atom per submit. It has to be activated by preincubation with ferrous ions or ascorbate. The enzyme activated this way is autoxidizable and returns to its non-activated state in the presence of oxygen. During the reaction with the substrate, this inactivation seems to be enhanced about 100 times. Since this kind of activation and inactivation is not observed in other meta-cleaving enzymes, this enzyme seems to represent a new type of a non-heme iron dioxygenase. We tentatively propose the name Chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase for this enzyme.

  4. Effect of vitamin E and human placenta cysteine peptidase inhibitor on expression of cathepsins B and L in implanted hepatoma Morris 5123 tumor model in Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadeusz Sebzda; Piotr Hanczyc; Yousif Saleh; Bernice F Akinpelumi; Maciej Siewinski; Jerzy Rudnicki

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effectiveness of human placental inhibitors, by injecting vitamin E to rats with transplanted Norris-5123 hepatoma, on the expression of cathepsins B and L in tumor, liver, lung and blood sera after transplantation of Norris 5123 hepatoma.METHODS: Animals were divided into 10 groups receiving three different concentrations of vitamin E and inhibitors along or in combination and compared with negative control (healthy rats) and positive control (tumor rats). Effectiveness of treatment was evaluated with regard to survival time,tumor response and determination of the activities of proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors using flurogenic substrates.RESULTS: Cathepsins B and L activities were elevated by 16-fold in comparison with negative control tissues, and their endogenous inhibitor activity decreased by 1.2-fold before treatment. In several cases, tumors completely disappeared following vitamin E plus human placental cyteine protease inhibitor (CPI) compared with controls.The number of complete tumor responses was higher when 20 m/kg vitamin E plus 400 μg of CPI was used, i.e.7/10 rats survived more than two mo. Cathepsins B and L were expressed significantly in tumor, liver, lung tissues and sera in parallel to the increasing of the endogenous inhibitor activity compared with the controls after treatment (P<0.0001).CONCLUSION: The data indicate formation of metastasis significantly reduced in treated rats, which might provide a therapeutic basis for anti-cancer therapy.

  5. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  6. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  7. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton Siklos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  8. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizarte, F.S. Neto; Tirapelli, D.P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, S.R. [Universidade de Franca, Núcleo de Pesquisa em Ciências e Tecnologia, Franca, SP (Brazil); Tirapelli, C.R. [Universidade de São Paulo, Laboratório de Farmacologia, Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, F.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Novais, P.C. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Peria, F.M.; Oliveira, H.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Carlotti, C.G. Junior; Tirapelli, L.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-01-11

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  9. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Lizarte Neto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA. We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21 and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8 genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3 and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP. KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  10. Kaurene diterpene induces apoptosis in U87 human malignant glioblastoma cells by suppression of anti-apoptotic signals and activation of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarte Neto, F S; Tirapelli, D P C; Ambrosio, S R; Tirapelli, C R; Oliveira, F M; Novais, P C; Peria, F M; Oliveira, H F; Carlotti Junior, C G; Tirapelli, L F

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and malignant primary brain tumors in humans. Studies have shown that classes of kaurene diterpene have anti-tumor activity related to their ability to induce apoptosis. We investigated the response of the human glioblastoma cell line U87 to treatment with ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (kaurenoic acid, KA). We analyzed cell survival and the induction of apoptosis using flow cytometry and annexin V staining. Additionally, the expression of anti-apoptotic (c-FLIP and miR-21) and apoptotic (Fas, caspase-3 and caspase-8) genes was analyzed by relative quantification (real-time PCR) of mRNA levels in U87 cells that were either untreated or treated with KA (30, 50, or 70 µM) for 24, 48, and 72 h. U87 cells treated with KA demonstrated reduced viability, and an increase in annexin V- and annexin V/PI-positive cells was observed. The percentage of apoptotic cells was 9% for control cells, 26% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 50 µM KA, and 31% for cells submitted to 48 h of treatment with 70 µM KA. Similarly, in U87 cells treated with KA for 48 h, we observed an increase in the expression of apoptotic genes (caspase-8, -3) and a decrease in the expression of anti-apoptotic genes (miR-21 and c-FLIP). KA possesses several interesting properties and induces apoptosis through a unique mechanism. Further experiments will be necessary to determine if KA may be used as a lead compound for the development of new chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of primary brain tumors.

  11. Tissue contents and urinary excretion of taurine after administration of L-cysteine and L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate to rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubuka,Toshihiko

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissue contents and urinary excretion of taurine were studied in rats after the administration of L-cysteine and its derivatives. Average taurine content in the liver of rats fed a 25% casein diet for 7 days increased 2-fold 2h after the intraperitoneal administration of 5 mmol of L-cysteine per kg of body weight, whereas that in rats fed a 5% casein diet for 2 days increased only slightly. The difference in the liver taurine contents between these two groups was discussed in relation to cysteine dioxygenase. Taurine contents in the heart, brain and blood did not differ significantly between these two groups or between the control and the group of rats which received L-cysteine. The increase in liver taurine concentrations after L-cysteine administration was much higher than that after L-cystine administration, suggesting a difference in their absorption. The intraperitoneal administration of 5 mmol/kg of L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTCA resulted in a 3-fold increase in liver taurine content. The average increase in taurine excretion in the 24-h urine after OTCA administration corresponded to about 6.0% and that in the next 24-h urine to about 2.6% of OTCA administered, suggesting that nearly 10% of OTCA was metabolized to taurine and excreted in the urine.

  12. 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase Inhibitors: From Chemical Biology to Agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndikuryayo, Ferdinand; Moosavi, Behrooz; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2017-10-04

    The development of new herbicides is receiving considerable attention to control weed biotypes resistant to current herbicides. Consequently, new enzymes are always desired as targets for herbicide discovery. 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD, EC 1.13.11.27) is an enzyme engaged in photosynthetic activity and catalyzes the transformation of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid (HPPA) into homogentisic acid (HGA). HPPD inhibitors constitute a promising area of discovery and development of innovative herbicides with some advantages, including excellent crop selectivity, low application rates, and broad-spectrum weed control. HPPD inhibitors have been investigated for agrochemical interests, and some of them have already been commercialized as herbicides. In this review, we mainly focus on the chemical biology of HPPD, discovery of new potential inhibitors, and strategies for engineering transgenic crops resistant to current HPPD-inhibiting herbicides. The conclusion raises some relevant gaps for future research directions.

  13. Structure and function of dioxygenases in histone demethylation and DNA/RNA demethylation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong, Cheng; Zhang, Heng; Xu, Chao; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Min, Jinrong

    2014-01-01

    Iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent dioxygenases involved in histone and DNA/RNA demethylation convert the cosubstrate 2OG and oxygen to succinate and carbon dioxide, resulting in hydroxylation of the methyl group...

  14. Chemical components from Aloe and their inhibition of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Nan Sun

    2017-01-01

    Abbreviation used: IDO: inhibit indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, TMS: tetramethylsilane, HMQC: heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation, HMBC: heteronuclear multiple bond correlation, COSY: 1H-1H correlation spectroscopy, ESI-MS: Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, DMSO: dimethyl sulfoxide

  15. S1 subsite specificity of a recombinant cysteine proteinase, CPB, of Leishmania mexicana compared with cruzain, human cathepsin L and papain using substrates containing non-natural basic amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L C; Melo, R L; Sanderson, S J; Mottram, J C; Coombs, G H; Caliendo, G; Santagada, V; Juliano, L; Juliano, M A

    2001-03-01

    We have explored the substrate specificity of a recombinant cysteine proteinase of Leishmania mexicana (CPB2.8 Delta CTE) in order to obtain data that will enable us to design specific inhibitors of the enzyme. Previously we have shown that the enzyme has high activity towards substrates with a basic group at the P1 position [Hilaire, P.M.S., Alves, L.C., Sanderson, S.J., Mottram, J.C., Juliano, M.A., Juliano, L., Coombs, G.H. & Meldal M. (2000) Chem. Biochem. 1, 115--122], but we have also observed high affinity for peptides with hydrophobic residues at this position. In order to have substrates containing both features, we synthesized one series of internally quenched fluorogenic peptides derived from the sequence ortho-amino-benzoyl-FRSRQ-N-[2,4-dinitrophenyl]-ethylenediamine, and substituted the Arg at the P1 position with the following non-natural basic amino acids: 4-aminomethyl-phenylalanine (Amf), 4-guanidine-phenylalanine (Gnf), 4-aminomethyl-N-isopropyl-phenylalanine (Iaf), 3-pyridyl-alanine (Pya), 4-piperidinyl-alanine (Ppa), 4-aminomethyl-cyclohexyl-alanine (Ama), and 4-aminocyclohexyl-alanine (Aca). For comparison, the series derived from ortho-amino-benzoyl-FRSRQ-N-[2,4-dinitrophenyl]-ethylenediamine was also assayed with cruzain (the major cysteine proteinase of Trypanosoma cruzi), human cathepsin L and papain. The peptides ortho-amino-benzoyl-FAmfSRQ-N-[2,4-dinitrophenyl]-ethylenediamine (k(cat)/K(m) = 12,000 mM(-1) x s(-1)) and ortho-amino-benzoyl-FIafSRQ-N-[2,4-dinitrophenyl]-ethylenediamine (k(cat)/K(m) = 27,000 mM(-1) x s(-1)) were the best substrates for CPB2.8 Delta CTE. In contrast, ortho-amino-benzoyl-FAmaSRQ-N-[2,4-dinitrophenyl]-ethylenediamine and ortho-amino-benzoyl-FAcaSRQ-N-[2,4-dinitrophenyl]-ethylenediamine were very resistant and inhibited this enzyme with K(i) values of 23 nM and 30 nM, respectively. Cruzain hydrolyzed quite well the substrates in this series with Amf, Ppa and Aca, whereas the peptide with Ama was resistant and

  16. Development of an HPLC-MS procedure for the quantification of N-acetyl-S-(n-propyl)-l-cysteine, the major urinary metabolite of 1-bromopropane in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheever, K L; Marlow, K L; B'hymer, C; Hanley, K W; Lynch, D W

    2009-03-15

    An analytical procedure was developed for the detection and quantification of N-acetyl-S-(n-propyl)-l-cysteine (n-propylmercapturic acid, AcPrCys), a metabolite and biomarker for exposure to 1-bromopropane (1-BP). 1-BP is used as an industrial solvent and exposure is a health concern for industrial workers due to its toxicity. It has been associated with neurological disorders in both animals and humans. Urine sample preparation for the determination of AcPrCys consisted of solid phase extraction (SPE). Urine samples on preconditioned SPE (C18) columns were washed with 40% methanol/60% water solution prior to elution with acetone. Quantification was by means of a liquid chromatograph (LC) equipped with a mass spectrometer (MS) using an Aqua 3 microm C18 300A column and [d(7)]-AcPrCys was used as internal standard. Electrospray ionization (ESI) was used with the MS operated in the negative ion mode and selected ion monitoring (SIM) at m/z 204 for AcPrCys and m/z 211 for [d(7)]-AcPrCys. Demonstrated recovery of urine samples fortified at multiple levels (0.625-10 microg/ml) varied between 96 and 103% of theory with relative standard deviations (RSD) of 6.4% or less. The limit of detection (LOD) for the procedure was approximately 0.01 microg/ml AcPrCys in urine. These data will be discussed as well as other factors of the development of this test procedure.

  17. New insights into the metabolism of organomercury compounds: mercury-containing cysteine S-conjugates are substrates of human glutamine transaminase K and potent inactivators of cystathionine γ-lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C; Krasnikov, Boris F; Joshee, Lucy; Pinto, John T; Hallen, André; Li, Jianyong; Zalups, Rudolfs K; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic practices and recycling in the environment through natural processes result in release of potentially harmful levels of mercury into the biosphere. Mercury, especially organic forms, accumulates in the food chain. Mercury reacts readily with sulfur-containing compounds and often exists as a thiol S-conjugate, such as the l-cysteine (Cys)-S-conjugate of methylmercury (CH(3)Hg-S-Cys) or inorganic mercury (Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys). These S-conjugates are structurally similar to l-methionine and l-cystine/l-cystathionine, respectively. Bovine and rat glutamine transaminase K (GTK) catalyze transamination of sulfur-containing amino acids. Recombinant human GTK (rhGTK) has a relatively open catalytic active site, and we report here that this enzyme, like the rat and bovine enzymes, can also utilize sulfur-containing l-amino acids, including l-methionine, l-cystine, and l-cystathionine as substrates. The current study extends this list to include mercuric S-conjugates, and shows that CH(3)Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are substrates and reversible inhibitors of rhGTK. The homocysteine S-conjugates, Hcy-S-Hg-S-Hcy and CH(3)Hg-S-Hcy, are also inhibitors. Finally, we show that HgCl(2), CH(3)Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are potent irreversible inhibitors of rat cystathionine γ-lyase. The present study broadens our knowledge of the biochemistry of mercury compounds by showing that Cys S-conjugates of mercury interact with enzymes that catalyze transformations of biologically important sulfur-containing amino acids.

  18. Trichloroethylene degradation by Escherichia coli containing the cloned Pseudomonas putida F1 toluene dioxygenase genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Zylstra, G J; Wackett, L P; Gibson, D T

    1989-01-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been implicated as an enzyme capable of degrading trichloroethylene. This has now been confirmed with Escherichia coli JM109(pDTG601) that contains the structural genes (todC1C2BA) of toluene dioxygenase under the control of the tac promoter. The extent of trichloroethylene degradation by the recombinant organism depended on the cell concentration and the concentration of trichloroethylene. A linear rate of trichloroethylene degradation was o...

  19. The cysteine-cluster motif of c-Yes, Lyn and FAK as a suppressive module for the kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Senga, Takeshi; Oo, Myat Lin; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Biswas, Md Helal Uddin; Mon, Naing Naing; Huang, Pengyu; Ito, Satoko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Hamaguchi, Michinari

    2008-04-01

    The Src family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in the progression of human cancers so that the development of its specific inhibitors is important as a therapeutic tool. We previously reported that cysteine residues in the cysteine-cluster (CC) motif of v-Src were critical for the kinase inactivation by the SH-alkylating agents such as N-(9-acridinyl) maleimide (NAM), whereas other cysteine residues were dispensable. We found similar CC-motifs in other Src-family kinases and a non-Src-family kinase, FAK. In this study, we explored the function of the CC-motif in Yes, Lyn and FAK. While Src has four cysteines in the CC-motif, c-Yes and Lyn have three and two of the four cysteines, respectively. Two conserved cysteines of the Src family kinases, corresponding to Cys487 and Cys498 of Src, were essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM, whereas the first cysteine of c-Yes, which is absent in Lyn, was less important. FAK has similar CC-motifs with two cysteines and both cysteines were again essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM. Taken together, modification of cysteine residues of the CC-motif causes a repressor effect on the catalytic activity of the Src family kinases and FAK.

  20. Inhibition of Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO in Glioblastoma Cells by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Reinhart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful oncolytic virus treatment of malignant glioblastoma multiforme depends on widespread tumor-specific lytic virus replication and escape from mitigating innate immune responses to infection. Here we characterize a new HSV vector, JD0G, that is deleted for ICP0 and the joint sequences separating the unique long and short elements of the viral genome. We observed that JD0G replication was enhanced in certain glioblastoma cell lines compared to HEL cells, suggesting that a vector backbone deleted for ICP0 may be useful for treatment of glioblastoma. The innate immune response to virus infection can potentially impede oncolytic vector replication in human tumors. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is expressed in response to interferon γ (IFNγ and has been linked to both antiviral functions and to the immune escape of tumor cells. We observed that IFNγ treatment of human glioblastoma cells induced the expression of IDO and that this expression was quelled by infection with both wild-type and JD0G viruses. The role of IDO in inhibiting virus replication and the connection of this protein to the escape of tumor cells from immune surveillance suggest that IDO downregulation by HSV infection may enhance the oncolytic activity of vectors such as JD0G.

  1. Cysteine sensing by plasmons of silver nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfassy, Eitan, E-mail: eitan.elfassi@gmail.com; Mastai, Yitzhak, E-mail: Yitzhak.Mastai@biu.ac.il; Salomon, Adi, E-mail: adi.salomon@biu.ac.il

    2016-09-15

    Noble metal nanoparticles are considered to be valuable nanostructures in the field of sensors due to their spectral response sensitivity to small changes in the surrounding refractive index which enables them to detect a small amount of molecules. In this research, we use silver nanocubes of about 50 nm length to detect low concentrations of cysteine, a semi-essential amino acid. Following cysteine adsorption onto the nanocubes, a redshift in the plasmonic modes was observed, enabling the detection of cysteine down to 10 µM and high sensitivity of about 125 nm/RIU (refractive index units). Furthermore, we found that multilayer adsorption of cysteine leads to the stabilization of the silver nanocubes. The cysteine growth onto the nanocubes was also characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). - Highlights: • Silver nanocubes (50 nm length) are used to detect low concentrations of cysteine. • A redshift in the plasmonic modes was observed following cysteine adsorption onto the nanocubes. • The cysteine growth onto the nanocubes is also characterized by TEM.

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of the human alpha 5 (IV) collagen chain and identification of a single-base mutation in exon 23 converting glycine 521 in the collagenous domain to cysteine in an Alport syndrome patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Hertz, Jens Michael; Leinonen, A;

    1992-01-01

    alleles. The mutation which was located to exon 23 was sequenced from a polymerase chain reaction-amplified product, and shown to be a G----T change in the coding strand. The mutation changed the GGT codon of glycine 521 to cysteine. The same mutation was found in one allele of the female cousin...

  3. 7-cysteine-pyrrole conjugate: A new potential DNA reactive metabolite of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaobo; Xia, Qingsu; Ma, Liang; Fu, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) require metabolic activation to exert cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. We previously reported that (±)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts are responsible for PA-induced liver tumor formation in rats. In this study, we determined that metabolism of riddelliine and monocrotaline by human or rat liver microsomes produced 7-cysteine-DHP and DHP. The metabolism of 7-glutathionyl-DHP by human and rat liver microsomes also generated 7-cysteine-DHP. Further, reaction of 7-cysteine-DHP with calf thymus DNA in aqueous solution yielded the described DHP-derived DNA adducts. This study represents the first report that 7-cysteine-DHP is a new PA metabolite that can lead to DNA adduct formation.

  4. Cysteine sensing by plasmons of silver nanocubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfassy, Eitan; Mastai, Yitzhak; Salomon, Adi

    2016-09-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are considered to be valuable nanostructures in the field of sensors due to their spectral response sensitivity to small changes in the surrounding refractive index which enables them to detect a small amount of molecules. In this research, we use silver nanocubes of about 50 nm length to detect low concentrations of cysteine, a semi-essential amino acid. Following cysteine adsorption onto the nanocubes, a redshift in the plasmonic modes was observed, enabling the detection of cysteine down to 10 μM and high sensitivity of about 125 nm/RIU (refractive index units). Furthermore, we found that multilayer adsorption of cysteine leads to the stabilization of the silver nanocubes. The cysteine growth onto the nanocubes was also characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM).

  5. A novel role for methyl cysteinate, a cysteine derivative, in cesium accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Eri; Miyazaki, Takae; Hayaishi-Satoh, Aya; Han, Minwoo; Kusano, Miyako; Khandelia, Himanshu; Saito, Kazuki; Shin, Ryoung

    2017-01-01

    Phytoaccumulation is a technique to extract metals from soil utilising ability of plants. Cesium is a valuable metal while radioactive isotopes of cesium can be hazardous. In order to establish a more efficient phytoaccumulation system, small molecules which promote plants to accumulate cesium were investigated. Through chemical library screening, 14 chemicals were isolated as ‘cesium accumulators’ in Arabidopsis thaliana. Of those, methyl cysteinate, a derivative of cysteine, was found to function within the plant to accumulate externally supplemented cesium. Moreover, metabolite profiling demonstrated that cesium treatment increased cysteine levels in Arabidopsis. The cesium accumulation effect was not observed for other cysteine derivatives or amino acids on the cysteine metabolic pathway tested. Our results suggest that methyl cysteinate, potentially metabolised from cysteine, binds with cesium on the surface of the roots or inside plant cells and improve phytoaccumulation. PMID:28230101

  6. Negative Impact of Hypoxia on Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Elbers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan is an essential amino acid for hosts and pathogens. The liver enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO provokes, by its ability to degrade tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine, the precursor of the immune-relevant kynurenines, direct and indirect antimicrobial and immunoregulatory states. Up to now these TDO-mediated broad-spectrum effector functions have never been observed under hypoxia in vitro, although physiologic oxygen concentrations in liver tissue are low, especially in case of infection. Here we analysed recombinant expressed human TDO and ex vivo murine TDO functions under different oxygen conditions and show that TDO-induced restrictions of clinically relevant pathogens (bacteria, parasites and of T cell proliferation are abrogated under hypoxic conditions. We pinpointed the loss of TDO efficiency to the reduction of TDO activity, since cell survival and TDO protein levels were unaffected. In conclusion, the potent antimicrobial as well as immunoregulatory effects of TDO were substantially impaired under hypoxic conditions that pathophysiologically occur in vivo. This might be detrimental for the appropriate host immune response towards relevant pathogens.

  7. Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is essential for dendritic cell activation and chemotactic responsiveness to chemokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih Ling HWANG; Nancy Pei-Yee CHUNG; Jacqueline Kwai-Yi CHAN; Chen-Lung Steve LIN

    2005-01-01

    Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate-limiting enzyme for the tryptophan catabolism. In human and murine cells, IDO inhibits antigen-specific T cell proliferation in vitro and suppresses T cell responses to fetal alloantigens during murine pregnancy. In mice, IDO expression is an inducible feature of specific subsets of dendritic cells (DCs),and is important for T cell regulatory properties. However, the effect of IDO and tryptophan deprivation on DC functions remains unknown. We report here that when tryptophan utilization was prevented by a pharmacological inhibitor of IDO, 1-methyl tryptophan (1MT), DC activation induced by pathogenic stimulus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was inhibited both phenotypically and functionally. Such an effect was less remarkable when DC was stimulated by a physiological stimulus, CD40 ligand. Tryptophan deprivation during DC activation also regulated the expression of CCR5 and CXCR4, as well as DC responsiveness to chemokines. These results suggest that tryptophan usage in the microenvironment is essential for DC maturation, and may also play a role in the regulation of DC migratory behaviors.

  8. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A. G. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Departamento Academico de Fisica (Brazil); Barison, A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Oliveira, V. S. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Parana (Brazil); Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes (Brazil); Schreiner, W. H., E-mail: wido@fisica.ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV-Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the {mu}M range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation-reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} form.

  9. Conversion of 3-chlorocatechol by various catechol 2,3-dioxygenases and sequence analysis of the chlorocatechol dioxygenase region of Pseudomonas putida GJ31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, Astrid E.; Kingma, Jaap; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Reineke, Walter; Janssen, Dick B.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida GJ31 contains an unusual catechol 2,3-dioxygenase that converts 3-chlorocatechol and 3-methylcatechol, which enables the organism to use both chloroaromatics and methylaromatics for growth, A 3.1-kb region of genomic DNA of strain GJ31 containing the gene for this chlorocatechol 2

  10. Structure of 4-hydrophenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) gene and its mutation in tyrosinemic mouse strain III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awata, H.; Endo, F.; Matsuda, I. [Kumamoto Univ. Medical School (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    4-Hydroxphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) is an important enzyme in tyrosine catabolism in most organisms. The activity of this enzyme is expressed mainly in the liver and is developmentally regulated in mammals. A genetic deficiency of the enzyme in man and mouse leads to hereditary tyrosinemia type 3. Using human HPD cDNA as a probe, a chromosomal gene related to HPD was isolated from human and mouse gene libraries. The human HPD gene is over 30 kilo-bases long and is split into 14 exons. Analysis of the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the gene suggests that expression of the gene is regulated by hepatocyte-specific and liver-enriched transcription factors, as well as by hormones. These features of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene are similar to those of other genes which are specifically expressed in hepatocytes and which are developmentally regulated. The gene for mouse HPD has a similar structure and we obtained evidence for a nucleotide substitution which generates a termination codon in exon 7 of the HPD gene in III mice. This mutation associates a partial exon skipping and most of the mRNA lacks sequences corresponding to exon 7. The partial exon skipping apparently is the result of a nonsense mutation in the exon. Thus, mouse strain III can serve as a genetic model for human tyrosinemia type 3. Ongoing studies are expected to elucidate the disease process involved in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 and to shed light on mechanisms that mediate developmental regulation of HPD gene expression. In addition, mouse strain III together with recently established models for tyrosinemia type 1 will facilitate studies on hereditary tyrosinemias.

  11. Potential in vivo amelioration by N-acetyl-L-cysteine of oxidative stress in brain in human double mutant APP/PS-1 knock-in mice: toward therapeutic modulation of mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Quanzhen; Aluise, Christopher D; Joshi, Gururaj; Sultana, Rukhsana; St Clair, Daret K; Markesbery, William R; Butterfield, D Allan

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia among the elderly. Although the underlying cause has yet to be established, numerous data have shown that oxidative stress is implicated in AD as well as in preclinical stages of AD, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The oxidative stress observed in brains of subjects with AD and MCI may be due, either fully or in part, to increased free radicals mediated by amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta). By using double human mutant APP/PS-1 knock-in mice as the AD model, the present work demonstrates that the APP/PS-1 double mutation results in elevated protein oxidation (as indexed by protein carbonyls), protein nitration (as indexed by 3-nitrotyrosine), as well as lipid peroxidation (as indexed by protein-bound 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) in brains of mice aged 9 months and 12 months. APP/PS-1 mice also exhibited lower levels of brain glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in both age groups studied, whereas glutathione reductase (GR) levels in brain were unaffected by the mutation. The activities of both of these antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in APP/PS-1 mouse brains, whereas the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) was increased relative to controls in both age groups. Levels of peptidyl prolyl isomerase 1 (Pin1) were significantly decreased in APP/PS-1 mouse brain aged 9 and 12 months. Administration of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a glutathione precursor, to APP/PS-1 mice via drinking water suppressed increased protein oxidation and nitration and also significantly augmented levels and activity of GPx in brain from both age groups. Oral administration of NAC also increased the diminished activity of GR and protected against lipid peroxidation in brains of 9-month-old APP/PS-1 mice only. Pin1 levels, GR levels, and G6PDH activity in brain were unaffected by oral administration of NAC in both age groups. These results are discussed with reference to the therapeutic potential of this brain

  12. Engineering Non-Heme Mono- and Dioxygenases for Biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Dror

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxygenases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the introduction of one or two oxygen atoms to unreactive chemical compounds. They require reduction equivalents from NADH or NADPH and comprise metal ions, metal ion complexes, or coenzymes in their active site. Thus, for industrial purposes, oxygenases are most commonly employed using whole cell catalysis, to alleviate the need for co-factor regeneration. Biotechnological applications include bioremediation, chiral synthesis, biosensors, fine chemicals, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, food ingredients and polymers. Controlling activity and selectivity of oxygenases is therefore of great importance and of growing interest to the scientific community. This review focuses on protein engineering of non-heme monooxygenases and dioxygenases for generating improved or novel functionalities. Rational mutagenesis based on x-ray structures and sequence alignment, as well as random methods such as directed evolution, have been utilized. It is concluded that knowledge-based protein engineering accompanied with targeted libraries, is most efficient for the design and tuning of biocatalysts towards novel substrates and enhanced catalytic activity while minimizing the screening efforts.

  13. Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur J. L. Cooper; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Pinto, John T.; Bruschi, Sam A.

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-containing enzymes that catalyze the conversion of cysteine S-conjugates [RSCH2CH(NH3+)CO2−] and selenium Se-conjugates [RSeCH2CH(NH3+)CO2−] that contain a leaving group in the β position to pyruvate, ammonium and a sulfur-containing fragment (RSH) or selenium-containing fragment (RSeH), respectively. At least ten PLP enzymes catalyze β-elimination reactions with such cysteine S-conjugates. All are enzymes involved in amino acid m...

  14. Expression, purification and kinetic characterization of recombinant benzoate dioxygenase from Rhodococcus ruber UKMP-5M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Tavakoli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, benzoate dioxygenase from Rhodococcus ruber UKMP-5M was catalyzed by oxidating the benzene ring to catechol and other derivatives. The benzoate dioxygenase (benA gene from Rhodococcus ruber UKMP-5M was then expressed, purified, characterized, The benA gene was amplified (642 bp, and the product was cloned into a pGEM-T vector.The recombinant plasmid pGEMT-benA was digested by double restriction enzymes BamHI and HindIII to construct plasmid pET28b-benA and was then ligated into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3. The recombinant E. coli was induced with 0.5 mM isopropyl β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG at 22˚C to produce benzoate dioxygenase. The enzyme was then purified by ion exchange chromatography after 8 purification folds. The resulting product was 25 kDa, determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Benzoate dioxygenase activity was found to be 6.54 U/mL and the optimal pH and temperature were 8.5 and 25°C, respectively. Maximum velocity (Vmax and Michaelis constant (Km were 7.36 U/mL and 5.58 µM, respectively. The end metabolite from the benzoate dioxygenase reaction was cyclohexane dione, which was determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS.

  15. Chloridazon-catechol dioxygenases, a distinct group of meta-cleaving enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, S; Müller, R; Wegst, W; Lingens, F

    1984-02-01

    We previously described a new meta-cleaving enzyme, termed chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase. The present paper describes the comparison of this enzyme with the meta-cleaving enzymes of eighteen strains of soil bacteria isolated with various aromatic compounds. Four of these strains were isolated with the herbicide chloridazon, six with the analgeticum aminopyrine and one with the analgeticum antipyrine as sole carbon source. These strains all belonged to a new type of bacteria, called Phenylobacteria. The seven other strains were isolated with aromatic compounds such as toluene, 3-phenylpropionate, benzoate, papaverine and 4-chlorobenzoate, and belonged to various species including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Nocardia. In double diffusion experiments with antibodies, prepared against chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase, extracts from the eleven strains of Phenylobacteria gave a cross reaction, whereas the extracts of the seven other strains showed no reaction. The enzymes of the eleven positive strains showed the same characteristic kinetic behaviour as the previously described enzyme. In contrast to catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase they needed the addition of exogenous Fe2+ ions for activity. On ion-exchange chromatography they emerged at the same buffer concentration as chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase. In polyacrylamide electrophoresis they migrated identically. The linkage map derived from the activities of the various enzymes with 10 different substrates revealed an identity of more than 80% for these eleven enzymes. So the meta-cleaving enzymes of the Phenylobacteria seem to form a distinct group among the non-heme iron-containing dioxygenases.

  16. Substrate Oxidation by Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase: EVIDENCE FOR A COMMON REACTION MECHANISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Elizabeth S; Basran, Jaswir; Lee, Michael; Handa, Sandeep; Raven, Emma L

    2015-12-25

    The kynurenine pathway is the major route of L-tryptophan (L-Trp) catabolism in biology, leading ultimately to the formation of NAD(+). The initial and rate-limiting step of the kynurenine pathway involves oxidation of L-Trp to N-formylkynurenine. This is an O2-dependent process and catalyzed by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase. More than 60 years after these dioxygenase enzymes were first isolated (Kotake, Y., and Masayama, I. (1936) Z. Physiol. Chem. 243, 237-244), the mechanism of the reaction is not established. We examined the mechanism of substrate oxidation for a series of substituted tryptophan analogues by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. We observed formation of a transient intermediate, assigned as a Compound II (ferryl) species, during oxidation of L-Trp, 1-methyl-L-Trp, and a number of other substrate analogues. The data are consistent with a common reaction mechanism for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-catalyzed oxidation of tryptophan and other tryptophan analogues.

  17. The SNO/SOH TMT strategy for combinatorial analysis of reversible cysteine oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Williamson, James; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Redox homeostasis is essential for normal function of cells and redox imbalance has been recognised as a pathogenic factor of numerous human diseases. Oxidative modifications of cysteine thiols modulate function of many proteins, mediate signalling, and fine-tune transcriptional...... and metabolic processes. In this study we present the SNO/SOH TMT strategy, which enables simultaneous analysis of two different types of cysteine modification: S-nitrosylation (SNO) and S-sulfenylation (SOH). The method facilitates quantitation of modification changes corrected by changes in protein abundance...... strategy is a viable alternative to existing methods for cysteine oxidation analysis and provides new features that will facilitate our understanding of the interplay between SNO and SOH. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: SNO/SOH TMT strategy outperforms other available strategies for cysteine oxidation analysis...

  18. Development of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase-specific primers for monitoring bioremediation by competitive quantitative PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesarch, M.B.; Nakatsu, C.H.; Nies, L.

    2000-02-01

    Benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, naphthalene, and biphenyl are among a group of compounds that have at least one reported pathway for biodegradation involving catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzymes. Thus, detection of the corresponding catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes can serve as a basis for identifying and quantifying bacteria that have these catabolic abilities. Primes that can successfully amplify a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene fragment from eight different bacteria are described. The identities of the amplicons were confirmed by hybridization with a 238-bp catechol 2,3-dioxygenase probe. The detection limit was 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} gene copies, which was lowered to 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 1} gene copies of hybridization. Using the dioxygenase-specific primers, an increase in catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes was detected in petroleum-amended soils. The dioxygenase genes were enumerated by competitive quantitative PCR and a 163-bp competitor that was amplified using the same primers. Target and competitor sequences had identical amplification kinetics. Potential PCR inhibitors that could coextract with DNA, nonamplifying DNA, soil factors (humics), and soil pollutants (toluene) did not impact enumeration. Therefore, this technique can be used to accurately and reproducibly quantify catechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes in complex environments such as petroleum-contaminated soil. Direct, non-cultivation-based molecular techniques for detecting and enumerating microbial pollutant-biodegrading genes in environmental samples are powerful tools for monitoring bioremediation and developing field evidence in support of natural attenuation.

  19. Crystal structure of thermostable catechol 2,3-dioxygenase determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The selenomethionyl derivative of the thermostable catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (SeMet-TC23O) is expressed,purified and crystallized. By using multiwave length anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing techniques, the crystal structure of TC23O at 0.3 nm resolutions is determined.TC23O is a homotetramer. Each monomer is composed of N-terminal and C-terminal domains (residues 1~153 and 153~319, respectively). The two domains are proximately symmetric by a non-crystallographic axis. Each domain contains two characteristic motifs which are found in almost all of extradial dioxygenases.Kevwords: multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD), X-ray diffraction, thermostable catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, crystal structure,synchrotron light source.

  20. Studies on linoleic acid 8R-dioxygenase and hydroperoxide isomerase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C; Brodowsky, I D; Oliw, E H

    1995-01-01

    Linoleic acid is sequentially converted to 7S,8S-dihydroxy-9Z,12Z-octadecadienoic acid by the 8R-dioxygenase and hydroperoxide isomerase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis, which is a common pathogen of wheat. The objective of this study was to separate and characterize the two enzyme activities. The isomerase activity was found mainly in the microsomal fraction of the mycelia and the 8R-dioxygenase in the cytosol. The 8R-dioxygenase could be partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography or isoelectric focusing. The 8R-dioxygenase was unstable during purification, but it could be stabilized by glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Several protease inhibitors reduced the enzyme activity. Gel filtration with Sephacryl S-300 showed that most 8R-dioxygenase activity was eluted with the front with little retention. Isoelectric focusing in the presence of ethylene glycol (20%) indicated an isoelectric point of pl 6.1-6.3. The enzyme was retained on strong anion exchange columns at pH 7.4 and could be eluted with 0.3-0.5 M NaCl. Incubation of the enzyme with 0.1 mM linoleic acid led to partial inactivation, which may indicate product inhibition. Paracetamol and the lipoxygenase inhibitor ICI 230,487 at 30 microM inhibited the 8R-dioxygenase by 44 and 58%, respectively. 8R-hydroperoxy-9Z,12Z-octadecadienoic acid was isolated from incubations of linoleic acid with the partially purified enzyme or with the cytosol in the presence of p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The hydroperoxide was rapidly converted by the hydroperoxide isomerase in the microsomal fractions to 7S,8S-dihydroxy-9Z,12Z-octadecadienoic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Spectroscopic and equilibrium studies of ligand and organic substrate binding to indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sono, M

    1990-02-13

    The binding of a number of ligands to the heme protein indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase has been examined with UV-visible absorption and with natural and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. Relatively large ligands (e.g., norharman) which do not readily form complexes with myoglobin and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) can bind to the dioxygenase. Except for only a few cases (e.g., 4-phenylimidazole) for the ferric dioxygenase, a direct competition for the enzyme rarely occurs between the substrate L-tryptophan (Trp) and the ligands examined. L-Trp and small heme ligands (CN-,N3-,F-) markedly enhance the affinity of each other for the ferric enzyme in a reciprocal manner, exhibiting positive cooperativity. For the ferrous enzyme, L-Trp exerts negative cooperativity with some ligands such as imidazoles, alkyl isocyanides, and CO binding to the enzyme. This likely reflects the proximity of the Trp binding site to the heme iron. Other indolamine substrates also exert similar but smaller cooperative effects on the binding of azide or ethyl isocyanide. The pH dependence of the ligand affinity of the dioxygenase is similar to that of myoglobin rather than that of HRP. These results suggest that indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase has the active-site heme pocket whose environmental structure is similar to, but whose size is considerably larger than, that of myoglobin, a typical O2-binding heme protein. Although the L-Trp affinity of the ferric cyanide and ferrous CO enzyme varies only slightly between pH 5.5 and 9.5, the unligated ferric and ferrous enzymes have considerably higher affinity for L-Trp at alkaline pH than at acidic pH. L-Trp binding to the ferrous dioxygenase is affected by an ionizable residue with a pKa value of 7.3.

  2. Crystal Structures of Fe2+ Dioxygenase Superoxo, Alkylperoxo, and Bound Product Intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Kovaleva, Elena G.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2007-01-01

    We report the structures of three intermediates in the O2 activation and insertion reactions of an extradiol ring-cleaving dioxygenase. A crystal of Fe2+-containing homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase was soaked in the slow substrate 4-nitrocatechol in a low O2 atmosphere. The X-ray crystal structure shows that three different intermediates reside in different subunits of a single homotetrameric enzyme molecule. One of these is the key substrate-alkylperoxo-Fe2+ intermediate, which has been p...

  3. Enzymology of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases: reaction mechanisms, inhibition and biochemical roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Peter J; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2014-02-15

    Carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) are a large family of non-heme iron (II) dependent enzymes. CCDs catalyse the selective oxidative cleavage of carotenoids to produce apocarotenoids. Apocarotenoid derived molecules form important signalling molecules in plants in the form of abscisic acid and strigolactone and in mammals in the form of retinal. Very little is known biochemically about the CCDs and only a handful of CCDs have been biochemically characterised. Mechanistically, debate surrounds whether CCDs utilise a mono or dioxygenase mechanism. Here, we review the biochemical roles of CCDs, discuss the mechanisms by which CCD cleavage is proposed to occur, and discuss recent reports of selective CCD enzyme inhibitors.

  4. Cloning and Characterization of a Sulfonate/α-Ketoglutarate Dioxygenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, Deborah A; Auchtung, Thomas A.; Hausinger, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YLL057c is predicted to encode a gene product with 31.5% amino acid sequence identity to Escherichia coli taurine/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase and 27% identity to Ralstonia eutropha TfdA, a herbicide-degrading enzyme. Purified recombinant yeast protein is shown to be an Fe(II)-dependent sulfonate/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase. Although taurine is a poor substrate, a variety of other sulfonates are utilized, with the best natural substrates being is...

  5. Isolation of S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]-3-thiolactic acid, a new metabolite of histidine, from normal human urine and its formation from S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinuta, M; Ubuka, T; Yao, W B; Zhao, Y Q; Shimizu, H

    1994-01-01

    S-[2-Carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]-3-thiolactic acid (CIE-TL), a novel imidazole compound with a sulphur-containing side chain, was isolated from normal human urine by ion-exchange column chromatography, and characterized by physicochemical analyses involving m.s., i.r. spectrophotometry, high-voltage paper electrophoresis and elemental analysis as well as chemical synthesis. CIE-TL was synthesized by the reaction of S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]cysteine (CIE-Cys) with NaNO2 in HCl. CIE-TL was also formed during enzymic degradation of CIE-Cys by rat liver or kidney homogenate in a phosphate buffer, possibly via the metabolic intermediate S-[2-carboxy-1-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethyl]-3-thiopyruvic acid, and this was accompanied by the formation of 3-[(carboxymethyl)thio]-3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)propanoic acid, a compound previously found in human urine [Kinuta, Yao, Masuoka, Ohta, Teraoka and Ubuka (1991) Biochem. J. 275, 617-621]. These results suggest that CIE-Cys [Kinuta, Ubuka, Yao, Futani, Fujiwara and Kurozumi (1992) Biochem. J. 283, 39-40] is a physiological precursor of the urinary compounds and that L-histidine is metabolized in part via an alternative pathway initiated by the adduction of natural thiol compounds such as cysteine and GSH to urocanic acid, the first catabolite of histidine. PMID:8110184

  6. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  7. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  8. Reduction of Guanosyl Radical by Cysteine and Cysteine-Glycine Studied by Time-Resolved CIDNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozova, O.B.; Kaptein, R.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    As a model for chemical DNA repair, reduction of guanosyl radicals in the reaction with cysteine or the dipeptide cysteine-glycine has been studied by time-resolved chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP). Radicals were generated photochemically by pulsed laser irradiation of a solut

  9. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-11-24

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target.

  10. Discovery of a Novel Linoleate Dioxygenase of Fusarium oxysporum and Linoleate Diol Synthase of Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooman, Linda; Oliw, Ernst H

    2015-12-01

    Fungal pathogens constitute serious threats for many forms of life. The pathogenic fungi Fusarium and Colletotrichum and their formae speciales (f. spp.) infect many types of crops with severe consequences and Fusarium oxysporum can also induce keratitis and allergic conditions in humans. These fungi code for homologues of dioxygenase-cytochrome P450 (DOX-CYP) fusion proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (cyclooxygenase) superfamily. The objective was to characterize the enzymatic activities of the DOX-CYP homologue of Colletotrichum graminicola (EFQ34869) and the DOX homologue of F. oxysporum (EGU79548). The former oxidized oleic and linoleic acids in analogy with 7,8-linoleate diol synthases (LDSs), but with the additional biosynthesis of 8,11-dihydroxylinoleic acid. The latter metabolized fatty acids to hydroperoxides with broad substrate specificity. It oxidized 20:4n-6 and 18:2n-6 to hydroperoxides with an R configuration at the (n-10) positions, and other n-6 fatty acids in the same way. [11S-(2)H]18:2n-6 was oxidized with retention and [11R-(2)H]18:2n-6 with loss of deuterium, suggesting suprafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygen insertion. Fatty acids of the n-3 series were oxidized less efficiently and often to hydroperoxides with an R configuration at both (n-10) and (n-7) positions. The enzyme spans 1426 amino acids with about 825 residues in the N-terminal domain with DOX homology and 600 residues at the C-terminal domain without homology to other enzymes. We conclude that fungal oxylipins can be formed by two novel subfamilies of cyclooxygenase-related DOX.

  11. In vivo correction with recombinant adenovirus of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase deficiencies in strain III mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, S; Kiwaki, K; Awata, H; Katoh, H; Kanegae, Y; Saito, I; Yamamoto, T; Miyazaki, J; Matsuda, I; Endo, F

    1997-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type 3, caused by a genetic deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid dioxygenase (HPD) in tyrosine catabolism, is characterized by convulsion, ataxia, and mental retardation. The III mouse is a model of tyrosinemia type 3. HPD activity and protein are defective in the liver and its blood tyrosine levels are elevated, the range being between 1,100 and 1,656 microM. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector bearing the human HPD cDNA (AdexCAGhHPD), which is expressed under the control of a potent CAG promoter. III mice were injected with 1.0 x 10(8) to 1.0 x 10(9) pfu of AdexCAGhHPD through the tail vein. When 3.0 x 10(8) - 1.0 x 10(9) pfu were injected, blood tyrosine levels decreased within 3 hr, reached a normal range (under 300 microM), and remained at a low level for 2-6 weeks. Hepatic HPD activities also increased as early as 3 hr after the injection of 5.0 x 10(8) pfu, reached the levels comparable to the control mice in 3-7 days, and then decreased, and correlated well to blood tyrosine. Hepatic HPD expression was confirmed by Northern blot and immunoblot analyses. Histology revealed no difference (gross or microscopic) between the liver injected with AdexCAGhHPD and the control. No significant changes in blood tyrosine levels were noted after the second injection of 5.0 x 10(8) pfu of AdexCAGhHPD. Thus, the intravenous administration of the adenoviral vector bearing a foreign gene seems suitable for transient, early gene transfer into the liver.

  12. Novel aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase genes from coastal marine sediments of Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrero Marcela A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, widespread pollutants in the marine environment, can produce adverse effects in marine organisms and can be transferred to humans through seafood. Our knowledge of PAH-degrading bacterial populations in the marine environment is still very limited, and mainly originates from studies of cultured bacteria. In this work, genes coding catabolic enzymes from PAH-biodegradation pathways were characterized in coastal sediments of Patagonia with different levels of PAH contamination. Results Genes encoding for the catalytic alpha subunit of aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (ARHDs were amplified from intertidal sediment samples using two different primer sets. Products were cloned and screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Clones representing each restriction pattern were selected in each library for sequencing. A total of 500 clones were screened in 9 gene libraries, and 193 clones were sequenced. Libraries contained one to five different ARHD gene types, and this number was correlated with the number of PAHs found in the samples above the quantification limit (r = 0.834, p nahAc-like genes, phnAc-like genes as identified in Alcaligenes faecalis AFK2, and phnA1-like genes from marine PAH-degraders from the genus Cycloclasticus. Conclusion These results show the presence of hitherto unidentified ARHD genes in this sub-Antarctic marine environment exposed to anthropogenic contamination. This information can be used to study the geographical distribution and ecological significance of bacterial populations carrying these genes, and to design molecular assays to monitor the progress and effectiveness of remediation technologies.

  13. Extracellular HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lin; YANG Yi-da; LU Guo-cai; SALVATO Maria S

    2005-01-01

    In our previous work we reported that HIV Tat and 6 cysteine rich peptides of Tat induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) in human monocytes (Yang et al., 2003). Here our results showed that HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in human monocytes, and this activity is inhibited by rabbit anti-Tat. Boiled Tat does not increase CCR5 expression in monocytes. These results provide insight into a new mechanism by which HIV Tat plays a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  14. Natural CD4+ T-cell responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Shamaila; Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Iversen, Trine Zeeberg

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) contributes to immune tolerance in a variety of settings. In cancer IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it endorses the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tum...

  15. The S. pombe histone H2A dioxygenase Ofd2 regulates gene expression during hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lando

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification of histone proteins are known to play an important role in regulating chromatin structure. In an effort to find additional histone modifications we set out to screen enzymes of the 2-oxoglutarate and Fe(II-dependent (2-OG-Fe(II dioxygenase family for activity towards histones. Here we show that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 2-OG-Fe(II dioxygenase domain containing protein-2 (Ofd2 is a histone H2A dioxygenase enzyme. Using a combination of peptide screening and alanine scanning substitution analysis, we identify an HxxLR motif in H2A as a substrate for Ofd2 activity. Transcriptional profiling indicates that Ofd2 regulates the repression of oxidative phosphorylation genes during hypoxic stress. We show that Ofd2 is recruited to the 5' end of oxidative phosphorylation genes specifically during hypoxia and that it uses its dioxygenase activity to regulate their transcription. Together, these data uncover a novel histone H2A modifying activity involved in the regulation of gene expression during hypoxia.

  16. Structures of aminophenol dioxygenase in complex with intermediate, product and inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De Feng; Zhang, Jia Yue; Hou, Yan Jie; Liu, Lei; Hu, Yonglin; Liu, Shuang Jiang; Wang, Da Cheng; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Dioxygen activation by nonhaem Fe(II) enzymes containing the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has been extensively studied in recent years. Here, crystal structures of 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase, an enzyme that represents a minor group of extradiol dioxygenases and that catalyses the ring opening of 2-aminophenol, in complex with the lactone intermediate (4Z,6Z)-3-iminooxepin-2(3H)-one and the product 2-aminomuconic 6-semialdehyde and in complex with the suicide inhibitor 4-nitrocatechol are reported. The Fe-ligand binding schemes observed in these structures revealed some common geometrical characteristics that are shared by the published structures of extradiol dioxygenases, suggesting that enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of noncatecholic compounds are very likely to utilize a similar strategy for dioxygen activation and the fission of aromatic rings as the canonical mechanism. The Fe-ligation arrangement, however, is strikingly enantiomeric to that of all other 2-His-1-carboxylate enzymes apart from protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase. This structural variance leads to the generation of an uncommon O(-)-Fe(2+)-O(-) species prior to O(2) binding, which probably forms the structural basis on which APD distinguishes its specific substrate and inhibitor, which share an analogous molecular structure.

  17. A biological pathway linking inflammation and depression: activation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christmas DM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available David M Christmas, JP Potokar, Simon JC DaviesAcademic Unit of Psychiatry, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK A presentation relating to this manuscript was made by Dr David Christmas at the 9th International Meeting on Clinical Pharmacology in Psychiatry (9th IMCPP in Copenhagen, Denmark in September 2010Abstract: This article highlights the evidence linking depression to increased inflammatory drive and explores putative mechanisms for the association by reviewing both preclinical and clinical literature. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is induced by proinflammatory cytokines and may form a link between immune functioning and altered neurotransmission, which results in depression. Increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity may cause both tryptophan depletion and increased neurotoxic metabolites of the kynurenine pathway, two alterations which have been hypothesized to cause depression. The tryptophan-kynurenine pathway is comprehensively described with a focus on the evidence linking metabolite alterations to depression. The use of immune-activated groups at high risk of depression have been used to explore these hypotheses; we focus on the studies involving chronic hepatitis C patients receiving interferon-alpha, an immune activating cytokine. Findings from this work have led to novel strategies for the future development of antidepressants including inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, moderating the cytokines which activate it, or addressing other targets in the kynurenine pathway.Keywords: depression, inflammation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, kynurenine, serotonin, tryptophan

  18. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Harold A

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically their roles in matrix remodeling and in regulating the immune response, and their relationship to lung diseases.

  19. 4-Nitrocatechol as a colorimetric probe for non-heme iron dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, C A

    1975-03-10

    4-Nitrocatechol is examined as an active site probe for non-heme iron dioxygenases and found to be of value, particularly with those containing iron in the Fe(II) oxidation state. 4-Nitrocatechol is astrong competitive inhibitor of substrate oxygenation by protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase, forming a reversible complex with this enzyme, and by pyrocatechase. The number of binding sites per enzyme molecule titrated spectrophotometrically with 4-nitrocatechol agrees with results from previous studies with either the principal substrate or other analogues, as expected of an effective probe. Despite these facts and the observation that both enzymes cleave the same substrates at the same carbon-carbon bond, the optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of their 4-nitrocatechol complexes are remarkably different. The 4-nitocatechol-protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase optical spectra resemble that of the 4-nitrocatecholate ion shifted 20 to 30 nm to longer wavelength. Concomitant with this change the EPR signal centered at g equal 4.28 shows increased rhombicity (g values at 4.74, 4.28, and 3.74). In contrast, the spectrum of the 4-nitrocatechol-pyrocatechase complex has a maximum at the same wavelength as that of a 1:1 solution of free Fe(II) and 4-nitrocatechol in the absence of enzyme after titration of the catecholic protons with base and the g equal 4.28 EPR signal is not resolved at liquid N-2 temperature. These changes are interpreted as resulting in part from a pronounced change in the ligand fields about the irons at the active sites which in the case of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase leads to enzyme inactivation. The results also are the first indication that substrate analogues change their ionization form upon complexation with Fe (III) dioxygenases. The interaction of the probe with metapyrocatechase, an Fe(III) containing dioxygenase, and with several additional oxygenases and hydroperoxidases is also briefly examined. The probe is not specific

  20. Review stapling peptides using cysteine crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, David P; Dantas de Araujo, Aline

    2016-11-01

    Stapled peptides are an emerging class of cyclic peptide molecules with enhanced biophysical properties such as conformational and proteolytic stability, cellular uptake and elevated binding affinity and specificity for their biological targets. Among the limited number of chemistries available for their synthesis, the cysteine-based stapling strategy has received considerable development in the last few years driven by facile access from cysteine-functionalized peptide precursors. Here we present some recent advances in peptide and protein stapling where the side-chains of cysteine residues are covalently connected with a range of different crosslinkers affording bisthioether macrocyclic peptides of varying topology and biophysical properties. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 843-852, 2016.

  1. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  2. The tumour metabolism inhibitors GSAO and PENAO react with cysteines 57 and 257 of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Danielle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GSAO (4-(N-(S-glutathionylacetylamino phenylarsonous acid and PENAO (4-(N-(S-penicillaminylacetylamino phenylarsonous acid are tumour metabolism inhibitors that target adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT of the inner-mitochondrial membrane. Both compounds are currently being trialled in patients with solid tumours. The trivalent arsenical moiety of GSAO and PENAO reacts with two matrix facing cysteine residues of ANT, inactivating the transporter. This leads to proliferation arrest and death of tumour and tumour-supporting cells. Results The two reactive ANT cysteine residues have been identified in this study by expressing cysteine mutants of human ANT1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and measuring interaction with the arsenical moiety of GSAO and PENAO. The arsenic atom of both compounds cross-links cysteine residues 57 and 257 of human ANT1. Conclusions The sulphur atoms of these two cysteines are 20 Å apart in the crystal structures of ANT and the optimal spacing of cysteine thiolates for reaction with As (III is 3-4 Å. This implies that a significant conformational change in ANT is required for the organoarsenicals to react with cysteines 57 and 257. This conformational change may relate to the selectivity of the compounds for proliferating cells.

  3. Protein cysteine oxidation in redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Henry Jay; Davies, Michael J; Krämer, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    . Previous studies have claimed that RSOH can be detected as an adduct (e.g., with 5,5-dimethylcyclohexane-1,3-dione; dimedone). Here, kinetic data are discussed which indicate that few proteins can form RSOH under physiological signaling conditions. We also present experimental evidence that indicates......Oxidation of critical signaling protein cysteines regulated by H2O2 has been considered to involve sulfenic acid (RSOH) formation. RSOH may subsequently form either a sulfenyl amide (RSNHR') with a neighboring amide, or a mixed disulfide (RSSR') with another protein cysteine or glutathione...

  4. Cysteine Modifications in the Pathogenesis of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Cristiana; Carrì, Maria Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Several proteins are found misfolded and aggregated in sporadic and genetic forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These include superoxide dismutase (SOD1), transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma protein (FUS/TLS), p62, vasolin-containing protein (VCP), Ubiquilin-2 and dipeptide repeats produced by unconventional RAN-translation of the GGGGCC expansion in C9ORF72. Up to date, functional studies have not yet revealed a common mechanism for the formation of such diverse protein inclusions. Consolidated studies have demonstrated a fundamental role of cysteine residues in the aggregation process of SOD1 and TDP43, but disturbance of protein thiols homeostatic factors such as protein disulfide isomerases (PDI), glutathione, cysteine oxidation or palmitoylation might contribute to a general aberration of cysteine residues proteostasis in ALS. In this article we review the evidence that cysteine modifications may have a central role in many, if not all, forms of this disease. PMID:28167899

  5. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  6. Spectroscopic and computational studies of NTBC bound to the non-heme iron enzyme (4-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvate dioxygenase: active site contributions to drug inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidig, Michael L; Decker, Andrea; Kavana, Michael; Moran, Graham R; Solomon, Edward I

    2005-12-01

    (4-Hydroxyphenyl)pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is an alpha-keto-acid-dependent dioxygenase which catalyzes the conversion of (4-hydroxyphenyl)pyruvate (HPP) to homogentisate as part of tyrosine catabolism. While several di- and tri-ketone alkaloids are known as inhibitors of HPPD and used commercially as herbicides, one such inhibitor, [2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC), has also been used therapeutically to treat type I tyrosinemia and alkaptonuria in humans. To gain further insight into the mechanism of inhibition by NTBC, a combination of CD/MCD spectroscopy and DFT calculations of HPPD/Fe(II)/NTBC has been performed to evaluate the contribution of the Fe(II)-NTBC bonding interaction to the high affinity of this drug for the enzyme. The results indicate that the bonding of NTBC to Fe(II) is very similar to that for HPP, both involving similar pi-backbonding interactions between NTBC/HPP and Fe(II). Combined with the result that the calculated binding energy of NTBC is, in fact, approximately 3 kcal/mol less than that for HPP, the bidentate coordination of NTBC to Fe(II) is not solely responsible for its extremely high affinity for the enzyme. Thus, the pi-stacking interactions between the aromatic rings of NTBC and two phenyalanine residues, as observed in the crystallography of the HPPD/Fe(II)/NTBC complex, appear to be responsible for the observed high affinity of drug binding.

  7. Hydroxylation of aspartic acid in domains homologous to the epidermal growth factor precursor is catalyzed by a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J; Holme, E; Lindstedt, S; Chandramouli, N; Huang, L H; Tam, J P; Merrifield, R B

    1989-01-01

    3-Hydroxyaspartic acid and 3-hydroxyasparagine are two rare amino acids that are present in domains homologous to the epidermal growth factor precursor in vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins as well as in proteins that do not require vitamin K for normal biosynthesis. They are formed by posttranslational hydroxylation of aspartic acid and asparagine, respectively. The first epidermal growth factor-like domain in factor IX (residues 45-87) was synthesized with aspartic acid in position 64, replacing 3-hydroxyaspartic acid. It was used as substrate in a hydroxylase assay with rat liver microsomes as the source of enzyme and reaction conditions that satisfy the requirements of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. The synthetic peptide stimulated the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylation in contrast to synthetic, modified epidermal growth factor (Met-21 and His-22 deleted and Glu-24 replaced by Asp) and synthetic peptides corresponding to residues 60-71 in human factor IX. This indicates that the hydroxylase is a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase with a selective substrate requirement. Images PMID:2492106

  8. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  9. Cysteine transport through excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Spencer D; Torres-Salazar, Delany; Divito, Christopher B; Amara, Susan G

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) limit glutamatergic signaling and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. Of the five known EAAT isoforms (EAATs 1-5), only the neuronal isoform, EAAT3 (EAAC1), can efficiently transport the uncharged amino acid L-cysteine. EAAT3-mediated cysteine transport has been proposed to be a primary mechanism used by neurons to obtain cysteine for the synthesis of glutathione, a key molecule in preventing oxidative stress and neuronal toxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective transport of cysteine by EAAT3 have not been elucidated. Here we propose that the transport of cysteine through EAAT3 requires formation of the thiolate form of cysteine in the binding site. Using Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing EAAT2 and EAAT3, we assessed the transport kinetics of different substrates and measured transporter-associated currents electrophysiologically. Our results show that L-selenocysteine, a cysteine analog that forms a negatively-charged selenolate ion at physiological pH, is efficiently transported by EAATs 1-3 and has a much higher apparent affinity for transport when compared to cysteine. Using a membrane tethered GFP variant to monitor intracellular pH changes associated with transport activity, we observed that transport of either L-glutamate or L-selenocysteine by EAAT3 decreased intracellular pH, whereas transport of cysteine resulted in cytoplasmic alkalinization. No change in pH was observed when cysteine was applied to cells expressing EAAT2, which displays negligible transport of cysteine. Under conditions that favor release of intracellular substrates through EAAT3 we observed release of labeled intracellular glutamate but did not detect cysteine release. Our results support a model whereby cysteine transport through EAAT3 is facilitated through cysteine de-protonation and that once inside, the thiolate is rapidly re-protonated. Moreover, these findings suggest

  10. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine. 184.1271 Section 184.1271 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3... of total L-cysteine per 100 parts of flour in dough as a dough strengthener as defined in §...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine... ingredient is used to supply up to 0.009 part of total L-cysteine per 100 parts of flour in dough as a...

  12. Selectively colorimetric detection of cysteine with triangular silver nanoprisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Wu; Yuan Fang Li; Cheng Zhi Huang

    2009-01-01

    Triangular silver nanoprisms were prepared and applied to make colorimetric detection of cysteine based on our findings that cysteine could lead to the blue shift of the dipole plasmon resonance absorption,but other 19 kinds of natural amino acids could not.Cysteine with a concentration 160 nmol/L can result in a color change that can be discerned with naked eyes.

  13. Cysteine and Cysteine-Related SignalingPathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine occupies a central position in plant metabolism because it is a reduced sulfur donor moleculeinvolved in the synthesis of essential biomolecules and defense compounds. Moreover, cysteine per se and its deriva-tive molecules play roles in the redox signaling of processes occurring in various cellular compartments. Cysteine issynthesized during the sulfate assimilation pathway via the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine, catalyzed byO-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL). Plant cells contain OASTLs in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytosol, resultingin a complex array of isoforms and subcellular cysteine pools, in recent years, significant progress has been made inArabidopsis, in determining the specific roles of the OASTLs and the metabolites produced by them. Thus, the dis-covery of novel enzymatic activities of the less-abundant, like DES1 with L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity and SCSwith S-sulfocysteine synthase activity, has provided new perspectives on their roles, besides their metabolic functions.Thereby, the research has been demonstrated that cytosolic sulfide and chloroplastic S-sulfocysteine act as signalingmolecules regulating autophagy and protecting the photosystems, respectively. In the cytosol, cysteine plays an essentialrole in plant immunity; in the mitochondria, this molecule plays a central role in the detoxification of cyanide, which isessential for root hair development and plant responses to pathogens.

  14. Tuning and predicting biological affinity: aryl nitriles as cysteine protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmke, Veronika; Quinsaat, Jose Enrico Q; Rivera-Fuentes, Pablo; Heindl, Cornelia; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Brun, Reto; Schirmeister, Tanja; Diederich, François

    2012-08-14

    A series of aryl nitrile-based ligands were prepared to investigate the effect of their electrophilicity on the affinity against the cysteine proteases rhodesain and human cathepsin L. Density functional theory calculations provided relative reactivities of the nitriles, enabling prediction of their biological affinity and cytotoxicity and a clear structure-activity relationship.

  15. Characterization of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Planococcus sp. strain S5 induced by high phenol concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Guzik, Urszula; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at characterization of a new catechol 2,3-dioxygenase isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium able to utilize phenol as the sole carbon and energy source. Planococcus sp. strain S5 grown on 1 or 2 mM phenol showed activity of both a catechol 1,2- and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase while at a higher concentrations of phenol only catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was observed. The enzyme was optimally active at 60°C and pH 8.0. Kinetic studies showed that the K(m) and V(max) of the enzyme were 42.70 µM and 329.96 mU, respectively. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase showed the following relative meta-cleavage activities for various catechols tested: catechol (100%), 3-methylcatechol (13.67%), 4-methylcatechol (106.33%) and 4-chlorocatechol (203.80%). The high reactivity of this enzyme towards 4-chlorocatechol is different from that observed for other catechol 2,3-dioxygenases. Nucleotide sequencing and homology search revealed that the gene encoding the S5 catechol 2,3-dioxygenase shared the greatest homology with the known genes encoding isoenzymes from Gram-negative Pseudomonas strains.

  16. Cloning, expression, and characterization of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from a phenol-degrading Candida tropicalis JH8 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Zhixiong; Cheng, Li

    2016-10-02

    The sequence cato encoding catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from Candida tropicalis JH8 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The sequence cato contained an ORF of 858 bp encoding a polypeptide of 285 amino acid residues. The recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase exists as a homodimer structure with a subunit molecular mass of 32 KD. Recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase was unstable below pH 5.0 and stable from pH 7.0 to 9.0; its optimum pH was at 7.5. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 30°C, and it possessed a thermophilic activity within a broad temperature range. Under the optimal conditions with catechol as substrate, the Km and Vmax of recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase were 9.2 µM and 0.987 µM/min, respectively. This is the first article presenting cloning and expressing in E. coli of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from C. tropicalis and characterization of the recombinant catechol 1,2-dioxygenase.

  17. Arabidopsis cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase 45 functions in the responses to abscisic acid and abiotic stresses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiujuan

    2013-06-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates seed germination, plant growth and development, and response to abiotic stresses such as drought and salt stresses. Receptor-like kinases are well known signaling components that mediate plant responses to developmental and environmental stimuli. Here, we characterized the biological function of an ABA and stress-inducible cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, CRK45, in ABA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The crk45 mutant was less sensitive to ABA than the wild type during seed germination and early seedling development, whereas CRK45 overexpression plants were more sensitive to ABA compared to the wild type. Furthermore, overexpression of CRK45 led to hypersensitivity to salt and glucose inhibition of seed germination, whereas the crk45 mutant showed the opposite phenotypes. In addition, CRK45 overexpression plants had enhanced tolerance to drought. Gene expression analyses revealed that the expression of representative stress-responsive genes was significantly enhanced in CRK45 overexpression plants in response to salt stress. ABA biosynthetic genes such as NCED3,. 22NCED3, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 3.NCED5,. 33NCED5, 9-Cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase 5.ABA2,. 44ABA2, Abscisic Acid Deficient 2. and AAO355AAO3, Abscisic Aldehyde Oxidase 3. were also constitutively elevated in the CRK45 overexpression plants. We concluded that CRK45 plays an important role in ABA signaling that regulates Arabidopsis seeds germination, early seedling development and abiotic stresses response, by positively regulating ABA responses in these processes. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. An FITC-BODIPY FRET couple: application to selective, ratiometric detection and bioimaging of cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dong Hee; Kim, Dokyoung; Akisawa, Takuya; Lee, Kyung-Ha; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2015-04-01

    A novel FRET couple of fluorescein is disclosed, and it was readily constructed by conjugating an amino-BODIPY dye, a new FRET donor, with fluorescein isocyanate. Its potential was demonstrated by a fluorescence sensing system for cysteine, which was prepared by introducing acryloyl groups to the fluorescein moiety. The FRET probe exhibited promising ratiometric response to cysteine with high selectivity and sensitivity in a buffer solution containing acetonitrile at a physiological pH of 7.4, but showed slow reactivity. This slow response was solved by addition of a surfactant, thus allowing ratiometric imaging and determination of the endogenous level of cysteine in cells in HEPES buffer, by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Imaging experiments toward various cells suggested that such aryl acrylate type probes are vulnerable to the ubiquitous esterase activity. For the selected C6 cell line, in which the esterase activity was minimal, the ratiometric quantification of cysteine level was demonstrated. The FRET probe was also applied to determine the level of cysteine in human blood plasma.

  19. A Critical Role for Cysteine 57 in the Biological Functions of Selenium Binding Protein-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Ying

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of selenium-binding protein1 (SBP1 is often lower in tumors than in the corresponding tissue and lower levels have been associated with poor clinical outcomes. SBP1 binds tightly selenium although what role selenium plays in its biological functions remains unknown. Previous studies indicated that cysteine 57 is the most likely candidate amino acid for selenium binding. In order to investigate the role of cysteine 57 in SBP1, this amino acid was altered to a glycine and the mutated protein was expressed in human cancer cells. The SBP1 half-life, as well as the cellular response to selenite cytotoxicity, was altered by this change. The ectopic expression of SBP1GLY also caused mitochondrial damage in HCT116 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine 57 is a critical determinant of SBP1 function and may play a significant role in mitochondrial function.

  20. Biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Hilda M; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human trichomonosis, infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The host-parasite interaction and pathophysiological processes of trichomonosis remain incompletely understood. This review focuses on the advancements reached in the area of the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis, especially in the role of the cysteine proteinases. It highlights various approaches made in this field and lists a group of trichomonad cysteine proteinases involved in diverse processes such as invasion of the mucous layer, cytoadherence, cytotoxicity, cytoskeleton disruption of red blood cells, hemolysis, and evasion of the host immune response. A better understanding of the biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of this parasite could be used in the identification of new chemotherapeutic targets. An additional advantage could be the development of a vaccine in order to reduce transmission of T. vaginalis.

  1. Interferon-γ regulates the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via activation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Croitoru-Lamoury

    Full Text Available The kynurenine pathway (KP of tryptophan metabolism is linked to antimicrobial activity and modulation of immune responses but its role in stem cell biology is unknown. We show that human and mouse mesenchymal and neural stem cells (MSCs and NSCs express the complete KP, including indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO and IDO2, that it is highly regulated by type I (IFN-β and II interferons (IFN-γ, and that its transcriptional modulation depends on the type of interferon, cell type and species. IFN-γ inhibited proliferation and altered human and mouse MSC neural, adipocytic and osteocytic differentiation via the activation of IDO. A functional KP present in MSCs, NSCs and perhaps other stem cell types offers novel therapeutic opportunities for optimisation of stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

  2. Discovery of Key Dioxygenases that Diverged the Paraherquonin and Acetoxydehydroaustin Pathways in Penicillium brasilianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yudai; Iwabuchi, Taiki; Fujimoto, Takayuki; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Nakashima, Yu; Mori, Takahiro; Zhang, Huiping; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Abe, Ikuro

    2016-09-28

    Paraherquonin (1), a fungal meroterpenoid produced by Penicillium brasilianum NBRC 6234, possesses a unique, highly congested hexacyclic molecular architecture. Here we identified the biosynthetic gene cluster of 1 (the prh cluster) and elucidated the pathway up to berkeleydione (2), which serves as the key intermediate for the biosynthesis of 1 as well as many other meroterpenoids. Interestingly, the nonheme iron and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase PrhA constructs the cycloheptadiene moiety to afford 2 from preaustinoid A1 (6), probably via the homoallyl-homoallyl radical rearrangement. Additionally, another fungal strain, P. brasilianum MG11, which produces acetoxydehydroaustin instead of 1, was found to have a gene cluster nearly identical to the prh cluster. The dioxygenase encoded by the cluster shares 92% sequence identity with PrhA, and also accepts 6 but produces preaustinoid A3 (17) with a spiro-lactone system, generating a diverging point for the two different meroterpenoid pathways in the same species.

  3. A two-electron shell game: Intermediates of the extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Extradiol catechol ring-cleaving dioxygenases function by binding both the organic substrate and O2 at a divalent metal center in the active site. They have proven to be a particularly versatile group of enzymes with which to study the O2 activation process. Here, recent studies of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) are summarized with the objective of showing how Nature can utilize the enzyme structure and the properties of the metal and the substrate to select among many possible chemical paths to achieve both specificity and efficiency. Possible intermediates in the mechanism have been trapped by swapping active site metals, introducing active site amino acid substituted variants, and using substrates with different electron donating capacities. While each of these intermediates could form part of a viable reaction pathway, kinetic measurements significantly limit the likely candidates. Structural, kinetic, spectroscopic and computational analysis of the various intermediates shed light on how catalytic efficiency can be achieved. PMID:24615282

  4. [Growth-inhibitory activity of Cladosporium cladosporioides by cysteine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Ueno, Yukihiro; Ogasawara, Ayako; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2007-07-01

    When Cladosporium cladosporioides was cultured with cysteine, its growth was completely inhibited statically. The growth of C. cladosporioides cultured on potato-dextrose agar plates was also inhibited by the addition of cysteine. The production of ATP in C. cladosporioides was inhibited by cysteine. When a silicone block was incubated with C. cladosporioides, the surface of the block was coated with the biofilm of C. cladosporioides. However, the block containing cysteine was not covered with biofilm. These results indicate that cysteine is useful as a material to prevent the growth of C. cladosporioides.

  5. Purification and characterization of linoleate 8-dioxygenase from the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis as a novel hemoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C; Oliw, E H

    1996-06-14

    The fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis, which causes the major root disease of wheat known as "take-all," can metabolize linoleic acid to (8R)-hydroperoxylinoleic acid. The enzyme linoleate 8-dioxygenase abstracts hydrogen and introduces molecular oxygen in an antarafacial way at C-8. We have now purified the enzyme 1000-fold to a specific activity of 1.8 micronol/min/mg of protein. Acetone powder of mycelia of G. graminis was subjected to extraction and ammonium sulfate precipitation with solubilization. The 8-dioxygenase was purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, anion-exchange chromatography, and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. The active enzyme appeared to consist of four subunits since the active enzyme had an apparent molecular mass of 520 kDa determined by gel filtration, while SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a protein band of 130 kDa. Spectroscopy indicated the presence of heme. The characteristic pyridine ferrohemochrome alpha-band was found at 557 nm and the beta-band at 525 nm. The purified protein showed an absorption maximum at 408 nm (gamma, Soret). The absorption maximum shifted to 429 nm after reduction with dithionite and to 421 nm after treatment of the reduced enzyme with carbon monoxide. BW A4C, a hydroxamic acid derivative, inhibited the enzyme by >90% at 10 microM. The pH optimum was 7.2-7.4, the isoelectric point was 5.2 by chromatofocusing, and the Km values were 8 microM for linoleic acid and 30 microM for oxygen. We conclude that linoleate 8-dioxygenase appears to be a tetrameric hemoprotein distinct from other fatty-acid dioxygenases.

  6. Novel carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase catalyzes the first dedicated step in saffron crocin biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Frusciante, Sarah

    2014-08-05

    Crocus sativus stigmas are the source of the saffron spice and accumulate the apocarotenoids crocetin, crocins, picrocrocin, and safranal, responsible for its color, taste, and aroma. Through deep transcriptome sequencing, we identified a novel dioxygenase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 (CCD2), expressed early during stigma development and closely related to, but distinct from, the CCD1 dioxygenase family. CCD2 is the only identified member of a novel CCD clade, presents the structural features of a bona fide CCD, and is able to cleave zeaxanthin, the presumed precursor of saffron apocarotenoids, both in Escherichia coli and in maize endosperm. The cleavage products, identified through high-resolution mass spectrometry and comigration with authentic standards, are crocetin dialdehyde and crocetin, respectively. In vitro assays show that CCD2 cleaves sequentially the 7,8 and 7′,8′ double bonds adjacent to a 3-OH-β-ionone ring and that the conversion of zeaxanthin to crocetin dialdehyde proceeds via the C30 intermediate 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal. In contrast, zeaxanthin cleavage dioxygenase (ZCD), an enzyme previously claimed to mediate crocetin formation, did not cleave zeaxanthin or 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal in the test systems used. Sequence comparison and structure prediction suggest that ZCD is an N-truncated CCD4 form, lacking one blade of the β-propeller structure conserved in all CCDs. These results constitute strong evidence that CCD2 catalyzes the first dedicated step in crocin biosynthesis. Similar to CCD1, CCD2 has a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that it may cleave carotenoids localized in the chromoplast outer envelope.

  7. Ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases involved in PAH biodegradation : structure, function, biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Jouanneau, Yves; Martin, Florence; Krivobok, Serge; Willison, John Christopher

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The first step in the biodegradation of PAHs by aerobic bacteria is catalyzed by metalloenzymes known as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases (RHDs). Because of the hydrophobic nature and chemical resistance of PAHs, their initial attack by RHDs is a difficult reaction, which is critical to the whole degradation process. This chapter gives an overview of the current knowledge on the genetics, structure, catalytic mechanism and diversity of RHDs involved in PAH degradation. ...

  8. 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors in combination with safeners: solutions for modern and sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Hartmut; Lange, Gudrun; Müller, Thomas; Rosinger, Chris; Willms, Lothar; van Almsick, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) prevent plant carotenoid pigment formation, which in turn leads to chlorophyll degradation. This "bleaching" herbicide mode of action provides weed-control products for various crops, such as rice, corn, and cereals. Combinations with suitable safeners allow the full exploitation of the potential of this compound class to selectively control major weed problems, including rapidly increasing cases of resistance against other important herbicide classes.

  9. Potentiation of LPS-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Hepatoma HepG2 Cells by Aspirin via ROS and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Protection by N-Acetyl Cysteine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Raza

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity and inflammation-associated toxic responses have been observed to be induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS in vitro and in vivo respectively. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as aspirin, has been reported to be beneficial in inflammation-associated diseases like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Their precise molecular mechanisms, however, are not clearly understood. Our previous studies on aspirin treated HepG2 cells strongly suggest cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we have further demonstrated that HepG2 cells treated with LPS alone or in combination with aspirin induces subcellular toxic responses which are accompanied by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production, oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and apoptosis. The LPS/Aspirin induced toxicity was attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC. Alterations in oxidative stress and glutathione-dependent redox-homeostasis were more pronounced in mitochondria compared to extra- mitochondrial cellular compartments. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with NAC exhibited a selective protection in redox homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results suggest that the altered redox metabolism, oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in HepG2 cells play a critical role in LPS/aspirin-induced cytotoxicity. These results may help in better understanding the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic properties of NSAIDs in cancer cells exposed to bacterial endotoxins.

  10. The inhibitory effects of silver diamine fluorides on cysteine cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, May L; Ito, L; Cao, Y; Li, Q L; Chu, C H; Lo, Edward C M

    2014-03-01

    The expression of cysteine cathepsins in human carious dentine suggests that this enzyme contributes to the collagen degradation in caries progress. This study investigated whether silver diamine fluoride (SDF) inhibited the activity of cysteine cathepsins. Three commercial SDF solutions with concentrations at 38%, 30% and 12% were studied. Two fluoride solutions with the same fluoride ion (F(-)) concentrations as the 38% and 12% SDF solutions, and 2 silver solutions with the same silver ion (Ag(+)) concentrations as the 38% and 12% SDF solutions were prepared. Five samples of each experimental solution were used to study their inhibitory effect on two cathepsins (B and K) using cathepsin assay kits. Positive control contained assay buffer and cathepsins dilution was used to calculate the percentage inhibition (difference between the mean readings of the test solution and control solution divided by that of the control group). The percentage inhibition of 38%, 30% and 12% SDF on cathepsin B were 92.0%, 91.5% and 90.3%, respectively (pF(-) (pF(-) only (p<0.01). According to this study, SDF solution at all 3 tested concentrations significantly inhibited the activity of cathepsin B and K. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of cumene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuesong; Fushinobu, Shinya; Fukuda, Eriko; Terada, Tohru; Nakamura, Shugo; Shimizu, Kentaro; Nojiri, Hideaki; Omori, Toshio; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2005-04-01

    The crystal structure of the terminal component of the cumene dioxygenase multicomponent enzyme system of Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01 (CumDO) was determined at a resolution of 2.2 A by means of molecular replacement by using the crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 (NphDO). The ligation of the two catalytic centers of CumDO (i.e., the nonheme iron and Rieske [2Fe-2S] centers) and the bridging between them in neighboring catalytic subunits by hydrogen bonds through a single amino acid residue, Asp231, are similar to those of NphDO. An unidentified external ligand, possibly dioxygen, was bound at the active site nonheme iron. The entrance to the active site of CumDO is different from the entrance to the active site of NphDO, as the two loops forming the lid exhibit great deviation. On the basis of the complex structure of NphDO, a biphenyl substrate was modeled in the substrate-binding pocket of CumDO. The residues surrounding the modeled biphenyl molecule include residues that have already been shown to be important for its substrate specificity by a number of engineering studies of biphenyl dioxygenases.

  12. [Isolation, charcaterization of an anthracene degrading bacterium Martelella sp. AD-3 and cloning of dioxygenase gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chang-Zheng; Feng, Tian-Cai; Yu, Ya-Qi; Dong, Fei; Yang, Xin-Mei; Feng, Yao-Yu; Liu, Yong-Di; Lin, Han-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Anthracene, among the 16 US EPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is a typical low molecular weight environmental contaminant, which gains concern on its biodegradation under hypersaline condition. In this study, an anthracene-degrading bacterial strain was isolated from highly saline petroleum-contaminated soil. Based on its physiological, biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the bacteria was preliminary identified and named as Martelella sp. AD-3. The strain was able to utilize anthracene as sole carbon source for growth and the degradation occurred under broad salinities (0.1% to 10%) and varying pHs (6.0 to 10.0). The optimized degradation conditions were initial concentration 25 mg x L(-1), culture temperature 30 degrees C, pH 9.0 and salinity 3%. And 94.6% of anthracene was degraded by strain AD-3 under the optimal conditions within 6 days. Degenerate primers design was performed with a reported dioxygenase alpha subunit homologous gene. A length of 307 bp fragment of the partial dioxygenase gene sequences (GenBank accession: JF823991.1) was amplified by nested PCR. The clones amino acid sequence from strain AD-3 showed 95% identity to that of the partial naphthalene dioxygenase large-subunit from Marinobacter sp. NCE312 (AF295033). The results lay a foundation for the further study of molecular mechanism involved in the PAHs biodegradation by strain AD-3.

  13. L-Cysteine Metabolism and Fermentation in Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ohtsu, Iwao

    L-Cysteine is an important amino acid both biologically and commercially. Although most amino acids are industrially produced by microbial fermentation, L-cysteine has been mainly produced by protein hydrolysis. Due to environmental and safety problems, synthetic or biotechnological products have been preferred in the market. Here, we reviewed L-cysteine metabolism, including biosynthesis, degradation, and transport, and biotechnological production (including both enzymatic and fermentation processes) of L-cysteine. The metabolic regulation of L-cysteine including novel sulfur metabolic pathways found in microorganisms is also discussed. Recent advancement in biochemical studies, genome sequencing, structural biology, and metabolome analysis has enabled us to use various approaches to achieve direct fermentation of L-cysteine from glucose. For example, worldwide companies began to supply L-cysteine and its derivatives produced by bacterial fermentation. These companies successfully optimized the original metabolism of their private strains. Basically, a combination of three factors should be required for improving L-cysteine fermentation: that is, (1) enhancing biosynthesis: overexpression of the altered cysE gene encoding feedback inhibition-insensitive L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT), (2) weakening degradation: knockout of the genes encoding L-cysteine desulfhydrases, and (3) exploiting export system: overexpression of the gene involved in L-cysteine transport. Moreover, we found that "thiosulfate" is much more effective sulfur source than commonly used "sulfate" for L-cysteine production in Escherichia coli, because thiosulfate is advantageous for saving consumption of NADPH and relating energy molecules.

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of L-cysteine by using polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles in the presence of barium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamdad, Farzad; Khorram, Fateme; Samet, Maryam; Bamdad, Kourosh; Sangi, Mohammad Reza; Allahbakhshi, Fateme

    2016-05-01

    In this article a simple and selective colorimetric probe for cysteine determination using silver nano particles (AgNPS) is described. The determination process was based upon the surface plasmon resonance properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized AgNPS. Interaction of AgNPS with cysteine molecules in the presence of barium ions induced a red shift in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) maximum of AgNPs, as a result of nanoparticle aggregation. Consequently, yellow color of AgNP solution was changed to pink. The linear range for the determination of cysteine was 3.2-8.2 μM (R = 0.9965) with a limit of detection equal to 2.8 μM (3σ). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of cysteine in human plasma samples. Acceptable recovery results of the spiked samples confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  15. Expression Pattern and Clinicopathological Relevance of the Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase 1/Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase Protein in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chien Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Cancer cells use the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 pathway to suppress the host’s immune response in order to facilitate survival, growth, invasion, and metastasis of malignant cells. Higher IDO1 expression was shown to be involved in colorectal cancer (CRC progression and to be correlated with impaired clinical outcome. However, the potential correlation between the expression of IDO1 in a CRC population with a low mutation rate of the APC gene remains unknown. Material and Methods. Tissues and blood samples were collected from 192 CRC patients. The expressions of IDO1, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2, and beta-catenin proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Microsatellite instability (MSI was determined by PCR amplification of microsatellite loci. Results. The results showed that high IDO1 or TDO2 protein expression was associated with characteristics of more aggressive phenotypes of CRC. For the first time, they also revealed a positive correlation between the abnormal expression of beta-catenin and IDO1 or TDO2 proteins in a CRC population with a low mutation rate of APC. Conclusion. We concluded that an IDO1-regulated molecular pathway led to abnormal expression of beta-catenin in the nucleus/cytoplasm of CRC patients with low mutation rate of APC, making IDO1 an interesting target for immunotherapy in CRC.

  16. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively.

  17. Diversity of 16S rRNA and dioxygenase genes detected in coal-tar-contaminated site undergoing active bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M.; Khanna, S. [NIIT Univ, Neemrana (India). Dept. of Biotechnology & Bioinformation

    2010-04-15

    In order to develop effective bioremediation strategies for polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation, the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities need to be better understood, especially in highly PAH contaminated sites in which little information on the cultivation-independent communities is available. Coal-tar-contaminated soil was collected, which consisted of 122-122.5 mg g{sup -1} total extractable PAH compounds. Biodegradation studies with this soil indicated the presence of microbial community that is capable of degrading the model PAH compounds viz naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene at 50 ppm each. PCR clone libraries were established from the DNA of the coal-tar-contaminated soil, targeting the 16S rRNA to characterize (I) the microbial communities, (ii) partial gene fragment encoding the Rieske iron sulfur center {alpha}-subunit) common to all PAH dioxygenase enzymes and (iii) {beta}-subunit of dioxygenase. Phylotypes related to Proteobacteria ({Alpha}-, {Epsilon}- and Gammaproteobacteria), Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococci were detected in 16S rRNA derived clone libraries. Many of the gene fragment sequences of alpha-subunit and beta-subunit of dioxygenase obtained from the respective clone libraries fell into clades that are distinct from the reference dioxygenase gene sequences. Presence of consensus sequence of the Rieske type (2Fe2S) cluster binding site suggested that these gene fragments encode for {alpha}-subunit of dioxygenase gene. Sequencing of the cloned libraries representing {alpha}-subunit gene fragments (Rf1) and beta-subunit of dioxygenase showed the presence of hitherto unidentified dioxygenase in coal-tar-contaminated soil.

  18. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Is Involved in the Inflammation Response of Corneal Epithelial Cells to Aspergillus fumigatus Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Jiang

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, which is mainly expressed in activated dendritic cells, is known as a regulator of immune responses. However, the role of IDO in immune responses against fungal corneal infection has not been investigated. To evaluate the regulatory mechanisms of IDO in fungal inflammation, we resorted to human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs, known as the first barrier of cornea against pathogenic microorganisms. We found that IDO was significantly up-regulated in corneal epithelium infected with Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus and HCECs incubated with spores of A. fumigatus. Furthermore, IDO inhibitor (1-methyltryptophan, 1-MT enhanced inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 expression which were up-regulated by A. fumigatus spores infection. Dectin-1, as one of the important C-type lectin receptors, can identify β-glucan, and mediate fungal innate immune responses. In the present study, pre-treatment with curdlan, a Dectin-1 agonist, further enhanced IDO expression compared with A. fumigatus stimulation. While laminarin, the Dectin-1 specific inhibitor, partially inhibited IDO expression stimulated by A. fumigatus. Further studies demonstrated inhibition of IDO activity amplified the expressions of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 induced by activation of Dectin-1. These results suggested that IDO was involved in the immune responses of fungal keratitis. The activation of Dectin-1 may contribute to A. fumigatus spores-induced up-regulation of IDO.

  19. Scavenging properties of neutrophil 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase are based on a hypothesis that does not stand up to scrutiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Costantino; Zicari, Alessandra; Mari, Emanuela; D'Eufemia, Patrizia

    2014-10-01

    It was previously reported by D'Eufemia et al. [9] that neutrophil preparations from a patient with tyrosinemia type III, i.e. with inherited deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD), exhibited a far higher NO release than controls, when NO was estimated in terms of nitrite content in the suspending media. It was hypothesized that HPPD might participate to NO sequestration in neutrophils and that excessive NO release might reflect the lack of the scavenging action in defective cells. In recent control experiments, we found that HPPD activity in neutrophils preparations from healthy subjects is below the detection limit of the enzymatic assay (less than 3nmol product/h per mg protein). This indicates that HPPD concentration in neutrophils is very low, if any, confirming what was already suggested in literature, and rules out the possibility of a prominent role of HPPD as NO scavenger in these cells. Moreover, we found that 500μM l-tyrosine increases nitrite release and accumulation in suspending media of U-937 cells, a human monoblast-like lymphoma cell line which displays many characteristics of macrophages, including the expression of inducible and endothelial nitric oxide synthases. We hypothesize that the increase of nitrite release by patient's neutrophils might be related to the presence of high l-tyrosine concentrations in the blood samples (426μmol/L instead of 52.1±10.9μmol/L as healthy subjects), rather than to HPPD deficiency of in these cells.

  20. Dependence of the structure and mechanics of metaphase chromosomes on oxidized cysteines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastland, Adrienne; Hornick, Jessica; Kawamura, Ryo; Nanavati, Dhaval; Marko, John F

    2016-09-01

    We have found that reagents that reduce oxidized cysteines lead to destabilization of metaphase chromosome folding, suggesting that chemically linked cysteine residues may play a structural role in mitotic chromosome organization, in accord with classical studies by Dounce et al. (J Theor Biol 42:275-285, 1973) and Sumner (J Cell Sci 70:177-188, 1984a). Human chromosomes isolated into buffer unfold when exposed to dithiothreitol (DTT) or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP). In micromanipulation experiments which allow us to examine the mechanics of individual metaphase chromosomes, we have found that the gel-like elastic stiffness of native metaphase chromosomes is dramatically suppressed by DTT and TCEP, even before the chromosomes become appreciably unfolded. We also report protein labeling experiments on human metaphase chromosomes which allow us to tag oxidized and reduction-sensitive cysteine residues. PAGE analysis using fluorescent labels shows a small number of labeled bands. Mass spectrometry analysis of similarly labeled proteins provides a list of candidates for proteins with oxidized cysteines involved in chromosome organization, notably including components of condensin I, cohesin, the nucleosome-interacting proteins RCC1 and RCC2, as well as the RNA/DNA-binding protein NONO/p54NRB.

  1. Identification of non-peptidic cysteine reactive fragments as inhibitors of cysteine protease rhodesain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShan, Danielle; Kathman, Stefan; Lowe, Brittiney; Xu, Ziyang; Zhan, Jennifer; Statsyuk, Alexander; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor

    2015-10-15

    Rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease in the protozoan Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is a well-validated drug target. In this work, we used a fragment-based approach to identify inhibitors of this cysteine protease, and identified inhibitors of T. brucei. To discover inhibitors active against rhodesain and T. brucei, we screened a library of covalent fragments against rhodesain and conducted preliminary SAR studies. We envision that in vitro enzymatic assays will further expand the use of the covalent tethering method, a simple fragment-based drug discovery technique to discover covalent drug leads.

  2. Safety, immune and clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients vaccinated with a long peptide derived from indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in combination with ipilimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, Jon; Iversen, Trine Zeeberg; Nitschke, Nikolaj Juul;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIM: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an emerging new target in cancer therapy that can be targeted with active immunotherapy (e.g. through peptide vaccination). Furthermore, IDO has been identified as a key mechanism underlying resistance to treatment with the checkpoint blocking...... antibody ipilimumab (ipi). METHODS: Ten patients with metastatic melanoma participated in a phase I first-in-human clinical study assessing safety of combining ipi with a 21-mer synthetic peptide vaccine from IDO denoted IDOlong. Secondary and tertiary end points included vaccine and clinical response....... RESULTS: Treatment was generally safe and well tolerated. Vaccine related adverse reactions included grade I and II erythema, oedema and pruritus at the vaccination site, which were manageable with mild topical corticosteroids. One patient developed presumed ipi-induced colitis. It initially responded...

  3. Immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis using recombinant procathepsin L cystein proteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, S; Rodríguez, M I; Guarnera, E A; Carmona, C; Tanos, T; Angel, S O

    2001-01-01

    Cathepsin L1, a cysteine protease secreted by the gastrodermis of juvenile and adult Fasciola hepatica, was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein containing the proregion, supplied with six histidyl residues at the N-terminal end (rproCL1). In this study we tested its potential as antigen for the serologic diagnosis of F. hepatica infections by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The analyzed human sera included 16 positive samples, 99 negative controls and 111 from individuals affected by other parasitic and non parasitic diseases. The sensitivity and specificity of the rproCL1-ELISA were 100%. We also assessed the ability to detect antibodies in sera from 10 experimentally infected sheep, obtaining preliminary results that shown a response since the third week post infection in all the studied animals. Therefore, the recombinant rproCL1-based ELISA could be a standardized test for the accurate diagnosis of fasciolosis.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Arabidopsis for remediation of different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using a hybrid bacterial dioxygenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rihe; Fu, Xiaoyan; Tian, Yongsheng; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Bo; Xu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Wang, Lijuan; Yao, Quanhong

    2014-11-01

    The widespread presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their potential harm to various organisms has generated interest in efficiently eliminating these compounds from the environment. Phytoremediation is an efficient technology for cleaning up pollutants. However, unlike microorganisms, plants lack the catabolic pathway for complete degradation of these dangerous groups of compounds. One way to enhance the potential of plants for remediation of these compounds is by transferring genes involved in xenobiotic degradation from microbes to plants. In this paper, four genes, namely nidA and nidB (encoding the large and small subunits of naphthalene dioxygenase of Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1) as well as NahAa and NahAb (encoding flavoprotein reductase and ferredoxin of the electron-transport chain of the Pseudomonas putida G7 naphthalene dioxygenase system), were transferred and ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the heterozygous naphthalene dioxygenase system exhibited enhanced tolerance toward 2-4 rings PAHs. Transgenic plants assimilated PAHs from the culture media faster and accumulated less in vivo than wild-type plants. Furthermore, examination of metabolic intermediates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that the naphthalene metabolic pathway in transgenic plants mainly involves the dioxygenase pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that grafting the naphthalene dioxygenase complex into plants is a possible strategy to breed PAH-tolerant plants to efficiently degrade PAHs in the environment. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural Basis of Conserved Cysteine in the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family: Evidence for a Vestigial Half-Cystine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael; (FSU)

    2010-11-09

    The 22 members of the mouse/human fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins contain a conserved cysteine residue at position 83 (numbering scheme of the 140-residue form of FGF-1). Sequence and structure information suggests that this position is a free cysteine in 16 members and participates as a half-cystine in at least 3 (and perhaps as many as 6) other members. While a structural role as a half-cystine provides a stability basis for possible selective pressure, it is less clear why this residue is conserved as a free cysteine (although free buried thiols can limit protein functional half-life). To probe the structural role of the free cysteine at position 83 in FGF-1, we constructed Ala, Ser, Thr, Val, and Ile mutations and determined their effects on structure and stability. These results show that position 83 in FGF-1 is thermodynamically optimized to accept a free cysteine. A second cysteine mutation was introduced into wild-type FGF-1 at adjacent position Ala66, which is known to participate as a half-cystine with position 83 in FGF-8, FGF-19, and FGF-23. Results show that, unlike position 83, a free cysteine at position 66 destabilizes FGF-1; however, upon oxidation, a near-optimal disulfide bond is formed between Cys66 and Cys83, resulting in {approx} 14 kJ/mol of increased thermostability. Thus, while the conserved free cysteine at position 83 in the majority of the FGF proteins may have a principal role in limiting functional half-life, evidence suggests that it is a vestigial half-cystine.

  6. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heis Marta D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11

  7. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  8. Anaerobic enzyme·substrate structures provide insight into the reaction mechanism of the copper-dependent quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, Roberto A.; Kalk, Kor H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2002-01-01

    Quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (2,3QD) is the only firmly established copper dioxygenase known so far. Depending solely on a mononuclear Cu center, it catalyzes the breakage of the O-heterocycle of flavonols, producing more easily degradable phenolic carboxylic acid ester derivatives. In the enzymatic pr

  9. Anaerobic enzyme-substrate structures provide insight into the reaction mechanism of the copper-dependent quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, RA; Kalk, KH; Dijkstra, BW

    2002-01-01

    Quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (2,3QD) is the only firmly established copper dioxygenase known so far. Depending solely on a mononuclear Cu center, it catalyzes the breakage of the O-heterocycle of flavonols, producing more easily degradable phenolic carboxylic acid ester derivatives. In the enzymatic pr

  10. Modulation of ion transport across rat distal colon by cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eDiener

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the actions of stimulation of endogenous production of H2S by cysteine, the substrate for the two H2S-producing enzymes, cystathionin-beta-synthase and cystathionin-gamma-lyase, on ion transport across rat distal colon. Changes in short-circuit current (Isc induced by cysteine were measured in Ussing chambers. Free cysteine caused a concentration-dependent, transient fall in Isc, which was sensitive to amino-oxyacetate and beta-cyano-L-alanine, i.e. inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes. In contrast, Na cysteinate evoked a biphasic change in Isc, i.e. an initial fall followed by a secondary increase, which was also reduced by these enzyme inhibitors. All responses were dependent on the presence of Cl- and inhibited by bumetanide, suggesting that free cysteine induces an inhibition of transcellular Cl- secretion, whereas Na cysteinate – after a transient inhibitory phase – activates anion secretion. The assumed reason for this discrepancy is a fall in the cytosolic pH induced by free cysteine, but not by Na cysteinate, as observed in isolated colonic crypts loaded with the pH-sensitive dye, BCECF. Intracellular acidification is known to inhibit epithelial K+ channels. Indeed, after preinhibition of basolateral K+ channels with tetrapentylammonium or Ba2+, the negative Isc induced by free cysteine was reduced significantly. In consequence, stimulation of endogenous H2S production by Na cysteinate causes, after a short inhibitory response, a delayed activation of anion secretion, which is missing in the case of free cysteine, probably due to the cytosolic acidification. In contrast, diallyl trisulfide, which is intracellularly converted to H2S, only evoked a monophasic increase in Isc without the initial fall observed with Na cysteinate. Consequently, time course and amount of produced H2S seem to strongly influence the functional response of the colonic epithelium evoked by this gasotransmitter.

  11. Cysteine transport through excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer D Watts

    Full Text Available Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs limit glutamatergic signaling and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. Of the five known EAAT isoforms (EAATs 1-5, only the neuronal isoform, EAAT3 (EAAC1, can efficiently transport the uncharged amino acid L-cysteine. EAAT3-mediated cysteine transport has been proposed to be a primary mechanism used by neurons to obtain cysteine for the synthesis of glutathione, a key molecule in preventing oxidative stress and neuronal toxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the selective transport of cysteine by EAAT3 have not been elucidated. Here we propose that the transport of cysteine through EAAT3 requires formation of the thiolate form of cysteine in the binding site. Using Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing EAAT2 and EAAT3, we assessed the transport kinetics of different substrates and measured transporter-associated currents electrophysiologically. Our results show that L-selenocysteine, a cysteine analog that forms a negatively-charged selenolate ion at physiological pH, is efficiently transported by EAATs 1-3 and has a much higher apparent affinity for transport when compared to cysteine. Using a membrane tethered GFP variant to monitor intracellular pH changes associated with transport activity, we observed that transport of either L-glutamate or L-selenocysteine by EAAT3 decreased intracellular pH, whereas transport of cysteine resulted in cytoplasmic alkalinization. No change in pH was observed when cysteine was applied to cells expressing EAAT2, which displays negligible transport of cysteine. Under conditions that favor release of intracellular substrates through EAAT3 we observed release of labeled intracellular glutamate but did not detect cysteine release. Our results support a model whereby cysteine transport through EAAT3 is facilitated through cysteine de-protonation and that once inside, the thiolate is rapidly re-protonated. Moreover, these

  12. Oxidation of chlorinated olefins by Escherichia coli transformed with dimethyl sulfide monooxygenase genes or cumene dioxygenase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Wako; Yoshida, Takako; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Omori, Toshio

    1999-04-01

    In the present work, it was shown that the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) monooxygenase and the cumene dioxygenase catalyzed oxidation of various chlorinated ethenes, propenes, and butenes. The specific activities of these oxygenases were determined for C(2) to C(4) chlorinated olefins, and the oxidation rates ranged from 0.19 to 4.18 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the DMS monooxygenase and from 0.19 to 1.29 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the cumene dioxygenase. The oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Most chlorinated olefins were monooxygenated by the DMS monooxygenase to yield chlorinated epoxides. In the case of the cumene dioxygenase, the substrates lacking any chlorine atom on double-bond carbon atoms were dioxygenated, and those with chlorine atoms attaching to double-bond carbon atoms were monooxygenated to yield allyl alcohols.

  13. Genetic encoding of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Rajendra; Luo, Ji; Liu, Jihe; Naro, Yuta; Samanta, Subhas; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-08-18

    We report the genetic incorporation of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine into proteins in bacterial and mammalian cells. The genetic code of these cells was expanded with an engineered pyrrolysine tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair that accepts both light-activatable amino acids as substrates. Incorporation was validated by reporter assays, western blots, and mass spectrometry, and differences in incorporation efficiency were explained by molecular modeling of synthetase-amino acid interactions. As a proof-of-principle application, the genetic replacement of an active-site cysteine residue with a caged cysteine residue in Renilla luciferase led to a complete loss of enzyme activity; however, upon brief exposure to UV light, a >150-fold increase in enzymatic activity was observed, thus showcasing the applicability of the caged cysteine in live human cells. A simultaneously conducted genetic replacement with homocysteine yielded an enzyme with greatly reduced activity, thereby demonstrating the precise probing of a protein active site. These discoveries provide a new tool for the optochemical control of protein function in mammalian cells and expand the set of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids.

  14. Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: The Functional Significance of Cysteine in Protein Function and the Soft Acids/Bases Thiol Chemistry That Facilitates Cysteine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R

    2017-03-20

    The unique biophysical and electronic properties of cysteine make this molecule one of the most biologically critical amino acids in the proteome. The defining sulfur atom in cysteine is much larger than the oxygen and nitrogen atoms more commonly found in the other amino acids. As a result of its size, the valence electrons of sulfur are highly polarizable. Unique protein microenvironments favor the polarization of sulfur, thus increasing the overt reactivity of cysteine. Here, we provide a brief overview of the endogenous generation of reactive oxygen and electrophilic species and specific examples of enzymes and transcription factors in which the oxidation or covalent modification of cysteine in those proteins modulates their function. The perspective concludes with a discussion of cysteine chemistry and biophysics, the hard and soft acids and bases model, and the proposal of the Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: a hypothesis proposing the existence of a complex signaling network governed by layered chemical reactivity and cross-talk in which the chemical modification of reactive cysteine in biological networks triggers the reorganization of intracellular biochemistry to mitigate spikes in endogenous or exogenous oxidative or electrophilic stress.

  15. The Targeting of Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase -Mediated Immune Escape in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Trine Zeeberg; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2015-01-01

    The era of immunotherapies was unleashed in 2010 with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the first therapeutic vaccine sipuleucel-T as a standard treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Next, the first immune-activating anticytotoxic lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) antibody...... a peptide vaccination with a HLA-A2-restricted epitope derived from indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). The overall aim in this trial was to evaluate safety and tolerability of IDO as an anticancer vaccine target in patients with NSCLC and to assess whether immunity correlated to clinical response....

  16. Iron(III) complexes of certain tetradentate phenolate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mallayan Palaniandavar; Marappan Velusamy; Ramasamy Mayilmurugan

    2006-11-01

    Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (CTD) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCD) are bacterial non-heme iron enzymes, which catalyse the oxidative cleavage of catechols to cis, cis-muconic acids with the incorporation of molecular oxygen via a mechanism involving a high-spin ferric centre. The iron(III) complexes of tripodal phenolate ligands containing N3O and N2O2 donor sets represent the metal binding region of the iron proteins. In our laboratory iron(III) complexes of mono- and bisphenolate ligands have been studied successfully as structural and functional models for the intradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenase enzymes. The single crystal X-ray crystal structures of four of the complexes have been determined. One of the bis-phenolato complexes contains a FeN2O2Cl chromophore with a novel trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry. The Fe-O-C bond angle of 136.1° observed for one of the iron(III) complex of a monophenolate ligand is very similar to that in the enzymes. The importance of the nearby sterically demanding coordinated -NMe2 group has been established and implies similar stereochemical constraints from the other ligated amino acid moieties in the 3,4-PCD enzymes, the enzyme activity of which is traced to the difference in the equatorial and axial Fe-O(tyrosinate) bonds (Fe-O-C, 133, 148°). The nature of heterocyclic rings of the ligands and the methyl substituents on them regulate the electronic spectral features, FeIII/FeII redox potentials and catechol cleavage activity of the complexes. Upon interacting with catecholate anions, two catecholate to iron(III) charge transfer bands appear and the low energy band is similar to that of catechol dioxygenase-substrate complex. Four of the complexes catalyze the oxidative cleavage of H2DBC by molecular oxygen to yield intradiol cleavage products. Remarkably, the more basic N-methylimidazole ring in one of the complexes facilitates the rate-determining productreleasing phase of the catalytic reaction. The present

  17. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis of Nitroaromatic Contaminant Transformations by Nitroarene Dioxygenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sarah G.; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2014-05-01

    Dioxygenation is an important biochemical reaction that often initiates the mineralization of recalcitrant organic contaminants such as nitroaromatic explosives, chlorinated benzenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. However, to assess the extent of dioxygenation in contaminated environments is difficult because of competing transformation processes and further reactions of the dioxygenation products. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers a new approach to reliably quantify biodegradation initiated by dioxygenation based on changes in stable isotope ratios of the pollutant. For CSIA it is essential to know the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) pertinent to the dioxygenation mechanism of organic contaminants. Unfortunately, the range of KIEs of such reactions is poorly constrained although many dioxygenase enzymes with a broad substrate specificity have been reported. Dioxygenase enzymes usually exhibit complex reaction kinetics involving multiple substrates and substrate-specific binding modes which makes the determination of KIEs challenging. The goal of this study was to explore the magnitude and variability of 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of one contaminant class, that is nitroaromatic contaminants (NACs). To this end, we investigated the C, H, and N isotope fractionation during the dioxygenation of nitrobenzene (NB), 2-nitrotoluene (2-NT), and 3-nitrotoluene (3-NT) by pure cultures, E. coli clones, cell extracts, and purified enzymes. From isotope fractionations measured in the substrates and reaction products, we determined dioxygenation KIEs for different combinations of the three substrates with nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) and 2-nitrotoluene dioxygenase (2NTDO). The 13C-, 2H-, and 15N-KIEs for the dioxygenation of NB by NBDO were consistent for all experimental systems considered (i.e., Comamonas sp. Strain JS765, E. coli clones, cell extracts of E. coli clones, and purified NBDO). This observation suggests that the isotope

  18. Structure of the 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A. [RAL, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Erskine, P.; Guo, J.; Wood, S. P. [UCL Division of Medicine (Royal Free Campus), Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Hopper, D. J. [Aberystwyth University, Penglais, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA Wales (United Kingdom); Rigby, S. E. J. [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Cooper, J. B., E-mail: jon.cooper@ucl.ac.uk [UCL Division of Medicine (Royal Free Campus), Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); RAL, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    The first X-ray structure of a 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP at a resolution of 2.2 Å is reported. This structure establishes that the enzyme adopts the cupin-fold, forming compact dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. Each monomer possesses a catalytic ferrous iron that is coordinated by three histidines (76, 78 and 114) and an additional ligand which has been putatively assigned as a carbonate, although formate and acetate are possibilities. The enzyme 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in

  19. Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Mesenchymal Stem Cells Regulate Immunity via Interferon Beta and Indoleamine-2,3-Dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Michael B.; Sampayo-Escobar, Viviana; Green, Ryan; Moore, Martin L.; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been reported to infect human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but the consequences are poorly understood. MSCs are present in nearly every organ including the nasal mucosa and the lung and play a role in regulating immune responses and mediating tissue repair. We sought to determine whether RSV infection of MSCs enhances their immune regulatory functions and contributes to RSV-associated lung disease. RSV was shown to replicate in human MSCs by fluorescence microscopy, plaque assay, and expression of RSV transcripts. RSV-infected MSCs showed differentially altered expression of cytokines and chemokines such as IL-1β, IL6, IL-8 and SDF-1 compared to epithelial cells. Notably, RSV-infected MSCs exhibited significantly increased expression of IFN-β (~100-fold) and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) (~70-fold) than in mock-infected MSCs. IDO was identified in cytosolic protein of infected cells by Western blots and enzymatic activity was detected by tryptophan catabolism assay. Treatment of PBMCs with culture supernatants from RSV-infected MSCs reduced their proliferation in a dose dependent manner. This effect on PBMC activation was reversed by treatment of MSCs with the IDO inhibitors 1-methyltryptophan and vitamin K3 during RSV infection, a result we confirmed by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of IDO in MSCs. Neutralizing IFN-β prevented IDO expression and activity. Treatment of MSCs with an endosomal TLR inhibitor, as well as a specific inhibitor of the TLR3/dsRNA complex, prevented IFN-β and IDO expression. Together, these results suggest that RSV infection of MSCs alters their immune regulatory function by upregulating IFN-β and IDO, affecting immune cell proliferation, which may account for the lack of protective RSV immunity and for chronicity of RSV-associated lung diseases such as asthma and COPD. PMID:27695127

  20. A synthetic model of the putative Fe(II)-iminobenzosemiquinonate intermediate in the catalytic cycle of o-aminophenol dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Michael M; Lindeman, Sergey V; Fiedler, Adam T

    2012-03-28

    The oxidative ring cleavage of aromatic substrates by nonheme Fe dioxygenases is thought to involve formation of a ferrous-(substrate radical) intermediate. Here we describe the synthesis of the trigonal-bipyramdial complex Fe((Ph2)Tp)(ISQ(tBu)) (2), the first synthetic example of an iron(II) center bound to an iminobenzosemiquinonate (ISQ) radical. The unique electronic structure of this S = 3/2 complex and its one-electron oxidized derivative ([3](+)) have been established on the basis of crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational analyses. These findings further demonstrate the viability of Fe(2+)-ISQ intermediates in the catalytic cycles of o-aminophenol dioxygenases.

  1. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...... for the full length protease...

  2. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Lian-Fu; Bian, Yin-Bing; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, Salam A; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecular basis of the function of Lecsl. Our analysis revealed Lecsl to be a novel cysteine desulfurase and not a type of cysteine sulfoxide lyase. The pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) molecule bonded tightly to Lecsl to form a Lecsl-PLP complex. Moreover, the Lecsl had one active center that served to bind two kinds of substrates, S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and L-cysteine, and had both cysteine sulfoxide lyase and cysteine desulfurase activity. We found that the amino acid residue Asn393 was essential for the catalytic activity of Lecsl and that the gene Csl encoded a novel cysteine desulfurase to influence organosulfur compounds in L. edodes. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the formation of the unique aroma of L. edodes.

  3. Electrons initiate efficient formation of hydroperoxides from cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-09-01

    Amino acid and protein hydroperoxides can constitute a significant hazard if formed in vivo. It has been suggested that cysteine can form hydroperoxides after intramolecular hydrogen transfer to the commonly produced cysteine sulfur-centered radical. The resultant cysteine-derived carbon-centered radicals can react with oxygen at almost diffusion-controlled rate, forming peroxyl radicals which can oxidize other molecules and be reduced to hydroperoxides in the process. No cysteine hydroperoxides have been found so far. In this study, dilute air-saturated cysteine solutions were exposed to radicals generated by ionizing radiation and the hydroperoxides measured by an iodide assay. Of the three primary radicals present, the hydroxyl, hydrogen atoms and hydrated electrons, the first two were ineffective. However, electrons did initiate the generation of hydroperoxides by removing the -SH group and forming cysteine-derived carbon radicals. Under optimal conditions, 100% of the electrons reacting with cysteine produced the hydroperoxides with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Maximum hydroperoxide yields were at pH 5.5, with fairly rapid decline under more acid or alkaline conditions. The hydroperoxides were stable between pH 3 and 7.5, and decomposed in alkaline solutions. The results suggest that formation of cysteine hydroperoxides initiated by electrons is an unlikely event under physiological conditions.

  4. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...

  5. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and w...

  6. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  7. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  8. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap.

  9. Sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine oxidation and the methionine and folate cycles in female cystathionine gamma-lyase null mice: a serendipitous model of the methylfolate trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Hurt, K Joseph; Breen, Kelsey; Stabler, Sally P; Allen, Robert H; Orlicky, David J; Maclean, Kenneth N

    2015-08-14

    In addition to its role in the endogenous synthesis of cysteine, cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL) is a major physiological source of the vasorelaxant hydrogen sulfide. Cgl null mice are potentially useful for studying the influence of this compound upon vascular tone and endothelial function. Here, we confirm a previous report that female Cgl null mice exhibit an approximate 45-fold increase in plasma total homocysteine compared to wild type controls. This level of homocysteine is approximately 3.5-fold higher than that observed in male Cgl null mice and is essentially equivalent to that observed in mouse models of cystathionine beta synthase deficient homocystinuria. Cgl null mice of both sexes exhibited decreased expression of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase compared to WT controls. Female Cgl null mice exhibited a sex-specific induction of betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase 1, alpha and a 70% decrease in methionine synthase expression accompanied by significantly decreased plasma methionine. Decreased plasma cysteine levels in female Cgl null mice were associated with sex-specific dysregulation of cysteine dioxygenase expression. Comparative histological assessment between cystathionine beta-synthase and Cgl null mice indicated that the therapeutic potential of cystathionine against liver injury merits possible further investigation. Collectively, our data demonstrates the importance of considering sex when investigating mouse models of inborn errors of metabolism and indicate that while female Cgl null mice are of questionable utility for studying the physiological role of hydrogen sulfide, they could serve as a useful model for studying the consequences of methionine synthase deficiency and the methylfolate trap.

  10. Trehalose improves cell proliferation and dehydration tolerance of human HaCaT cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kyung Eun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a disaccharide molecule that serves as a natural osmotic regulator in halophilic microorganisms and plants but not in mammals. We observed that human HaCaT cells supplied with trehalose improved cell proliferation and extended viability under dehydration. In HaCaT cells, in response to increasing concentrations of exogenous trehalose, the levels of heat shock protein (HSP 70 increased and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 1 decreased. Proteome analysis of trehalose-treated HaCaT cells revealed remarkable increases in the levels of proteins involved in cell signaling and the cell cycle, including p21 activated kinase I, Sec I family domain protein and elongation factor G. Moreover, the proteins for cell stress resistance, tryptophan hydroxylase, serine/cysteine proteinase inhibitors and vitamin D receptors were also increased. In addition, the proteins responsible for the maintenance of the cytoskeleton and cellular structures including procollagen-lysine dioxygenase, vinculin and ezrin were increased. Proteomic data revealed that trehalose affected HaCaT cells by inducing the proteins involved in cell proliferation. These results suggest that trehalose improves the proliferation and dehydration tolerance of HaCaT cells by inducing proteins involved in cell growth and dehydration protection.

  11. Cysteine analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin release in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammon, H.P.; Hehl, K.H.; Enz, G.; Setiadi-Ranti, A.; Verspohl, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    In rat pancreatic islets, cysteine analogues, including glutathione, acetylcysteine, cysteamine, D-penicillamine, L-cysteine ethyl ester, and cysteine-potentiated glucose (11.1 mM) induced insulin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. Their maximal effects were similar and occurred at approximately 0.05, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.0 mM, respectively. At substimulatory glucose levels (2.8 mM), insulin release was not affected by these compounds. In contrast, thiol compounds, structurally different from cysteine and its analogues, such as mesna, tiopronin, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), dimercaprol (BAL), beta-thio-D-glucose, as well as those cysteine analogues that lack a free-thiol group, including L-cystine, cystamine, D-penicillamine disulfide, S-carbocysteine, and S-carbamoyl-L-cysteine, did not enhance insulin release at stimulatory glucose levels (11.1 mM); cystine (5 mM) was inhibitory. These in vitro data indicate that among the thiols tested here, only cysteine and its analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin secretion, whereas thiols that are structurally not related to cysteine do not. This suggests that a cysteine moiety in the molecule is necessary for the insulinotropic effect. For their synergistic action to glucose, the availability of a sulfhydryl group is also a prerequisite. The maximal synergistic action is similar for all cysteine analogues tested, whereas the potency of action is different, suggesting similarity in the mechanism of action but differences in the affinity to the secretory system.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF DANSYLATED CYSTEINE, GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE, CYSTEINE AND CYSTINE BY NARROW BORE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric (RP-LC/ESI-MS) method has been developed to confirm the identity of dansylated derivatives of cysteine and glutathione, and their respective dimers. Cysteine, GSH, CSSC...

  13. The role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in a mouse model of neuroinflammation-induced depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobos, Nikoletta; de Vries, Erik F.J.; Kema, Ido P.; Patas, Konstantinos; Prins, Marloes; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Korf, Jakob; den Boer, Johan A.; Luiten, Paul G M; Eisel, Ulrich L M; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme which is activated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, has been suggested as a potential link between neuroinflammatory processes in neurodegenerative diseases (like Alzheimer's disease) and depression. The present study aimed to determine whether

  14. The Role of Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase in a Mouse Model of Neuroinflammation-Induced Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobos, Nikoletta; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Kema, Ido P.; Patas, Konstantinos; Prins, Marloes; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Korf, Jakob; den Boer, Johan A.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Borsello, Tiziana

    2012-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme which is activated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, has been suggested as a potential link between neuroinflammatory processes in neurodegenerative diseases (like Alzheimer's disease) and depression. The present study aimed to determine whether neuroinflamm

  15. Design of cell-permeable, fluorescent activity-based probes for the lysosomal cysteine protease asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP)/legumain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sexton, Kelly B.; Witte, Martin D.; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    Asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP), also known as legumain, is a cysteine protease that has been ascribed roles in antigen presentation yet its exact role in human biology remains poorly understood. We report here, the use of a positional scanning combinatorial library of peptide AOMKs containing a P1

  16. FRET ratiometric probes reveal the chiral-sensitive cysteine-dependent H2S production and regulation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lv; Yi, Long; Song, Fanbo; Wei, Chao; Wang, Bai-Fan; Xi, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signalling molecule with multiple biological functions. In order to visualize and quantify the endogenous in situ production of H2S in living cells, here we developed two new sulphide ratiometric probes (SR400 and SR550) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) strategy for live capture of H2S. The FRET-based probes show excellent selectivity toward H2S in a high thiol background under physiological buffer. The probe can be used to in situ visualize cysteine-dependent H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. The ratiometric imaging studies indicated that D-Cys induces more H2S production than that of L-Cys in mitochondria of human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The cysteine mimics propargylglycine (PPG) has also been found to inhibit the cysteine-dependent endogenous H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. D-PPG inhibited D-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than L-PPG, while, L-PPG inhibited L-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than D-PPG. Our bioimaging studies support Kimura's discovery of H2S production from D-cysteine in mammalian cells and further highlight the potential of D-cysteine and its derivatives as an alternative strategy for classical H2S-releasing drugs.

  17. Research Progress of Cysteine Sensor%半胱氨酸传感器的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红丽; 胡慧; 周晓东; 胡继明

    2013-01-01

    As one of indispensable amino acids in human body, cysteine plays an important role in the maintenance of the functions of proteins and metabolism,therefore,it becomes significant to develop the sensors of cysteine. This paper reviews the research progress of cysteine sensor, focusing on the elaboration and evaluation of some electrochemical sensors,colorimetric sensors and fluorescence sensors for cysteine detection,and the development prospect of cysteine sensor is also discussed.%半胱氨酸(Cys)作为人体中一种不可缺少的氨基酸,对维持蛋白质功能和新陈代谢等方面起着重要作用,因此半胱氨酸的检测与传感器的开发也显得十分重要.本文综述了近些年来半胱氨酸传感器的研究进展,对半胱氨酸电化学传感器、比色传感器以及荧光传感器等的研制与应用方面进行了阐述和评价,并对半胱氨酸传感器的发展前景进行了展望.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF THE E 920 ADDITIVE (L - CYSTEINE IN RELATION TO SOME PROBLEMS OF MODERN FOOD INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radiana Maria TAMBA BEREHOIU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to assess the current state of knowledge about the use of L - cysteine in food industry, regarding certain cultural, legal, technological, toxicological, and other aspects that influence the attitude of the consumerstowards food. Use of L - cysteine and its derivatives in bakery allows the optimizing of the technological characteristics of flours and their higher recovery, by using products with high added value. Use the E 920 additivein human food is subject to the cultural and religious controversy, due to the generalized process of obtaining this additive from animal products (keratin. Our study shows that these controversies will be overcome when industrialfermentative technologies of L - cysteine production will be generalized in the market. There exist no data on thepotential toxicity of L - cysteine in the usual doses which are used in the baking industry. The only threat to the status of E 920 as a safe additive is the excitotoxic potential, suggested in several recent studies. Also, there exists a potential for extending the use of L - cysteine in the food industry in order to reduce the contamination degree withcertain chemicals having carcinogen potential, such as acrylamide and mycotoxins.

  19. Modification of Keap1 Cysteine Residues by Sulforaphane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenqi; Eggler, Aimee L.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) through modification of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) cysteines, leading to up-regulation of the antioxidant response element (ARE), is an important mechanism of cellular defense against reactive oxygen species and xenobiotic electrophiles. Sulforaphane, occurring in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is a potent natural ARE activator that functions by modifying Keap1 cysteine residues, but there are conflicting in vitro and in vivo data regarding which of these cysteine residues react. Although most biological data indicate that modification of C151 is essential for sulforaphane action, some recent studies using mass spectrometry have failed to identify C151 as a site of Keap1 sulforaphane reaction. We have reconciled these conflicting data using mass spectrometry with a revised sample preparation protocol and confirmed that C151 is indeed among the most readily modified cysteines of Keap1 by sulforaphane. Previous mass spectrometry-based studies used iodoacetamide during sample preparation to derivatize free cysteine sulfhydryl groups causing loss of sulforaphane from highly reactive and reversible cysteine residues on Keap1 including C151. By omitting iodoacetamide from the protocol and reducing sample preparation time, our mass spectrometry-based studies now confirm previous cell-based studies which showed that sulforaphane reacts with at least four cysteine residues of Keap1 including C151. PMID:21391649

  20. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  1. A simple isotopic labeling method to study cysteine oxidation in Alzheimer's disease: oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A S

    2016-04-01

    Cysteine is widely involved in redox signaling pathways through a number of reversible and irreversible modifications. Reversible modifications (e.g., S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, disulfide bonds, and sulfenic acid) are used to protect proteins from oxidative attack and maintain cellular homeostasis, while irreversible oxidations (e.g., sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid) serve as hallmarks of oxidative stress. Proteomic analysis of cysteine-enriched peptides coupled with reduction of oxidized thiols can be used to measure the oxidation states of cysteine, which is helpful for elucidating the role that oxidative stress plays in biology and disease. As an extension of our previously reported cysDML method, we have developed oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML), to investigate the site-specific total oxidation of cysteine residues in biologically relevant samples. OxcysDML employs (1) blocking of free thiols by a cysteine-reactive reagent, (2) enrichment of peptides containing reversibly oxidized cysteine by a solid phase resin, and (3) isotopic labeling of peptide amino groups to quantify cysteine modifications arising from different biological conditions. On-resin enrichment and labeling minimizes sample handing time and improves efficiency in comparison with other redox proteomic methods. OxcysDML is also inexpensive and flexible, as it can accommodate the exploration of various cysteine modifications. Here, we applied the method to liver tissues from a late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. Because we have previously characterized this proteome using the cysDML approach, we are able here to probe deeper into the redox status of cysteine in AD. OxcysDML identified 1129 cysteine sites (from 527 proteins), among which 828 cysteine sites underwent oxidative modifications. Nineteen oxidized cysteine sites had significant alteration levels in AD and represent proteins involved in metabolic processes. Overall

  2. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria. PMID:20349253

  3. 7-Glutathione-pyrrole and 7-cysteine-pyrrole are potential carcinogenic metabolites of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaobo; Xia, Qingsu; Fu, Peter P

    2017-04-03

    Many pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are hepatotoxic, genotoxic, and carcinogenic phytochemicals. Metabolism of PAs in vivo generates four (±)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-DNA adducts that have been proposed to be responsible for PA-induced liver tumor formation in rats. In this present study, we determined that the same set of DHP-DNA adducts was formed upon the incubation of 7-glutathione-DHP and 7-cysteine-DHP with cultured human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. These results suggest that 7-glutathione-DHP and 7-cysteine-DHP are reactive metabolites of PAs that can bind to cellular DNA to form DHP-DNA adducts in HepG2 cells, and can potentially initiate liver tumor formation.

  4. A novel class of cysteine protease inhibitors: solution structure of staphostatin A from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Grzegorz; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Stec-Niemczyk, Justyna; Bochtler, Matthias; Potempa, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Holak, Tad A

    2003-11-25

    A series of secreted proteases are included among the virulence factors documented for Staphylococcus aureus. In light of increasing antibiotic resistance of this dangerous human pathogen, these proteases are considered as suitable targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The recent discovery of staphostatins, endogenous, highly specific, staphylococcal cysteine protease inhibitors, opened a possibility for structure-based design of low molecular weight analogues. Moreover, the crystal structure of staphostatin B revealed a distinct folding pattern and an unexpected, substrate-like binding mode. The solution structure of staphostatin A reported here confirms that staphostatins constitute a novel, distinct class of cysteine protease inhibitors. In addition, the structure knowledge-based mutagenesis studies shed light on individual structural features of staphostatin A, the inhibition mechanism, and the determinants of distinct specificity of staphostatins toward their target proteases.

  5. Mutations in the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase gene (HPD) in patients with tyrosinemia type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüetschi, U; Cerone, R; Pérez-Cerda, C; Schiaffino, M C; Standing, S; Ugarte, M; Holme, E

    2000-06-01

    Tyrosinemia type III (OMIM 276710) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPD), the second enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway. The enzyme deficiency results in an accumulation and increased excretion of tyrosine and phenolic metabolites. Only a few cases with the disorder have been described, and the clinical spectrum of the disorder is unknown. Reported patients have presented with mental retardation or neurological symptoms or have been picked up by neonatal screening. We have identified four presumed pathogenic mutations (two missense and two nonsense mutations) in the HPD gene in three unrelated families encompassing four homozygous individuals and one compound heterozygous individual with tyrosinemia type III. Furthermore, a number of polymorphic mutations have been identified in the HPD gene. No correlation of the severity of the mutation and enzyme deficiency and mental function has been found; neither do the recorded tyrosine levels correlate with the clinical phenotype.

  6. Characterization of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from cell extracts of Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Min; QU YuanYuan; ZHOU JiTi; LI Ang; M.Salah Uddin

    2009-01-01

    Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY, capable of growing significantly on more than ten kinds of aromatic compounds as sole carbon source, was used to study characterization of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C120) in cell extracts. Characterization of the crude C120 showed that the maximum activity was obtained at 40-70℃ and pH 7.8-8.8. Metal ions had different influences on the activity of crude C120. It was suggested that strain QYY possessed an inducible and ferric-dependent C120. Kinetic studies showed that the value of Vmax and Km was 0.25 μmol catechol/L/mg protein/min and 52.85 μmol/L, respectively. In addition, the partial purification of C120 was achieved by a HiTrap Q Sepharose column chromatography.

  7. Characterization of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from cell extracts of Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Salah; Uddin

    2009-01-01

    Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY, capable of growing significantly on more than ten kinds of aromatic compounds as sole carbon source, was used to study characterization of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O) in cell extracts. Characterization of the crude C12O showed that the maximum activity was obtained at 40-70℃ and pH 7.8-8.8. Metal ions had different influences on the activity of crude C12O. It was suggested that strain QYY possessed an inducible and ferric-dependent C12O. Kinetic studies showed that the value of Vmax and Km was 0.25 μmol catechol/L/mg protein/min and 52.85 μmol/L, respectively. In addition, the partial purification of C12O was achieved by a HiTrap Q Sepharose column chromatography.

  8. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase specific, cytotoxic T cells as immune regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Svane, Inge Marie

    2011-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme that is implicated in suppressing T-cell immunity in normal and pathologic settings. Here, we describe that spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO exists not only in patients with cancer but also in healthy persons. We...... show that the presence of such IDO-specific CD8(+) T cells boosted T-cell immunity against viral or tumor-associated antigens by eliminating IDO+ suppressive cells. This had profound effects on the balance between interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells. Furthermore......, this caused an increase in the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha while decreasing the IL-10 production. Finally, the addition of IDO-inducing agents (ie, the TLR9 ligand cytosine-phosphate- guanosine, soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4...

  9. The influence of the protector thiol L-cystein on the toxic and therapeutic responses of stabilized "activated" cyclophosphamide (4-(S-ethanol)-sulfido-cyclophosphamide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelcker, G; Laber, P; Rockinger, H; Wientzek, C; Hohorst, H J

    1984-01-01

    The influence of L-cystein on the toxic and therapeutic responses of 4-(S-ethanol)-sulfido-cyclophosphamide (P1), a stabilized "activated" cyclophosphamide, was investigated. Stabilized "activated" cyclophosphamides hydrolyze under physiological conditions to 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (4-OH-CP). The antitumor activity of P1 was investigated on a heterotransplanted human bladder sarcoma in nude mice and in perfusion experiments carried out on the isolated tumor bearing limb in rats. Due to its rapid hydrolysis to 4-OH-CP, P1 exhibits severe local toxicity which is decreased by the protector thiol L-cystein. Simultaneous application of double molar amounts of L-cystein reduces toxicity in nude mice to approximately one-third. Therapeutic activity is not affected by this ratio of L-cystein so that the protector thiol increases the therapeutic efficacy of P1. Higher amounts of L-cystein reduce both the acute toxicity in nude mice and the therapeutic efficacy against the human xenograft. The perfusion experiments demonstrate that a P1 concentration necessary to cure rats with tumor bearing limb is only tolerated in combination with L-cystein.

  10. 2,3-Dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase gene was first discovered in Arthrobacter sp. strain P J3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG MeiYing; MA PengDa; LI WenMing; LIU JinYing; LI Liang; ZHU XiaoJuan; WANG XingZhi

    2007-01-01

    Bacterium strain PJ3, isolated from wastewater and identified as Arthrobacter sp. bacterium based on its 16S rDNA gene, could use carbazole as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source. The genomic libraryof strain PJ3 was constructed and a positive clone JM109 (pUCW402) was screened out for the expression of dioxygenase by the ability to form yellow ring-fission product. A 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase (23DHBD) gene of 933 bp was found in the 3360 bp exogenous fragment of pUCW402 by GenSCAN software and BLAST analysis. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 23DHBD from strain PJ3 formed a deep branch separate from a cluster containing most known 23DHBD in GenBank.Southern hybridization confirmed for the first time that the 23DHBD gene was from the genomic DNA of Arthrobacter sp. PJ3. In order to test the gene function, recombinant bacterium BL21 (pETW-8) was constructed to express 23DHBD. The expression level in BL21 (pETW-8) was highest compared with the recombinant bacteria JM109 (pUCW402) and strain PJ3. We observed that 23DHBD was not absolute specific. The enzyme activity was higher with 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl as a substrate than with catechol.The substrate specificity assay suggested that 23DHBD was essential for cleavage of bi-cyclic aromatic compounds during the course of aromatic compound biodegradation in Arthrobacter sp. strain PJ3.

  11. Promotion of Germination Using Hydroxamic Acid Inhibitors of 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Sajjad Z.; Chandler, Jake O.; Harrison, Peter J.; Sergeant, Martin J.; Bugg, Timothy D. H.; Thompson, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits seed germination and the regulation of ABA biosynthesis has a role in maintenance of seed dormancy. The key rate-limiting step in ABA biosynthesis is catalyzed by 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). Two hydroxamic acid inhibitors of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD), D4 and D7, previously found to inhibit CCD and NCED in vitro, are shown to have the novel property of decreasing mean germination time of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seeds constitutively overexpressing LeNCED1. Post-germination, D4 exhibited no negative effects on tomato seedling growth in terms of height, dry weight, and fresh weight. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) seeds containing a tetracycline-inducible LeNCED1 transgene were used to show that germination could be negatively and positively controlled through the chemical induction of gene expression and the chemical inhibition of the NCED protein: application of tetracycline increased mean germination time and delayed hypocotyl emergence in a similar manner to that observed when exogenous ABA was applied and this was reversed by D4 when NCED expression was induced at intermediate levels. D4 also improved germination in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds under thermoinhibitory temperatures and in tomato seeds imbibed in high osmolarity solutions of polyethylene glycol. D4 reduced ABA and dihydrophaseic acid accumulation in tomato seeds overexpressing LeNCED1 and reduced ABA accumulation in wild type tomato seeds imbibed on polyethylene glycol. The evidence supports a mode of action of D4 through NCED inhibition, and this molecule provides a lead compound for the design of NCED inhibitors with greater specificity and potency.

  12. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    cysteine. Disruption of these interactions by protein unfolding or proteolysis promoted instantaneous cleavage of the covalent bond. Our results establish a chemistry-based framework for engineering sustained covalent inhibition without accumulating permanently modified proteins and peptides....

  13. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-11-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signaling including PR-gene expression. Therefore the inhibition of apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases by CC9 is essential to suppress host immunity during U. maydis infection. Here were present new experimental data on the cysteine protease-cystatin interaction and provide an in silco analysis of plant cystatins and the identified apoplastic cysteine proteases.

  14. Cysteine-functional polymers via thiol-ene conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Matthias; Reimann, Oliver; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Groll, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    A thiofunctional thiazolidine is introduced as a new low-molar-mass building block for the introduction of cysteine residues via a thiol-ene reaction. Allyl-functional polyglycidol (PG) is used as a model polymer to demonstrate polymer-analogue functionalization through reaction with the unsaturated side-chains. A modified trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBSA) assay is used for the redox-insensitive quantification and a precise final cysteine content can be predetermined at the polymerization stage. Native chemical ligation at cysteine-functional PG is performed as a model reaction for a chemoselective peptide modification of this polymer. The three-step synthesis of the thiofunctional thiazolidine reactant, together with the standard thiol-ene coupling and the robust quantification assay, broadens the toolbox for thiol-ene chemistry and offers a generic and straightforward approach to cysteine-functional materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Cysteine protease activation and apoptosis in Murine norovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettayebi Khalil

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. Because a suitable in vitro culture system for the human virus has yet to be developed, many basic details of the infection process are unknown. Murine norovirus (MNV serves as a model system for the study of norovirus infection. Recently it was shown that infection of RAW 264.7 cells involved a novel apoptotic pathway involving survivin. Results Using a different set of approaches, the up-regulation of caspases, DNA condensation/fragmentation, and membrane blebbing, all of which are markers of apoptosis, were confirmed. Live cell imaging and activity-based protein profiling showed that activation of caspase-like proteases occurred within two hours of infection, followed by morphological changes to the cells. MNV infection in the presence of caspase inhibitors proceeded via a distinct pathway of rapid cellular necrosis and reduced viral production. Affinity purification of activity-based protein profiling targets and identification by peptide mass fingerprinting showed that the cysteine protease cathepsin B was activated early in infection, establishing this protein as an upstream activator of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion This work adds cathepsin B to the noncanonical programmed cell death induced by MNV, and provides data suggesting that the virus may induce apoptosis to expand the window of time for viral replication. This work also highlights the significant power of activity-based protein profiling in the study of viral pathogenesis.

  16. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukomanovic, Dragic; Rahman, Mona N; Maines, Mahin D; Ozolinš, Terence Rs; Szarek, Walter A; Jia, Zongchao; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2016-03-01

    Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys) residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2) and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD) and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  17. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragic Vukomanovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2 isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2 and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  18. Application of L-cystein derivative to DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakauchi, Gen; Inaki, Yoshiaki; Kitaoka, Shiho; Yokoyama, Chieko; Tanabe, Tadashi

    2002-01-01

    S-carboxymethyl-L-cystein derivatives of nucleic acid bases were prepared as DNA chip probe. These compounds in vitro have been found to form stable complex with oligo-DNA and RNA. This paper deals with preparing new DNA chip using L-cystein derivative synthetic nucleotides as probe and immobilized it to quartz plate by photosensitive PVA. Then the chip exposed with FITC labeled target DNA was observed by confocal fluorescence microscope.

  19. Fluorescent nitrile-based inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizler, Maxim; Mertens, Matthias D; Gütschow, Michael

    2012-12-15

    Cysteine cathepsins play an important role in many (patho)physiological conditions. Among them, cathepsins L, S, K and B are subjects of several drug discovery programs. Besides their role as drug targets, cysteine cathepsins are additionally considered to be possible biomarkers for inflammation and cancer. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, biological evaluation and spectral properties of fluorescently labeled dipeptide- and azadipeptide nitriles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cysteine homeostasis plays an essential role in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Consolación; Bermúdez, M Ángeles; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine is the metabolic precursor of essential biomolecules such as vitamins, cofactors, antioxidants and many defense compounds. The last step of cysteine metabolism is catalysed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), which incorporates reduced sulfur into O-acetylserine to produce cysteine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the main OASTL isoform OAS-A1 and the cytosolic desulfhydrase DES1, which degrades cysteine, contribute to the cytosolic cysteine homeostasis. • Meta-analysis of the transcriptomes of knockout plants for OAS-A1 and for DES1 show a high correlation with the biotic stress series in both cases. • The study of the response of knockout mutants to plant pathogens shows that des1 mutants behave as constitutive systemic acquired resistance mutants, with high resistance to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, salicylic acid accumulation and WRKY54 and PR1 induction, while oas-a1 knockout mutants are more sensitive to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. However, oas-a1 knockout mutants lack the hypersensitive response associated with the effector-triggered immunity elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 avrRpm1. • Our results highlight the role of cysteine as a crucial metabolite in the plant immune response.

  1. Synthesis, antioxidative and whitening effects of novel cysteine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Jeong, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Soo Nam [Dept. of Fine Chemistry, Cosmetic R and D Center, Cosmetic Industry Coupled Collaboration Center, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jino [Daebong LS. Ltd, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Recently, development of biocompatibility functional cosmetic agents as antioxidant or whitening agent has increased. In this study, synthetic cysteine derivatives (DBLS-21, -24, and -33) were developed containing syringic acid and cysteine moieties (l-cysteine ethyl ester, N-acetyl cysteine methyl ester, and N-acetyl cysteine ethyl ester), and their antioxidative and whitening activities were evaluated. The cellular protective effect (τ{sub 50}) of DBLS-21 was 51.1 min at 50 μM on {sup 1}O{sub 2} -induced hemolysis of erythrocytes. This activity was slightly higher than that of α-tocopherol (43.6 min) as a lipophilic antioxidant. In the melanogenesis inhibitory effect, DBLS-21, -24, and -33 was 1.6-, 1.8-, and 2.5-fold higher than arbutin, respectively. In particular, DBLS-21 and -33 was 112.8- and 6.1-fold higher than arbutin, respectively (293.4 μM) on tyrosinase inhibition activity (IC{sub 50} ). But DBLS-24 had no tyrosinase inhibitory activity. These results suggest that cysteine derivatives possess potential for use as an antioxidant agent (DBLS-21) and whitening agents (all derivatives) in cosmetics.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus CstB is a novel multidomain persulfide dioxygenase-sulfurtransferase involved in hydrogen sulfide detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiangchuan; Keithly, Mary E.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Higgins, Khadine A.; Edmonds, Katherine A.; Giedroc, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is both a lethal gas and an emerging gasotransmitter in humans, suggesting that cellular H2S level must be tightly regulated. CstB is encoded by the cst operon of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and is under the transcriptional control of the persulfide sensor CstR and H2S. Here we show that CstB is a multifunctional Fe(II)-containing persulfide dioxygenase (PDO), analogous to the vertebrate protein ETHE1 (Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy Protein 1). Chromosomal deletion of ethe1 is fatal in vertebrates. In the presence of molecular oxygen (O2), hETHE1 oxidizes glutathione persulfide (GSSH) to generate sulfite and reduced glutathione. In contrast, CstB oxidizes major cellular low molecular weight (LMW) persulfide substrates from S. aureus, coenzyme A persulfide (CoASSH) and bacillithiol persulfide (BSSH), directly to generate thiosulfate (TS) and reduced thiols, thereby avoiding the cellular toxicity of sulfite. Both Cys201 in the N-terminal PDO domain (CstBPDO) and Cys408 in the C-terminal rhodanese domain (CstBRhod) strongly enhance the TS generating activity of CstB. CstB also possesses persulfide transferase (PT; reverse rhodanese) activity which generates TS when provided with LMW persulfides and sulfite, as well as conventional thiosulfate transferase (TST; rhodanese) activity; both activities require Cys408. CstB protects S. aureus against H2S toxicity with C201S and C408S cstB genes unable to rescue a NaHS-induced ΔcstB growth phenotype. Induction of the cst operon by NaHS reveals that functional CstB impacts the cellular TS concentrations. These data collectively suggest that CstB may have evolved to facilitate the clearance of LMW persulfides that occur upon the elevation of the level of cellular H2S and hence may have an impact on bacterial viability under H2S stress, in concert with the other enzymes encoded by the cst operon. PMID:26177047

  3. Construction, purification, and immunogenicity of recombinant cystein-cystein type chemokine receptor 5 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kongtian; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Zenglu; Yan, Zhen; Shi, Jihong; Han, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2006-09-01

    Cystein-Cystein type chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a seven-transmembrane, G-protein coupled receptor. It is a major coreceptor with CD4 glycoprotein mediating cellular entry of CCR5 strains of HIV-1. A lack of cell-surface expression of CCR5 found in the homozygous Delta32 CCR5 mutation, upregulation of CC chemokines and antibodies to CCR5 are associated with resistance to HIV infection. In addition, CCR5 can be blocked by three CC chemokines and antibodies to three extracellular domains of CCR5. Consequently, CCR5 is considered an attractive therapeutic target against HIV infection. In the current study, we constructed a recombinant vaccine by coupling a T helper epitope AKFVAAWTLKAA (PADRE) to the N terminus of CCR5 extracellular domains (PADRE-CCR5) and expressed this protein in Escherichia coli. We have developed an inexpensive and scalable purification process for the fusion protein from inclusion bodies and the final yields of 6mg purified fusion protein per gram of cell paste was obtained. The immunogenicity of the recombinant vaccine generated was examined in BALB/c mice. Sera from the vaccinated mice demonstrated high-titer specific antibodies to the recombinant vaccine, suggesting that PADRE-rCCR5 may be used as a candidate of active CCR5 vaccine.

  4. Molecularly imprinted polymer based electrochemical detection of L-cysteine at carbon paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswini, K K; Vinu Mohan, A M; Biju, V M

    2014-04-01

    A methacrylic acid (MAA) based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) was developed for electrochemical detection of L-cysteine (Cys). Characterisation of MIP was done with FTIR and the modified electrode with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). CV, DPV and impedance analysis demonstrated that the modified electrode is responsive towards the target molecule. The optimum percentage composition of MIP for MIP/CPE and the effect of pH towards the electrode response for Cys were studied. The detection of Cys in the range of 2×10(-8) to 18×10(-8)M at MIP/CPE was monitored by DPV with a limit of detection of 9.6nM and R(2) of 0.9974. Also, various physiological interferents such as ascorbic acid, L-tryptophan, D-glucose, D-cysteine and L-cysteine were found to have little effect on DPV response at MIP/CPE. The utility of the electrode was proved by the effective detection of Cys from tap water and human blood plasma samples with reproducible results.

  5. Facile fabrication and selective detection for cysteine of xylan/Au nanoparticles composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuqiong; Shen, Zuguang; Liu, Pai; Zhao, Lihong; Wang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-20

    This work reported a facile and green method to prepare highly stable and uniformly distributed Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), using biopolymer xylan as stabilizing and reducing agent. Full characterizations were performed and the results revealed that AuNPs were well dispersed with the diameters of 10-30nm. The optimal condition was as follows: the ratio of xylan to HAuCl4 was 150mg:15mg, reaction temperature was 80°C and reaction time was 40min. The xylan/AuNPs composite exhibited highly selective and sensitive sensing of cysteine in aqueous solution, it could distinguish cysteine among dozens kinds of amino acids, and the limit of detection (LOD) for cysteine was calculated as 0.57μM. Besides, the xylan/AuNPs composite was applied for Cys detection in human serum. This study provides a new way for high-value utilization of the rich biomass resource and a cheap, rapid and simple method for Cys detection in real biological samples.

  6. Speciation of selenium dietary supplements; formation of S-(methylseleno)cysteine and other selenium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoako, Prince O. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States); Uden, Peter C., E-mail: pcuden@chem.umass.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States); Tyson, Julian F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States)

    2009-10-12

    Speciation of selenium is of interest because it is both essential and toxic to humans, depending on the species and the amount ingested. Following indications that selenium supplementation could reduce the incidence of some cancers, selenium-enriched yeast and other materials have been commercialized as supplements. Most dramatically however, the SELECT trial that utilized L-selenomethionine as the active supplement was terminated in 2008 and there is much debate regarding both the planning and the results of efficacy studies. Further, since dietary supplements are not regulated as pharmaceuticals, there are concerns about the quality, storage conditions, stability and selenium content in selenium supplements. Enzymatic hydrolysis enabled selenium speciation profiles to be obtained by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and following derivatization gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Coated fiber solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile selenium species for determination by GC-AED and GC-MS. Similar speciation patterns were observed between yeast-based supplements subject to extended storage and those heated briefly at elevated temperatures. All the yeast-based supplements and one yeast-free supplement formed S-(methylseleno)cysteine on heating. Evidence was obtained in support of the hypotheses that S-(methylseleno)cysteine is formed from a reaction between dimethyldiselenide and cysteine or cystine.

  7. Tryptamine and dimethyltryptamine inhibit indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase and increase the tumor-reactive effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourino, Melissa Cavalheiro; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Knebel, Franciele Hinterholz; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Dörr, Felipe Augusto; Okada, Sabrina Sayori; Migliorini, Silene; Soares, Irene Silva; Campa, Ana

    2013-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced tryptophan-degrading enzyme, producing kynurenine (KYN) that participates in the mechanism of tumor immune tolerance. Thus, IDO inhibition has been considered a strategy for anticancer therapy. The aim of this study was to identify whether the metabolites originated from the competitive routes of tryptophan metabolism, such as the serotonergic or N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) pathways, have inhibitory effects on recombinant human IDO (rhIDO) activity. Serotonin and melatonin had no effect; on the other hand, tryptamine (TRY) and DMT modulated the activity of rhIDO as classical non-competitive inhibitors, with Ki values of 156 and 506 μM, respectively. This inhibitory effect was also observed on constitutively expressed or IFN-γ-induced IDO in the A172 human glioma cell line. TRY and DMT increased the cytotoxic activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in co-culture assays. We conclude that the IDO inhibition by TRY and DMT contributed to a more effective tumor-reactive response by the PBMCs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Potential involvement of Brugia malayi cysteine proteases in the maintenance of the endosymbiotic relationship with Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lustigman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode that causes lymphatic filariasis, harbors endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria, Wolbachia, that are required for the development and reproduction of the worm. The essential nature of this endosymbiosis led to the development of anti-Wolbachia chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of human filarial infections. Our study is aimed at identifying specific proteins that play a critical role in this endosymbiotic relationship leading to the identification of potential targets in the adult worms. Filarial cysteine proteases are known to be involved in molting and embryogenesis, processes shown to also be Wolbachia dependent. Based on the observation that cysteine protease transcripts are differentially regulated in response to tetracycline treatment, we focused on defining their role in symbiosis. We observe a bimodal regulation pattern of transcripts encoding cysteine proteases when in vitro tetracycline treated worms were examined. Using tetracycline-treated infertile female worms and purified embryos we established that the first peak of the bimodal pattern corresponds to embryonic transcripts while the second takes place within the hypodermis of the adult worms. Localization studies of the native proteins corresponding to Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 indicate that they are present in the area surrounding Wolbachia, and, in some cases, the proteins appear localized within the bacteria. Both proteins were also found in the inner bodies of microfilariae. The possible role of these cysteine proteases during development and endosymbiosis was further characterized using RNAi. Reduction in Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 transcript levels was accompanied by hindered microfilarial development and release, and reduced Wolbachia DNA levels, making these enzymes strong drug target candidates.

  9. Cysteine effects on the pharmacokinetics of etoposide in protein-calorie malnutrition rats: increased gastrointestinal absorption by cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J H; Kang, H E; Yoon, I S; Yang, S H; Kim, S H; Lee, H J; Shim, C-K; Lee, M G

    2011-10-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition (PCM) occurs frequently in advanced cancer patients and has a profound impact on the toxicity of many drugs. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of etoposide were evaluated in control, control with cysteine (CC), PCM, and PCM with cysteine (PCMC) rats. Etoposide was administered intravenously (2 mg/kg) or orally (10 mg/kg). Changes in hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and effects of cysteine on intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux were also measured. In PCM rats, the CL(NR) (AUC(0-∞)) of intravenous etoposide was significantly slower (greater) than that in controls, because of the significant decrease in the hepatic CYP3A subfamily and P-gp. In PCMC rats, the slowed CL(NR) of etoposide in PCM rats was restored to the control level by cysteine treatment. PCMC rats showed a significantly greater AUC(0-6 h) of oral etoposide than PCM rats, primarily because of the increased gastrointestinal absorption of etoposide as a result of the inhibition of intestinal P-gp by cysteine. The gastrointestinal absorption of an oral anticancer drug, which is a substrate of P-gp, may be improved by co-administration of cysteine in advanced cancer patients if the present rat data can be extrapolated to patients.

  10. Structure of the Dioxygenase AsqJ: Mechanistic Insights into a One-Pot Multistep Quinolone Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Bräuer, Alois

    2015-11-10

    © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Multienzymatic cascades are responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products and represent a source of inspiration for synthetic chemists. The FeII/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase AsqJ from Aspergillus nidulans is outstanding because it stereoselectively catalyzes both a ferryl-induced desaturation reaction and epoxidation on a benzodiazepinedione. Interestingly, the enzymatically formed spiro epoxide spring-loads the 6,7-bicyclic skeleton for non-enzymatic rearrangement into the 6,6-bicyclic scaffold of the quinolone alkaloid 4′-methoxyviridicatin. Herein, we report different crystal structures of the protein in the absence and presence of synthesized substrates, surrogates, and intermediates that mimic the various stages of the reaction cycle of this exceptional dioxygenase.

  11. Loss of Homogentisate 1,2-Dioxygenase Activity in Bacillus anthracis Results in Accumulation of Protective Pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hesong; Iakovenko, Liudmyla; Wilson, Adam C

    2015-01-01

    Melanin production is important to the pathogenicity and survival of some bacterial pathogens. In Bacillus anthracis, loss of hmgA, encoding homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, results in accumulation of a melanin-like pigment called pyomelanin. Pyomelanin is produced in the mutant as a byproduct of disrupted catabolism of L-tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. Accumulation of pyomelanin protects B. anthracis cells from UV damage but not from oxidative damage. Neither loss of hmgA nor accumulation of pyomelanin alter virulence gene expression, sporulation or germination. This is the first investigation of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity in the Gram-positive bacteria, and these results provide insight into a conserved aspect of bacterial physiology.

  12. Loss of Homogentisate 1,2-Dioxygenase Activity in Bacillus anthracis Results in Accumulation of Protective Pigment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesong Han

    Full Text Available Melanin production is important to the pathogenicity and survival of some bacterial pathogens. In Bacillus anthracis, loss of hmgA, encoding homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, results in accumulation of a melanin-like pigment called pyomelanin. Pyomelanin is produced in the mutant as a byproduct of disrupted catabolism of L-tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. Accumulation of pyomelanin protects B. anthracis cells from UV damage but not from oxidative damage. Neither loss of hmgA nor accumulation of pyomelanin alter virulence gene expression, sporulation or germination. This is the first investigation of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase activity in the Gram-positive bacteria, and these results provide insight into a conserved aspect of bacterial physiology.

  13. Atom Tunneling in the Hydroxylation Process of Taurine/α-Ketoglutarate Dioxygenase Identified by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-06-01

    Taurine/α-ketoglutarate dioxygenase is one of the most studied α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (αKGDs), involved in several biotechnological applications. We investigated the key step in the catalytic cycle of the αKGDs, the hydrogen transfer process, by a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach (B3LYP/CHARMM22). Analysis of the charge and spin densities during the reaction demonstrates that a concerted mechanism takes place, where the H atom transfer happens simultaneously with the electron transfer from taurine to the Fe═O cofactor. We found the quantum tunneling of the hydrogen atom to increase the rate constant by a factor of 40 at 5 °C. As a consequence, a quite high kinetic isotope effect close to 60 is obtained, which is consistent with the experimental value.

  14. Sequential oxygenation of linoleic acid in the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis: stereochemistry of dioxygenase and hydroperoxide isomerase reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, M; Zhang, L Y; Brodowsky, I D; Oliw, E H

    1994-02-15

    Linoleic acid is sequentially oxygenated to (7S,8S)-dihydroxylinoleic acid by dioxygenase and hydroperoxide isomerase activities present in the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis (Brodowsky, I. D., Hamberg, M., and Oliw, E. H., J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14738-14745 (1992)). Linoleic acids stereospecifically deuterated at C-7 and C-8 were prepared by biological desaturation of the corresponding stearates and used to determine the stereochemistry of the hydrogen abstractions occurring in the dioxygenase- and hydroperoxide isomerase-catalyzed reactions. The dioxygenase reaction was found to involve stereospecific abstraction of the pro-S hydrogen from C-8 followed by antarafacial insertion of dioxygen to produce (8R)-hydroperoxylinoleic acid. The hydroperoxide isomerase reaction consisted of conversion of (8R)-hydroperoxylinoleic acid into (7S,8S)-dihydroxylinoleic acid by stereospecific elimination of the pro-S hydrogen from C-7 and intramolecular suprafacial insertion of oxygen at C-7. Accordingly, during the conversion of linoleic acid into (8R)-hydroperoxylinoleic acid, the absolute configuration of C-8 was inverted, while the conversion of (8R)-hydroperoxylinoleic acid into (7S,8S)-dihydroxylinoleic acid occurred with retention of absolute configuration at C-7.

  15. The Role of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase in Enhancement of Solid-Phase Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, Charles E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Beliaev, Alex S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zakrajsek, Brian A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reardon, Catherine L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lowy, Daniel A. [Nova Research Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States); Poppy, Tara E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Maloney, Andrea [Winthrop Univ., Rock Hill, SC (United States); Ekechukwu, Amy A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT - While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane associated c-type cytochromes and electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione ([2-(2- chloro- 4- methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA, which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates at which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E°') of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase complexed with substrate and with an inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-Feng; Zhang, Jia-Yue; Hou, Yanjie; Liu, Lei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Liu, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Dioxygen activation implemented by nonhaem Fe(II) enzymes containing the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has been extensively studied in recent years. Extradiol dioxygenase is the archetypal member of this superfamily and catalyzes the oxygenolytic ring opening of catechol analogues. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase, an enzyme representing a minor subset of extradiol dioxygenases that catalyze the fission of 2-aminophenol rather than catecholic compounds, is reported. Crystals of the holoenzyme with FeII and of complexes with the substrate 2-aminophenol and the suicide inhibitor 4-nitrocatechol were grown using the cocrystallization method under the same conditions as used for the crystallization of the apoenzyme. The crystals belonged to space group C2 and diffracted to 2.3-2.7 Å resolution; the crystal that diffracted to the highest resolution had unit-cell parameters a=270.24, b=48.39, c=108.55 Å, β=109.57°. All X-ray data sets collected from diffraction-quality crystals were suitable for structure determination.

  17. The gene coding for the DOPA dioxygenase involved in betalain biosynthesis in Amanita muscaria and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, U G; Fivaz, J; Girod, P A; Zyrd, J P

    1997-09-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones derived from the gene (dodA) coding for DOPA dioxygenase, a key enzyme in the betalain pathway, were obtained from the basidiomycete Amanita muscaria. A cDNA library was established in the phage lambda ZapII and dodA clones were isolated using polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified enzyme. Their identity was confirmed by comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence of several tryptic peptide fragments of DOPA dioxygenase. The gene coded for a 228-amino acid protein that showed no homology to published sequences. The coding region was interrupted by five short introns. Regulation was shown to occur at the transcriptional level; the mRNA accumulated to high levels only in the coloured cap tissue. dodA was found to be a single-copy gene in A. muscaria. To our knowledge, this is the first gene from the betalain pathway to be cloned. It encodes a type of aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenase that has not been previously described.

  18. Molecular mechanism of strict substrate specificity of an extradiol dioxygenase, DesB, derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sugimoto

    Full Text Available DesB, which is derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6, is a type II extradiol dioxygenase that catalyzes a ring opening reaction of gallate. While typical extradiol dioxygenases show broad substrate specificity, DesB has strict substrate specificity for gallate. The substrate specificity of DesB seems to be required for the efficient growth of S. sp. SYK-6 using lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Since direct coordination of hydroxyl groups of the substrate to the non-heme iron in the active site is a critical step for the catalytic reaction of the extradiol dioxygenases, the mechanism of the substrate recognition and coordination of DesB was analyzed by biochemical and crystallographic methods. Our study demonstrated that the direct coordination between the non-heme iron and hydroxyl groups of the substrate requires a large shift of the Fe (II ion in the active site. Mutational analysis revealed that His124 and His192 in the active site are essential to the catalytic reaction of DesB. His124, which interacts with OH (4 of the bound gallate, seems to contribute to proper positioning of the substrate in the active site. His192, which is located close to OH (3 of the gallate, is likely to serve as the catalytic base. Glu377' interacts with OH (5 of the gallate and seems to play a critical role in the substrate specificity. Our biochemical and structural study showed the substrate recognition and catalytic mechanisms of DesB.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase PheB from Bacillus stearothermophilus BR219

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Keisuke; Matsufuzi, Kazuki; Ohnuma, Hiroaki [Department of Material Chemistry, Asahikawa National College of Technology, 2-2-1-6 Shunko-dai, Asahikawa, Hokkaido 071-8142 (Japan); Senda, Miki [Japan Biological Information Research Center (JBIRC), Japan Biological Informatics Consortium (JBIC), 2-42 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); Fukuda, Masao [Department of Bioengineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Senda, Toshiya, E-mail: tsenda@jbirc.aist.go.jp [Biological Information Research Center (BIRC), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-42 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Material Chemistry, Asahikawa National College of Technology, 2-2-1-6 Shunko-dai, Asahikawa, Hokkaido 071-8142 (Japan)

    2006-02-01

    PheB, an extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, and diffracts to 2.3 Å resolution. Class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenase, a key enzyme of aromatic compound degradation in bacteria, cleaves the aromatic ring of catechol by adding two O atoms. PheB is one of the class II extradiol-cleaving catecholic dioxygenases and shows a high substrate specificity for catechol derivatives, which have one aromatic ring. In order to reveal the mechanism of the substrate specificity of PheB, PheB has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 4000 as a precipitant. The space group of the obtained crystal was P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 65.5, b = 119.2, c = 158.7 Å. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution.

  20. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  1. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thornton, Roibeard F

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  2. The dissemination of C10 cysteine protease genes in Bacteroides fragilis by mobile genetic elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagawa Todd F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C10 family of cysteine proteases includes enzymes that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens, such as SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes. The presence of homologues of cysteine protease genes in human commensal organisms has not been examined. Bacteroides fragilis is a member of the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum of the human intestinal microbiota, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen. Results Four homologues of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB were identified in the B. fragilis genome. These four protease genes, two were directly contiguous to open reading frames predicted to encode staphostatin-like inhibitors, with which the protease genes were co-transcribed. Two of these protease genes are unique to B. fragilis 638R and are associated with two large genomic insertions. Gene annotation indicated that one of these insertions was a conjugative Tn-like element and the other was a prophage-like element, which was shown to be capable of excision. Homologues of the B. fragilis C10 protease genes were present in a panel of clinical isolates, and in DNA extracted from normal human faecal microbiota. Conclusions This study suggests a mechanism for the evolution and dissemination of an important class of protease in major members of the normal human microbiota.

  3. Food-derived opioid peptides inhibit cysteine uptake with redox and epigenetic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Shah, Jayni S; Al-Mughairy, Sara; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Simms, Benjamin; Trooskens, Geert A; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deth, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Dietary interventions like gluten-free and casein-free diets have been reported to improve intestinal, autoimmune and neurological symptoms in patients with a variety of conditions; however, the underlying mechanism of benefit for such diets remains unclear. Epigenetic programming, including CpG methylation and histone modifications, occurring during early postnatal development can influence the risk of disease in later life, and such programming may be modulated by nutritional factors such as milk and wheat, especially during the transition from a solely milk-based diet to one that includes other forms of nutrition. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, and in the present study, we demonstrate that these food-derived proline-rich opioid peptides modulate cysteine uptake in cultured human neuronal and gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells via activation of opioid receptors. Decreases in cysteine uptake were associated with changes in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. Bovine and human casein-derived opioid peptides increased genome-wide DNA methylation in the transcription start site region with a potency order similar to their inhibition of cysteine uptake. Altered expression of genes involved in redox and methylation homeostasis was also observed. These results illustrate the potential of milk- and wheat-derived peptides to exert antioxidant and epigenetic changes that may be particularly important during the postnatal transition from placental to GI nutrition. Differences between peptides derived from human and bovine milk may contribute to developmental differences between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Restricted antioxidant capacity, caused by wheat- and milk-derived opioid peptides, may predispose susceptible individuals to inflammation and systemic oxidation, partly explaining the benefits of gluten-free or

  4. Characterization of arene di-oxygenases involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation in Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1; Caracterisation d'arene dioxygenases impliquees dans la biodegradation des hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques chez Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuony, S.

    2005-06-15

    This thesis deals with the bacterial biodegradation of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The bacterium Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1 was isolated from a polluted soil for its ability to use pyrene, a 4-ring PAH, as sole source of carbon and energy. To learn about the pyrene metabolic pathway, the identification of the enzymes involved in this process has been undertaken using a proteomic approach. This approach revealed the occurrence of two ring-hydroxylating di-oxygenases in strain 6PY1, which could catalyze the initial attack of pyrene. The goal of this study was to clone the genes encoding the di-oxygenases identified in Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1, over-express these genes in an heterologous system in order to facilitate the purification of the corresponding enzymes, and determine the biochemical and catalytic properties of these enzymes. The pdoA1B1 genes encoding the terminal component of a di-oxygenase were cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The catalytic properties of this enzyme, called Pdo1, were determined in vivo by measuring the oxidation products of 2- to 4-ring PAHs by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Analysis of the selectivity of the enzyme, as determined using GC-MS, showed that Pdo1 preferentially oxidized 3- or 4-ring PAHs, including phenanthrene and pyrene, but was inactive on di-aromatic compounds such as naphthalene and biphenyl. Pdo1 was unstable and was therefore purified in inactive form. The genes encoding a second di-oxygenase component were found in a locus containing two other catabolic genes. The pdoA2B2 genes encoded an enzyme called Pdo2 showing a narrow specificity towards 2- to 3-ring PAHs, and a high preference for phenanthrene. Pdo2 is an a3{beta}3 hexamer, containing [2Fe-2S] Rieske clusters which confer it a characteristic absorbance spectrum. A third set of genes possibly encoding another di-oxygenase was discovered in the genome of Mycobacterium sp. 6PY1. This set is closely

  5. Effects of various phytochemicals on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 activity: galanal is a novel, competitive inhibitor of the enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO 1, that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the degradation of L-tryptophan, has an important immunomodulatory function. The activity of IDO1 increases in various inflammatory diseases, including tumors, autoimmune diseases, and different kinds of inflammation. We evaluated the suppressive effect of plant extracts or phytochemicals on IDO1 induction and activity; sixteen kinds of plants extracts and fourteen kinds of phytochemicals were examined. As a result, the methanol extracts of Myoga flower buds, which are traditional Japanese foods, and labdane-type diterpene galanal derived from Myoga flowers significantly suppressed IDO1 activity. The Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis indicated that galanal is a competitive inhibitor. Galanal attenuated L-kynurenine formation with an IC₅₀ value of 7.7 µM in the assay system using recombinant human IDO1, and an IC₅₀ value of 45 nM in the cell-based assay. Further, mechanistic analysis revealed that galanal interfered with the transcriptional function of the nuclear factor-κB and the interferon-γ signaling pathway. These effects of galanal are important for immune response. Because the inhibitory effect of galanal on IDO1 activity was stronger than that of 1-methyl tryptophan, a tryptophan analog, galanal may have great potential as the novel drug for various immune-related diseases.

  6. Umbilical Cord Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce T Lymphocyte Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest by Expression of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuying Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that human mesenchymal stem cells are able to inhibit T lymphocyte activation; however, the discrepancy among different sources of MSCs is not well documented. In this study, we have compared the MSCs from bone marrow (BM, adipose tissue (AT, placenta (PL, and umbilical cord (UC to determine which one displayed the most efficient immunosuppressive effects on phytohemagglutinin-induced T cell proliferation. Among them we found that hUC-MSC has the strongest effects on inhibiting T cell proliferation and is chosen to do the further study. We observed that T lymphocyte spontaneously released abundant IFN-γ. And IFN-γ secreted by T lymphocyte could induce the expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO in hUC-MSCs. IDO was previously reported to induce T lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in S phase. When cocultured with hUC-MSCs, T lymphocyte expression of caspase 3 was significantly increased, while Bcl2 and CDK4 mRNA expression decreased dramatically. Addition of 1-methyl tryptophan (1-MT, an IDO inhibitor, restored T lymphocyte proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and induced resumption of the cell cycle. In addition, the changes in caspase 3, CDK4, and Bcl2 expression were reversed by 1-MT. These findings demonstrate that hUC-MSCs induce T lymphocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by expressing abundant IDO and provide an explanation for some of the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs.

  7. Enhanced tolerance and remediation to mixed contaminates of PCBs and 2,4-DCP by transgenic alfalfa plants expressing the 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ren, Hejun; Pan, Hongyu; Liu, Jinliang; Zhang, Lanying

    2015-04-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) generally led to mixed contamination of soils as a result of commercial and agricultural activities. Their accumulation in the environment poses great risks to human and animal health. Therefore, the effective strategies for disposal of these pollutants are urgently needed. In this study, genetic engineering to enhance PCBs/2,4-DCP phytoremediation is a focus. We cloned the 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-1,2-dioxygenase (BphC.B) from a soil metagenomic library, which is the key enzyme of aerobic catabolism of a variety of aromatic compounds, and then it was expressed in alfalfa driven by CaMV 35S promoter using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic line BB11 was selected out through PCR, Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Its disposal and tolerance to both PCBs and 2,4-DCP were examined. The tolerance capability of transgenic line BB11 towards complex contaminants of PCBs/2,4-DCP significantly increased compared with non-transgenic plants. Strong dissipation of PCBs and high removal efficiency of 2,4-DCP were exhibited in a short time. It was confirmed expressing BphC.B would be a feasible strategy to help achieving phytoremediation in mixed contaminated soils with PCBs and 2,4-DCP.

  8. The Graphene/l-Cysteine/Gold-Modified Electrode for the Differential Pulse Stripping Voltammetry Detection of Trace Levels of Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium(II is a common water pollutant with high toxicity. It is of significant importance for detecting aqueous contaminants accurately, as these contaminants are harmful to human health and environment. This paper describes the fabrication, characterization, and application of an environment-friendly graphene (Gr/l-cysteine/gold electrode to detect trace levels of cadmium (Cd by differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV. The influence of hydrogen overflow was decreased and the current response was enhanced because the modified graphene extended the potential range of the electrode. The Gr/l-cysteine/gold electrode showed high electrochemical conductivity, producing a marked increase in anodic peak currents (vs. the glass carbon electrode (GCE and boron-doped diamond (BDD electrode. The calculated detection limits are 1.15, 0.30, and 1.42 µg/L, and the sensitivities go up to 0.18, 21.69, and 152.0 nA·mm−2·µg−1·L for, respectively, the BDD electrode, the GCE, and the Gr/l-cysteine/gold electrode. It was shown that the Gr/l-cysteine/gold-modified electrode is an effective means for obtaining highly selective and sensitive electrodes to detect trace levels of cadmium.

  9. Cysteine depletion causes oxidative stress and triggers outer membrane vesicle release by Neisseria meningitidis; implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas van de Waterbeemd

    Full Text Available Outer membrane vesicles (OMV contain immunogenic proteins and contribute to in vivo survival and virulence of bacterial pathogens. The first OMV vaccines successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B outbreaks but required detergent-extraction for endotoxin removal. Current vaccines use attenuated endotoxin, to preserve immunological properties and allow a detergent-free process. The preferred process is based on spontaneously released OMV (sOMV, which are most similar to in vivo vesicles and easier to purify. The release mechanism however is poorly understood resulting in low yield. This study with N. meningitidis demonstrates that an external stimulus, cysteine depletion, can trigger growth arrest and sOMV release in sufficient quantities for vaccine production (±1500 human doses per liter cultivation. Transcriptome analysis suggests that cysteine depletion impairs iron-sulfur protein assembly and causes oxidative stress. Involvement of oxidative stress is confirmed by showing that addition of reactive oxygen species during cysteine-rich growth also triggers vesiculation. The sOMV in this study are similar to vesicles from natural infection, therefore cysteine-dependent vesiculation is likely to be relevant for the in vivo pathogenesis of N. meningitidis.

  10. Cysteine depletion causes oxidative stress and triggers outer membrane vesicle release by Neisseria meningitidis; implications for vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Zomer, Gijsbert; van den Ijssel, Jan; van Keulen, Lonneke; Eppink, Michel H; van der Ley, Peter; van der Pol, Leo A

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) contain immunogenic proteins and contribute to in vivo survival and virulence of bacterial pathogens. The first OMV vaccines successfully stopped Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B outbreaks but required detergent-extraction for endotoxin removal. Current vaccines use attenuated endotoxin, to preserve immunological properties and allow a detergent-free process. The preferred process is based on spontaneously released OMV (sOMV), which are most similar to in vivo vesicles and easier to purify. The release mechanism however is poorly understood resulting in low yield. This study with N. meningitidis demonstrates that an external stimulus, cysteine depletion, can trigger growth arrest and sOMV release in sufficient quantities for vaccine production (±1500 human doses per liter cultivation). Transcriptome analysis suggests that cysteine depletion impairs iron-sulfur protein assembly and causes oxidative stress. Involvement of oxidative stress is confirmed by showing that addition of reactive oxygen species during cysteine-rich growth also triggers vesiculation. The sOMV in this study are similar to vesicles from natural infection, therefore cysteine-dependent vesiculation is likely to be relevant for the in vivo pathogenesis of N. meningitidis.

  11. L-Cysteine-assisted Synthesis of Copper Gallium Sulfide Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-juan; ZHONG Jia-song; CAI Qian; HUANG Hai-yu; LIU Hai-tao; XIANG Wei-dong; SUN Jun-cai

    2012-01-01

    An effective L-cysteine-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare copper gallium sulfide(CuGaS2) microspheres under solvothermal conditions with CuCI2-2H2O,GaCl3 and L-cysteine as source materials,in which L-cysteine was used as the sulfide source and eomplexing molecule.The experiments revealed that the synthesized sample was of a typical CuGaS2 tetragonal structure.Moreover,the prepared CuGaS2 crystals consisting of microspheres made up of nanoflakes,and the diameter of the nanoflakes was about 20 nm.Raman spectrum of the obtained CuGaS2 exhibits a high-intensity peak of the A1 mode at 306 cm-1.Meanwhile,a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the investigations.

  12. L-cysteine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, and glutathione protect Xenopus laevis embryos against acrylamide-induced malformations and mortality in the frog embryo teratogenesis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, James R; Friedman, Mendel

    2010-10-27

    Dietary acrylamide is largely derived from heat-induced reactions between the amino group of the free amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose during heat processing (baking, frying) of plant-derived foods such as potato fries and cereals. After consumption, acrylamide is absorbed into the circulation and is then distributed to various organs, where it can react with DNA, neurons, hemoglobin, and essential enzymes. In the present study, we explored the potential of L-cysteine (CySH), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), reduced glutathione (GSH), and the amino acid glycine (Gly) to protect frog embryos against acrylamide-induced developmental toxicity in the frog embryo teratogenesis assay - Xenopus (FETAX). To test the antiteratogenic potential, based on concentration-response study ranging from 0.07 to 4.22 mM acrylamide in FETAX solution (pH 8.1), we selected concentrations of acrylamide that induced 100% malformations and mortality. At the end of 96 h, we counted survivors and malformed embryos and measured embryo length. The data show that CySH, NAC, and GSH protected the embryos against acrylamide induced malformations and mortality to different degrees. CySH and GSH protected the embryos against both malformations and mortality, whereas NAC protected only against mortality. Gly had no protective effect. Possible mechanisms of the protective effects and the dietary significance of the results of this and related studies for food safety and human health are discussed.

  13. Phycobilin:cystein-84 biliprotein lyase, a near-universal lyase for cysteine-84-binding sites in cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai-Hong; Su, Ping; Tu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Xing; Liu, Hui; Plöscher, Matthias; Eichacker, Lutz; Yang, Bei; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo

    2007-09-04

    Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting complexes of cyanobacteria and red algae, contain two to four types of chromophores that are attached covalently to seven or more members of a family of homologous proteins, each carrying one to four binding sites. Chromophore binding to apoproteins is catalyzed by lyases, of which only few have been characterized in detail. The situation is complicated by nonenzymatic background binding to some apoproteins. Using a modular multiplasmidic expression-reconstitution assay in Escherichia coli with low background binding, phycobilin:cystein-84 biliprotein lyase (CpeS1) from Anabaena PCC7120, has been characterized as a nearly universal lyase for the cysteine-84-binding site that is conserved in all biliproteins. It catalyzes covalent attachment of phycocyanobilin to all allophycocyanin subunits and to cysteine-84 in the beta-subunits of C-phycocyanin and phycoerythrocyanin. Together with the known lyases, it can thereby account for chromophore binding to all binding sites of the phycobiliproteins of Anabaena PCC7120. Moreover, it catalyzes the attachment of phycoerythrobilin to cysteine-84 of both subunits of C-phycoerythrin. The only exceptions not served by CpeS1 among the cysteine-84 sites are the alpha-subunits from phycocyanin and phycoerythrocyanin, which, by sequence analyses, have been defined as members of a subclass that is served by the more specialized E/F type lyases.

  14. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  15. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in patients with allergic rhinitis: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luukkainen Annika

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is a tryptophan catalyzing enzyme. It has been suggested that it has a role in lower airway allergic inflammations, but its role in allergic rhinitis has not been investigated. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the expression of IDO in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients allergic to birch pollen during peak exposure to birch pollen allergen and compare it to non-atopic patients. Methods IDO expression was immunohistochemically evaluated from nasal specimens obtained in- and off-season from otherwise healthy non-smoking volunteers both allergic to birch pollen (having mild or moderate allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and non-allergic controls. Results: The IDO expression levels were low in healthy controls and remained low also in patients allergic to birch pollen. There were no differences in the expression of IDO in- and off-season in either healthy or allergic subjects. Conclusions There is a controversy in the role of IDO in upper and lower airways during allergic airway disease. It seems that IDO is associated to allergic inflammations of the lower airways, but does not have a local role in the nasal cavity at least in mild or moderate forms of allergic rhinitis.

  16. Nanomedicine and cancer immunotherapy: focus on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfiqar, Bilal; Mahroo, Amnah; Nasir, Kaenat; Farooq, Rai Khalid; Jalal, Nasir; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Asghar, Kashif

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicine application in cancer immunotherapy is currently one of the most challenging areas in cancer therapeutic intervention. Innovative solutions have been provided by nanotechnology to deliver cytotoxic agents to the cancer cells partially affecting the healthy cells of the body during the process. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery is an emerging approach to stimulate the immune responses against cancer. The inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a pivotal area of research in cancer immunotherapy. IDO is a heme-containing immunosuppressive enzyme, which is responsible for the degradation of tryptophan while increasing the concentration of kynurenine metabolites. Various preclinical studies showed that IDO inhibition in certain diseases may result in significant therapeutic effects. Here, we provide a review of the natural and synthetic inhibitors of IDO. These inhibitors are classified according to their source, inhibitory concentrations, the chemical structure, and the mechanism of action. Tumor-targeted chemotherapy is an advanced technique and has more advantages as compared to the conventional chemotherapy. Search for more efficient and less toxic nanoparticles in conjunction with compounds to inhibit IDO is still an area of interest for several research groups worldwide, especially revealing to be an extensive and a promising area in cancer therapeutic innovations. PMID:28176942

  17. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: First evidence of expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Jimena; Alvarez, Claudio; Santana, Paula; Torres, Elisa; Mercado, Luis

    2016-12-01

    The role of enzymes as active antimicrobial agents of the innate immunity in teleost fish is proposed in diverse works. Secretion of Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been described in higher vertebrates; it degrades l-tryptophan in extracellular environments associated mainly with mucosal organs. The effect of IDO on decreasing amino acid concentration may inhibit the growth of potential pathogens. In fish the study of this molecule is still. Here we report the identification of an Onchorhyncus mykiss IDO homologue (OmIDO). IDO was cloned, sequenced, and the primary structure shows conservation of key functional sites. The constitutive expression is altered when the fish is challenged with LPS as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMPs). Up-regulation of IDO was shown preferentially in the fish's mucosal cells. In order to obtain evidence of a possible regulation mechanism, an in vitro cell model was used for to show that OmIDO is induced by rIFN. These study has identified a Indoleamine 2,3-dyoxigenase in O. mykiss will contribute to expands our knowledge of the function this protein in fish immune response. These findings allow to propose the use of OmIDO as a molecular indicator of strength of the animal's immune response and wellbeing.

  18. Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase (IDO Expression and Activity in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Mancuso

    Full Text Available Interferon gamma (IFN-γ production induces the transcription of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO resulting in the reduction of T-cell activation and proliferation through the depletion of tryptophan and the elicitation of Treg lymphocytes. IDO was shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases; we investigated whether changes in IDO gene expression and activity could be indicative of onset of relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS patients.IDO and interferon-γ (IFN-γ gene expression, serum IDO activity (Kynurenine/Tryptophan ratio and serum neopterin concentration--a protein released by macrophages upon IFN-γ stimulation--were measured in 51 individuals: 36 relapsing remitting (RR-MS patients (21 in acute phase--AMS, 15 in stable phase--SMS and 15 healthy controls (HC. PBMCs samples in AMS patients were collected before (BT-AMS and during glucocorticoids-based therapy (DT-AMS.IDO expression was increased and IFN-γ was decreased (p<0.001 in BT-AMS compared to SMS patients. Glucocorticoids-induced disease remission resulted in a significant reduction of IDO and IFN-γ gene expression, IDO catalytic activity (p<0.001. Serum neopterin concentration followed the same trend as IDO expression and activity.Measurement of IDO gene expression and activity in blood could be a useful marker to monitor the clinical course of RR-MS. Therapeutic interventions modulating IDO activity may be beneficial in MS.

  19. Tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition ameliorates neurodegeneration by modulation of kynurenine pathway metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Carlo; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Sograte Idrissi, Shama; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Estranero, Jasper G.; Moore, Gareth G. L.; Green, Edward W.; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites of the kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (TRP) degradation have been closely linked to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of inhibiting two critical regulatory enzymes in this pathway—kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) and tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO). Much evidence indicates that the efficacy of KMO inhibition arises from normalizing an imbalance between neurotoxic [3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK); quinolinic acid (QUIN)] and neuroprotective [kynurenic acid (KYNA)] KP metabolites. However, it is not clear if TDO inhibition is protective via a similar mechanism or if this is instead due to increased levels of TRP—the substrate of TDO. Here, we find that increased levels of KYNA relative to 3-HK are likely central to the protection conferred by TDO inhibition in a fruit fly model of Huntington’s disease and that TRP treatment strongly reduces neurodegeneration by shifting KP flux toward KYNA synthesis. In fly models of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, we provide genetic evidence that inhibition of TDO or KMO improves locomotor performance and ameliorates shortened life span, as well as reducing neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's model flies. Critically, we find that treatment with a chemical TDO inhibitor is robustly protective in these models. Consequently, our work strongly supports targeting of the KP as a potential treatment strategy for several major neurodegenerative disorders and suggests that alterations in the levels of neuroactive KP metabolites could underlie several therapeutic benefits. PMID:27114543

  20. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates inhibitor development in gene-therapy-treated hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Liu, H; Mah, C; Fletcher, B S

    2009-06-01

    A serious impediment to gene and protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A is the development of inhibitors. Mechanisms responsible for inhibitor development include T-cell-dependent adaptive immune responses and the CD28-B7 signaling pathway that eventually leads to the formation of antibodies directed against factor VIII (FVIII). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a potent immunosuppressive enzyme that can inhibit T-cell responses and induce T-cell apoptosis by regulation of tryptophan metabolism. Kynurenine, one of the metabolites of tryptophan, has been implicated as an immune modulator. Here we hypothesize that co-delivery of the genes for FVIII and IDO can attenuate inhibitor formation. Using transposon-based gene delivery, we observed long-term therapeutic FVIII expression and significantly reduced inhibitor titers when the genes were co-delivered. Co-expression of FVIII and IDO in the liver was associated with increased plasma kynurenine levels, an inhibition of T-cell infiltration and increased apoptosis of T cells within the liver. These experiments suggest that modulation of tryptophan catabolism through IDO expression provides a novel strategy to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia gene/protein therapy.

  1. Reaction mechanism of cobalt-substituted homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase: a QM/MM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lili; Dong, Geng; Lai, Wenzhen

    2015-04-01

    The reaction mechanisms of cobalt-substituted homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (Co-HPCD) with electron-rich substrate homoprotocatechuate (HPCA) and electron-poor substrate 4-nitrocatechol (4NC) were investigated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. Our results demonstrated that the Co-O2 adducts has doublet ground state with a Co(III)-O2(•-) character when 4NC was used as the substrate, in good agreement with the EPR spectroscopic experiment. The reactive oxygen species is the doublet Co(III)-O2(•-) for Co-HPCD/4NC and the quartet SQ(•↑)-Co(II)-O2(•-↓) species for Co-HPCD/HPCA, indicating that the substrate plays important roles in the dioxygen activation by Co-HPCD. B3LYP was found to overestimate the rate-limiting barriers in Co-HPCD. TPSSh predicts barriers of 21.5 versus 12.0 kcal/mol for Co-HPCD/4NC versus Co-HPCD/HPCA, which is consistent with the fact that the rate of the reaction is decreased when the substrate was changed from HPCA to 4NC.

  2. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Berge-Hansen, Linda; Junker, Niels; Hansen, Christina Aaen; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Schumacher, Ton N M; Svane, Inge Marie; Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2009-09-07

    The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) exerts an well established immunosuppressive function in cancer. IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it promotes the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tumor antigens. In the present study, we tested the notion whether IDO itself may be subject to immune responses. The presence of naturally occurring IDO-specific CD8 T cells in cancer patients was determined by MHC/peptide stainings as well as ELISPOT. Antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from the peripheral blood of cancer patients were cloned and expanded. The functional capacity of the established CTL clones was examined by chrome release assays. The study unveiled spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO in peripheral blood as well as in the tumor microenvironment of different cancer patients. We demonstrate that these IDO reactive T cells are indeed peptide specific, cytotoxic effector cells. Hence, IDO reactive T cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells including directly isolated AML blasts as well as IDO-expressing dendritic cells, i.e. one of the major immune suppressive cell populations. IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals, IDO-based immunotherapy holds the promise to boost anti-cancer immunotherapy in general.

  3. On the substrate- and stereospecificity of the plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 7

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Strigolactones are phytohormones synthesized from carotenoids via a stereospecific pathway involving the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 7 (CCD7) and 8. CCD7 cleaves 9-cis-β-carotene to form a supposedly 9-cis-configured β-apo-10′-carotenal. CCD8 converts this intermediate through a combination of yet undetermined reactions into the strigolactone-like compound carlactone. Here, we investigated the substrate and stereo-specificity of the Arabidopsis and pea CCD7 and determined the stereo-configuration of the β-apo-10′-carotenal intermediate by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Our data unequivocally demonstrate the 9-cis-configuration of the intermediate. Both CCD7s cleave different 9-cis-carotenoids, yielding hydroxylated 9-cis-apo-10′-carotenals that may lead to hydroxylated carlactones, but show highest affinity for 9-cis-β-carotene. © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Emerging concepts on inhibitors of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, P; Del Papa, N; Sambataro, D; Del Bufalo, A; Locatelli, F; Rutella, S

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) finely regulates both innate and adaptive immune responses through the degradation of the essential amino acid tryptophan into kynurenine and other downstream metabolites, which suppress effector T-cell function and promote the differentiation of regulatory T cells. A novel role for IDO1 as a signaling molecule and a modifier of innate inflammatory responses is now emerging. In particular, IDO1 can either support or antagonize inflammation in a context- and tissuedependent manner. Studies in experimental arthritis have unravelled a previously unappreciated role for IDO in controlling B-cell activation and autoantibody production. IDO dysregulation has been documented in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and Sjogren's syndrome, as well as in severe sepsis and chronic kidney disease. This article summarizes the contribution of IDO to the pathophysiology of inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, and discusses whether strategies to restore metabolic equilibrium in the kynurenine pathway might be pursued in diseases states such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic sclerosis.

  5. Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarei, Gelareh; Leavitt, Blair R

    2015-01-01

    Within the past decade, there has been increasing interest in the role of tryptophan (Trp) metabolites and the kynurenine pathway (KP) in diseases of the brain such as Huntington's disease (HD). Evidence is accumulating to suggest that this pathway is imbalanced in neurologic disease states. The KP diverges into two branches that can lead to production of either neuroprotective or neurotoxic metabolites. In one branch, kynurenine (Kyn) produced as a result of tryptophan (Trp) catabolism is further metabolized to neurotoxic metabolites such as 3-hydroxykunurenine (3-HK) and quinolinic acid (QA). In the other branch, Kyn is converted to the neuroprotective metabolite kynurenic acid (KA). The enzyme Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO1) catalyzes the conversion of Trp into Kyn, the first and rate-limiting enzymatic step of the KP. This reaction takes place throughout the body in multiple cell types as a required step in the degradation of the essential amino acid Trp. Studies of IDO1 in brain have focused primarily on a potential role in depression, immune tolerance associated with brain tumours, and multiple sclerosis; however the role of this enzyme in neurodegenerative disease has garnered significant attention in recent years. This review will provide a summary of the current understanding of the role of IDO1 in Huntington's disease and will assess this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target for HD.

  6. Induction of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds enhances seed dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; Ordiz, M Isabel; Huang, Zhonglian; Nonogaki, Mariko; Beachy, Roger N; Nonogaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-11

    Full understanding of mechanisms that control seed dormancy and germination remains elusive. Whereas it has been proposed that translational control plays a predominant role in germination, other studies suggest the importance of specific gene expression patterns in imbibed seeds. Transgenic plants were developed to permit conditional expression of a gene encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 6 (NCED6), a rate-limiting enzyme in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, using the ecdysone receptor-based plant gene switch system and the ligand methoxyfenozide. Induction of NCED6 during imbibition increased ABA levels more than 20-fold and was sufficient to prevent seed germination. Germination suppression was prevented by fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis. In another study, induction of the NCED6 gene in transgenic seeds of nondormant mutants tt3 and tt4 reestablished seed dormancy. Furthermore, inducing expression of NCED6 during seed development suppressed vivipary, precocious germination of developing seeds. These results indicate that expression of a hormone metabolism gene in seeds can be a sole determinant of dormancy. This study opens the possibility of developing a robust technology to suppress or promote seed germination through engineering pathways of hormone metabolism.

  7. Functional expression of a valencene dioxygenase from Pleurotus sapidus in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelena, Kateryna; Krings, Ulrich; Berger, Ralf G

    2012-03-01

    Valencene dioxygenase (ValOx) from the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus converted the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene to the valuable grapefruit flavour (+)-nootkatone and to nootkatols through intermediate hydroperoxides. Expression of the enzyme was carried out in the cytosol and periplasm of Escherichia coli. The heterologous production led to high yields of inclusion bodies. The poor yield of soluble recombinant protein was improved by various strategies including cold shock expression, chaperone co-expression, and employment of mutant E. coli strains. Up to 60 mg of the biologically active, soluble ValOx was produced by cold shock under control of the cspA promoter at 8 °C in the BL21(DE3)Star strain and co-expression of the E. coli trigger factor. The recombinant enzyme, purified using the N-terminal His tag, showed the catalytic properties of the wild-type enzyme, as was confirmed by the LC-MS analysis of hydroperoxide intermediates and GC-MS analysis of the volatile products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tissue distribution, intracellular localization and proteolytic processing of rat 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Søren; Aarenstrup, Lene; Tornehave, Ditte; Rahbek-Nielsen, Henrik; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Roepstorff, Peter; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPD) is an important enzyme involved in tyrosine catabolism. HPD was shown to be identical to a protein named the F-antigen, exploited by immunologists because of its unique immunological properties. Congenital HPD deficiency is a rare, relatively benign condition known as hereditary type III tyrosinemia. Decreased expression of HPD is often observed in association with the severe type I tyrosinemia, and interestingly, inhibition of HPD activity seems to ameliorate the clinical symptoms of type I tyrosinemia. In this study we present a comprehensive analysis of tissue specific expression and intracellular localization of HPD in the rat. By combined use of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we confirm previously known sites of expression in liver and kidney. In addition, we show that HPD is abundantly expressed in neurons in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus. By using immunoelectron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we provide evidence that HPD contrary to earlier assumptions specifically localizes to membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Detailed mass spectrometric analyses of HPD purified from rat liver revealed N-terminal and C-terminal processing of HPD, and expression of recombinant HPD suggested that C-terminal processing enhances the enzymatic activity.

  9. Suicide inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-halocatechols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartels, I.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Reineke, W.

    1984-03-01

    The inactivation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by 3-chloro- and 3-fluorocatechol and the iron-chelating agent Tiron (catechol-3,5-disulfonate) was studied. Whereas inactivation by Tiron is an oxygen-independent and mostly reversible process, inactivation by the 3-halocatechols was only observed in the presence of oxygen and was largely irreversible. The rate constants for inactivation (K/sub 2/) were 1.62 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-chlorocatechol and 2.38 x 10/sup -3/ sec/sup -1/ for 3-fluorocatechol. The inhibitor constants (K/sub i/) were 23 ..mu..M for 3-chlorocatechol and 17 ..mu..M for 3-fluorocatechol. The kinetic data for 3-fluorocatechol could only be obtained in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Besides inactivated enzyme, some 2-hydroxyhexa-2,4-dienoic acid as the actual suicide product of meta-cleavage. A side product of 3-fluorocatechol cleavage is a yellow compound with the spectral characteristics of a 2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoci acid indicating 1,6-cleavage. Rates of inactivation by 3-fluorocatechol were reduced in the presence of superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate, and mannitol, which implies that superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical exhibit additional inactivation. 64 references.

  10. Lignans from Carthamus tinctorius suppress tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnl, Susanne; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Temml, Veronika; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Stuppner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Seed extracts of Carthamus tinctorius L. (Asteraceae), safflower, have been traditionally used to treat coronary disease, thrombotic disorders, and menstrual problems but also against cancer and depression. A possible effect of C. tinctorius compounds on tryptophan-degrading activity of enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) could explain many of its activities. To test for an effect of C. tinctorius extracts and isolated compounds on cytokine-induced IDO activity in immunocompetent cells in vitro methanol and ethylacetate seed extracts were prepared from cold pressed seed cakes of C. tinctorius and three lignan derivatives, trachelogenin, arctigenin and matairesinol were isolated. The influence on tryptophan breakdown was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Effects were compared to neopterin production in the same cellular assay. Both seed extracts suppressed tryptophan breakdown in stimulated PBMC. The three structurally closely related isolates exerted differing suppressive activity on PBMC: arctigenin (IC50 26.5 μM) and trachelogenin (IC50 of 57.4 μM) showed higher activity than matairesinol (IC50 >200 μM) to inhibit tryptophan breakdown. Effects on neopterin production were similar albeit generally less strong. Data show an immunosuppressive property of compounds which slows down IDO activity. The in vitro results support the view that some of the anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and antidepressant properties of C. tinctorius lignans might relate to their suppressive influence on tryptophan breakdown. PMID:23867649

  11. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity accelerates skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Ando, Tatsuya; Ogiso, Hideyuki; Arioka, Yuko; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2015-06-01

    Skin wound healing is a complex process involving several stages that include inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. In the inflammatory phase, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines are induced at the wound site and, they contribute to the development of wound healing. These cytokines also induce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) activity; this is the rate-limiting and first enzyme in the l-tryptophan (TRP)-l-kynurenine (KYN) pathway. This study examined the effect of IDO1 on the process of skin wound healing. The expression of the Ido1 mRNA was enhanced after creating a wound in wild-type (WT) mice. TRP concentration was simultaneously reduced at the wound site. The rate of wound healing in IDO1 knockout (IDO-KO) mice was significantly higher than that in WT mice. 1-Methyl-dl-tryptophan (1-MT), a potent inhibitor of IDO1, increased the rate of wound healing in WT mice. The administration of TRP accelerated wound healing in vivo and in an in vitro experimental model, whereas the rate of wound healing was not affected by the administration of KYN. The present study identifies the role of IDO1 in skin wound healing, and indicates that the local administration of 1-MT or TRP may provide an effective strategy for accelerating wound healing.

  12. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-05

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments.

  13. Novel bacterial bioassay for a high-throughput screening of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocaboy-Faquet, Emilie; Noguer, Thierry; Romdhane, Sana; Bertrand, Cédric; Dayan, Franck Emmanuel; Barthelmebs, Lise

    2014-08-01

    Plant 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) is the molecular target of a range of synthetic β-triketone herbicides that are currently used commercially. Their mode of action is based on an irreversible inhibition of HPPD. Therefore, this inhibitory capacity was used to develop a whole-cell colorimetric bioassay with a recombinant Escherichia coli expressing a plant HPPD for the herbicide analysis of β-triketones. The principle of the bioassay is based on the ability of the recombinant E. coli clone to produce a soluble melanin-like pigment, from tyrosine catabolism through p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate and homogentisate. The addition of sulcotrione, a HPPD inhibitor, decreased the pigment production. With the aim to optimize the assay, the E. coli recombinant clone was immobilized in sol-gel or agarose matrix in a 96-well microplate format. The limit of detection for mesotrione, tembotrione, sulcotrione, and leptospermone was 0.069, 0.051, 0.038, and 20 μM, respectively, allowing to validate the whole-cell colorimetric bioassay as a simple and cost-effective alternative tool for laboratory use. The bioassay results from sulcotrione-spiked soil samples were confirmed with high-performance liquid chromatography.

  14. Expression Profile of Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase Genes in Summer Squash (Cucurbita pepo L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Verdejo, Clara I; Obrero, Ángeles; Román, Belén; Gómez, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Carotenoids are important dietary components that can be found in vegetable crops. The accumulation of these compounds in fruit and vegetables is altered by the activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) enzymes that produce their degradation. The aim of this work was to study the possible implication of CCD genes in preventing carotenoid storage in the horticultural crop summer squash (Cucurbita pepo L.). The relationship between the presence of these compounds and gene expression for CCDs was studied in three varieties showing different peel and flesh colour. Expression analysis for the CCD genes CpNCED1, CpNCED2, CpNCED3, CpNCED9, CpCCD1, CpCCD4a, CpCCD4b and CpCCD8 was carried out on different organs and at several fruit developmental stages. The results showed that the CpCCD4a and CpCCD4b genes were highly expressed in the variety with lowest carotenoid content suggesting a putative role in carotenoid accumulation pattern in summer squash fruit.

  15. Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenase DpgC+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding,E.; Widboom, P.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenases not dependent on accessory cofactors for activity. DpgC is in the biosynthetic pathway for the nonproteinogenic amino acid 3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in actinomycetes bacteria responsible for the production of the vancomycin/teicoplanin family of antibiotic natural products. The X-ray structure of DpgC confirmed the absence of cofactors and defined a novel hydrophobic dioxygen binding pocket adjacent to a bound substrate analogue. In this paper, the role specific amino acids play in substrate recognition and catalysis is examined through biochemical and structural characterization of site-specific enzyme mutations and alternate substrates. The results establish the importance of three amino acids, Arg254, Glu299, and Glu189, in the chemistry of DpgC. Arg254 and Glu189 join to form a specific contact with one of the phenolic hydroxyls of the substrate, and this interaction plays a key role in both substrate recognition and catalysis. The X-ray crystal structure of Arg254Lys was determined to address the role this residue plays in the chemistry. In addition, characterization of alternate substrate analogues demonstrates the presence and position of phenol groups are necessary for both enzyme recognition and downstream oxidation chemistry. Overall, this work defines the mechanism of substrate recognition and specificity by the cofactor-independent dioxygenase DpgC.

  16. Cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors in breast and genital cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Milan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors probably play the main role in carcinogenesis and metastasis. The metastasis process need external proteolytic activities that pass several barriers which are membranous structures of the connective tissue which includes, the basement membrane of blood vessels. Activities of the proteinases are regulated by endogenous inhibitors and activators. The imbalance between cysteine proteinases and cystatins seems to be associated with an increase in metastatic potential in some tumors. It has also been reported that proteinase inhibitors, specific antibodies for these enzymes and inhibition of the urokinase receptor may prevent cancer cell invasion. Some proteinase inhibitor could serve as agents for cancer treatment.

  17. Irreversible Oxidation of the Active-site Cysteine of Peroxiredoxin to Cysteine Sulfonic Acid for Enhanced Molecular Chaperone Activity*

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The thiol (–SH) of the active cysteine residue in peroxiredoxin (Prx) is known to be reversibly hyperoxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid (–SO2H), which can be reduced back to thiol by sulfiredoxin/sestrin. However, hyperoxidized Prx of an irreversible nature has not been reported yet. Using an antibody developed against the sulfonylated (–SO3H) yeast Prx (Tsa1p) active-site peptide (AFTFVCPTEI), we observed an increase in the immunoblot intensity in proportion to the ...

  18. Bioactivation of cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides by cysteine conjugate beta-lyase purified from Peptostreptococcus magnus.

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, K; Kinouchi, T; Akimoto, S; Ohnishi, Y

    1995-01-01

    To determine the role of cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase) in the metabolism of mutagenic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we determined the effect of beta-lyase on the mutagenicities and DNA binding of cysteine conjugates of 4,5-epoxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 4,5-oxide) and 9,10-epoxy-9,10-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 9,10-oxide), which are detoxified metabolites of the mutagenic compound 1-nitropyrene. We purified beta-lyase from Peptostreptococcus magnus GAI0663, since...

  19. Chloro(triphenylphosphole)gold(I) - A selective Chemosensor for Cysteine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maruthai Kumaravel; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Photophysical studies of luminescent gold complex of triphenylphosphole has been described. Addition of biologically relevant thio compounds was found to quench its fluorescence in methanol solution. Based on this, a simple and selective luminescence sensing method for cysteine detection has been developed.

  20. Role of cysteine residues in pseudouridine synthases of different families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, V; Swann, S L; Spedaliere, C J; Mueller, E G

    1999-10-01

    The pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine in RNA molecules. An attractive mechanism was proposed based on that of thymidylate synthase, in which the thiol(ate) group of a cysteine side chain serves as the nucleophile in a Michael addition to C6 of the isomerized uridine. Such a role for cysteine in the pseudouridine synthase TruA (also named Psi synthase I) has been discredited by site-directed mutagenesis, but sequence alignments have led to the conclusion that there are four distinct "families" of pseudouridine synthases that share no statistically significant global sequence similarity. It was, therefore, necessary to probe the role of cysteine residues in pseudouridine synthases of the families that do not include TruA. We examined the enzymes RluA and TruB, which are members of different families than TruA and each other. Substitution of cysteine for amino acids with nonnucleophilic side chains did not significantly alter the catalytic activity of either pseudouridine synthase. We conclude, therefore, that neither TruB nor RluA require thiol(ate) groups to effect catalysis, excluding their participation in a Michael addition to C6 of uridine, although not eliminating that mechanism (with an alternate nucleophile) from future consideration.

  1. Structure and Reactivity of the Cysteine Methyl Ester Radical Cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.; O' Hair, R. A. J.; Van Stipdonk, M.; Ryzhov, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure and reactivity of the cysteine methyl ester radical cation, CysOMe(center dot+), have been examined in the gas phase using a combination of experiment and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. CysOMe(center dot+) undergoes rapid ion molecule reactions with dimethyl disulfide, a

  2. Structure and Reactivity of the Cysteine Methyl Ester Radical Cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.; O' Hair, R. A. J.; Van Stipdonk, M.; Ryzhov, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure and reactivity of the cysteine methyl ester radical cation, CysOMe(center dot+), have been examined in the gas phase using a combination of experiment and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. CysOMe(center dot+) undergoes rapid ion molecule reactions with dimethyl disulfide,

  3. Acetaminophen inhibits liver trytophan-2,3-dioxygenase activity with a concomitant rise in brain serotonin levels and a reduction in urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya, S; Anoopkumar-Dukie, S

    2000-06-08

    The effect of the analgesic agent, acetaminophen was determined on rat forebrain serotonin levels as well as hepatic tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) activity and urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA). The results show that acetaminophen administration (100mg/kg) over three hours does not affect the holoenzyme of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase but significantly inhibits the apoenzyme. This inhibition is accompanied by a concomitant rise in forebrain serotonin levels. This phenomenon is also accompanied by a reduction in urinary 5-HIAA levels. These results suggest that acetaminophen use is accompanied by changes in brain serotonin levels due to inhibition of hepatic tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase activity. This in turn could explain the possible abuse potential of acetaminophen and its effects on mood at high doses.

  4. Spore and crystal formation in Bacillus thuringiensis var thuringiensis during growth in cystine and cysteine.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajalakshmi, S.; Shethna, YI

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the addition of different concentratons of cystine and cysteine on sporulation and parasporal crystal formation in Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis was studied. The effect was well pronounced when the systine/cysteine additions were made after the stationary phase. Heat stable spores and crystals were formed when the culture was provided with a low concentration of cystine/cysteine (0.05 per cent w/v). At a moderate concentration of cystine or cysteine (0.15%), only ...

  5. Functional analysis of alpha-DOX2, an active alpha-dioxygenase critical for normal development in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannenberg, Gerard; Martínez, Marta; Rodríguez, María José; López, Miguel Angel; Ponce de León, Inés; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2009-11-01

    Plant alpha-dioxygenases initiate the synthesis of oxylipins by catalyzing the incorporation of molecular oxygen at the alpha-methylene carbon atom of fatty acids. Previously, alpha-DOX1 has been shown to display alpha-dioxygenase activity and to be implicated in plant defense. In this study, we investigated the function of a second alpha-dioxygenase isoform, alpha-DOX2, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Recombinant Slalpha-DOX2 and Atalpha-DOX2 proteins catalyzed the conversion of a wide range of fatty acids into 2(R)-hydroperoxy derivatives. Expression of Slalpha-DOX2 and Atalpha-DOX2 was found in seedlings and increased during senescence induced by detachment of leaves. In contrast, microbial infection, earlier known to increase the expression of alpha-DOX1, did not alter the expression of Slalpha-DOX2 or Atalpha-DOX2. The tomato mutant divaricata, characterized by early dwarfing and anthocyanin accumulation, carries a mutation at the Slalpha-DOX2 locus and was chosen for functional studies of alpha-DOX2. Transcriptional changes in such mutants showed the up-regulation of genes playing roles in lipid and phenylpropanoid metabolism, the latter being in consonance with the anthocyanin accumulation. Transgenic expression of Atalpha-DOX2 and Slalpha-DOX2 in divaricata partially complemented the compromised phenotype in mature plants and fully complemented it in seedlings, thus indicating the functional exchangeability between alpha-DOX2 from tomato and Arabidopsis. However, deletion of Atalpha-DOX2 in Arabidopsis plants did not provoke any visible phenotypic alteration indicating that the relative importance of alpha-DOX2 in plant physiology is species specific.

  6. Resonance Raman study on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: Control of reactivity by substrate-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Hara, Masayuki [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Koto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ogura, Takashi, E-mail: ogura@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: • Indoleamine 2,3-dioygenase has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. • Trp-binding to the enzyme induces high frequency shift of the Fe–His stretching mode. • Increased imidazolate character of histidine promotes the O–O bond cleavage step. • A fine-tuning of the reactivity of the O–O bond cleavage reaction is identified. • The results are consistent with the sequential oxygen-atom-transfer mechanism. - Abstract: Resonance Raman spectra of ligand-bound complexes including the 4-phenylimidazole complex and of free and L-Trp-bound forms of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in the ferric state were examined. Effects on the vinyl and propionate substituent groups of the heme were detected in a ligand-dependent fashion. The effects of phenyl group of 4-phenylimidazole on the vinyl and propionate Raman bands were evident when compared with the case of imidazole ligand. Substrate binding to the ferrous protein caused an upshift of the iron–histidine stretching mode by 3 cm{sup −1}, indicating an increase in negativity of the imidazole ring, which favors the O–O bond cleavage. The substrate binding event is likely to be communicated from the heme distal side to the iron–histidine bond through heme substituent groups and the hydrogen-bond network which includes water molecules, as identified in an X-ray structure of a 4-phenylimidazole complex. The results provide evidence for fine-tuning of the reactivity of O–O bond cleavage by the oxygenated heme upon binding of L-Trp.

  7. The immune system strikes back: cellular immune responses against indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Baek Sørensen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO exerts an well established immunosuppressive function in cancer. IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it promotes the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tumor antigens. In the present study, we tested the notion whether IDO itself may be subject to immune responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The presence of naturally occurring IDO-specific CD8 T cells in cancer patients was determined by MHC/peptide stainings as well as ELISPOT. Antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL from the peripheral blood of cancer patients were cloned and expanded. The functional capacity of the established CTL clones was examined by chrome release assays. The study unveiled spontaneous cytotoxic T-cell reactivity against IDO in peripheral blood as well as in the tumor microenvironment of different cancer patients. We demonstrate that these IDO reactive T cells are indeed peptide specific, cytotoxic effector cells. Hence, IDO reactive T cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells including directly isolated AML blasts as well as IDO-expressing dendritic cells, i.e. one of the major immune suppressive cell populations. CONCLUSION: IDO may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Furthermore, as emerging evidence suggests that IDO constitutes a significant counter-regulatory mechanism induced by pro-inflammatory signals, IDO-based immunotherapy holds the promise to boost anti-cancer immunotherapy in general.

  8. Robust crop resistance to broadleaf and grass herbicides provided by aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase transgenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Terry R.; Shan, Guomin; Walsh, Terence A.; Lira, Justin M.; Cui, Cory; Song, Ping; Zhuang, Meibao; Arnold, Nicole L.; Lin, Gaofeng; Yau, Kerrm; Russell, Sean M.; Cicchillo, Robert M.; Peterson, Mark A.; Simpson, David M.; Zhou, Ning; Ponsamuel, Jayakumar; Zhang, Zhanyuan

    2010-01-01

    Engineered glyphosate resistance is the most widely adopted genetically modified trait in agriculture, gaining widespread acceptance by providing a simple robust weed control system. However, extensive and sustained use of glyphosate as a sole weed control mechanism has led to field selection for glyphosate-resistant weeds and has induced significant population shifts to weeds with inherent tolerance to glyphosate. Additional weed control mechanisms that can complement glyphosate-resistant crops are, therefore, urgently needed. 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is an effective low-cost, broad-spectrum herbicide that controls many of the weeds developing resistance to glyphosate. We investigated the substrate preferences of bacterial aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase enzymes (AADs) that can effectively degrade 2,4-D and have found that some members of this class can act on other widely used herbicides in addition to their activity on 2,4-D. AAD-1 cleaves the aryloxyphenoxypropionate family of grass-active herbicides, and AAD-12 acts on pyridyloxyacetate auxin herbicides such as triclopyr and fluroxypyr. Maize plants transformed with an AAD-1 gene showed robust crop resistance to aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides over four generations and were also not injured by 2,4-D applications at any growth stage. Arabidopsis plants expressing AAD-12 were resistant to 2,4-D as well as triclopyr and fluroxypyr, and transgenic soybean plants expressing AAD-12 maintained field resistance to 2,4-D over five generations. These results show that single AAD transgenes can provide simultaneous resistance to a broad repertoire of agronomically important classes of herbicides, including 2,4-D, with utility in both monocot and dicot crops. These transgenes can help preserve the productivity and environmental benefits of herbicide-resistant crops. PMID:21059954

  9. Characteristics and function of sulfur dioxygenase in Echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litao Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sulfide is a common toxin to animals and is abundant in coastal and aquatic sediments. Sulfur dioxygenase (SDO is thought to be the key enzyme involved in sulfide oxidation in some organisms. The echiuran worm, Urechis unicinctus, inhabits coastal sediment and tolerates high concentrations of sulfide. The SDO is presumably important for sulfide tolerance in U. unicinctus. RESULTS: The full-length cDNA of SDO from the echiuran worm U. unicinctus, proven to be located in the mitochondria, was cloned and the analysis of its sequence suggests that it belongs to the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily. The enzyme was produced using an E. coli expression system and the measured activity is approximately 0.80 U mg protein(-1. Furthermore, the expression of four sub-segments of the U. unicinctus SDO was accomplished leading to preliminary identification of functional domains of the enzyme. The identification of the conserved metal I (H113, H115, H169 and D188, metal II (D117, H118, H169 and H229 as well as the potential glutathione (GSH (R197, Y231, M279 and I283 binding sites was determined by enzyme activity and GSH affinity measurements. The key residues responsible for SDO activity were identified by analysis of simultaneous mutations of residues D117 and H118 located close to the metal II binding site. CONCLUSION: The recombinant SDO from U. unicinctus was produced, purified and characterized. The metal binding sites in the SDO were identified and Y231 recognized as the mostly important amino acid residue for GSH binding. Our results show that SDO is located in the mitochondria where it plays an important role in sulfide detoxification of U. unicinctus.

  10. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N. [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, Rafael M. [Biology of Host Parasite Interactions Unit, Institute Pasteur, 75015 Paris (France); Braz, Gloria R.C. [Department of Biochemistry, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tanaka, Aparecida S., E-mail: Tanaka.bioq@epm.br [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  11. Glutathione, cysteine, and ascorbate concentrations in clinically ill dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviano, K R; Lavergne, S N; Goodman, L; Vanderwielen, B; Grundahl, L; Padilla, M; Trepanier, L A

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of many systemic diseases. Hospitalized human patients are glutathione, cysteine, and ascorbate deficient, and antioxidant depletion has been correlated with poor clinical outcome. To date little is known about antioxidant concentrations in hospitalized veterinary patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ascorbate, cysteine, or glutathione depletion is present in ill dogs and cats compared with healthy controls. Clinically ill dogs and cats would be antioxidant depleted, and depletion would correlate with illness severity and clinical outcome. Clinically ill client-owned dogs (n = 61) and cats (n = 37), healthy control dogs (n = 37) and cats (n = 33). Prospective, observational, case control study. Erythrocyte reduced glutathione, plasma cysteine, and plasma ascorbate were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Clinically ill dogs had significantly lower erythrocyte glutathione concentrations (1.22 mM, range 0.55-3.61) compared with controls (1.91 mM, range 0.87-3.51; P = .0004), and glutathione depletion correlated with both illness severity (P = .038) and mortality (P = .010). Cats had higher ascorbate concentrations when ill (10.65 microM, range 1.13-25.26) compared with controls (3.68 microM, range 0.36-13.57; P = .0009). Clinically ill dogs had decreased erythrocyte glutathione concentrations, which could be a marker of illness severity and prognostic of a poor outcome. Clinically ill cats had an unexpectedly high plasma ascorbate, which could represent a unique species response to oxidative stress.

  12. Cysteine-Mediated Gene Expression and Characterization of the CmbR Regulon in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Manzoor, Irfan; Kuipers, Oscar P; Shafeeq, Sulman

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to cysteine. Transcriptome comparison of the D39 wild-type grown at a restricted concentration of cysteine (0.03 mM) to one grown at a high concentration of cysteine (50 mM) in chemically-defined medium (CDM)

  13. Introgression of leginsulin, a cysteine-rich protein, and high-protein trait from an Asian soybean plant introduction genotype into a North American experimental soybean line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean is an important protein source for both humans and animals. However, soybean proteins are relatively poor in the sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Improving the content of endogenous proteins rich in sulfur containing amino acids could enhance the nutritive value of soy...

  14. Structural Basis for Substrate and Oxygen Activation in Homoprotocatechuate 2,3-Dioxygenase: Roles of Conserved Active Site Histidine-200

    OpenAIRE

    Kovaleva, Elena G.; Rogers, Melanie S.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have shown that the conserved active site residue His200 of the extradiol ring-cleaving homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (FeHPCD) from Brevibacterium fuscum is critical for efficient catalysis. The roles played by this residue are probed here by analysis of the steady state kinetics, pH dependence, and X-ray crystal structures of the FeHPCD position 200 variants His200Asn, His200Gln, and His200Glu alone and in complex with three catecholic substrates (homo...

  15. Purification and properties of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase from Chaetomium piluliferum induced with p-hydroxybenzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaś-Wasilewska, M; Trojanowski, J

    1980-01-01

    1. Protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (protocatechuate : oxygen 3,4-oxidoreductase, EC 1.13.11.3) was isolated from mycelium of Chaetomium piluliferum induced with p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The enzyme was purified about 80-fold by ammonium sulphate fractionation and DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex G-200 chromatography, and was homogeneous on polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 2. The enzyme showed high substrate specificity; its pH optimum was 7.5-8.0, and molecula weight about 76 000 as determined by filtration on Sephadex G-200. The Michaelis constant for protocatechuic acid was 11.1 microM.

  16. Protective effect of N-acetyl cysteine against chemical hypoxia-induced injury to an immortal human skin keratinocyte line HaCaT%N-乙酰半胱氨酸对化学性缺氧引起HaCaT细胞损伤的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张美芬; 杨春涛; 杨战利; 孟金兰; 曾凡钦; 韩艳芳; 陈培熹; 冯鉴强

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate the influences of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on a chemical hypoxiamimetic agent CoCl2 induced-injury to, and expressions of inflammatory factors by, an immortal human skin keratinocyte line HaCaT. Methods HaCaT cells were treated with CoCl2 of 2000 μmol/L for 4 hours to set up a chemical hypoxia-induced cell model of skin injury. NAC of various concentrations ( 1000, 2000, 3000 μmol/L)was used to pretreat HaCaT cells for 2 hours prior to the establishment of cell model. After these treatments,cell viability was detected by cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8), the levels of interleukin 6 and 8 (IL-6 and -8) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in culture supernatant by ELISA kits, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by rhodamine 123 (Rh123) staining and photofluorography, intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH)content by glutathione detection kit. Results An obvious decline was observed in HaCaT cell viability after pretreatment with various concentrations of NAC for 2 hours. The treatment with CoCl2 of 2000 μmol/L for 4 hours induced an elevation in the supernatant levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and a decrease in GSH content and MMP, while the pretreatment with NAC for 2 hours retarded the CoCl2-induced increase in IL-6 and IL-8 levels as well as decrease in GSH content and MMP. Conclusion The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger NAC can protect against CoCl2-induced injury to and inflammatory reaction in HaCaT cells, which may be associated with a decrement in oxidative stress.%目的 探讨N-乙酰半胱氨酸(NAC)能否保护人皮肤永生化角质形成细胞(HaCaT)对抗化学性低氧模拟剂氯化钴(CoCl2)诱导的损伤及对炎症因子的影响.方法 用2000 μmol/L CoCl2处理HaCaT细胞,建立化学性低氧诱导皮肤细胞损伤的实验模型.应用CCK-8比色法检测细胞存活率;ELISA试剂盒检测细胞培养基中IL-6、IL-8和TNF-α的水平;罗丹明123(Rh123)染色/荣光显微镜照相术检测线粒体膜电

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography assay of cysteine and homocysteine using fluorosurfactant-functionalized gold nanoparticles as postcolumn resonance light scattering reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qunyan; Gao, Huiling; Yuan, Qipeng; Lu, Chao; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-01-25

    Herein, a new postcolumn resonance light scattering (RLS) detection approach coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed to detect cysteine and homocysteine. In the established system, the fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were first employed as postcolumn RLS reagents. The detection principle was based on the enhancement of RLS intensity of AuNPs upon the addition of cysteine/homocysteine. The RLS signals were detected by a common fluorescence detector at λ(EX)=λ(EM)=560 nm. The linear ranges for both cysteine and homocysteine were in the range of 5.0-50 μM. The detection limits were 5.9 pmol for cysteine and 12 pmol for homocysteine at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. HPLC separation and RLS detection conditions were optimized in detail. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by detecting cysteine and homocysteine in human urine samples. Recoveries from spiked urine samples were 95.0-103.0%.

  18. Non-invasive imaging of cysteine cathepsin activity in solid tumors using a 64Cu-labeled activity-based probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Ren

    Full Text Available The papain family of cysteine cathepsins are actively involved in multiple stages of tumorigenesis. Because elevated cathepsin activity can be found in many types of human cancers, they are promising biomarkers that can be used to target radiological contrast agents for tumor detection. However, currently there are no radiological imaging agents available for these important molecular targets. We report here the development of positron emission tomography (PET radionuclide-labeled probes that target the cysteine cathepsins by formation of an enzyme activity-dependent bond with the active site cysteine. These probes contain an acyloxymethyl ketone (AOMK functional group that irreversibly labels the active site cysteine of papain family proteases attached to a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA tag for labeling with (64Cu for PET imaging studies. We performed biodistribution and microPET imaging studies in nude mice bearing subcutaneous tumors expressing various levels of cysteine cathepsin activity and found that the extent of probe uptake by tumors correlated with overall protease activity as measured by biochemical methods. Furthermore, probe signals could be reduced by pre-treatment with a general cathepsin inhibitor. We also found that inclusion of a Cy5 tag on the probe increased tumor uptake relative to probes lacking this fluorogenic dye. Overall, these results demonstrate that small molecule activity-based probes carrying radio-tracers can be used to image protease activity in living subjects.

  19. Molecular cloning of a cysteine proteinase cDNA from adult Ancylostoma ceylanicum by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends using polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszczanek, J; Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2000-12-01

    The hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum is a parasite of great importance in human and veterinary medicine. The most promising vaccination trials against hookworm infections are based on antigens belonging to the proteinase family. The aim of the present research was to isolate a cysteine proteinase gene from A. ceylanicum. This was achieved by rapid amplification of cDNA ends using polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). A set of consensus oligonucleotide primers was designed to anneal to the conserved coding regions of cysteine proteinase. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. The novel sequence displayed a high degree of homology with genes of cysteine proteinases known from other hookworm species. In the coding region the nucleotide identity with accp-1, the cysteine proteinase gene of A. caninum, reaches 84.3%. Analysis of the expression of acey-1. the cysteine proteinase gene of A. ceylanicum, suggests that it is produced exclusively in the gland cells of either adult worms or blood-feeding stages of A. ceylanicum.

  20. Determination of cysteine, homocysteine, cystine, and homocystine in biological fluids by HPLC using fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles as postcolumn colorimetric reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Lu, Biqi; Lu, Chao; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time the suitability of fluorosurfactant-capped spherical gold nanoparticles as HPLC postcolumn colorimetric reagents for the direct assay of cysteine, homocysteine, cystine, and homocystine. The success of this work was based on the use of an on-line tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine reduction column for cystine and homocystine. Several parameters affecting the separation efficiency and the postcolumn colorimetric detection were thoroughly investigated. Under the optimized conditions, cysteine, homocysteine, cystine, and homocystine in human urine and plasma samples were determined. Detection limits for cysteine, homocysteine, cystine, and homocystine ranged from 0.16-0.49 μM. The accuracy in terms of recoveries ranged between 94.0-102.1%. This proposed method was rapid, inexpensive, and simple.

  1. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  2. A proteomic approach to verify in vivo expression of a novel gamma-gliadin containing an extra cysteine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Paola; Masci, Stefania; D'Ovidio, Renato; Lafiandra, Domenico; Volpi, Chiara; Mattei, Benedetta

    2006-03-01

    Gliadins and glutenins are the main protein fractions present in wheat gluten. They are responsible for technological and nutritional quality of wheat based products. In particular, glutenins are mainly responsible for dough visco-elastic properties, whereas gliadins confer extensibility to dough and are the most important factor triggering celiac disease, the major human intolerance to gluten. Gliadins are monomeric proteins, whereas glutenins are polymers stabilized by disulfide bonds. Although they have distinctive structural characteristics, it is possible that some gliadins become part of the glutenin fraction because of mutations that affect cysteine number and distribution. Here, we provide evidence that a naturally mutated gamma-gliadin with an extra cysteine residue is incorporated into the polymeric fraction. This goal was achieved using an integrated approach involving heterologous expression, 2-DE, RP-HPLC and MS.

  3. Entamoeba histolytica HM1:IMSS: hemoglobin-degrading neutral cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Luna, J J; Negrete, E; Reyes, M; de la Garza, M

    1998-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica HMI:IMSS trophozoites were able to utilize human hemoglobin but not hemin as a sole iron source to grow in vitro. Proteases from crude extracts of E. histolytica degraded human, porcine, and bovine hemoglobins at pH 7.0. These proteolytic activities were found by electrophoresis in SDS-polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with hemoglobin, with apparent molecular weights of 116, 82, and 21 kDa, the 82-kDa protein being the most active protease against this substrate. The proteases were classified in the cysteine group since the activities were inhibited by l-trans-epoxysuccinylleucylamido(4-guanidino)butane, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, iodoacetate, and N-ethylmaleimide and activated with dithiothreitol. Other pathogenic strains of E. histolytica showed the same pattern of hemoglobinases. These hemoglobin-degrading proteases could be playing an important role in iron acquisition by E. histolytica.

  4. Identification of natural inhibitors of Entamoeba histolytica cysteine synthase from microbial secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mihoko; Jeelani, Ghulam; Masuda, Yui; Sakai, Kazunari; Tsukui, Kumiko; Waluyo, Danang; Tarwadi; Watanabe, Yoshio; Nonaka, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Shiomi, Kazuro

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is a common worldwide diarrheal disease, caused by the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its known side effects and low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers. E. histolytica is also capable of surviving sub-therapeutic levels of metronidazole in vitro. Novel drugs with different mode of action are therefore urgently needed. The sulfur assimilatory de novo L-cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for various cellular activities, including the proliferation and anti-oxidative defense of E. histolytica. Since the pathway, consisting of two reactions catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase), does not exist in humans, it is a rational drug target against amebiasis. To discover inhibitors against the CS of E. histolytica (EhCS), the compounds of Kitasato Natural Products Library were screened against two recombinant CS isozymes: EhCS1 and EhCS3. Nine compounds inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3 with IC50 values of 0.31-490 μM. Of those, seven compounds share a naphthoquinone moiety, indicating the structural importance of the moiety for binding to the active site of EhCS1 and EhCS3. We further screened >9,000 microbial broths for CS inhibition and purified two compounds, xanthofulvin and exophillic acid from fungal broths. Xanthofulvin inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3. Exophillic acid showed high selectivity against EhCS1, but exhibited no inhibition against EhCS3. In vitro anti-amebic activity of the 11 EhCS inhibitors was also examined. Deacetylkinamycin C and nanaomycin A showed more potent amebicidal activity with IC50 values of 18 and 0.8 μM, respectively, in the cysteine deprived conditions. The differential sensitivity of trophozoites against deacetylkinamycin C in the presence or absence of L-cysteine in the medium and the IC50 values against EhCS suggest the amebicidal effect of deacetylkinamycin C is due to CS

  5. Identification of natural inhibitors of Entamoeba histolytica cysteine synthase from microbial secondary metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihoko eMori

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis is a common worldwide diarrheal disease, caused by the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its known side effects and low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers. E. histolytica is also capable of surviving sub-therapeutic levels of metronidazole in vitro. Novel drugs with different mode of action are therefore urgently needed. The sulfur assimilatory de novo L-cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for various cellular activities, including the proliferation and anti-oxidative defense of E. histolytica. Since the pathway, consisting of two reactions catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SAT and cysteine synthase (CS, O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase, does not exist in humans, it is a rational drug target against amebiasis. To discover inhibitors against the CS of E. histolytica (EhCS, the compounds of Kitasato Natural Products Library were screened against two recombinant CS isozymes: EhCS1 and EhCS3. Nine compounds inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3 with IC50 values of 0.31-490 μM. Of those, seven compounds share a naphthoquinone moiety, indicating the structural importance of the moiety for binding to the active site of EhCS1 and EhCS3.We further screened >9,000 microbial broths for CS inhibition and purified two compounds, xanthofulvin and exophillic acid from fungal broths. Xanthofulvin inhibited EhCS1 and EhCS3. Exophillic acid showed high selectivity against EhCS1, but exhibited no inhibition against EhCS3. In vitro anti-amebic activity of the 11 EhCS inhibitors was also examined. Deacetylkinamycin, deoxyfrenolicin, and nanaomycin A showed more potent amebicidal activity with IC50 values of 0.3-11 μM in the cysteine deprived conditions. The differential sensitivity of trophozoites against deacetylkinamycin in the presence or absence of L-cysteine in the medium and the IC50 values against EhCS suggest the amebicidal effect of deacetylkinamycin is

  6. Heterologous expression and purification of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    2011-01-01

    The mobilization of protein during germination of barley seeds is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction...... of the active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. The barley key cysteine protease, endoprotease...

  7. Characterization of a family of novel cysteine- serine-rich nuclear proteins (CSRNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Gingras

    Full Text Available Gene array analysis has been widely used to identify genes induced during T cell activation. Our studies identified an immediate early gene that is strongly induced in response to IL-2 in mouse T cells which we named cysteine- serine-rich nuclear protein-1 (CSRNP-1. The human ortholog was previously identified as an AXIN1 induced gene (AXUD1. The protein does not contain sequence defined domains or motifs annotated in public databases, however the gene is a member of a family of three mammalian genes that share conserved regions, including cysteine- and serine-rich regions and a basic domain, they encode nuclear proteins, possess transcriptional activation domain and bind the sequence AGAGTG. Consequently we propose the nomenclature of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3 for the family. To elucidate the physiological functions of CSRNP-1, -2 and -3, we generated mice deficient for each of these genes by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Although the CSRNP proteins have the hallmark of transcription factors and CSRNP-1 expression is highly induced by IL-2, deletion of the individual genes had no obvious consequences on normal mouse development, hematopoiesis or T cell functions. However, combined deficiencies cause partial neonatal lethality suggesting that the genes have redundant functions.

  8. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  9. Improved detection specificity for plasma proteins by targeting cysteine-containing peptides with photo-SRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjalbert, Quentin; Girod, Marion; Simon, Romain; Jeudy, Jérémy; Chirot, Fabien; Salvador, Arnaud; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Lemoine, Jérôme

    2013-03-01

    Targeted mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) has emerged as an alternative to immunoassays for protein quantification owing to faster development time and higher multiplexing capability. However, the SRM strategy is faced with the high complexity of peptide mixtures after trypsin digestion of whole plasma or the cellular proteome that most of the time causes contamination, irremediably, by interfering compounds in the transition channels monitored. This problem becomes increasingly acute when the targeted protein is present at a low concentration. In this work, the merit of laser-induced photo-dissociation in the visible region at 473 nm implemented in an hybrid quadrupole linear ion-trap mass spectrometer (photo-SRM) was evaluated for detection specificity of cysteine-containing peptides in a group of plasma proteins after tagging with a dabcyl chromophore. Compared with conventional SRM, photo-SRM chromatograms have improved detection specificity for most of peptides monitored. Comparison of the signals obtained for the best proteotypic peptides in SRM mode and those recorded by photo-SRM of cysteine-containing peptides for the same proteins reveals either increased (up to 10-fold) or similar signal to photo-SRM detection. Finally, photo-SRM has extended response linearity across a calibration plot obtained by diluting human plasma in rat plasma, down to the lowest concentrations. Hence, photo-SRM may advantageously complement conventional SRM in assay of proteins in complex biological matrices.

  10. Chemical and Biological Properties of S-1-Propenyl-ʟ-Cysteine in Aged Garlic Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihioro Kodera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available S-1-Propenyl-ʟ-cysteine (S1PC is a stereoisomer of S-1-Propenyl-ʟ-cysteine (SAC, an important sulfur-containing amino acid that plays a role for the beneficial pharmacological effects of aged garlic extract (AGE. The existence of S1PC in garlic preparations has been known since the 1960’s. However, there was no report regarding the biological and/or pharmacological activity of S1PC until 2016. Recently, we performed a series of studies to examine the chemical, biological, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of S1PC, and obtained some interesting results. S1PC existed only in trace amounts in raw garlic, but its concentration increased almost up to the level similar of SAC through aging process of AGE. S1PC showed immunomodulatory effects in vitro and in vivo, and reduced blood pressure in a hypertensive animal model. A pharmacokinetic study revealed that S1PC was readily absorbed after oral administration in rats and dogs with bioavailability of 88–100%. Additionally, S1PC had little inhibitory influence on human cytochrome P450 activities, even at a concentration of 1 mM. Based on these findings, S1PC was suggested to be another important, pharmacologically active and safe component of AGE similar to SAC. In this review, we highlight some results from recent studies on S1PC and discuss the potential medicinal value of S1PC.

  11. Chemical and Biological Properties of S-1-Propenyl-l-Cysteine in Aged Garlic Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, Yukihioro; Ushijima, Mitsuyasu; Amano, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Jun-Ichiro; Matsutomo, Toshiaki

    2017-03-31

    S-1-Propenyl-l-cysteine (S1PC) is a stereoisomer of S-1-Propenyl-l-cysteine (SAC), an important sulfur-containing amino acid that plays a role for the beneficial pharmacological effects of aged garlic extract (AGE). The existence of S1PC in garlic preparations has been known since the 1960's. However, there was no report regarding the biological and/or pharmacological activity of S1PC until 2016. Recently, we performed a series of studies to examine the chemical, biological, pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of S1PC, and obtained some interesting results. S1PC existed only in trace amounts in raw garlic, but its concentration increased almost up to the level similar of SAC through aging process of AGE. S1PC showed immunomodulatory effects in vitro and in vivo, and reduced blood pressure in a hypertensive animal model. A pharmacokinetic study revealed that S1PC was readily absorbed after oral administration in rats and dogs with bioavailability of 88-100%. Additionally, S1PC had little inhibitory influence on human cytochrome P450 activities, even at a concentration of 1 mM. Based on these findings, S1PC was suggested to be another important, pharmacologically active and safe component of AGE similar to SAC. In this review, we highlight some results from recent studies on S1PC and discuss the potential medicinal value of S1PC.

  12. Cloning and mutagenesis of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene from the gram-positive Planococcus sp. strain S5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Stawicka, Agnieszka; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene that encodes a 307- amino-acid protein was cloned from Planococcus sp. S5. The protein was identified to be a member of the superfamily I, subfamily 2A of extradiol dioxygenases. In order to study residues and regions affecting the enzyme's catalytic parameters, the c23o gene was randomly mutated by error-prone PCR. The wild-type enzyme and mutants containing substitutions within either the C-terminal or both domains were functionally produced in Escherichia coli and their activity towards catechol was characterized. The C23OB65 mutant with R296Q substitution showed significant tolerance to acidic pH with an optimum at pH 5.0. In addition, it showed activity more than 1.5 as high as that of the wild type enzyme and its Km was 2.5 times lower. It also showed altered sensitivity to substrate inhibition. The results indicate that residue at position 296 plays a role in determining pH dependence of the enzyme and its activity. Lower activity toward catechol was shown for mutants C23OB58 and C23OB81. Despite lower activity, these mutants showed higher affinity to catechol and were more sensitive to substrate concentration than nonmutated enzyme.

  13. Multistep conversion of para-substituted phenols by phenol hydroxylase and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanyuan; Shi, Shengnan; Ma, Qiao; Kong, Chunlei; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Xuwang; Zhou, Jiti

    2013-04-01

    A multistep conversion system of para-substituted phenols by recombinant phenol hydroxylase (PH(IND)) and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase (BphC(LA-4)) was constructed in this study. Docking studies with different para-substituted phenols and corresponding catechols inside of the active site of PH(IND) and BphC(LA-4) predicted that all the substrates should be transformed. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that the products of multistep conversion were the corresponding para-substituted catechols and semialdehydes. For the first-step conversion, the formation rate of 4-fluorocatechol (0.39 μM/min/mg dry weight) by strain PH(IND) hydroxylation was 1.15, 6.50, 3.00, and 1.18-fold higher than the formation of 4-chlorocatechol, 4-bromocatechol, 4-nitrocatechol, and 4-methylcatechol, respectively. For the second-step conversion, the formation rates of semialdehydes by strain BphC(LA-4) were as follows: 5-fluoro-HODA>5-chloro-HODA>2-hydroxy-5-nitro-ODA>5-bromo-HODA>2-hydroxy-5-methyl-ODA. The present study suggested that the multistep conversion by both ring hydroxylase and cleavage dioxygenase should be potential in the synthesis of industrial precursors and provide a novel avenue in the wastewater recycling treatment.

  14. Overexpression of the rice carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 gene in Golden Rice endosperm suggests apocarotenoids as substrates in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Andrea; Yu, Qiuju; Schaub, Patrick; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-08-01

    Carotenoids are converted by carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases that catalyze oxidative cleavage reactions leading to apocarotenoids. However, apocarotenoids can also be further truncated by some members of this enzyme family. The plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 (CCD1) subfamily is known to degrade both carotenoids and apocarotenoids in vitro, leading to different volatile compounds. In this study, we investigated the impact of the rice CCD1 (OsCCD1) on the pigmentation of Golden Rice 2 (GR2), a genetically modified rice variety accumulating carotenoids in the endosperm. For this purpose, the corresponding cDNA was introduced into the rice genome under the control of an endosperm-specific promoter in sense and anti-sense orientations. Despite high expression levels of OsCCD1 in sense plants, pigment analysis revealed carotenoid levels and patterns comparable to those of GR2, pleading against carotenoids as substrates in rice endosperm. In support, similar carotenoid contents were determined in anti-sense plants. To check whether OsCCD1 overexpressed in GR2 endosperm is active, in vitro assays were performed with apocarotenoid substrates. HPLC analysis confirmed the cleavage activity of introduced OsCCD1. Our data indicate that apocarotenoids rather than carotenoids are the substrates of OsCCD1 in planta.

  15. Activity of a Carboxyl-Terminal Truncated Form of Catechol 2,3-Dioxygenase from Planococcus sp. S5

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    Katarzyna Hupert-Kocurek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catechol 2,3-dioxygenases (C23Os, E.C.1.13.12.2 are two domain enzymes that catalyze degradation of monoaromatic hydrocarbons. The catalytically active C-domain of all known C23Os comprises ferrous ion ligands as well as residues forming active site pocket. The aim of this work was to examine and discuss the effect of nonsense mutation at position 289 on the activity of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Planococcus strain. Although the mutant C23O showed the same optimal temperature for activity as the wild-type protein (35°C, it exhibited activity slightly more tolerant to alkaline pH. Mutant enzyme exhibited also higher affinity to catechol as a substrate. Its Km (66.17 µM was approximately 30% lower than that of wild-type enzyme. Interestingly, removal of the C-terminal residues resulted in 1.5- to 1.8-fold (P<0.05 increase in the activity of C23OB61 against 4-methylcatechol and 4-chlorocatechol, respectively, while towards catechol the activity of the protein dropped to about 80% of that of the wild-type enzyme. The results obtained may facilitate the engineering of the C23O for application in the bioremediation of polluted areas.

  16. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

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    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  17. Fluoresence quenching of riboflavin in aqueous solution by methionin and cystein

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    Droessler, P.; Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Hegemann, P

    2003-01-15

    The fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes of riboflavin in methanol, DMSO, water, and aqueous solutions of the sulphur atom containing amino acids methionin and cystein have been determined. In methanol, DMSO, and water (pH=4-8) only dynamic fluorescence reduction due to intersystem crossing and internal conversion is observed. In aqueous methionin solutions of pH=5.25-9 a pH independent static and dynamic fluorescence quenching occurs probably due to riboflavin anion-methionin cation pair formation. In aqueous cystein solutions (pH range from 4.15 to 9) the fluorescence quenching increases with rising pH due to cystein thiolate formation. The cystein thiol form present at low pH does not react with neutral riboflavin. Cystein thiolate present at high pH seems to react with neutral riboflavin causing riboflavin deprotonation (anion formation) by cystein thiolate reduction to the cystein thiol form.

  18. Fluoresence quenching of riboflavin in aqueous solution by methionin and cystein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drössler, P.; Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Hegemann, P.

    2003-01-01

    The fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes of riboflavin in methanol, DMSO, water, and aqueous solutions of the sulphur atom containing amino acids methionin and cystein have been determined. In methanol, DMSO, and water (pH=4-8) only dynamic fluorescence reduction due to intersystem crossing and internal conversion is observed. In aqueous methionin solutions of pH=5.25-9 a pH independent static and dynamic fluorescence quenching occurs probably due to riboflavin anion-methionin cation pair formation. In aqueous cystein solutions (pH range from 4.15 to 9) the fluorescence quenching increases with rising pH due to cystein thiolate formation. The cystein thiol form present at low pH does not react with neutral riboflavin. Cystein thiolate present at high pH seems to react with neutral riboflavin causing riboflavin deprotonation (anion formation) by cystein thiolate reduction to the cystein thiol form.

  19. Cysteine Peptidases as Schistosomiasis Vaccines with Inbuilt Adjuvanticity

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    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem; Selim, Sahar; Donnelly, Sheila; Cotton, Sophie; Gonzales Santana, Bibiana; Dalton, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is caused by several worm species of the genus Schistosoma and afflicts up to 600 million people in 74 tropical and sub-tropical countries in the developing world. Present disease control depends on treatment with the only available drug praziquantel. No vaccine exists despite the intense search for molecular candidates and adjuvant formulations over the last three decades. Cysteine peptidases such as papain and Der p 1 are well known environmental allergens that sensitize the immune system driving potent Th2-responses. Recently, we showed that the administration of active papain to mice induced significant protection (P<0.02, 50%) against an experimental challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Since schistosomes express and secrete papain-like cysteine peptidases we reasoned that these could be employed as vaccines with inbuilt adjuvanticity to protect against these parasites. Here we demonstrate that sub-cutaneous injection of functionally active S. mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1), or a cathepsin L from a related parasite Fasciola hepatica (FhCL1), elicits highly significant (P<0.0001) protection (up to 73%) against an experimental challenge worm infection. Protection and reduction in worm egg burden were further increased (up to 83%) when the cysteine peptidases were combined with other S. mansoni vaccine candidates, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH) and peroxiredoxin (PRX-MAP), without the need to add chemical adjuvants. These studies demonstrate the capacity of helminth cysteine peptidases to behave simultaneously as immunogens and adjuvants, and offer an innovative approach towards developing schistosomiasis vaccines PMID:24465551

  20. Cysteine Activated Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Donors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Hua; Xian, Ming

    2010-01-01

    H2S, the newly discovered gasotransmitter, plays important roles in biological systems. However, the research on H2S has been hindered by lacking controllable H2S donors which could mimic the slow and continuous H2S generation process in vivo. Herein we report a series of cysteine-activated H2S donors. Structural modifications on these molecules can regulate the rates of H2S generation. These compounds can be useful tools in H2S research.

  1. Cysteine peptidases as schistosomiasis vaccines with inbuilt adjuvanticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashika El Ridi

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is caused by several worm species of the genus Schistosoma and afflicts up to 600 million people in 74 tropical and sub-tropical countries in the developing world. Present disease control depends on treatment with the only available drug praziquantel. No vaccine exists despite the intense search for molecular candidates and adjuvant formulations over the last three decades. Cysteine peptidases such as papain and Der p 1 are well known environmental allergens that sensitize the immune system driving potent Th2-responses. Recently, we showed that the administration of active papain to mice induced significant protection (P<0.02, 50% against an experimental challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Since schistosomes express and secrete papain-like cysteine peptidases we reasoned that these could be employed as vaccines with inbuilt adjuvanticity to protect against these parasites. Here we demonstrate that sub-cutaneous injection of functionally active S. mansoni cathepsin B1 (SmCB1, or a cathepsin L from a related parasite Fasciola hepatica (FhCL1, elicits highly significant (P<0.0001 protection (up to 73% against an experimental challenge worm infection. Protection and reduction in worm egg burden were further increased (up to 83% when the cysteine peptidases were combined with other S. mansoni vaccine candidates, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH and peroxiredoxin (PRX-MAP, without the need to add chemical adjuvants. These studies demonstrate the capacity of helminth cysteine peptidases to behave simultaneously as immunogens and adjuvants, and offer an innovative approach towards developing schistosomiasis vaccines.

  2. Synthetic cyclohexenyl chalcone natural products possess cytotoxic activities against prostate cancer cells and inhibit cysteine cathepsins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb Majumdar, Ishita; Devanabanda, Arvind; Fox, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Jacob; Cong, Huan; Porco, John A; Weber, Horst C

    2011-12-16

    A number of cyclohexenyl chalcone Diels-Alder natural products possess promising biological properties including strong cytotoxicity in various human cancer cells. Herein, we show that natural products in this class including panduratin A and nicolaioidesin C inhibit cysteine cathepsins as indicated by protease profiling assays and cell-free cathepsin L enzyme assays. Owing to the critical roles of cathepsins in the biology of human tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis, these findings should pave the way for development of novel antitumor agents for use in clinical settings.

  3. Aminothienopyridazines and methylene blue affect Tau fibrillization via cysteine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alex; James, Michael J; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Smith, Amos B; Trojanowski, John Q; Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R

    2013-04-19

    Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of intraneuronal fibrils comprised of the protein Tau. Tau is normally a soluble protein that stabilizes microtubules, with splice isoforms that contain either three (3-R) or four (4-R) microtubule binding repeats. The formation of Tau fibrils is thought to result in neuronal damage, and inhibitors of Tau fibrillization may hold promise as therapeutic agents. The process of Tau fibrillization can be replicated in vitro, and a number of small molecules have been identified that inhibit Tau fibril formation. However, little is known about how these molecules affect Tau fibrillization. Here, we examined the mechanism by which the previously described aminothieno pyridazine (ATPZ) series of compounds inhibit Tau fibrillization. Active ATPZs were found to promote the oxidation of the two cysteine residues within 4-R Tau by a redox cycling mechanism, resulting in the formation of a disulfide-containing compact monomer that was refractory to fibrillization. Moreover, the ATPZs facilitated intermolecular disulfide formation between 3-R Tau monomers, leading to dimers that were capable of fibrillization. The ATPZs also caused cysteine oxidation in molecules unrelated to Tau. Interestingly, methylene blue, an inhibitor of Tau fibrillization under evaluation in Alzheimer disease clinical trials, caused a similar oxidation of cysteines in Tau and other molecules. These findings reveal that the ATPZs and methylene blue act by a mechanism that may affect their viability as potential therapeutic agents.

  4. Cysteine as a Biological Probe for Comparing Plasma Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Golda, Judith; Kogelheide, Friederike; Held, Julian; Schulz-von-der-Gathen, Volker; Stapelmann, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    A large variety of plasma sources are available in the plasma medicine community. While enabling to choose the most promising source for a certain biomedical application, comparison of the different sources with a focus on their effect on biological targets is rather challenging. To allow for better comparison of various sources, the recent European COST action MP1101 was used to design the COST reference microplasma jet. Cysteine is a promising candidate investigate the impact of plasma from various sources on a standardized biological molecule, which is especially relevant for the investigations on a molecular level after plasma treatment. The simple structure of cysteine allows for a more in-depth analysis of each chemical group after plasma treatment and enables a comparison between different plasma sources and treatment parameters on each chemical group. The model itself has already been successfully established using a dielectric barrier discharge. Here, additional plasma sources are compared by the means of their impact on cysteine samples, showing e.g. the influence of feed-gas variations by adding oxygen or nitrogen admixture This work was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) with the packet grant PAK816 (PlaCID).

  5. Mechanical and chemical properties of cysteine-modified kinesin molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, S; Iwane, A H; Higuchi, H; Ishii, Y; Yanagida, T

    1999-08-10

    To probe the structural changes within kinesin molecules, we made the mutants of motor domains of two-headed kinesin (4-411 aa) in which either all the five cysteines or all except Cys45 were mutated. A residual cysteine (Cys45) of the kinesin mutant was labeled with an environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, acrylodan. ATPase activity, mechanical properties, and fluorescence intensity of the mutants were measured. Upon acrylodan-labeled kinesin binding to microtubules in the presence of 1 mM AMPPNP, the peak intensity was enhanced by 3.4-fold, indicating the structural change of the kinesin head by the binding. Substitution of cysteines decreased both the maximum microtubule-activated ATPase and the sliding velocity to the same extent. However, the maximum force and the step size were not affected; the force produced by a single molecule was 6-6.5 pN, and a step size due to the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule by kinesin molecules was about 10 nm for all kinesins. This step size was close to a unitary step size of 8 nm. Thus, the mechanical events of kinesin are tightly coupled with the chemical events.

  6. The paradoxical patterns of expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in colon cancer

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    Ding Ya

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the putative mechanisms of tumor immune escape is based on the hypothesis that carcinomas actively create an immunosuppressed state via the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, both in the cancer cells and in the immune cells among the tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN. In an attempt to verify this hypothesis, the patterns of expression of IDO in the cancer cells and the immune cells among colon cancers were examined. Methods Seventy-one cases of pathologically-confirmed colon cancer tissues matched with adjacent non-cancerous tissues, lymph node metastases, and TDLN without metastases were collected at the Sun Yat-sen Cancer Center between January 2000 and December 2000. The expression of IDO and Bin1, an IDO regulator, was determined with an immunohistochemical assay. The association between IDO or Bin1 expression and TNM stages and the 5-year survival rate in colon cancer patients was analyzed. Results IDO and Bin1 were detected in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In primary colon cancer, the strong expression of IDO existed in 9/71 cases (12.7%, while the strong expression of Bin1 existed in 33/71 cases (46.5%. However, similar staining of IDO and Bin1 existed in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Among the 41 cases with primary colon tumor and lymph node metastases, decreased expression of IDO was documented in the lymph node metastases. Furthermore, among the TDLN without metastases, a higher density of IDO+cells was documented in 21/60 cases (35%. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that the density of IDO+cells in TDLN was an independent prognostic factor. The patients with a higher density of IDO+cells in TDLN had a lower 5-year survival rate (37.5% than the cells with a lower density (73.1%. Conclusion This study demonstrated paradoxical patterns of expression of IDO in colon cancer. The high density IDO+cells existed in TDLN and IDO was down-regulated in lymph

  7. NO binding to Mn-substituted homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase: relationship to O₂ reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Joshua A; Farquhar, Erik R; Que, Lawrence; Lipscomb, John D; Hendrich, Michael P

    2013-10-01

    Iron(II)-containing homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (FeHPCD) activates O2 to catalyze the aromatic ring opening of homoprotocatechuate (HPCA). The enzyme requires Fe(II) for catalysis, but Mn(II) can be substituted (MnHPCD) with essentially no change in the steady-state kinetic parameters. Near simultaneous O2 and HPCA activation has been proposed to occur through transfer of an electron or electrons from HPCA to O2 through the divalent metal. In O2 reactions with MnHPCD-HPCA and the 4-nitrocatechol (4NC) complex of the His200Asn (H200N) variant of FeHPCD, this transfer has resulted in the detection of a transient M(III)-O2 (·-) species that is not observed during turnover of the wild-type FeHPCD. The factors governing formation of the M(III)-O2 (·-) species are explored here by EPR spectroscopy using MnHPCD and nitric oxide (NO) as an O2 surrogate. Both the HPCA and the dihydroxymandelic substrate complexes of MnHPCD bind NO, thus representing the first reported stable MnNO complexes of a nonheme enzyme. In contrast, the free enzyme, the MnHPCD-4NC complex, and the MnH200N and MnH200Q variants with or without HPCA bound do not bind NO. The MnHPCD-ligand complexes that bind NO are also active in normal O2-linked turnover, whereas the others are inactive. Past studies have shown that FeHPCD and the analogous variants and catecholic ligand complexes all bind NO, and are active in normal turnover. This contrasting behavior may stem from the ability of the enzyme to maintain the approximately 0.8-V difference in the solution redox potentials of Fe(II) and Mn(II). Owing to the higher potential of Mn, the formation of the NO adduct or the O2 adduct requires both strong charge donation from the bound catecholic ligand and additional stabilization by interaction with the active-site His200. The same nonoptimal electronic and structural forces that prevent NO and O2 binding in MnHPCD variants may lead to inefficient electron transfer from the catecholic substrate to

  8. NO Binding to Mn-Substituted Homoprotocatechuate 2,3-Dioxygenase: Relationship to O2 Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Joshua A.; Farquhar, Erik R.; Que, Lawrence; Lipscomb, John D.; Hendrich, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (FeHPCD) activates O2 to catalyze the aromatic ring opening of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (HPCA). The enzyme requires FeII for catalysis, but MnII can be substituted (MnHPCD) with essentially no change in the steady-state kinetic parameters. Near simultaneous O2 and HPCA activation has been proposed to occur through transfer of an electron(s) from HPCA to O2 through the divalent metal. In O2 reactions with MnHPCD-HPCA and the 4-nitrocatechol (4NC) complex of the His200Asn (H200N) variant of FeHPCD, this transfer has resulted in the detection of a transient MIII-O2•− species not observed during turnover of the wild type FeHPCD. The factors governing formation of the MIII-O2•− species are explored here with EPR spectroscopy using MnHPCD and nitric oxide (NO) as an O2 surrogate. Both the HPCA and dihydroxymandelic substrate complexes of MnHPCD bind NO, thus representing the first reported stable MnNO complexes of a nonheme enzyme. In contrast, the free enzyme, the MnHPCD-4NC complex, and the MnH200N and MnH200Q variants with or without HPCA bound do not bind NO. The MnHPCD-ligand complexes that bind NO are also active in normal O2-linked turnover, whereas the others are inactive. Past studies have shown that FeHPCD and the analogous variants and catecholic ligand complexes all bind NO, and are active in normal turnover. This contrasting behavior may stem from ability of the enzyme to maintain the ~0.8 V difference in the solution redox potentials of FeII and MnII. Due to the higher potential of Mn, the formation of the NO or O2 adduct requires both strong charge donation from the bound catecholic ligand and additional stabilization by interaction with the active site His200. The same non-optimal electronic and structural forces that prevent NO and O2 binding in MnHPCD variants may lead to inefficient electron transfer from the catecholic substrate to the metal center in variants of FeHPCD during O2-linked turnover

  9. Immuno-regulatory function of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase through modulation of innate immune responses.

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    Malihe-Sadat Poormasjedi-Meibod

    Full Text Available Successful long-term treatment of type-1 diabetes mainly relies on replacement of β-cells via islet transplantation. Donor shortage is one of the main obstacles preventing transplantation from becoming the treatment of choice. Although animal organs could be an alternative source for transplantation, common immunosuppressive treatments demonstrate low efficacy in preventing xenorejection. Immunoprotective effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO on T-cell mediated allorejection has been extensively studied. Our studies revealed that IDO expression by fibroblasts, induced apoptosis in T-cells while not affecting non-immune cell survival/function. Since macrophages play a pivotal role in xenograft rejection, herein we investigated the effect of IDO-induced tryptophan deficiency/kynurenine accumulation on macrophage function/survival. Moreover, we evaluated the local immunosuppressive effect of IDO on islet-xenograft protection. Our results indicated that IDO expression by bystander fibroblasts significantly reduced the viability of primary macrophages via apoptosis induction. Treatment of peritoneal macrophages by IDO-expressing fibroblast conditioned medium significantly reduced their proinflammatory activity through inhibition of iNOS expression. To determine whether IDO-induced tryptophan starvation or kynurenine accumulation is responsible for macrophage apoptosis and inhibition of their proinflammatory activity, Raw264.7 cell viability and proinflammatory responses were evaluated in tryptophan deficient medium or in the presence of kynurenine. Tryptophan deficiency, but not kynurenine accumulation, reduced Raw264.7 cell viability and suppressed their proinflammatory activity. Next a three-dimensional islet-xenograft was engineered by embedding rat islets within either control or IDO-expressing fibroblast-populated collagen matrix. Islets morphology and immune cell infiltration were then studied in the xenografts transplanted into the C57

  10. The effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity

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    Andréa Scaramal da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthracene is a highly toxic organic compound capable of contaminating water and soils, and biodegradation is an important tool for remediating polluted environments. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on the activity of the protocatechol 3,4-dioxygenase (P3,4O enzyme produced by the isolate Leifsonia sp. in cell-free and immobilized extracts. The isolate was grown in Luria Bertani broth medium (LB amended with 250 mg L-1 of phenanthrene. Various levels of pH (4.0-9.0, temperature (5-80 °C, time (0-90 min, trace elements (Cu2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+, and cations (Mg2+, Mn2+, K+ and NH4+ were tested to determine which conditions optimized enzyme activity. In general, the immobilized extract exhibited higher enzyme activity than the cell-free extract in the presence of trace elements and cations. Adding iron yielded the highest relative activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 16 and 99 %, respectively. Copper also increased enzyme activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 8 and 44 %, respectively. Enzyme activity in the phosphate buffer was high across a wide range of pH, reaching 80 % in the pH range between 6.5 and 8.0. The optimum temperatures for enzyme activity differed for cell-free and immobilized extracts, with maximum enzyme activity observed at 35 ºC for the cell-free extract and at 55 ºC for the immobilized extract. The cell-free extract of the P3,4O enzyme exhibited high activity only during the first 3 min of incubation, when it showed 50 % relative activity, and dropped to 0 % after 60 min of incubation. By contrast, activity in the immobilized extract was maintained during 90 min of incubation. This isolate has important characteristics for phenanthrene biodegradation, producing high quantities of the P3,4O enzyme that forms part of the most important pathway for PAH biodegradation.

  11. Characterization of metal binding in the active sites of acireductone dioxygenase isoforms from Klebsiella ATCC 8724.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Sergio C; Ju, Tingting; Dang, Marina; Goldsmith, Rachel Beaulieu; Maroney, Michael J; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-26

    The two acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) isozymes from the methionine salvage pathway of Klebsiella ATCC 8724 present an unusual case in which two enzymes with different structures and distinct activities toward their common substrates (1,2-dihydroxy-3-oxo-5-(methylthio)pent-1-ene and dioxygen) are derived from the same polypeptide chain. Structural and functional differences between the two isozymes are determined by the type of M2+ metal ion bound in the active site. The Ni2+-bound NiARD catalyzes an off-pathway shunt from the methionine salvage pathway leading to the production of formate, methylthiopropionate, and carbon monoxide, while the Fe2+-bound FeARD' catalyzes the on-pathway formation of methionine precursor 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate and formate. Four potential protein-based metal ligands were identified by sequence homology and structural considerations. Based on the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and isothermal calorimetry measurements, it is concluded that the same four residues, His96, His98, Glu102 and His140, provide the protein-based ligands for the metal in both the Ni- and Fe-containing forms of the enzyme, and subtle differences in the local backbone conformations trigger the observed structural and functional differences between the FeARD' and NiARD isozymes. Furthermore, both forms of the enzyme bind their respective metals with pseudo-octahedral geometry, and both may lose a histidine ligand upon binding of substrate under anaerobic conditions. However, mutations at two conserved nonligand acidic residues, Glu95 and Glu100, result in low metal contents for the mutant proteins as isolated, suggesting that some of the conserved charged residues may aid in transfer of metal from in vivo sources or prevent the loss of metal to stronger chelators. The Glu100 mutant reconstitutes readily but has low activity. Mutation of Asp101 results in an active enzyme that incorporates metal in vivo but

  12. Correlation between indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase mRNA and CDKN2A/p16 mRNA: a combined strategy to cervical cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffi Junior, Mario Cezar; Duarte, Ivone da Silva; Brito, Rodrigo Barbosa de Oliveira; Prado, Giovana Garcia; Makabe, Sergio; Dellê, Humberto; Camacho, Cleber P

    2016-11-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. The relation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) with CC and its precursor lesions was first suspected for over 40 years. The indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) is an immune modulator enzyme responsible for the immune system tissue protection mechanism, which may be the key to the tumoural persistence. HPV oncoprotein E7 promotes the increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16 (CDKN2A/p16). The isolated and combined analysis of CDKN2A/p16 mRNA to CC diagnosis was done with promising results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation between IDO mRNA and CDKN2A/p16 mRNA. We will explore the potential of both as diagnostic tools. RNA was extracted from tissue samples. cDNA was generated with High Capacity RNA-to-cDNA kit. The real-time PCR results were analysed using nonlinear curve estimation, ROC curve, Chi-squared test, the proportion of variance explained and Galen and Gambino formulas. From 270 patients attended, colposcopy examination was performed in 110 and the biopsy in 75 patients. We found a positive correlation in patients older than 28 years old with low-risk lesions, but the correlation is lost in high-risk lesions. Although cytology, IDO mRNA and CDKN2A/p16 mRNA could not differentiate the risk groups, IDO combined with CDKN2A/p16 mRNA results could (p = 0.028). The best diagnostic result was achieved by IDO coupled with CDKN2A/p16 mRNA, which may considerably increase the sensitivity of screening for CC.

  13. Upregulated expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in CHO cells induces apoptosis of competent T cells and increases proportion of Treg cells

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    Liu Juntian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The inflammatory enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO participates in immune tolerance and promotes immune escape of IDO+ tumors. A recent hypothesis suggested that IDO may contribute to the differentiation of new T regulatory cells (Tregs from naive CD4+ T cells. In this study we investigated the role of IDO in induction of immunosuppression in breast cancer by increasing the apoptosis of T cells and the proportion of Tregs. Methods An IDO expression plasmid was constructed and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were stably transfected with human IDO. Purified CD3+ T cells were isolated from the peripheral blood monouclear cells of breast cancer patients. After co-culturing IDO expressing or untransfected (control CHO cells with T cells, T cells apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry analysis and annexin-V and PI staining. The proportion of the regulatory T cell (Tregs [CD4 + CD25 + CD127-] subset was measured by flow cytometry analysis. T cells total RNA and cellular protein samples were isolated for detecting Foxp3 gene and protein expression. Results IDO transgenic CHO cells yielded high levels of IDO enzymatic activity, resulting in complete depletion of tryptophan from the culture medium. We found that apoptosis occurred in 79.07 ± 8.13% of CD3+T cells after co-cultured with IDO+ CHO cells for 3 days and the proportion of CD4 + CD25 + CD127- T cells increased from 3.43 ± 1.07% to 8.98 ± 1.88% (P Conclusions These results suggest that IDO helps to create a tolerogenic milieu in breast tumors by directly inducing T cell apoptosis and enhancing Treg-mediated immunosuppression.

  14. Upregulated expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in CHO cells induces apoptosis of competent T cells and increases proportion of Treg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyan; Yu, Jinpu; Li, Hui; Yang, Lili; Wei, Feng; Yu, Wenwen; Liu, Juntian; Ren, Xiubao

    2011-09-14

    The inflammatory enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) participates in immune tolerance and promotes immune escape of IDO+ tumors. A recent hypothesis suggested that IDO may contribute to the differentiation of new T regulatory cells (Tregs) from naive CD4+ T cells. In this study we investigated the role of IDO in induction of immunosuppression in breast cancer by increasing the apoptosis of T cells and the proportion of Tregs. An IDO expression plasmid was constructed and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were stably transfected with human IDO. Purified CD3+ T cells were isolated from the peripheral blood monouclear cells of breast cancer patients. After co-culturing IDO expressing or untransfected (control) CHO cells with T cells, T cells apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry analysis and annexin-V and PI staining. The proportion of the regulatory T cell (Tregs [CD4 + CD25 + CD127⁻]) subset was measured by flow cytometry analysis. T cells total RNA and cellular protein samples were isolated for detecting Foxp3 gene and protein expression. IDO transgenic CHO cells yielded high levels of IDO enzymatic activity, resulting in complete depletion of tryptophan from the culture medium. We found that apoptosis occurred in 79.07 ± 8.13% of CD3+T cells after co-cultured with IDO+ CHO cells for 3 days and the proportion of CD4 + CD25 + CD127⁻ T cells increased from 3.43 ± 1.07% to 8.98 ± 1.88% (P Tregs in vitro. Increased expression of Foxp3, a key molecular marker of Tregs, was confirmed by RT-PCR, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis at the same time. These results suggest that IDO helps to create a tolerogenic milieu in breast tumors by directly inducing T cell apoptosis and enhancing Treg-mediated immunosuppression.

  15. The tomato CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE8 (SlCCD8) regulates rhizosphere signaling, plant architecture and affects reproductive development through strigolactone biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlen, W.; Charnikhova, T.; Lammers, M.; Pollina, T.; Toth, P.; Haider, I.; Pozo, M.J.; Maagd, de R.A.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Lopez-Raez, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    •Strigolactones are plant hormones that regulate both above- and belowground plant architecture. Strigolactones were initially identified as rhizosphere signaling molecules. In the present work, the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 8 (SlCCD8) was cloned and its role in

  16. BW A4C and other hydroxamic acids are potent inhibitors of linoleic acid 8R-dioxygenase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodowsky, I D; Hamberg, M; Oliw, E H

    1994-03-11

    Linoleic acid is converted to 8R-hydroperoxylinoleic acid by the soluble 8R-dioxygenase of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis. Effects of different lipoxygenase inhibitors on the 8R-dioxygenase were evaluated. Three hydroxamic acid derivatives were investigated. BW A4C (N-(3-phenoxycinnamyl)acetohydroxamic acid) was the most potent with an IC50 of 0.2 microM, followed by zileuton (3-10 microM) and linoleate-hydroxamic acid (0.02 mM). Two other lipoxygenase inhibitors, nordihydroguaiaretic acid and eicosatetraynoic acid, were less potent (IC50 0.09 and 0.15 mM, respectively). The 8R-dioxygenase was also strongly inhibited by commonly used buffer additives, dithiothreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. G. graminis also contains a hydroperoxide isomerase, which converts 8R-hydroperoxylinoleic acid to 7S,8S-dihydroxylinoleic acid. Ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration indicated that the dioxygenase and the hydroperoxide isomerase activities could be separated.

  17. Characterization of MnpC, a hydroquinone dioxygenase likely involved in the meta-nitrophenol degradation by Cupriavidus necator JMP134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ying; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2010-11-01

    Cupriavidus necator JMP134 utilizes meta-nitrophenol (MNP) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The metabolic reconstruction of MNP degradation performed in silico suggested that MnpC might have played an important role in MNP degradation. In order to experimentally confirm the prediction, we have now characterized the mnpC-encoded (amino)hydroquinone dioxygenase involved in the ring-cleavage reaction of MNP degradation. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that mnpC played an essential role in MNP degradation. MnpC was purified to homogeneity as an N-terminal six-His-tagged fusion protein, and it was proved to be a dimer as demonstrated by gel filtration. MnpC was a Fe(2+)- and Mn(2+)-dependent dioxygenase, catalyzing the ring-cleavage of hydroquinone to 4-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde in vitro and proposed as an aminohydroquinone dioxygenase involved in MNP degradation in vivo. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that MnpC diverged from the other (chloro)hydroquinone dioxygenases at an earlier point, which might result in the preference for its physiological substrate.

  18. Modeling the 2-His-1-Carboxylate Facial Triad: Iron-Catecholato Complexes as Structural and Functional Models of the Extradiol Cleaving Dioxygenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Mononuclear iron(II)- and iron(III)-catecholato complexes with three members of a new 3,3-bis(1-alkylimidazol-2-yl)propionate ligand family have been synthesized as models of the active sites of the extradiol cleaving catechol dioxygenases. These enzymes are part of the superfamily of dioxygen-activ

  19. NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCING AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL MAPPING OF THE GENES ENCODING BIPHENYL DIOXYGENASE, A MULTICOM- PONENT POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYL-DEGRADING ENZYME IN PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DNA region encoding biphenyl dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the biphenyl-polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Pseudomonas species strain LB400, was sequenced. Six open reading frames were identified, four of which are homologous to the components of toluene dioxy...

  20. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  1. The IRC7 gene encodes cysteine desulphydrase activity and confers on yeast the ability to grow on cysteine as a nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Margarita; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Although cysteine desulphydrase activity has been purified and characterized from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding this activity in vivo has never been defined. We show that the full-length IRC7 gene, encoded by the YFR055W open reading frame, encodes a protein with cysteine desulphydrase activity. Irc7p purified to homogeneity is able to utilize l-cysteine as a substrate, producing pyruvate and hydrogen sulphide as products of the reaction. Purified Irc7p also utilized l-cystine and some other cysteine conjugates, but not l-cystathionine or l-methionine, as substrates. We further show that, in vivo, the IRC7 gene is both necessary and sufficient for yeast to grow on l-cysteine as a nitrogen source, and that overexpression of the gene results in increased H2 S production. Strains overexpressing IRC7 are also hypersensitive to a toxic analogue, S-ethyl-l-cysteine. While IRC7 has been identified as playing a critical role in converting cysteine conjugates to volatile thiols that are important in wine aroma, its biological role in yeast cells is likely to involve regulation of cysteine and redox homeostasis.

  2. Recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with cysteine residue for preparation of affinity chromatography stationary phase and immunosensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbatiuk O. B.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Engineering of recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with cysteine residue (SPA-Cys for preparation of affinity chromatography stationary phase and formation of bioselective element of immunosensor. Methods. DNA sequences encoding IgG-binding region of SPA, His-tag and cysteine were genetically fused and expressed in E. coli. SPA-Cys was immobilized on maleimide-functionalized silica beads for affinity chromatography stationary phase preparation and on a gold sensor surface as a bioselective element of immunosensor. Results. SPA-Cys was expressed at a high-level in a soluble form. The target protein was purified and showed a high IgG-binding activity. The capacity of the obtained SPA-Cys-based affinity chromatography stationary phase was 10–12 mg of IgG /ml. The purity of eluted IgG was more than 95 % in one-step purification procedure. The developed SPA-Cys-based bioselective element of immunosensor selectively interacted with human IgG and did not interact with the control proteins. Conclusions. The recombinant Staphylococcal protein A with cysteine residue was successfully used for the preparation of affinity chromatography stationary phase and formation of the bioselective element of immunosensor.

  3. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of cysteine and site specific conjugated herceptin antibody-drug conjugates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowdy Jackson

    Full Text Available Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs are monoclonal antibodies designed to deliver a cytotoxic drug selectively to antigen expressing cells. Several components of an ADC including the selection of the antibody, the linker, the cytotoxic drug payload and the site of attachment used to attach the drug to the antibody are critical to the activity and development of the ADC. The cytotoxic drugs or payloads used to make ADCs are typically conjugated to the antibody through cysteine or lysine residues. This results in ADCs that have a heterogeneous number of drugs per antibody. The number of drugs per antibody commonly referred to as the drug to antibody ratio (DAR, can vary between 0 and 8 drugs for a IgG1 antibody. Antibodies with 0 drugs are ineffective and compete with the ADC for binding to the antigen expressing cells. Antibodies with 8 drugs per antibody have reduced in vivo stability, which may contribute to non target related toxicities. In these studies we incorporated a non-natural amino acid, para acetyl phenylalanine, at two unique sites within an antibody against Her2/neu. We covalently attached a cytotoxic drug to these sites to form an ADC which contains two drugs per antibody. We report the results from the first direct preclinical comparison of a site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADC and a cysteine conjugated anti-Her2 ADC. We report that the site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADCs have superior in vitro serum stability and preclinical toxicology profile in rats as compared to the cysteine conjugated anti-Her2 ADCs. We also demonstrate that the site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADCs maintain their in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy against Her2 expressing human tumor cell lines. Our data suggests that site specific non-natural amino acid ADCs may have a superior therapeutic window than cysteine conjugated ADCs.

  5. Evidence for several cysteine transport mechanisms in the mitochondrial membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Pong; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is essential for many mitochondrial processes in plants, including translation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and cyanide detoxification. Its biosynthesis is carried out by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL) which can be found in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria. Mutants lacking one compartment-specific OAS-TL isoform show viable phenotypes, leading to the hypothesis that the organellar membranes are permeable to substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. In this report, we show that exogenouslly supplied [(35)S]cysteine accumulates in the mitochondrial fraction and is taken up into isolated mitochondria for in organello protein synthesis. Analysis of cysteine uptake by isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts indicates that cysteine is transported by multiple facilitated mechanisms that operate in a concentration gradient-dependent manner. In addition, cysteine uptake is dependent mainly on the ΔpH across the inner membrane. The rates of mitochondrial cysteine transport can be mildly altered by specific metabolites in the cyanide detoxification-linked sulfide oxidation, but not by most substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the transport of cysteine plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular cysteine biosynthesis as well as modulating the availability of sulfur for mitochondrial metabolism.

  6. A novel potentiometric biosensor for selective L-cysteine determination using L-cysteine-desulfhydrase producing Trichosporon jirovecii yeast cells coupled with sulfide electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Saad S.M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: saadsmhassan@yahoo.com; El-Baz, Ashraf F. [Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, Menofia University (Egypt); Abd-Rabboh, Hisham S.M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-10-17

    Trichosporon jirovecii yeast cells are used for the first time as a source of L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme (EC 4.4.1.1) and incorporated in a biosensor for determining L-cysteine. The cells are grown under cadmium stress conditions to increase the expression level of the enzyme. The intact cells are immobilized on the membrane of a solid-state Ag{sub 2}S electrode to provide a simple L-cysteine responsive biosensor. Upon immersion of the sensor in L-cysteine containing solutions, L-cysteine undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis into pyruvate, ammonia and sulfide ion. The rate of sulfide ion formation is potentiometrically measured as a function of L-cysteine concentration. Under optimized conditions (phosphate buffer pH 7, temperature 37 {+-} 1 deg. C and actual weight of immobilized yeast cells 100 mg), a linear relationship between L-cysteine concentration and the initial rate of sulfide liberation (dE/dt) is obtained. The sensor response covers the concentration range of 0.2-150 mg L{sup -1} (1.7-1250 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) L-cysteine. Validation of the assay method according to the quality control/quality assurance standards (precision, accuracy, between-day variability, within-day reproducibility, range of measurements and lower limit of detection) reveals remarkable performance characteristics of the proposed biosensor. The sensor is satisfactorily utilized for determination of L-cysteine in some pharmaceutical formulations. The lower limit of detection is {approx}1 {mu}mol L{sup -1} and the accuracy and precision of the method are 97.5% and {+-}1.1%, respectively. Structurally similar sulfur containing compounds such as glutathione, cystine, methionine, and D-cysteine do no interfere.

  7. Cysteine 904 is required for maximal insulin degrading enzyme activity and polyanion activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Suk Song

    Full Text Available Cysteine residues in insulin degrading enzyme have been reported as non-critical for its activity. We found that converting the twelve cysteine residues in rat insulin degrading enzyme (IDE to serines resulted in a cysteine-free form of the enzyme with reduced activity and decreased activation by polyanions. Mutation of each cysteine residue individually revealed cysteine 904 as the key residue required for maximal activity and polyanion activation, although other cysteines affect polyanion binding to a lesser extent. Based on the structure of IDE, Asn 575 was identified as a potential hydrogen bond partner for Cys904 and mutation of this residue also reduced activity and decreased polyanion activation. The oligomerization state of IDE did not correlate with its activity, with the dimer being the predominant form in all the samples examined. These data suggest that there are several conformational states of the dimer that affect activity and polyanion activation.

  8. Cysteine and hydrogen sulphide in the regulation of metabolism: insights from genetics and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Roderick N; Morton, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes represent a significant and escalating worldwide health burden. These conditions are characterized by abnormal nutrient homeostasis. One such perturbation is altered metabolism of the sulphur-containing amino acid cysteine. Obesity is associated with elevated plasma cysteine, whereas diabetes is associated with reduced cysteine levels. One mechanism by which cysteine may act is through its enzymatic breakdown to produce hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a gasotransmitter that regulates glucose and lipid homeostasis. Here we review evidence from both pharmacological studies and transgenic models suggesting that cysteine and hydrogen sulphide play a role in the metabolic dysregulation underpinning obesity and diabetes. We then outline the growing evidence that regulation of hydrogen sulphide levels through its catabolism can impact metabolic health. By integrating hydrogen sulphide production and breakdown pathways, we re-assess current hypothetical models of cysteine and hydrogen sulphide metabolism, offering new insight into their roles in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes.

  9. Cysteine reacts to form blue-green pigments with thiosulfinates obtained from garlic (Allium sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Keum; Kyung, Kyu Hang

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine was found to form pigments with garlic thiosulfinates in this investigation, in contrast to previous reports. Pigments were formed only when the molar concentration ratios of cysteine to total thiosulfinates were smaller than 2:1. Cysteine does not form pigments with thiosulfinates in the same manner as other pigment-forming amino compounds because it has a sulfhydryl (SH) group. A colour reaction of cysteine with thiosulfinates is proposed where colourless disulphide-type S-alk(en)yl mercaptocysteines (SAMCs) are formed first by the SH-involved reaction between cysteine and thiosulfinates, and then SAMCs react with residual thiosulfinates to form pigments. When the cysteine to total thiosulfinate molar concentration ratio was 2:1 or greater, total thiosulfinates were consumed to form SAMCs without leaving any thiosulfinates remaining available for the following colour reactions.

  10. Decavanadate interactions with actin: cysteine oxidation and vanadyl formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Susana; Duarte, Rui O; Moura, José J G; Aureliano, Manuel

    2009-10-14

    Incubation of actin with decavanadate induces cysteine oxidation and oxidovanadium(IV) formation. The studies were performed combining kinetic with spectroscopic (NMR and EPR) methodologies. Although decavanadate is converted to labile oxovanadates, the rate of deoligomerization can be very slow (half-life time of 5.4 h, at 25 degrees C, with a first order kinetics), which effectively allows decavanadate to exist for some time under experimental conditions. It was observed that decavanadate inhibits F-actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity with an IC(50) of 0.8 microM V(10) species, whereas 50 microM of vanadate or oxidovanadium(IV) only inhibits enzyme activity up to 25%. Moreover, from these three vanadium forms, only decavanadate induces the oxidation of the so called "fast" cysteines (or exposed cysteine, Cys-374) when the enzyme is in the polymerized and active form, F-actin, with an IC(50) of 1 microM V(10) species. Decavanadate exposition to F- and G-actin (monomeric form) promotes vanadate reduction since a typical EPR oxidovanadium(IV) spectrum was observed. Upon observation that V(10) reduces to oxidovanadium(IV), it is proposed that this cation interacts with G-actin (K(d) of 7.48 +/- 1.11 microM), and with F-actin (K(d) = 43.05 +/- 5.34 microM) with 1:1 and 4:1 stoichiometries, respectively, as observed by EPR upon protein titration with oxidovanadium(IV). The interaction of oxidovanadium(IV) with the protein may occur close to the ATP binding site of actin, eventually with lysine-336 and 3 water molecules.

  11. Ascorbate as a co-factor for fe- and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases: physiological activity in tumor growth and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C M

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbate is a specific co-factor for a large family of enzymes known as the Fe- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are found throughout biology and catalyze the addition of a hydroxyl group to various substrates. The proline hydroxylase that is involved in collagen maturation is well known, but in recent times many new enzymes and functions have been uncovered, including those involved in epigenetic control and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) regulation. These discoveries have provided crucial mechanistic insights into how ascorbate may affect tumor biology. In particular, there is growing evidence that HIF-1-dependent tumor progression may be inhibited by increasing tumor ascorbate levels. However, rigorous clinical intervention studies are lacking. This review will explore the physiological role of ascorbate as an enzyme co-factor and how this mechanism relates to cancer biology and treatment. The use of ascorbate in cancer should be informed by clinical studies based on such mechanistic hypotheses.

  12. Inflammation-induced activation of the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathway: Relevance to cancer-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangmi; Miller, Brian J; Stefanek, Michael E; Miller, Andrew H

    2015-07-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a common complication of cancer and its treatment that can significantly impair quality of life. Although the specific mechanisms remain poorly understood, inflammation is now considered to be a distinct component of CRF in addition to effects of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and other factors. One key biological pathway that may link inflammation and CRF is indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Induced by inflammatory stimuli, IDO catabolizes tryptophan to kynurenine (KYN), which is subsequently converted into neuroactive metabolites. Here we summarize current knowledge concerning the relevance of the IDO pathway to CRF, including activation of the IDO pathway in cancer patients and, as a consequence, accumulation of neurotoxic KYN metabolites and depletion of serotonin in the brain. Because IDO inhibitors are already being evaluated as therapeutic agents in cancer, the elucidation of the relationship between IDO activation and CRF in cancer patients may lead to novel diagnostic and clinical approaches to managing CRF and its debilitating consequences.

  13. Characteristics and biotechnology applications of aliphatic amino acid hydroxylases belonging to the Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun

    2014-05-01

    The asymmetric hydroxylation of inactive carbon atoms is still an important reaction in the industrial synthesis of valuable chiral compounds such as pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. Applications of monooxygenation enzymes, like cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, flavin-containing monooxygenases, and Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (Fe/αKG-DOs), are strongly desired as hydroxylation biocatalysts because they have great advantages in regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions. Recently, several novel Fe/αKG-DOs have been found to catalyze the asymmetric hydroxylation of aliphatic amino acids. Depending on their amino acid sequences, these Fe/αKG-DOs catalyze different types of regioselective hydroxylations, or C3-, C4-, and C5-hydroxylation. Additionally, most also have stereoselective sulfoxidation activities. Here, we have reviewed the characterization and process development of this novel functioning group of Fe/αKG-DOs.

  14. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein, desmin, was purified from pork longissimus dorsi and incubated with either P-calpain, m-calpain or cathepsin B. Proteolysis of desmin was followed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. After incubation of desmin with the proteases, cleavage sites on the desmin...... a sequential C-terminal degradation pattern characteristic of this dipeptylpeptidase. The substrate primary structure was not found to be essential for regulation of the proteolytic activity of the cysteine peptidases studied. However, the degradation patterns obtained imply that calpains are involved...

  15. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Liu; Xiao-Yu Lei; Lian-Fu Chen; Yin-Bing Bian; Hong Yang; Ibrahim, Salam A.; Wen Huang

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecula...

  16. Characterization of Cysteine Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Ahmadi; Ning Gu; Hamid Reza Madaah Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a kind of stabilized ferrofluid based on magnetite nanoparticles (mean core and its coating size about 21.9 and 1.6 nm, respectively) was synthesized via coprecipitation method. Cysteine was used as surfactant due to its proper conjunction to the surface of magnetite nanoparticles. Coating density and synthesized ferrofluids were characterized by using transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, dynamic light scattering and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging studies show that the synthesized ferrofluid can be used as a potential contrast enhancement agent especially for imaging lymphatic system.

  17. Excretory bladder: the source of cysteine proteases in Paragonimus westermani metacercariae

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Young-Bae; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2002-01-01

    The cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani metacercariae are involved in metacercarial excystment, host immune modulation, and possibly in tissue penetration. In order to clarify the origin of the enzymes, 28 and 27 kDa cysteine proteases in metacercarial excretory-secretory products were purified through the FPLC system using Mono Q column chromatography. The polyclonal antibodies to the enzymes were produced in BALB/c mice. Immunolocalization studies revealed that both cysteine protea...

  18. Quantitative Mapping of Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Cysteine Oxidation in a Parkinson Disease Mouse Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Danielson, Steven R.; Held, Jason M.; Oo, May; Riley, Rebeccah; Gibson, Bradford W.; Andersen, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    Differential cysteine oxidation within mitochondrial Complex I has been quantified in an in vivo oxidative stress model of Parkinson disease. We developed a strategy that incorporates rapid and efficient immunoaffinity purification of Complex I followed by differential alkylation and quantitative detection using sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. This method allowed us to quantify the reversible cysteine oxidation status of 34 distinct cysteine residues out of a total 130 present in muri...

  19. Properties of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase in the cell free extract and immobilized extract of Mycobacterium fortuitum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH are carcinogenic compounds which contaminate water and soil, and the enzymes can be used for bioremediation of these environments. This study aimed to evaluate some environmental conditions that affect the production and activity of the catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12O by Mycobacterium fortuitum in the cell free and immobilized extract in sodium alginate. The bacterium was grown in mineral medium and LB broth containing 250 mg L-1 of anthracene (PAH. The optimum conditions of pH (4.0-9.0, temperature (5-70 ºC, reaction time (10-90 min and the effect of ions in the enzyme activity were determined. The Mycobacterium cultivated in LB shown higher growth and the C12O activity was two-fold higher to that in the mineral medium. To both extracts the highest enzyme activity was at pH 8.0, however, the immobilized extract promoted the increase in the C12O activity in a pH range between 4.0 and 8.5. The immobilized extract increased the enzymatic activity time and showed the highest C12O activity at 45 ºC, 20 ºC higher than the greatest temperature in the cell free extract. The enzyme activity in both extracts was stimulated by Fe3+, Hg2+ and Mn2+ and inhibited by NH4+ and Cu2+, but the immobilization protected the enzyme against the deleterious effects of K+ and Mg2+ in tested concentrations. The catechol 1,2-dioxygenase of Mycobacterium fortuitum in the immobilized extract has greater stability to the variations of pH, temperature and reaction time, and show higher activity in presence of ions, comparing to the cell free extract.

  20. Characterization of the fungal gibberellin desaturase as a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase and its utilization for enhancing plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Anjanabha; Kourmpetli, Sofia; Ward, Dennis A; Thomas, Stephen G; Gong, Fan; Powers, Stephen J; Carrera, Esther; Taylor, Benjamin; de Caceres Gonzalez, Francisco Nuñez; Tudzynski, Bettina; Phillips, Andrew L; Davey, Michael R; Hedden, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The biosynthesis of gibberellic acid (GA(3)) by the fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is catalyzed by seven enzymes encoded in a gene cluster. While four of these enzymes are characterized as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, the nature of a fifth oxidase, GA(4) desaturase (DES), is unknown. DES converts GA(4) to GA(7) by the formation of a carbon-1,2 double bond in the penultimate step of the pathway. Here, we show by expression of the des complementary DNA in Escherichia coli that DES has the characteristics of a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase. Although it has low amino acid sequence homology with known 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, putative iron- and 2-oxoglutarate-binding residues, typical of such enzymes, are apparent in its primary sequence. A survey of sequence databases revealed that homologs of DES are widespread in the ascomycetes, although in most cases the homologs must participate in non-gibberellin (GA) pathways. Expression of des from the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in the plant species Solanum nigrum, Solanum dulcamara, and Nicotiana sylvestris resulted in substantial growth stimulation, with a 3-fold increase in height in S. dulcamara compared with controls. In S. nigrum, the height increase was accompanied by a 20-fold higher concentration of GA(3) in the growing shoots than in controls, although GA(1) content was reduced. Expression of des was also shown to partially restore growth in plants dwarfed by ectopic expression of a GA 2-oxidase (GA-deactivating) gene, consistent with GA(3) being protected from 2-oxidation. Thus, des has the potential to enable substantial growth increases, with practical implications, for example, in biomass production.

  1. Cytosolic and plastoglobule-targeted carotenoid dioxygenases from Crocus sativus are both involved in beta-ionone release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Angela; Rambla, José Luís; Santaella, Marcella; Gómez, M Dolores; Orzaez, Diego; Granell, Antonio; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2008-09-05

    Saffron, the processed stigma of Crocus sativus, is characterized by the presence of several apocarotenoids that contribute to the color, flavor, and aroma of the spice. However, little is known about the synthesis of aroma compounds during the development of the C. sativus stigma. The developing stigma is nearly odorless, but before and at anthesis, the aromatic compound beta-ionone becomes the principal norisoprenoid volatile in the stigma. In this study, four carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) genes, CsCCD1a, CsCCD1b, CsCCD4a, and CsCCD4b, were isolated from C. sativus. Expression analysis showed that CsCCD1a was constitutively expressed, CsCCD1b was unique to the stigma tissue, but only CsCCD4a and -b had expression patterns consistent with the highest levels of beta-carotene and emission of beta-ionone derived during the stigma development. The CsCCD4 enzymes were localized in plastids and more specifically were present in the plastoglobules. The enzymatic activities of CsCCD1a, CsCCD1b, and CsCCD4 enzymes were determined by Escherichia coli expression, and subsequent analysis of the volatile products was generated by GC/MS. The four CCDs fell in two phylogenetically divergent dioxygenase classes, but all could cleave beta-carotene at the 9,10(9',10') positions to yield beta-ionone. The data obtained suggest that all four C. sativus CCD enzymes may contribute in different ways to the production of beta-ionone. In addition, the location and precise timing of beta-ionone synthesis, together with its known activity as a fragrance and insect attractant, suggest that this volatile may have a role in Crocus pollination.

  2. Redox proteins of hydroxylating bacterial dioxygenases establish a regulatory cascade that prevents gratuitous induction of tetralin biodegradation genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-García, Laura; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Medina, Milagros; Reyes-Ramírez, Francisca; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial dioxygenase systems are multicomponent enzymes that catalyze the initial degradation of many environmentally hazardous compounds. In Sphingopyxis granuli strain TFA tetralin dioxygenase hydroxylates tetralin, an organic contaminant. It consists of a ferredoxin reductase (ThnA4), a ferredoxin (ThnA3) and a oxygenase (ThnA1/ThnA2), forming a NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnA1/ThnA2 electron transport chain. ThnA3 has also a regulatory function since it prevents expression of tetralin degradation genes (thn) in the presence of non-metabolizable substrates of the catabolic pathway. This role is of physiological relevance since avoids gratuitous and wasteful production of catabolic enzymes. Our hypothesis for thn regulation implies that ThnA3 exerts its action by diverting electrons towards the regulator ThnY, an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that together with the transcriptional activator ThnR is necessary for thn gene expression. Here we analyze electron transfer among ThnA4, ThnA3 and ThnY by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry and determination of midpoint reduction potentials. Our results indicate that when accumulated in its reduced form ThnA3 is able to fully reduce ThnY. In addition, we have reproduced in vitro the regulatory circuit in the proposed physiological direction, NAD(P)H–ThnA4–ThnA3–ThnY. ThnA3 represents an unprecedented way of communication between a catabolic pathway and its regulatory system to prevent gratuitous induction. PMID:27030382

  3. Effect of L-cysteine on the oxidation of cyclohexane catalyzed by manganeseporphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-You; Tian, Peng; Chen, Yong; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun; Chen, Zai Xin

    2015-06-01

    Effect of L-cysteine as the cocatalyst on the oxidation of cyclohexane by tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) catalyzed by manganese tetraphenylporphyrin (MnTPP) has been investigated. The results showed that L-cysteine could moderately improve the catalytic activity of MnTPP and significantly increase the selectivity of cyclohexanol. Different from imidazole and pyridine, the L-cysteine may perform dual roles in the catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane. Besides as the axial ligand for MnTPP, the L-cysteine could also react with cyclohexyl peroxide formed as the intermediate to produce alcohol as the main product.

  4. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M; van der Linden, Wouter A; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S

    2015-09-29

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis.

  5. Mobilization of sulfane sulfur from cysteine desulfurases to the Azotobacter vinelandii sulfurtransferase RhdA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartini, Francesca; Remelli, William; Dos Santos, Patricia C; Papenbrock, Jutta; Pagani, Silvia; Forlani, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    Mobilization of the L-cysteine sulfur for the persulfuration of the rhodanese of Azotobacter vinelandii, RhdA, can be mediated by the A. vinelandii cysteine desulfurases, IscS and NifS. The amount of cysteine was higher in mutant strains lacking rhdA (MV474) than in wild type. The diazotrophic growth of MV474 was impaired. Taking into account the functional results about rhodanese-like proteins and RhdA itself, it is suggested that RhdA-dependent modulation of L-cysteine levels must deal with a redox-related process.

  6. Influence of cysteine doping on photoluminescence intensity from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes can be applied for detection of cysteine. It is shown that cysteine doping (from 10-8 to 10-3 M) into aqueous suspension of nanotubes with adsorbed DNA leads to increase of PL intensity. The PL intensity was enhanced by 27% at 10-3 M cysteine concentration in suspension. Most likely, the PL intensity increases due to the passivation of p-defects on the nanotube by the cysteine containing reactive thiol group. The effect of doping with other amino acids without this group (methionine, serine, aspartic acid, lysine, proline) on the PL intensity is essentially weaker.

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS FOR METAL BINDING CAPACITY OF CYSTEINE BY USING UV-VIS SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivendu Ranjan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The metal binding capacity of cysteine with three different metals Nickel, Copper and Lead was studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometer for which absorbance values were taken after interaction of cysteine with metal salt solutions (10ppm and 100ppm. Before taking above absorbance dilution factor was set using cysteine stock. The increase in peak intensity was observed when metal salt solution and metal saltcysteine solution were compared. Based on peak shift and peak intensity finally it can be concluded that the binding capacity of cysteine with Nickel is more, followed by lead and copper. The normal chromophore activity in cysteine is due to the sulphur in which the transition takes place from non bonding orbital’s to the excited antibonding orbital in the range of 210-215nm range. The binding of the metals with cysteine may affect the chromophore activity and may also lead to structural damage of the chromophore. This can give the decrease in the peak intensity or the complete shift in the peak. These results suggest that cysteine metal binding ability can be used for the removal of the metals in water purification. Also this property can be used in removal of metals from our body considering the fact that cysteine may not show adverse effect in the system. So we can go for designing a new type of drug containing cysteine which helps to prevent the accumulation of such metals and thus prevent us from adverse effect.

  8. N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevents stress-induced desmin aggregation in cellular models of desminopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand-David Segard

    Full Text Available Mutations within the human desmin gene are responsible for a subcategory of myofibrillar myopathies called desminopathies. However, a single inherited mutation can produce different phenotypes within a family, suggesting that environmental factors influence disease states. Although several mouse models have been used to investigate organ-specific desminopathies, a more general mechanistic perspective is required to advance our knowledge toward patient treatment. To improve our understanding of disease pathology, we have developed cellular models to observe desmin behaviour in early stages of disease pathology, e.g., upon formation of cytoplasmic desmin aggregates, within an isogenic background. We cloned the wildtype and three mutant desmin cDNAs using a Tet-On Advanced® expression system in C2C12 cells. Mutations were selected based on positioning within desmin and capacity to form aggregates in transient experiments, as follows: DesS46Y (head domain; low aggregation, DesD399Y (central rod domain; high aggregation, and DesS460I (tail domain; moderate aggregation. Introduction of these proteins into a C2C12 background permitted us to compare between desmin variants as well as to determine the role of external stress on aggregation. Three different types of stress, likely encountered during muscle activity, were introduced to the cell models-thermal (heat shock, redox-associated (H2O2 and cadmium chloride, and mechanical (stretching stresses-after which aggregation was measured. Cells containing variant DesD399Y were more sensitive to stress, leading to marked cytoplasmic perinuclear aggregations. We then evaluated the capacity of biochemical compounds to prevent this aggregation, applying dexamethasone (an inducer of heat shock proteins, fisetin or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (antioxidants before stress induction. Interestingly, N-acetyl-L-cysteine pre-treatment prevented DesD399Y aggregation during most stress. N-acetyl-L-cysteine has recently been

  9. Hydrogen sulfide is a novel potential virulence factor of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: characterization of the unusual cysteine desulfurase/desulfhydrase HapE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großhennig, Stephanie; Ischebeck, Till; Gibhardt, Johannes; Busse, Julia; Feussner, Ivo; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing atypical pneumonia with a minimalized and highly streamlined genome. So far, hydrogen peroxide production, cytadherence, and the ADP-ribosylating CARDS toxin have been identified as pathogenicity determinants. We have studied haemolysis caused by M. pneumoniae, and discovered that hydrogen peroxide is responsible for the oxidation of heme, but not for lysis of erythrocytes. This feature could be attributed to hydrogen sulfide, a compound that has previously not been identified as virulence factor in lung pathogens. Indeed, we observed hydrogen sulfide production by M. pneumoniae. The search for a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme identified HapE, a protein with similarity to cysteine desulfurases. In contrast to typical cysteine desulfurases, HapE is a bifunctional enzyme: it has both the cysteine desulfurase activity to produce alanine and the cysteine desulfhydrase activity to produce pyruvate and hydrogen sulfide. Experiments with purified HapE showed that the enzymatic activity of the protein is responsible for haemolysis, demonstrating that HapE is a novel potential virulence factor of M. pneumoniae.

  10. A futile cycle, formed between two ATP-dependant -glutamyl cycle enzymes, -glutamyl cysteine synthetase and 5-oxoprolinase: the cause of cellular ATP depletion in nephrotic cystinosis?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh Kumar; Anand Kumar Bachhawat

    2010-03-01

    Cystinosis, an inherited disease caused by a defect in the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS), is characterized by renal proximal tubular dysfunction. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion appears to be a key event in the pathophysiology of the disease, even though the manner in which ATP depletion occurs is still a puzzle. We present a model that explains how a futile cycle that is generated between two ATP-utilizing enzymes of the -glutamyl cycle leads to ATP depletion. The enzyme -glutamyl cysteine synthetase (-GCS), in the absence of cysteine, forms 5-oxoproline (instead of the normal substrate, -glutamyl cysteine) and the 5-oxoproline is converted into glutamate by the ATP-dependant enzyme, 5-oxoprolinase. Thus, in cysteine-limiting conditions, glutamate is cycled back into glutamate via 5-oxoproline at the cost of two ATP molecules without production of glutathione and is the cause of the decreased levels of glutathione synthesis, as well as the ATP depletion observed in these cells. The model is also compatible with the differences seen in the human patients and the mouse model of cystinosis, where renal failure is not observed.

  11. LPS-induced NF-{kappa}B expression in THP-1Blue cells correlates with neopterin production and activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroecksnadel, Sebastian [Division of Biological Chemistry, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Jenny, Marcel [Division of Biological Chemistry, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Division of Medical Biochemistry, Biocenter, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Kurz, Katharina [Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Klein, Angela [Division of Medical Biochemistry, Biocenter, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Ledochowski, Maximilian [Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Uberall, Florian [Division of Medical Biochemistry, Biocenter, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Fuchs, Dietmar, E-mail: dietmar.fuchs@i-med.ac.at [Division of Biological Chemistry, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} LPS induces NF-{kappa}B, neopterin formation and tryptophan degradation in THP-1 cells. {yields} Close dose- and time-dependent correlations exist between these biochemical events. {yields} Data provides some evidence for a parallel induction of them upon TLR stimulation. {yields} Results can be of considerable relevance also in vivo. -- Abstract: Neopterin production is induced in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells upon stimulation with Th1-type cytokine interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}). In parallel, IFN-{gamma} induces the tryptophan-(trp)-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and triggers the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Translocation of the signal transduction element nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is induced by ROS and accelerates the pro-inflammatory response by activation of other pro-inflammatory pathways. Therefore, a close relationship between NF-{kappa}B expression, the production of neopterin and the degradation of trp can be assumed, although this has not been demonstrated so far. In the present in vitro study we compared the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on NF-{kappa}B activation, neopterin formation and the degradation of trp in THP-1Blue cells, which represent the human myelomonocytic cell line THP-1 stably transfected with an NF-{kappa}B inducible reporter system. In cells stimulated with LPS, a significant induction of NF-{kappa}B was observed, and this was paralleled by an increase of kynureunine (kyn) and neopterin concentrations and a decline of trp. The increase of the kyn to trp quotient indicates accelerated IDO activity. Higher LPS concentrations and longer incubation of cells were associated with higher activities of all three biochemical pathways and significant correlations existed between NF-{kappa}B activation, neopterin release and trp degradation (all p < 0.001). We conclude that there is a parallel induction of NF-{kappa}B, neopterin

  12. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  13. Co2+ binding cysteine and selenocysteine: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Tournois, Guewen; Cartailler, Thierry; Tortajada, Jeanine; Jeanvoine, Yannick

    2006-08-10

    In this paper we report structural and energetic data for cysteine and selenocysteine in the gas phase and the effect of Co(2+) complexation on their properties. Different conformers are analyzed at the DFT/B3LYP level of both bound and unbound species. Geometries, vibrational frequencies, and natural population analysis are reported and used to understand the activity of these species. In particular, we have focused our attention on the role of sulfur and selenium in the metal binding process and on the resulting deprotonation of the thiol and seleniol functions. From the present calculations we are able to explain, both from electronic structure and thermochemical point of views, a metal-induced thiol deprotonation as observed in gas-phase experiments. A similar process is expected in the case of selenocysteine. In fact, cobalt was found to have a preferential affinity with respect to thiolate and selenolate functions. This can be related to the observation that only S and Se are able-in thiolate and selenolate states-to make a partial charge transfer to the cobalt thus forming very stable complexes. Globally, very similar results are found when substituting S with Se, and a very small difference in cobalt binding affinity is found, thus justifying the use of this substitution in X-ray absorption experiments done on biomolecules containing cysteine metal binding pockets.

  14. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jérémy; Chibani, Kamel; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signaling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathione adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenyl-amides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  15. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  16. Copper oxide assisted cysteine hierarchical structures for immunosensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sumana, Gajjala, E-mail: sumanagajjala@gmail.com [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Tiwari, Ida [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-09-08

    The present work describes the promising electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on copper (II) assisted hierarchical cysteine structures (CuCys) varying from star to flower like morphology. The CuCys having average size of 10 μm have been synthesised using L-Cysteine as initial precursor in presence of copper oxide under environmentally friendly conditions in aqueous medium. To delineate the synthesis mechanism, detailed structural investigations have been carried out using characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of self-assembled CuCys on gold electrode shows surface controlled electrode reaction with an apparent electron transfer rate constant of 3.38 × 10{sup −4 }cm s{sup −1}. This innovative platform has been utilized to fabricate an immunosensor by covalently immobilizing monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor is found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of E. coli with a detection limit of 10 cfu/ml.

  17. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify.

  18. S-sulfhydration: a cysteine posttranslational modification in plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Ángeles; Serna, Antonio; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly reactive molecule that is currently accepted as a signaling compound. This molecule is as important as carbon monoxide in mammals and hydrogen peroxide in plants, as well as nitric oxide in both eukaryotic systems. Although many studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of hydrogen sulfide, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. One of the proposed mechanisms involves the posttranslational modification of protein cysteine residues, a process called S-sulfhydration. In this work, a modified biotin switch method was used for the detection of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) proteins modified by S-sulfhydration under physiological conditions. The presence of an S-sulfhydration-modified cysteine residue on cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase was demonstrated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and a total of 106 S-sulfhydrated proteins were identified. Immunoblot and enzyme activity analyses of some of these proteins showed that the sulfide added through S-sulfhydration reversibly regulates the functions of plant proteins in a manner similar to that described in mammalian systems.

  19. Redox interactions between Fe and cysteine: Spectroscopic studies and multiplet calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Stavitski, Eli; Dvorak, Joseph; Martínez, Carmen Enid

    2013-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycle of Fe is intricately linked with that of organic matter. Cysteine represents an organic molecule with functionalities (O, S, N functional groups) and a C backbone that may mimic the functional groups present in organic matter from terrestrial and aquatic environments. In the present study we explore the redox speciation and coordination environment of Fe and the roles of the various ligand atoms of cysteine (C, N, S) in iron-organic redox coupling and transformations. The changes in oxidation state of Fe, C, N, and S in laboratory-synthesized Fe(II)-cysteine (synthesized from ferrous sulfate) and Fe(III)-cysteine (synthesized from ferric nitrate) complexes are monitored as a function of time using synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Fe L2,3-edge XANES; C, N and S K-edge XANES; Fe K-edge EXAFS) and theoretical multiplet calculations using the program CTM4XAS (Charge Transfer Multiplet for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy). CTM4XAS calculations show that 80% of the total Fe in both the Fe(II)-cysteine and the Fe(III)-cysteine complexes is present as Fe2+ initially (t = 0), thus indicating preservation of Fe(II) in Fe(II)-cysteine and reduction of Fe(III) in Fe(III)-cysteine at initial conditions, the latter caused by an internal electron transfer reaction from S of -SH on the cysteine molecule. After 12 months, however, ∼60% of the total Fe is present as Fe3+ in the Fe(II)-cysteine complex whereas ∼67% of the total Fe is present as Fe2+ in the Fe(III)-cysteine complex. The fact that a larger proportion of the Fe in the Fe(III)-cysteine complex remained reduced after 12 months than that in the Fe(II)-cysteine complex suggests that the reduced Fe in Fe(III)-cysteine after 12 months is further stabilized via preferential binding with the donor atoms of cysteine. Stabilization via preferential binding is supported by a coordination environment that changed from tetrahedral Fe2+ binding to S at a distance of 2.3 Å at t = 0 for both Fe(II,III)-cysteine

  20. S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine: a novel chemical modification of tissue proteins by a Krebs cycle intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Nathan L; Wang, Yuping; Blatnik, Matthew; Frizzell, Norma; Walla, Michael D; Lyons, Timothy J; Alt, Nadja; Carson, James A; Nagai, Ryoji; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2006-06-01

    S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine (2SC) has been identified as a chemical modification in plasma proteins, in the non-mercaptalbumin fraction of human plasma albumin, in human skin collagen, and in rat skeletal muscle proteins and urine. 2SC increases in human skin collagen with age and is increased in muscle protein of diabetic vs. control rats. The concentration of 2SC in skin collagen and muscle protein correlated strongly with that of the advanced glycation/lipoxidation end-product (AGE/ALE), N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML). 2SC is formed by a Michael addition reaction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups with fumarate at physiological pH. Fumarate, but not succinate, inactivates the sulfhydryl enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in vitro, in concert with formation of 2SC. 2SC is the first example of spontaneous chemical modification of protein by a metabolic intermediate in the Krebs cycle. These observations identify fumarate as an endogenous electrophile and suggest a role for fumarate in regulation of metabolism.

  1. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of Cu2+ ion based on catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Li, Bowei; Wang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-02-15

    As an essential element, copper ion (Cu(2+)) plays important roles in human beings for its participation in diverse metabolic processes as a cofactor and/or a structural component of enzymes. However, excessive uptake of Cu(2+) ion gives rise to the risk of certain diseases. So, it is important to develop simple ways to monitor and detect Cu(2+) ion. In this study, a simple, facile colorimetric sensor for the ultrasensitive determination of Cu(2+) ion was developed based on the following principle: L-cysteine and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) could be conjugated to form the yellow product 2,4-dinitrophenylcysteine (DNPC), which was measurable at 355nm; however, upon addition of Cu(2+) ion, the absorbance of DNPC would be decreased owing to the Cu(2+) ion catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cystine in the presence of O2. Thus, the colorimetric detection of Cu(2+) ion could be achieved. The optimal pH, buffer, temperature and incubation time for the colorimetric sensor were obtained of pH 6.8 in 0.1M HEPES solution, 90 °C and 50 min, respectively. A good linearity within the range of 0.8-10 nM (r = 0.996) was attained, with a high detectability up to 0.5nM. Analyses of Cu(2+) ion in drinking water, lake water, seawater and biological samples were carried out and the method performances were found to agree well with that obtained by ICP-MS. The developed simple colorimetric sensor proved applicable for Cu(2+) ion determination in real samples with high sensitivity and selectivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis and application of a novel cysteine-based DTPA-NCS for targeted radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Young; Hong, Young Don; Kim, Hak-Sung; Choi, Sun-Ju

    2013-04-01

    For the development of safe and effective protein-based radiolabeled complexes such as radioimmunotherapy (RIT), the selection of the radionuclides and the chelating agents used for the radiolabeling of tumor-targeting molecules is a critical factor. We aim to synthesize a novel bifunctional chelating agent containing the isothiocyanate group for easy conjugation with antibodies having the characteristics of high stable chelation with therapeutic radionuclides. We have synthesized the DTPA analogue retaining L-cysteine as a core ligand of the thiol group. The chelating power of cysteine-based DTPA-NCS (cys-DTPA-NCS) was compared with that of commercial ρ-SCN-Bn-DTPA. In an application, the cetuximab was radioimmunoconjugated with (177)Lu using cys-DTPA-NCS. The affinity was tested in a cell line overexpressing EGFR. A therapy study was conducted in nude mice with subcutaneous HT-29 xenografts. The cys-DTPA-NCS presents an excellent ability to chelate as compared to the ρ-SCN-Bn-DTPA. For mean ratio chemical labeling yields of 95%, the result was 0.97. (177)Lu-cys-DTPA-NCS-cetuximab was prepared under ambient condition with a high radiolabeling yield and the radiochemical purity was sustained for at least 6days. The IC50 value of the (177)Lu-labeled cetuximab was 10nM (95% confidence). The stability and therapeutic efficacy of the candidate radiopharmaceutical were verified. The new DTPA derivative, cys-DTPA-NCS, is a good bifunctional chelating agent that can be used for protein-based radiopharmaceutical using lanthanides such as (177)Lu and (90)Y. The prepared (177)Lu-cys-DTPA-NCS-cetuximab can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of human colorectal tumor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protective role of purified cysteine proteinases against Fasciola gigantica infection in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ahwany, Eman; Rabia, Ibrahim; Nagy, Faten; Zoheiry, Mona; Diab, Tarek; Zada, Suher

    2012-03-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the public health problems in the world. Cysteine proteinases (CP) released by Fasciola gigantica play a key role in parasite feeding, migration through host tissues, and in immune evasion. There has been some evidence from several parasite systems that proteinases might have potential as protective antigens against parasitic infections. Cysteine proteinases were purified and tested in vaccine trials of sheep infected with the liver fluke. Multiple doses (2 mg of CP in Freund's adjuvant followed by 3 booster doses 1 mg each at 4 week intervals) were injected intramuscularly into sheep 1 week prior to infect orally with 300 F. gigantica metacercariae. All the sheep were humanely slaughtered 12 weeks after the first immunization. Changes in the worm burden, ova count, and humoral and cellular responses were evaluated. Significant reduction was observed in the worm burden (56.9%), bile egg count (70.7%), and fecel egg count (75.2%). Immunization with CP was also found to be associated with increases of total IgG, IgG(1), and IgG(2) (P<0.05). Data showed that the serum cytokine levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, revealed significant decreases (P<0.05). However, the anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6, showed significant increases (P<0.05). In conclusion, it has been found that CP released by F. gigantica are highly important candidates for a vaccine antigen because of their role in the fluke biology and host-parasite relationships.

  4. Emission of hydrogen sulfide by leaf tissue in response to L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiya, J.; Schmidt, A.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1982-08-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to L-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H/sub 2/S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to L-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H/sub 2/S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar L-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar L-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar L-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H/sub 2/S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to L-cysteine; neither D-cysteine nor L-cysteine elicited H/sub 2/S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H/sub 2/S formation and its release occurred in response to L-cysteine. Feeding experiments with (/sup 35/S)t-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H/sub 2/S was derived from sulfur in the L-cysteine supplied.

  5. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: parameterization and validation of a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2012-11-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pK(a) s from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pK(a) s. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pK(a) s; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pK(a) s. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pK(a) values (where the calculation should reproduce the pK(a) within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pK(a) in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pK(a) should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Functional characterization of enzymes involved in cysteine biosynthesis and H(2)S production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Daniela; Santana, Marianela; Nowicki, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is expected to synthetize de novo cysteine by different routes, among which the two-step pathway involving serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase (CS) is comprised. Also, cystathionine β synthase (CBS) might contribute to the de novo generation of cysteine in addition to catalyze the first step of the reverse transsulfuration route producing cystathionine. However, neither the functionality of CS nor that of cystathionine γ lyase (CGL) has been assessed. Our results show that T. cruzi CS could participate notably more actively than CBS in the de novo synthesis of cysteine. Interestingly, at the protein level T. cruzi CS is more abundant in amastigotes than in epimastigotes. Unlike the mammalian homologues, T. cruzi CGL specifically cleaves cystathionine into cysteine and is unable to produce H(2)S. The expression pattern of T. cruzi CGL parallels that of CBS, which unexpectedly suggests that in addition to the de novo synthesis of cysteine, the reverse transsulfuration pathway could be operative in the mammalian and insect stages. Besides, T. cruzi CBS produces H(2)S by decomposing cysteine or via condensation of cysteine with homocysteine. The latter reaction leads to cystathionine production, and is catalyzed remarkably more efficiently than the breakdown of cysteine. In T. cruzi like in other organisms, H(2)S could exert regulatory effects on varied metabolic processes. Notably, T. cruzi seems to count on stage-specific routes involved in cysteine production, the multiple cysteine-processing alternatives could presumably reflect this parasite's high needs of reducing power for detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  7. Gluten gel and film properties in the presence of cysteine and sodium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuno-Ohta, Naoko; Yamada, Mariko; Inomata, Masako; Konagai, Hiromi; Kataoka, Tomomi

    2009-08-01

    Wheat flour has an ability of forming dough by mixing with water, which exhibits a rheological property required for making bread. The major protein is gluten, which is a valuable protein material for food industry. In this study, gluten protein gels and films were formed with cysteine and sodium alginate. Adding cysteine improved gel and film properties (stress relaxation behavior, bending strength). The gel containing 0.01 M cysteine had a longer relaxation time and was more rigid than the gel without cysteine. Although adding sodium alginate to the gluten suspension containing cysteine improved the water-holding ability and homogeneity of the gel network, the film from this gel was more brittle than the gluten film with cysteine alone. Microstructural observations of the gels and films with scanning electron microscopy suggested that water evaporation was more heterogeneous from the gel containing sodium alginate than from the gel with cysteine alone. Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) analysis during film formation suggested that the presence