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Sample records for human congenital syndromes

  1. Clinical and molecular characterisation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, M.H.F.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of clinical and molecular investigation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations as a hallmark feature, with emphasis on nail patella syndrome, small patella syndrome, isolated patellar aplasia or hypoplasia, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The el

  2. Clinical and molecular characterisation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, M.H.F.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the results are described of clinical and molecular investigation of human syndromes with congenital patellar malformations as a hallmark feature, with emphasis on nail patella syndrome, small patella syndrome, isolated patellar aplasia or hypoplasia, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome. The

  3. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

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    Claudia Fanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CNS (Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a disorder characterized by the presence of a nephrotic syndrome in the first three months of life. Different pathologies can cause this syndrome. In general, we can distinguish primary forms (sporadic and hereditary and secondary forms (acquired and associated with other syndromes. The most common form is the Finnish CNS (CNF, congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type, a hereditary form whose name derives from the fact that the highest incidence is described in that country (1.2:10,000. The pathogenesis, the clinical picture, the diagnostic criteria, the therapy and the outcome are described in details.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  4. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

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    Charles Antzelevitch

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Long QT intervals in the ECG have long been associated with sudden cardiac death. The congenital long QT syndrome was first described in individuals with structurally normal hearts in 1957.1 Little was known about the significance of a short QT interval. In 1993, after analyzing 6693 consecutive Holter recordings Algra et al concluded that an increased risk of sudden death was present not only in patients with long QT interval, but also in patients with short QT interval (<400 ms.2 Because this was a retrospective analysis, further evaluation of the data was not possible. It was not until 2000 that a short-QT syndrome (SQTS was proposed as a new inherited clinical syndrome by Gussak et al.3 The initial report was of two siblings and their mother all of whom displayed persistently short QT interval. The youngest was a 17 year old female presenting with several episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation requiring electrical cardioversion.3 Her QT interval measured 280 msec at a heart rate of 69. Her 21 year old brother displayed a QT interval of 272 msec at a heart rate of 58, whereas the 51 year old mother showed a QT of 260 msec at a heart rate of 74. The authors also noted similar ECG findings in another unrelated 37 year old patient associated with sudden cardiac death.

  5. Schinzel-Giedion syndrome and congenital megacalyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, T E; Sweetser, D A; McAlister, W H; Dowton, S B

    1993-01-01

    The Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive condition with typical facies, skeletal manifestations and congenital hydronephrosis. We report an infant with characteristic findings who had bilateral congenital megacalyces. Congenital megacalyces is believed to be a developmental abnormality, occurs in other malformation syndromes and has not previously been described in the Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

  6. Syndromes with congenital brittle bones

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    Plotkin Horacio

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no clear definition of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI. The most widely used classification of OI divides the disease in four types, although it has been suggested that there may be at least 12 forms of OI. These forms have been named with numbers, eponyms or descriptive names. Some of these syndromes can actually be considered congenital forms of brittle bones resembling OI (SROI. Discussion A review of different syndromes with congenital brittle bones published in the literature is presented. Syndromes are classified in "OI" (those secondary to mutations in the type I pro-collagen genes, and "syndromes resembling OI" (those secondary to mutations other that the type I pro-collagen genes, identified or not. A definition for OI is proposed as a syndrome of congenital brittle bones secondary to mutations in the genes codifying for pro-collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2. Summary A debate about the definition of OI and a possible clinical and prognostic classification are warranted.

  7. NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Rabies, animal to Rubella, congenital syndrome - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported...

  8. Unilateral straight hair and congenital horner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Frederick M; Wertenbaker, Christian; Cho, Hyung; Marmor, Maury A; Ahn-Lee, Sandra S; Bernard, Bruno A

    2012-06-01

    Congenital Horner syndrome is a rare disorder that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of Horner syndrome. Like Horner syndrome in general, it consists primarily of ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis. Congenital Horner syndrome may manifest some special features such as iris heterochromia since the sympathetic nervous system is an essential component for the development and maintenance of eye color. We present 3 cases of unilateral straight hair in association with congenital Horner syndrome in which the patients had straight hair ipsilateral to the Horner syndrome, whereas on the contralateral side, it was curly, and we discuss possible mechanisms for this phenomenon.

  9. Human syndromes with congenital patellar anomalies and the underlying gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, E.M.H.F.; Kampen, A. van; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Knoers, N.V.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic disorders characterized by congenital patellar aplasia or hypoplasia belong to a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous group of lower limb malformations. Patella development involves different molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating dorso-ventral patterning, cartilage and

  10. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (Beals syndrome

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    Alanay Yasemin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (Beals syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by multiple flexion contractures, arachnodactyly, severe kyphoscoliosis, abnormal pinnae and muscular hypoplasia. It is caused by a mutation in FBN2 gene on chromosome 5q23. Although the clinical features can be similar to Marfan syndrome (MFS, multiple joint contractures (especially elbow, knee and finger joints, and crumpled ears in the absence of significant aortic root dilatation are characteristic of Beals syndrome and rarely found in Marfan syndrome. The incidence of CCA is unknown and its prevalence is difficult to estimate considering the overlap in phenotype with MFS; the number of patients reported has increased following the identification of FBN2 mutation. Molecular prenatal diagnosis is possible. Ultrasound imaging may be used to demonstrate joint contractures and hypokinesia in suspected cases. Management of children with CCA is symptomatic. Spontaneous improvement in camptodactyly and contractures is observed but residual camptodactyly always remains. Early intervention for scoliosis can prevent morbidity later in life. Cardiac evaluation and ophthalmologic evaluations are recommended.

  11. Congenital rubella syndrome and delayed manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Several hypotheses of different medical and psychological delayed manifestations among people who have congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) have been discussed. This study tests some of these hypotheses of delayed manifestations. Methods: Gathering information about 35 individuals who hav...... which people with CRS face must primarily be understood in relation to congenital deafblindness and dual sensory and communicative deprivation....

  12. Mutations in different functional domains of the human muscle acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit in patients with the slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croxen, R; Newland, C; Beeson, D; Oosterhuis, H; Chauplannaz, G; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    1997-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a group of rare genetic disorders that compromise neuromuscular transmission. A subset of these disorders, the slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS), is dominantly inherited and has been shown to involve mutations within the muscle acetylcholine rece

  13. Congenital rubella syndrome in Iran

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    Eftekhar Hasan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS can be prevented with appropriate vaccination programs. The prevalence rates of rubella and CRS in Iran are unknown; therefore, the risk of exposure in pregnant women is not clear. The prevalence of CRS in the pre-vaccine period can be estimated by evaluating the proportion of children in the population with sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella. Methods This was a case-control study to estimate prevalence of CRS in Tehran (Iran by evaluating the proportion of children with sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella. The study used rubella antibody titer as an indicator, and compared the prevalence of rubella antibody between children with and without sensorineural hearing loss. Using these findings, the proportion of cases of sensorineural hearing loss attributable to rubella was estimated. Results A total of 225 children aged 1 to 4 years were entered into the study (113 cases and 112 controls. There was a significant difference between cases and controls with regard to rubella antibody seropositivity (19.5% vs. 8.9%, respectively, odds ratio = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.04–5.97. The proportion of sensorineural hearing loss cases attributable to rubella was found to be 12%, corresponding to a CRS prevalence of 0.2/1000. Conclusion The prevalence of CRS was approximately 0.2/1000 before rubella vaccination in Iran, Moreover; the results suggest that implementation of appropriate rubella vaccination programs could potentially prevent about 12% of cases of sensorineural hearing loss in Iranian children. This data could potentially be used as baseline data, which in conjunction with an appropriate method, to establish a surveillance system for rubella vaccination in Iran. An appropriate surveillance system is needed, because the introduction of a rubella vaccine without epidemiological data and an adequate monitoring program could result in the shifting of rubella cases to higher

  14. A Case of Congenital Syndromic Hydrocephalus: A Subtype of ‘Game-Friedman-Paradice Syndrome'

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    Tapan Kumar Jana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human hydrocephalus is a disorder of abnormality in CSF flow or resorption, which has been classified in pertinent literature as congenital and acquired. Congenital hydrocephalus can present as an isolated phenomenon which is common; or with associated anomalies affecting other organs, disturbing physiology or presenting as a syndrome. This report describes a case with congenital foetal hydrocephalus, hypoplastic lungs with super-numery lobations and large left lobe of liver compared to right. Thus far, a review of the literature indicates that this case can be postulated as a subtype of Game-Friedman-Paradice syndrome.

  15. Congenital myasthenic syndrome of Brahman cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.

    2006-01-01

    The postsynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome that is the subject of this thesis is caused by a deficiency of nAChR at the neuromuscular junction, resulting from homozygosity for a null mutation in the ε-subunit gene (CHRNE 470del20). To date, this represents the only naturally occurring CMS in

  16. Escobar syndrome mimicing congenital patellar syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-01-01

    ...) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome...

  17. Mutations in SMG9, Encoding an Essential Component of Nonsense-Mediated Decay Machinery, Cause a Multiple Congenital Anomaly Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Anazi, Shams; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Caddle, L. Brianna; Palmer, Kristina; Ali, Rehab; Alshidi, Tarfa; Hagos, Samya; Goodwin, Leslie; Hashem, Mais; Wakil, Salma M.; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Colak, Dilek; Murray, Stephen A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is an important process that is best known for degrading transcripts that contain premature stop codons (PTCs) to mitigate their potentially harmful consequences, although its regulatory role encompasses other classes of transcripts as well. Despite the critical role of NMD at the cellular level, our knowledge about the consequences of deficiency of its components at the organismal level is largely limited to model organisms. In this study, we report two consanguineous families in which a similar pattern of congenital anomalies was found to be most likely caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMG9, encoding an essential component of the SURF complex that generates phospho-UPF1, the single most important step in NMD. By knocking out Smg9 in mice via CRISPR/Cas9, we were able to recapitulate the major features of the SMG9-related multiple congenital anomaly syndrome we observed in humans. Surprisingly, human cells devoid of SMG9 do not appear to have reduction of PTC-containing transcripts but do display global transcriptional dysregulation. We conclude that SMG9 is required for normal human and murine development, most likely through a transcriptional regulatory role, the precise nature of which remains to be determined. PMID:27018474

  18. Ophthalmic Manifestations of Congenital Zika Syndrome in Colombia and Venezuela.

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    Yepez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe A; Pettito, Michele; Peñaranda, Carlos F; de Yepez, Jazmin; Maestre, Gladys; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2017-05-01

    The ocular manifestations and sequelae of Zika virus infection are not well known. Recently, the World Health Organization changed the declaration of Zika as a public health emergency and designated the viral outbreak and related microcephaly clusters as a long-term program of work. This change indicates the urgent need to evaluate and document ophthalmic manifestations in patients for timely management of this disease. In addition, confirmation whether the public health problem in Brazil extends to other regions in South America is needed. To report the ocular manifestations of congenital Zika syndrome with microcephaly in Colombia and Venezuela. This prospective case series included 43 patients from 2 ophthalmic centers in Colombia and Venezuela who underwent evaluation from October 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016, and were clinically diagnosed with congenital Zika syndrome. Twenty patients were Hispanic; 13, African; 8, white; and 2, Native American. Ophthalmic and systemic evaluations and serologic testing were performed on all infants. Patients underwent external ocular examination and dilated ophthalmoscopy. Serologic testing ruled out toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, and human immunodeficiency virus. Ophthalmic manifestations of congenital Zika syndrome. Of the 43 patients included in this series (28 female and 15 male), the mean (SD) age at examination was 2.1 (1.5) months. The mothers of all the children had no ophthalmic findings and did not report ocular symptoms during pregnancy. All patients had bilateral ophthalmic manifestations. Optic nerve findings included hypoplasia with the double-ring sign, pallor, and increased cup-disc ratio in 5 patients (11.6%). Macular abnormalities included mild to severe pigment mottling in 27 patients (63%) and lacunar maculopathy in 3 (6.9%). Chorioretinal scarring was present in 3 patients (7%). Eleven patients (26%) had a combination of lesions in the posterior pole. Five patients (12%) were

  19. Congenital cataract facial dysmorphism neuropathy syndrome: a clinically recognizable entity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shabo, G.; Scheffer, H.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Pasman, J.W.; Spruit, M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism neuropathy syndrome is a recently delineated autosomal recessive condition exclusively found in the Gypsy population. Congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism neuropathy syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the CTDP1 gene, leading to disruption of the

  20. Hyperpyrexia associated with congenital Long QT Syndrome

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    Nuriye Tarakci

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome (CLQTS is a genetic disorder presented with prolonged QT interval. In these patients, risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias is high. Bradycardia may exhibit as a result of intrauterine fetal atrioventricular block, sinus bradycardia, tachycardia in these patient. Prolonged QT interval and multisystem involvement such as sensorineural hearing loss, muscle paralysis, immune deficiency, syndactyly have been reported in these patient . We have detected hyperpyrexia without clinical immunodeficiency and infection in our patient. To our knowledge, our patient is the first case in the literature . [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 909-903

  1. Case report: Congenital short bowel syndrome

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    Palle Lalitha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital short bowel syndrome (SBS is a relatively rare condition as compared to acquired SBS. It is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Infants usually present with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and diarrhea. It is important to suspect and diagnose this condition promptly, as early initiation of parenteral nutrition or surgery, if necessary, may result in a favorable outcome. We discuss a case of an infant aged 26 days, who presented with failure to thrive, recurrent vomiting, and weight loss. A contrast study of the gastrointestinal tract revealed a short small bowel, with malrotation. The infant was started on parenteral nutrition, but succumbed shortly thereafter to severe disseminated sepsis.

  2. Congenital long QT syndrome in children

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    Cerović Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization disorder characterized by prolonged QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG and increased propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and cardiac events. LQTS might be acquired or congenital, which presents a group of channelopathies that occur due to mutation in one of 15 so far identified genes. The most frequent types of congenital LTQS are LQT1, LQT2 and LQT3. Prolonged or delayed repolarization leads to the increase of action potential duration which predisposes early afterdepolarization, as well as the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization, both contributing to the development of Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia. Clinical manifestations of LQTS are palpitations, syncope, aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death, but it can also be asymptomatic. Trigger factors for symptoms are specific for certain genotype. LQTS examination includes thorough clinical and family history focused on distinctive data (repeated syncopes, cases of sudden cardiac death in the family, hereditary arrhythmias, resting ECG, exercise stress testing and genetic analysis, with additional methods (serial ECG records, 24h ECG Holter, epinephrine test. Clinical LQTS diagnosis is based on Schwartz's scoring system, while the criteria for final diagnosis of LQTS depend on Schwartz's score, QT interval duration, presence of pathogenic mutation and clinical symptoms. Treatment approach begins with lifestyle modifications and β-blockers therapy, while other options include implantable cardioverter- defibrillator, permanent pacemaker or surgical sympathectomy. Sudden cardiac death is the reason of 90% of sudden deaths in young athletes, while LQTS is one of its causes. Recommendations for physical activities in children with congenital LQTS arise from the ones for adults and they presume very strict limitations. Further researches are expected to advance the understanding of genotype

  3. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. PHACE syndrome and congenitally absent thyroid gland at MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, Mark D; Yu, John-Paul J; Asch, Sarah; Mathes, Erin F

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, and abnormalities of the eye. Thyroid disorders associated with PHACE syndrome have been described, although there are limited reports of this rare occurrence. We report a case of PHACE syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism in an infant, for which absent thyroid gland was diagnosed at magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Primary congenital glaucoma associated with Patau syndrome with long survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Pimkwan; Kuchtey, John; Dev, V G; Kuchtey, Rachel

    2010-06-23

    Ocular abnormalities are common in Patau syndrome (trisomy 13), but only a few cases with congenital glaucoma have been reported, some of which were associated with other ocular defects. This report describes a case of primary congenital glaucoma in an 11-year-old patient with full trisomy 13.

  6. Congenital Cases of Concomitant Harlequin and Horner Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, Juliette; Piyaraly, Saguiraly; Dupuy, Alain; Cochat, Pierre; Phan, Alice

    2017-03-01

    We report three pediatric cases of concomitant congenital Horner and Harlequin syndromes. This association suggests a lesion at the superior cervical ganglion or just inferior. Often, no underlying lesion is documented.

  7. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginat, Daniel T. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Robson, Caroline D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  8. Major congenital anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed...... to determine if the introduction of these screening programs and the subsequent termination of prenatally detected pregnancies were associated with any decline in the prevalence of additional anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome. The study sample consisted of 7,044 live births and fetal deaths with Down...... syndrome registered in 28 European population-based congenital anomaly registries covering seven million births during 2000-2010. Overall, 43.6% (95% CI: 42.4-44.7%) of births with Down syndrome had a cardiac anomaly and 15.0% (14.2-15.8%) had a non-cardiac anomaly. Female babies with Down syndrome were...

  9. Congenital Cholestatic Syndromes: What Happens When Children Grow Up?

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    Simon C Ling

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although advances in the management of children with congenital cholestasis have enabled many to survive into adulthood with their native livers, even the most common of these conditions remains rare in adult hepatology practice. Among four congenital cholestatic syndromes (biliary atresia, Alagille syndrome, Caroli disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis, and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, the published data on outcomes of the syndromes into adulthood suggest that a spectrum of severity of liver disease can be expected, from cirrhosis (almost universal in adults with biliary atresia who have not required liver transplantation to mild and subclinical (eg, in the previously undiagnosed affected parent of an infant with Alagille syndrome. Complications associated with portal hypertension and nutritional deficiencies are common, and other associated features of the cholestatic syndrome may require appropriate attention, such as congenital heart disease in Alagille syndrome. Indications for liver transplantation include synthetic failure, progressive encephalopathy, intractable pruritus, recurrent biliary sepsis and recurrent complications of portal hypertension. Improved understanding of biliary physiology will hopefully translate into improved therapy for children and adults with cholestasis.

  10. Bilateral congenital cataracts in an infant with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Banu Güzel; Altıok-Clark, Özden; İlhan, Hatice Deniz; Sayar, Ersin; Yücel, İclal; Mıhçı, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    Congenital cataract is one of the most treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of approximately 2.5:10,000 infants under the age of 1 year. Congenital cataract can be observed with certain chromosomal abnormalities, such as trisomies, deletions, translocations and Turner syndrome. In Klinefelter syndrome, however, ocular complications and cataract are not commonly encountered, so reports in the literature are very rare. In this manuscript, we present a 3-month-old male infant who had congenital cataracts. Chromosomal analysis revealed that his karyotype was 47,XXY. He did not show any of the main clinical signs of Klinefelter syndrome because of his very young age. To the best of our knowledge, our patient is only the second-ever case reported in the literature in which congenital cataracts have been found in an infant with a nonmosaic 47,XXY karyotype. The aim of the present report is to both describe the ocular abnormalities that can sometimes be found in Klinefelter syndrome and to emphasize the importance of performing a karyotype analysis in order to rule out chromosome abnormalities in patients with congenital cataracts.

  11. Congenital upper eyelids ectropion in Down’s syndrome

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    Corredor-Osorio, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital bilateral ectropion of the upper eyelids is a rare, benign condition reported in ophthalmic literature. It is more frequently associated with Down’s syndrome, ichthyosis, and sporadic cases in newborns from black population. We report three cases of congenital bilateral upper eyelid ectropion associated with Down’s syndrome. Management of these patients usually requires medial and lateral canthoplasties, full-thickness pentagonal resection of the upper eyelids and placement of skin grafts. We present herein the evolution of one of these patients and we will discuss the mechanism of the eyelid ectropion and its treatment.

  12. Diaphragm pacers as a treatment for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maida Lynn; Tablizo, Mary Anne; Kun, Sheila; Keens, Thomas G

    2005-09-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome is a rare syndrome present from birth, and is defined as the failure of automatic control of breathing. All patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome require life-long ventilatory support during sleep, although approximately a third of patients require ventilatory support 24 h per day. Diaphragm pacers offer a modality of ventilatory support that affords congenital central hypoventilation syndrome patients with maximal mobility for full-time ventilatory patients, and they may allow for a more normal lifestyle in the appropriate patient. They may permit tracheostomy decannulation in those requiring only support during sleep. Diaphragm pacing entails surgical placement of an electrode onto the phrenic nerve, connected to a subcutaneous receiver. There is an external battery-operated transmitter and antenna placed on the skin over the receiver. The transmitter emits energy, similar to radio transmission, which is converted into an electrical current by the receiver. This stimulates the phrenic nerve resulting in a diaphragmatic contraction. Settings on the transmitter include respiratory rate and electrical voltage, and are adjusted to give enough tidal volume to allow for adequate oxygenation and ventilation. Therefore, diaphragm pacing is an attractive alternative mode of mechanically assisted ventilation for many patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

  13. Congenital staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in a premature infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveman, LM; Fleer, A; de Vries, LS; Gerards, LJ

    2004-01-01

    A case of congenital staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) with fatal outcome in a premature infant is reported. An intrauterine infection with Staphylococcus aureus was probably the cause for the fulminant course of the disease. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, the infant died within 24

  14. Dental treatment of a child with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boka, V.; Lefkelidou, A.; Athanasiadou, E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome (CCHS) is a rare condition combining respiratory hypoventilation with symptoms of autonomic dysregulation. Management of patients requires both medical and dental expertise to achieve a successful outcome. The aim of this paper is to present th

  15. Congenital varicella syndrome in a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy

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    Vania A Villota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital varicella syndrome encompasses a broad spectrum of malformations present in children of mothers who developed chickenpox during the first 20 weeks of gestation. We report a case of a monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancy, with maternal exposure to chickenpox during the thirteenth week of gestation, which produced one symptomatic and one healthy child.

  16. Nitric Oxide-Sensitive Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Rubella Syndrome

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    Francesco Raimondi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a very rare presentation of congenital virus infection. We discuss the case of complete congenital rubella syndrome presenting at echocardiography with pulmonary hypertension that worsened after ductus ligation. Cardiac catheterization showed a normal pulmonary valve and vascular tree but a PAP=40 mmHg. The infant promptly responded to inhaled nitric oxide while on mechanical ventilation and was later shifted to oral sildenafil. It is not clear whether our observation may be due to direct viral damage to the endothelium or to the rubella virus increasing the vascular tone via a metabolic derangement.

  17. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

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    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  18. Congenital absence of the portal vein in a child with Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noe, Jacob A.; Burton, Edward M. [Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee College of Medicine-Chattanooga Branch, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Pittman, Heather C. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee College of Medicine-Chattanooga Branch, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Congenital absence of the portal vein (CAPV) is a rare malformation associated with hepatic encephalopathy and liver function abnormalities. We report a case of a 2-year-old with Turner syndrome, CAPV, and congenital heart malformations. (orig.)

  19. Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Hyun Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The proper development and coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis are essential for normal reproductive competence. The key factor that regulates the function of the HPG axis is gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH. Timely release of GnRH is critical for the onset of puberty and subsequent sexual maturation. Misregulation in this system can result in delayed or absent puberty and infertility. Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH and Kallmann syndrome (KS are genetic disorders that are rooted in a GnRH deficiency but often accompanied by a variety of non-reproductive phenotypes such as the loss of the sense of smell and defects of the skeleton, eye, ear, kidney, and heart. Recent progress in DNA sequencing technology has produced a wealth of information regarding the genetic makeup of CHH and KS patients and revealed the resilient yet complex nature of the human reproductive neuroendocrine system. Further research on the molecular basis of the disease and the diverse signal pathways involved will aid in improving the diagnosis, treatment, and management of CHH and KS patients as well as in developing more precise genetic screening and counseling regime.

  20. Temporary diazepam responsive apneic attacks and congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yis, Uluç; Kurul, Semra Hiz; Oztura, Ibrahim; Ozden, Omer; Akinci, Gülçin; Dirik, Eray

    2009-07-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular junction. Mutations in the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase cause presynaptic defects. The missense mutation I336T has been identified in Turkish population, and most of the cases carrying this mutation present with exercise-induced fatigability and ptosis. Although apneic attacks occur in these cases during febrile illness in childhood, the number of reported respiratory distress episodes during infancy is scarce. Another important feature of these cases is that response to esterase inhibitors is satisfactory. We present a case of congenital myasthenic syndrome with I336T choline acetyltransferase mutation who presented with numerous attacks of respiratory distress in the infancy period. Interestingly, the patient had myopathic findings on electromyography and diazepam decreased severity of apneic attacks. There was also no improvement with esterase inhibitors.

  1. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita - a rare congenital stiff joints syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Velisavljev-Filipović Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is not a disease but a term describing multiple congenital contractures. Etiological factors include neurological and primary myogenic diseases. This rare syndrome is present at birth and is characterized by reduced mobility of many joints. The contractures involve two or more joints with ankylosis. The accompanying musculature is hypoplastic, but multiple pterygia are also present. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous group of...

  2. Congenital scalp defects and vitreoretinal degeneration: redefining the Knobloch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaver, L H; Joffe, L; Spark, R P; Smith, B L; Hoyme, H E

    1993-04-15

    An apparently autosomal recessive syndrome of hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration (VRD) with retinal detachment, high myopia, and congenital encephalocele was described in 1971 by Knobloch and Layer [J Pediatr Ophthalmol 8:181-184]. Clinical confirmation of the presence of encephaloceles was lacking, and no neuropathologic studies were reported. We have evaluated a similarly affected family with 2 sibs with high myopia, VRD, and occipital scalp defects. Histologic examination of the scalp defects showed heterotopic neuronal tissue in both instances. The older girl has had a unilateral retinal detachment. Her other eye and both eyes of the younger sib have so far been treated successfully with prophylactic retinal cryotherapy. Both children have normal to above normal intelligence. The family reported by Knobloch and Layer [1971] and the sibship herein described appear to represent a distinct autosomal recessive trait. Analysis of the associated defects suggests an underlying defect in early cephalic neuroectodermal morphogenesis. Data from these families imply that congenital occipital scalp defects rather than true encephaloceles may, as is true in some cases of Meckel syndrome, accompany Knobloch syndrome. The presence of a congenital midline scalp defect should alert the clinician to possible underlying central nervous system and/or ocular pathology and should lead to consideration of further diagnostic evaluations and prophylactic measures.

  3. Emergence of Epidemic Zika Virus Transmission and Congenital Zika Syndrome: Are Recently Evolved Traits to Blame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms responsible for the dramatic emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV), accompanied by congenital Zika syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), remain unclear. However, two hypotheses are prominent: (i) evolution for enhanced urban transmission via adaptation to mosquito vectors, or for enhanced human infection to increase amplification, or (ii) the stochastic introduction of ZIKV into large, naive human populations in regions with abundant Aedes aegypti populations, leading to enough rare, severe infection outcomes for their first recognition. Advances in animal models for human infection combined with improvements in serodiagnostics, better surveillance, and reverse genetic approaches should provide more conclusive evidence of whether mosquito transmission or human pathogenesis changed coincidentally with emergence in the South Pacific and the Americas. Ultimately, understanding the mechanisms of epidemic ZIKV emergence, and its associated syndromes, is critical to predict future risks as well as to target surveillance and control measures in key locations. PMID:28074023

  4. Emergence of Epidemic Zika Virus Transmission and Congenital Zika Syndrome: Are Recently Evolved Traits to Blame?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Scott C

    2017-01-10

    The mechanisms responsible for the dramatic emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV), accompanied by congenital Zika syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), remain unclear. However, two hypotheses are prominent: (i) evolution for enhanced urban transmission via adaptation to mosquito vectors, or for enhanced human infection to increase amplification, or (ii) the stochastic introduction of ZIKV into large, naive human populations in regions with abundant Aedes aegypti populations, leading to enough rare, severe infection outcomes for their first recognition. Advances in animal models for human infection combined with improvements in serodiagnostics, better surveillance, and reverse genetic approaches should provide more conclusive evidence of whether mosquito transmission or human pathogenesis changed coincidentally with emergence in the South Pacific and the Americas. Ultimately, understanding the mechanisms of epidemic ZIKV emergence, and its associated syndromes, is critical to predict future risks as well as to target surveillance and control measures in key locations. Copyright © 2017 Weaver.

  5. Congenital Heart Disease in an Infant with 49,XXXXY Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Argun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available 49,XXXXY syndrome which is characterized with the addition of three extra X chromosomes to 46,XY is the rarest sex chromosome aneuploidy syndrome. Its classical findings were defined as a triad of mental retardation, hypogonadism and radioulnar synostosis. In 49,XXXXY syndrome, congenital heart defects like patent ductus arteriosus, atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis, Fallot’s tetralogy have been reported. We present a case diagnosed in the newborn stage with low birth weight, short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial findings and hypoplastic male genitalia who was found to have severe pulmonary hypertension and medium patent ductus arteriosus when admitted at 4 months of age with heart failure and who underwent transcathater ductus closure with Amplatzer Duct Occluder I. To our knowledge, our case is the first reported 49,XXXXY syndrome with patent ductus arteriosus closed with the transcathater route.

  6. Neuroblastoma in a Case with Congenital Horner’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Mayalı

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Miosis, ptosis, and ipsilateral facial anhidrosis are normally present in Horner’s syndrome. Pathologies which show central, preganglionic and postganglionic residence in sympathetic chain are present in its etiology. A 3-month-old girl baby was admitted to our clinic for ptosis in the left eye. Heterochromia, ptosis in the left eye, myosis and, ipsilateral anhidrosis were detected in her examination. In view of these findings, it seemed possible that her disease could be congenital Horner’s syndrome. Brachial plexus injury due to birth trauma plays a major role in the etiology of congenital Horner’s syndrome. There was not any birth trauma history in our patient. The patient was diagnosed to have neuroblastoma as a result of etiologic tests. In conclusion, Horner’s syndrome can be the presenting sign of childhood neuroblastoma. Therefore, it is advisable to examine the oculosympathetic system in detail in order to leave out any underlying serious disorder. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 325-6

  7. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome or congenital tracheobronchomegaly: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustins, Eduards; Kravale, Zaiga; Buls, Atis

    2013-12-01

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome or congenital tracheobronchomegaly is a chronic airway condition which for currently unknown reasons mostly affects males. It is commonly overlooked on conventional chest X-rays, and is considered to be rare, but the prevalence might be higher as commonly assumed. The hallmark of it is a dilatation of the main airways which frequently, but not always, causes marked, mainly respiratory, symptoms, and patients usually present with varying degrees of recurrent infections, breathlessness, haemoptysis, dyspnoea. Although at least 200 case reports have been published, there have been only a few attempts to review them, and none in the last 20 years. Due to the lack of clinical trials and wide variability of case-report format, a systematic review was deemed not feasible, therefore PubMed and Medline databases were searched using terms "Mounier-Kuhn syndrome", "tracheobronchomegaly", "tracheomegaly", and "bronchomegaly", without any time restrictions, to summarize currently known facts about the syndrome. To the authors' best knowledge, the result is currently the most comprehensive review of previously published literature about the congenital tracheobronchomegaly, and summarizes what's known about symptoms, prevalence, disease associations, and treatment options for this syndrome.

  8. [Congenital sick sinus syndrome in a healthy heart: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Youssef; Hmam, Mohamed; Battikh, Kaïes; Mlika, Azmi; Terras, Mouna; Longo, Salma; Kraïem, Sondes; Slimane, Mohamed L

    2003-06-01

    Isolated congenital sick sinusal syndrome on non harmed heart is a rare affection. Its association with an atrio-ventricular block is exceptional. The authors report a case of a 19 year-old patient, with an early history of bradycardia, hospitalised for effort intolerance. His electrocardiogram reveals a high degree sino-atrial block replaced by a junctional rhythm at 30/mn. During Treadmill test, the sinusal acceleration is satisfactory and an effort atrio-ventricular block was present. He later had a definitive stimulation under DDDR. This report shows that the sinusal node, in the same way as the atrio-ventricular node may be injured by congenital dysimmunitary process. The coexistence of these two conductive troubles worsen the prognosis and should lead more often to the practice of definitive stimulation by the only mode DDDR.

  9. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. D. Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial microsomia (CFM includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS. Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them.

  10. Clinical features of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome associated with different types of congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈果

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical features and hemodynamics of adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome in different types of congenital heart diseases (CHD) .Methods Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome with different types of CHD diagnosed by right heart

  11. Association of a congenital long QT syndrome type 1 with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    El?Battrawy, Ibrahim; Behnes, Michael; Borggrefe, Martin; Akin, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message The occurrence of takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with congenital long QT syndrome has rarely been described. This case report discusses the occurrence of a clinically overt takotsubo cardiomyopathy accompanied by congenital long QT syndrome type 1 in a female patient.

  12. Congenital short bowel syndrome as the presenting symptom in male patients with FLNA mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christine S.; Sribudiani, Yunia; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Carroll, Matthew; O'Loughlin, Edward; Chen, Chien-Huan; Brooks, Alice S.; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Atkinson, John P.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Autosomal recessive congenital short bowel syndrome is caused by mutations in CLMP. No mutations were found in the affected males of a family with presumed X-linked congenital short bowel syndrome or in an isolated male patient. Our aim was to identify the disease-causing mutation in these

  13. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Finlayson, Sarah; Morrow, Jasper M.; Rodriguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Fischmann, Arne; Thornton, John S.; Knight, Steve; Norbury, Ray; White, Mel; Al‐hajjar, Michal; Carboni, Nicola; Jayawant, Sandeep; Robb, Stephanie A.; Yousry, Tarek A; Beeson, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction In this study we investigated muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). Methods Twenty‐six patients with 9 CMS subtypes and 10 controls were imaged. T1‐weighted (T1w) and short‐tau inversion recovery (STIR) 3‐Tesla MRI images obtained at thigh and calf levels were scored for severity. Results Overall mean the T1w score was increased in GFPT1 and DPAGT1 CMS. T1w scans of the AChR‐deficiency, COLQ, and CHAT subjects were indistinguishable ...

  14. Monogenic human obesity syndromes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-01-01

    .... This chapter will consider the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterized to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  15. Ocular manifestations of congenital rubella syndrome in a developing country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi P

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the ocular manifestations of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS, a common cause of congenital cataracts in developing countries. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of case records of 46 sero-positive infants under 12 months of age who presented at Aravind Eye Hospital, Madurai between July 1993 and February 2001. The ocular and systemic examination details were recorded. RESULTS: Both eyes were affected in 41 (89% patients. Cataract was present in 81 (93.1% eyes; most of them were nuclear cataract (79, 97.5%. Other common ocular presentations included microphthalmos in 74 (85.1% eyes, iris abnormalities in 51 (58.6% eyes, and pigmentary retinopathy in 33 (37.9% eyes. Cataract, microphthalmos and iris hypoplasia was a common combination present in 49 (56.3% eyes. Systemic manifestations included cardiac anomalies in 23 (50% and neurological anomalies in 16 (34% children. Multi-system involvement was present in 32 (70% children. Low birth weight (below 2 kg was seen in 30% infants. CONCLUSION: CRS may present with a wide spectrum of ocular and systemic findings and requires a high index of suspicion for diagnosis. Any sick infant with unilateral or bilateral congenital cataract should be investigated thoroughly for CRS.

  16. Hospital-based surveillance of congenital rubella syndrome in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herini, Elisabeth Siti; Gunadi; Triono, Agung; Mulyadi, Asal Wahyuni Erlin; Mardin, Niprida; Rusipah; Soenarto, Yati; Reef, Susan E

    2017-03-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) has serious consequences, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, and severe birth defects in infants, resulting from rubella virus infection during pregnancy. However, rubella vaccine has not yet been implemented in Indonesia. This study aimed (1) to estimate the incidence of CRS in Indonesia, (2) describe the clinical features of CRS at our referral hospital, and (3) pilot a CRS surveillance system to be extended to other hospitals. We conducted a 4-month prospective surveillance study of infants aged Indonesia. Conducting hospital-based surveillance of CRS in other hospitals in Indonesia may be appropriate. What is Known: •Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) has serious consequences in infants resulting from rubella virus infection during pregnancy. •The incidence of CRS in most developed countries has greatly decreased since implementation of rubella vaccination. •Rubella vaccine has not yet been implemented in many developing countries. What is New: •The number of laboratory-confirmed CRS cases among Indonesian infants was high. •Implementation of rubella vaccine into immunization programs in Indonesia is important because of the high number of CRS cases. •Our study highlights the need for ongoing prospective surveillance of CRS in Indonesia.

  17. Congenital Lumbar Hernia with Lumbocostovertebral Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Vagholkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital lumbar hernia is one of the rare types of hernias. Anomalies of the ribs, spine, and muscles which constitute the lumbocostovertebral syndrome in association with congenital lumbar hernia make it the rarest of entities. In addition, a multitude of other organ systems may be involved. Case Report. A case of congenital lumbar hernia associated with lumbocostovertebral syndrome is presented in view of its rarity and diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Discussion. Anatomical background of congenital lumbar hernia associated with various other anomalies especially of the musculoskeletal structures is discussed. All cases of congenital lumbar hernia should be investigated for other congenital anomalies. Both open and laparoscopic approaches have been described for surgical treatment. Conclusion. Open surgical intervention is the mainstay of treatment taking into consideration the technical challenges posed by distorted anatomy due to the associated congenital anomalies.

  18. Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy with progressive sensorineural deafness (Harboyan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramowicz Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Harboyan syndrome is a degenerative corneal disorder defined as congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED accompanied by progressive, postlingual sensorineural hearing loss. To date, 24 cases from 11 families of various origin (Asian Indian, South American Indian, Sephardi Jewish, Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, Gypsy, Moroccan, Dominican have been reported. More than 50% of the reported cases have been associated with parental consanguinity. The ocular manifestations in Harboyan syndrome include diffuse bilateral corneal edema occurring with severe corneal clouding, blurred vision, visual loss and nystagmus. They are apparent at birth or within the neonatal period and are indistinguishable from those characteristic of the autosomal recessive CHED (CHED2. Hearing deficit in Harboyan is slowly progressive and typically found in patients 10–25 years old. There are no reported cases with prelinglual deafness, however, a significant hearing loss in children as young as 4 years old has been detected by audiometry, suggesting that hearing may be affected earlier, even at birth. Harboyan syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC4A11 gene located at the CHED2 locus on chromosome 20p13-p12, indicating that CHED2 and Harboyan syndrome are allelic disorders. A total of 62 different SLC4A11 mutations have been reported in 98 families (92 CHED2 and 6 Harboyan. All reported cases have been consistent with autosomal recessive transmission. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, detailed ophthalmological assessment and audiometry. A molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is feasible. A variety of genetic, metabolic, developmental and acquired diseases presenting with clouding of the cornea should be considered in the differential diagnosis (Peters anomaly, sclerocornea, limbal dermoids, congenital glaucoma. Audiometry must be performed to differentiate Harboyan syndrome from CHED2. Autosomal recessive types of CHED (CHED2 and

  19. CONGENITAL COMPLETE HEART BLOCK IN DOWN SYNDROME: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome ( T risomy 21 is the commonest disorder among chromosomal anomalies having incidence of 1:650 – 1:1000 live births. [1] The clinical manifestations of Down syndrome are numerous and can present in any body system. Down association of congenital heart disease is well known. Among all cases of congenital heart diseases, 4% - 10% are with Down syndrome, and 40% - 60% of Down syndrome patients have congenital heart disease. The most common congenital cardiac anomaly in Down syndrome is Atrioventricular septal defects, followed by patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defects. Oth er forms of complex heart disease can occur including overriding aorta and Tetralogy of fallot. [2] The pure Conduction defect are very rare to have association with the Down syndrome and is not reported in infancy so far.

  20. Congenital Mirror Movements in Gorlin Syndrome: A Case Report With DTI and Functional MRI Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Erdal; Gocmen, Rahsan; Yildiz, F Gokcem; Ozturk, Zeynelabidin; Temucin, Cagri; Teksam, Ozlem; Utine, Eda

    2016-03-01

    Congenital mirror movements are rare conditions that define the inability to perform unimanual movements. Gorlin syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is a genetic disorder with multiple nevi predisposing to basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal malformations. Herein we report on an adolescent patient with Gorlin syndrome and coexisting congenital mirror movements. To our knowledge, this is the first patient in the literature who has both of these very rare conditions.

  1. Congenital Zika syndrome with arthrogryposis: retrospective case series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Epitacio Leite Rolim; Lins, Otavio Gomes; Aragão, Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco; Brainer-Lima, Alessandra Mertens; Cruz, Danielle Di Cavalcanti Sousa; Rocha, Maria Angela Wanderley; Sobral da Silva, Paula Fabiana; Carvalho, Maria Durce Costa Gomes; do Amaral, Fernando José; Gomes, Joelma Arruda; Ribeiro de Medeiros, Igor Colaço; Ventura, Camila V; Ramos, Regina Coeli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical, radiological, and electromyographic features in a series of children with joint contractures (arthrogryposis) associated with congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus. Design Retrospective case series study. Setting Association for Assistance of Disabled Children, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Participants Seven children with arthrogryposis and a diagnosis of congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus during the Brazilian microcephaly epidemic. Main outcome measures Main clinical, radiological, and electromyographic findings, and likely correlation between clinical and primary neurological abnormalities. Results The brain images of all seven children were characteristic of congenital infection and arthrogryposis. Two children tested positive for IgM to Zika virus in the cerebrospinal fluid. Arthrogryposis was present in the arms and legs of six children (86%) and the legs of one child (14%). Hip radiographs showed bilateral dislocation in seven children, subluxation of the knee associated with genu valgus in three children (43%), which was bilateral in two (29%). All the children underwent high definition ultrasonography of the joints, and there was no evidence of abnormalities. Moderate signs of remodeling of the motor units and a reduced recruitment pattern were found on needle electromyography (monopolar). Five of the children underwent brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the remaining two CT only. All presented malformations of cortical development, calcifications predominantly in the cortex and subcortical white matter (especially in the junction between the cortex and white matter), reduction in brain volume, ventriculomegaly, and hypoplasia of the brainstem and cerebellum. MRI of the spine in four children showed apparent thinning of the cord and reduced ventral roots. Conclusions Congenital Zika syndrome should be added to the differential diagnosis of congenital

  2. Congenital Auricular Malformations: Description of Anomalies and Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel-Friedrich, Sylva

    2015-12-01

    Half of the malformations in the ear, nose, and throat region affect the ear. Malformations of the external ear (pinna or auricle with external auditory canal [EAC]) are collectively termed microtia. Microtia is a congenital anomaly that ranges in severity from mild structural abnormalities to complete absence of the external ear (anotia). Microtia occurs more frequently in males (∼2 or 3:1), is predominantly unilateral (∼70-90%), and more often involves the right ear (∼60%). The reported prevalence varies geographically from 0.83 to 17.4 per 10,000 births. Microtia may be genetic (with family history, spontaneous mutations) or acquired. Malformations of the external ear can also involve the middle ear and/or inner ear. Microtia may be an isolated birth defect, but associated anomalies or syndromes are described in 20 to 60% of cases, depending on study design. These generally fit within the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum; defects are located most frequently in the facial skeleton, facial soft tissues, heart, and vertebral column, or comprise a syndrome (e.g., Treacher Collins syndrome). Diagnostic investigation of microtia includes clinical examination, audiologic testing, genetic analysis and, especially in higher grade malformations with EAC deformities, computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT for the planning of surgery and rehabilitation procedures, including implantation of hearing aids.

  3. Pediatric patient with systemic lupus erythematosus & congenital acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: An unusual case and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaee Fariba

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The coexistence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in patients with congenital human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is rare. This is a case report of a child diagnosed with SLE at nine years of age. She initially did well on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hydroxychloroquine, and steroids. She then discontinued her anti-lupus medications and was lost to follow-up. At 13 years of age, her lupus symptoms had resolved and she presented with intermittent fevers, cachexia, myalgias, arthralgias, and respiratory symptoms. Through subsequent investigations, the patient was ultimately diagnosed with congenitally acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS.

  4. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, Gary E; Alicea-Vázquez, Vivianette; Grajales-Reyes, Jose G; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-08-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca(2+) overload, the activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective.

  5. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome: diagnostic and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasi AS

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajay S Kasi,1 Iris A Perez,1,2 Sheila S Kun,1 Thomas G Keens1,2 1Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, 2Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS is a rare genetic disorder with failure of central control of breathing and of the autonomic nervous system function due to a mutation in the paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B gene. Affected patients have absent or negligible ventilatory sensitivity to hypercapnia and hypoxemia, and they do not exhibit signs of respiratory distress when challenged with hypercarbia or hypoxia. The diagnosis of CCHS must be confirmed with PHOX2B gene mutation. Generally, the PHOX2B mutation genotype can aid in anticipating the severity of the phenotype. They require ventilatory support for life. Home assisted ventilation options include positive pressure ventilation via tracheostomy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and diaphragm pacing via phrenic nerve stimulation, but each strategy has its associated limitations and challenges. Since all the clinical manifestations of CCHS may not manifest at birth, periodic monitoring and early intervention are necessary to prevent complications and improve outcome. Life-threatening arrhythmias can manifest at different ages and a normal cardiac monitoring study does not exclude future occurrences leading to the dilemma of timing and frequency of cardiac rhythm monitoring and treatment. Given the rare incidence of CCHS, most health care professionals are not experienced with managing CCHS patients, particularly those with diaphragm pacers. With early diagnosis and advances in home mechanical ventilation and monitoring strategies, many CCHS children are surviving into adulthood presenting new challenges in their care. Keywords: congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, PHOX2B, home mechanical ventilation, diaphragm

  6. Thrombocytopenia and absent radii (TAR syndrome associated with bilateral congenital cataract: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Thrombocytopenia with absent radii is a rare congenital defect with hypomegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and bilateral radial aplasia that may have additional anomalies. We report the case of a girl baby with thrombocytopenia and absent radii syndrome and bilateral congenital cataract. This anomaly has not been previously reported in the children of a non- consanguineous marriage. Case presentation This case report describes a two-day-old girl baby of Arab origin with thrombocytopenia and absent radii syndrome and bilateral congenital cataract. Conclusions This report describes a finding of bilateral congenital cataract associated with thrombocytopenia and absent radii syndrome that has been reported only once before in the literature. This case report highlights a new ocular manifestation in one of the bone marrow failure syndromes.

  7. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vineet V; Pritti, Kumari; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP). The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH.

  8. A Case of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Mimicking Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Kang, Mira; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon; Min, Yong-Ki; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is characterized by decreased adrenal hormone production due to enzymatic defects and subsequent rise of adrenocorticotrophic hormone that stimulates the adrenal cortex to become hyperplastic, and sometimes tumorous. As the pathophysiology is basically a defect in the biosynthesis of cortisol, one may not consider CAH in patients with hypercortisolism. We report a case of a 41-yr-old man with a 4 cm-sized left adrenal tumorous lesion mimicking Cushing's syndrome who was diagnosed with CAH. He had central obesity and acanthosis nigricans involving the axillae together with elevated 24-hr urine cortisol level, supporting the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. However, the 24-hr urine cortisol was suppressed by 95% with the low dose dexamethasone suppression test. CAH was suspected based on the history of precocious puberty, short stature and a profound suppression of cortisol production by dexamethasone. CAH was confirmed by a remarkably increased level of serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone level. Gene mutation analysis revealed a compound heterozygote mutation of CYP21A2 (I173N and R357W). PMID:23166432

  9. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet V Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP. The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH.

  10. Poorly Controlled Congenital Hypothyroidism due to an Underlying Allgrove Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tellingen, V.; Finken, M.J.J.; Israëls, J.; Hendriks, Y.M.C.; Kamp, G.A.; van Santen, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital hypothyroidism of thyroidal origin (CHT) is a common disorder in pediatric endocrinology practices, which can be difficult to manage. Elevated thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations are in the great majority of cases explained by poor compliance to levothyroxine therapy. Methods Case description. Results We present a boy with CHT, with 2 heterozygous mutations in the TSH receptor gene, who showed persistently elevated TSH concentrations and psychomotor retardation, initially misinterpreted as malcompliance. At the age of 4 years, he was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency, wherefore a broad diagnostic search was initiated. After the start of glucocorticoid replacement therapy, his TSH normalized and the levothyroxine could be lowered. At the age of 6 years, his TSH increased again, this time caused by malabsorption of levothyroxine due to esophageal achalasia. In retrospect, alacrima was also present and the diagnosis of Allgrove syndrome was genetically confirmed. The CHT was considered a separate disease entity. Conclusions In case of persistently elevated TSH levels in children with CHT, causes other than noncompliance must be considered. Second, in establishing the cause of adrenal insufficiency, specific symptoms, such as alacrima, are easily overlooked. Third, Allgrove syndrome is a rare disorder, in which diagnostic delay can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. PMID:27255745

  11. Congenital combined eyelid imbrication and floppy eyelid syndrome: Case report and review of literature

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    Shivcharan Lal Chandravanshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital eyelid imbrication syndrome (CEIS is an extremely rare, benign, transient, self-limiting eyelid malposition disorder. The classic triad of signs in patients with a CEIS consists of bilateral upper eyelids overriding the lower eyelids when child was in sleep, bilateral medial and lateral canthal tendon laxity and tarsal conjunctival hyperemia. We report a third case of congenital combined eyelid imbrication and floppy eyelid syndrome in healthy neonate that was resolved within a week with conservative treatment.

  12. Congenital heart defects in two siblings in an Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Mehmet Necdet; Argin, Atilla

    2010-04-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by anomalies of the anterior segment of the eye, face, teeth, and umbilicus. Many other extraocular findings, including congenital heart defects, have been reported in association with this syndrome. It has been suggested by some investigators that the coexistence of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and congenital heart defects is not a chance event but it represents a distinct entity. We report a family in which four members in three generations have typical ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Two of them, who are siblings, also have congenital heart defects. The congenital heart defect was bicuspid aortic valve anomaly with severe stenosis and mild regurgitation in one sibling and ostium secundum atrial septal defect in the other. To our knowledge, the combination of congenital heart defects with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome in siblings has not been reported previously. Our observation further strengthens the notion that Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with congenital heart defects is not a chance event.

  13. Hippocampal volume reduction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

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    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a genetic disorder characterized by diminished drive to breathe during sleep and impaired CO(2 sensitivity, show brain structural and functional changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans, with impaired responses in specific hippocampal regions, suggesting localized injury.We assessed total volume and regional variation in hippocampal surface morphology to identify areas affected in the syndrome. We studied 18 CCHS (mean age+/-std: 15.1+/-2.2 years; 8 female and 32 healthy control (age 15.2+/-2.4 years; 14 female children, and traced hippocampi on 1 mm(3 resolution T1-weighted scans, collected with a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner. Regional hippocampal volume variations, adjusted for cranial volume, were compared between groups based on t-tests of surface distances to the structure midline, with correction for multiple comparisons. Significant tissue losses emerged in CCHS patients on the left side, with a trend for loss on the right; however, most areas affected on the left also showed equivalent right-sided volume reductions. Reduced regional volumes appeared in the left rostral hippocampus, bilateral areas in mid and mid-to-caudal regions, and a dorsal-caudal region, adjacent to the fimbria.The volume losses may result from hypoxic exposure following hypoventilation during sleep-disordered breathing, or from developmental or vascular consequences of genetic mutations in the syndrome. The sites of change overlap regions of abnormal functional responses to respiratory and autonomic challenges. Affected hippocampal areas have roles associated with memory, mood, and indirectly, autonomic regulation; impairments in these behavioral and physiological functions appear in CCHS.

  14. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita - a rare congenital stiff joints syndrome

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    Velisavljev-Filipović Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is not a disease but a term describing multiple congenital contractures. Etiological factors include neurological and primary myogenic diseases. This rare syndrome is present at birth and is characterized by reduced mobility of many joints. The contractures involve two or more joints with ankylosis. The accompanying musculature is hypoplastic, but multiple pterygia are also present. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous group of disorders with the incidence rate of 6.2/100000 liveborn infants. The true incidence cannot be established, because many cases result in spontaneous miscarriages or stillbirth. More than 90% of cases are associated with birth defects. The cause of this syndrome is unknown. Many forms are not hereditary, though there are hereditary forms as well. Case report. This paper presents a case with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. The pregnancy was not controlled regularly. During the pregnancy, oligohydramnion was detected. Due to contractures, labor ended is cesarean section. The child was born in the 34th week of gestation. Flexion and extension joint contractures were observed. Active and passive mobility of the afflicted joints was reduced. There was a limited motor function in the shoulder, elbow and wrist joints with a slight internal rotation of the shoulder joint and lower arm joints during pronation. The hips were subluxated; the feet were in equinovarus position and the fingers in ulnar deviation with partial syndactyly of the 4th and 5th fingers on the left hand. The infant had abnormal dermatoglyphics. The neck was short, and the 2nd and 3rd cervical vertebrae were fused. There was also a slight left-sided thoracic scoliosis. Trismus was present due to the existing ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint. The karyotype was normal. The serum creatinine phosphokinase was slightly elevated. The electromyographic picture indicate non-specific signs of

  15. 14q12 Microdeletion syndrome and congenital variant of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Katzaki, Eleni; Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Cohen, Monika; Pfundt, Rolph; Ariani, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Only two patients with 14q12 deletion have been reported to date. Here, we describe an additional patient with a similar deletion in order to improve the clinical delineation of this new microdeletion syndrome. The emerging phenotype is characterized by a Rett-like clinical course with an almost normal development during the first months of life followed by a period of regression. A peculiar facial phenotype is also present and it is characterized by mild dysmorphisms such as downslanting palpebral fissures, bilateral epicanthic folds, depressed nasal bridge, bulbous nasal tip, tented upper lip, everted lower lip and large ears. The relationship between this microdeletion syndrome and the congenital variant of Rett syndrome due to point mutations in one of the genes included in the deleted region, FOXG1, is discussed.

  16. Genetic Modifiers Predisposing to Congenital Heart Disease in the Sensitized Down Syndrome Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiqing; Cherry, Sheila; Klinedinst, Donna; DeLeon, Valerie; Redig, Jennifer; Reshey, Benjamin; Chin, Michael T.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2012-01-01

    Background About half of people with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit some form of congenital heart disease (CHD). However, trisomy for human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) alone is insufficient to cause CHD as half of all people with DS have a normal heart, suggesting that genetic modifiers interact with dosage sensitive gene(s) on Hsa21 to result in CHD. We hypothesize that a threshold exists in both Down syndrome and euploid populations for the number of genetic perturbations that can be tolerated before CHD results. Methods and Results We ascertained a group of individuals with DS and complete atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and sequenced two candidate genes for CHD, CRELD1, which is associated with AVSD in people with or without DS, and HEY2, whose mouse ortholog produces septal defects when mutated. Several deleterious variants were identified but the frequency of these potential modifiers was low. We crossed mice with mutant forms of these potential modifiers to the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome. Crossing loss-of-function alleles of either Creld1 or Hey2 onto the trisomic background caused a significant increase in the frequency of CHD, demonstrating an interaction between the modifiers and trisomic genes. We showed further that although either of these mutant modifiers is benign by itself, they interact to affect heart development when inherited together. Conclusions Using mouse models of Down syndrome and of genes associated with congenital heart disease we demonstrate a biological basis for an interaction that supports a threshold hypothesis for additive effects of genetic modifiers in the sensitized trisomic population. PMID:22523272

  17. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Congenital heart disease in 149 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza Casas, Ariadna; Puisac Uriol, Beatriz; Teresa Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Hernández Marcos, María; Ramos Fuentes, Feliciano J; Pie Juste, Juan

    2017-06-16

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is produced by mutations in genes that encode regulatory or structural proteins of the cohesin complex. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is not a major criterion of the disease, but it affects many individuals. The objective of this study was to study the incidence and type of CHD in patients with CdLS. Cardiological findings were evaluated in 149 patients with CdLS and their possible relationship with clinical and genetic variables. A percentage of 34.9 had CHD (septal defects 50%, pulmonary stenosis 27%, aortic coarctation 9.6%). The presence of CHD was related with neonatal hospitalisation (P=.04), hearing loss (P=.002), mortality (P=.09) and lower hyperactivity (P=.02), it being more frequent in HDAC8+ patients (60%), followed by NIPBL+ (33%) and SMC1A+ (28.5%). While septal defects predominate in NIPBL+, pulmonary stenosis is more common in HDAC8+. Patients with CdLS have a high incidence of CHD, which varies according to the affected gene, the most frequent findings being septal defects and pulmonary stenosis. Perform a cardiologic study in all these patients is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Visual impairment in children with congenital Zika syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Liana O; Ventura, Camila V; Lawrence, Linda; van der Linden, Vanessa; van der Linden, Ana; Gois, Adriana L; Cavalcanti, Milena M; Barros, Eveline A; Dias, Natalia C; Berrocal, Audina M; Miller, Marilyn T

    2017-08-01

    To describe the visual impairment associated with ocular and neurological abnormalities in a cohort of children with congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). This cross-sectional study included infants with microcephaly born in Pernambuco, Brazil, from May to December 2015. Immunoglobulin M antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the Zika virus on the cerebrospinal fluid samples was positive for all infants. Clinical evaluation consisted of comprehensive ophthalmologic examination including visual acuity, visual function assessment, visual developmental milestone, neurologic examination, and neuroimaging. A total of 32 infants (18 males [56%]) were included. Mean age at examination was 5.7 ± 0.9 months (range, 4-7 months). Visual function and visual developmental milestone could not be tested in 1 child (3%). Visual impairment was detected in 32 infants (100%). Retinal and/or optic nerve findings were observed in 14 patients (44%). There was no statistical difference between the patients with ocular findings and those without (P = 0.180). All patients (100%) demonstrated neurological and neuroimaging abnormalities; 3 (9%) presented with late-onset of microcephaly. Children with CZS demonstrated visual impairment regardless of retina and/or optic nerve abnormalities. This finding suggests that cortical/cerebral visual impairment may be the most common cause of blindness identified in children with CZS. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Jasper M.; Rodriguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Fischmann, Arne; Thornton, John S.; Knight, Steve; Norbury, Ray; White, Mel; Al‐hajjar, Michal; Carboni, Nicola; Jayawant, Sandeep; Robb, Stephanie A.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Beeson, David; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction In this study we investigated muscle magnetic resonance imaging in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS). Methods Twenty‐six patients with 9 CMS subtypes and 10 controls were imaged. T1‐weighted (T1w) and short‐tau inversion recovery (STIR) 3‐Tesla MRI images obtained at thigh and calf levels were scored for severity. Results Overall mean the T1w score was increased in GFPT1 and DPAGT1 CMS. T1w scans of the AChR‐deficiency, COLQ, and CHAT subjects were indistinguishable from controls. STIR images from CMS patients did not differ significantly from those of controls. Mean T1w score correlated with age in the CMS cohort. Conclusions MRI appearances ranged from normal to marked abnormality. T1w images seem to be especially abnormal in some CMS caused by mutations of proteins involved in the glycosylation pathway. A non‐selective pattern of fat infiltration or a normal‐appearing scan in the setting of significant clinical weakness should suggest CMS as a potential diagnosis. Muscle MRI could play a role in differentiating CMS subtypes. Muscle Nerve 54: 211–219, 2016 PMID:26789134

  20. Dental treatment of a child with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boka, V; Lefkelidou, A; Athanasiadou, E

    2016-06-01

    Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome (CCHS) is a rare condition combining respiratory hypoventilation with symptoms of autonomic dysregulation. Management of patients requires both medical and dental expertise to achieve a successful outcome. The aim of this paper is to present the dental management of a child diagnosed with CCHS, without pharmacological measures and in cooperation with medical expertise. A 7-year-old girl was referred to a private dental practice with the chief complaints being pain and poor aesthetics. The child had been diagnosed with CCHS since infancy and had undergone several courses of medication. Although the patient was uncooperative, the paediatric pulmonologist advised against general anaesthesia. As a result, she was treated in the operating theater (OT) without sedatives, being monitored throughout the entire procedure. A total of eight primary teeth needed dental treatment (3 were restored, 4 were extracted and 1 was restored with a preformed metal crown). A mandibular lingual holding arch was placed, two weeks later. The patient was seen after 6 months and 1 year. Her oral hygiene had improved significantly and her mother reported that the child ate better, brushed her teeth on a daily basis and was careful with dietary habits. The collaboration between medical experts and a paediatric dentist was of crucial importance. The use of basic behaviour management techniques in conjunction with monitoring the patient's vital signs led to a successful outcome and an improvement in the behaviour of the patient.

  1. Prenatal Diagnosis of Non-Syndromic Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailes, Elizabeth C.; Gilboa, Suzanne M.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Johnson, Candice Y.; Hobbs, Charlotte A.; Correa, Adolfo; Honein, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Congenital heart defects (CHDs) occur in nearly 1% of live births. We sought to assess factors associated with prenatal CHD diagnosis in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS). Methods We analyzed data from mothers with CHD-affected pregnancies from 1998–2005. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was defined as affirmative responses to questions about abnormal prenatal ultrasounds and/or fetal echocardiography obtained during a structured telephone interview. Results Fifteen percent (1,097/7,299) of women with CHD-affected pregnancies (excluding recognized syndromes and single-gene disorders) reported receiving a prenatal CHD diagnosis. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was positively associated with advanced maternal age, family history of CHD, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, twin or higher order gestation, CHD complexity and presence of extracardiac defects. Prenatal CHD diagnosis was inversely associated with maternal Hispanic race/ethnicity, prepregnancy overweight or obesity, and pre-existing hypertension. Prenatal CHD diagnosis varied by time to NBDPS interview and NBDPS study site. Conclusions Further work is warranted to identify reasons for the observed variability in maternal reports of prenatal CHD diagnosis and the extent to which differences in health literacy or health system factors such as access to specialized prenatal care and/or fetal echocardiography may account for such variability. PMID:24222433

  2. Growth curves in Down syndrome with congenital heart disease

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    Caroline D’Azevedo Sica

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction: To assess dietary habits, nutritional status and food frequency in children and adolescents with Down syndrome (DS and congenital heart disease (CHD. Additionally, we attempted to compare body mass index (BMI classifications according to the World Health Organization (WHO curves and curves developed for individuals with DS. Method: Cross-sectional study including individuals with DS and CHD treated at a referral center for cardiology, aged 2 to 18 years. Weight, height, BMI, total energy and food frequency were measured. Nutritional status was assessed using BMI for age and gender, using curves for evaluation of patients with DS and those set by the WHO. Results: 68 subjects with DS and CHD were evaluated. Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD was the most common heart disease (52.9%. There were differences in BMI classification between the curves proposed for patients with DS and those proposed by the WHO. There was an association between consumption of vitamin E and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Conclusion: Results showed that individuals with DS are mostly considered normal weight for age, when evaluated using specific curves for DS. Reviews on specific curves for DS would be the recommended practice for health professionals so as to avoid precipitated diagnosis of overweight and/or obesity in this population.

  3. Postmortem magnetic resonance appearances of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Chitty, Lyn S. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Genetics and Genomic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street and UCLH NHS Foundation Trusts, London (United Kingdom); Judge-Kronis, Lydia [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare life-threatening condition characterised by complete or near-complete developmental obstruction of the foetal airway. Although antenatal imaging findings have been described, the postmortem MRI findings have not been reported. To present postmortem MRI features of CHAOS. We retrospectively reviewed our hospital pathology and imaging databases for cases of CHAOS over a 2-year period. We identified two cases of CHAOS. In both cases, postmortem plain radiographs demonstrated gross abdominal distension with distortion and splaying of the rib cage. Both foetuses had characteristic postmortem MRI findings including large-volume fluid-filled lungs on T2-weighted imaging, diaphragmatic eversion, fluid-filled airway dilatation below the level of obstruction, centrally positioned and compressed heart, and massive ascites. One foetus had an associated limb abnormality. Postmortem MRI in foetuses suspected of having CHAOS allows confirmation of the diagnosis, determination of the anatomical level of the atresia or stenosis, and identification of associated abnormalities without the need for invasive autopsy. (orig.)

  4. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities. PMID:26034714

  5. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, A.; P. Kumar; Jindal, A; YK Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital DiaphragmaticHernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  6. Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome in a 17-year-old female with congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Renata; Capasso, Raffaella; Capaldo, Guglielmo; Dato, Clemente; Saracino, Dario; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Melone, Mariarosa A

    2014-01-01

    Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome is characterized by bilateral facio-glosso-pharyngo-masticatory paralysis of voluntary movement due to bilateral anterior opercular lesions. We describe the case of a 17-year-old female affected by Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome and congenital cytomegalovirus infection, evaluating the possible etiopathogenetic correlation between cerebral cortical dysplasia and intrauterine infections.

  7. Dupuytren Contracture in a Patient with Congenital Camptodactyly and Incidental Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mahendran

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Dupuytren contracture is commonly seen in northern European populations but not in Asians. Even more rare is a presentation of flexion deformity of fingers involving two different pathologies with incidental carpal tunnel syndrome in the same patient. We report herein a case of Dupuytren contracture with congenital camptodactyly and unilateral carpal tunnel syndrome.

  8. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jain

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital DiaphragmaticHernia (CDH occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  9. Major Congenital Anomalies in Babies Born With Down Syndrome : A EUROCAT Population-Based Registry Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, Joan K.; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Budd, Judith; Dias, Carlos Matias; Gatt, Miriam; Klungsoyr, Kari; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J.; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Cath; Sipek, Antonin; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tucker, David; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed to

  10. Major Congenital Anomalies in Babies Born With Down Syndrome : A EUROCAT Population-Based Registry Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, Joan K.; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Budd, Judith; Dias, Carlos Matias; Gatt, Miriam; Klungsoyr, Kari; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J.; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Cath; Sipek, Antonin; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tucker, David; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed to determin

  11. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in a Case of Patau Syndrome: A Rare Association

    OpenAIRE

    A Jain; Kumar, P.; A Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital DiaphragmaticHernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  12. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a case of patau syndrome: a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Jain; P, Kumar; A, Jindal; Yk, Sarin

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) occurs in 5-10% associated with chromosomal abnormalities like, Pallister Killian syndrome, Trisomy 18, and certain deletions.. Association of CDH with trisomy 13 (Patau syndromes) is very rare. Here, we report such an unusual association, where surgical repair was done, but eventually the case succumbed as a result of multiple fatal co-morbidities.

  13. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, I S

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes, and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. Others and we have also recently identified several single gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have been in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. I will review the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterised to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  14. Management of laryngomalacia in children with congenital syndrome: the role of supraglottoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Anette; Probst, Rudolf; Gysin, Claudine

    2015-04-01

    Supraglottoplasty is the surgical procedure of choice for severe laryngomalacia and has shown to be successful in most cases; however, patients with medical comorbidities present a higher rate of failure. To date, the best management of laryngomalacia in children with congenital syndrome remains unclear. To study the outcome of supraglottoplasty in children with severe laryngomalacia, and to analyze the management and outcome in infants with a congenital syndrome. Retrospective medical records review from January 2003 to October 2012 of all patients who underwent laser supraglottoplasty for severe laryngomalacia at the University Children's Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Thirty-one patients were included; median age at time of surgery was 3.5 months. Three patients (10%) had a genetically proven congenital syndrome with associated neurologic anomalies. Overall success rate was 87%. Failures were observed in four (13%) of 31 cases; including all three patients presenting a congenital syndrome. Supraglottoplasty is an effective and safe treatment for laryngomalacia in otherwise healthy children. Signs of a possible underlying predominant neurologic origin and discrepancy between the clinical presentation and the endoscopic findings have to be taken into account, as in children with congenital syndrome with neurologic anomalies the risk of failure is higher. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  16. Unusual association of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, V; Brandt, I K; Bixler, D

    1977-05-01

    This report describes and discusses the very rare occurrence of two heritable traits, the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (21 hydroxylase deficiency, salt-losing type) in a female infant whose father presents the clinical manifestations of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Family study revealed no other instances of the recessively inherited adrenogenital syndrome. Other literature cases combining acrocephalosyndactyly and urogenital anomalies are discussed and compared.

  17. Eisenmenger syndrome and long-term survival in patients with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körten, Marc-André; Helm, Paul C; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Baumgartner, Helmut; Kececioglu, Deniz; Schlensak, Christian; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2016-10-01

    To characterise patients with trisomy 21 (Down syndrome, DS) based on the data of the German National Register for Congenital Heart Defects, to identify changes in the availability of surgical therapy over time and to analyse the impact of these changes on developing Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) as well as survival. Out of 1549 patients with DS with congenital heart disease in the National Register for Congenital Heart Defects, 894 patients (55% female, mean age 17.5 years) had a post-tricuspid shunt lesion (atrioventricular septal defect 69.5%, ventricular septal defect 27.7%, patent arterial duct 2.6%) and were included in the current study. The likelihood of being treated interventionally or surgically before the age of 1 year increased significantly over time. In parallel, the likelihood of developing ES decreased over time (53% birth cohort during 1950s/1960s vs 0.5% birth cohort during 2000-2009, p<0.0001). Overall survival after 1, 10, 20 and 40 years was 96.8%, 94.1%, 92.6% and 75.5%, respectively. Patients with ES had a significantly worse survival compared with those without ES (HR 18.1; 95% CI 7.2 to 45.4; p<0.0001). The availability of surgical correction was associated with a decrease in the likelihood of developing ES. Patients with DS still have reduced survival prospects compared with the general population, but this effect is largely driven by patients developing ES who still have a very poor prognosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. [Lowe syndrome revealed by prenatal diagnosis of congenital cataract with brain abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zéphir, P; Decramer, S; Sartor, A; Vayssière, C

    2014-05-01

    Congenital cataract is a rare disease whose incidence is estimated to 0.5% of birth in France. A study of the literature shows that congenital cataract is idiopathic in 50% of cases, hereditary forms representing 25% of cases. Other causes of congenital cataract are represented by viral embryofoetopathies acquired during pregnancy, metabolic disorders and chromosomal aberrations within the scope of malformative syndromes. The authors report the case of a neonatal diagnosis of Lowe syndrome suspected by the discovery of bilateral cataract initially isolated. The morphological exploration was completed by secondary brain abnormalities (periventricular lesions). The etiological prenatal exploration was negative. Lowe syndrome is a rare cause of antenatal cataract, which so far only one case has been reported.

  19. MR imaging appearance of laryngeal atresia (congenital high airway obstruction syndrome): unique course in a fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwashima, Shigeko; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kaji, Yasushi [Dokkyo Medical University, Department of Radiology, Mibu, Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Dokkyo Medical University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mibu (Japan); Watabe, Yoshiyuki; Suzumura, Hiroshi [Dokkyo Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Mibu (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare life-threatening syndrome. Most cases are diagnosed prenatally by US. We report a fetus with this syndrome that showed a unique course revealed on MRI. Ultrasonography at 22 weeks demonstrated that the fetus had ascites and bilaterally enlarged hyperechoic lungs. Congenital infection, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation or CHAOS was suspected. Subsequent MRI performed at 24 weeks demonstrated bilaterally enlarged high-signal lungs, dilated bronchi, massive ascites, subcutaneous oedema and polyhydramnios. MRI confirmed the diagnosis of CHAOS. A second MRI at 35 weeks showed that the bilateral lung enlargement, ascites, oedema and polyhydramnios had resolved, but that the appearance of the airway was unchanged. The infant was delivered by caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation and immediate tracheostomy was performed. This spontaneous regression was explained by a tracheo-oesophageal fistula that may have decreased the intrathoracic pressure. (orig.)

  20. Major congenital anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome: a EUROCAT population-based registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joan K; Garne, Ester; Wellesley, Diana; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Budd, Judith; Dias, Carlos Matias; Gatt, Miriam; Klungsoyr, Kari; Khoshnood, Babak; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Mullaney, Carmel; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O'Mahony, Mary; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Rounding, Cath; Sipek, Antonin; Stoianova, Sylvia; Tucker, David; de Walle, Hermien; Yevtushok, Lyubov; Loane, Maria; Dolk, Helen

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that over 40% of babies with Down syndrome have a major cardiac anomaly and are more likely to have other major congenital anomalies. Since 2000, many countries in Europe have introduced national antenatal screening programs for Down syndrome. This study aimed to determine if the introduction of these screening programs and the subsequent termination of prenatally detected pregnancies were associated with any decline in the prevalence of additional anomalies in babies born with Down syndrome. The study sample consisted of 7,044 live births and fetal deaths with Down syndrome registered in 28 European population-based congenital anomaly registries covering seven million births during 2000-2010. Overall, 43.6% (95% CI: 42.4-44.7%) of births with Down syndrome had a cardiac anomaly and 15.0% (14.2-15.8%) had a non-cardiac anomaly. Female babies with Down syndrome were significantly more likely to have a cardiac anomaly compared to male babies (47.6% compared with 40.4%, P Down syndrome has remained constant, suggesting that population screening for Down syndrome and subsequent terminations has not influenced the prevalence of specific congenital anomalies in these babies.

  1. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Female, 6 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: - - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Otolaryngology. Congenital defects. Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or Patau syndrome (trisomy 13). Sometimes phenotype may delusively correspond to the characteristic features of a given syndrome, but genotype tests do not confirm its presence. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl admitted to the Clinic of Phoniatrics and Audiology for the assessment of communication in the course of congenital malformations with phenotype characteristic for trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). Immediately upon birth, dysmorphic changes suggesting trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) were observed, but trisomy 18 was excluded after karyotype test results were normal (46, XX). DISTURBED ARTICULATION WAS DIAGNOSED: deformed linguo-dental and palatal sounds, interdental realization with flat tongue of the /s/, /z/, /c/, /dz/, /ś/, /ź/, /ć/, /dz/ sounds (sigmatismus interdentalis). Hearing loss was confirmed.

  2. Treacher Collins syndrome with multiple congenital heart defects after paroxetine exposure: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinlen, N; Zenciroğlu, A; Dilli, D; Aydin, B; Beken, S; Okumuş, N

    2014-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with an incidence of I in 40,000 to in 70,000 live births. It is characterized by abnormalities of the pinnae which are frequently associated with atresia of the external auditory canals and anomalies of the middle ear ossicles. Rarely congenital heart defects can be present. Prenatal paroxetine exposure may enhance the risks of major malformation, particularly cardiac defects. This article reports a newborn, whose mother used paroxetine during pregnancy, presenting with multiple congenital heart defects associated to typical physical characteristics of Treacher Collins syndrome.

  3. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  4. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is part of the new 15q24 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Esch, Hilde; Backx, Liesbeth; Pijkels, Elly; Fryns, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The recurrent microdeletion 15q24 syndrome is rare with only 5 cases reported thus far. Here we describe an additional patient with this deletion, presenting with many features common to this syndrome, including developmental delay, loose connective tissue, digital and genital anomalies and a distinct facial gestalt. Interestingly, in addition, this patient has a large congenital diaphragmatic hernia, as was described in one other patient with a 15q24 microdeletion, indicating that this feature might be part of the syndrome. Chromosome 15q24 has a highly polymorphic architecture that is prone to genomic rearrangements underlying this novel microdeletion syndrome.

  5. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies. 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Giovanni; Martini-Neri, Maria Enrica; Katz, Ben E; Opitz, John M

    2013-11-01

    The ensuing paper by Professor Giovanni Neri and colleagues was originally published in 1984, American Journal of Medical Genetics 19:195–207. The original article described a new family with a condition that the authors designated as the Perlman syndrome. This disorder, while uncommon, is an important multiple congenital anomaly and dysplasia syndrome; the causative gene was recently identified. This paper is a seminal work and is graciously republished by Wiley-Blackwell in the Special Festschrift issue honoring Professor Neri. We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al. [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of congenital Zika virus syndrome and diaphragmatic unilateral palsy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Sandro Rolland Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: several birth defects associated to congenital Zika virus infection have been reported, although the clinical features have not been fully characterized. Description: this is the first case report on unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis diagnosed on a neonate with congenital Zika confirmed by the examination of the amniotic fluid through polymerase chain reaction (ZIKV RT-PCR and the examination of cerebrospinal fluid by serological test (IgM ZIKV-ELISA after birth. The main manifestations detected by intrauterine ultrasound were: microcephaly, ventriculomegaly, intracranial calcifications, enlarged cisterna magna, increased amniotic fluid index and fetal akinesia syndrome. The newborn had acute respiratory failure in the first hours of life, requiring mechanical ventila-tion. The X- ray of the chest showed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis and cardiomegaly. Discussion: diaphragmatic palsy in congenital Zika has not been previously reported, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of this event in congenital Zika virus needs to be elucidated.

  7. Congenital Horner Syndrome with Heterochromia Iridis Associated with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Hypoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Deprez, Fabrice; Coulier, Julie; Rommel, Denis; Boschi, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Background: Horner syndrome (HS), also known as Claude-Bernard-Horner syndrome or oculosympathetic palsy, comprises ipsilateral ptosis, miosis, and facial anhidrosis. Case Report: We report herein the case of a 67-year-old man who presented with congenital HS associated with ipsilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery (ICA), as revealed by heterochromia iridis and confirmed by computed tomography (CT). Conclusions: CT evaluation of the skull base is essential to establish this diagn...

  8. Congenital varicella syndrome: cranial MRI in a long-term survivor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deasy, N.P.; Jarosz, J.M.; Cox, T.C.S. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Ruskin Wing, King`s Coll. Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, E. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, King`s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-03-01

    Congenital varicella syndrome is a rare disorder which follows maternal infection in the first or early second trimester. The syndrome comprises a number of malformations including microcephaly, cortical destruction and limb hypoplasia. We describe a case where there has been long-term survival following second trimester maternal infection. The clinical findings, including the characteristic lower limb hypoplasia, are documented, as are the appearances on cranial MRI indicating an encephaloclastic porencephaly. (orig.) (orig.) With 4 figs., 28 refs.

  9. Brugada syndrome and calcium channel mutation in a patient with congenital deaf mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Canpolat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To the best of our knowledge, for the first time in the literature, we described a congenitally deaf-mute patient with Brugada syndrome (BrS in whom a mutation in L-type Ca+2 channel [CACNA1C (Cav1.2α1] was identified.

  10. Brugada syndrome and calcium channel mutation in a patient with congenital deaf mutism

    OpenAIRE

    Canpolat, Uğur; Coteli, Cem; Aytemir, Kudret

    2017-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, for the first time in the literature, we described a congenitally deaf-mute patient with Brugada syndrome (BrS) in whom a mutation in L-type Ca+2 channel [CACNA1C (Cav1.2?1)] was identified.

  11. Identification of a Kir3.4 Mutation in Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yanzong; Yang, Yiqing; Liang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary disorder that leads to sudden cardiac death secondary to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Although many genes for LQTS have been described, the etiology remains unknown in 30%-40% of cases. In the present study, a large Chinese family (four generations...

  12. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome with congenital heart disease: a new association.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We report a sibship of two brothers and one sister with the osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and congenital heart disease. They presented in infancy with visual impairment and psychomotor retardation. Major features included bilateral cataracts, generalised osteopenia, severe platyspondyly, borderline mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, joint laxity, and ventricular septal defect. Parental consanguinity and affected sibs of both sexes strongly suggested autosomal recessive inheritance. ...

  13. Identification of a Kir3.4 Mutation in Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yanzong; Yang, Yiqing; Liang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary disorder that leads to sudden cardiac death secondary to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Although many genes for LQTS have been described, the etiology remains unknown in 30%-40% of cases. In the present study, a large Chinese family (four generations...

  14. Can folic acid protect against congenital heart defects in Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Willemijn M.; Werler, Martha M.; Louik, Carol; Hernandez-Diaz, Sonia; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested a protective effect of folic acid (FA) on congenital heart anomalies. Down syndrome (DS) infants are known to have a high frequency of heart anomalies. Not all children with DS suffer from heart anomalies, which raises the question whether maternal factors

  15. Effect of Congenital Heart Defects on Language Development in Toddlers with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visootsak, J.; Hess, B.; Bakeman, R.; Adamson, L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS, OMIM #190685) is the most commonly identified genetic form of intellectual disability with congenital heart defect (CHD) occurring in 50% of cases. With advances in surgical techniques and an increasing lifespan, this has necessitated a greater understanding of the neurodevelopmental consequences of CHDs. Herein, we…

  16. Early Growth and Neurologic Outcomes of Infants with Probable Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jucelia Sousa Santos; Sousa, Patricia da Silva; Doriqui, Maria Juliana Rodvalho; Ribeiro, Marizelia Rodrigues Costa; Branco, Maria dos Remédios Freitas Carvalho; Queiroz, Rejane Christine de Sousa; Pacheco, Maria de Jesus Torres; Vieira da Costa, Flavia Regina; Silva, Francelena de Sousa; Simões, Vanda Maria Ferreira; Pacheco, Marcos Antonio Barbosa; Lamy-Filho, Fernando; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho; Soares de Britto e Alves, Maria Teresa Seabra

    2016-01-01

    We report the early growth and neurologic findings of 48 infants in Brazil diagnosed with probable congenital Zika virus syndrome and followed to age 1–8 months. Most of these infants had microcephaly (86.7%) and craniofacial disproportion (95.8%). The clinical pattern included poor head growth with increasingly negative z-scores, pyramidal/extrapyramidal symptoms, and epilepsy. PMID:27767931

  17. Identification of a novel locus for a USH3 like syndrome combined with congenital cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dad, S.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Thykjær, T.

    2010-01-01

    Danish family of Dutch descent, we have identified a novel locus for a rare USH3-like syndrome. The affected family members have a unique association of retinitis pigmentosa, progressive hearing impairment, vestibular dysfunction, and congenital cataract. The phenotype is similar, but not identical...

  18. Distinct genetic architectures for syndromic and nonsyndromic congenital heart defects identified by exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifrim, Alejandro; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Wilsdon, Anna; Breckpot, Jeroen; Turki, Saeed H Al; Thienpont, Bernard; McRae, Jeremy; Fitzgerald, Tomas W; Singh, Tarjinder; Swaminathan, Ganesh Jawahar; Prigmore, Elena; Rajan, Diana; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Banka, Siddharth; Bauer, Ulrike M M; Bentham, Jamie; Berger, Felix; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Bu'Lock, Frances; Canham, Natalie; Colgiu, Irina-Gabriela; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Helen; Daehnert, Ingo; Daly, Allan; Danesh, John; Fryer, Alan; Gewillig, Marc; Hobson, Emma; Hoff, Kirstin; Homfray, Tessa; Kahlert, Anne-Karin; Ketley, Ami; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Lachlan, Katherine; Lampe, Anne Katrin; Louw, Jacoba J; Manickara, Ashok Kumar; Manase, Dorin; McCarthy, Karen P; Metcalfe, Kay; Moore, Carmel; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Omer, Seham Osman; Ouwehand, Willem H; Park, Soo-Mi; Parker, Michael J; Pickardt, Thomas; Pollard, Martin O; Robert, Leema; Roberts, David J; Sambrook, Jennifer; Setchfield, Kerry; Stiller, Brigitte; Thornborough, Chris; Toka, Okan; Watkins, Hugh; Williams, Denise; Wright, Michael; Mital, Seema; Daubeney, Piers E F; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Abu-Sulaiman, Riyadh Mahdi; Klaassen, Sabine; Wright, Caroline F; Firth, Helen V; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Devriendt, Koenraad; FitzPatrick, David R; Brook, J David; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-09-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) have a neonatal incidence of 0.8-1% (refs. 1,2). Despite abundant examples of monogenic CHD in humans and mice, CHD has a low absolute sibling recurrence risk (∼2.7%), suggesting a considerable role for de novo mutations (DNMs) and/or incomplete penetrance. De novo protein-truncating variants (PTVs) have been shown to be enriched among the 10% of 'syndromic' patients with extra-cardiac manifestations. We exome sequenced 1,891 probands, including both syndromic CHD (S-CHD, n = 610) and nonsyndromic CHD (NS-CHD, n = 1,281). In S-CHD, we confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo PTVs but not inherited PTVs in known CHD-associated genes, consistent with recent findings. Conversely, in NS-CHD we observed significant enrichment of PTVs inherited from unaffected parents in CHD-associated genes. We identified three genome-wide significant S-CHD disorders caused by DNMs in CHD4, CDK13 and PRKD1. Our study finds evidence for distinct genetic architectures underlying the low sibling recurrence risk in S-CHD and NS-CHD.

  19. Current Surgical Outcomes of Congenital Heart Surgery for Patients With Down Syndrome in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoashi, Takaya; Hirahara, Norimichi; Murakami, Arata; Hirata, Yasutaka; Ichikawa, Hajime; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2017-09-12

    Current surgical outcomes of congenital heart surgery for patients with Down syndrome are unclear.Methods and Results:Of 29,087 operations between 2008 and 2012 registered in the Japan Congenital Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JCCVSD), 2,651 were carried out for patients with Down syndrome (9%). Of those, 5 major biventricular repair procedures [ventricular septal defect repair (n=752), atrioventricular septal defect repair (n=452), patent ductus arteriosus closure (n=184), atrial septal defect repair (n=167), tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair (n=108)], as well as 2 major single ventricular palliations [bidirectional Glenn (n=21) and Fontan operation (n=25)] were selected and their outcomes were compared. The 90-day and in-hospital mortality rates for all 5 major biventricular repair procedures and bidirectional Glenn were similarly low in patients with Down syndrome compared with patients without Down syndrome. On the other hand, mortality after Fontan operation in patients with Down syndrome was significantly higher than in patients without Down syndrome (42/1,558=2.7% vs. 3/25=12.0%, P=0.005). Although intensive management of pulmonary hypertension is essential, analysis of the JCCVSD revealed favorable early prognostic outcomes after 5 major biventricular procedures and bidirectional Glenn in patients with Down syndrome. Indication of the Fontan operation for patients with Down syndrome should be carefully decided.

  20. Congenital scoliosis in Smith-Magenis syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian; Sheng, Lin

    2015-05-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex and rare congenital condition that is characterized by minor craniofacial anomalies, short stature, sleep disturbances, behavioral, and neurocognitive abnormalities, as well as variable multisystemic manifestations. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome.This study is to present a case of scoliosis occurring in the setting of SMS and explore the possible mechanisms between the 2 diseases.The patient is a 13-year-old Chinese female with congenital scoliosis and Tetralogy of Fallot, mental retardation, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertrophy of tonsil, conductive hearing loss, and agenesis of the epiglottis. An interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization at chromosome 17p11.2 revealed a heterozygous deletion, confirming a molecular diagnosis of SMS. She underwent a posterior correction at thoracic 1-lumbar 1 (T1-L1) levels, using the Moss-SI spinal system. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of correction.Congenital cardiac disease, immunodeficiency, and severe behavioral problems can affect the surgical outcome following spine fusion and need to be taken into consideration for the surgeon and anesthesiologist. Scoliosis is not uncommon among patients with SMS, and there is a potential association between congenital scoliosis and SMS. The potential mechanisms in the pathogenesis of congenital scoliosis of SMS included retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) microdeletion and RAI1 gene point mutation.

  1. A case of Toriello-Carey syndrome with severe congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoo, Noritaka; Marumo, Chieko; Nishida, Yoshinobu; Iio, Jun; Maeda, Shinji; Nonaka, Michiko; Maihara, Toshiro; Chujoh, Satoru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Sakazaki, Hisanori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2013-09-01

    Toriello-Carey syndrome is rare condition characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, the Pierre Robin sequence, and facial anomalies such as telecanthus, short palpebral fissures, and a small nose with anteverted nares [Toriello and Carey, 1988]. In addition, tracheal and laryngeal anomalies are common complications in patients with Toriello-Carey syndrome, and these anomalies can lead to death [Kataoka et al., 2003]. Congenital tracheal stenosis is a life-threatening condition with high mortality. Even if surgery is successful, several serious complications can result in a high risk of mortality. We describe a case of a Japanese boy with Toriello-Carey syndrome who had severe congenital tracheal stenosis, in whom surgical tracheal plasty was avoided because of adequate respiratory care, allowing the patient to be alive at 18 months of age. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Profuse congenital familial milia with absent dermatoglyphics (Basan's Syndrome): description of a new family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Paula Carolina; Larralde, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Milia are common, small, keratin-containing cysts frequently seen in all age groups. They may arise spontaneously or develop after a variety of stimuli. They can be found alone or as part of syndromes. We present a female neonate born not only with profuse facial milia, but also with acral bullae and absent dermatoglyphics. Similar features were seen in several members of her family. These findings correspond to the syndrome known as Basan's syndrome, a rare autosomal-dominant inherited dermatosis characterized by profuse congenital milia, transient neonatal acral bullae, and absence of dermatoglyphics.

  3. Prenatal Diagnosis and Pathology of Laryngeal Atresia in Congenital High Airway Obstruction Syndrome

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    Piya Chaemsaithong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare but life-threatening condition. Therefore, prenatal diagnosis is important. The obstruction can be due to laryngeal/tracheal atresia or external compression. While a differential diagnosis with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM type III may be difficult, it is still possible with ultrasonography. In this study, we report a case of bilateral echogenic lungs with hydrops fetalis. After the prenatal diagnosis of laryngeal atresia, the couple opted to have an elective termination of pregnancy performed at 20 weeks of gestation. The diagnosis was confirmed by a complete pathological examination.

  4. Evaluation of congenital dysautonomia other than Riley-Day syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, E; Ferrer, T; Pérez-Conde, C; López-Terradas, J M; Pérez-Jiménez, A; Ramos, M J

    1996-02-01

    We report on four children, from different families, who suffer from a congenital autonomic disorder, presumably inherited. Three of them have a sensory neuropathy but do not fit any described hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. All four were examined along with some of their immediate family members. We assessed the cardiovagal, sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic functions with a battery of non-invasive tests. Results demonstrated that sudomotor and cardiovascular orthostatic regulation exhibited the greatest abnormalities, pointing to a predominant impairment of sympathetic components, both cholinergic and adrenergic. The overall examination showed a heterogeneous group of congenital dysautonomia, exclusive of Riley-Day or other recognized hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. We emphasize the importance of studying whole family groups to diagnose subclinical impairment and to provide correct genetic counselling.

  5. Life and Death of a Child with Down Syndrome and a Congenital Heart Condition: Experiences of Six Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Deirdre; Huws, Jaci; Hastings, Richard; Vaughan, Frances

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased risk of congenital heart conditions (CHCs), and mortality is higher in people with Down syndrome and a CHC than those without (J. C. Vis et al., 2009). As a consequence, parents of children with Down syndrome and a CHC are more likely to outlive their child. In this research, semistructured…

  6. Congenital defect of the partial atrioventricular canal with Klinefelter syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yejing

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 25-year-old man with a partial atrioventricular canal defect (PAVCD) with Klinefelter syndrome is reported here. The patient had Klinefelter syndrome associated with an atrial septal defect and the cleft of the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve.

  7. TREACHER COLLINS SYNDROME - A RARE CONGENITAL DISOR DER

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    Richa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is a rare genetic d isorder characterized primarily by abnormalities in the development of the head and face. We report a case of 5 year old boy who presented with complaint of hearing impairment a nd malformed pinna and later diagnosed as case of treacher Collins syndrome

  8. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome: a well-defined congenital ichthyosis subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, Anette; Westermark, Per; Brandrup, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    . The parents recalled that his elder sister had similar but milder skin changes and respiratory distress syndrome at birth. Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome was suggested and the diagnosis supported by electron microscopy of a skin biopsy specimen showing pathognomonic trilamellar membrane aggregations...... birth he developed respiratory distress and needed intubation. Remarkable skin changes were noticed with universal red, edematous and desquamating, spongy skin giving an impression of excessive vernix caseosa. Marked regression of the edema and ichthyotic scaling was observed within a few weeks......Ichthyosis prematurity syndrome is a rare syndrome characterized by the clinical triad of premature birth, thick caseous desquamating epidermis, and neonatal asphyxia. We describe two siblings with ichthyosis prematurity syndrome. The index patient was born at gestational week 34. Immediately after...

  9. Down syndrome: Molecular mapping of the congenital heart disease and duodenal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenburg, J.R. (University of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Bradley, C.; Disteche, C.M. (University of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of congenital heart and gut disease and mental retardation. DS individuals also have characteristic facies, hands, and dermatoglyphics, in addition to abnormalities of the immune system, and increased risk of leukemia, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Although their molecular basis is unknown, recent work on patients with DS and partial duplications of chromosome 21 has suggested small chromosomal regions located in band q22 that are likely to contain the genes for some of these features. The authors now extend these analyses to define molecular markers for the congenital heart disease, the duodenal stenosis, and an 'overlap' region for the facial and some of the skeletal features. They report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular analysis of two patients. These studies provide the molecular basis for the construction of a DS phenotypic map and focus the search for genes responsible for the physical features, congenital heart disease, and duodenal stenosis of DS.

  10. Pseudo-Bartter syndrome in an infant with congenital chloride diarrhoea

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    Igrutinović Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pseudo-Bartter syndrome encompasses a heterogenous group of disorders similar to Bartter syndrome. We are presenting an infant with pseudo-Bartter syndrome caused by congenital chloride diarrhoea. Case Outline. A male newborn born in the 37th gestational week (GW to young healthy and non-consanguineous parents. In the 35th GW a polyhydramnios with bowel dilatation was verified by ultrasonography. After birth he manifested several episodes of hyponatremic dehydration with hypochloraemia, hypokalaemia and metabolic alkalosis, so as Bartter syndrome was suspected treatment with indomethacin, spironolactone and additional intake of NaCl was initiated. However, this therapy gave no results, so that at age six months he was rehospitalized under the features of persistent watery diarrhoea, vomiting, dehydration and acute renal failure (serum creatinine 123 μmol/L. The laboratory results showed hyponatraemia (123 mmol/L, hypokalaemia (3.1 mmol/L, severe hypochloraemia (43 mmol/L, alcalosis (blood pH 7.64, bicarbonate 50.6 mmol/L, high plasma renin (20.6 ng/ml and aldosterone (232.9 ng/ml, but a low urinary chloride concentration (2.1 mmol/L. Based on these findings, as well as the stool chloride concentration of 110 mmol/L, the patient was diagnosed congenital chloride diarrhoea. In further course, the patient was treated by intensive fluid, sodium and potassium supplementation which resulted in the normalization of serum electrolytes, renal function, as well as his mental and physical development during 10 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Persistent watery diarrhoea with a high concentration of chloride in stool is the key finding in the differentiation of congenital chloride diarrhoea from Bartter syndrome. The treatment of congenital chloride diarrhoea consists primarily of adequate water and electrolytes replacement.

  11. Haploinsufficiency of TAB2 causes congenital heart defects in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thienpont, Bernard; Zhang, Litu; Postma, Alex V;

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common major developmental anomalies and the most frequent cause for perinatal mortality, but their etiology remains often obscure. We identified a locus for CHDs on 6q24-q25. Genotype-phenotype correlations in 12 patients carrying a chromosomal deletion...... in cardiac development was further supported by its conserved expression in the developing human and zebrafish heart. Moreover, a critical, dosage-sensitive role during development was demonstrated by the cardiac defects observed upon titrated knockdown of tab2 expression in zebrafish embryos...

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Microstructural Changes of the Retina in Infants With Congenital Zika Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S; Ventura, Camila V; Cavalcanti, Milena M; Serrano, Leona W; Traband, Anastasia; Nti, Akosua A; Gois, Adriana L; Bravo-Filho, Vasco; Martins, Thayze T; Nichols, Charles W; Maia, Mauricio; Belfort, Rubens

    2017-10-01

    . The inner nuclear layer was normal or had borderline thinning. The central retinal degeneration was similar to that of cblC deficiency. Congenital Zika syndrome showed a central retinal degeneration with severe GCL loss, borderline inner nuclear layer thinning, and less prominent photoreceptor loss. The findings provide the first, to date, in vivo evidence in humans for possible retinal maldevelopment with a predilection for retinal GCL loss in CZS, consistent with a murine model of the disease and suggestive of in utero depletion of this neuronal population as a consequence of Zika virus infection.

  13. A RARE CASE OF BUPHTHALMOS AND BILATERAL NUCLEAR CATARACTS IN A NEONATE WITH CONGENITAL RUBELLA SYNDROME

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    Uppin Narayan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS is the second leading cause of non‐ traumatic childhood cataracts in India. While nuclear cataract is the most common abnormality reported in CRS, congenital glaucoma is a rarer manifestation. CASE REPORT: A 34weeks low birth weight, male neonate was born by vaginal delivery with normal APGARS. The neonate had sparse hypo pigmented hair over the scalp, along with hypopigmented eye brows and eye lashes. There were erythematous lesions over palms, soles and groin region. Eye examination revealed bilateral nuclear cataracts along with buphthalmos. The neonate also had clinical manifestations of PDA, which was confirmed by 2-D Echo. Systemic involvement was seen as hepatosplenomegaly and bilateral cryptorchidism. Hence CRS was suspected and further evaluation was done. There was thrombocytopenia, mild unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia with elevated transaminases. Neurosonogram was normal and there were no intra cranial calcifications. TORCH profile in both mother and baby showed elevated rubella IgM levels confirming CRS. The neonate received supportive and symptomatic treatment. DISCUSSION: congenital nuclear cataracts are reported in 60-80% of CRS, while buphthalmos is rarely seen, more so in neonatal period. PDA occurs in 50% of CRS and two-thirds have hepatosplenomegaly. Rubelliform rash is infrequent in neonates with CRS. CONCLUSION: We report a preterm low birth weight, male neonate with congenital rubella syndrome and its rare manifestations

  14. A CHRNE frameshift mutation causes congenital myasthenic syndrome in young Jack Russell Terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Lennon, Vanda A; James, Fiona; Thoreson, James B; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Humphries, H Dale; Guo, Ling T; Palmer, Anthony C; Clark, Leigh Anne; Shelton, G Diane

    2015-12-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a group of rare genetic disorders of the neuromuscular junction resulting in structural or functional causes of fatigable weakness that usually begins early in life. Mutations in pre-synaptic, synaptic and post-synaptic proteins have been demonstrated in human cases, with more than half involving aberrations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits. CMS was first recognized in dogs in 1974 as an autosomal recessive trait in Jack Russell Terriers (JRTs). A deficiency of junctional AChRs was demonstrated. Here we characterize a CMS in 2 contemporary cases of JRT littermates with classic clinical and electromyographic findings, and immunochemical confirmation of an approximately 90% reduction in AChR protein content. Loci encoding the 5 AChR subunits were evaluated using microsatellite markers, and CHRNB1 and CHRNE were identified as candidate genes. Sequences of the splice sites and exons of both genes revealed a single base insertion in exon 7 of CHRNE that predicts a frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon. We further demonstrated this pathogenic mutation in CHRNE in archival tissues from unrelated JRTs studied 34 years ago.

  15. Congenital rubella syndrome: seeking damages to be born. Ethical, medical and public health considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghini, Emanuele; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa; Virdis, Andrea; De Luca, Daniele

    2011-12-01

    A case of congenital rubella syndrome has been the reason to seek damages but a Civil Court of Rome sentenced against this and in favor of sued doctors. We discussed the high level of social attention and the feeling present in our western culture behind the request for damages. Legal considerations above the Italian abortion Law is provided to understand the framework of the court decision. Ethical, medical, and public health issues are commented and compared with the Perruche's case.

  16. Implications of spatially heterogeneous vaccination coverage for the risk of congenital rubella syndrome in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalf, C. J. E.; C. Cohen; Lessler, J; McAnerney, J M; G.M. Ntshoe; Puren, A; Klepac, P.; TATEM, A.; Grenfell, B. T.; O.N. Bjørnstad

    2013-01-01

    Rubella is generally a mild childhood disease, but infection during early pregnancy may cause spontaneous abortion or congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), which may entail a variety of birth defects. Since vaccination at levels short of those necessary to achieve eradication may increase the average age of infection, and thus potentially the CRS burden, introduction of the vaccine has been limited to contexts where coverage is high. Recent work suggests that spatial heterogeneity in coverage sh...

  17. Congenital lumbar hernia associated to lumbar costovertebral syndrome. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Quintero Delgado

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Reported the case of a born patient of color of white skin, 6 years old, of pregnancy and normal childbirth that it was valued in the Service of Surgery of the Pediatric Hospital ¨Paquito González Cueto¨ because it presented increase of volume in both lumbar regions, without another associate sintomatology. Congenital bilateral lumbar hernia associated to syndrome lumbocostovertebral, strange affection in the pediatric age.

  18. Salbutamol benefits children with congenital myasthenic syndrome due to DOK7 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Georgina; Hiscock, Andrew; Klein, Andrea; Niks, Erik H; Main, Marion; Manzur, Adnan Y; Ng, Joanne; de Vile, Catherine; Muntoni, Francesco; Beeson, David; Robb, Stephanie

    2013-02-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes due to DOK7 mutations cause fatigable limb girdle weakness. Treatment with ephedrine improves muscle strength. Salbutamol, a β(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist with fewer side effects and more readily available, has been effective in adult and anecdotal childhood cases. This study reports the effects of salbutamol on motor function in childhood DOK7 congenital myasthenic syndrome. Nine children (age range 5.9-15.1years) were treated with oral salbutamol, 2-4mg TDS. The effect on timed tests of motor function, pre- and up to 28months post-treatment, was audited retrospectively. All 9 reported functional benefit within 1month, with progressive improvement to a plateau at 12-18months. Within the first month, all 3 non-ambulant children resumed walking with assistance. Although improvements were seen in some timed tests (timed 10m, arm raise time, 6min walk time) this did not fully reflect the observed functional benefits in daily living activities. No major side effects were reported. We conclude that oral salbutamol treatment significantly improves strength in children with DOK7 congenital myasthenic syndrome and is well tolerated. Outcome measures need to be refined further, both to accurately reflect functional abilities in children and to document progress and treatment response.

  19. Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome with congenital heart disease: a new association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teebi, A S; Al-Awadi, S A; Marafie, M J; Bushnaq, R A; Satyanath, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a sibship of two brothers and one sister with the osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and congenital heart disease. They presented in infancy with visual impairment and psychomotor retardation. Major features included bilateral cataracts, generalised osteopenia, severe platyspondyly, borderline mental retardation, muscular hypotonia, joint laxity, and ventricular septal defect. Parental consanguinity and affected sibs of both sexes strongly suggested autosomal recessive inheritance. Analysis of the present and previously reported cases showed a wide range of interfamilial variability which may point to the existence of multiple allelism or genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome.

  20. Glaucoma in Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis associated with congenital Horner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenbogen, L S; Naveh-Floman, N

    1987-11-01

    We report a retrospective study of five patients with monocular Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis associated with an ipsilateral Horner's syndrome. The minimum follow-up was 10 years. The presenting findings were cyclitis in three of the patients and heterochromia iridis associated with blepharoptosis in the other two. The major factors affecting all five patients were cataract and glaucoma. The intraocular pressure was uncontrolled even with maximal therapy, and antiglaucomatous surgery was performed in all cases. A short period of good postoperative control was followed by an intractable ocular hypertension, causing loss of useful vision in all patients. The remarkable combination of Horner's syndrome with glaucoma and their interaction is discussed.

  1. Diversity of congenital cardiac defects and skeletal deformities associated with the Holt–Oram syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chryssostomidis, Gregory; Kanakis, Meletios; Fotiadou, Vassiliki; Laskari, Cleo; Kousi, Theofili; Apostolidis, Christos; Azariadis, Prodromos; Chatzis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Holt–Oram syndrome is a rare congenital disorder involving the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is characterized by upper limb deformities and cardiac malformations, atrial septal defects in particular. PRESENTATION OF CASE Four consecutive patients 1–15 years old with the Holt–Oram syndrome presented over a 10 year span for surgical treatment of their cardiac maladies. The spectrum of the heart defects and skeletal deformities encountered in these patients are described and discussed. DISCUSSION The Holt–Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition; however absence of the morphological features of the trait in close family members is not rare. Although patients are known to predominately present with atrial septal defects, other cardiovascular anomalies, including rhythm abnormalities, are not uncommon. Skeletal disorders vary as well. CONCLUSION Cardiovascular disorders, skeletal malformations and familial expression of the Holt–Oram syndrome, vary widely. PMID:24879328

  2. Diversity of congenital cardiac defects and skeletal deformities associated with the Holt-Oram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chryssostomidis, Gregory; Kanakis, Meletios; Fotiadou, Vassiliki; Laskari, Cleo; Kousi, Theofili; Apostolidis, Christos; Azariadis, Prodromos; Chatzis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The Holt-Oram syndrome is a rare congenital disorder involving the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. It is characterized by upper limb deformities and cardiac malformations, atrial septal defects in particular. Four consecutive patients 1-15 years old with the Holt-Oram syndrome presented over a 10 year span for surgical treatment of their cardiac maladies. The spectrum of the heart defects and skeletal deformities encountered in these patients are described and discussed. The Holt-Oram syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition; however absence of the morphological features of the trait in close family members is not rare. Although patients are known to predominately present with atrial septal defects, other cardiovascular anomalies, including rhythm abnormalities, are not uncommon. Skeletal disorders vary as well. Cardiovascular disorders, skeletal malformations and familial expression of the Holt-Oram syndrome, vary widely. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz P W Radner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3 and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289. Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3 and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis.

  4. Mutations in CERS3 cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz P W Radner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI is a rare genetic disorder of the skin characterized by abnormal desquamation over the whole body. In this study we report four patients from three consanguineous Tunisian families with skin, eye, heart, and skeletal anomalies, who harbor a homozygous contiguous gene deletion syndrome on chromosome 15q26.3. Genome-wide SNP-genotyping revealed a homozygous region in all affected individuals, including the same microdeletion that partially affects two coding genes (ADAMTS17, CERS3 and abolishes a sequence for a long non-coding RNA (FLJ42289. Whereas mutations in ADAMTS17 have recently been identified in autosomal recessive Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome in humans and dogs presenting with ophthalmologic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities, no disease associations have been described for CERS3 (ceramide synthase 3 and FLJ42289 so far. However, analysis of additional patients with non-syndromic ARCI revealed a splice site mutation in CERS3 indicating that a defect in ceramide synthesis is causative for the present skin phenotype of our patients. Functional analysis of patient skin and in vitro differentiated keratinocytes demonstrated that mutations in CERS3 lead to a disturbed sphingolipid profile with reduced levels of epidermis-specific very long-chain ceramides that interferes with epidermal differentiation. Taken together, these data present a novel pathway involved in ARCI development and, moreover, provide the first evidence that CERS3 plays an essential role in human sphingolipid metabolism for the maintenance of epidermal lipid homeostasis.

  5. Twenty-seven years follow-up of a patient with congenital retinocephalofacial vascular malformation syndrome and additional congenital malformations (Bonnet-dechaume-blanc syndrome or wyburn-mason syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt D

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Follow-up of vascular changes in a patient with congenital retinocephalofacial vascular malformation syndrome. Methods MRI and cerebral angiography. Results In a 36-year-old man, magnetic resonance im aging of the skull and cerebral angiography revealed left intracranial arteriovenous malformations. Follow-up observation of 27 years revealed no essential change of retinal and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Additional congenital deficits in this patient were described. Conclusion Patients with retinal arteriovenous malformations should be early examined with neuroradiological methods.

  6. Glaucoma in Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis associated with congenital Horner's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Regenbogen, L S; Naveh-Floman, N

    1987-01-01

    We report a retrospective study of five patients with monocular Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis associated with an ipsilateral Horner's syndrome. The minimum follow-up was 10 years. The presenting findings were cyclitis in three of the patients and heterochromia iridis associated with blepharoptosis in the other two. The major factors affecting all five patients were cataract and glaucoma. The intraocular pressure was uncontrolled even with maximal therapy, and antiglaucomatous surgery was perf...

  7. CLMP is required for intestinal development, and loss-of-function mutations cause congenital short-bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Werf, Christine S.; Wabbersen, Tara D.; Hsiao, Nai-Hua; Paredes, Joana; Etchevers, Heather C.; Kroisel, Peter M.; Tibboel, Dick; Babarit, Candice; Schreiber, Richard A.; Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Vekemans, Michel; Zeder, Sirkka L.; Ceccherini, Isabella; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Ribeiro, Ana S.; Seruca, Raquel; Meerman, Gerard J. Te; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Shepherd, Iain T.; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Short-bowel syndrome usually results from surgical resection of the small intestine for diseases such as intestinal atresias, volvulus, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Patients with congenital short-bowel syndrome (CSBS) are born with a substantial shortening of the small intestine

  8. A new 48, XXYY/47, XYY syndrome associated with multiple skeletal abnormalities, congenital heart disease and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutesa, Leon; Jamar, Mauricette; Hellin, Anne Cecile; Pierquin, Genevieve; Bours, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    While the XYY and XXYY syndromes have been several time described in patients, the combination of both syndromes in an individual is a rare event and may result in a severe phenotype. In the present observation, a boy with congenital scoliosis due to segmented thoracic hemivertebra associated with radioulnar synostosis and congenital heart disease is described. Chromosome G-banding and FISH analysis demonstrated a de novo mosaic karyotype 48, XXYY/47, XYY in this patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of XYY and XXYY syndromes.

  9. A new 48, XXYY/47, XYY syndrome associated with multiple skeletal abnormalities, congenital heart disease and mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Mutesa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While the XYY and XXYY syndromes have been several time described in patients, the combination of both syndromes in an individual is a rare event and may result in a severe phenotype. In the present observation, a boy with congenital scoliosis due to segmented thoracic hemivertebra associated with radioulnar synostosis and congenital heart disease is described. Chromosome G-banding and FISH analysis demonstrated a de novo mosaic karyotype 48, XXYY/47, XYY in this patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of XYY and XXYY syndromes.

  10. Identification of a Novel Mutation in BRD4 that Causes Autosomal Dominant Syndromic Congenital Cataracts Associated with Other Neuro-Skeletal Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Jeonhyun; Kwak, Woori; Jeong, Hyeonsoo; Lim, Gyu-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cataracts can occur as a non-syndromic isolated ocular disease or as a part of genetic syndromes accompanied by a multi-systemic disease. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases have a heterogeneous genetic basis. Here, we describe three generations of a family with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern and common complex phenotypes, including bilateral congenital cataracts, short stature, macrocephaly, and minor skeletal anomalies. We did not find any chromosomal aberrations or gene copy number abnormalities using conventional genetic tests; accordingly, we conducted whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify disease-causing genetic alterations in this family. Based on family WES data, we identified a novel BRD4 missense mutation as a candidate causal variant and performed cell-based experiments by ablation of endogenous BRD4 expression in human lens epithelial cells. The protein expression levels of connexin 43, p62, LC3BII, and p53 differed significantly between control cells and cells in which endogenous BRD4 expression was inhibited. We inferred that a BRD4 missense mutation was the likely disease-causing mutation in this family. Our findings may improve the molecular diagnosis of congenital cataracts and support the use of WES to clarify the genetic basis of complex diseases. PMID:28076398

  11. Ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome: a rare cause of congenital lacrimal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmann, Solly; Hanson, Sarah A; Bunce, Christopher N; Shinder, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with a medical history significant for ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia clefting (EEC) syndrome was referred for evaluation of congenital left-sided epiphora. The patient had undergone successful right external dacryocystorhinostomy at age 5 to treat congenital right-sided epiphora. On examination, several ocular anomalies were noted, including absence of the upper eyelid puncta, absence of the left inferior punctum, a left lacrimal fistula opening at the left caruncle, increased left tear lake, bilateral hypoplastic meibomian glands, mild conjunctival injection, and thin eyelid cilia and brow hair. Systemic findings included cleft lip and palate status-post repair, ectrodactyly of the hands and feet, adontia and microdontia, a pointed nose, and lightly pigmented, dry hair and skin. The patient underwent examination under anesthesia and left conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy with insertion of a Jones tube with resolution of lacrimation postoperatively. To the authors' knowledge, this is the second report detailing management of congenital lacrimal anomalies in EEC syndrome, and the first describing management of punctal atresia with conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy and Jones tube placement.

  12. Congenital spigelian hernia and cryptorchidism: another case of new syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Dhiraj; Kadian, Yogender Singh; Raikwar, Preeti; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2013-01-01

    Spigelian hernia (SH) is rarely seen in pediatric age group and is usually associated with cryptorchidism on the same side; termed as a syndromic association of the defect in the Spigelian fascia and absence of gubernaculum and inguinal canal. The absence of the inguinal canal has surgical implication as to placement of the undescended testis into the scrotum. A 3-month-old baby presented with spigelian hernia and ipsilateral impalpable testis. The spigelian hernia was repaired and undescended testis which was present in abdominal wall layers was brought to scrotum with cord structures anterior to external oblique muscle.

  13. Congenital Spigelian Hernia and Cryptorchidism: Another Case of New Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Parihar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Spigelian hernia (SH is rarely seen in pediatric age group and is usually associated with cryptorchidism on the same side; termed as a syndromic association of the defect in the Spigelian fascia and absence of gubernaculum and inguinal canal. The absence of the inguinal canal has surgical implication as to placement of the undescended testis into the scrotum. A 3-month-old baby presented with spigelian hernia and ipsilateral impalpable testis. The spigelian hernia was repaired and undescended testis which was present in abdominal wall layers was brought to scrotum with cord structures anterior to external oblique muscle.

  14. Lumbo-Costo-Vertebral Syndrome with Congenital Lumbar Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucky Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS is a set of rare abnormalities involving vertebral bodies, ribs, and abdominal wall. We present a case of LCVS in a 2-year-old girl who had a progressive swelling over left lumbar area noted for the last 12 months. Clinical examination revealed a reducible swelling with positive cough impulse. Ultrasonography showed a defect containing bowel loops in the left lumbar region. Chest x-ray showed scoliosis and hemivertebrae with absent lower ribs on left side. Meshplasty was done.

  15. Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome with congenital lumbar hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lucky; Mala, Tariq Ahmed; Gupta, Rahul; Malla, Shahid Amin

    2014-01-01

    Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS) is a set of rare abnormalities involving vertebral bodies, ribs, and abdominal wall. We present a case of LCVS in a 2-year-old girl who had a progressive swelling over left lumbar area noted for the last 12 months. Clinical examination revealed a reducible swelling with positive cough impulse. Ultrasonography showed a defect containing bowel loops in the left lumbar region. Chest x-ray showed scoliosis and hemivertebrae with absent lower ribs on left side. Meshplasty was done.

  16. 76. Profile and spectrum of congenital heart defect in pediatric patient with down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alsuhaibani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormality worldwide. It occurs in 1 of every 800 live births. Almost one-half of patients with Down Syndrome have congenital heart defect. Our objective is to describe the frequency and spectrum of congenital heart defect (CHD among children with Down Syndrome in Saudi Arabia and identify the rate of primary and secondary pulmonary hypertension among pediatric patients with Down syndrome. Cross-sectional, retrospective study of the cardiac anomalies among 331 pediatric patients (0–18 years with Down Syndrome in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH from August 2001 till October 2014. The demographic data, reason for referral, echocardiography data including systolic function parameters, the presence of CHD, type and details of CHD, presence of pulmonary hypertension (PHTN, history of cardiac surgeries or transcatheter interventions. Among the 331 pediatric patients with Down Syndrome; 230 patients (69.5% have Congenital Heart Defect (CHD. The patients with CHD were significantly younger (median age 3 months with lower weight (P-value <0.05 and height (P-value <0.05 compared to patients with no CHD. The median age at first assessment was 3 months. The most common type of CHDs among DS pediatric patients was atrial septal defect secundum (ASD II which account for 33.5% of all CHD followed by ventricular septal defect (VSD which account for 26.5%, then atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD 21.7% and moderate to large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA 21.7%. There is another (11.7% who have other CHDs. Pulmonary hypertension was present in 32% of patients with CHD vs 4% among patients with no CHD. There is significant relationship between CHD and pulmonary hypertension with odds ratio 11.3 (CI 3.99–31.83, P-value <0.05. 15% of patients underwent either cardiac surgery or transcatheter intervention. Almost two thirds of Down Syndrome patients have CHD with pulmonary hypertension affecting almost

  17. Escobar syndrome mimicking congenital patellar syndrome/Konjenitol patella sendromunu taklit eden Escobar sendromu

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ezirmik, Naci; Yildiz, Kadri; Can, Cahit Emre

    2012-01-01

    ...) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome...

  18. Escobar Syndrome Mimicing Congenital Patellar Syndrome/Konjenital Patella Sendromunu Taklit Eden Escobar Sendromu

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naci Ezirmik; Kadri Yildiz; Cahit Emre Can

    2012-01-01

    ...) syndrome is a rare syndrome. Intrauterin growth reterdation, abnormal face, wide-spead pterygiums that resulted in joint contractures, ptosis, chryptoorchidism, patellar dysplasia and foot deformities are seen on this syndrome...

  19. The phenotype of multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 1: report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couser, Natario L; Masood, Maheer M; Strande, Natasha T; Foreman, Ann Katherine M; Crooks, Kristy; Weck, Karen E; Lu, Mei; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Roche, Myra; Evans, James P; Berg, Jonathan S; Powell, Cynthia M

    2015-09-01

    The Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures Syndrome 1 (MCAHS1) has been described in two families to date. We describe a 2-year-old Mexican American boy with the syndrome and additional manifestations not yet reported as part of the phenotype. The patient presented with severe hypotonia, microphallus and left cryptorchidism, and was later diagnosed with epilepsy and severe cortical visual impairment. He also had supernumerary nipples, pectus excavatum, a short upturned nose, fleshy ear lobes, and a right auricular pit. Massively parallel exome sequencing and analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygous missense (Trp136Gly and Ser859Thr) variants in the PIGN gene. This report extends and further defines the phenotype of this syndrome.

  20. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus in a child with congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, T; Itagaki, Y; Kobayashi, M; Sano, T; Sumi, K

    1999-08-01

    A 9-year-old male with congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome is described. He had pseudobulbar palsy, mental retardation, and intractable epilepsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of the brain demonstrated bilateral perisylvian malformations and a diffuse pachygyric appearance. At 8 years of age, he had episodes of excessive drooling, fluctuating impairment of consciousness, unsteady sitting, and frequent head drop that lasted several days. The electroencephalogram demonstrated continuous diffuse slow spike and waves. These findings suggested atypical absence status epilepticus. Intravenous administration of diazepam resulted in transient improvement of clinical and electroencephalographic findings. Status epilepticus recurred within several minutes after diazepam administration. Although no patient has been reported to have a history of status epilepticus among those affected by this syndrome, it seems that atypical absence status can occur more frequently than expected, as seen in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. After recognition and confirmation of nonconvulsive status epilepticus, immediate treatment must be attempted.

  1. Congenital Syphilis Presenting with Only Nephrotic Syndrome: Reemergence of a Forgotten Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hee; Song, Ji Ho; Kim, Chan Jong; Yang, Eun Mi

    2017-08-01

    Syphilis infection has re-emerged after years of declining incidence. The prevalence of congenital syphilis (CS) has increased in Korea and other countries during the last few decades. Untreated infants develop symptoms such as rhinorrhea, anemia, jaundice, cutaneous lesions, hepatosplenomegaly, and pseudoparalysis within weeks or months. Significant renal disease is uncommon in CS, and clinical renal involvement varies from mild transient proteinuria to frank nephrosis. We report a 2-month-old infant with CS who presented with only nephrotic syndrome (NS). The previously healthy infant presented with NS and showed no other syphilitic manifestations. Remission of the NS was achieved with adequate penicillin treatment. No recurrence of proteinuria was observed during the 1 year of follow-up. Although rare, this long forgotten disease continues to affect pregnant women, resulting in prenatal or postnatal mortality. We still consider the possibility of syphilitic nephropathy and therefore serologic testing for congenital NS. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  2. Segmental anhidrosis with hyporeflexia associated with congenital spinal deformity: A Ross's syndrome variant or inverse Horner's syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney M

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old soldier presented with anhidrosis affecting both upper extremities below the shoulders, the right side of the trunk below the third rib in front and the third vertebra on the back, and the left lower extremity below the inguinal ligament since 1992. Ten years later in 2002, he was also found to have bilateral absence of Achilles reflex and decreased right knee jerk. In addition, the patient was found to have congenital spinal abnormalities in the form of block of vertebrae C3-C4; decreased disc space C4-C5; and break in pars interarticularis L5-S1 with decreased disc space. A total of seven cases of Ross syndrome, Holmes-Adie syndrome (tonic pupil with lost tendon jerks with segmental anhidrosis, have been described in the literature. Our case, however, did not have any pupillary abnormality. A case of progressive isolated segmental anhidrosis has also been described. The association of congenital spinal abnormality, which may be pathognomonic in the causation of this progressive sudomotor degeneration, is quite interesting in our case. The distribution of anhidrosis on the right side is just below the level of sweating loss sometimes described in lesions of superior sympathetic cervical ganglion in Horner's syndrome.

  3. Fragile X syndrome in two siblings with major congenital malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampietro, P.F.; Haas, B.R.; Lipper, E. [Cornell Univ. Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on 2 brothers with both fragile X and VACTERL-H syndrome. The first sibling, age 5, had bilateral cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect, and a hypoplastic thumb. The second sibling, age 2{1/2}, had a trachesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, and vertebral abnormality. High-resolution chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY chromosome constitution in both siblings. By PCR and Southern blot analysis, the siblings were found to have large triplet repeat expansions in the fragile X gene (FMR 1) and both had methylation mosaicism. Enzyme kinetic studies of iduronate sulfatase demonstrated a two-fold increase in activity in the first sib as compared to the second. Possible mechanisms through which the fragile X mutation can cause down-regulation of adjacent loci are discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  4. A COLQ missense mutation in Labrador Retrievers having congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin J Rinz

    Full Text Available Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by skeletal muscle weakness caused by disruption of signal transmission across the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. CMSs are rarely encountered in veterinary medicine, and causative mutations have only been identified in Old Danish Pointing Dogs and Brahman cattle to date. Herein, we characterize a novel CMS in 2 Labrador Retriever littermates with an early onset of marked generalized muscle weakness. Because the sire and dam share 2 recent common ancestors, CMS is likely the result of recessive alleles inherited identical by descent (IBD. Genome-wide SNP profiles generated from the Illumina HD array for 9 nuclear family members were used to determine genomic inheritance patterns in chromosomal regions encompassing 18 functional candidate genes. SNP haplotypes spanning 3 genes were consistent with autosomal recessive transmission, and microsatellite data showed that only the segment encompassing COLQ was inherited IBD. COLQ encodes the collagenous tail of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for termination of signal transduction in the NMJ. Sequences from COLQ revealed a variant in exon 14 (c.1010T>C that results in the substitution of a conserved amino acid (I337T within the C-terminal domain. Both affected puppies were homozygous for this variant, and 16 relatives were heterozygous, while 288 unrelated Labrador Retrievers and 112 dogs of other breeds were wild-type. A recent study in which 2 human CMS patients were found to be homozygous for an identical COLQ mutation (c.1010T>C; I337T provides further evidence that this mutation is pathogenic. This report describes the first COLQ mutation in canine CMS and demonstrates the utility of SNP profiles from nuclear family members for the identification of private mutations.

  5. Cardiac conduction abnormalities and congenital immunodeficiency in a child with Kabuki syndrome: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    deMello Daphne E

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since it's recognition in 1981, a more complete phenotype of Kabuki syndrome is becoming evident as additional cases are identified. Congenital heart defects and a number of visceral abnormalities have been added to the typical dysmorphic features originally described. Case Report In this report we describe the clinical course of a child diagnosed with Kabuki syndrome based on characteristic clinical, radiological and morphologic features who died of a cardiac arrhythmia at 11-months of age. This infant, however, had abnormal pulmonary architecture and alterations in his cardiac conduction system resulting in episodes of bradycardia and asystole. This child also had an immunological phenotype consistent with common variable immunodeficiency. His clinical course consisted of numerous hospitalizations for recurrent bacterial infections and congenital hypogammaglobulinemia characterized by low serum IgG and IgA but normal IgM levels, and decreased antibody levels to immunizations. T-, B- and NK lymphocyte subpopulations and T-cell function studies were normal. Conclusion This child may represent a more severe phenotype of Kabuki syndrome. Recurrent infections in a child should prompt a thorough immunological evaluation. Additionally, electrophysiology testing may be indicated if cardiopulmonary events occur which are not explained by anatomic defects.

  6. Clinical and molecular characterization of two patients with palmoplantar keratoderma-congenital alopecia syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, M; Morlino, S; Sana, M E; Paradisi, M; Tadini, G; Angioni, A; Malacarne, M; Grammatico, P; Iascone, M; Forzano, F

    2016-08-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma-congenital alopecia (PPKCA) syndrome is a rare genodermatosis, with two clinically recognizable forms: dominant (Type 1) and recessive (Type 2). Reports of only 18 patients have been published to date, and the molecular basis of the condition is unknown. We describe two cases with PPKCA Type 2 (PPKCA2), comprising a novel patient, originally reported as an example of autosomal ichthyosis follicularis-atrichia-photophobia syndrome, and the 6-year follow-up of a previously published case. Extensive molecular studies of both patients excluded mutations in all the known genes associated with PPK and partially overlapping syndromes. The striking similarities between these two patients confirm PPKCA2 as a discrete genodermatosis, of which the main features are congenital and universal alopecia, diffuse keratosis pilaris, facial erythema, and a specific PPK with predominant involvement of the fingertips and borders of the hands and feet, with evolution of sclerodactyly, contractures and constrictions. Clinical follow-up of these patients has demonstrated progressive worsening of the hand involvement and attenuation of facial erythema.

  7. Hyperammonemia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome predicts presence of hepatic encephalopathy in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey S Tivers

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver disease. The pathogenesis of he is incompletely understood although ammonia and inflammatory cytokines have been implicated as key mediators. To facilitate further mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of HE, a large number of animal models have been developed which often involve the surgical creation of an anastomosis between the hepatic portal vein and the caudal vena cava. One of the most common congenital abnormalities in dogs is a congenital portosystemic shunt (cpss, which closely mimics these surgical experimental models of HE. Dogs with a cPSS often have clinical signs which mimic clinical signs observed in humans with HE. Our hypothesis is that the pathogenesis of HE in dogs with a cPSS is similar to humans with HE. The aim of the study was to measure a range of clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters, which have been linked to the development of HE in humans, in dogs with a cPSS and a known HE grade. One hundred and twenty dogs with a cPSS were included in the study and multiple regression analysis of clinical, haematological and biochemical variables revealed that plasma ammonia concentrations and systemic inflammatory response syndrome scores predicted the presence of HE. Our findings further support the notion that the pathogenesis of canine and human HE share many similarities and indicate that dogs with cPSS may be an informative spontaneous model of human HE. Further investigations on dogs with cPSS may allow studies on HE to be undertaken without creating surgical models of HE thereby allowing the number of large animals used in animal experimentation to be reduced.

  8. Congenital candidiasis as a subject of research in medicine and human ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczylas, Michał M; Walat, Anna; Kordek, Agnieszka; Loniewska, Beata; Rudnicki, Jacek; Maleszka, Romuald; Torbé, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Congenital candidiasis is a severe complication of candidal vulvovaginitis. It occurs in two forms,congenital mucocutaneous candidiasis and congenital systemic candidiasis. Also newborns are in age group the most vulnerable to invasive candidiasis. Congenital candidiasis should be considered as an interdisciplinary problem including maternal and fetal condition (including antibiotic therapy during pregnancy), birth age and rare genetic predispositions as severe combined immunodeficiency or neutrophil-specific granule deficiency. Environmental factors are no less important to investigate in diagnosing, treatment and prevention. External factors (e.g., food) and microenvironment of human organism (microflora of the mouth, intestine and genitalia) are important for solving clinical problems connected to congenital candidiasis. Physician knowledge about microorganisms in a specific compartments of the microenvironment of human organism and in the course of defined disorders of homeostasis makes it easier to predict the course of the disease and allows the development of procedures that can be extremely helpful in individualized diagnostic and therapeutic process.

  9. Prenatal screening for Down syndrome and for structural congenital anomalies in the Netherlands: Information provision, informed decision-making and participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M.H.J.D. Schoonen (Marleen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital anomalies are the leading cause of death and morbidity in children under 1 year of age. Down syndrome and neural tube defects are congenital anomalies that may be diagnosed before birth using prenatal tests. In the Netherlands, prenatal screening for Down syndrome and for stru

  10. Prenatal screening for Down syndrome and for structural congenital anomalies in the Netherlands: Information provision, informed decision-making and participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M.H.J.D. Schoonen (Marleen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital anomalies are the leading cause of death and morbidity in children under 1 year of age. Down syndrome and neural tube defects are congenital anomalies that may be diagnosed before birth using prenatal tests. In the Netherlands, prenatal screening for Down syndrome and for stru

  11. Assisted reproductive technology and congenital overgrowth: some speculations on a case of Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurazzi, P; Bajer, J; Tabolacci, E; Pomponi, M G; Lecce, R; Zollino, M; Neri, G

    2004-10-15

    We report on a boy with Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) who was conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART), specifically in vitro fertilization (IVF) with parents' gametes. A prenatal diagnosis performed elsewhere by CVS failed to detect the presence of the isochromosome 12p that was demonstrated postnatally in approximately 50% of cultured skin fibroblasts. Given that the patient did not show the congenital overgrowth typical of PKS, we speculate that ART might have restricted overgrowth in this particular case. More broadly, we hypothesize that overgrowth might protect from early demise fetuses conceived by ART, a technology known to cause low and very low birth weight.

  12. Congenital gluteus maximus contracture syndrome - a case report with review of imaging findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Vamshi Krishna; Reddy, Rajasekhar; Reddy, M. Venkateshwar; Moorthy, Rangubatla Sathyanrayana; Kishan, Tatikonda Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Although the clinical features of gluteus maximus contracture syndrome have been frequently described, imaging features have been seldom described. Most commonly reported cases are those following intramuscular injection in the gluteal region although congenital contracture is an uncommon but important occurrence. This condition has most often been reported in children of school going age. These patients often present with difficulty in squatting, limitation of hip motion or specific deformities and often require surgical correction. We describe the plain radiography, ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of this condition in a patient with no previous known history of intramuscular injections. PMID:24967033

  13. Congenital gluteus maximus contracture syndrome--a case report with review of imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Vamshi Krishna; Reddy, Rajasekhar; Reddy, M Venkateshwar; Moorthy, Rangubatla Sathyanrayana; Kishan, Tatikonda Venkat

    2014-04-01

    Although the clinical features of gluteus maximus contracture syndrome have been frequently described, imaging features have been seldom described. Most commonly reported cases are those following intramuscular injection in the gluteal region although congenital contracture is an uncommon but important occurrence. This condition has most often been reported in children of school going age. These patients often present with difficulty in squatting, limitation of hip motion or specific deformities and often require surgical correction. We describe the plain radiography, ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of this condition in a patient with no previous known history of intramuscular injections.

  14. Meier-Gorlin syndrome: Report of an additional patient with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 7 year old female child with the classical triad of Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS, (microtia, absent patella and short stature. She had the characteristic facial features, with normal mentality and defective speech, skeletal abnormalities, conductive hearing loss, cystitis and normal growth hormone level. She suffered from recurrent chest infection during the first year of life which improved gradually with age. Although congenital heart is rarely observed in MGS, our patient had in addition fenestrated interatrial septal defect.

  15. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome successfully treated with unrelated cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagor, Yotam; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Averbuch, Diana; Mechoulam, Hadas; Engelhard, Dan; Resnick, Igor B; Weintraub, Michael; Stepensky, Polina

    2011-10-01

    We report a successful umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) in an 8-month male with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) and congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. The child presented at 3 months of age with symptomatic thrombocytopenia and CMV infection. Despite appropriate antiviral treatment no rise in the platelet count was observed. Genetic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of WAS. The clinical course was complicated by severe CMV retinitis with bilateral retinal hemorrhages and renal vasculitis. He underwent unrelated UCBT resulting in a rapid resolution of autoimmunity and thrombocytopenia. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Osteomalacia complicating a blind loop syndrome from congenital megaesophagus-megaduodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicourt, D H; Orloff, S

    1979-01-01

    A young female with osteomalacia complicating a blind loop syndrome associated with congenital megaduodenum is described. In this case, the correction of vitamin D malabsorption by administration of antibiotics highlights the role of massive intraluminal bacterial overgrowth from destruction of vitamin D, or decreased unicellar solubilization due to deconjugation of biliary acids. The importance of cutaneous vitamin D synthesis in patients with osteomalacia of gastrointestinal origin is emphasized. The detection of megaduodenum and megaesophagus in the patient's father may be the first report of a familial association of these gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  17. The application of root mean square electrocardiography (RMS ECG for the detection of acquired and congenital long QT syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Lux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Precise measurement of the QT interval is often hampered by difficulty determining the end of the low amplitude T wave. Root mean square electrocardiography (RMS ECG provides a novel alternative measure of ventricular repolarization. Experimental data have shown that the interval between the RMS ECG QRS and T wave peaks (RTPK closely reflects the mean ventricular action potential duration while the RMS T wave width (TW tracks the dispersion of repolarization timing. Here, we tested the precision of RMS ECG to assess ventricular repolarization in humans in the setting of drug-induced and congenital Long QT Syndrome (LQTS. METHODS: RMS ECG signals were derived from high-resolution 24 hour Holter monitor recordings from 68 subjects after receiving placebo and moxifloxacin and from standard 12 lead ECGs obtained in 97 subjects with LQTS and 97 age- and sex-matched controls. RTPK, QTRMS and RMS TW intervals were automatically measured using custom software and compared to traditional QT measures using lead II. RESULTS: All measures of repolarization were prolonged during moxifloxacin administration and in LQTS subjects, but the variance of RMS intervals was significantly smaller than traditional lead II measurements. TW was prolonged during moxifloxacin and in subjects with LQT-2, but not LQT-1 or LQT-3. CONCLUSION: These data validate the application of RMS ECG for the detection of drug-induced and congenital LQTS. RMS ECG measurements are more precise than the current standard of care lead II measurements.

  18. The application of root mean square electrocardiography (RMS ECG) for the detection of acquired and congenital long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Robert L; Sower, Christopher Todd; Allen, Nancy; Etheridge, Susan P; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Saarel, Elizabeth V

    2014-01-01

    Precise measurement of the QT interval is often hampered by difficulty determining the end of the low amplitude T wave. Root mean square electrocardiography (RMS ECG) provides a novel alternative measure of ventricular repolarization. Experimental data have shown that the interval between the RMS ECG QRS and T wave peaks (RTPK) closely reflects the mean ventricular action potential duration while the RMS T wave width (TW) tracks the dispersion of repolarization timing. Here, we tested the precision of RMS ECG to assess ventricular repolarization in humans in the setting of drug-induced and congenital Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). RMS ECG signals were derived from high-resolution 24 hour Holter monitor recordings from 68 subjects after receiving placebo and moxifloxacin and from standard 12 lead ECGs obtained in 97 subjects with LQTS and 97 age- and sex-matched controls. RTPK, QTRMS and RMS TW intervals were automatically measured using custom software and compared to traditional QT measures using lead II. All measures of repolarization were prolonged during moxifloxacin administration and in LQTS subjects, but the variance of RMS intervals was significantly smaller than traditional lead II measurements. TW was prolonged during moxifloxacin and in subjects with LQT-2, but not LQT-1 or LQT-3. These data validate the application of RMS ECG for the detection of drug-induced and congenital LQTS. RMS ECG measurements are more precise than the current standard of care lead II measurements.

  19. Holter monitoring in the evaluation of congenital long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriello, Daniel A; Johnson, Jonathan N; Ackerman, Michael J

    2011-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a potentially lethal cardiac channelopathy that affects one in 2,000 persons; causes syncope, seizures, and sudden death; and is both under- and overdiagnosed. LQTS diagnostic miscues have stemmed from assessment of ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring (Holter) results. We sought to determine the prevalence of positive Holter monitor tests and its diagnostic significance in evaluating LQTS. We performed an institutional review board-approved review of patients evaluated in our LQTS clinic from 2000 to 2009 who had Holter testing during their evaluation. Included patients (N = 473) were diagnosed with LQTS or dismissed as otherwise normal. Holters classified as positive had an episode of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, ≥4 couplets/day, ≥10 premature ventricular contractions/hour, or >5-second sinus pause. Among 209 patients dismissed as normal (128 females, average age 21 ± 15 years, average QTc 424 ± 39 ms), 27 (12.9%) had a positive Holter, while among 264 patients with LQTS (149 females, average age 22 ± 16 years, average QTc 472 ± 41 ms), 30 (11.3%) had a positive Holter (P = NS). Patients with LQT3 (5/23, 21%) and genotype-negative LQTS (5/19, 26%) had a higher rate of positive Holter testing compared to LQT1 patients (7/124, 6%, P Holters, only one (0.2%) impacted clinical decision making. Routine Holter monitoring appears to be of minimal clinical utility from a diagnostic and prognostic perspective in evaluating LQTS, and may not be cost effective. Whether Holter monitoring aids in therapeutic decisions such as dosing or whether ambulatory QTc measurements, provided by some newer devices, might help in the diagnostic evaluation warrants further scrutiny. ©2011, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. PHOX2B mutations in three Chinese patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siu-Fong June Or; Ming-for Tony Tong; Fai-Man Ivan Lo; Chi-Wai Law; Ting-Yat Miu; Delphine Trochet; Tak-Sum Stephen Lam

    2006-01-01

    @@ Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome(CCHS, OMIM #209880) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of the autonomic nervous system(ANS) characterized by an abnormal autonomic ventilatory response to progressive hypercarbia and sustained hypoxemia. Patients typically present in the newborn period with hypoventilation or apnea asleep, awake, or both, without any associated cardiac, pulmonary, neuromuscular or brainstem lesions. Rarely, some patients may present at a later age and are diagnosed to have late onset central hypoventilation syndrome (LOCHS).1 Other features of ANS dysfunction such as feeding difficulty due to oesophageal dysmotility, severe constipation in the absence of Hirschsprung disease, poor regulation of basal body temperature, episodes of profuse sweating, pupillary and ocular abnormalities,decreased beat-to-beat variability of heart rate,attenuated response of heart rate to exercise,abnormal fluctuation of blood pressure, decreased perception to pain, and decreased perception to anxiety may be variably present but not essential for diagnosis.

  1. Are there any association between polycistic ovary syndrome and congenital abnormalities of Müllerian ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubić-Pavlović Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. There are many specificities of merital infertility and sometimes surprising connections between some thinks with no connections at first sight. Examinations of these patients imply diagnostic actions such as the blood basal hormone sample, doing hysterosalpingography, ultrahysterosonography, ultrasound examinations, and sometimes laparoscopy and hysteroscopy if there are necessary. The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of the connection between policystic ovary (PCO syndrome (Sy and congenital Müllerian ducts abnormalities. Methods. This study included 356 patients treated in the period from January 1, to December 31, 2009, in the Department of Infertility of the Clinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology in Niš, Serbia. Exclusion criteria were no myoma, ovary cysts, tubal and male factors of infertility. Results. A total of 180 patients were divided into 3 groups: the group I with PCO sy, the group II with uterine congenital malformation and the group III with a combination of these disorders. The middle age of patients was 29.6 ± 4.8, body mass index (BMI was 26.1 ± 4,8 kg/m2 the middle thicknes of endometrium was 5.2 + 2.7 mm, and there were no significant differences between the examined groups. There were no significant among in a number of miscarriages in the examined groups. We found that PCO Sy and congenital abnormalities of Müllerian ducts were conjoint in 30% of examined patients. Conclusion. Conjoined PCO Sy and congenital abnormalities of Müllerian ducts do not result in a higher number of misscarriages than only either PCO Sy or abnormalities of Müllerian ducts. It is important to check BMI, basal level of follicle stimulating hormone and number of antral follicles because the induction protocol and concentracion of inductors depends on these characteristics, thus, the successful cycles and pregnancy.

  2. Thrombocytosis in asplenia syndrome with congenital heart disease: a previously unrecognized risk factor for thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Kenichiro; Joo, Kunitaka; Ohga, Shouichi; Nagata, Hazumu; Ikeda, Kazuyuki; Muneuchi, Jun; Watanabe, Mamie; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-09-01

    Thrombocytosis and thromboembolic complications occur after splenectomy. However, there is no previous report investigating the presence of thrombocytosis and its association with thromboembolic events in patients having asplenia syndrome with congenital heart disease. Enrolled were 161 consecutive patients with functionally single ventricle who underwent cardiac catheterization between 1997 and 2010. They were divided into two groups: patients having asplenia (Group A, n=46) and patients having no asplenia (Group B, n=115). Aspirin therapy was employed in all patients after surgical interventions except for pulmonary artery banding. We retrospectively reviewed the platelet counts at each seven stage of cardiac catheterization (for pre- and postoperative evaluation of the first palliation, Glenn operation, and Fontan operation, and for late evaluation after Fontan operation), incidence of thromboembolic events, and other possible risk factors for thromboembolism. The median platelet counts in Group A were consistently higher than those in Group B at any of the seven stages of cardiac catheterizations (pthrombocytosis is present in patients with asplenia syndrome. It may greatly contribute to the development of thromboembolism during the management of congenital heart disease than expected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Normalisation of left ventricular systolic function after change from VVI pacing to biventricular pacing in a child with congenital complete atrioventricular block, long-QT syndrome, and congenital muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellesøe, Sabrina G; Reimers, Jesper I; Andersen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Development of dilated cardiomyopathy in patients with congenital complete atrioventricular block with or without pacemaker is well described. We report a case of dilated cardiomyopathy in a child with congenital complete atrioventricular block, long-QT syndrome, and VVI pacemaker. Temporary pacing...

  4. Photosensitive human syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Graciela; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-06-01

    Photosensitivity in humans can result from defects in repair of light-induced DNA lesions, from photoactivation of chemicals (including certain medications) with sunlight to produce toxic mediators, and by immune reactions to sunlight exposures. Deficiencies in DNA repair and the processing of damaged DNA during replication and transcription may result in mutations and genomic instability. We will review current understanding of photosensitivity to short wavelength ultraviolet light (UV) due to genetic defects in particular DNA repair pathways; deficiencies in some are characterized by an extremely high incidence of cancer in sun-exposed tissues, while in others no cancers have been reported.

  5. Novel de novo mutations in ZBTB20 in Primrose syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Francesca; Piton, Amelie; Gérard, Bénédicte; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Unger, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    The cardinal features of Primrose syndrome (MIM 259050) are dysmorphic facial features, macrocephaly, and intellectual disability, as well as large body size, height and weight, and calcified pinnae. A variety of neurological signs and symptoms have been reported including hearing loss, autism, behavioral abormalities, hypotonia, cerebral calcifications, and hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Recently, heterozygous de novo missense mutations in ZBTB20, coding for a zing finger protein, have been identified in Primrose syndrome patients. We report a boy with intellectual disability carrying two de novo missense mutations in the last exon of ZBTB20 (Ser616Phe and Gly741Arg; both previously unreported). One of them, Ser616Phe, affects an amino acid located in one of the C2H2 zing-fingers involved in DNA-binding and close to other missense mutations already described. Reverse phenotyping showed that this patient presents with classic features of Primrose syndrome (dysmorphic facies, macrocephaly, hearing loss, hypotonia, hypoplasia of the corpus callosum) and, in addition, congenital hypothyroidism. Review of the literature reveals another Primrose syndrome patient with hypothyroidism and thus, this may represent an under recognized component that should be investigated in other patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cataract, mitochondrial myopathy and defective oxidative phosphorylation in two siblings with Sengers-like syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Laak, H.J. ter; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Janssen, A.; Trijbels, J.M.F.; Cruysberg, H.; Boelen, C.; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    We describe two siblings with a Sengers-like syndrome, who presented with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, infantile cataract, mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and normal mental development. A mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) defect was detected since the ANT1 pro

  7. Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome : from clinical and genetic diagnosis to the molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal elongation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christine S.; Halim, Danny; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Alves, Maria M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome (CSBS) is a rare gastrointestinal disorder in which the mean length of the small intestine is substantially reduced when compared to its normal counterpart. Families with several affected members have been described and CSBS has been suggested to have a genetic basis.

  8. Unilateral pulmonary artery stenosis and late-onset cataract in an adult: a case of suspected congenital rubella syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; GUO Jun; ZHAO Rui-fu; WANG Lin

    2012-01-01

    Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is characterized by the triad of deafness,cataract and cardiovascular malformations.1 The great majority of the cases in the literature have been usually diagnosed in infancy and childhood because of various defects at birth.However,we report a rare case of suspected CRS in an adult with unilateral pulmonary artery stenosis and late-onset cataract.

  9. Recessive inheritance and variable penetrance of slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndromes (Retracted Article. See vol 72, pg 294, 2009)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croxen, R; Hatton, C; Shelley, C; Brydson, M; Chauplannaz, G; Oosterhuis, H; Vincent, A; Newsom-Davis, J; Colquhoun, D; Beeson, D

    2002-01-01

    Background: Slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndromes (SCCMS) typically show dominant inheritance. They are caused by missense mutations within the subunits of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) that result in prolonged ion channel activations. SCCMS mutations within the AChR a

  10. Configural and featural processing in humans with congenital prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobmaier, Janek S; Bölte, Jens; Mast, Fred W; Dobel, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Prosopagnosia describes the failure to recognize faces, a deficiency that can be devastating in social interactions. Cases of acquired prosopagnosia have often been described over the last century. In recent years, more and more cases of congenital prosopagnosia (CP) have been reported. In the present study we tried to determine possible cognitive characteristics of this impairment. We used scrambled and blurred images of faces, houses, and sugar bowls to separate featural processing strategies from configural processing strategies. This served to investigate whether congenital prosopagnosia results from process-specific deficiencies, or whether it is a face-specific impairment. Using a delayed matching paradigm, 6 individuals with CP and 6 matched healthy controls indicated whether an intact test stimulus was the same identity as a previously presented scrambled or blurred cue stimulus. Analyses of d values indicated that congenital prosopagnosia is a face-specific deficit, but that this shortcoming is particularly pronounced for processing configural facial information.

  11. Platelet abnormalities in adults with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension related to congenital heart defects (Eisenmenger syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remková, Anna; Šimková, Iveta; Valkovičová, Tatiana; Kaldarárová, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension suffer from life-threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications. The aim of this study was to compare selected platelet, endothelial, and coagulation parameters in healthy volunteers and patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension because of congenital heart defects. The study included healthy volunteers (n = 50) and patients with cyanotic congenital heart defects classified as Eisenmenger syndrome (n = 41). We investigated platelet count, mean platelet volume, and platelet aggregation - spontaneous and induced by various concentrations of five agonists. Von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen, factor VIII and XII, plasminogen activator inhibitor, antithrombin, D-dimer, and antiphospholipid antibodies were also investigated. We found a decreased platelet count [190 (147-225) vs. 248 (205-295) 10 l, P < 0.0001], higher mean platelet volume [10.9 (10.1-12.0) vs. 10.2 (9.4-10.4) fl, P < 0.0001], and significantly decreased platelet aggregation (induced by five agonists, in various concentrations) in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome compared with controls. These changes were accompanied by an increase of plasma vWF antigen [141.6 (108.9-179.1) vs. 117.4 (9.2-140.7) IU/dl, P = 0.022] and serum anti-β2-glycoprotein [2.07 (0.71-3.41) vs. 0.47 (0.18-0.99) U/ml, P < 0.0001]. Eisenmenger syndrome is accompanied by platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopenia with increased platelet size is probably due to a higher platelet turnover associated with platelet activation. Impaired platelet aggregation can reflect specific platelet behaviour in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome. These changes can be related both to bleeding and to thrombotic events. A higher vWF antigen may be a consequence of endothelial damage in Eisenmenger syndrome, but the cause for an increase of anti-β2-glycoprotein is unknown.

  12. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and congenital heart defects: presentation of an additional 32 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Christine B; Kochilas, Lazaros; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Moller, James H

    2011-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare genetic abnormality that has been linked to a mutation in the EVC or EVC2 genes. Common atrium (CA) is an uncommon cardiac malformation, and yet it is commonly found in patients with EVC. We performed a retrospective review of the cases submitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) between 1982 and 2007. A review of the English-language literature for previously published cases, as well as current genetic research findings, was also performed. Thirty-two pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and EVC syndrome were identified in the PCCC database. Twenty-eight (88%) had an endocardial cushion defect, with 15 of these having primary failure of atrial septation resulting in CA. Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) and pulmonary venous connection abnormalities were common. The incidence of persistent LSVC and pulmonary venous abnormalities were greater than previously reported for patients with EVC. Our study reviews the reported literature and adds 32 additional cases from the PCCC database. Review of the cardiac phenotype in patients with EVC syndrome reveals a characteristic pattern of atrioventricular canal defects with systemic and pulmonary venous abnormalities. The frequent association of these abnormalities is strongly reminiscent of the cardiac phenotype found in patients with heterotaxy syndromes. Emerging molecular and developmental studies suggest that EVC and EVC2 proteins may be important for cilia function, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of heterotaxy syndromes. It is speculated that coordinate function between the EVC proteins is required for a cilia-dependent cardiac morphogenesis.

  13. The Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Down syndrome Children with and without Congenital Heart Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of celiac disease (CD is remarkably varied in Down syndrome(DSpatientscompared with other diseases.  This study aimed to assess celiac disease prevalence in Down syndrome children with and without congenital heart defects (CHD and its comparison with controls. Materials and Methods This case-control study was performed at a single center on 132 participants in three groups. Clinical and genetic tests were performed on all patients suspected with Down syndrome to confirm their diseases.  After that in patients with confirmed Down syndrome echocardiography was carried out to diagnosis of CHD. Healthy children selected randomly among those who referred to the center for annual check-up. Statistical evaluation was done using SPSS-16. Results For the factors of age, weight, height and Body Mass Index (BMI not observed significant differences between three groups of participants, but it would be observed statistically differences for the variable of tTG- IgA.  For variables of weight, tTG- IgA and BMI was observed statistically different in the case and controls. The status of tTG- IgA (normal or 20 had significant correlation with three groups of controls, Down syndrome with and without CHD. The status of tTG- IgA also had significant correlation with groups of case and controls. In comparison of tTG- IgA in DS patients with and without CHD, no significant differences were observed. Conclusion The prevalence of CD in DS patients was higher compared the controls population; and in DS patients with CHD was higher compared the DS patients without CHD.

  14. 14q12 microdeletions excluding FOXG1 give rise to a congenital variant Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Carolyn J; Ho, Gladys; Bettella, Elisa; Knapman, Alisa; Collins, Felicity; Hackett, Anna; McKenzie, Fiona; Darmanian, Artur; Peters, Gregory B; Fagan, Kerry; Christodoulou, John

    2013-05-01

    Rett syndrome is a clinically defined neurodevelopmental disorder almost exclusively affecting females. Usually sporadic, Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene in ∼90-95% of classic cases and 40-60% of individuals with atypical Rett syndrome. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene have been associated with the early-onset seizure variant of Rett syndrome and mutations in FOXG1 have been associated with the congenital Rett syndrome variant. We report the clinical features and array CGH findings of three atypical Rett syndrome patients who had severe intellectual impairment, early-onset developmental delay, postnatal microcephaly and hypotonia. In addition, the females had a seizure disorder, agenesis of the corpus callosum and subtle dysmorphism. All three were found to have an interstitial deletion of 14q12. The deleted region in common included the PRKD1 gene but not the FOXG1 gene. Gene expression analysis suggested a decrease in FOXG1 levels in two of the patients. Screening of 32 atypical Rett syndrome patients did not identify any pathogenic mutations in the PRKD1 gene, although a previously reported frameshift mutation affecting FOXG1 (c.256dupC, p.Gln86ProfsX35) was identified in a patient with the congenital Rett syndrome variant. There is phenotypic overlap between congenital Rett syndrome variants with FOXG1 mutations and the clinical presentation of our three patients with this 14q12 microdeletion, not encompassing the FOXG1 gene. We propose that the primary defect in these patients is misregulation of the FOXG1 gene rather than a primary abnormality of PRKD1.

  15. Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the Philippines: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabay, Xenia Cathrine J.; Vinarao, Ariel B.; Manalastas, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. As part of regional elimination efforts, rubella-containing vaccines (RCV) have recently been introduced in the Philippines, yet the true burden of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in the country is largely unknown. Objective. To provide baseline information on rubella and CRS prior to routine vaccine introduction in the Philippines. Methods. We conducted a systematic literature review on rubella and CRS in the Philippines, including a cross-sectional study conducted in 2002 among 383 pregnant women attending the obstetric outpatient clinic of the Philippine General Hospital to assess rubella susceptibility of women of childbearing age. Results. 15 locally published and unpublished studies were reviewed. Susceptibility to rubella among women of childbearing age was higher in rural communities. Retrospective reviews revealed congenital heart diseases, cataracts, and hearing impairments to be most common presentations in children of CRS. In the cross-sectional study, 59 (15.4%) of the 383 pregnant women enrolled were seronegative for rubella IgG. Conclusion. Similar to other countries introducing RCV, it was only recently that surveillance for rubella has been established. Previous studies show substantial disabilities due to CRS and a substantial proportion of susceptible women who are at risk for having babies affected with CRS. Establishment of CRS surveillance and enhanced awareness on rubella case detection should be prioritized. PMID:28115948

  16. Further efforts in the achievement of congenital rubella syndrome/rubella elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozza, Vanessa; Martinelli, Domenico; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Tafuri, Silvio; Fortunato, Francesca; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The Italian National Plan of Measles and Rubella Elimination 2010-2015 has deferred the objective to reduce congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) to rubella among women in childbearing-age. In Puglia region, MMR vaccine coverage is 93% in newborns (cohort 2010; one dose), 85% in children 5-6 years old and 77% in adolescents (cohort 2005 and 1997, respectively; two doses). Combining available seroepidemiological data and results of a survey on the attitude towards rubella vaccination and rubella testing before pregnancy, we could estimate that 5.7% of Apulian women in childbearing-age are currently susceptible to rubella infection. The regional infectious disease routine notification system reported no cases of CRS and rubella in pregnancy in 2001-2010 period. The inconsistency among the mentioned data triggered the evaluation of the reliability of disease reporting. We performed a retrospective case-finding for the years 2003-2011. We scanned the regional hospital discharge registry to identify hospitalizations for rubella in pregnancy and CRS and retrieve individual records. We also searched for clinical history of CRS mothers in the delivery assistance certificate registry. We identified one CRS, two confirmed and four suspected congenital infections, and seven cases of rubella in pregnancy. Passive surveillance of CRS and rubella in pregnancy appears not to be reliable in the light of strengthening rubella elimination strategies.

  17. Identification of Ocular and Auditory Manifestations of Congenital Rubella Syndrome in Mbingo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Jivraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS is a global cause of preventable hearing impairment, blindness, and intellectual impairment. The present study sought to identify ocular and auditory manifestations of CRS in school-aged children in Mbingo, Cameroon. Design. Cross sectional study. Subjects. Students at two schools, one for children with hearing impairment, were screened for cataract, congenital glaucoma, and pigmentary retinopathy. Methods. Students underwent seven-field digital fundus photography through a dilated pupil using a Topcon NW200 nonmydriatic camera. Images were assessed by retina specialists in Canada via teleophthalmology. Clinical evidence was integrated to form case definitions for CRS based on Center for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Serological evidence of rubella infection was obtained using standardized IgG antibody titers. Main Outcome Measure. Number of probable and suspicious cases of CRS. Results. Between September 2009 and May 2010, 320 students participated. There were 28 (10.2% probable cases, 104 (37.8% suspects, and 143 (52.0% unaffected. Rubella IgG serology was positive in 79 (48.7% of children with hearing impairment and 11 (7.4% of children with normal hearing. Conclusions. The present study identified 28 probable cases of CRS. Furthermore, 92.6% of students with normal hearing did not possess rubella IgG antibodies making future cases of CRS likely without intervention.

  18. Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome in the Philippines: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Lopez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As part of regional elimination efforts, rubella-containing vaccines (RCV have recently been introduced in the Philippines, yet the true burden of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS in the country is largely unknown. Objective. To provide baseline information on rubella and CRS prior to routine vaccine introduction in the Philippines. Methods. We conducted a systematic literature review on rubella and CRS in the Philippines, including a cross-sectional study conducted in 2002 among 383 pregnant women attending the obstetric outpatient clinic of the Philippine General Hospital to assess rubella susceptibility of women of childbearing age. Results. 15 locally published and unpublished studies were reviewed. Susceptibility to rubella among women of childbearing age was higher in rural communities. Retrospective reviews revealed congenital heart diseases, cataracts, and hearing impairments to be most common presentations in children of CRS. In the cross-sectional study, 59 (15.4% of the 383 pregnant women enrolled were seronegative for rubella IgG. Conclusion. Similar to other countries introducing RCV, it was only recently that surveillance for rubella has been established. Previous studies show substantial disabilities due to CRS and a substantial proportion of susceptible women who are at risk for having babies affected with CRS. Establishment of CRS surveillance and enhanced awareness on rubella case detection should be prioritized.

  19. WAGR syndrome and congenital hypothyroidism in a child with a Mosaic 11p13 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh Tuan; Boudry-Labis, Elise; Duban, Bénédicte; Andrieux, Joris; Tran, Cong Toai; Tampere, Heidi; Ceraso, Delphine; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Tachdjian, Gérard; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    Wilm's tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome, a rare genetic disorder, is caused by the loss of 11p13 region including PAX6 and WT1. We report novel findings in a 28-month-old boy with aniridia, Wilm's tumor, congenital hypothyroidism, and sublingual thyroid ectopia. He was found to have a mosaic 5.28 Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 11p13 deleting PAX6 and WT1. In order to clarify the mechanism underlying his thyroid dysgenesis, sequence analysis of candidate thyroid developmental genes was performed. We identified a FOXE1: c.532_537delGCCGCC p.(Ala178_Ala179del) variant that predisposes to thyroid ectopia. Taken together, this is the first report of mosaic 11p13 deletion in association with thyroid dysgenesis. We also propose a model of complex interactions of different genetic variants for this particular phenotype in the present patient. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Congenital heart disease and cardiac procedural outcomes in patients with trisomy 21 and Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Demori, Raysa

    2017-07-24

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is present in approximately 50% of patients with trisomy 21 (T21) and Turner syndrome (TS). According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, every patient with these genetic disorders should have a postnatal echocardiogram. T21 is usually associated with atrioventricular (30%-60%), atrial (16%-21%), or ventricular septal defects (14%-27%). TS is usually associated with left-sided heart disease. However, the spectrum of CHD in these genetic disorders is wider than those mentioned lesions. More cardiac surgical procedures are offered to these patients and that has influenced positively their life expectancy for some CHD conditions. Single ventricular anatomy is associated with high mortality in these genetic disorders (49% in T21 and 83%-91% in TS). The goal of this article is to describe the spectrum of CHD, screening guidelines, and cardiac surgical outcomes in patients with T21 or TS with CHD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome in combination with congenital dislocation of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Klippel–Trenaunay syndrome (KTS is a rare and sporadic disorder characterized by the triad of capillary malformations, venous varicosities, and limb hypertrophy. The clinical manifestations of KTS are heterogeneous. In this report, we present a unique case of KTS in combination with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH in a 4-day-old female neonate. The patient had a widespread port-wine stain surrounded by regions of unaffected skin in a mosaic pattern, cutaneous hemangioma on the upper lip, left-sided hemihypertrophy involving the entire body, and also evidence of left CDH (based on the results of a physical examination and radiographic interpretation. We present this case for the rarity of presentation, discuss the relationship between KTS and CDH, and the treatment options available with a brief review of the literature.

  2. Congenital Horner′s syndrome and the usefulness of the apraclonidine test in its diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzai Hasan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a seven-month-old baby with miosis of the left pupil, left hypochromia, mild ipsilateral ptosis, left hemifacial anhidrosis and asymmetrical facial flushing. A diagnosis of Horner′s syndrome (HS was presumed and was confirmed by instillation of apraclonidine eye drops. Miosis was reversed upon apraclonidine instillation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head, neck and thorax and ultrasonography of the neck and abdomen did not reveal any pathological conditions. Although delivery-related brachial plexus injury is known as the most common cause of congenital HS, it should be investigated and should include neuroimaging of the sympathetic pathway, to exclude a serious underlying disease. As in our case, a specific etiology may not always be elicited. Pharmacological testing with apraclonidine may be a practical alternative to cocaine in the diagnosis of HS.

  3. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia may be associated with 17q12 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumy, Carole; Laffargue, Fanny; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Kemeny, Stéphen; Gay-Bellile, Mathilde; Gouas, Laetiti; Gallot, Denis; Francannet, Christine; Tchirkov, Andrei; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Vago, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions of 17q12 encompassing TCF2 are associated with maturity-onset of diabetes of the young type 5, cystic renal disease, pancreatic atrophy, Mullerian aplasia in females and variable cognitive impairment. We report on a patient with a de novo 17q12 microdeletion, 1.8 Mb in size, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). The 5-year-old male patient presented multicystic renal dysplasia kidneys, minor facial dysmorphic features and skeletal anomalies, but neither developmental delay nor behavioral abnormalities. CDH has been previously associated with the 17q12 microdeletion syndrome only in one prenatal case. The present study reinforces the hypothesis that CDH is part of the phenotype for 17q12 microdeletion and that 17q12 encompasses candidate(s) gene(s) involved in diaphragm development. We suggest that PIGW, a gene involved in an early step of GPI biosynthesis, could be a strong candidate gene for CDH.

  4. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly

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    Debangshu Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  5. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debangshu; Saha, Somnath; Basu, Sumit Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD) obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  6. Hallermann–Streiff syndrome with severe bilateral enophthalmos and radiological evidence of silent brain syndrome: a new congenital silent brain syndrome?

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    Nucci P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Nucci¹, Carlo de Conciliis², Matteo Sacchi¹, Massimiliano Serafino¹¹Eye Clinic, San Giuseppe Hospital, University of Milan, ²Eye Clinic, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, ItalyBackground: We present the first case of a congenital form of silent brain syndrome (SBS in a young patient affected by Hallermann–Streiff syndrome (HSS and the surgical management of the associated eyelid anomalies.Methods: HSS signs were evaluated according to the Francois criteria. Orbital computed tomography (CT and genetic analysis were performed. An upper eyelid retractor-free recession was performed. Follow-up visits were performed at day 1, weeks 1 and 3, and months 3, 6, 9 (for both eyes, and 12 (for left eye after surgery.Results: The patient exhibited six of the seven signs of HSS. Orbital CT showed bilateral enophthalmos and upward bowing of the orbital roof with air entrapment under the upper eyelid as previously described for SBS. Genetic analysis showed a 2q polymorphism. During follow-up, the cornea showed absence of epithelial damage and the upper eyelids were lowered symmetrically, with a regular contour.Conclusion: Our HSS patient shares features with SBS. We postulate that SBS could include more than one pattern, ie, an acquired form following ventriculoperitoneal shunting and this newly reported congenital form in our HSS patient in whom typical syndromic skull anomalies led to this condition. The surgical treatment has been effective in restoring an appropriate lid level, with good globe apposition and a good cosmetic result.Keywords: Hallermann–Streiff syndrome, silent brain syndrome, upper eyelid entropion

  7. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that ... function, even though there are normal platelet numbers. Most ...

  8. Recurrent progressive anterior segment fibrosis syndrome following a descemet-stripping endothelial keratoplasty in an infant with congenital aniridia

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    Mihir Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive anterior segment fibrosis syndrome (ASFS, after intraocular surgery in older children (≥9 years and adults with congenital aniridia, is described in the literature. In this report, we describe an unique case of ASFS in an infant with congenital aniridia following a combined trabeculotomy-ectomy and its recurrence after a descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty. The ophthalmologists should be well aware of this entity and warn the parents about its possibilities. Use of immunomodulators or prolonged anti-inflammatory therapy may be considered to prevent its occurrence.

  9. Clinical Characteristics of Down Syndrome Children With Congenital Heart Disease in a Developing Country

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    Mottaghi Moghaddam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Down syndrome (DS is the most common chromosomal abnormality in newborns and is associated with other congenital malformations and health problems. The features of Down syndrome differ according to ethnicity and geographic region. Objectives The main aim was to assess the clinical characteristics of DS patients in a referral pediatric cardiology department. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the clinical characteristics of children with Down syndrome and heart defects in an educational hospital over 11 years (from September 2001 to September 2012 in Iran. All data were collected according to a checklist created by the researchers, which included the clinical information, genetic characteristics, cardiac and non-cardiac co-existing diseases, and parental variables of the children. An independent t-test and a chi-square test were used to compare qualitative variables such as birth weight and age of diagnosis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results 100 patients with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease were evaluated; 52 were female (52% and 48 were male (48%. The average birth weight of the subjects was 2745 ± 523 (mean ± SD grams. The mean age of the patients’ mothers was 32 ± 6 years, and the mean age of the patients’ fathers was 36 ± 6 years. Chromosomal analysis was performed for 61 patients, 60 of whom had free trisomy (98.4%, one of whom had translocation (1.6%, and none of whom had a mosaic pattern of chromosomal abnormality. The parents of 33 the patients in this study were consanguineous. All patients had cardiac disorders, but non-cardiac disorder also was recorded in 37 patients (37%. The most common non-cardiac disorder in patients was hypothyroidism, and the second most common was gastrointestinal problems. Conclusions Parents were blood relatives in 33 (33% of the patient cases, which is a very high rate. Therefore, non-random mating is an important issue in

  10. Phakomatosis Pigmentovascularis Associated With Sturge–Weber Syndrome, Ota Nevus, and Congenital Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yangfan; Guo, Xiujuan; Xu, Jiangang; Ye, Yiming; Liu, Xiaoan; Yu, Minbin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis (PPV) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome that is characterized by a combination of capillary abnormalities and dermal melanocytosis. We describe 3 cases of PPV combined with bilateral Sturge–Weber syndrome (SWS), Ota nevus, and congenital glaucoma. Case 1 was a 2-year-old boy. Facial port-wine stains distributed along the 3 branches of his trigeminal nerves, which suggested the existence of SWS. Gray-blue patches were spread over the frontal and temporal areas of bilateral face, waist, buttocks, and thigh. Bilateral triangular alopecia was found on the temporal scalp. The diagnosis of Ota nevus was made by the bilateral scleral malanocystosis. Increased intraocular pressure, enlarged cornea, and pathologic optic disc cupping supported the diagnoses of infantile bilateral glaucoma. Case 2 was a 4-year-old boy. Port-wine stains were found on the face along the 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve and distributed along the trunk, arms, and legs. Mongolian spots spread over his frontal and temporal areas of the bilateral face, waist, buttocks, thigh, abdomen, and back. Infantile glaucoma was found in both eyes. Ota nevus were found in the both eyes. Optic coherent tomography (OCT) scans revealed increased thickness of choroid. Case 3 was a 5-year-old boy. Besides Ota nevus and infantile glaucoma in both eyes, color Doppler ultrasonography showed choroidal hemagioma. OCT scan showed increased choroidal thickness. The bilateral triangular alopecia on the child's temporal scalp was similar to that of Case 1. Cases 1 and 2 presented with port-wine stain patches that were consistent with the characteristic manifestation of PPV type IIb. However, the CMTC of Case 3 met the diagnostic criteria for PPV type Vb. Case 1 was treated with trabeculotomies in both eyes. For Cases 2 and 3, surgical interventions were not considered due to the high risks of antiglaucomatous operation complications. We prescribed them antiglaucoma

  11. Phakomatosis Pigmentovascularis Associated With Sturge-Weber Syndrome, Ota Nevus, and Congenital Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yangfan; Guo, Xiujuan; Xu, Jiangang; Ye, Yiming; Liu, Xiaoan; Yu, Minbin

    2015-07-01

    Phakomatosis pigmentovascularis (PPV) is a rare congenital malformation syndrome that is characterized by a combination of capillary abnormalities and dermal melanocytosis.We describe 3 cases of PPV combined with bilateral Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), Ota nevus, and congenital glaucoma.Case 1 was a 2-year-old boy. Facial port-wine stains distributed along the 3 branches of his trigeminal nerves, which suggested the existence of SWS. Gray-blue patches were spread over the frontal and temporal areas of bilateral face, waist, buttocks, and thigh. Bilateral triangular alopecia was found on the temporal scalp. The diagnosis of Ota nevus was made by the bilateral scleral malanocystosis. Increased intraocular pressure, enlarged cornea, and pathologic optic disc cupping supported the diagnoses of infantile bilateral glaucoma. Case 2 was a 4-year-old boy. Port-wine stains were found on the face along the 3 branches of the trigeminal nerve and distributed along the trunk, arms, and legs. Mongolian spots spread over his frontal and temporal areas of the bilateral face, waist, buttocks, thigh, abdomen, and back. Infantile glaucoma was found in both eyes. Ota nevus were found in the both eyes. Optic coherent tomography (OCT) scans revealed increased thickness of choroid. Case 3 was a 5-year-old boy. Besides Ota nevus and infantile glaucoma in both eyes, color Doppler ultrasonography showed choroidal hemagioma. OCT scan showed increased choroidal thickness. The bilateral triangular alopecia on the child's temporal scalp was similar to that of Case 1. Cases 1 and 2 presented with port-wine stain patches that were consistent with the characteristic manifestation of PPV type IIb. However, the CMTC of Case 3 met the diagnostic criteria for PPV type Vb.Case 1 was treated with trabeculotomies in both eyes. For Cases 2 and 3, surgical interventions were not considered due to the high risks of antiglaucomatous operation complications. We prescribed them antiglaucoma indications

  12. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  13. Non-syndromic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: clinical presentation and genotype-phenotype relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioude, Frédéric; Bouligand, Jérôme; Trabado, Séverine; Francou, Bruno; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Chanson, Philippe; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Young, Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) results from abnormal gonadotropin secretion, and it is characterized by impaired pubertal development. CHH is caused by defective GNRH release, or by a gonadotrope cell dysfunction in the pituitary. Identification of genetic abnormalities related to CHH has provided major insights into the pathways critical for the development, maturation, and function of the reproductive axis. Mutations in five genes have been found specifically in Kallmann's syndrome, a disorder in which CHH is related to abnormal GNRH neuron ontogenesis and is associated with anosmia or hyposmia. In combined pituitary hormone deficiency or in complex syndromic CHH in which gonadotropin deficiency is either incidental or only one aspect of a more complex endocrine disorder or a non-endocrine disorder, other mutations affecting GNRH and/or gonadotropin secretion have been reported. Often, the CHH phenotype is tightly linked to an isolated deficiency of gonadotropin secretion. These patients, who have no associated signs or hormone deficiencies independent of the deficiency in gonadotropin and sex steroids, have isolated CHH. In some familial cases, they are due to genetic alterations affecting GNRH secretion (mutations in GNRH1, GPR54/KISS1R and TAC3 and TACR3) or the GNRH sensitivity of the gonadotropic cells (GNRHR). A minority of patients with Kallmann's syndrome or a syndromic form of CHH may also appear to have isolated CHH, but close clinical, familial, and genetic studies can reorient the diagnosis, which is important for genetic counseling in the context of assisted reproductive medicine. This review focuses on published cases of isolated CHH, its clinical and endocrine features, genetic causes, and genotype-phenotype relationships.

  14. Congenital short QT syndrome: landmarks of the newest arrhythmogenic cardiac channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Riera, Andrés Ricardo; Paixão-Almeida, Adail; Barbosa-Barros, Raimundo; Yanowitz, Frank G; Baranchuk, Adrian; Dubner, Sergio; Palandri Chagas, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Congenital or familial short QT syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous cardiac channelopathy without structural heart disease that has a dominant autosomal or sporadic pattern of transmission affecting the electric system of the heart. Patients present clinically with a spectrum of signs and symptoms including irregular palpitations due to episodes of paroxysmal atrialfibrillation, dizziness and fainting (syncope) and/or sudden cardiac death due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Electrocardiographic (ECG) findings include extremely short QTc intervals (QTc interval ≤330 ms) not significantly modified with heart rate changes and T waves of great voltage witha narrow base. Electrophysiologic studies are characterized by significant shortening of atrial and ventricular refractory periods and arrhythmias induced by programmed stimulation. A few families have been identified with specific genotypes: 3 with mutations in potassium channels called SQT1 (Iks), SQT2 (Ikr) and SQT3 (Ik1). These 3 potassium channel variants are the "genetic mirror image" of long QT syndrome type 2, type 1 and Andersen-Tawil syndrome respectively because they exert opposite gain-of-function effects on the potassium channels in contrast to the loss-of-function of the potassium channels in the long QT syndromes. Three new variants with overlapping phenotypes affecting the slow inward calcium channels havealso been described. Finally, another variant with mixed phenotype affecting the sodium channel was reported. This review focuses the landmarks of this newest arrhythmogenic cardiac channelopathy on the main clinical, genetic, and proposed ECG mechanisms. In addition therapeutic options and the molecular autopsy of this fascinating primary electrical heart disease are discussed.

  15. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV : unusual congenital anomalies in a mother and son with a COL3A1 mutation and a normal collagen III protein profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, HY; Pals, G; van Essen, AJ

    2003-01-01

    A mother and son with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV and unusual congenital anomalies are described. The congenital anomalies include, in the mother, amniotic band-like constrictions on one hand, a unilateral clubfoot, and macrocephaly owing to normal-pressure hydrocephaly and, in the son, an

  16. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV : unusual congenital anomalies in a mother and son with a COL3A1 mutation and a normal collagen III protein profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, HY; Pals, G; van Essen, AJ

    2003-01-01

    A mother and son with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV and unusual congenital anomalies are described. The congenital anomalies include, in the mother, amniotic band-like constrictions on one hand, a unilateral clubfoot, and macrocephaly owing to normal-pressure hydrocephaly and, in the son, an

  17. Prevalence and profile of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension in Down syndrome in a pediatric cardiology service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Alves Mourato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To determine the frequence and profile of congenital heart defects in Down syndrome patients referred to a pediatric cardiologic center, considering the age of referral, gender, type of heart disease diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and its association with pulmonary hypertension at the initial diagnosis.METHODS:Cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection of 138 patients with Down syndrome from a total of 17,873 records. Descriptive analysis of the data was performed, using Epi-Info version 7.RESULTS: Among the 138 patients with Down syndrome, females prevailed (56.1% and 112 (81.2% were diagnosed with congenital heart disease. The most common lesion was ostium secundum atrial septal defect, present in 51.8%, followed by atrioventricular septal defect, in 46.4%. Ventricular septal defects were present in 27.7%, while tetralogy of Fallot represented 6.3% of the cases. Other cardiac malformations corresponded to 12.5%. Pulmonary hypertension was associated with 37.5% of the heart diseases. Only 35.5% of the patients were referred before six months of age.CONCLUSIONS: The low percentage of referral until six months of age highlights the need for a better tracking of patients with Down syndrome in the context of congenital heart disease, due to the high frequency and progression of pulmonary hypertension.

  18. 14q12 Microdeletion syndrome and congenital variant of Rett syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mencarelli, M.A.; Kleefstra, T.; Katzaki, E.; Papa, F.T.; Cohen, M.; Pfundt, R.P.; Ariani, F.; Meloni, I.; Mari, F.; Renieri, A.

    2009-01-01

    Only two patients with 14q12 deletion have been reported to date. Here, we describe an additional patient with a similar deletion in order to improve the clinical delineation of this new microdeletion syndrome. The emerging phenotype is characterized by a Rett-like clinical course with an almost nor

  19. Configural and featural processing in humans with congenital prosopagnosia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lobmaier, Janek S.; Bölte, Jens; Mast, Fred W.; Dobel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Prosopagnosia describes the failure to recognize faces, a deficiency that can be devastating in social interactions. Cases of acquired prosopagnosia have often been described over the last century. In recent years, more and more cases of congenital prosopagnosia (CP) have been reported. In the present study we tried to determine possible cognitive characteristics of this impairment. We used scrambled and blurred images of faces, houses, and sugar bowls to separate featural processing strategi...

  20. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  1. Variations in NPHP5 in Patients With Nonsyndromic Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Senior-Loken Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Edwin M.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Ehlinger, Mary A.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Lam, Byron L.; Fulton, Anne B.; Mullins, Robert F.; Sheffield, Val C.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether mutations in NPHP5 can cause Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) without early-onset renal disease. Methods DNA samples from 276 individuals with non-syndromic LCA were screened for variations in the NPHP5 gene. Each had been previously screened for mutations in 8 known LCA genes without identifying a disease-causing genotype. Results Nine of the 276 LCA probands (3.2%) harbored 2 plausible disease-causing mutations (7 different alleles) in NPHP5. Four of these have been previously reported in patients with Senior-Loken syndrome (F141del, R461X, H506del, and R489X) and 3 are novel (A111del, E346X, and R455X). All 9 patients had severe visual loss from early childhood but none had overt renal disease in the first decade of life. Two patients were diagnosed with nephronophthisis in the second decade. Retinal imaging studies showed retained photoreceptor nuclei and retinal pigment epithelium integrity mainly in the cone-rich central retina, a phenotype with strong similarities to that of NPHP6 disease. Conclusions Mutations in NPHP5 can cause LCA without early-onset renal disease. Abnormalities observed in the photoreceptor outer segments (a cilial structure) may explain the severe visual loss in NPHP5-associated LCA. Clinical Relevance The persistence of central photoreceptor nuclei despite severe visual loss in NPHP5 disease is encouraging for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:21220633

  2. Global Progress Toward Rubella and Congenital Rubella Syndrome Control and Elimination - 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gavin B; Reef, Susan E; Dabbagh, Alya; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Strebel, Peter M

    2015-09-25

    Rubella virus usually causes a mild fever and rash in children and adults. However, infection during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester, can result in miscarriage, fetal death, stillbirth, or a constellation of congenital malformations known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS). In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated guidance on the preferred strategy for introduction of rubella-containing vaccine (RCV) into national routine immunization schedules, including an initial vaccination campaign usually targeting children aged 9 months-15 years . The Global Vaccine Action Plan endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2012 and the Global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan (2012-2020) published by Measles and Rubella Initiative partners in 2012 both include goals to eliminate rubella and CRS in at least two WHO regions by 2015, and at least five WHO regions by 2020 (2,3). This report updates a previous report and summarizes global progress toward rubella and CRS control and elimination during 2000-2014. As of December 2014, RCV had been introduced in 140 (72%) countries, an increase from 99 (51%) countries in 2000 (for this report, WHO member states are referred to as countries). Reported rubella cases declined 95%, from 670,894 cases in 102 countries in 2000 to 33,068 cases in 162 countries in 2014, although reporting is inconsistent. To achieve the 2020 Global Vaccine Action Plan rubella and CRS elimination goals, RCV introduction needs to continue as country criteria indicating readiness are met, and rubella and CRS surveillance need to be strengthened to ensure that progress toward elimination can be measured.

  3. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in FOXC1 Causes Axenfeld Rieger Syndrome with Congenital Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Micheal

    Full Text Available Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD disorders are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes in which frequently cornea, iris, and lens are affected. This study aimed to identify novel mutations in PAX6, PITX2 and FOXC1 in families with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders.We studied 14 Pakistani and one Mexican family with Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS; n = 10 or aniridia (n = 5. All affected and unaffected family members underwent full ophthalmologic and general examinations. Total genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood. PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed for the exons and intron-exon boundaries of the FOXC1, PAX6, and PITX2 genes.Mutations were identified in five of the 15 probands; four variants were novel and one variant was described previously. A novel de novo variant (c.225C>A; p.Tyr75* was identified in the PAX6 gene in two unrelated probands with aniridia. In addition, a known variant (c.649C>T; p.Arg217* in PAX6 segregated in a family with aniridia. In the FOXC1 gene, a novel heterozygous variant (c.454T>C; p.Trp152Arg segregated with the disease in a Mexican family with ARS. A novel homozygous variant (c.92_100del; p.Ala31_Ala33del in the FOXC1 gene segregated in a Pakistani family with ARS and congenital glaucoma.Our study expands the mutation spectrum of the PAX6 and FOXC1 genes in individuals with anterior segment dysgenesis disorders. In addition, our study suggests that FOXC1 mutations, besides typical autosomal dominant ARS, can also cause ARS with congenital glaucoma through an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Our results thus expand the disease spectrum of FOXC1, and may lead to a better understanding of the role of FOXC1 in development.

  4. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome after pediatric congenital heart surgery: Incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehne, Martin; Sasse, Michael; Karch, André; Dziuba, Friederike; Horke, Alexander; Kaussen, Torsten; Mikolajczyk, Rafael; Beerbaum, Philipp; Jack, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is frequent after cardiac surgery, but data on its incidence and perioperative risk factors are scarce for children with congenital heart disease. SIRS incidence within 72 hours following cardiac surgery was evaluated in a secondary analysis of children enrolled to a treatment-free control group of a randomized controlled trial. Intraoperative parameters were investigated for their association with SIRS using multivariable fractional polynomial logistic regression models. Effects of SIRS on various organ functions and length of stay were evaluated using time-varying Cox regression models. In 116 children after cardiac surgery (median age [range]: 7.4 month [1 day-16.2 years]) SIRS occurred in n = 39/102 with and n = 1/14 without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Duration of CPB (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.28 per hour; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17; 4.42) and amount of fresh frozen plasma (HR: 1.23 per 10 mL/kg; 95%CI 1.06; 1.42) were identified as predictors for SIRS; neonates seemed to be less susceptible for SIRS development (HR: 0.86; 95%CI 0.79; 0.95). SIRS was associated with organ dysfunction (HR: 2.69; 95%CI 1.41; 5.12) and extended stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) (median: 168 vs. 96 hours; p = 0.007). SIRS is a frequent complication after pediatric congenital heart surgery; it affects nearly one third of children and prolongs PICU stay significantly. Duration of CPB and amount of fresh frozen plasma were identified as important risk factors. Neonates seem to be less susceptible to SIRS development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Craniosynostosis, ectopia lentis, and congenital heart defects: further delineation of an autosomal dominant syndrome with incomplete penetrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, Nada L; Teebi, Ahmad S

    2002-01-01

    The association of craniosynostosis with ectopia lentis is extremely rare. This was recently reported in monozygotic twin sisters, supporting a genetic etiology for this syndromic association. We report on female first cousins once removed who were born with unilateral coronal synostosis. One cousin also had peripheral pulmonic branch stenosis at birth and was later found to have ectopia lentis and severe myopia. The other cousin had an atrial septal defect, mitral valve prolapse, and only mild myopia. Their intelligence is normal. The inheritance is likely autosomal dominant with variable expression and incomplete penetrance and further defines this syndrome to include congenital heart defects. These findings will have important implications for genetic counseling.

  6. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and microtia in a newborn with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) exposure: phenocopy for Fryns syndrome or broad spectrum of teratogenic effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Melissa A; Zayed, Hatem; Slavotinek, Anne M; Rutledge, Joe C

    2009-06-01

    A newborn female infant born to a woman on immunosuppressive medications including mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for a renal graft secondary to lupus nephritis presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and additional findings of microtia, esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, cleft palate, congenital heart defect, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic facial features. Pulmonary hypoplasia resulted in death at day 2 of life. She was presumed to have Fryns syndrome based on diagnostic criteria established for this recessive disorder with prominent features including CDH, facial anomalies, and nail hypoplasia. In retrospect, this infant's findings are more likely the result of teratogenic exposure to MMF, as more recent data have emerged linking aural atresia, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic features to this drug. To date, this is the only human report of CDH in an infant with prenatal exposure to MMF, although the manufacturer's package insert alludes to animal studies with a broad spectrum of malformations, including CDH. Thus, a teratogenic exposure can mimic a known Mendelian genetic syndrome, and caution is urged in presuming a genetic etiology for infants with potential teratogenic exposure to relatively new drugs with limited published animal data.

  7. A novel congenital myasthenic syndrome due to decreased acetylcholine receptor ion-channel conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Richard; Maxwell, Susan; Spearman, Hayley; Tai, Kaihsu; Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark; Beeson, David

    2012-04-01

    Muscle acetylcholine receptor ion channels mediate neurotransmission by depolarizing the postsynaptic membrane at the neuromuscular junction. Inherited disorders of neuromuscular transmission, termed congenital myasthenic syndromes, are commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding the five subunits of the acetylcholine receptor that severely reduce endplate acetylcholine receptor numbers and/or cause kinetic abnormalities of acetylcholine receptor function. We tracked the cause of the myasthenic disorder in a female with onset of first symptoms at birth, who displayed mildly progressive bulbar, respiratory and generalized limb weakness with ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. Direct DNA sequencing revealed heteroallelic mutations in exon 8 of the acetylcholine receptor ε-subunit gene. Two alleles were identified: one with the missense substitution p.εP282R, and the second with a deletion, c.798_800delCTT, which result in the loss of a single amino acid, residue F266, within the M2 transmembrane domain. When these acetylcholine receptor mutations were expressed in HEK 293 cells, the p.εP282R mutation caused severely reduced expression on the cell surface, whereas p.εΔF266 gave robust surface expression. Single-channel analysis for p.εΔF266 acetylcholine receptor channels showed the longest burst duration population was not different from wild-type acetylcholine receptor (4.39 ± 0.6 ms versus 4.68 ± 0.7 ms, n = 5 each) but that the amplitude of channel openings was reduced. Channel amplitudes at different holding potentials showed that single-channel conductance was significantly reduced in p.εΔF266 acetylcholine receptor channels (42.7 ± 1.4 pS, n = 8, compared with 70.9 ± 1.6 pS for wild-type, n = 6). Although a phenylalanine residue at this position within M2 is conserved throughout ligand-gated excitatory cys-loop channel subunits, deletion of equivalent residues in the other subunits of muscle acetylcholine receptor did not

  8. Neonatal progeroid variant of Marfan syndrome with congenital lipodystrophy results from mutations at the 3' end of FBN1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet, Adeline; Verloes, Alain; Callewaert, Bert; Coremans, Christine; Coucke, Paul; de Paepe, Anne; Kornak, Uwe; Lebrun, Frederic; Lombet, Jacques; Piérard, Gérald E; Robinson, Peter N; Symoens, Sofie; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Debray, François-Guillaume

    2014-04-01

    We report a 16-year-old girl with neonatal progeroid features and congenital lipodystrophy who was considered at birth as a possible variant of Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome. The emergence of additional clinical signs (marfanoid habitus, severe myopia and dilatation of the aortic bulb) lead to consider the diagnosis of the progeroid variant of Marfan syndrome. A de novo donor splice-site mutation (c.8226+1G>A) was identified in FBN1. We show that this mutation leads to exon 64 skipping and to the production of a stable mRNA that should allow synthesis of a truncated profibrillin-1, in which the C-terminal furin cleavage site is altered. FBN1 mutations associated with a similar phenotype have only been reported in four other patients. We confirm the correlation between marfanoid phenotype with congenital lipodystrophy and neonatal progeroid features (marfanoid-progeroid-lipodystrophy syndrome) and frameshift mutations at the 3' end of FBN1. This syndrome should be considered in differential diagnosis of neonatal progeroid syndromes.

  9. Congenital prosopagnosia--a common hereditary cognitive dysfunction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerknecht, Ingo; Pluempe, Nina; Welling, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    The apparent selectivity of agnosia for faces is termed prosopagnosia or face blindness. This cognitive dysfunction can be seen after traumatic events--involving at least the right occipital temporal region--or very frequently congenital in the absence of any detectable lesions. The familiarity of congenital prosopagnosia was studied in two independently ascertained collections of subjects with prosopagnosia. One was an unselected group of pupils and students who underwent a questionnaire based screening. The others were self reported subjects after having heard for the first time about the phenomenon of prosopagnosia from mass media citing our studies and/or from our homepage (www.prosopagnosia.de). Those who agreed with consecutive studies of their family members had mostly one or more prosopagnosic first degree relatives. The segregation patterns derived from 39 families are compatible with autosomal dominant inheritance. Hence, mutation(s) in one gene are sufficient for manifestation of the phenotype. Still fitting the concept of autosomal dominant inheritance, we have evidence for a slightly reduced penetrance (4 normal transmitters from distinct families) and one or two de novo mutations.

  10. Refining the Diagnosis of Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome on Long-term Stored Tissue: c.1097G>A (p.(Arg366His)) WT1 Mutation Causing Denys Drash Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillen, L.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Schoots, J.; Tiebosch, A.T.; Speel, E.J.; Roemen, G.M.; Peutz-Koostra, C.J.; Stumpel, C.T.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS) caused by a mutation in the Wilms tumor 1 suppressor gene (WT1) is part of Denys Drash Syndrome or Frasier syndrome. In the framework of genetic counseling, the diagnosis of CNS can be refined with gene mutation studies on long-term stored formalin-fixed paraffin-

  11. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome associated with Hirschsprung's Disease: case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Renata Lazari; Zaconeta, Carlos Moreno; Margotto, Paulo Roberto; Cardoso, Maria Teresinha de Oliveira; França, Evely Mirella Santos; Medina, Cristina Touguinha Neves; Canó, Talyta Matos; de Faria, Aline Saliba

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To report the case of a newborn with recurrent episodes of apnea, diagnosed with Congenital Central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) associated with Hirschsprung's disease (HD), configuring Haddad syndrome. Case description: Third child born at full-term to a non-consanguineous couple through normal delivery without complications, with appropriate weight and length for gestational age. Soon after birth he started to show bradypnea, bradycardia and cyanosis, being submitted to tracheal intubation and started empiric antibiotic therapy for suspected early neonatal sepsis. During hospitalization in the NICU, he showed difficulty to undergo extubation due to episodes of desaturation during sleep and wakefulness. He had recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, abdominal distension, leukocytosis, increase in C-reactive protein levels, with negative blood cultures and suspected inborn error of metabolism. At 2 months of age he was diagnosed with long-segment Hirschsprung's disease and was submitted to segment resection and colostomy through Hartmann's procedure. A genetic research was performed by polymerase chain reaction for CCHS screening, which showed the mutated allele of PHOX2B gene, confirming the diagnosis. Comments: This is a rare genetic, autosomal dominant disease, caused by mutation in PHOX2B gene, located in chromosome band 4p12, which results in autonomic nervous system dysfunction. CCHS can also occur with Hirschsprung's disease and tumors derived from the neural crest. There is a correlation between phenotype and genotype, as well as high intrafamilial phenotypic variability. In the neonatal period it can simulate cases of sepsis and inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:26838603

  12. Biphasic response of subscapular skinfold thickness to hGH or IGF-1 administration to patients with congenital IGHD, congenital MPHD and Laron syndrome.

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    Bisker-Kassif, Orly; Kauli, Rivka; Lilos, Pearl; Laron, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate changes in adiposity in congenital GH/IGF-1 deficient children during hGH or IGF-1 treatment. 27 children with congenital isolated growth hormone deficiency (cIGHD) treated with hGH for 2.5-€“15.2 years (mean 10.0 ± 3.4), 18 children with congenital multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (cMPHD), treated with hGH for 2.3-€“17.9 years (mean 6.1 ± 4.3), and 14 children with Laron syndrome (LS) treated with IGF-1 for 1.2-12 years (mean 5.5 ± 3.7) were studied. Changes in the degree of adiposity were evaluated by subscapular skinfold thickness (SSFT), before, during and up to 2 years after treatment. All the children had various degrees of obesity. During the pretreatment period, cIGHD patients showed little changes in SSFT (P = 0.45), cMPHD and LS patients showed an increase in SSFT (P = 0.01, P = 0.06 respectively). During the initial 0.6-1.1 years of hGH/IGF-1 treatment, the SSFT decreased in all 3 groups (P < 0.001), while during subsequent years a significant increase in SSFT (P < 0.001) was observed, in all types of patients, notably in females. Only the cIGHD patients demonstrated a significant correlation between the degree of SSFT decrease and height SDS gain (R = -ˆ’0.56, P = 0.002) in the first period of treatment. Short term replacement therapy of 0.6-€“1.1 years with either hGH or IGF-1, induced a reduction in subscapular subcutaneous fat whereas prolongation of therapy led to an increase in the subcutaneous fat. © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The frequency of congenital long QT syndrome based on new formula in children with sensori-neural hearing loss

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    Arezoo Khosravi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a repolarization cardiac disorder that can lead to syncope, cardiac arrest and sudden death in apparently healthy individuals. The congenital type can be accompanied with congenital sensory-neural deafness (Jervell-Lang-Nielsen syndrome. Although there are limited studies assessed the frequency of LQTS in these children in developed countries, regarding introducing the new formula, it is necessary to re-evaluate the frequency of this syndrome. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional and descriptive study was done on 203 patients with congenital sensory-neural hearing loss (SNHL that had cochlear implant surgery in Baqiyatallah cochlear implant center from 2008 to 2012. Corrected QT was calculated with this formula: QTC = QT + 1.75 (heart rate-60 Patients with QTC > 460 ms, were categorized in four groups: Long QT: QT > 460, Borderline: 440 470 and very markedly: >500. Also, cardiac arrhythmias or arrest were evaluated in patients during cochlear implant surgery and in the postoperative recovery period. Result: Prevalence of LQTS in patients was 12.32% (25 patients. Prevalence of markedly long QT and very markedly long QT were 8.87% (18 patients and 2.46% (5 patients respectively. The prevalence of borderline group was 14.29% (29 patients. None of the patients during or after surgery were affected by cardiac arrhythmias or arrest. Conclusion: This study showed higher prevalence of LQTS in patients with SNHL than the normal population, and we suggest that all patients with congenital deafness should be screen for LQTS.

  14. An outbreak investigation of congenital rubella syndrome in Solomon Islands, 2013

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    Kara N Durski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During May 2012, a rubella outbreak was declared in Solomon Islands. A suspected case of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS was reported from one hospital 11 months later in 2013. This report describes the subsequent CRS investigation, findings and measures implemented. Methods: Prospective CRS surveillance was conducted at the newborn nursery, paediatric and post-natal wards, and the paediatric cardiology and ophthalmology clinics of the study hospital from April to July 2013. Retrospective case finding by reviewing medical records was also undertaken to identify additional cases born between January and March 2013 for the same wards and clinics. Cases were identified using established World Health Organization case definitions for CRS. Results: A total of 13 CRS cases were identified, including two laboratory-confirmed, four clinically confirmed and seven suspected cases. Five CRS cases were retrospectively identified, including four suspected and one clinically confirmed case. There was no geospatial clustering of residences. The mothers of the cases were aged between 20 and 36 years. Three of the six mothers available for interview recalled an acute illness with rash during the first trimester of pregnancy. Discussion: Additional CRS cases not captured in this investigation are likely. Caring for CRS cases is a challenge in resource-poor settings. Rubella vaccination is safe and effective and can prevent the serious consequences of CRS. Well-planned and funded vaccination activities can prevent future CRS cases.

  15. Loss of smell but not taste in adult women with Turner's syndrome and other congenital hypogonadisms.

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    Ros, Cristina; Alobid, Isam; Centellas, Silvia; Balasch, Juan; Mullol, Joaquim; Castelo-Branco, Camil

    2012-11-01

    To assess the impact of Turner's syndrome (TS) and other congenital hypogonadisms (OCH) on the sense of smell and taste. An analytical study of three independent cohorts was designed: patients affected by TS, OCH, and a control group of healthy women taking contraception. Gynaecological Endocrinology Unit and Smell Clinic in Rhinology Unit of Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Thirty TS patients between 20 and 50 years of age receiving hormone replacement treatment (HT) were included as the exposed cohort; fourteen age-matched women with OCH taking HT were recruited; forty-three age-matched healthy controls receiving hormone contraception treatment were selected as the control group. This group was matched with an historical cohort of forty healthy women without contraception, used to validate BAST-24 in Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Clinical history, presence of nasal symptoms, general physical examination, nasal endoscopy, and Barcelona Smell Test-24 (BAST-24) and gustometry were carried out on all patients. TS physical dysmorphology features, intensity of nasal symptoms and signs of nasal obstruction were collected. BAST-24 test included 24 odours to assess both sensory (detection, memory and forced choice) and sensitivity (intensity, irritability, freshness and pleasantness) odour characteristics, as well as 4 tastes to evaluate taste domains (detection and forced choice). Healthy women taking hormone contraception felt odours with more intensity (p=0.002) and less irritability (psmell memory (psmell but not of taste, compared to OCH and healthy controls taking contraception. Smell sensitivity was not affected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Congenital rubella syndrome and autism spectrum disorder prevented by rubella vaccination - United States, 2001-2010

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    Omer Saad B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS is associated with several negative outcomes, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. The objective of this study was to estimate the numbers of CRS and ASD cases prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States from 2001 through 2010. Methods Prevention estimates were calculated through simple mathematical modeling, with values of model parameters determined from published literature. Model parameters included pre-vaccine era CRS incidence, vaccine era CRS incidence, the number of live births per year, and the percentage of CRS cases presenting with an ASD. Results Based on our estimates, 16,600 CRS cases (range: 8300-62,250 were prevented by rubella vaccination from 2001 through 2010 in the United States. An estimated 1228 ASD cases were prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States during this time period. Simulating a slight expansion in ASD diagnostic criteria in recent decades, we estimate that a minimum of 830 ASD cases and a maximum of 6225 ASD cases were prevented. Conclusions We estimate that rubella vaccination prevented substantial numbers of CRS and ASD cases in the United States from 2001 through 2010. These findings provide additional incentive to maintain high measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccination coverage.

  17. Congenital Heart Disease in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: Phenotype and Genotype Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Kathryn C.; Schrier, Samantha A.; Li, Jennifer; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Kline, Antonie D.; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Jackson, Laird S.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Krantz, Ian D.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) has been reported to occur in 14–70% of individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS, OMIM 122470) and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality when present. Charts from a cohort of 479 patients with CdLS were reviewed for cardiac evaluations, gene testing and information to determine phenotypic severity. Two hundred fifty-nine individuals had either documented structural defects or minor cardiac findings. The presence of CHD was then quantified as a function of mutation status and severity of CdLS: mild, moderate, or severe. Different types of CHD were also evaluated by mutation status to assess for any genotype –phenotype correlation. NIPBL, SMC1A, and SMC3 mutation-positive patients were equally likely to have CHD, although the number of SMC1A and SMC3 mutation-positive patients were small in comparison. Structural CHDs were more likely to be present in individuals with moderate and severe CdLS than in the mild phenotype. This study evaluates the trends of CHD seen in the CdLS population and correlates these findings with genotype. PMID:22965847

  18. Role of left cardiac sympathetic denervation in the management of congenital long QT syndrome.

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    Wang L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS is a rare but life-threatening disorder affecting cardiac electrophysiology. It occurs due to mutation in genes encoding for the ion channels in ventricular cell membrane. Syncopal attacks and cardiac arrest are the main symptoms of the disease. Anti-adrenergic therapy with oral beta-blockers has been the mainstay of treatment for LQTS. However, up to 30% of patients fail to respond to medical therapy and remain symptomatic. An alarming 10% of patients still experience cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death during the course of therapy. Left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD has been used as an alternative therapy in patients who are resistant to beta-blockers. Although LCSD appears effective in reducing the frequency of syncopal attacks and improving the survival rate in both the short and long-term, its use has not gained popularity. The recent advent of minimally invasive thoracoscopic sympathectomy may improve the acceptance of LCSD by physicians and patients in the future. The primary objective of this article was to review the current evidence of the clinical efficacy and safety of LCSD in the management of LQTS. The review was based on Medline search of articles published between 1966 and 2002.

  19. High throughput genetic analysis of congenital myasthenic syndromes using resequencing microarrays.

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    Lisa Denning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of resequencing microarrays for screening multiple, candidate disease loci is a promising alternative to conventional capillary sequencing. We describe the performance of a custom resequencing microarray for mutational analysis of Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes (CMSs, a group of disorders in which the normal process of neuromuscular transmission is impaired. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our microarray was designed to assay the exons and flanking intronic regions of 8 genes linked to CMSs. A total of 31 microarrays were hybridized with genomic DNA from either individuals with known CMS mutations or from healthy controls. We estimated an overall microarray call rate of 93.61%, and we found the percentage agreement between the microarray and capillary sequencing techniques to be 99.95%. In addition, our microarray exhibited 100% specificity and 99.99% reproducibility. Finally, the microarray detected 22 out of the 23 known missense mutations, but it failed to detect all 7 known insertion and deletion (indels mutations, indicating an overall sensitivity of 73.33% and a sensitivity with respect to missense mutations of 95.65%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our microarray prototype exhibited strong performance and proved highly efficient for screening genes associated with CMSs. Until indels can be efficiently assayed with this technology, however, we recommend using resequencing microarrays for screening CMS mutations after common indels have been first assayed by capillary sequencing.

  20. Pulmonary hypertension in adults with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome: current advanced management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alto, Michele; Diller, Gerhard-Paul

    2014-09-01

    The presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) increases morbidity and reduces survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition, depending on the type of the underlying defect and previous repair strategies. There is growing evidence of the benefits of PAH-specific therapy in the PAH-CHD population, but despite recent advances mortality rates remain relatively high. In the last years, an increasing focus has been placed on patients with PAH-CHD and net left-to-right shunt. Currently, there are limited data to guide the management of these patients and uncertainty on the cut-off values for eventual defect closure. Pregnancy conveys significant risks in PAH-CHD patients: appropriate counselling and care, including psychological support and a multidisciplinary team, should be part of the routine management of women with PAH-CHD of reproductive age. Some subgroups, such as patients with Down's syndrome, Fontan circulation and 'segmental' pulmonary hypertension, present particular challenges in terms of management and therapy. The current review focuses on contemporary treatment strategies in PAH-CHD patients with particular emphasis on challenging patient groups and conditions.

  1. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome

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    Teodora Chamova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients’ age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes.

  2. Prevalence of congenital heart defects associated with Down syndrome in Korea.

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    Kim, Min-A; Lee, You Sun; Yee, Nan Hee; Choi, Jeong Soo; Choi, Jung Yun; Seo, Kyung

    2014-11-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is common in infants with Down syndrome (DS), which is the principle cause of mortality. However, there is no data available for the frequency and types of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. We investigated the frequency of CHD in infants with DS in Korea. After the survey on birth defects was conducted throughout the country, the prevalence of CHD in DS in 2005-2006 was calculated. This study was conducted based on the medical insurance claims database of the National Health Insurance Corporation. The number of total births in Korea was 888,263 in 2005-2006; of them, 25,975 cases of birth defects were identified. The prevalence of DS was 4.4 per 10,000 total births, accounting for 1.5% of all birth defects. Of the 394 infants with DS, 224 (56.9%) had a CHD. Atrial septal defect was the most common defect accounting for 30.5% of DS followed by ventricular septal defect (19.3%), patent duct arteriosus (17.5%), and atrioventricular septal defect (9.4%). Our study will be helpful to demonstrate the current status of DS and to identify the distribution of CHD in infants with DS in Korea.

  3. A human neurodevelopmental model for Williams syndrome.

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    Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Trujillo, Cleber A; Freitas, Beatriz C; Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Herai, Roberto H; Yu, Diana X; Brown, Timothy T; Marchetto, Maria C; Bardy, Cedric; McHenry, Lauren; Stefanacci, Lisa; Järvinen, Anna; Searcy, Yvonne M; DeWitt, Michelle; Wong, Wenny; Lai, Philip; Ard, M Colin; Hanson, Kari L; Romero, Sarah; Jacobs, Bob; Dale, Anders M; Dai, Li; Korenberg, Julie R; Gage, Fred H; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric; Semendeferi, Katerina; Muotri, Alysson R

    2016-08-18

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uncommon hypersociability and a mosaic of retained and compromised linguistic and cognitive abilities. Nearly all clinically diagnosed individuals with Williams syndrome lack precisely the same set of genes, with breakpoints in chromosome band 7q11.23 (refs 1-5). The contribution of specific genes to the neuroanatomical and functional alterations, leading to behavioural pathologies in humans, remains largely unexplored. Here we investigate neural progenitor cells and cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome and typically developing induced pluripotent stem cells. Neural progenitor cells in Williams syndrome have an increased doubling time and apoptosis compared with typically developing neural progenitor cells. Using an individual with atypical Williams syndrome, we narrowed this cellular phenotype to a single gene candidate, frizzled 9 (FZD9). At the neuronal stage, layer V/VI cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome were characterized by longer total dendrites, increased numbers of spines and synapses, aberrant calcium oscillation and altered network connectivity. Morphometric alterations observed in neurons from Williams syndrome were validated after Golgi staining of post-mortem layer V/VI cortical neurons. This model of human induced pluripotent stem cells fills the current knowledge gap in the cellular biology of Williams syndrome and could lead to further insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the disorder and the human social brain.

  4. Movement Induces the Use of External Spatial Coordinates for Tactile Localization in Congenitally Blind Humans.

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    Heed, Tobias; Möller, Johanna; Röder, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    To localize touch, the brain integrates spatial information coded in anatomically based and external spatial reference frames. Sighted humans, by default, use both reference frames in tactile localization. In contrast, congenitally blind individuals have been reported to rely exclusively on anatomical coordinates, suggesting a crucial role of the visual system for tactile spatial processing. We tested whether the use of external spatial information in touch can, alternatively, be induced by a movement context. Sighted and congenitally blind humans performed a tactile temporal order judgment task that indexes the use of external coordinates for tactile localization, while they executed bimanual arm movements with uncrossed and crossed start and end postures. In the sighted, start posture and planned end posture of the arm movement modulated tactile localization for stimuli presented before and during movement, indicating automatic, external recoding of touch. Contrary to previous findings, tactile localization of congenitally blind participants, too, was affected by external coordinates, though only for stimuli presented before movement start. Furthermore, only the movement's start posture, but not the planned end posture affected blind individuals' tactile performance. Thus, integration of external coordinates in touch is established without vision, though more selectively than when vision has developed normally, and possibly restricted to movement contexts. The lack of modulation by the planned posture in congenitally blind participants suggests that external coordinates in this group are not mediated by motor efference copy. Instead the task-related frequent posture changes, that is, movement consequences rather than planning, appear to have induced their use of external coordinates.

  5. Persistent congenital hyperinsulinism in two patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome due to mosaic uniparental disomy 11p.

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    Zarate, Yuri A; Shur, Natasha; Robin, Andrew; Garnica, Adolfo D; Quintos, Jose Bernardo; Schaefer, G Bradley

    2014-09-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is a rare metabolic disease characterized by inappropriate insulin secretion in the presence of hypoglycemia. We describe the clinical presentation and management of congenital hyperinsulinism and persistent hypoglycemia in two infants. Both patients had an initial clinical diagnosis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) but normal methylation analysis for LIT1 and H19 status. Both patients were eventually found to have mosaic uniparental disomy 11p diagnosed by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in DNA isolated from lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, respectively. We report that patients with mosaic BWS are at increased risk for both transient and refractory hypoglycemia that may need aggressive management with diazoxide, octreotide, high glucose infusion rates, and a frequent feeding regime. Our patient experience supports the case for pursuing further testing in patients with features of BWS with normal methylation studies, karyotype, and SNP arrays on blood. The next logical step is SNP array on skin biopsy to rule out mosaicism.

  6. Psychological and Behavioral Characteristics of Chromosomal Anomalies and Congenital Contiguous Gene Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies exert significant impact on individuals and their families, with particularly negative effects on their quality of life. However, studies focusing on the psychological and behavioral characteristics of children with congenital anomalies are still limited, though this information is indispensable for the educational support of such children. In this paper, we reviewed articles dealing with psychological, behavioral and socioemotionalcharacteristics of children with congeni...

  7. Epidemiology of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in Japan before 1989.

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    Ueda, Kohji

    2016-04-07

    Epidemiological studies of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) in Japan have been conducted since the first nationwide rubella epidemic of 1965-1969 and subsequent epidemics of 1975-1977, 1982, 1987-1988, and 1992-1993. Rubella was non-endemic in Japan before the 1975-1977 epidemic, and endemic thereafter. Japan started a selective rubella vaccination program for junior high school girls in 1977, and universal rubella vaccination of children of both sexes in 1989. No nationwide rubella epidemics have occurred since 1994. Only three children with CRS were reported in Japan before 1964; however, many children with CRS were identified in 1965 when a rubella epidemic struck Okinawa, which has many the United States military bases. After the 1965-1969 and 1975-1977 rubella epidemics on the Japanese mainland, small numbers of children with CRS were identified (hospital survey). These findings led to the hypothesis that, compared to U.S. rubella virus strains, Japanese strains of rubella virus are less teratogenic. This hypothesis strongly affected the development of rubella vaccines in Japan. However, retrospective seroepidemiological studies attributed the CRS in many children in Okinawa to the high rate of rubella infection in pregnant women. According to the survey conducted at special schools for the deaf, 83, 232, 77, and 167 children were born with CRS on the Japanese mainland respectively after the 1965-1969, 1975-1977, 1982, and 1987-1988 nationwide rubella epidemics, suggesting that the incidence of CRS in Japan is in fact comparable to that in the U.S. and Europe. Rubella epidemics in children have been effectively prevented since 1994. However, a rubella outbreak among adult males and CRS occurred between 2012 and 2014.

  8. The cerebral cost of breathing: an FMRI case-study in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

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    Mike Sharman

    Full Text Available Certain motor activities--like walking or breathing--present the interesting property of proceeding either automatically or under voluntary control. In the case of breathing, brainstem structures located in the medulla are in charge of the automatic mode, whereas cortico-subcortical brain networks--including various frontal lobe areas--subtend the voluntary mode. We speculated that the involvement of cortical activity during voluntary breathing could impact both on the "resting state" pattern of cortical-subcortical connectivity, and on the recruitment of executive functions mediated by the frontal lobe. In order to test this prediction we explored a patient suffering from central congenital hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS, a very rare developmental condition secondary to brainstem dysfunction. Typically, CCHS patients demonstrate efficient cortically-controlled breathing while awake, but require mechanically-assisted ventilation during sleep to overcome the inability of brainstem structures to mediate automatic breathing. We used simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings to compare patterns of brain activity between these two types of ventilation during wakefulness. As compared with spontaneous breathing (SB, mechanical ventilation (MV restored the default mode network (DMN associated with self-consciousness, mind-wandering, creativity and introspection in healthy subjects. SB on the other hand resulted in a specific increase of functional connectivity between brainstem and frontal lobe. Behaviorally, the patient was more efficient in cognitive tasks requiring executive control during MV than during SB, in agreement with her subjective reports in everyday life. Taken together our results provide insight into the cognitive and neural costs of spontaneous breathing in one CCHS patient, and suggest that MV during waking periods may free up frontal lobe resources, and make them available for cognitive recruitment. More generally, this study reveals how the

  9. A Rare Combination: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due To 21 Hydroxylase Deficiency and Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Aycan, Zehra; Çetinkaya, Semra; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat Yılmaz; Önder, Aşan

    2012-01-01

    A combination of Turner syndrome (TS) and classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is rare. A one-day-old newborn was referred to our hospital with ambiguous genitalia. The parents were third-degree relatives. The infant’s weight was 3350g (50-75p), and the head circumference was 34.5cm (50p). The gonads were nonpalpable. Presence of a 3 cm phallus, one urogenital opening into the perineum, and incomplete labial fusion were identified. Laboratory tests revealed a classical type of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Karyotyping revealed a 45X0(35)/46XX(22) pattern with negative sex-determining region Y (SRY) on gene analysis. At the most recent follow-up visit, the patient appeared to be in good health - her height was 70.4 cm [-1.5 standard deviation (SD)] and her weight was 9.8 kg (0.3 SD). She was receiving hydrocortisone in a dose of 10 mg/m2/day, fludrocortisone acetate in a dose of 0.075 mg/day, and oral salt of 1 g/day. System examinations were normal. The patient’s electrolyte levels were found to be normal and she was in good metabolic control. The findings of this patient demonstrate that routine karyotyping during investigation of patients with sexual differentiation disorders can reveal TS. Additionally, signs of virilism should always be investigated at diagnosis or during physical examinations for follow-up of TS cases. [i][/i]SRY analysis should be performed primarily when signs of virilism are observed. CAH should also be considered in patients with negative [i]SRY[/i]. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23261864

  10. Impaired Neural Structure and Function Contributing to Autonomic Symptoms in Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

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    Ronald M Harper

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover

  11. Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome: MR/US findings, effect on management, and outcome

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    Mong, Andrew; Johnson, Ann M.; Kramer, Sandra S.; Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Coleman, Beverly G. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hedrick, Holly L.; Flake, Alan; Johnson, Mark; Wilson, R.D.; Adzick, N.S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, The Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kreiger, Portia [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare disorder defined as any fetal abnormality that obstructs the larynx or trachea. Prompt airway intervention at delivery after accurate prenatal diagnosis may allow survival of this otherwise fatal condition. To identify prenatal MRI findings in CHAOS, to compare these findings with those of fetal US, to determine if imaging alters diagnosis and management decisions, and to correlate prenatal with postnatal imaging findings. Records and MRI scans of ten fetuses with CHAOS were reviewed, and the findings correlated with outside and same-day fetal US and postnatal imaging findings. Fetal lung volumes were measured on MRI scans. Large lung volumes were found in 90% of the fetuses. Increased lung signal intensity, inverted diaphragm, and a dilated, fluid-filled lower airway were identified in all. The obstruction level was identified in 90%. MRI changed screening US diagnosis in 70%, but was concordant with the tertiary care US imaging in 90%. Seven fetuses were terminated or died in utero, and three fetuses survived after ex utero intrapartum tracheostomy placement. Autopsy or bronchoscopy performed in 60% confirmed CHAOS. Postnatal chest radiographs and CT showed hyperinflation, while US and fluoroscopy showed diminished diaphragmatic motion. MRI demonstrates large lung volumes, increased lung signal intensity, inverted diaphragm, and dilated fluid-filled lower airway, and usually identifies the obstruction level. The degree of correlation between MRI and tertiary prenatal US is high, but CHAOS is frequently misdiagnosed on screening US. Correct diagnosis may enable planned airway management. Voluminous lungs and diaphragmatic abnormalities persist on postnatal imaging. (orig.)

  12. Ophthalmologic impairment during adulthood in central congenital hypoventilation syndrome: a longitudinal cohort analysis of nine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger-Scemama, Elise; Fardeau, Christine; Straus, Christian; Simon, Claude; Touitou, Valérie; Touhami, Sara; Amini, Maryam; Similowski, Thomas; LeHoang, Phuc

    2014-12-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is a rare dysgenetic form of neurocristopathy associated with dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. Ophthalmologic abnormalities are reported in CCHS children, and range from pupillary and iris abnormalities to ptosis, strabismus and convergence deficiency. Since earlier CCHS diagnosis and multidisciplinary management, combined with improved ventilatory support techniques, the lifespan of children with CCHS has been considerably lengthened. The oldest of them have now reached adult age and we report in this study the results of their ophthalmologic examination. Nine CCHS adult patients were prospectively included during a 14-month period. Each patient underwent complete ophthalmologic examination, static pupillometry with scotopic and photopic pupillary diameter (PD) measures, Humphrey 24-2 visual field analysis, macular OCT and complete orthoptic assessment including a Hess-Lancaster test. Ophthalmologic abnormalities were found in six of the nine patients (66%). The main features were strabismus in six patients (66%). Four patients (44%) displayed abnormal pupillary function, with a decrease in average scotopic PD (3.8 ± 1.4 mm), average photopic PD (3.5 ± 1.2 mm), and average percentage of pupillary constriction (7.6 ± 8.5%). Three patients (33%) exhibited iris abnormalities such as iris atrophy, smooth iris surface and atrophic sphincter. This study allowed the description of ophthalmologic abnormalities occurring in CCHS in a series of adult patients, thus improving current knowledge of the disease. The prevalence of pupillary and iris lesions were lower than those observed in a series of children, suggesting that they could be considered as systemic disease severity markers.

  13. Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy syndrome associated with inflammatory-degenerative hystopathological findings in child with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Domenico; Camassei, Francesca Diomedi; Delalande, Olivier; Marras, Carlo E; Specchio, Nicola; Vigevano, Federico; Fusco, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia (HH) syndrome represents an uncommon consequence of prolonged unilateral clonic or hemiconvulsive status epilepticus in childhood, usually occurring during a febrile illness, followed by ipsilateral hemiplegia. The subsequent appearance of focal seizures configures the so called Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy (HHE) syndrome. The pathogenesis of HH/HHE syndrome is still unclear. We describe the case of a 4 year-old girl with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) whom developed HH/HHE syndrome with drug resistant seizures at the age of 21 months and underwent left cerebral hemispherotomy at the age of 3 years and 6 months. Histopathological findings showed the presence of an underlying inflammatory-degenerative process. Disregulation of the inflammatory cascade has been proposed as one of the possible pathogenetic mechanisms underlying HH/HHE syndrome. To our knowledge however, this is the first report of an association with a histologically documented inflammatory process. The clinical and histopathological findings of our reported case lend support to the possible role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of HH/HHE syndrome.

  14. The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (congenital absence of uterus and vagina – phenotypic manifestations and genetic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquier Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome affects at least 1 out of 4500 women and has for a long time been considered as a sporadic anomaly. Congenital absence of upper vagina and uterus is the prime feature of the disease which, in addition, is often found associated with unilateral renal agenesis or adysplasia as well as skeletal malformations (MURCS association. The phenotypic manifestations of MRKH overlap various other syndromes or associations and thus require accurate delineation. Since MRKH manifests itself in males, the term GRES syndrome (Genital, Renal, Ear, Skeletal might be more appropriate when applied to both sexes. The MRKH syndrome, when described in familial aggregates, seems to be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with an incomplete degree of penetrance and variable expressivity. This suggests the involvement of either mutations in a major developmental gene or a limited chromosomal deletion. Until recently progress in understanding the genetics of MRKH syndrome has been slow, however, now HOX genes have been shown to play key roles in body patterning and organogenesis, and in particular during genital tract development. Expression and/or function defects of one or several HOX genes may account for this syndrome.

  15. Mutations in GLIS3 are responsible for a rare syndrome with neonatal diabetes mellitus and congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senée, Valérie; Chelala, Claude; Duchatelet, Sabine; Feng, Daorong; Blanc, Hervé; Cossec, Jack-Christophe; Charon, Céline; Nicolino, Marc; Boileau, Pascal; Cavener, Douglas R; Bougnères, Pierre; Taha, Doris; Julier, Cécile

    2006-06-01

    We recently described a new neonatal diabetes syndrome associated with congenital hypothyroidism, congenital glaucoma, hepatic fibrosis and polycystic kidneys. Here, we show that this syndrome results from mutations in GLIS3, encoding GLI similar 3, a recently identified transcription factor. In the original family, we identified a frameshift mutation predicted to result in a truncated protein. In two other families with an incomplete syndrome, we found that affected individuals harbor deletions affecting the 11 or 12 5'-most exons of the gene. The absence of a major transcript in the pancreas and thyroid (deletions from both families) and an eye-specific transcript (deletion from one family), together with residual expression of some GLIS3 transcripts, seems to explain the incomplete clinical manifestations in these individuals. GLIS3 is expressed in the pancreas from early developmental stages, with greater expression in beta cells than in other pancreatic tissues. These results demonstrate a major role for GLIS3 in the development of pancreatic beta cells and the thyroid, eye, liver and kidney.

  16. Management of ventricular fibrillation or unstable ventricular tachycardia in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome: a suggested modification to ACLS guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homme, Jason H; White, Roger D; Ackerman, Michael J

    2003-10-01

    Prolongation of the QT interval is a known risk factor for syncope, seizures and sudden cardiac death. Most patients with QT prolongation have an acquired cause, but congenital forms of QT prolongation are being increasingly recognized. However, existing advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) treatment algorithms for prolonged QT mediated ventricular fibrillation pertains to acquired long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Here, a young patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to congenital LQTS illustrates critical exceptions to the current ACLS treatment algorithms for ventricular fibrillation and unstable ventricular tachycardia when QT prolongation is congenital in origin. A clarified ACLS algorithm is proposed.

  17. Coffin-Siris syndrome with the rarest constellation of congenital cardiac defects: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalita Nemani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of type-A Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS with a unique constellation of congenital heart defects. A 17-year-old Indian boy was referred to our hospital for central cyanosis with features of right heart failure. The cardiac abnormalities included biventricular outflow tract obstruction, small atrial septal defect (ASD, subaortic ventricular septal defect, drainage of left superior venacava to left atrial appendage, and aortic arch anomaly. Patient underwent successful right ventricular infundibular resection, subaortic membrane resection, closure of atrial and ventricular septal defect, rerouting left superior vena cava to left pulmonary artery and aortic valve replacement.

  18. Surgical management of a large peritoneal pseudocyst causing acute kidney injury secondary to abdominal compartment syndrome in a rare case of congenital absence of omentum during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin P; Hunjan, Tia; Terry, Jayne

    2016-09-01

    Complete congenital absence of the omentum is very rare with only one previously reported case. We present a unique case of the management of a pregnant woman with a large pelvic pseudocyst caused by complications related to congenital absence of omentum, resulting in acute kidney injury, likely secondary to acute compartment syndrome. This case highlights the importance of considering acute compartment syndrome in critically unwell pregnant women and reiterates the need to measure intra-abdominal pressure when clinically indicated. Given that pregnancy is in itself a state of intra-abdominal hypertension, obstetricians should maintain a high index of suspicion in the context of additional risk factors.

  19. A rare cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia : Antley-Bixler syndrome due to POR deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herkert, J. C.; Blaauwwiekel, E. E.; Hoek, A.; Veenstra-Knol, H. E.; Kema, I. P.; Arlt, W.; Kerstens, M. N.

    Cytochrome P(450) oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency is a recently discovered new variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Distinctive features of POR deficiency are the presence of disorders of sexual development in both sexes, glucocorticoid deficiency and skeletal malformations similar to those

  20. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  1. Nutritional intakes in children with Prader–Willi syndrome and non-congenital obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A. Rubin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals with Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS have extremely regulated diets to prevent the development of morbid obesity. Objective: This study evaluated potential deficiencies in macro and micronutrients in a cohort of youth with PWS and compared them to a group of children with non-congenital obesity and to US national recommendations. Design: Participants were 32 youth with PWS (age=10.8±2.6 years, body fat=46.7±10.1% and 48 children without PWS but classified as obese (age=9.7±1.2 years, body fat=43.4±5.7%. Participants’ parents completed a training session on food recording before completing a 3-day food record during a typical week including a weekend day and two weekdays, as well as a screening form indicating nutritional supplements use. Results: Youth with PWS reported less calories (1,312±75 vs. 1,531±61 kcal, p=0.03, carbohydrate (175±10 vs. 203±8 g, and sugars (67±5 vs. 81±4 g; p=0.04 for both than obese. Youth with PWS consumed more vegetables (1.1±0.1 vs. 0.6±0.1 cups and more of them met the daily recommendation (p<0.01 for both. Likewise, youth with PWS consumed more calcium than obese (899±53 vs. 752±43 mg and more of them met the recommended daily dose (p=0.04 for both. The majority of participants in this study did not meet the vitamin D recommendation. Conclusion: Despite consuming less calories, youth with PWS had a similar proportion of macronutrients in their diet as children with obesity. Micronutrient deficiencies in calcium and vitamin D in youth with PWS were noted despite a third of youth with PWS consuming multivitamin supplements. Special attention must be paid to the diets of youth with PWS and with obesity to ensure they are meeting micronutrient needs during this period of growth and development.

  2. Bisphenol A and congenital developmental defects in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guida, Maurizio [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Troisi, Jacopo, E-mail: j.troisi@studenti.unisa.it [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Ciccone, Carla [“G. Moscati” Hospital Avellino (Italy); Granozio, Giovanni; Cosimato, Cosimo [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Sardo, Attilio Di Spiezio; Ferrara, Cinzia [Department of Medicine, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy); Guida, Marco [Department of Biology, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy); Nappi, Carmine [Department of Medicine, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy); Zullo, Fulvio [Department of Medicine, University of Salerno (Italy); Di Carlo, Costantino [Department of Medicine, “Federico II”, University of Naples (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We show a correlation between environmental exposure to BPA and fetal malformations in humans. • We show that a reduced ability to metabolize the BPA in the mother can concur to the occurrence of malformations. • The average value of free BPA appears to be nearly three times greater in case of chromosomal malformations than the controls. - Abstract: Over 50% of the causes of fetal malformations in humans are still unknown. Recent evidence suggests the relationship between environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors and fetal malformations. Our study aims to establish the role of Bisphenol A (BPA), if any, in altering human reproduction. We enrolled 151 pregnant women who were divided into two groups: case group (CS, n = 101), women with established diagnosis of developmental defect, and control group (CL, n = 50), pregnant women with normally developed fetus. Total, free and conjugated BPA were measured in their blood using GC–MS with isotopic dilution. The results show a correlation between environmental exposure to BPA and the genesis of fetal malformations. Conjugated BPA, which was higher in the CL, casts light on the hypothesis that a reduced ability to metabolize the chemical in the mother can concur to the occurrence of malformation. In a more detailed manner, in case of chromosomal malformations, the average value of free BPA appears to be nearly three times greater than that of the controls. Similarly, in case of central and peripheral nervous system non-chromosomal malformations, the value of free BPA is nearly two times greater than that of the controls.

  3. Treatment of neuroblastoma in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome with a PHOX2B polyalanine repeat expansion mutation: New twist on a neurocristopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Amy E; Weese-Mayer, Debra E; Mian, Amir; Maris, John M; Batra, Vandana; Gosiengfiao, Yasmin; Reichek, Jennifer; Madonna, Mary Beth; Bush, Jonathan W; Shore, Richard M; Walterhouse, David O

    2015-11-01

    Neuroblastoma in patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) as part of a neurocristopathy syndrome is a rare finding and has only been associated with paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B) non-polyalanine-repeat-expansion mutations. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of a child with CCHS and Hirschsprung disease who had a PHOX2B polyalanine-repeat-expansion mutation (PARM) (genotype 20/33) and developed high-risk neuroblastoma. We further describe his treatment including chemotherapy and therapeutic I(131) -metaiodobenzylguanidine. This case highlights the need to consider neuroblastoma in patients with CCHS and the longest PHOX2B PARMs and to individualize treatment based on co-morbidities.

  4. Multiple nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome associated with congenital orbital teratoma, caused by a PTCH1 frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A L; Carvalho, A; Cabral, R; Carneiro, V; Gilardi, P; Duarte, C P; Puente-Prieto, J; Santos, P; Mota-Vieira, L

    2014-07-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressivity. The syndrome is characterized by developmental abnormalities or neoplasms and is diagnosed with 2 major criteria, or with 1 major and 2 minor criteria. Here, we report a new clinical manifestation associated with this syndrome in a boy affected by NBCCS who had congenital orbital teratoma at birth. Later, at the age of 15 years, he presented with 4 major and 4 minor criteria of NBCCS, including multiple basal cell carcinoma and 2 odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw, both confirmed by histology, more than 5 palmar pits, calcification of the cerebral falx, extensive meningeal calcifications, macrocephaly, hypertelorism, frontal bosses, and kyphoscoliosis. PTCH1 mutation analysis revealed the heterozygous germline mutation c.290dupA. This mutation generated a frameshift within exon 2 and an early premature stop codon (p.Asn97LysfsX43), predicting a truncated protein with complete loss of function. Identification of this mutation is useful for genetic counseling. Although the clinical symptoms are well-known, our case contributes to the understanding of phenotypic variability in NBCCS, highlighting that PTCH1 mutations cannot be used for predicting disease burden and reinforces the need of a multidisciplinary team in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of NBCCS patients.

  5. [Mosaic isochromosome Xq and microduplication 17p13.3p13.2 in a patient with Turner syndrome and congenital cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Martínez, Jorge A; Acosta Guio, Johanna C

    2015-01-01

    The combination of Turner syndrome with other genetic disorders such as congenital cataract has been reported, but its association with a congenital form with autosomal dominant inheritance and incomplete penetrance has not been previously reported in the literature. There are no reports on its presentations with rearrangements on chromosome 17. We report the exceptional case of a 20 months old girl with a constellation of major and minor anomalies, diagnosed with mosaic Turner syndrome by isochromosome Xq associated with a microduplication 17p13.3p13.2, who also had bilateral congenital nuclear cataract autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance. We reviewed in the literature the origin and cause of these genetic alterations and we provided an approach to the hypothesis of the pathogenesis of the association of two of these genetic disorders in the same patient.

  6. The CHRNE 470del20 mutation causing congenital myasthenic syndrome in South African Brahman cattle: Prevalence, origin, and association with performance traits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.; Werf, van der J.H.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Genotyping of the South African, registered, Brahman cattle population for the 470del20 mutation in the CHRNE gene causing congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) was carried out in 1,453 animals. Overall prevalence of carriers was 0.97% (0.50 to 1.68%, 95% confidence interval). Carrier prevalence

  7. The CHRNE 470del20 mutation causing congenital myasthenic syndrome in South African Brahman cattle: Prevalence, origin, and association with performance traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.; Werf, J.H.J. van der; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Arendonk, J.A.M. van

    Genotyping of the South African, registered, Brahman cattle population for the 470del20 mutation in the CHRNE gene causing congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) was carried out in 1,453 animals. Overall prevalence of carriers was 0.97% (0.50 to 1.68%, 95% confidence interval). Carrier

  8. The CHRNE 470del20 mutation causing congenital myasthenic syndrome in South African Brahman cattle: Prevalence, origin, and association with performance traits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, P.N.; Werf, van der J.H.J.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Genotyping of the South African, registered, Brahman cattle population for the 470del20 mutation in the CHRNE gene causing congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) was carried out in 1,453 animals. Overall prevalence of carriers was 0.97% (0.50 to 1.68%, 95% confidence interval). Carrier prevalence amon

  9. Using the two-source capture–recapture method to estimate the incidence and case ascertainment of congenital rubella syndrome in Australia, 1993–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolee Martin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To verify rubella and congenital rubella syndrome (CRS elimination, countries need to ensure that their surveillance systems are sufficiently sensitive to capture almost all cases. This study aims to estimate the incidence of CRS in Australia and the sensitivity of CRS case ascertainment in the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System.

  10. Genetic screening of Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome patients confirms CLMP as the major gene involved in the recessive form of this disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, Maria M.; Halim, Danny; Maroofian, Reza; de Graaf, Bianca M.; Rooman, Raoul; van der Werf, Christine S.; Van de Vijver, Els; Mehrjardi, Mohammad Y. V.; Aflatoonian, Majid; Chioza, Barry A.; Baple, Emma L.; Dehghani, Mohammadreza; Crosby, Andrew H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital short bowel syndrome (CSBS) is an intestinal pediatric disorder, where patients are born with a dramatic shortened small intestine. Pathogenic variants in CLMP were recently identified to cause an autosomal recessive form of the disease. However, due to the rare nature of CSBS, only a sma

  11. Mutations in congenital myasthenic syndromes reveal an epsilon subunit C-terminal cysteine, C470, crucial for maturation and surface expression of adult AChR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ealing, J; Webster, R; Brownlow, S; Abdelgany, A; Oosterhuis, H; Muntoni, F; Vaux, DJ; Vincent, A; Beeson, D

    2002-01-01

    Many congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are associated with mutations in the genes encoding the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), an oligomeric protein with the structure alpha(2)betadeltaepsilon. AChR deficiency is frequently due to homozygous or heteroallelic mutations in the AChR epsilon subunit,

  12. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities, congenital abnormalities and transfusion syndrome in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperling, Lene; Kiil, C; Larsen, L U;

    2007-01-01

    by assisted reproduction. The incidence of TTTS was 23% from 12 weeks until delivery, and all those monochorionic twin pregnancies that miscarried had signs of TTTS. CONCLUSION: Twin pregnancies have an increased risk of congenital malformations and one out of four monochorionic pregnancies develops TTTS...

  13. A rare cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia : Antley-Bixler syndrome due to POR deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herkert, J. C.; Blaauwwiekel, E. E.; Hoek, A.; Veenstra-Knol, H. E.; Kema, I. P.; Arlt, W.; Kerstens, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P(450) oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency is a recently discovered new variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Distinctive features of POR deficiency are the presence of disorders of sexual development in both sexes, glucocorticoid deficiency and skeletal malformations similar to those ob

  14. Mutations in SPINT2 Cause a Syndromic Form of Congenital Sodium Diarrhea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinz-Erian, Peter; Mueller, Thomas; Krabichler, Birgit; Schranz, Melanie; Becker, Christian; Rueschendorf, Franz; Nuernberg, Peter; Rossier, Bernard; Vujic, Mihailo; Booth, Ian W.; Holmberg, Christer; Wijmenga, Cisca; Grigelioniene, Giedre; Kneepkens, C. M. Frank; Rosipal, Stefan; Mistrik, Martin; Kappler, Matthias; Michaud, Laurent; Doczy, Ludwig-Christoph; Siu, Victoria Mok; Krantz, Marie; Zoller, Heinz; Utermann, Gerd; Janecke, Andreas R.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive congenital sodium diarrhea (CSD) is characterized by perinatal onset of a persistent watery diarrhea with nonproportionally high fecal sodium excretion. Defective jejunal brush-border Na(+)/H(+) exchange has been reported in three sporadic patients, but the molecular basis of the

  15. Sight restoration after congenital blindness does not reinstate alpha oscillatory activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottari, Davide; Troje, Nikolaus F; Ley, Pia; Hense, Marlene; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Röder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain development is characterized by sensitive periods during which experience must be available to allow for the full development of neural circuits and associated behavior. Yet, only few neural markers of sensitive period plasticity in humans are known. Here we employed electroencephalographic recordings in a unique sample of twelve humans who had been blind from birth and regained sight through cataract surgery between four months and 16 years of age. Two additional control groups were tested: a group of visually impaired individuals without a history of total congenital blindness and a group of typically sighted individuals. The EEG was recorded while participants performed a visual discrimination task involving intact and scrambled biological motion stimuli. Posterior alpha and theta oscillations were evaluated. The three groups showed indistinguishable behavioral performance and in all groups evoked theta activity varied with biological motion processing. By contrast, alpha oscillatory activity was significantly reduced only in individuals with a history of congenital cataracts. These data document on the one hand brain mechanisms of functional recovery (related to theta oscillations) and on the other hand, for the first time, a sensitive period for the development of alpha oscillatory activity in humans.

  16. [Vasopressin V2 receptor-related pathologies: congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and nephrogenic syndrome of inappropiate antidiuresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Denis

    2014-12-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is a rare hereditary disease with mainly an X-linked inheritance (90% of the cases) but there are also autosomal recessive and dominant forms. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is characterized by a resistance of the renal collecting duct to the action of the arginine vasopressin hormone responsible for the inability of the kidney to concentrate urine. The X-linked form is due to inactivating mutations of the vasopressin 2 receptor gene leading to a loss of function of the mutated receptors. Affected males are often symptomatic in the neonatal period with a lack of weight gain, dehydration and hypernatremia but mild phenotypes may also occur. Females carrying the mutation may be asymptomatic but, sometimes, severe polyuria is found due to the random X chromosome inactivation. The autosomal recessive and dominant forms, occurring in both genders, are linked to mutations in the aquaporin-2 gene. The treatment remains difficult, especially in infants, and is based on a low osmotic diet with increased water intake and the use of thiazides and indomethacin. The main goal is to avoid hypernatremic episodes and maintain a good hydration state. Potentially, specific treatment, in some cases of X-linked congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with pharmacological chaperones such as non-peptide vasopressin-2 receptor antagonists will be available in the future. Conversely, the nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD) is linked to a constitutive activation of the V(2)-receptor due to activating mutations with clinical and biological features of inappropriate antidiuresis but with low or undetectable plasma arginine vasopressin hormone levels.

  17. Monitoring for new multiple congenital anomalies in the search for human teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, M J; Botto, L; Waters, G D; Mastroiacovo, P; Castilla, E; Erickson, J D

    1993-06-01

    The ability of birth defects monitoring to detect new human teratogenic and mutagenic agents may be limited if only isolated defects are monitored. Surveillance for "new" multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) may improve the detection of environmental agents associated with new defect patterns. To evaluate the feasibility of such monitoring, we examined data from two programs: 1) the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP), which ascertains infants with serious defects diagnosed in the first year of life, and, 2) the Italian Multicenter Register for Congenital Malformations (IPIMC), which ascertains newborn infants with birth defects from many hospitals in Italy. We focused on 24 relatively serious defects and defect groups. For a baseline period (MACDP: 1968-1988, 581,000 births; IPIMC: 1986-1989, 448,000 births), we identified all possible combinations of defects occurring in the same baby. For a test period (MACDP: 1989-1990, 77,000 births; IPIMC: 1990, 91,500 births), we identified babies with "new" MCA (i.e., combinations of defects not observed before in the system). During this period in MACDP, of the 85 babies with two or more defects, 9 babies had new MCAs. In IPIMC, of the 54 babies with two or more defects, 10 babies had new MCAs. A review of the records of infants with new MCAs in MACDP and IPIMC did not identify commonalities in maternal characteristics. This analysis illustrates the feasibility of monitoring for new MCAs in surveillance systems. This approach, complemented by an evaluation of exposures, may be a powerful additional tool in searching for human teratogens and mutagens.

  18. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia in Smith-Magenis syndrome: a possible locus at chromosome 17p11.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, E F; Bermudez-Wagner, K; Jeng, L J B; Rauen, K A; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2011-11-01

    We report on a 7-month-old girl with Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) due to a 4.76-Mb deletion of 17p12-17p11.2 detected by array comparative genomic hybridization. She was also affected with a left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiac anomalies including an atypical atrioventricular canal defect and a cleft mitral valve. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a patient with both SMS and CDH. There are numerous chromosomal regions in which duplications, deletions, inversions, or translocations have been associated with CDH, but none have previously been reported at or close to 17p11.2. We discuss candidate genes for the diaphragmatic defect in this patient. Our case demonstrates that it is important to consider the possibility of SMS in non-isolated cases of diaphragmatic hernia.

  19. Novel PIGT Variant in Two Brothers: Expansion of the Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Skauli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biallelic PIGT variants were previously reported in seven patients from three families with Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia Seizures Syndrome 3 (MCAHS3, characterized by epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, global developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, craniofacial dysmorphisms, and skeletal, ophthalmological, cardiac, and genitourinary abnormalities. We report a novel homozygous PIGT missense variant c.1079G>T (p.Gly360Val in two brothers with several of the typical features of MCAHS3, but in addition, pyramidal tract neurological signs. Notably, they are the first patients with MCAHS3 without skeletal, cardiac, or genitourinary anomalies. PIGT encodes a crucial subunit of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI transamidase complex, which catalyzes the attachment of proteins to GPI-anchors, attaching the proteins to the cell membrane. In vitro studies in cells from the two brothers showed reduced levels of GPI-anchors and GPI-anchored proteins on the cell surface, supporting the pathogenicity of the novel PIGT variant.

  20. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Jackie David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner′s syndrome.

  1. Unilateral right pulmonary artery agenesis and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the right lung with Ortner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jane Jackie; Mohanlal, Smilu; Sankhe, Punam; Ghildiyal, Radha

    2016-01-01

    We report a 2.5-year-old girl who presented with hoarseness of voice since 3 months of age and failure to thrive. Chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with a deviation of the trachea and mediastinum to the right side. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed decreased flow across the right pulmonary artery, a small atrial septal defect (ASD) with a right-to-left shunt, and a dilated right atrium and right ventricle with severe tricuspid regurgitation suggestive of severe pulmonary hypertension. A silent large patent ductus arteriosus was also seen. Multiple detector computerized tomography aortogram confirmed the findings of absent right pulmonary artery and hypoplastic right lung with small cystic lesions suggestive of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation in the right lower lobe. Hoarseness of voice was due to the left vocal cord palsy probably secondary to severe pulmonary hypertension (Ortner's syndrome).

  2. Creatinine clearance, urinary excretion of glomerular basement membrane antigens and renal histology in congenital nephrotic syndrome of Finnish type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, N P

    1977-04-01

    The endogenous creatinine clearance and urinary excretion rate of glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antigens were followed from 2 to 19 months in fifteen patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNF). The quantitative examination of renal morphology was made on fourteen of these patients. Creatinine clearance increased during the first few months of life and thereafter gradually decreased. The urinary excretion rate of GBM antigens rose during the course of the disease. The creatinine clearance did not correlate significantly with glomerular fibrosis but it did correlate with tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. The urinary excretion of GBM antigens correlated significantly with glomerular and interstitial fibrosis and with tubular atrophy. It is concluded that there is a clear progress in the disease and the renal histological changes probably are caused by accumulation of GBM material in glomeruli.

  3. Congenital immunodeficiency in an individual with Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome due to a novel missense mutation in KMT2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellacci, Emilia; Onesimo, Roberta; Bruselles, Alessandro; Pizzi, Simone; Battaglia, Domenica; Leoni, Chiara; Zampino, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Wiedemann-Steiner Syndrome (WSS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypertrichosis, short stature, intellectual disability, developmental delay, and facial dysmorphism. Since the original reports by Wiedemann and co-workers, and Steiner and Marques, only a few cases have been described. Recently, the clinical variability of the disorder has more precisely been characterized by Jones and co-workers, who also identified heterozygous KMT2A mutations as the molecular defect underlying this condition. Here, we report on a boy with a complex phenotype overlapping WSS but exhibiting epilepsy, feeding difficulties, microcephaly, and congenital immunodeficiency with low levels of immunoglobulins as additional features. Whole exome sequencing allowed identifying a previously unreported de novo KMT2A missense mutation affecting the DNA binding domain of the methyltransferase. This finding expands the clinical phenotype associated with KMT2A mutations to include immunodeficiency and epilepsy as clinically relevant features for this disorder. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Copy-Number Variation of the Glucose Transporter Gene SLC2A3 and Congenital Heart Defects in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mlynarski, Elisabeth E.; Sheridan, Molly B.; Xie, Michael; Guo, Tingwei; Racedo, Silvia E.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Gai, Xiaowu; Chow, Eva W.C.; Vorstman, Jacob; Swillen, Ann; Devriendt, Koen; Breckpot, Jeroen; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS; velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome; VCFS/DGS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome and the phenotypic presentation is highly variable. Approximately 65% of individuals with 22q11DS have a congenital heart defect (CHD), mostly of the conotruncal type, and/or an aortic arch defect. The etiology of this phenotypic variability is not currently known. We hypothesized that copy-number variants (CNVs) outside the 22q11.2 deleted region might increase the ...

  5. The Genomic Landscape of Balanced Cytogenetic Abnormalities Associated with Human Congenital Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L.; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C.; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M.; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F.; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M.H.F.; Brilstra, Eva H.; Brown, Chester W.; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T.; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B.; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Dheedene, Annelies; D’Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Earl, Dawn L.; Ferguson, Heather L.; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R.; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T.; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H.; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J.; Hayden, Mark A.; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Hubshman, Monika W.; Innes, A. Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C.; Kahler, Stephen G.; Koolen, David A.; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M.; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V.; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C.; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J.; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J.; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W.; Zepeda Mendoza, Cinthya J.; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R.; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E.; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W.; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P.; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Piña Aguilar, Raul E.; Poddighe, Pino J.; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L.P.; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R.; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V.; van Bon, Bregje W.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M.; van Roosmalen, Markus J.; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M.L.; Warburton, Dorothy P.; Waterman, Matthew J.; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A.; Zori, Roberto T.; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G.; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Thorland, Erik C.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite their clinical significance, characterization of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs) has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing revised 93% of karyotypes and revealed complexity that was cryptic to karyotyping in 21% of BCAs, highlighting the limitations of conventional cytogenetic approaches. At least 33.9% of BCAs resulted in gene disruption that likely contributed to the developmental phenotype, 5.2% were associated with pathogenic genomic imbalances, and 7.3% disrupted topologically associated domains (TADs) encompassing known syndromic loci. Remarkably, BCA breakpoints in eight subjects altered a single TAD encompassing MEF2C, a known driver of 5q14.3 microdeletion syndrome, resulting in decreased MEF2C expression. This study proposes that sequence-level resolution dramatically improves prediction of clinical outcomes for balanced rearrangements, and provides insight into novel pathogenic mechanisms such as altered regulation due to changes in chromosome topology. PMID:27841880

  6. Study of Soluble HLA-G in Congenital Human Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Liliana; Bortolotti, Daria; Gentili, Valentina; Piccirilli, Giulia; Chiereghin, Angela; Pavia, Claudia; Bolzani, Silvia; Guerra, Brunella; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Cervi, Francesca; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Luca, Dario Di; Landini, Maria Paola; Lazzarotto, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I antigen that is expressed during pregnancy contributing to maternal-fetal tolerance. HLA-G can be expressed as membrane-bound and soluble forms. HLA-G expression increases strongly during viral infections such as congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, with functional consequences in immunoregulation. In this work we investigated the expression of soluble (s)HLA-G and beta-2 microglobulin (component of HLA) molecules in correlation with the risk of transmission and severity of congenital HCMV infection. We analyzed 182 blood samples from 130 pregnant women and 52 nonpregnant women and 56 amniotic fluid samples from women experiencing primary HCMV infection. The median levels of sHLA-G in maternal serum of women with primary HCMV infection were higher in comparison with nonprimary and uninfected pregnant women (p < 0.001). AF from HCMV symptomatic fetuses presented higher sHLA-G levels in comparison with infected asymptomatic fetuses (p < 0.001), presence of HLA-G free-heavy chain, and a concentration gradient from amniotic fluid to maternal blood. No significant statistical difference of beta-2 microglobulin median levels was observed between all different groups. Our results suggest the determination of sHLA-G molecules in both maternal blood and amniotic fluid as a promising biomarker of diagnosis of maternal HCMV primary infection and fetal HCMV disease. PMID:27699182

  7. Congenital myasthenic syndrome : report of four cases and brief review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja G

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The term ′congenital myasthenic syndrome′ (CMS encompasses a number of heterogeneous disorders characterised by myasthenic symptoms since birth, usually with positive family history and absence of acetyl choline receptor antibodies. Recent advances in electrophysiology and ultrastructural analysis of neuromuscular junction have made it possible to identify the various defects underlying these disorders. We report four cases of CMS, with a review of literature.

  8. Síndromes nefróticos congénitos y hereditarios Congenital and heritable nephrotic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandalio Durán Álvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años se han identificado muchos síndromes nefróticos familiares y esporádicos que no responden a los tratamientos habituales (esteroides e inmunosupresores, evolucionan con relativa rapidez a la insuficiencia renal crónica y se producen por mutaciones genéticas. La mayoría de los síndromes nefróticos que se trasmiten genéticamente y que pueden ser congénitos, presentarse en el primer año de la vida, o en el niño mayor, son atribuidos a mutaciones en los genes NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1 y LAMB2. Otros síndromes nefróticos producidos por mutaciones genéticas pueden no manifestarse hasta la adultez. El objetivo fundamental de esta revisión fue llamar la atención sobre los síndromes nefróticos producidos por mutaciones genéticas en los que no sólo no se obtienen resultados con los tratamientos inmunosupresores, si no en los que dichos tratamientos pueden ser perjudiciales para el paciente.In past years many familial and sporadic nephrotic syndromes refractory to usual treatments (steroids and immunosuppressives, evolve quickly to a chronic renal failure produced by genetic mutations. Most of nephrotic syndromes genetically transmitted and that may be congenital, present in the first year of life or in the older child, are attributable to NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1 and KLAMB2 gen mutations. Other nephrotic syndromes produced by genetic mutations may not appear until adulthood. The main objective of present review was to alert on the nephrotic syndromes produced by genetic mutations without response to immunosuppressive treatments, but on those in which such treatment may be dangerous for patient.

  9. Zika Virus Infection as a Cause of Congenital Brain Abnormalities and Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauer, Fabienne; Riesen, Maurane; Reveiz, Ludovic; Oladapo, Olufemi T; Martínez-Vega, Ruth; Porgo, Teegwendé V; Haefliger, Anina; Broutet, Nathalie J; Low, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) stated in March 2016 that there was scientific consensus that the mosquito-borne Zika virus was a cause of the neurological disorder Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and of microcephaly and other congenital brain abnormalities based on rapid evidence assessments. Decisions about causality require systematic assessment to guide public health actions. The objectives of this study were to update and reassess the evidence for causality through a rapid and systematic review about links between Zika virus infection and (a) congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, in the foetuses and offspring of pregnant women and (b) GBS in any population, and to describe the process and outcomes of an expert assessment of the evidence about causality. The study had three linked components. First, in February 2016, we developed a causality framework that defined questions about the relationship between Zika virus infection and each of the two clinical outcomes in ten dimensions: temporality, biological plausibility, strength of association, alternative explanations, cessation, dose-response relationship, animal experiments, analogy, specificity, and consistency. Second, we did a systematic review (protocol number CRD42016036693). We searched multiple online sources up to May 30, 2016 to find studies that directly addressed either outcome and any causality dimension, used methods to expedite study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment, and summarised evidence descriptively. Third, WHO convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts who assessed the review findings and reached consensus statements to update the WHO position on causality. We found 1,091 unique items up to May 30, 2016. For congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, we included 72 items; for eight of ten causality dimensions (all except dose-response relationship and specificity), we found that more than half the relevant studies supported a causal

  10. Zika Virus Infection as a Cause of Congenital Brain Abnormalities and Guillain–Barré Syndrome: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveiz, Ludovic; Oladapo, Olufemi T.; Martínez-Vega, Ruth; Haefliger, Anina

    2017-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) stated in March 2016 that there was scientific consensus that the mosquito-borne Zika virus was a cause of the neurological disorder Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and of microcephaly and other congenital brain abnormalities based on rapid evidence assessments. Decisions about causality require systematic assessment to guide public health actions. The objectives of this study were to update and reassess the evidence for causality through a rapid and systematic review about links between Zika virus infection and (a) congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, in the foetuses and offspring of pregnant women and (b) GBS in any population, and to describe the process and outcomes of an expert assessment of the evidence about causality. Methods and Findings The study had three linked components. First, in February 2016, we developed a causality framework that defined questions about the relationship between Zika virus infection and each of the two clinical outcomes in ten dimensions: temporality, biological plausibility, strength of association, alternative explanations, cessation, dose–response relationship, animal experiments, analogy, specificity, and consistency. Second, we did a systematic review (protocol number CRD42016036693). We searched multiple online sources up to May 30, 2016 to find studies that directly addressed either outcome and any causality dimension, used methods to expedite study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment, and summarised evidence descriptively. Third, WHO convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts who assessed the review findings and reached consensus statements to update the WHO position on causality. We found 1,091 unique items up to May 30, 2016. For congenital brain abnormalities, including microcephaly, we included 72 items; for eight of ten causality dimensions (all except dose–response relationship and specificity), we found that more than half the

  11. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  12. Prenatal Diagnosis of Walker–Warburg Syndrome Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array: A Clinical Experience from Three Related Palestinian Families with Congenital Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman S. Abumansour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background - Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. Various syndromic forms of hydrocephalus have been reported in the Palestinian population including Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS, Carpenter syndrome, and Meckel syndrome. Aim - In this report we discuss the antenatal diagnosis of congenital hydrocephalus in three related Palestinian families. Method - Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array was performed prenatally for the third affected fetus. Results A diagnosis of WWS was found and molecular testing revealed a known pathogenic mutation in the POMT2 gene. An affected fetus from the other family was diagnosed and tested postnatally in light of this finding. Testing of another affected stillborn offspring was performed and revealed the same mutation. Conclusions - Here, we show that the use of prenatal SNP array testing can be helpful in elucidating the etiology of congenital hydrocephalus and in guiding appropriate perinatal care. Also, testing for this specific POMT2 mutation should be considered in cases of prenatally detected hydrocephalus in Palestinian families.

  13. Prenatal Diagnosis of Walker–Warburg Syndrome Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array: A Clinical Experience from Three Related Palestinian Families with Congenital Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumansour, Iman S.; Al Sulmi, Eman; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Hunt, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. Various syndromic forms of hydrocephalus have been reported in the Palestinian population including Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), Carpenter syndrome, and Meckel syndrome. Aim In this report we discuss the antenatal diagnosis of congenital hydrocephalus in three related Palestinian families. Method Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed prenatally for the third affected fetus. Results A diagnosis of WWS was found and molecular testing revealed a known pathogenic mutation in the POMT2 gene. An affected fetus from the other family was diagnosed and tested postnatally in light of this finding. Testing of another affected stillborn offspring was performed and revealed the same mutation. Conclusions Here, we show that the use of prenatal SNP array testing can be helpful in elucidating the etiology of congenital hydrocephalus and in guiding appropriate perinatal care. Also, testing for this specific POMT2 mutation should be considered in cases of prenatally detected hydrocephalus in Palestinian families. PMID:26495167

  14. Prenatal Diagnosis of Walker-Warburg Syndrome Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array: A Clinical Experience from Three Related Palestinian Families with Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumansour, Iman S; Al Sulmi, Eman; Chodirker, Bernard N; Hunt, Jennifer C

    2015-10-01

    Background Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. Various syndromic forms of hydrocephalus have been reported in the Palestinian population including Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), Carpenter syndrome, and Meckel syndrome. Aim In this report we discuss the antenatal diagnosis of congenital hydrocephalus in three related Palestinian families. Method Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was performed prenatally for the third affected fetus. Results A diagnosis of WWS was found and molecular testing revealed a known pathogenic mutation in the POMT2 gene. An affected fetus from the other family was diagnosed and tested postnatally in light of this finding. Testing of another affected stillborn offspring was performed and revealed the same mutation. Conclusions Here, we show that the use of prenatal SNP array testing can be helpful in elucidating the etiology of congenital hydrocephalus and in guiding appropriate perinatal care. Also, testing for this specific POMT2 mutation should be considered in cases of prenatally detected hydrocephalus in Palestinian families.

  15. Drug-Induced QT Prolongation as a Result of an Escitalopram Overdose in a Patient with Previously Undiagnosed Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of drug-induced QT prolongation caused by an escitalopram overdose in a patient with previously undiagnosed congenital LQTS. A 15-year-old Caucasian female presented following a suicide attempt via an escitalopram overdose. The patient was found to have a prolonged QT interval with episodes of torsades de pointes. The patient was admitted to the telemetry unit and treated. Despite the resolution of the torsades de pointes, she continued to demonstrate a persistently prolonged QT interval. She was seen by the cardiology service and diagnosed with congenital long QT syndrome. This case illustrates the potential for an escitalopram overdose to cause an acute QT prolongation in a patient with congenital LQTS and suggests the importance of a screening electrocardiogram prior to the initiation of SSRIs, especially in patients at high risk for QT prolongation.

  16. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV: unusual congenital anomalies in a mother and son with a COL3A1 mutation and a normal collagen III protein profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, H Y; Pals, G; van Essen, A J

    2003-03-01

    A mother and son with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV and unusual congenital anomalies are described. The congenital anomalies include, in the mother, amniotic band-like constrictions on one hand, a unilateral clubfoot, and macrocephaly owing to normal-pressure hydrocephaly and, in the son, an esophageal atresia and hydrocephaly. Protein analysis of collagen III in cultured fibroblasts of the mother showed no abnormalities. However, DNA analysis of the COL3A1 gene revealed a pathogenic mutation (388G-->T) in both the mother and the son. The possible relationship between the observed congenital anomalies and EDS IV are discussed. We stress that DNA analysis of COL3A1 should be performed in all patients when there is a strong suspicion of EDS IV, despite negative findings in a collagen protein analysis. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2003

  17. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  18. Multiple congenital malformations in two sibs reminiscent of hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dincsoy, M.Y.; Salih, M.A.M.; Al-Jurayyan, N. [King Saud Univ, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    We report on two sibs, born to consanguineous parents, with defects of the midline including cleft lip and palate, flat nose, hypotelorism, and dysgenesis of corpus callosum, in addition to short limbs, radiolucent tibial notch, digital anomalies, ambiguous genitalia, and hypopituitarism. In spite of the similarities between this condition and the hydrolethalus and pseudotrisomy 13 syndromes, our patients had neither preaxial nor postaxial polydactyly, but had previously undescribed bilateral radiolucent tibial notch, which is not known to be part of those two syndromes. The cases presented here may very well represent a new autosomal recessive syndrome. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Congenital Malformations of the Urinary System in Infants and Syndrome of Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Lukianenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data on the frequency of phenotypic and clinical signs of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia (UCTD in infants with congenital malformations of the urinary system (CMUS complicated by pyelonephritis. The considerable incidence of connective tissue dysfunction among the examined children has been shown, especially among the children with anomalies of the renal tissue formation and differentiation. The authors draw the conclusion about the necessity of early verification of UCTD among young children with pyelonephritis against the CMUS. This will allow ground and perform metabolic correction of connective tissue dysfunction, which should raise the treatment efficiency in such children

  20. TAR (THROMBOCYTOPENIA WITH ABSENT RADIUS) SYNDROME WITH CONGENITAL ACYANOTIC HEART DISEASE: A RARE CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok S; Ankit; Aundhakar; Lekha; Umardand

    2016-01-01

    It is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the absence of the radius bone in the forearm and a dramatically reduced platelet count. This syndrome may occur as a part of the 1q21.1 deletion syndrome. Symptoms of thrombocytopenia or a lowered platelet count leads to bruising and potentially life-threatening haemorrhage. Affected children who survive this period and do not have damaging haemorrhages in the brain usually have a normal life expectancy and normal intellectual develo...

  1. A Case of Lacrimo-Auriculo-Dento-Digital Syndrome with Multiple Congenitally Missing Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Munagala Karthik; Rallan, Mandeep

    2016-01-01

    Lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital (LADD) syndrome is an extremely rare disorder which may occur sporadically or inheritably as an autosomal dominant condition. It is characterized by defects in the lacrimal apparatus, ear problems, and dental and digital abnormalities. However, specific symptoms vary greatly among the cases with a high degree of overlap with other similar genetic disorders. Here, we describe a 7-year-old boy with LADD syndrome, clinical and radiological findings, dental treatment undertaken, and its differential diagnosis. PMID:27803819

  2. Screening and Characterization of Spontaneous Porcine Congenital Heart Defects for Gene Identification and Models of Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Rodent models of human congenital birth defects have been instrumental for gene discovery and investigation of mechanisms of disease. However, these models are limited by their small size making practiced intervention or detailed anatomic evaluation difficult. Swine have similar anato...

  3. [Intrathoracic kidney in a newborn with breathing difficulty syndrome secondary to congenital diaphragmatic hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdaneta-Carruyo, Eliexer; Méndez-Parra, Alexander; Palencia-Molina, María Alejandra; Urdaneta-Contreras, Adriana; Urdaneta-Morales, Aubin

    2004-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is found frequently in from 0.17 to 0.57 among 1000 newborns and is associated with intrathoracic kidney (IK) in 0.25%. The objective of the present work was to describe both present pathologies in a newborn and to review the literature in this respect. male newborns, who presented tachypnea sudden and persistent for the first 24 h of life. For the that was physical exam, we included breathing difficult, (eight points of Silverman's) and cyanosis; initial arterial gases: hypoxemia and hypocapnia (acute respiratory failure type I); thorax X-ray; increase of bronchial plot and of parahiliary density; normal lungs, pleuro-peritoneal membrane and solid mass superimposed on heart silhouette were observed and confirmed by echocardiogram. Computed axial tomography (CAT) revealed left kidney and part of spleen inside thorax, beside inferior lobe of left lung. Immediately, the patient was mechanically ventilated and after 2 days, was operated surgically for correction of CDH and descent of left kidney. After surgical intervention, initial symtomatology disappeared and evolution was satisfactory. The present case illustrates how the kidney on occasion can emigrate due to congenital default to the thorax of the wall of the diaphragm and be a casual discovery at the moment of radiologic exploration.

  4. Mutation screening of patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis or the enhanced S-Cone Syndrome reveals a lack of sequence variations in the NRL gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ceren; Mears, Alan J; Yashar, Beverly M; Maheshwary, Anjali S; Andreasson, Sten; Baldi, Alfonso; Sieving, Paul A; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Musarella, Maria A; Jacobson, Samuel G; Swaroop, Anand

    2003-01-24

    To determine if mutations in the retinal transcription factor gene NRL are associated with retinopathies other than autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples obtained from 50 patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), 17 patients with the Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome (ESCS), and a patient with an atypical retinal degeneration that causes photoreceptor rosettes with blue cone opsin. The 5' upstream region (putative promoter), untranslated exon 1, coding exons 2 and 3, and exon-intron boundaries of the NRL gene were analyzed by direct sequencing of the PCR-amplified products. Complete sequencing of the NRL gene in DNA samples from this cohort of patients revealed only one nucleotide change. The C->G transversion at nucleotide 711 of NRL exon 3 was detected in one LCA patient; however, this change did not alter the amino acid (L237L). No potential disease causing mutation was identified in the NRL gene in patients with LCA, ESCS, or the atypical retinal degeneration. Together with previous studies, our results demonstrate that mutations in the NRL gene are not a major cause of retinopathy. To date, only missense changes have been reported in adRP patients, and sequence variations are rare. It is possible that the loss of NRL function in humans is associated with a more complex clinical phenotype due to its expression in pineal gland in addition to rod photoreceptors.

  5. Microdeletion on 17p11.2 in a Smith-Magenis syndrome patient with mental retardation and congenital heart defect: first report from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Yang, Y-F; Zhang, H; Xie, L; Chen, J-L; Wang, J; Tan, Z-P; Luo, H

    2012-08-13

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a rare syndrome with multiple congenital malformations, including development and mental retardation, behavioral problems and a distinct facial appearance. SMS is caused by haploinsufficiency of RAI1 (deletion or mutation of RAI1). We describe an eight-year-old female Chinese patient with multiple malformations, congenital heart defect, mental retardation, and behavioral problems (self hugging, sleeping disturbance). High-resolution genome wide single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed a 3.7-Mb deletion in chromosome region 17p11.2. This chromosome region contains RAI1, a critical gene involved in SMS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an SMS patient in mainland China.

  6. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Qiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25. We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  7. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Ruimin; He, Yuyong; Pan, Bo; Xiao, Shijun; Zhang, Xufei; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyan; Hong, Yuan; Xing, Yuyun; Ren, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25). We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn) as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  8. Diagnostic and surgical challenge: middle ear dermoid cyst in 12 month old with branchio-oto-renal syndrome and multiple middle-ear congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D R; Whittemore, K; Poe, D; Robson, C D; Perez-Atayde, A R

    2011-10-01

    Described is the first case report, to our knowledge, of a middle-ear dermoid in a child with branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome. Radiographic, pathologic, and intraoperative figures are shown. This was a diagnostic and surgical challenge as the presentation was similar to a congenital cholesteatoma and the child had numerous significant temporal bone abnormalities. After the intraoperative findings suggested a non-destructive process, the treatment strategy was altered. This case reiterates the need for a cautious, flexible operative approach in a syndromic child. Included is a relevant review of the literature and a detailed clinical analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Congenital Heart Disease in Children with Down syndrome in Kermanshah, West of Iran during 2002 - 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jalili

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal anomaly. Dysmorphic features can occur in several organs in this syndrome. Cardiac anomalies with a prevalence of 50% are the most common anomalies responsible for death during the first two years of life. We aimed to determine the prevalence of cardiac anomalies among Down syndrome patients admitted to two tertiary hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran from 2002 to 2016. Materials and Methods In this descriptive study, the medical records of all patients with Down syndrome admitted to two university hospitals namely Imam Ali and Imam Reza, Kermanshah city located in Western part of Iran in the study period were reviewed. All patients had received Echocardiography two-dimensional (2D. The required data including cardiac anomaly type, consanguinity of parents, maternal age, surgical interventions, and survival were collected into a checklist. Results:  During the study period, 166 patients with Down syndrome had received diagnostic and therapeutic services in the studied hospitals. There were 70 males (42.2% and 96 females (57.8%. Familial consanguinity was documented in 95 patients (57.2%. Mean ± standard deviation (SD maternal age at delivery was 26.33 (±4.7 years (range, 15 to 45 years. Of 166 studied patients, 123 (74.1% had cardiac anomaly. Ventricular septal defect (VSD was the most prevalent single defect seen in 32 (26% patients, followed by atrial septal defect (ASD detected in in 22 (17.8% patients. Seventy patients (42.1% required surgical interventions. A total of 74 patients experienced relative improvement of the symptoms. Also, seven patients (10.2% died including five females and two males. Conclusion: The frequency of cardiac anomalies in the studied population of Down syndrome patients was higher than former reported figures. The pattern of the anomalies is compatible with some former reports, but contradicts other reports.

  10. A novel congenital ichthyosiform syndrome with associated panhypopituitarism, corneal opacities and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandhi, Deepika; Khanna, Deepshikha; Singal, Archana; Madhu, Sri Venkata

    2007-11-01

    A 15-year-old male presented with ichthyosis since infancy with panhypopituitarism, short stature and knock-knees, delayed puberty, high scrotal retractile testes, mental retardation and corneal opacities. He developed recurrent tinea capitis and tinea corporis. The clinical symptomatology indicates that this case cannot be considered as a subtype of inherited ichthyosis group, but suggests a new syndrome as a separate nosologic entity. Two previously reported cases with possibly the same syndrome also had ichthyosis associated with variable endocrinopathy. Thorough endocrinological evaluation and appropriate intervention in patients of ichthyosis with short stature may reduce the morbidity associated with retarded skeletal growth and gonadal maturation.

  11. Relation of increased short-term variability of QT interval to congenital long-QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinterseer, Martin; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Thomsen, Morten B

    2009-01-01

    Apart from clinical symptoms the diagnosis and risk stratification in long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is usually based on the surface electrocardiogram. Studies have indicated that not only prolongation of the QT interval but also an increased short-term variability of QT interval (STV(QT)) is a marker f...

  12. TAR (THROMBOCYTOPENIA WITH ABSENT RADIUS SYNDROME WITH CONGENITAL ACYANOTIC HEART DISEASE: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the absence of the radius bone in the forearm and a dramatically reduced platelet count. This syndrome may occur as a part of the 1q21.1 deletion syndrome. Symptoms of thrombocytopenia or a lowered platelet count leads to bruising and potentially life-threatening haemorrhage. Affected children who survive this period and do not have damaging haemorrhages in the brain usually have a normal life expectancy and normal intellectual development. Other common links between with TAR seem to include heart problems, kidney problems, knee joint problems, frequently lactose intolerance and often thumb hypoplasia. The incidence is 0.5-1 per 100,000 live births. Mutations in the RBM8A gene cause TAR syndrome. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. This disorder is to be differentiated from Holt-Oram syndrome, which has similar presentation. Prevention of bleeding with physiotherapy and occupational therapy are mainstay of management. With this case report we try to discuss the complexity of the condition and its management in the neonatal period.

  13. Two novel RUNX1 mutations in a patient with congenital thrombocytopenia that evolved into a high grade myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Schmit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report two new RUNX1 mutations in one patient with congenital thrombocytopenia that transformed into a high grade myelodysplastic syndrome with myelomonocytic features. The first mutation was a nucleotide base substitution from guanine to adenine within exon 8, resulting in a nonsense mutation in the DNA-binding inhibitory domain of the Runx1 protein. This nonsense mutation is suspected a de novo germline mutation since both parents are negative for the mutation. The second mutation identified was an in-frame six nucleotide base pair insertion in exon 5 of the RUNX1 gene, which is predicted to result in an insertion in the DNA-binding runt homology domain (RHD. This mutation is believed to be a somatic mutation as it was mosaic before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and disappeared after transplant. As no other genetic mutation was found using genetic screening, it is speculated that the combined effect of these two RUNX1 mutations may have exerted a stronger dominant negative effect than either RUNX1 mutation alone, thus leading to a myeloid malignancy.

  14. Epidemiological characteristics of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in the 2012-2013 epidemics in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugishita, Yoshiyuki; Shimatani, Naotaka; Katow, Shigetaka; Takahashi, Takuri; Hori, Narumi

    2015-01-01

    A large rubella outbreak has been observed since June 2012 in Tokyo, Japan, and a rapid increase in the number of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) cases have also been reported in Japan since October 2012. All the clinically diagnosed and laboratory-confirmed rubella cases reported in Tokyo from January 2012 to December 2013 and all the laboratory-confirmed CRS cases from January 2012 to March 2014 were analyzed. In total, 4,116 rubella cases were reported in Tokyo. Of these, 77.2% (n=3,176) were male; the highest number of cases occurred in males aged 35-39 years and in females aged 20-24 years. Complications included arthralgia/arthritis (19.4%), thrombocytopenic purpura (0.5%), hepatic dysfunction (0.3%), and encephalitis (0.1%). The circulating rubella virus in Tokyo was genotype 2B. The most possible site of transmission was the workplace. Because of the rubella epidemic, 16 CRS cases were reported in Tokyo from March 2013 to February 2014. Domestic infection with rubella was proven for all mothers of 16 cases. This situation suggests that Japan is still working to achieve rubella elimination.

  15. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and the PHOX2B gene: a model of respiratory and autonomic dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwari, Pallavi P; Carroll, Michael S; Rand, Casey M; Kumar, Rajesh; Harper, Ronald; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2010-10-31

    The paired-like homeobox 2B gene (PHOX2B) is the disease-defining gene for congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS). Individuals with CCHS typically present in the newborn period with alveolar hypoventilation during sleep and often during wakefulness, altered respiratory control including reduced or absent ventilatory responses to hypercarbia and hypoxemia, and autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysregulation; however, a subset of individuals present well into adulthood. Thermoregulation is altered and perception of shortness of breath is absent, but voluntary breathing is retained. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and limited post-mortem studies in subjects with CCHS reveal abnormalities in both forebrain and brainstem. MRI changes appear in the hypothalamus (responsible for thermal drive to breathing), posterior thalamus and midbrain (mediating O(2) and oscillatory motor patterns), caudal raphé and locus coeruleus (regulating serotonergic and noradrenergic systems), the lateral medulla, parabrachial pons, and cerebellum (coordinating chemoreceptor and somatic afferent activity with breathing), and insular and cingulate cortices (mediating shortness of breath perception). Structural and functional alterations in these sites may result from PHOX2B mutations or be secondary to hypoxia/perfusion alterations from suboptimal management/compliance. The study of CCHS, with collaboration between physician-scientists and basic scientists, offers a rare opportunity to investigate control of breathing within the complex physiological network of the ANS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genotype-phenotype correlation for congenital heart disease in Down syndrome through analysis of partial trisomy 21 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Gennari, Elena; Locatelli, Chiara; Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Antonaros, Francesca; Rocca, Alessandro; Donati, Costanza Maria; Conti, Letizia; Strippoli, Pierluigi; Seri, Marco; Vitale, Lorenza; Cocchi, Guido

    2017-06-23

    Among Down syndrome (DS) children, 40-50% have congenital heart disease (CHD). Although trisomy 21 is not sufficient to cause CHD, three copies of at least part of chromosome 21 (Hsa21) increases the risk for CHD. In order to establish a genotype-phenotype correlation for CHD in DS, we built an integrated Hsa21 map of all described partial trisomy 21 (PT21) cases with sufficient indications regarding presence or absence of CHD (n=107), focusing on DS PT21 cases. We suggest a DS CHD candidate region on 21q22.2 (0.96Mb), being shared by most PT21 cases with CHD and containing three known protein-coding genes (DSCAM, BACE2, PLAC4) and four known non-coding RNAs (DSCAM-AS1, DSCAM-IT1, LINC00323, MIR3197). The characterization of a DS CHD candidate region provides a useful approach to identify specific genes contributing to the pathology and to orient further investigations and possibly more effective therapy in relation to the multifactorial pathogenesis of CHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sonographic Diagnosis in a Rare Aetiology of Neonatal Scrotal Swellings: A Case Report of Congenital Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Shabnam Bhandari; Kumar, Nishith; Grover, Hemal; Taneja, Dinesh Kumar; Katyan, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Common etiologies of scrotal swelling in neonates include hydrocoele, inguinal hernia and testicular torsion; less common is epididymo-orchitis. Congenital nephrotic syndrome (CNS), a rare entity, is known to present as progressive renal failure and its leading presentation with scrotal involvement has not been reported. Material/Methods We report a rare case of CNS with primary clinical presentation as scrotal cellulitis and epididymo-orchitis. In this neonate, scrotal and abdominal ultrasound examination was performed and the laboratory data were obtained. Results Sonography revealed bilaterally enlarged echogenic kidneys, testis and epididymis with echogenic peritoneal fluid tracking into both scrotal sacs. Laboratory data revealed proteinuria and severe depletion of serum IgG. Culture of the peritoneal fluid showed gram-negative organisms. A final diagnosis of CNS, complicated with peritonitis tracking into the scrotal sacs was arrived at. Conclusions CNS may have a rare presentation with distracting symptoms of scrotal cellulitis and epididymo-orchitis, as seen in our patient. However, diligent use of abdomino-scrotal sonography, supported by relevant laboratory data can clinch the accurate diagnosis. PMID:27757175

  18. Cryo-EM Structure of a KCNQ1/CaM Complex Reveals Insights into Congenital Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ji; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-06-01

    KCNQ1 is the pore-forming subunit of cardiac slow-delayed rectifier potassium (IKs) channels. Mutations in the kcnq1 gene are the leading cause of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). Here, we present the cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a KCNQ1/calmodulin (CaM) complex. The conformation corresponds to an "uncoupled," PIP2-free state of KCNQ1, with activated voltage sensors and a closed pore. Unique structural features within the S4-S5 linker permit uncoupling of the voltage sensor from the pore in the absence of PIP2. CaM contacts the KCNQ1 voltage sensor through a specific interface involving a residue on CaM that is mutated in a form of inherited LQTS. Using an electrophysiological assay, we find that this mutation on CaM shifts the KCNQ1 voltage-activation curve. This study describes one physiological form of KCNQ1, depolarized voltage sensors with a closed pore in the absence of PIP2, and reveals a regulatory interaction between CaM and KCNQ1 that may explain CaM-mediated LQTS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced A-V nodal conduction (Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome) by congenitally hypoplastic A-V node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ometto, R; Thiene, G; Corrado, D; Vincenzi, M; Rossi, L

    1992-11-01

    The basic anatomical substrate of enhanced A-V nodal conduction, manifesting or not as Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome, is still a controversial issue. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man who presented episodes of ventricular fibrillation. Electrophysiological studies showed that the AH interval was 55 ms, and increased by only 20 ms at paced cycle lengths of 300 ms; atrial pacing induced atrial fibrillation, with a shortest RR interval of 240 ms. Despite verapamil therapy, this patient died suddenly at home. Histological study disclosed a severe A-V node hypoplasia that was evidently congenital in nature; the rest of the conduction system was normal, and no accessory A-V pathways were present. We suggest that enhanced A-V nodal conduction in this patient was due to the developmental defect in the A-V node; this abnormality caused a loss of specific impulse-delaying function, and thus allowed rapid, unfiltered atrial impulses to reach the lower A-V junction and ventricles.

  20. Sexual orientation and medical history among Iranian people with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorashad, Behzad S; Roshan, Ghasem M; Reid, Alistair G; Aghili, Zahra; Hiradfar, Mehran; Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Talaei, Ali; Aarabi, Azadeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Taghehchian, Negin; Saberi, Hedieh; Farahi, Nazanin; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    To report sexual orientation, relationship status and medical history of Iranian people with Differences of Sex Development (DSD) who were raised female. Our participants consisted of nineteen 46,XY individuals with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) and eighteen 46,XX individuals with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) who were raised as females and older than 13years. As well as their relationship status and detailed medical history, an expert psychiatrist assessed their sexual orientation by a semi-structured psychiatric interview with them and, where applicable, their parents. Five percent of CAH participants and 42% of CAIS participants were in a relationship, which was significantly different. All CAH individuals had been diagnosed at birth; 89% of CAIS had been diagnosed after puberty and due to primary amenorrhea and 11% were diagnosed in childhood due to inguinal hernia. Genital reconstructive surgery had been performed in 100% of CAH participants and 37% of CAIS. Regarding sexual contact experiences and sexual fantasies (androphilic, gynephilic or both), no significant differences were found. However, CAH females had significantly more gynephilic dreams (P=0.045). This study, notable as one of the rare from a non-western culture, described sexual, medical and socioeconomic status of 46,XX CAH and 46,XY CAIS individuals living in Iran. Although broadly in line with previous findings from Western cultures, Iranian CAH individuals had fewer romantic relationships, but in contrast to previous studies their sexual orientation was only different from CAIS in the contents of sexual dreams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lemierre syndrome presenting as acute mastoiditis in a 2-year-old girl with congenital dwarfism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. Fischer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre syndrome is defined by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein caused by Fusobacterium. Historically, these infections originate from the oropharynx and typically are seen in older children, adolescents and young adults. More recently, otogenic sources in younger children have been described with increasing frequency. We present a case of a two-year old, who initially developed an otitis media with perforation of the tympanic membrane and went on to develop mastoiditis and non-occlusive thrombosis of the venous sinus and right internal jugular vein. Fusobacterium necrophorum was grown from operative cultures of the mastoid, ensuing computed tomography scan revealed occlusion of the internal jugular vein and the patient was successfully treated with clindamycin, ciprofloxacin and enoxaparin. This case demonstrates the importance of considering Fusobacterium in otogenic infections and the consideration of Lemierre syndrome when F. necrophorum is identified.

  2. Meier-Gorlin syndrome with ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic corpus callosum: a rarely reported congenital malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabanita Kora

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS or ear-patella-short stature syndrome (MIM 224690 is a rarely reported autosomal recessive disorder having characteristic triad of microtia, short stature and aplastic or hypoplastic patella. Only 67 cases are reported. We are reporting a newborn female baby with typical features of MGS along with some other features never described before, ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic corpus callosum. We did x-rays of whole body (infantogram and MRI of brain for microcephaly. Ultrasonography of both knees showed absence of patellae and brain MRI showed ventriculomegaly and hypoplastic corpus callosum. To our best knowledge this is the second case report of MGS in India; the first reported a MGS associated with papilledema. In previously reported cases, there was no statement regarding agenesis of corpus callosum.

  3. Homocysteine related Nutritional and Genetic Risk Factors for Human Congenital Heart Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Verkleij-Hagoort (Anna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart defects (CHDs) belong to the most common group of major congenital malformations in newborns. Most CHDs are considered complex diseases with a multifactorial aetiology, which are thought to result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. This thesis p

  4. Apheresis in high risk antiphospholipid syndrome pregnancy and autoimmune congenital heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffatti, Amelia; Favaro, Maria; Brucato, Antonio; Ramoni, Veronique; Facchinetti, Myriam; Tonello, Marta; Del Ross, Teresa; Calligaro, Antonia; Hoxha, Ariela; Grava, Chiara; De Silvestro, Giustina

    2015-12-01

    In the first part a prospective cohort study was reported to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a treatment protocol including plasma exchange (PE) or PE plus intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) or immunoadsorption (IA) plus IVIG administered in addition to conventional therapy to 22 pregnant women with high-risk APS. The results indicate that PE or IA treatments administered along with IVIG and conventional antithrombotic therapy could be a valuable and safe therapeutic option in pregnant APS women with triple antiphospholipid antibody positivity along with a history of thrombosis and/or one or more severe pregnancy complications. In the second part the efficacy and safety of PE combined with IVIG and steroids were evaluated for the treatment of 10 patients with autoimmune congenital heart block (CHB) by comparing maternal features, pregnancy outcome and side effects with those of 24 CHB patients treated with steroids only. The patients treated with the combined therapy showed a statistically significant regression of 2nd degree blocks, an increase in heart rate at birth and a significantly lower prevalence of pacing in the first year of life. Moreover, no side effects were observed except for a few steroid-related events. If these results are confirmed by large-scale studies, the apheretic procedures could lead to improved outcomes in the treatment of these devastating diseases.

  5. Effects of inhaled iloprost on congenital heart disease with Eisenmenger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Song I; Chung, Wook Jin; Jung, Sung Hwan; Choi, Deok Young

    2012-06-01

    Identification of the pathophysiology associated with Eisenmenger syndrome has led to the evaluation of targeted therapies. Iloprost is one such targeted therapy used for patients with Eisenmenger syndrome. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of iloprost used for patients with Eisenmenger syndrome. In this study, 12 patients with Eisenmenger syndrome (mean age, 33.2 ± 12.1 years; 75% female) started receiving iloprost 10 μg/dose administered six times a day. Of the 12 patients, 9 were classified as New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class 3, and three were categorized as functional class 4. Changes in 6-min walk distance, NYHA functional class, oxygen saturation at resting, and results after the 6-min walk test were checked, as well as changes in right ventricle diameter and pulmonary arterial pressure shown by echocardiography. The distance during a 6-min walk increased from 255.8 ± 120.4 to 349.4 ± 134.7 m (p = 0.013), and 10 patients improved their NYHA functional class by one grade (p = 0.007). The mean resting oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) increased from 80.6 ± 14.2 to 84.9 ± 13.0% (p = 0.040), and after the 6-min walk test, it increased from 63.8 ± 22.9 to 68.8 ± 21.5% (p = 0.007). The mean right ventricle diameter during the diastolic phase changed from 53.7 ± 4.8 to 51.4 ± 3.9 mm (p = 0.068), and the mean pulmonary arterial pressure changed from 62.8 ± 13.7 to 58.9 ± 11.7 mmHg (p = 0.059). Neither death nor critical adverse effects occurred for any patients. Mild headache and dyspnea were common reports during the iloprost treatments. No patients stopped the therapy due to these adverse effects. Iloprost is well tolerated and appears to be beneficial in the management of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome.

  6. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Song; J Willer; P Scherer; J Panzer; A Kugath; E Skordalakes; R Gregg; G Willer; R Balice-Gordon

    2011-12-31

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development.

  7. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  8. Role of HOXA7 to HOXA13 and PBX1 genes in various forms of MRKH syndrome (congenital absence of uterus and vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellerin Isabelle

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH syndrome refers to the congenital absence or severe hypoplasia of the female genital tract, often described as uterovaginal aplasia which is the prime feature of the syndrome. It is the second cause of primary amenorrhea after gonadal dysgenesis and occurs in ~1 in 4500 women. Aetiology of this syndrome remains poorly understood. Frequent association of other malformations with the MRKH syndrome, involving kidneys, skeleton and ears, suggests the involvement of major developmental genes such as those of the HOX family. Indeed mammalian HOX genes are well known for their crucial role during embryogenesis, particularly in axial skeleton, hindbrain and limb development. More recently, their involvement in organogenesis has been demonstrated notably during urogenital differentiation. Although null mutations of HOX genes in animal models do not lead to MRKH-like phenotypes, dominant mutations in their coding sequences or aberrant expression due to mutated regulatory regions could well account for it. Sequence analysis of coding regions of HOX candidate genes and of PBX1, a likely HOX cofactor during Müllerian duct differentiation and kidney morphogenesis, did not reveal any mutation in patients showing various forms of MRKH syndrome. This tends to show that HOX genes are not involved in MRKH syndrome. However it does not exclude that other mechanisms leading to HOX dysfunction may account for the syndrome.

  9. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome plus; a contiguous gene constellation of congenital anomalies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, T.E. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A term female infant was referred to the University Hospital because of respiratory distress secondary to bilateral choanal stenosis. Her examination revealed bilateral pre-auricular pits, branchial fistulae, cupped shaped ears, and bilateral athelia. She failed ABR screening; her creatinine was elevated to 1.5 mgs% and renal ultra-sonography showed reduced kidney size bilaterally. She was the product of her mother`s third pregnancy. The first produced a now normal 5 year old son. The second pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios and resulted in a premature delivery at 27 weeks gestation. The infant expired secondary to pulmonary hypoplasia. The mother had bilateral neurosensory deafness, pre-auricular pits, cupped shaped ears, lacrimal stenois and bilateral athelia. She wore dentures having earlier been diagnosed with dentogeneis imperfecta. She was shorter than her three normal sisters and had experienced academic problems throughout her school years. The maternal grandfather had an adult onset neurosensory hearing loss, but he and the maternal grandmother exhibited no other features of the BOR syndrome. Althelia was present only in the mother and daughter. The mother clearly has BOR syndrome transmitted to one, and possibly two, of her three offspring. The additional features of athelia, choanal stenosis and dentogenesis imperfecta are thought to represent additional autosomal dominant traits. Greenberg described an infant with athelia and choanal atresia. By family linkage studies, the BOR syndrome has been mapped to 8q13-21 with no recombination observed with loci D8S530 and D8S279. Given a normal prophase karyotype in the proband, it is speculated that a sub-microscopic deletion at 8q13-21 is the likely basis for the constellation of birth defects seen in this mother and daughter. Analysis of D8S530 and D8S279 is currently underway in this family.

  10. [An adult case of congenital Horner's syndrome with heterochromia iridis--with special reference to alteration of Horner's sign associated with development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyama, E; Maeda, J; Adachi, K; Yu, T C; Araki, S

    1989-10-01

    It is well known that when the Horner's syndrome is congenital, a defect in pigmentation of the iris is usual; all or part of the iris remains light brown. We reported an adult case of congenital Horner's syndrome with remission and relapse of unilateral ptosis. A 25-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for ophthalmologic surgical treatment of right ptosis. According to the patient's mother, the patient was delivered with the aid of forceps at birth, and the right ptosis was observed during the first few days of his life. At 2 to 3 years of age, his parents noted lighter color of the right eye. The right ptosis was gradually improved as he grew older. However, he developed right ptosis again with left meralgia paresthesia since eighteen age. At age 25 years, he was noted to have right ptosis, right miosis (the left pupil measured 4.5 mm in diameter and the right 3.0 mm), right heterochromia iridis with pigmented iris nevi, and left meralgia paresthesia . Laboratory data of urine, blood and CSF as well as radiological studies of chest X-ray, skull X-ray, spine X-ray, brain MRI and spinal cord MRI showed unremarkable. Sweating test was intact, pharmacologic test to Horner's syndrome with 5% cocaine and 1.25% 1-epinephrine indicated that the damage was pointed to the post ganglionic sympathetic neuron. Ten patients with congenital Horner's syndrome reported in Japan since 1953 were reviewed including our case. Ten of eleven were male and Horner's sign was recorded on the left eye in 8 cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Ultra high-resolution gene centric genomic structural analysis of a non-syndromic congenital heart defect, Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C Bittel

    Full Text Available Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF is one of the most common severe congenital heart malformations. Great progress has been made in identifying key genes that regulate heart development, yet approximately 70% of TOF cases are sporadic and nonsyndromic with no known genetic cause. We created an ultra high-resolution gene centric comparative genomic hybridization (gcCGH microarray based on 591 genes with a validated association with cardiovascular development or function. We used our gcCGH array to analyze the genomic structure of 34 infants with sporadic TOF without a deletion on chromosome 22q11.2 (n male = 20; n female = 14; age range of 2 to 10 months. Using our custom-made gcCGH microarray platform, we identified a total of 613 copy number variations (CNVs ranging in size from 78 base pairs to 19.5 Mb. We identified 16 subjects with 33 CNVs that contained 13 different genes which are known to be directly associated with heart development. Additionally, there were 79 genes from the broader list of genes that were partially or completely contained in a CNV. All 34 individuals examined had at least one CNV involving these 79 genes. Furthermore, we had available whole genome exon arrays from right ventricular tissue in 13 of our subjects. We analyzed these for correlations between copy number and gene expression level. Surprisingly, we could detect only one clear association between CNVs and expression (GSTT1 for any of the 591 focal genes on the gcCGH array. The expression levels of GSTT1 were correlated with copy number in all cases examined (r = 0.95, p = 0.001. We identified a large number of small CNVs in genes with varying associations with heart development. Our results illustrate the complexity of human genome structural variation and underscore the need for multifactorial assessment of potential genetic/genomic factors that contribute to congenital heart defects.

  12. Congenital short pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Juan; XU Guo-qiang; XU Ping; JIN En-yun; LIU Qiong; LI You-ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Congenital short pancreas, also known as partial agenesis or hypoplasia of the dorsal pancreas1 is a rare congenital abnormality consisting of the parenchyma and ductal system restricted to the head with some residual dorsal tapering and arborizing ducts communicating with the minor papill.2 Complete pancreatic agenesis is fatal, and only nine possible examples of partial agenesis have been previously reported in adults in the literature.3-10 Three of them were polysplenia syndrome associated with short pancreas,and only six patients with congenital short pancreas with normal situs. Here we present a new case associated with steatorrhoea.

  13. A detailed musculoskeletal study of a fetus with anencephaly and spina bifida (craniorachischisis), and comparison with other cases of human congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Malak A; Ziermann, Janine M; Gregg, Lydia; Diogo, Rui

    2017-03-07

    Few descriptions of the musculoskeletal system of humans with anencephaly or spina bifida exist in the literature. Even less is published about individuals in which both phenomena occur together, i.e. about craniorachischisis. Here we provide a detailed report on the musculoskeletal structures of a fetus with craniorachischisis, as well as comparisons with the few descriptions for anencephaly and with musculoskeletal anomalies found in other congenital malformations. We focused in particular on the comparison with trisomies 13, 18, and 21 because neural tube defects have been associated with such chromosomal defects. Our results showed that many of the defects found in the fetus with craniorachischisis are similar not only to anomalies previously described in the available works on musculoskeletal phenotypes seen in fetuses with anencephaly and spina bifida, but also to a wide range of other different conditions/syndromes including trisomies 13, 18 and 21, and cyclopia. The fact that similar anomalies are seen commonly not only in a wide range of different syndromes, but also as variants of the normal human population and as the 'normal' phenotype of other animals, supports Pere Alberch's unfortunately named idea of a 'logic of monsters'. That is, it supports the idea that development is so constrained that both in 'normal' and abnormal development one sees certain outcomes being produced again and again because ontogenetic constraints only allow a few possible outcomes, thus also leading to cases where the anatomical defects of some organisms are similar to the 'normal' phenotype of other organisms. In fact, this applies not only to specific anomalies but also to general patterns, such as the fact that in pathological conditions affecting different regions of the body, one consistently sees more defects on the upper limbs than on the lower limbs. Such general patterns are, again, seen in the fetus examined for this study, which had 29 muscle anomalies on the right

  14. Plasticity of the human visual system after retinal gene therapy in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtari, Manzar; Zhang, Hui; Cook, Philip A; Cyckowski, Laura L; Shindler, Kenneth S; Marshall, Kathleen A; Aravand, Puya; Vossough, Arastoo; Gee, James C; Maguire, Albert M; Baker, Chris I; Bennett, Jean

    2015-07-15

    Much of our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying plasticity in the visual cortex in response to visual impairment, vision restoration, and environmental interactions comes from animal studies. We evaluated human brain plasticity in a group of patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), who regained vision through gene therapy. Using non-invasive multimodal neuroimaging methods, we demonstrated that reversing blindness with gene therapy promoted long-term structural plasticity in the visual pathways emanating from the treated retina of LCA patients. The data revealed improvements and normalization along the visual fibers corresponding to the site of retinal injection of the gene therapy vector carrying the therapeutic gene in the treated eye compared to the visual pathway for the untreated eye of LCA patients. After gene therapy, the primary visual pathways (for example, geniculostriate fibers) in the treated retina were similar to those of sighted control subjects, whereas the primary visual pathways of the untreated retina continued to deteriorate. Our results suggest that visual experience, enhanced by gene therapy, may be responsible for the reorganization and maturation of synaptic connectivity in the visual pathways of the treated eye in LCA patients. The interactions between the eye and the brain enabled improved and sustained long-term visual function in patients with LCA after gene therapy.

  15. Congenital and acquired neutropenias consensus guidelines on therapy and follow-up in childhood from the Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group of the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioredda, Francesca; Calvillo, Michaela; Bonanomi, Sonia; Coliva, Tiziana; Tucci, Fabio; Farruggia, Piero; Pillon, Marta; Martire, Baldassarre; Ghilardi, Roberta; Ramenghi, Ugo; Renga, Daniela; Menna, Giuseppe; Pusiol, Anna; Barone, Angelica; Gambineri, Eleonora; Palazzi, Giovanni; Casazza, Gabriella; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo

    2012-02-01

    The management of congenital and acquired neutropenias presents some differences according to the type of the disease. Treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is not standardized and scanty data are available on the best schedule to apply. The frequency and the type of longitudinal controls in patients affected with neutropenias are not usually discussed in the literature. The Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group (MFSG) of the Associazione Italiana di Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) elaborated this document following design and methodology formerly approved by the AIEOP board. The panel of experts reviewed the literature on the topic and participated in a conference producing a document that includes recommendations on neutropenia treatment and timing of follow-up.

  16. The genetics of folate metabolism and maternal risk of birth of a child with Down syndrome and associated congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eCoppedè

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Almost 15 years ago it was hypothesized that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in folate metabolism could lead to aberrant methylation of peri-centromeric regions of chromosome 21, favoring its abnormal segregation during maternal meiosis. Subsequently, more than 50 small case-control studies investigated whether or not maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes could be risk factors for the birth of a child with Down syndrome (DS, yielding conflicting and inconclusive results. However, recent meta-analyses of those studies suggest that at least three of those polymorphisms, namely MTHFR 677C>T, MTRR 66A>G, and RFC1 80G>A, are likely to act as maternal risk factors for the birth of a child with trisomy 21, revealing also complex gene-nutrient interactions. A large-cohort study also revealed that lack of maternal folic acid supplementation at peri-conception resulted in increased risk for a DS birth due to errors occurred at maternal meiosis II in the aging oocyte, and it was shown that the methylation status of chromosome 21 peri-centromeric regions could favor recombination errors during meiosis leading to its malsegregation. In this regard, two recent case-control studies revealed association of maternal polymorphisms or haplotypes of the DNMT3B gene, coding for an enzyme required for the regulation of DNA methylation at centromeric and peri-centromeric regions of human chromosomes, with risk of having a birth with DS. Furthermore, congenital heart defects (CHD are found in almost a half of DS births, and increasing evidence points to a possible contribution of lack of folic acid supplementation at peri-conception, maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes, and resulting epigenetic modifications of several genes, at the basis of their occurrence. This review summarizes available case-control studies and literature meta-analyses in order to provide a critical and up to date overview of what we currently know in this

  17. The genetics of folate metabolism and maternal risk of birth of a child with Down syndrome and associated congenital heart defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Almost 15 years ago it was hypothesized that polymorphisms of genes encoding enzymes involved in folate metabolism could lead to aberrant methylation of peri-centromeric regions of chromosome 21, favoring its abnormal segregation during maternal meiosis. Subsequently, more than 50 small case-control studies investigated whether or not maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes could be risk factors for the birth of a child with Down syndrome (DS), yielding conflicting and inconclusive results. However, recent meta-analyses of those studies suggest that at least three of those polymorphisms, namely MTHFR 677C>T, MTRR 66A>G, and RFC1 80G>A, are likely to act as maternal risk factors for the birth of a child with trisomy 21, revealing also complex gene-nutrient interactions. A large-cohort study also revealed that lack of maternal folic acid supplementation at peri-conception resulted in increased risk for a DS birth due to errors occurred at maternal meiosis II in the aging oocyte, and it was shown that the methylation status of chromosome 21 peri-centromeric regions could favor recombination errors during meiosis leading to its malsegregation. In this regard, two recent case-control studies revealed association of maternal polymorphisms or haplotypes of the DNMT3B gene, coding for an enzyme required for the regulation of DNA methylation at centromeric and peri-centromeric regions of human chromosomes, with risk of having a birth with DS. Furthermore, congenital heart defects (CHD) are found in almost a half of DS births, and increasing evidence points to a possible contribution of lack of folic acid supplementation at peri-conception, maternal polymorphisms of folate pathway genes, and resulting epigenetic modifications of several genes, at the basis of their occurrence. This review summarizes available case-control studies and literature meta-analyses in order to provide a critical and up to date overview of what we currently know in this field. PMID:26161087

  18. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Brilstra, Eva H; Brown, Chester W; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B A; Earl, Dawn L; Ferguson, Heather L; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W; Gropman, Andrea L; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J; Hayden, Mark A; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D; Hopkin, Robert J; Hubshman, Monika W; Innes, A Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Kahler, Stephen G; Koolen, David A; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W; Mendoza, Cinthya J Zepeda; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Aguilar, Raul E Piña; Poddighe, Pino J; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L P; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V; van Bon, Bregje W; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M L; Warburton, Dorothy P; Waterman, Matthew J; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A; Zori, Roberto T; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Thorland, Erik C; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing

  19. Autosomal and X chromosome structural variants are associated with congenital heart defects in Turner syndrome: The NHLBI GenTAC registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Siddharth K; Bondy, Carolyn A; Maslen, Cheryl L; Silberbach, Michael; Lin, Angela E; Perrone, Laura; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Michelena, Hector I; Bossone, Eduardo; Citro, Rodolfo; Lemaire, Scott A; Body, Simon C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-12-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder caused by partial or complete loss of one sex chromosome. Bicuspid aortic valve and other left-sided congenital heart lesions (LSL), including thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections, are 30-50 times more frequent in TS than in the general population. In 454 TS subjects, we found that LSL are significantly associated with reduced dosage of Xp genes and increased dosage of Xq genes. We also showed that genome-wide copy number variation is increased in TS and identify a common copy number variant (CNV) in chromosome 12p13.31 that is associated with LSL with an odds ratio of 3.7. This CNV contains three protein-coding genes (SLC2A3, SLC2A14, and NANOGP1) and was previously implicated in congenital heart defects in the 22q11 deletion syndrome. In addition, we identified a subset of rare and recurrent CNVs that are also enriched in non-syndromic BAV cases. These observations support our hypothesis that X chromosome and autosomal variants affecting cardiac developmental genes may interact to cause the increased prevalence of LSL in TS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Global Nav1.7 knockout mice recapitulate the phenotype of human congenital indifference to pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinthe Gingras

    Full Text Available Clinical genetic studies have shown that loss of Nav1.7 function leads to the complete loss of acute pain perception. The global deletion is reported lethal in mice, however, and studies of mice with promoter-specific deletions of Nav1.7 have suggested that the role of Nav1.7 in pain transduction depends on the precise form of pain. We developed genetic and animal husbandry strategies that overcame the neonatal-lethal phenotype and enabled construction of a global Nav1.7 knockout mouse. Knockouts were anatomically normal, reached adulthood, and had phenotype wholly analogous to human congenital indifference to pain (CIP: compared to littermates, knockouts showed no defects in mechanical sensitivity or overall movement yet were completely insensitive to painful tactile, thermal, and chemical stimuli and were anosmic. Knockouts also showed no painful behaviors resulting from peripheral injection of nonselective sodium channel activators, did not develop complete Freund's adjuvant-induced thermal hyperalgesia, and were insensitive to intra-dermal histamine injection. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current recorded from cell bodies of isolated sensory neurons and the mechanically-evoked spiking of C-fibers in a skin-nerve preparation each were reduced but not eliminated in tissue from knockouts compared to littermates. Results support a role for Nav1.7 that is conserved between rodents and humans and suggest several possibly translatable biomarkers for the study of Nav1.7-targeted therapeutics. Results further suggest that Nav1.7 may retain its key role in persistent as well as acute forms of pain.

  1. Neurotrophins expression is decreased in lungs of human infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hanlon LD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lynn D O'Hanlon, Sherry M Mabry, Ikechukwu I EkekezieChildren's Mercy Hospitals/University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Kansas City, MO, USAObjectives: To evaluate neurotrophin (NT (nerve growth factor [NGF], NT-3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] expression in autopsy lung tissues of human congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH infants versus that of infants that expired with: 1 "normal" lungs (controls; 2 chronic lung disease (CLD; and 3 pulmonary hypertension (PPHN.Hypothesis: NT expression will be significantly altered in CDH lung tissue compared with normal lung tissue and other neonatal lung diseases.Study design: Immunohistochemical studies for NT proteins NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 were applied to human autopsy neonatal lung tissue samples.Subject selection: The samples included a control group of 18 samples ranging from 23-week gestational age to term, a CDH group of 15 samples, a PPHN group of six samples, and a CLD group of 12 samples.Methodology: The tissue samples were studied, and four representative slide fields of alveoli/saccules and four of bronchioles were recorded from each sample. These slide fields were then graded (from 0 to 3 by three blinded observers for intensity of staining.Results: BDNF, NGF, and NT-3 immunostaining intensity scores were significantly decreased in the CDH lung tissue (n=15 compared with normal neonatal lung tissue (n=18 (P<0.001. The other neonatal pulmonary diseases that were studied, CLD and PPHN, were much less likely to be affected and were much more variable in their neurotrophin expression.Conclusion: NT expression is decreased in CDH lungs. The decreased expression of NT in CDH lung tissue may suggest they contribute to the abnormality in this condition.Keywords: nerve growth factor, NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF, neurotrophin-3, NT-3, chronic lung disease, persistent pulmonary hypertension, lung

  2. Human APECED; a sick thymus syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petteri eArstila

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE gene cause a rare inherited form of autoimmune disease, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, also known as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1. The patients suffer from multiple endocrine deficiencies, the most common manifestations being hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, hypogonadism and secondary amenorrhea, usually accompanied by typical autoantibodies against the target tissues. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is also a prominent part of the disease. The highest expression of AIRE is found in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs. Murine studies suggest that it promotes ectopic transcription of self antigens in mTECs and is thus important for negative selection. However, failed negative selection alone is not enough to explain key findings in human patients, necessitating the search for alternative or additional pathogenetic mechanisms. A striking feature of the human AIRE-deficient phenotype is that all patients develop high titres of neutralizing autoantibodies against type I interferons, which have been shown to downregulate the expression of interferon-controlled genes. These autoantibodies often precede clinical symptoms and other autoantibodies, suggesting that they are a reflection of the pathogenetic process. Other cytokines are targeted as well, notably those produced by Th17 cells; these autoantibodies have been linked to the defect in anti-candidal defenses. A defect in regulatory T cells has also been reported in several studies and seems to affect already the recent thymic emigrant population. Taken together, these findings in human patients point to a widespread disruption of T cell development and regulation, which is likely to have its origins in an abnormal thymic milieu. The absence of functional AIRE in peripheral lymphoid tissues may also contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  3. Congenital and acquired neutropenia consensus guidelines on diagnosis from the Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group of the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioredda, Francesca; Calvillo, Michaela; Bonanomi, Sonia; Coliva, Tiziana; Tucci, Fabio; Farruggia, Piero; Pillon, Marta; Martire, Baldassarre; Ghilardi, Roberta; Ramenghi, Ugo; Renga, Daniela; Menna, Giuseppe; Barone, Angelica; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo

    2011-07-15

    Congenital and acquired neutropenia are rare disorders whose frequency in pediatric age may be underestimated due to remarkable differences in definition or misdiagnosed because of the lack of common practice guidelines. Neutropenia Committee of the Marrow Failure Syndrome Group (MFSG) of the AIEOP (Associazione Italiana Emato-Oncologia Pediatrica) elaborated this document following design and methodology formerly approved by the AIEOP board. The panel of experts reviewed the literature on the topic and participated in a conference producing a document which includes a classification of neutropenia and a comprehensive guideline on diagnosis of neutropenia. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Lethal Congenital Contractural Syndrome Type 2 (LCCS2) Is Caused by a Mutation in ERBB3 (Her3), a Modulator of the Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase/Akt Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Narkis, Ginat ; Ofir, Rivka ; Manor, Esther ; Landau, Daniella ; Elbedour, Khalil ; Birk, Ohad S. 

    2007-01-01

    Lethal congenital contractural syndrome type 2 (LCCS2) is an autosomal recessive neurogenic form of arthrogryposis that is associated with atrophy of the anterior horn of the spinal cord. We previously mapped LCCS2 to 6.4 Mb on chromosome 12q13 and have now narrowed the locus to 4.6 Mb. We show that the disease is caused by aberrant splicing of ERBB3, which leads to a predicted truncated protein. ERBB3 (Her3), an activator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway—regulating cell survi...

  5. ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang (Harvard-Med); (Ottawa Hosp.); (MSKCC); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston); (Tsinghua); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

    2011-07-19

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  6. ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

    2011-12-31

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  7. Non syndromic childhood onset congenital sideroblastic anemia: A report of 13 patients identified with an ALAS2 or SLC25A38 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rouzic, Marie-Amelyne; Fouquet, Cyrielle; Leblanc, Thierry; Touati, Mohamed; Fouyssac, Fanny; Vermylen, Christiane; Jäkel, Nadja; Guichard, Jean-François; Maloum, Karim; Toutain, Fabienne; Lutz, Patrick; Perel, Yves; Manceau, Hana; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-01

    The most frequent germline mutations responsible for non syndromic congenital sideroblastic anemia are identified in ALAS2 and SLC25A38 genes. Iron overload is a key issue and optimal chelation therapy should be used to limit its adverse effects on the development of children. Our multicentre retrospective descriptive study compared the strategies for diagnosis and management of congenital sideroblastic anemia during the follow-up of six patients with an ALAS2 mutation and seven patients with an SLC25A38 mutation. We described in depth the clinical, biological and radiological phenotype of these patients at diagnosis and during follow-up and highlighted our results with a review of available evidence and data on the management strategies for congenital sideroblastic anemia. This report confirms the considerable variability in manifestations among patients with ALAS2 or SLC25A38 mutations and draws attention to differences in the assessment and the monitoring of iron overload and its complications. The use of an international registry would certainly help defining recommendations for the management of these rare disorders to improve patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional analysis of human cytochrome P450 21A2 variants involved in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chunxue; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Zhang, Wei; Lei, Li; Yoshimoto, Francis K.; Waterman, Michael R.; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F. Peter (Vanderbilt-MED)

    2017-05-24

    Cytochrome P450 (P450, CYP) 21A2 is the major steroid 21-hydroxylase, converting progesterone to 11-deoxycorticosterone and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17α-OH-progesterone) to 11-deoxycortisol. More than 100 CYP21A2 variants give rise to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We previously reported a structure of WT human P450 21A2 with bound progesterone and now present a structure bound to the other substrate (17α-OH-progesterone). We found that the 17α-OH-progesterone- and progesterone-bound complex structures are highly similar, with only some minor differences in surface loop regions. Twelve P450 21A2 variants associated with either salt-wasting or nonclassical forms of CAH were expressed, purified, and analyzed. The catalytic activities of these 12 variants ranged from 0.00009% to 30% of WT P450 21A2 and the extent of heme incorporation from 10% to 95% of the WT. Substrate dissociation constants (Ks) for four variants were 37–13,000-fold higher than for WT P450 21A2. Cytochrome b5, which augments several P450 activities, inhibited P450 21A2 activity. Similar to the WT enzyme, high noncompetitive intermolecular kinetic deuterium isotope effects (≥ 5.5) were observed for all six P450 21A2 variants examined for 21-hydroxylation of 21-d3-progesterone, indicating that C–H bond breaking is a rate-limiting step over a 104-fold range of catalytic efficiency. Using UV-visible and CD spectroscopy, we found that P450 21A2 thermal stability assessed in bacterial cells and with purified enzymes differed among salt-wasting- and nonclassical-associated variants, but these differences did not correlate with catalytic activity. Our in-depth investigation of CAH-associated P450 21A2 variants reveals critical insight into the effects of disease-causing mutations on this important enzyme.

  9. Role of connexins in human congenital heart disease: the chicken and egg problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida eSalameh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inborn cardiac diseases are among the most frequent congenital anomalies and are the main cause of death in infants within the first year of age in industrialized countries when not adequately treated. They can be divided into simple and complex cardiac malformations. The former ones, for instance atrial and ventricular septal defects, valvular or subvalvular stenosis or insufficiency account for up to 80% of cardiac abnormalities. The latter ones, for example transposition of the great vessels, Tetralogy of Fallot or Shone's anomaly often do not involve only the heart but also the great vessels and although occurring less frequently these severe cardiac malformations will become symptomatically within the first months of age and have a high risk of mortality if the patients remain untreated. In the last decade there is increasing evidence that cardiac gap junction proteins, the connexins (Cx, might have an impact on cardiac anomalies. In the heart mainly three of them (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 are differentially expressed with regard to temporal organogenesis and to their spatial distribution in the heart. These proteins, forming gap junction channels, are most important for a normal electrical conduction and coordinated synchronous heart muscle contraction and also for the normal embryonic development of the heart. Animal and also some human studies revealed that at least in some cardiac malformations alterations in certain gap junction proteins are present but until today no particular gap junction mutation could be assigned to a specific cardiac anomaly. As gap junctions transmit growth and differentiation signals from cell to cell it is reasonable to assume that they are somehow involved in misdirected growth present in many inborn heart diseases playing a primary or contributory role. This review addresses potential role of gap junctions in the development of inborn heart anomalies like the conotruncal heart defects.

  10. Role of connexins in human congenital heart disease: the chicken and egg problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Aida; Blanke, Katja; Daehnert, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Inborn cardiac diseases are among the most frequent congenital anomalies and are the main cause of death in infants within the first year of age in industrialized countries when not adequately treated. They can be divided into simple and complex cardiac malformations. The former ones, for instance atrial and ventricular septal defects, valvular or subvalvular stenosis or insufficiency account for up to 80% of cardiac abnormalities. The latter ones, for example transposition of the great vessels, Tetralogy of Fallot or Shone's anomaly often do not involve only the heart, but also the great vessels and although occurring less frequently, these severe cardiac malformations will become symptomatic within the first months of age and have a high risk of mortality if the patients remain untreated. In the last decade, there is increasing evidence that cardiac gap junction proteins, the connexins (Cx), might have an impact on cardiac anomalies. In the heart, mainly three of them (Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45) are differentially expressed with regard to temporal organogenesis and to their spatial distribution in the heart. These proteins, forming gap junction channels, are most important for a normal electrical conduction and coordinated synchronous heart muscle contraction and also for the normal embryonic development of the heart. Animal and also some human studies revealed that at least in some cardiac malformations alterations in certain gap junction proteins are present but until today no particular gap junction mutation could be assigned to a specific cardiac anomaly. As gap junctions have often been supposed to transmit growth and differentiation signals from cell to cell it is reasonable to assume that they are somehow involved in misdirected growth present in many inborn heart diseases playing a primary or contributory role. This review addresses the potentional role of gap junctions in the development of inborn heart anomalies like the conotruncal heart defects.

  11. Human retinal gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis shows advancing retinal degeneration despite enduring visual improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Beltran, William A; Sumaroka, Alexander; Swider, Malgorzata; Iwabe, Simone; Roman, Alejandro J; Olivares, Melani B; Schwartz, Sharon B; Komáromy, András M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2013-02-05

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) associated with retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein 65 kDa (RPE65) mutations is a severe hereditary blindness resulting from both dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors. Clinical trials with gene augmentation therapy have shown partial reversal of the dysfunction, but the effects on the degeneration are not known. We evaluated the consequences of gene therapy on retinal degeneration in patients with RPE65-LCA and its canine model. In untreated RPE65-LCA patients, there was dysfunction and degeneration of photoreceptors, even at the earliest ages. Examined serially over years, the outer photoreceptor nuclear layer showed progressive thinning. Treated RPE65-LCA showed substantial visual improvement in the short term and no detectable decline from this new level over the long term. However, retinal degeneration continued to progress unabated. In RPE65-mutant dogs, the first one-quarter of their lifespan showed only dysfunction, and there was normal outer photoreceptor nuclear layer thickness retina-wide. Dogs treated during the earlier dysfunction-only stage showed improved visual function and dramatic protection of treated photoreceptors from degeneration when measured 5-11 y later. Dogs treated later during the combined dysfunction and degeneration stage also showed visual function improvement, but photoreceptor loss continued unabated, the same as in human RPE65-LCA. The results suggest that, in RPE65 disease treatment, protection from visual function deterioration cannot be assumed to imply protection from degeneration. The effects of gene augmentation therapy are complex and suggest a need for a combinatorial strategy in RPE65-LCA to not only improve function in the short term but also slow retinal degeneration in the long term.

  12. Wolfram gene (WFS1) mutation causes autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Vanita; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl; Emmett, Warren; Waseem, Naushin; Raby, Jacob; Prescott, DeQuincy; Moore, Anthony T; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2013-12-01

    Congenital cataracts are an important cause of bilateral visual impairment in infants. Through genome-wide linkage analysis in a four-generation family of Irish descent, the disease-associated gene causing autosomal-dominant congenital nuclear cataract was mapped to chromosome 4p16.1. The maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score was 2.62 at a recombination fraction θ=0, obtained for marker D4S432 physically close to the Wolfram gene (WFS1). By sequencing the coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of WFS1, we identified a DNA substitution (c.1385A-to-G) in exon 8, causing a missense mutation at codon 462 (E462G) of the Wolframin protein. This is the first report of a mutation in this gene causing an isolated nuclear congenital cataract. These findings suggest that the membrane trafficking protein Wolframin may be important for supporting the developing lens.

  13. A Rare Case of Acroangiodermatitis Associated with a Congenital Arteriovenous Malformation (Stewart-Bluefarb Syndrome) in a Young Veteran: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archie, Mark; Khademi, Saieh; Aungst, David; Nouvong, Aksone; Freeman, Shanna; Gelabert, Hugh; Rigberg, David; deVirgilio, Christian; Lewis, Michael; O'Connell, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    Acroangiodermatitis (AD) is a rare angioproliferative disease manifesting with cutaneous lesions clinically similar to Kaposi's sarcoma. AD is a benign hyperplasia of preexisting vasculature and may be associated with acquired or congenital arteriovenous malformations (AVM), or severe chronic venous insufficiency (because of hypostasis, elevated venous pressure, arteriovenous shunting). Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome is the rare syndrome in which AD is associated with a congenital AVM. We present the case of a young veteran with a painful, chronic nonhealing ulcer and ipsilateral popliteal artery occlusion likely because of trauma, who elected transmetatarsal amputation for symptomatic relief. A 24-year-old male veteran presented with a 5-year history of a nonhealing dorsal left foot ulcer, resulting from a training exercise injury. He ultimately developed osteomyelitis requiring antibiotics, frequent debridements, multiple trials of unsuccessful skin substitute grafting, and severe unremitting pain. He noted a remote history of left digital deformities treated surgically as a child, and an AVM, previously endovascularly treated at an outside facility. Arterial duplex revealed somewhat dampened left popliteal, posterior tibial (PT), and dorsalis pedis (DP) artery signals with arterial brachial index of 1.0. CT angiography showed occlusion of the proximal to mid popliteal artery with significant calcifications felt initially to be a result of prior trauma. Pedal pulses were palpable and transcutaneous oxygen measurements revealed adequate oxygenation. Because of unremitting pain, the patient opted for amputation. Pathology revealed vascular proliferation consistent with AD. This case illustrates an unusual diagnosis of acroangiodermatitis, and a rare syndrome when associated with his underlying AVM (Stewart-Bluefarb syndrome). This resulted in a painful, chronic ulcer and was further complicated by trauma-related arterial occlusive disease. AD disease can hinder wound

  14. ALDH1A2 (RALDH2 genetic variation in human congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesquita Sonia MF

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling by the vitamin A-derived morphogen retinoic acid (RA is required at multiple steps of cardiac development. Since conversion of retinaldehyde to RA by retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type II (ALDH1A2, a.k.a RALDH2 is critical for cardiac development, we screened patients with congenital heart disease (CHDs for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus. Methods One-hundred and thirty-three CHD patients were screened for genetic variation at the ALDH1A2 locus through bi-directional sequencing. In addition, six SNPs (rs2704188, rs1441815, rs3784259, rs1530293, rs1899430 at the same locus were studied using a TDT-based association approach in 101 CHD trios. Observed mutations were modeled through molecular mechanics (MM simulations using the AMBER 9 package, Sander and Pmemd programs. Sequence conservation of observed mutations was evaluated through phylogenetic tree construction from ungapped alignments containing ALDH8 s, ALDH1Ls, ALDH1 s and ALDH2 s. Trees were generated by the Neighbor Joining method. Variations potentially affecting splicing mechanisms were cloned and functional assays were designed to test splicing alterations using the pSPL3 splicing assay. Results We describe in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF the mutations Ala151Ser and Ile157Thr that change non-polar to polar residues at exon 4. Exon 4 encodes part of the highly-conserved tetramerization domain, a structural motif required for ALDH oligomerization. Molecular mechanics simulation studies of the two mutations indicate that they hinder tetramerization. We determined that the SNP rs16939660, previously associated with spina bifida and observed in patients with TOF, does not affect splicing. Moreover, association studies performed with classical models and with the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT design using single marker genotype, or haplotype information do not show differences between cases and controls. Conclusion In summary, our screen indicates that

  15. Congenital hyperinsulinism in an infant with paternal uniparental disomy on chromosome 11p15: few clinical features suggestive of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Higashimoto, Ken; Tsuchida, Satoko; Noguchi, Atsuko; Tamura, Hiroaki; Arai, Hirokazu; Ito, Tomoo; Masue, Michiya; Nishibori, Hironori; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2013-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is the most common congenital overgrowth syndrome involving tumor predisposition. BWS is caused by various epigenetic or genetic alterations that disrupt the imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15.5 and the clinical findings of BWS are highly variable. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is reported in about half of all babies with BWS. We identified an infant with diazoxide-unresponsive congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) without any apparent clinical features suggestive of BWS, but diagnosed BWS by molecular testing. The patient developed severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia within a few hours after birth, with macrosomia and mild hydronephrosis. We excluded mutations in the K(ATP) channel genes on chromosome 11p15.1, but found a rare homozygous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of ABCC8. Parental SNP pattern suggested paternal uniparetal disomy in this region. By microsatellite marker analysis on chromosome 11p15, we could diagnose BWS due to the mosaic of paternal uniparental disomy. Our case suggests that some HI of unknown genetic etiology could involve undiagnosed BWS with no apparent clinical features, which might be diagnosed only by molecular testing.

  16. A Missense Mutation in Epsilon-subunit of Acetylcholine Receptor Causing Autosomal Dominant Slow-channel Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome in a Chinese Family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Ze Tan; Yuan Man; Fei Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Background:Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a group orrare disorders that are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and caused by mutations in the genes encoding proteins of the neuromuscular junction.Here,we described a Chinese family that presented with phenotypes of classic slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS).Methods:Clinical characteristics and electrophysiological features of three patients from a Chinese family were examined,and next-generation sequencing followed by direct sequencing was carried out.Results:The patients revealed variability in clinical and electrophysiological features.However,weakness,scoliosis,and repetitive-compound muscle action potential were found in all affected members in the family.A heterozygous C>T missense mutation at nucleotide 865 in acetylcholine receptor epsilon-subunit (CHRNE) gene that causes a leucine-to-phenylalanine substitution at position 289 (L289F) was found.Conclusions:We reported a SCCMS family of Chinese origin.In the family,classical clinical phenotype with phenotypic variability among different members was found.Genetic testing could help diagnose this rare disease.

  17. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkreim, I; Skogland, L B; Trygstad, O

    1976-06-01

    Five cases of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) are reported. Three belong to the one family. CCA has often been mistaken for Marfan's disease and arthrogrypois multiplex. Because CCA has a more favourable prognosis, it is very important to be able to recognize this syndrome.

  18. Papillorenal syndrome-causing missense mutations in PAX2/Pax2 result in hypomorphic alleles in mouse and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna P Alur

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Papillorenal syndrome (PRS, also known as renal-coloboma syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by potentially-blinding congenital optic nerve excavation and congenital kidney abnormalities. Many patients with PRS have mutations in the paired box transcription factor gene, PAX2. Although most mutations in PAX2 are predicted to result in complete loss of one allele's function, three missense mutations have been reported, raising the possibility that more subtle alterations in PAX2 function may be disease-causing. To date, the molecular behaviors of these mutations have not been explored. We describe a novel mouse model of PRS due to a missense mutation in a highly-conserved threonine residue in the paired domain of Pax2 (p.T74A that recapitulates the ocular and kidney findings of patients. This mutation is in the Pax2 paired domain at the same location as two human missense mutations. We show that all three missense mutations disrupt potentially critical hydrogen bonds in atomic models and result in reduced Pax2 transactivation, but do not affect nuclear localization, steady state mRNA levels, or the ability of Pax2 to bind its DNA consensus sequence. Moreover, these mutations show reduced steady-state levels of Pax2 protein in vitro and (for p.T74A in vivo, likely by reducing protein stability. These results suggest that hypomorphic alleles of PAX2/Pax2 can lead to significant disease in humans and mice.

  19. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Brilstra, Eva H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/23639195X; Brown, Chester W; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/183050487; Currall, Benjamin B; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B A; Earl, Dawn L; Ferguson, Heather L; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W; Gropman, Andrea L; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J; Hayden, Mark A; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/117339067; Hoffman, Jodi D; Hopkin, Robert J; Hubshman, Monika W; Innes, A Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Kahler, Stephen G; Koolen, David A; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W; Mendoza, Cinthya J Zepeda; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Aguilar, Raul E Piña; Poddighe, Pino J; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L P; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V; van Bon, Bregje W; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M L; Warburton, Dorothy P; Waterman, Matthew J; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A; Zori, Roberto T; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304076953; Thorland, Erik C; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing re

  20. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L.; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C.; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M.; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F.; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; Brilstra, Eva H.; Brown, Chester W.; Bruggenwirth, Hennie T.; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B.; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Earl, Dawn L.; Ferguson, Heather L.; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R.; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T.; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H.; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J.; Hayden, Mark A.; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Hubshman, Monika W.; Innes, A. Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C.; Kahler, Stephen G.; Koolen, David A.; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M.; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V.; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C.; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J.; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J.; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W.; Mendoza, Cinthya J. Zepeda; Menten, Bjorn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R.; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E.; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W.; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P.; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Pina Aguilar, Raul E.; Poddighe, Pino J.; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L. P.; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R.; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V.; van Bon, Bregje W.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M.; van Roosmalen, Markus J.; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M. L.; Warburton, Dorothy P.; Waterman, Matthew J.; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A.; Zori, Roberto T.; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G.; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Thorland, Erik C.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing re

  1. Basic multisensory functions can be acquired after congenital visual pattern deprivation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putzar, L.; Gondan, Matthias; Röder, B.

    2012-01-01

    People treated for bilateral congenital cataracts offer a model to study the influence of visual deprivation in early infancy on visual and multisensory development. We investigated cross-modal integration capabilities in cataract patients using a simple detection task that provided redundant...

  2. The genomic landscape of balanced cytogenetic abnormalities associated with human congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redin, Claire; Brand, Harrison; Collins, Ryan L; Kammin, Tammy; Mitchell, Elyse; Hodge, Jennelle C; Hanscom, Carrie; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Seabra, Catarina M; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Aberg, Erika; Adley, Rhett; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; An, Yu; Anderson, Mary-Anne; Antolik, Caroline; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Atkin, Joan F; Bartell, Tina; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Beyer, Elizabeth; Blumenthal, Ian; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Brilstra, Eva H; Brown, Chester W; Brüggenwirth, Hennie T; Callewaert, Bert; Chiang, Colby; Corning, Ken; Cox, Helen; Cuppen, Edwin; Currall, Benjamin B; Cushing, Tom; David, Dezso; Deardorff, Matthew A; Dheedene, Annelies; D'Hooghe, Marc; de Vries, Bert B A; Earl, Dawn L; Ferguson, Heather L; Fisher, Heather; FitzPatrick, David R; Gerrol, Pamela; Giachino, Daniela; Glessner, Joseph T; Gliem, Troy; Grady, Margo; Graham, Brett H; Griffis, Cristin; Gripp, Karen W; Gropman, Andrea L; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Harris, David J; Hayden, Mark A; Hill, Rosamund; Hochstenbach, Ron; Hoffman, Jodi D; Hopkin, Robert J; Hubshman, Monika W; Innes, A Micheil; Irons, Mira; Irving, Melita; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Janssens, Sandra; Jewett, Tamison; Johnson, John P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Kahler, Stephen G; Koolen, David A; Korzelius, Jerome; Kroisel, Peter M; Lacassie, Yves; Lawless, William; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Leppig, Kathleen; Levin, Alex V; Li, Haibo; Li, Hong; Liao, Eric C; Lim, Cynthia; Lose, Edward J; Lucente, Diane; Macera, Michael J; Manavalan, Poornima; Mandrile, Giorgia; Marcelis, Carlo L; Margolin, Lauren; Mason, Tamara; Masser-Frye, Diane; McClellan, Michael W; Mendoza, Cinthya J Zepeda; Menten, Björn; Middelkamp, Sjors; Mikami, Liya R; Moe, Emily; Mohammed, Shehla; Mononen, Tarja; Mortenson, Megan E; Moya, Graciela; Nieuwint, Aggie W; Ordulu, Zehra; Parkash, Sandhya; Pauker, Susan P; Pereira, Shahrin; Perrin, Danielle; Phelan, Katy; Aguilar, Raul E Piña; Poddighe, Pino J; Pregno, Giulia; Raskin, Salmo; Reis, Linda; Rhead, William; Rita, Debra; Renkens, Ivo; Roelens, Filip; Ruliera, Jayla; Rump, Patrick; Schilit, Samantha L P; Shaheen, Ranad; Sparkes, Rebecca; Spiegel, Erica; Stevens, Blair; Stone, Matthew R; Tagoe, Julia; Thakuria, Joseph V; van Bon, Bregje W; van de Kamp, Jiddeke; van Der Burgt, Ineke; van Essen, Ton; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Vergult, Sarah; Volker-Touw, Catharina M L; Warburton, Dorothy P; Waterman, Matthew J; Wiley, Susan; Wilson, Anna; Yerena-de Vega, Maria de la Concepcion A; Zori, Roberto T; Levy, Brynn; Brunner, Han G; de Leeuw, Nicole; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Thorland, Erik C; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Talkowski, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical significance of balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs), their characterization has largely been restricted to cytogenetic resolution. We explored the landscape of BCAs at nucleotide resolution in 273 subjects with a spectrum of congenital anomalies. Whole-genome sequencing re

  3. Epífora congênita nos pacientes com síndrome de Down Congenital epiphora in patients with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Carvalho Salvio

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar as causas de epífora congênita em pacientes com síndrome de Down. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os prontuários de 695 pacientes com epífora congênita, atendidos no Ambulatório de Vias Lacrimais da Clínica Oftalmológica da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, de outubro de 1989 a julho de 2005. Todos foram previamente submetidos a exame oftalmológico completo e apresentavam como queixa principal epífora e/ou secreção ocular constante, uni ou bilateral, desde o nascimento. Os pacientes foram divididos em: grupo A, 30 pacientes com síndrome de Down, e grupo B, 665 pacientes controle. A avaliação das vias lacrimais foi realizada com a prova de irrigação sob anestesia geral. RESULTADOS: Os grupos A e B são semelhantes estatisticamente quanto à idade (p=0,07, sexo (p=0,63 e raça (p=0,68. As queixas bilaterais foram mais freqüentes no grupo A (p=0,0008. A obstrução anatômica das vias lacrimais foi encontrada em 32,73% do grupo A e em 85,51% do grupo B (pPURPOSE: To describe the causes of congenital epiphora in patients with Down syndrome. METHODS: Retrospective study of 695 patients with congenital epiphora, of the Lacrimal Sector of the Department of Ophthalmology, São Paulo "Santa Casa", Brazil, between October 1998 and July 2005. This study analyzed: the main symptom of continuous epiphora or mucous discharge, which affected one or both eyes, since birth. Subjects were separated in to two groups: group A, with 30 patients with Down syndrome and group B, with 665 control patients. The lacrimal evaluation was performed by the throw irrigation test after general anesthesia. RESULTS: Both groups were statistically similar regarding age (p=0.07, sex (p=0.63 and race (p=0.68. Bilateral symptoms were more frequent in group A (p=0.0008. Anatomic obstruction of the lacrimal canal was present in 32.73% of group A and in 85.51% of group B (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: The most frequent cause of congenital epiphora

  4. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Pediatric Endocrine Society MedlinePlus (NIH) What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  5. Prophylactic levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Johanna; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2017-08-02

    Low cardiac output syndrome remains a serious complication, and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality in the postoperative course of paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Standard prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for low cardiac output syndrome are based mainly on catecholamines, which are effective drugs, but have considerable side effects. Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, enhances the myocardial function by generating more energy-efficient myocardial contractility than achieved via adrenergic stimulation with catecholamines. Thus potentially, levosimendan is a beneficial alternative to standard medication for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery. To review the efficacy and safety of the postoperative prophylactic use of levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. We identified trials via systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science, as well as clinical trial registries, in June 2016. Reference lists from primary studies and review articles were checked for additional references. We only included randomised controlled trials (RCT) in our analysis that compared prophylactic levosimendan with standard medication or placebo, in infants and children up to 18 years of age, who were undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all but one of the study authors of the included studies. We used the five GRADE considerations (study limitations, consistency of effect, imprecision, indirectness, and publication bias) to assess the quality of evidence from the studies that contributed data to the meta-analyses for the prespecified outcomes. We created a 'Summary of findings' table to

  6. Congenital Neutropenia Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Award Clinical Terms of Award Restriction for China Clinical Terms Guidance Compliance Sample Letter Inclusion Codes ... Division of AIDS Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Division of ...

  7. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by: Charles Silberberg, DO, private practice specializing in nephrology, affiliated with New York Medical College, Division of Nephrology, Valhalla, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. ...

  8. Apert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saikat; Saha, Sandip; Kar, Arnab; Mondal, Souvonik; Basu, Syamantak

    2014-09-01

    Apert syndrome is one of the craniosynostosis syndromes which, due to its association with other skeletal anomalies, is also known as acrocephalosyndactyly. It is a rare congenital anomaly which stands out from other craniosynostosis due to its characteristic skeletal presentations.

  9. MPDU1 mutations underlie a novel human congenital disorder of glycosylation, designated type If

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Barbara; Imbach, Timo; Frank, Christian G.; Grubenmann, Claudia E.; Raymond, Gerald V.; Hurvitz, Haggit; Raas-Rotschild, Annick; Luder, Anthony S.; Berger, Eric G.; Matthijs, Gert; Hennet, Thierry; Aebi, Markus; Jaeken, Jaak

    2003-01-01

    Deficiencies in the pathway of N-glycan biosynthesis lead to severe multisystem diseases, known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). The clinical appearance of CDG is variable, and different types can be distinguished according to the gene that is altered. In this report, we describe the molecular basis of a novel type of the disease in three unrelated patients diagnosed with CDG-I. Serum transferrin was hypoglycosylated and patients’ fibroblasts accumulated incomplete lipid-linked...

  10. Congenital Abdominal Wall Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risby, Kirsten; Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    complications were seen in five (15%) children: four had detachment of the mesh and one patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Mesh related clinical infection was observed in five children. In hospital mortality occurred in four cases (2 gastroschisis and 2 omphalocele) and was not procedure......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical utility of GORE® DUALMESH (GDM) in the staged closure of large congenital abdominal wall defects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of patients with congenital abdominal wall defects managed with GDM was analyzed for outcome regarding complete fascial closure; mesh...

  11. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.Key words: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, collgen VI genes, Bethlemmyopathy, autophagy.

  12. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenital muscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in the Western world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagen VI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may be overlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There has been some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.

  13. Defining the phenotype in an autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndrome with a combined congenital defect of glycosylation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Lefeber, D.J.; Urban, Z.; Meirleir, L. de; Meinecke, P.; Kaesbach, G. Gillessen; Sykut-Cegielska, J.; Adamowicz, M.; Salafsky, I.; Ranells, J.; Lemyre, E.; Reeuwijk, J. van; Brunner, H.G.; Wevers, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa is a genetically heterogeneous condition. Its molecular basis is largely unknown. Recently, a combined disorder of N- and O-linked glycosylation was described in children with congenital cutis laxa in association with severe central nervous system involvement, brain

  14. Human Genetic Disorders of Axon Guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Engle, Elizabeth C

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews symptoms and signs of aberrant axon connectivity in humans, and summarizes major human genetic disorders that result, or have been proposed to result, from defective axon guidance. These include corpus callosum agenesis, L1 syndrome, Joubert syndrome and related disorders, horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, Kallmann syndrome, albinism, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1, Duane retraction syndrome, and pontine tegmental cap dysplasia. Gene...

  15. Ultrastructural study of the neovagina following the utilization of human amniotic membrane for treatment of congenital absence of the vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Bleggi-Torres

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an ultrastructural study of the utilization of human amniotic membrane in the treatment of congenital absence of the vagina in 10 patients. All patients were surgically treated with application of an amniotic membrane graft using the modified McIndoe and Bannister technique. Sixty days after surgery, samples of the vaginal neo-epithelium were collected for transmission electron microscopy analysis. The ultrastructural findings consisted of a lining of mature squamous epithelium indicating the occurrence of metaplasia of the amniotic epithelium into the vaginal epithelium. The cells were arranged in layers as in the normal vaginal epithelium, i.e., superficial, intermediate and deep layers. There were desmosomes and cytoplasmic intermediate cytokeratin filaments, as well as some remnant features of the previous amniotic epithelium. These findings suggest that human amniotic membrane is able to complete metaplasia into squamous cells but the mechanism of this cellular transformation is unknown

  16. Mutations in 3 genes (MKS3, CC2D2A and RPGRIP1L) cause COACH syndrome (Joubert syndrome with congenital hepatic fibrosis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doherty, D.; Parisi, M. A.; Finn, L. S.; Gunay-Aygun, M.; Al-Mateen, M.; Bates, D.; Clericuzio, C.; Demir, H.; Dorschner, M.; van Essen, A. J.; Gahl, W. A.; Gentile, M.; Gorden, N. T.; Hikida, A.; Knutzen, D.; Ozyurek, H.; Phelps, I.; Rosenthal, P.; Verloes, A.; Weigand, H.; Chance, P. F.; Dobyns, W. B.; Glass, I. A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify genetic causes of COACH syndrome Background COACH syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, Oligophrenia (developmental delay/mental retardation), Ataxia, Coloboma, and Hepatic fibrosis. The vermis hypoplasia falls in a spect

  17. Mutations in 3 genes (MKS3, CC2D2A and RPGRIP1L) cause COACH syndrome (Joubert syndrome with congenital hepatic fibrosis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doherty, D.; Parisi, M. A.; Finn, L. S.; Gunay-Aygun, M.; Al-Mateen, M.; Bates, D.; Clericuzio, C.; Demir, H.; Dorschner, M.; van Essen, A. J.; Gahl, W. A.; Gentile, M.; Gorden, N. T.; Hikida, A.; Knutzen, D.; Ozyurek, H.; Phelps, I.; Rosenthal, P.; Verloes, A.; Weigand, H.; Chance, P. F.; Dobyns, W. B.; Glass, I. A.

    Objective To identify genetic causes of COACH syndrome Background COACH syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, Oligophrenia (developmental delay/mental retardation), Ataxia, Coloboma, and Hepatic fibrosis. The vermis hypoplasia falls in a

  18. Syndrome Diagnosis: Human Intuition or Machine Intelligence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Øivind; Friestad, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether artificial intelligence methods can represent objective methods that are essential in syndrome diagnosis. Most syndromes have no external criterion standard of diagnosis. The predictive value of a clinical sign used in diagnosis is dependent on the prior probability of the syndrome diagnosis. Clinicians often misjudge the probabilities involved. Syndromology needs objective methods to ensure diagnostic consistency, and take prior probabilities into account. We applied two basic artificial intelligence methods to a database of machine-generated patients - a ‘vector method’ and a set method. As reference methods we ran an ID3 algorithm, a cluster analysis and a naive Bayes’ calculation on the same patient series. The overall diagnostic error rate for the the vector algorithm was 0.93%, and for the ID3 0.97%. For the clinical signs found by the set method, the predictive values varied between 0.71 and 1.0. The artificial intelligence methods that we used, proved simple, robust and powerful, and represent objective diagnostic methods. PMID:19415142

  19. Syndrome diagnosis: human intuition or machine intelligence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Oivind; Friestad, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether artificial intelligence methods can represent objective methods that are essential in syndrome diagnosis. Most syndromes have no external criterion standard of diagnosis. The predictive value of a clinical sign used in diagnosis is dependent on the prior probability of the syndrome diagnosis. Clinicians often misjudge the probabilities involved. Syndromology needs objective methods to ensure diagnostic consistency, and take prior probabilities into account. We applied two basic artificial intelligence methods to a database of machine-generated patients - a 'vector method' and a set method. As reference methods we ran an ID3 algorithm, a cluster analysis and a naive Bayes' calculation on the same patient series. The overall diagnostic error rate for the the vector algorithm was 0.93%, and for the ID3 0.97%. For the clinical signs found by the set method, the predictive values varied between 0.71 and 1.0. The artificial intelligence methods that we used, proved simple, robust and powerful, and represent objective diagnostic methods.

  20. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Congenital papillomas and papillomatoses associated with the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV: report on 5 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Pedra Dias

    Full Text Available The authors present a study of five cases of vulvar congenital papillomas and papillomatoses in stillborns and neonates dead upon birth. The studied material was collected from five necropsies. The histopathological evaluation showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, papillomatosis, perinuclear haloes, and nuclear abnormalities. In three of the cases, the electron microscopy identified nuclear and cytoplasmatic viral particles ranging from 40 to 60 nm in size, compatible with HPV. The immunohistochemical study of those lesions showed nuclear and cytoplasmatic positivity. The authors concluded that the presence of viral particles suggestive of HPV added to the immunopositivity indicated the possibility of viral infection.

  2. Basic multisensory functions can be acquired after congenital visual pattern deprivation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzar, Lisa; Gondan, Matthias; Röder, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    People treated for bilateral congenital cataracts offer a model to study the influence of visual deprivation in early infancy on visual and multisensory development. We investigated cross-modal integration capabilities in cataract patients using a simple detection task that provided redundant information to two different senses. In both patients and controls, redundancy gains were consistent with coactivation models, indicating an integrated processing of modality-specific information. This finding is in contrast with recent studies showing impaired higher-level multisensory interactions in cataract patients. The present results suggest that basic cross-modal integrative processes for simple short stimuli do not depend on visual and/or crossmodal input since birth.

  3. Chromosome 18q22.2-->qter deletion and a congenital anomaly syndrome with multiple vertebral segmentation defects.

    OpenAIRE

    Dowton, S B; Hing, A V; Sheen-Kaniecki, V; Watson, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    Multiple vertebral segmentation defects occur in a group of conditions variably associated with anomalies of other organ systems. This report describes a female child in whom a deletion of chromosome 18 (18q22.2-->qter) is associated with congenital anomalies including multiple vertebral segmentation defects resembling sporadic spondylocostal dysplasia. The child also has unilateral renal agenesis and unilateral fibular aplasia. The association of severe multiple vertebral segmentation defect...

  4. Human embryonic stem cells as models for aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Narwani, Kavita; Buehler, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Yanuka, Ofra; Clark, Amander; Hill, David; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

    2010-09-01

    Syndromes caused by chromosomal aneuploidies are widely recognized genetic disorders in humans and often lead to spontaneous miscarriage. Preimplantation genetic screening is used to detect chromosomal aneuploidies in early embryos. Our aim was to derive aneuploid human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that may serve as models for human syndromes caused by aneuploidies. We have established 25 hESC lines from blastocysts diagnosed as aneuploid on day 3 of their in vitro development. The hESC lines exhibited morphology and expressed markers typical of hESCs. They demonstrated long-term proliferation capacity and pluripotent differentiation. Karyotype analysis revealed that two-third of the cell lines carry a normal euploid karyotype, while one-third remained aneuploid throughout the derivation, resulting in eight hESC lines carrying either trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), 16, 17, 21 (Down syndrome), X (Triple X syndrome), or monosomy X (Turner syndrome). On the basis of the level of single nucleotide polymorphism heterozygosity in the aneuploid chromosomes, we determined whether the aneuploidy originated from meiotic or mitotic chromosomal nondisjunction. Gene expression profiles of the trisomic cell lines suggested that all three chromosomes are actively transcribed. Our analysis allowed us to determine which tissues are most affected by the presence of a third copy of either chromosome 13, 16, 17 or 21 and highlighted the effects of trisomies on embryonic development. The results presented here suggest that aneuploid embryos can serve as an alternative source for either normal euploid or aneuploid hESC lines, which represent an invaluable tool to study developmental aspects of chromosomal abnormalities in humans.

  5. A case of Fabry's disease with congenital agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Yeol; Jeon, Su-Young; Hong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sung-Eun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hun; Kim, Ki-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by abnormalities in the α-galactosidase A (GLA) gene, which leads to a GLA deficiency and to the intracellular deposition of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) within vascular endothelium and other tissues. It manifests as progressive multiple organ dysfunctions caused by the deposition of Gb3. On the other hand, congenital agammaglobulinemia is usually caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene with X-linked dominence, suppresses B cell maturation, and causes recurrent pyogenic infections. In former reports, the distance between the loci in the Xq22 region of the human X chromosome was found to be about 69 kilobases. A 23-yr-old man diagnosed with congenital agammaglobulinemia at age 5, showed typical clinical and laboratory and histopathological findings of Fabry's disease. The genetic basis of this combination of the two syndromes was studied in this patient. Here, we report a case of Fabry's disease with congenital agammaglobulinemia.

  6. [Congenital galactosaemia: an unusual presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, M O; Laporte-Turpin, E; Alberge, C; Fournie-Gardini, E; Castex, M P; Rolland, M; Brivet, M; Broue, P

    2005-02-01

    Congenital galactosaemia reveals usually in the second and third weeks of life with a severe liver dysfunction. We report on a case of congenital galactosaemia with, on the one hand, an early onset liver failure, without any free interval, and on the other hand, an hemophagocytic syndrome as a severe secondary outbreak with pulmonary haemorrhage. Appropriate diet led to normalisation of liver function. Hemophagocytosis, probably linked to an associated Klebsiella Pneumoniae sepsis, had a favourable outcome after antibiotic and corticosteroid therapy.

  7. [Human growth hormone and Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Marco, Silvia Beatriz; de Arriba Muñoz, Antonio; Ferrer Lozano, Marta; Labarta Aizpún, José Ignacio; Garagorri Otero, Jesús María

    2017-02-01

    The evaluation of clinical and analytical parameters as predictors of the final growth response in Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone. A retrospective study was performed on 25 girls with Turner syndrome (17 treated with growth hormone), followed-up until adult height. Auxological, analytical, genetic and pharmacological parameters were collected. A descriptive and analytical study was conducted to evaluate short (12 months) and long term response to treatment with growth hormone. A favourable treatment response was shown during the first year of treatment in terms of height velocity gain in 66.6% of cases (height-gain velocity >3cm/year). A favourable long-term treatment response was also observed in terms of adult height, which increased by 42.82±21.23cm (1.25±0.76 SDS), with an adult height gain of 9.59±5.39cm (1.68±1.51 SDS). Predictors of good response to growth hormone treatment are: A) initial growth hormone dose, B) time on growth hormone treatment until starting oestrogen therapy, C) increased IGF1 and IGFBP-3 levels in the first year of treatment, and D) height gain velocity in the first year of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. A Case of Epidermal Nervous Syndrome with a Novel Association of Congenital Cystic Dysplastic Kidney with Numerous Nephroblastic Proliferations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    Epidermal nevus syndrome is a broad term encompassing several disease processes. These entities are united by their association with epidermal nevi...and extracutaneous abnormalities. Renal aberrancies associated with this syndrome include nephroblastoma, hamartomas, hypoplasia, and renal agenesis...However, there are no well-described, documented cases of dysplastic kidney with cystic nephroblastic proliferation associated with epidermal nevus

  9. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  10. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure espe...

  11. Brief report: human figure drawings by children with Asperger's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hui Keow; Slaughter, Virginia

    2008-05-01

    Twenty-nine children with Asperger's syndrome and 28 typically developing children, matched on gender, chronological age and nonverbal IQ, were asked to produce a free drawing, then requested to draw a person, a house and a tree. The drawings were scored using standardized procedures for assessing accuracy, detail and complexity. There were no differences between the diagnostic groups on the tree or house drawing scores. The human figure drawing scores of children with Asperger's syndrome were significantly lower than those of the typically developing children, and there was a positive correlation between human figure drawing scores and communication sub-scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales, for the Asperger's group. These results suggest that the selective deficit in generating human figure representations may derive from a relative lack of interest in the social world, and/or limited practice in drawing people.

  12. Association between chemical pattern in breast milk and congenital cryptorchidism: modelling of complex human exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krysiak-Baltyn, Konrad; Toppari, J.; Skakkebaek, N. E.;

    2012-01-01

    in 130 breast milk samples from Danish and Finnish mothers. Half the newborns were healthy controls, whereas the other half was boys with congenital cryptorchidism. The measured chemicals included polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl‐ethers, dioxins (OCDD/PCDFs), phthalates...... for multiple testing, exposure to nine chemicals was significantly different between the cases and controls in the Danish cohort, but not in the Finnish cohort. The multivariate analysis indicated that Danish samples exhibited a stronger correlation between chemical exposure patterns in breast milk...... and cryptorchidism than Finnish samples. Moreover, PCBs were indicated as having a protective effect within the Danish cohort, which was supported by molecular data recovered through systems biology. Our results lend further support to the hypothesis that the mixture of environmental chemicals may contribute...

  13. Congenital blindness affects diencephalic but not mesencephalic structures in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cecchetti, Luca; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Handjaras, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    While there is ample evidence that the structure and function of visual cortical areas are affected by early visual deprivation, little is known of how early blindness modifies subcortical relay and association thalamic nuclei, as well as mesencephalic structures. Therefore, in the present...... multicenter study, we used MRI to measure volume of the superior and inferior colliculi, as well as of the thalamic nuclei relaying sensory and motor information to the neocortex, parcellated according to atlas-based thalamo-cortical connections, in 29 individuals with congenital blindness of peripheral...... origin (17 M, age 35.7 ± 14.3 years) and 29 sighted subjects (17 M, age 31.9 ± 9.0). Blind participants showed an overall volume reduction in the left (p = 0.008) and right (p = 0.007) thalami, as compared to the sighted individuals. Specifically, the lateral geniculate (i.e., primary visual thalamic...

  14. [Autoinflammatory syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, José Melo; Gomes, Sónia Melo; Conde, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes (AIS) are a heterogeneous group of congenital diseases characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of fever and local or generalized inflammation, in the absence of infectious agents, detectable auto-antibodies or antigen-specific autoreactive T-cells. These diseases have been much better understood during the past 15 years, mainly due to the marked advances of the Human Genoma Project and its implications in the identification and characterization of genetic mutations. In this paper we make a revision of the classification of AIS and focus our attention specially on the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), in particular the CINCA syndrome that shares many clinical characteristics with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  15. Chromosome 18q22.2-->qter deletion and a congenital anomaly syndrome with multiple vertebral segmentation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, S B; Hing, A V; Sheen-Kaniecki, V; Watson, M S

    1997-05-01

    Multiple vertebral segmentation defects occur in a group of conditions variably associated with anomalies of other organ systems. This report describes a female child in whom a deletion of chromosome 18 (18q22.2-->qter) is associated with congenital anomalies including multiple vertebral segmentation defects resembling sporadic spondylocostal dysplasia. The child also has unilateral renal agenesis and unilateral fibular aplasia. The association of severe multiple vertebral segmentation defects with 18q- in this patient suggests the possibility that a gene important for somite formation or vertebral differentiation maps to this segment of chromosome 18.

  16. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.

  17. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  18. Metachronous Bilateral Testicular Leydig-Like Tumors Leading to the Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (Adrenogenital Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Vukina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male with a history of left testis Leydig cell tumor (LCT, 3-month status after left radical orchiectomy, presented with a rapidly enlarging (0.6 cm to 3.7 cm right testicular mass. He underwent a right radical orchiectomy, sections interpreted as showing a similar Leydig cell-like oncocytic proliferation, with a differential diagnosis including metachronous bilateral LCT and metachronous bilateral testicular tumors associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (a.k.a. “testicular adrenal rest tumors” (TARTs and “testicular tumors of the adrenogenital syndrome” (TTAGS. Additional workup demonstrated a markedly elevated serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH and elevated adrenal precursor steroid levels. He was diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3BHSD type, and started on treatment. Metachronous bilateral testicular masses in adults should prompt consideration of adult presentation of CAH. Since all untreated CAH patients are expected to have elevated serum ACTH, formal exclusion of CAH prior to surgical resection of a testicular Leydig-like proliferation could be accomplished by screening for elevated serum ACTH.

  19. Human congenital myopathy actin mutants cause myopathy and alter Z-disc structure in Drosophila flight muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevdali, Maria; Kumar, Vikash; Peckham, Michelle; Sparrow, John

    2013-03-01

    Over 190 mutations in the human skeletal muscle α-actin gene, ACTA1 cause congenital actin myopathies. We transgenically expressed six different mutant actins, G15R, I136M, D154N, V163L, V163M and D292V in Drosophila indirect flight muscles and investigated their effects in flies that express one wild type and one mutant actin copy. All the flies were flightless, and the IFMs showed incomplete Z-discs, disorganised actin filaments and 'zebra bodies'. No differences in levels of sarcomeric protein expression were observed, but tropomodulin staining was somewhat disrupted in D164N, V163L, G15R and V163M heterozygotes. A single copy of D292V mutant actin rescued the hypercontractile phenotypes caused by TnI and TnT mutants, suggesting that the D292V mutation interferes with thin filament regulation. Our results show that expression of actin mutations homologous to those in humans in the indirect flight muscles of Drosophila disrupt sarcomere organisation, with somewhat similar phenotypes to those observed in humans. Using Drosophila to study actin mutations may help aid our understanding of congential myopathies caused by actin mutations.

  20. Replacement gene therapy with a human RPGRIP1 sequence slows photoreceptor degeneration in a murine model of Leber congenital amaurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlyk, Basil S; Bulgakov, Oleg V; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xiaoyun; Adamian, Michael; Sun, Xun; Khani, Shahrokh C; Berson, Eliot L; Sandberg, Michael A; Li, Tiansen

    2010-08-01

    RPGR-interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1) is localized in the photoreceptor-connecting cilium, where it anchors the RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) protein, and its function is essential for photoreceptor maintenance. Genetic defect in RPGRIP1 is a known cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe, early-onset form of retinal degeneration. We evaluated the efficacy of replacement gene therapy in a murine model of LCA carrying a targeted disruption of RPGRIP1. The replacement construct, packaged in an adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) vector, used a rhodopsin kinase gene promoter to drive RPGRIP1 expression. Both promoter and transgene were of human origin. After subretinal delivery of the replacement gene in the mutant mice, human RPGRIP1 was expressed specifically in photoreceptors, localized correctly in the connecting cilia, and restored the normal localization of RPGR. Electroretinogram and histological examinations showed better preservation of rod and cone photoreceptor function and improved photoreceptor survival in the treated eyes. This study demonstrates the efficacy of human gene replacement therapy and validates a gene therapy design for future clinical trials in patients afflicted with this condition. Our results also have therapeutic implications for other forms of retinal degenerations attributable to a ciliary defect.

  1. Is preterm birth a human-specific syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Julie Baker; Abbot, Patrick; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-06-14

    Human preterm birth (PTB), a multifactorial syndrome affecting offspring born before 37 completed weeks of gestation, is the leading cause of newborn death worldwide. Remarkably, the degree to which early parturition contributes to mortality in other placental mammals remains unclear. To gain insights on whether PTB is a human-specific syndrome, we examined within- and between-species variation in gestation length across placental mammals and the impact of early parturition on offspring fitness. Within species, gestation length is normally distributed, and all species appear to occasionally give birth before the 'optimal' time. Furthermore, human gestation length, like that of many mammalian species, scales proportionally to body mass, suggesting that this trait, like many others, is constrained by body size. Premature humans suffer from numerous cognitive impairments, but little is known of cognitive impairments in other placental mammals. Human gestation differs in the timing of the 'brain growth spurt', where unlike many mammals, including closely related primates, the trajectory of human brain growth directly overlaps with the parturition time window. Thus, although all mammals experience early parturition, the fitness costs imposed by the cognitive impairments may be unique to our species. Describing PTB broadly in mammals opens avenues for comparative studies on the physiological and genetic regulators of birth timing as well as the development of new mammalian models of the disease.

  2. Genetic Studies of Strabismus, Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders (CCDDs), and Their Associated Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-16

    Congenital Fibrosis of Extraocular Muscles; Duane Retraction Syndrome; Duane Radial Ray Syndrome; Mobius Syndrome; Brown Syndrome; Marcus Gunn Syndrome; Strabismus Congenital; Horizontal Gaze Palsy; Horizontal Gaze Palsy With Progressive Scoliosis; Facial Palsy; Facial Paresis, Hereditary, Congenital; Third Nerve Palsy; Fourth Nerve Palsy; Sixth Nerve Palsy; Synkinesis; Ocular Motility Disorders; Levator-Medial Rectus Synkinesis; Athabaskan Brainstem Dysgenesis; Tongue Paralysis; Ninth Nerve Disorder; Fifth Nerve Palsy; Seventh Nerve Palsy; Eleventh Nerve Disorder; Twelfth Nerve Disorder; Vagus Nerve Paralysis; Moebius Sequence

  3. MPDU1 mutations underlie a novel human congenital disorder of glycosylation, designated type If

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Barbara; Imbach, Timo; Frank, Christian G.; Grubenmann, Claudia E.; Raymond, Gerald V.; Hurvitz, Haggit; Raas-Rotschild, Annick; Luder, Anthony S.; Jaeken, Jaak; Berger, Eric G.; Matthijs, Gert; Hennet, Thierry; Aebi, Markus

    2001-01-01

    Deficiencies in the pathway of N-glycan biosynthesis lead to severe multisystem diseases, known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). The clinical appearance of CDG is variable, and different types can be distinguished according to the gene that is altered. In this report, we describe the molecular basis of a novel type of the disease in three unrelated patients diagnosed with CDG-I. Serum transferrin was hypoglycosylated and patients’ fibroblasts accumulated incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursors for N-linked protein glycosylation. Transfer of incomplete oligosaccharides to protein was detected. Sequence analysis of the Lec35/MPDU1 gene, known to be involved in the use of dolichylphosphomannose and dolichylphosphoglucose, revealed mutations in all three patients. Retroviral-based expression of the normal Lec35 cDNA in primary fibroblasts of patients restored normal lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. We concluded that mutations in the Lec35/MPDU1 gene cause CDG. This novel type was termed CDG-If. PMID:11733564

  4. Human giant congenital melanocytic nevus exhibits potential proteomic alterations leading to melanotumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyoung Kyu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A giant congenital melanocytic nevus (GCMN is a malformation of the pigment cells. It is a distress to the patients for two reasons: one is disfigurement, and the other is the possibility of malignant changes. However, the underlying mechanisms of the development of GCMN and melanotumorigenesis in GCMN are unknown. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify the proteomic alterations and associated functional pathways in GCMN. Results Proteomic differences between GCMN (n = 3 and normal skin samples (n = 3 were analyzed by one-dimensional-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry Relative levels of the selected proteins were validated using western blot analysis. The biological processes associated with the abundance modified proteins were analyzed using bioinformatic tools. Among the 46 abundance modified proteins, expression of 4 proteins was significantly downregulated and expression of 42 proteins was significantly upregulated in GCMN compared to normal skin samples (p  Conclusion These findings suggest that GCMN exhibits potential proteomic alterations, which may play a role in melanotumorigenesis, and the significant alteration of 14-3-3 family proteins could be a key regulator of the biological pathway remodeling in GCMN.

  5. Rare variants in NR2F2 cause congenital heart defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K; Mercer, Catherine L; Gerety, Sebastian S; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Swaminathan, G Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Louw, Jacoba; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M; O'Kelly, Ita M; Salmon, Anthony P; Bu'lock, Frances A; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Fitzpatrick, David F; Wilson, David I; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10(-7)) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters.

  6. Microencephaly in children congenitally infected with human immunodeficiency virus--a gross-anatomical morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, P B; Brudkowska, J; Kraszpulski, M; Sersen, E A; Wrzolek, M A; Anzil, A P; Rao, C; Wisniewski, H M

    1997-02-01

    A quantitative technique involving serial sectioning and semiautomatic morphometric analysis was used to assess the severity of the reduction in size of the major brain structures in cerebral hemispheres of children congenitally infected with HIV-1. Cerebral hemispheres from 12 children (18-48 months of age) who died of AIDS were sectioned into 5-mm-thick serial slabs and photographed. The cross-sectional areas of grossly recognizable brain structures were digitized, and the volumes were calculated according to Cavalieri's principle. The results were compared with those of an identically processed group of control brains from non-AIDS children. Analysis of the brain weight showed that there was a significant reduction in supratentorial and infratentorial weight in the AIDS group. The results of the morphometric study revealed that the loss in brain mass was associated with a statistically significant reduction in the total volume of both hemispheres, the entire cortex, white matter, and basal ganglia. Detailed analysis of individual brain structures also showed a significant reduction in volume of all cortical regions and most of the subcortical gray matter (e.g., caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, claustrum, and thalamus). It appears that in the microencephaly observed as a frequent sequel in pediatric AIDS, the loss of brain tissue is global and includes an almost proportional loss of cortex, subcortical gray matter and white matter.

  7. Bilateral congenital corneal keloids and anterior segment mesenchymal dysgenesis in a case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Srinivas K; Fan, Dorothy S P; Pang, C P; Li, Winnie W Y; Ng, Joan S K; Good, William V; Lam, Dennis S C

    2002-01-01

    To report the unusual association of bilateral corneal keloids and anterior segment mesenchymal dysgenesis in a child with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Case report of a 2-year-old boy. Excision of the epicorneal mass in the right eye was followed by recurrence of the lesion. Multiple penetrating keratoplasties were unsuccessful in reconstructing the anterior segment because of recurrent corneal epithelial breakdown, suggesting limbal stem cell insufficiency. Histopathology and electron microscopy of the excised mass lesion showed features typical of a corneal keloid: thickened keratinized epithelium, absent Bowman's layer, and fibrovascular hyperplasia, with haphazard orientation of the collagen lamellae. Ultrasound biomicroscopy and intraoperative findings suggested a diagnosis of Peter anomaly, but genetic analysis did not show a PAX6 mutation. The findings in our patient add to the spectrum of ocular changes described in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and confirm earlier reports of poor ocular prognosis in corneal keloids and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

  8. Síndrome de QT prolongado congénito y embarazo: reporte de dos casos Congenital long QT syndrome and pregnancy: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián M Aristizábal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de QT prolongado congénito, es una entidad clínica que se caracteriza por la alteración en la repolarización miocárdica dada por una prolongación significativa del intervalo QT con riesgo aumentado de síncope, taquicardia ventricular polimórfica y muerte súbita. Se produce por la alteración en la función de canales iónicos responsables del potencial de acción de las células cardíacas, como consecuencia de múltiples mutaciones, de las cuales las más frecuentes se dan en los canales de sodio y potasio. La relación con el embarazo y principalmente la presencia de eventos en el posparto, está determinada por arritmias ventriculares o episodios de muerte súbita, lo cual debe llevar a una evaluación exhaustiva de QTc prolongado y sus factores desencadenantes o enfermedades concomitantes. Se muestran los casos clínicos de dos pacientes que presentaron muerte súbita en el posparto en las cuales se diagnosticó síndrome de QT largo congénito.Congenital long QT syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by impairment of myocardial repolarization given by significant prolongation of the corrected QT interval with an increased risk of syncope, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and sudden death. This is produced by an alteration in the function of ion channels responsible for the action potential of cardiac cells as a consequence of multiple mutations, the most common of which are in the sodium and potassium channels. The relationship with pregnancy and especially the presence of events in the postpartum period is clearly determined by the presence of ventricular arrhythmias or episodes of sudden death, that should lead to a thorough evaluation of prolonged QTc and its triggers or concomitant diseases. We present the clinical records of two patients who had sudden death during the postpartum and were diagnosed as congenital long QT Syndrome.

  9. [Congenital ectropion of the upper eyelids due to an anomaly of the eyelids in down's syndrome (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennighausen, U; Schmidt-Martens, F W; Reim, M

    1978-05-01

    A 5-months-old female baby with Down's Syndrome developed an intermittent spastic ectropion of the upper eyelids. The reasons for this are thought to be the flaccidity of the connective tissue, which is typical in Down's Syndrome, and a little anomaly of the eyelids, the tarsus was too short horizontally and very weak and the upper eyelids were somewhat larger than normal and elongated. Suturing Bangerter's lid-sheets on the upper eyelids for 15 days resulted in a scarring of the tarsus with the lax connective tissue of the upper eyelids. The ectropion disappeared and did not recur.

  10. Congenital defects of C1 arches and odontoid process in a child with Down′s syndrome: A case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hatzantonis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 2-year-old child with Down′s syndrome who presented to our unit with torticollis. Imaging studies revealed the rare occurrence of anterior and posterior C1 arch defects, absent odontoid process, and atlantoaxial subluxation. We managed her conservatively for 3 years without neurological deficits or worsening of atlantoaxial subluxation. We discuss the rare occurrences of anterior and posterior arch defects of the atlas, the radiological presentations of axis defects in patients, and the occurrence of atlantoaxial instability in patients with Down′s syndrome. Management options with consideration to surgery in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients are also discussed.

  11. Loss of Bloom syndrome protein destabilizes human gene cluster architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Adachi, Noritaka; Hanakahi, Les; Pierce, Andrew J

    2009-09-15

    Bloom syndrome confers strong predisposition to malignancy in multiple tissue types. The Bloom syndrome patient (BLM) protein defective in the disease biochemically functions as a Holliday junction dissolvase and human cells lacking functional BLM show 10-fold elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange. Collectively, these phenomena suggest that dysregulated mitotic recombination drives the genomic instability underpinning the development of cancer in these individuals. Here we use physical analysis of the highly repeated, highly self-similar human ribosomal RNA gene clusters as sentinel biomarkers for dysregulated homologous recombination to demonstrate that loss of BLM protein function causes a striking increase in spontaneous molecular level genomic restructuring. Analysis of single-cell derived sub-clonal populations from wild-type human cell lines shows that gene cluster architecture is ordinarily very faithfully preserved under mitosis, but is so unstable in cell lines derived from BLMs as to make gene cluster architecture in different sub-clonal populations essentially unrecognizable one from another. Human cells defective in a different RecQ helicase, the WRN protein involved in the premature aging Werner syndrome, do not exhibit the gene cluster instability (GCI) phenotype, indicating that the BLM protein specifically, rather than RecQ helicases generally, holds back this recombination-mediated genomic instability. An ataxia-telangiectasia defective cell line also shows elevated rDNA GCI, although not to the extent of BLM defective cells. Genomic restructuring mediated by dysregulated recombination between the abundant low-copy repeats in the human genome may prove to be an important additional mechanism of genomic instability driving the initiation and progression of human cancer.

  12. Congenital Generalized Hypertrichosis Terminalis with Gingival Hyperplasia and a Coarse Face: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazandjieva Jana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital generalized hypertrichosis, in its most common form, is idiopathic. In the absence of underlying endocrine or metabolic disorders, congenital generalized hypertrichosis is rare in humans, affecting as few as one in a billion individuals and may be an isolated condition of the skin, or a component feature of other disorders or syndromes. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis is an extremely rare condition, a distinct subset of disorders with congenital hypertrichosis, presenting with excessive hair as the primary clinical feature. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis is characterized by universal excessive growth of pigmented terminal hair and often accompanied with gingival hyperplasia and/or a coarse face. Gingival hyperplasia may be delayed even until puberty. Its pathogenesis may be caused by one of the following mechanisms: conversion of vellus to terminal hairs and/or prolonged anagenetic stage, and/or increase in the number of hair follicles. Since the Middle Ages, less than 60 individuals with congenital hypertrichosis terminalis have been described, and, according to the most recent estimates, less than 40 cases were documented adequately and definitively in the literature. Recent articles identified congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis as a genomic disorder.

  13. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin.

  14. Congenital Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... evaluate the electrical activity of the muscle, a muscle biopsy, and genetic testing. There are currently seven distinct types of congenital myopathy, with some variation in symptoms, complications, treatment options, and outlook. Nemaline ...

  15. Congenital syphilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital syphilis is caused by the bacteria Treponema pallidum , which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all children infected with syphilis while they ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mental retardation-overgrowth syndrome SDYS SGBS SGBS1 Simpson dysplasia syndrome Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome ... Topic: Congenital Heart Defects Health Topic: Craniofacial Abnormalities Health Topic: ...

  17. Histological features of the pancreas in a patient with congenital hyperinsulinism due to Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lene; Christesen, Henrik Boye Thybo; Brusgaard, Klaus

    Introduction: Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a genetic disorder with typical features such as macroglossia, abdominal wall defects, macrosomia, visceromegaly and embryonal tumors. Hypoglycemia is reported in about half of all newborns with BWS, usually resolving spontaneously within the first...

  18. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  19. Surgical management of aortic root disease in Marfan syndrome and other congenital disorders associated with aortic root aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Treasure (Tom); J.J.M. Takkenberg (Hanneke); J. Pepper (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractElective root replacement in Marfan syndrome has improved life expectancy in affected patients. Three forms of surgery are now available: total root replacement (TRR) with a valved conduit, valve sparing root replacement (VSRR) and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) with a

  20. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria (CEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov Website: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/ References JOURNAL ARTICLES Christiansen AL, Aagaard L, Krag A, Rasmussen ... homeostasis of human uroporphyrinogen III synthase by enzyme engineering at a single hotspot of congenital erythropoietic ... a Doctor Clinical Studies Porphyria featured Television and Other Media AIP ...

  1. Nebennierenkrisen und Hypoglykämien bei Kindern mit klassischem adrenogenitalem Syndrom (AGS // Adrenal crisis and hypoglycemia in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonfig W

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH have a life-long risk for potentially leathal adrenal crisis. Toddlers and infants are also at risk for hypoglycemia. Especially infants with CAH have a higher seizure risk as a consequence of hyponatremia and hypoglycemia. Typical trigger situations for adrenal crisis are infectious diseases, especially gastroenteritis. Patients with CAH and their family members should be educated in terms of compliance with glucocorticoid medication, adequate stress dosing (usually triple to five fold elevated oral hydrocortisone dosage and intramuscular injection of hydrocortisone or prednisone. p bKurzfassung: /bPatienten mit klassischem adrenogenitalem Syndrom (AGS sind lebenslang für potentiell letale Nebennierenkrisen gefährdet. Bei Kleinkindern können außerdem Hypoglykämien auftreten. Als Folge von Elektrolytentgleisungen und Hypoglykämien haben besonders Kleinkinder auch ein erhöhtes Krampfanfallrisiko, wie erstmalig in einer deutschen Langzeitstudie berichtet wurde. Typische Triggersituationen für Nebennierenkrisen sind Infektionserkrankungen, vor allem Gastroenteritiden. Patienten mit AGS und deren Angehörige sollten im Umgang mit der Erkrankung regelmäßig geschult werden. Dies betrifft die Notwendigkeit der regelmäßigen Medikamenteneinnahme, die adäquate Glukokortikoiddosiserhöhung bei Stress (in der Regel dreifache bis fünffache Hydrokortison-Dosiserhöhung sowie die parenterale Verabreichung von Hydrokortison oder Prednison.

  2. Congenital lumbar hernia associated to lumbar costovertebral syndrome. A case report. Hernia lumbar congénita asociada a síndrome lumbocostovertebral. Reporte de un caso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusimy Izaguirre Martínez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Reported the case of a born patient of color of white skin, 6 years old, of pregnancy and normal childbirth that it was valued in the Service of Surgery of the Pediatric Hospital ¨Paquito González Cueto¨ because it presented increase of volume in both lumbar regions, without another associate sintomatology. Congenital bilateral lumbar hernia associated to syndrome lumbocostovertebral, strange affection in the pediatric age.

    Se reporta el caso de una paciente de color de piel blanca, de 6 años de edad, nacida de embarazo y parto normal que fue valorada en el Servicio de Cirugía del Hospital Pediátrico ¨Paquito González Cueto¨ debido a que presentaba aumento de volumen en ambas regiones lumbares, sin otra sintomatología asociada. Se diagnostica hernia lumbar bilateral congénita asociada a síndrome lumbocostovertebral, afección rara en la edad pediátrica.

  3. Immunity to polio, measles and rubella in women of child-bearing age and estimated congenital rubella syndrome incidence, Cambodia, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, B; Chheng, K; Wannemuehler, K; Vynnycky, E; Buth, S; Soeung, S C; Reef, S; Weldon, W; Quick, L; Gregory, C J

    2015-07-01

    Significant gaps in immunity to polio, measles, and rubella may exist in adults in Cambodia and threaten vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) elimination and control goals, despite high childhood vaccination coverage. We conducted a nationwide serological survey during November-December 2012 of 2154 women aged 15-39 years to assess immunity to polio, measles, and rubella and to estimate congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) incidence. Measles and rubella antibodies were detected by IgG ELISA and polio antibodies by microneutralization testing. Age-structured catalytic models were fitted to rubella serological data to predict CRS cases. Overall, 29.8% of women lacked immunity to at least one poliovirus (PV); seroprevalence to PV1, PV2 and PV3 was 85.9%, 93.4% and 83.3%, respectively. Rubella and measles antibody seroprevalence was 73.3% and 95.9%, respectively. In the 15-19 years age group, 48.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 42.4-54.1] were susceptible to either PV1 or PV3, and 40.3% (95% CI 33.0-47.5) to rubella virus. Based on rubella antibody seroprevalence, we estimate that >600 infants are born with CRS in Cambodia annually. Significant numbers of Cambodian women are still susceptible to polio and rubella, especially those aged 15-19 years, emphasizing the need to include adults in VPD surveillance and a potential role for vaccination strategies targeted at adults.

  4. Constellation of congenital abnormalities in an infant: A new syndrome or tissue-specific mosaicism for trisomy 18?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; von Kap-Herr, C.; Wilson, W.G. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville (United States)

    1996-03-01

    A newborn infant born to consanguineous (first cousin) parents was noted to have complex cogenital heart defect and minor anomalies suggestive of trisomy 18. Blood lymphocyte and skin fibroblast karyotypes were normal. He died in the neonatal period of postoperative complications. On interphase fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) using autopsy specimens, a significant number of cells in the liver (17%) were trisomic for chromosome 18, compared to normal control liver tissue. However, interphase FISH analyses of blood lymphocytes, skin fibroblasts, and kidney tissue were normal. It is our opinion that this apparent mosaicism for trisomy 18 in the patient`s liver may be spurious, though it brings into focus the issue of possible tissue/organ-specific mosaicism. The anomalies in this infant do not resemble a previously described malformation syndrome. Parental consanguinity raises the possibility that this represents a new autosomal recessive malformation syndrome. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Treatment of Children with Protein – Losing Enteropathy After Fontan and Other Complex Congenital Heart Disease Procedures in Condition with Limited Human and Technical Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Vuqiterna, Armend; Maloku, Arlinda

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a disorder characterized by abnormal and often profound enteric protein loss. It’s relatively uncommon complication of Fontan and other complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) procedures. Because of the complexity and rarity of this disease process, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of protein-losing enteropathy remain poorly understood, and attempts at treatment seldom yield long-term success. Aim of presentation is to describe single centre experience in diagnosis, evaluation, management and treatment of children with protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan and other CCHD procedures in the current era and in centre with limited human and technical resources, follows with a comprehensive review of protein-losing enteropathy publications, and concludes with suggestions for prevention and treatment. Material and methodology Retrospectively we analyzed patients with CCHD and protein-losing enteropathy in our institution, starting from January 2000 to December 2012. The including criteria were age between two and 17 years, to have a complex congenital heart disease and available complete documentation of cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Results Of all patients we evaluated 18 cases with protein-losing enteropathy, aged 6 to 19 years (mean 14±9); there were three children who had undergone screening procedure for D-transposition, one Tetralogy of Fallot, and remaining 14 patients had undergone Fontan procedures; (anatomic diagnosis are: six with tricuspid atresia, seven with d-transposition, double outlet right ventricle and pulmonary atresia and two with hypoplastic left heart syndrome). The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy was made at median age of 5.6 years, ranging from 13 months to 15 years. Diagnosis was made using alpha 1-antitrypsin as a gold marker in stool. By physical examination in 14 patients edema was found, in three ascites, and six patients had pleural effusion. Laboratory findings

  6. Treatment of children with protein - losing enteropathy after fontan and other complex congenital heart disease procedures in condition with limited human and technical resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Vuqiterna, Armend; Maloku, Arlinda

    2014-02-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a disorder characterized by abnormal and often profound enteric protein loss. It's relatively uncommon complication of Fontan and other complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) procedures. Because of the complexity and rarity of this disease process, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of protein-losing enteropathy remain poorly understood, and attempts at treatment seldom yield long-term success. is to describe single centre experience in diagnosis, evaluation, management and treatment of children with protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan and other CCHD procedures in the current era and in centre with limited human and technical resources, follows with a comprehensive review of protein-losing enteropathy publications, and concludes with suggestions for prevention and treatment. Retrospectively we analyzed patients with CCHD and protein-losing enteropathy in our institution, starting from January 2000 to December 2012. The including criteria were age between two and 17 years, to have a complex congenital heart disease and available complete documentation of cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Of all patients we evaluated 18 cases with protein-losing enteropathy, aged 6 to 19 years (mean 14±9); there were three children who had undergone screening procedure for D-transposition, one Tetralogy of Fallot, and remaining 14 patients had undergone Fontan procedures; (anatomic diagnosis are: six with tricuspid atresia, seven with d-transposition, double outlet right ventricle and pulmonary atresia and two with hypoplastic left heart syndrome). The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy was made at median age of 5.6 years, ranging from 13 months to 15 years. Diagnosis was made using alpha 1-antitrypsin as a gold marker in stool. By physical examination in 14 patients edema was found, in three ascites, and six patients had pleural effusion. Laboratory findings at the time of diagnosis are: abnormal enteric protein loss was

  7. Computed tomography of common congenital lesions of the temporal bone

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    Yuen, H.Y. E-mail: drhyyuen@doctors.org.uk; Ahuja, A.T.; Wong, K.T.; Yue, V.; Hasselt, A.C. van

    2003-09-01

    This pictorial review describes the application of high-resolution computed tomography to the investigation and pre-operative work-up of the common lesions of congenital hearing loss, including congenital aural dysplasia, various congenital ossicular anomalies, inner ear dysmorphology, large vestibular aqueduct syndrome, and congenital absence of cochlear nerve and labyrinthitis ossificans from previous infection. The aim is to help radiologists to provide a more accurate diagnosis of underlying aetiology and assist in surgical planning.

  8. An Emerging Pulmonary Haemorrhagic Syndrome in Dogs: Similar to the Human Leptospiral Pulmonary Haemorrhagic Syndrome?

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    R. Klopfleisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe pulmonary haemorrhage is a rare necropsy finding in dogs but the leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhagic syndrome (LPHS is a well recognized disease in humans. Here we report a pulmonary haemorrhagic syndrome in dogs that closely resembles the human disease. All 15 dogs had massive, pulmonary haemorrhage affecting all lung lobes while haemorrhage in other organs was minimal. Histologically, pulmonary lesions were characterized by acute, alveolar haemorrhage without identifiable vascular lesions. Seven dogs had mild alveolar wall necrosis with hyaline membranes and minimal intraalveolar fibrin. In addition, eight dogs had acute renal tubular necrosis. Six dogs had a clinical diagnosis of leptospirosis based on renal and hepatic failure, positive microscopic agglutination test (MAT and/or positive blood/urine Leptospira-specific PCR. Leptospira could not be cultured post mortem from the lungs or kidneys. However, Leptospira-specific PCR was positive in lung, liver or kidneys of three dogs. In summary, a novel pulmonary haemorrhagic syndrome was identified in dogs but the mechanism of the massive pulmonary erythrocyte extravasation remains elusive. The lack of a consistent post mortem identification of Leptospira spp. in dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage raise questions as to whether additional factors besides Leptospira may cause this as yet unrecognized entity in dogs.

  9. Congenital lipodystrophies and dyslipidemias.

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    Prieur, Xavier; Le May, Cedric; Magré, Jocelyne; Cariou, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    Lipodystrophies are rare acquired and genetic disorders characterized by the selective loss of adipose tissue. One key metabolic feature of patients with congenital inherited lipodystrophy is hypertriglyceridemia. The precise mechanisms by which the lack of adipose tissue causes dyslipidemia remain largely unknown. In recent years, new insights have arisen from data obtained in vitro in adipocytes, yeast, drosophila, and very recently in several genetically modified mouse models of generalized lipodystrophy. A common metabolic pathway involving accelerated lipolysis and defective energy storage seems to contribute to the dyslipidemia associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy syndromes, although the pathophysiological changes may vary with the nature of the mutation involved. Therapeutic management of dyslipidemia in patients with lipodystrophy is primarily based on specific approaches using recombinant leptin therapy. Preclinical studies suggest a potential efficacy of thiazolidinediones that remains to be assessed in dedicated clinical trials.

  10. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

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    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  11. [Orthopedic aspects of congenital insensitivity to pain].

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    Bronfen, C; Bensahel, H; Teule, J G

    1985-01-01

    The congenital insensitivity to pain regroups some rare diseases which are mainly 5: congenital insensitivity to pain; congenital sensitive neuropathies; distal sensitive neuropathies; Riley-Day syndrome or hereditary dysautonomia; at last, miscellaneous troubles. Three different cases are reported in children: true congenital insensitivity to pain; hereditary dysautonomia or Riley-Day syndrome; congenital insensitivity to pain localised to a lower limb joined to amniotic disease and abnormality of this limb. The orthopedic symptoms (osteomyelitis, arthropathies as Charcot type, dislocations, fractures) lead often to diagnosis and they are an important step of the prognosis. Scoliosis seems to be frequent in this disease. The orthopedic and surgical treatment, according to each localization, is difficult and must emphasize the prevention of bones and joints injuries.

  12. Plasticity of the human visual system after retinal gene therapy in patients with Leber’s congenital amaurosis

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    Ashtari, Manzar; Zhang, Hui; Cook, Philip A.; Cyckowski, Laura L.; Shindler, Kenneth S.; Marshall, Kathleen A.; Aravand, Puya; Vossough, Arastoo; Gee, James C.; Maguire, Albert M.; Baker, Chris I.; Bennett, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying plasticity in the visual cortex in response to visual impairment, vision restoration, and environmental interactions comes from animal studies. We evaluated human brain plasticity in a group of patients with Leber’s congenital amaurosis (LCA), who regained vision through gene therapy. Using non-invasive multimodal neuroimaging methods, we demonstrated that reversing blindness with gene therapy promoted long-term structural plasticity in the visual pathways emanating from the treated retina of LCA patients. The data revealed improvements and normalization along the visual fibers corresponding to the site of retinal injection of the gene therapy vector carrying the therapeutic gene in the treated eye compared to the visual pathway for the untreated eye of LCA patients. After gene therapy, the primary visual pathways (for example, geniculostriate fibers) in the treated retina were similar to those of sighted control subjects, whereas the primary visual pathways of the untreated retina continued to deteriorate. Our results suggest that visual experience, enhanced by gene therapy, may be responsible for the reorganization and maturation of synaptic connectivity in the visual pathways of the treated eye in LCA patients. The interactions between the eye and the brain enabled improved and sustained long-term visual function in patients with LCA after gene therapy. PMID:26180100

  13. Amniotic fluid deficiency and congenital abnormalities both influence fluctuating asymmetry in developing limbs of human deceased fetuses.

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    Clara Mariquita Antoinette ten Broek

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA, as an indirect measure of developmental instability (DI, has been intensively studied for associations with stress and fitness. Patterns, however, appear heterogeneous and the underlying causes remain largely unknown. One aspect that has received relatively little attention in the literature is the consequence of direct mechanical effects on asymmetries. The crucial prerequisite for FA to reflect DI is that environmental conditions on both sides should be identical. This condition may be violated during early human development if amniotic fluid volume is deficient, as the resulting mechanical pressures may increase asymmetries. Indeed, we showed that limb bones of deceased human fetuses exhibited increased asymmetry, when there was not sufficient amniotic fluid (and, thus, space in the uterine cavity. As amniotic fluid deficiency is known to cause substantial asymmetries and abnormal limb development, these subtle asymmetries are probably at least in part caused by the mechanical pressures. On the other hand, deficiencies in amniotic fluid volume are known to be associated with other congenital abnormalities that may disturb DI. More specifically, urogenital abnormalities can directly affect/reduce amniotic fluid volume. We disentangled the direct mechanical effects on FA from the indirect effects of urogenital abnormalities, the latter presumably representing DI. We discovered that both factors contributed significantly to the increase in FA. However, the direct mechanical effect of uterine pressure, albeit statistically significant, appeared less important than the effects of urogenital abnormalities, with an effect size only two-third as large. We, thus, conclude that correcting for the relevant direct factors allowed for a representative test of the association between DI and stress, and confirmed that fetuses form a suitable model system to increase our understanding in patterns of FA and symmetry development.

  14. Pathological changes in acute experimental toxoplasmosis with Toxoplasma gondii strains obtained from human cases of congenital disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Breno Veloso; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes Meirelles; Cunha, Mariana Maciel; Tavares, Alice Thomaz; Carneiro, Ana Carolina Aguiar Vasconcelos; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Vitor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of studies using Toxoplasma gondii strains isolated from human patients. Here, we present a pathological study of three strains obtained from human cases of congenital toxoplasmosis in Brazil using inbred mice after oral infection with 10 tissue cysts. Multiplex-nested PCR-RFLP of eleven loci revealed atypical genotypes commonly found in Brazil: toxodb #8 for TgCTBr5 and TgCTBr16 strains and toxodb #11 for the TgCTBr9 strain. BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were evaluated for survival and histological changes during the acute phase of the disease. All mice inoculated with the non-virulent TgCTBR5 strain survived after 30 days, although irreversible tissue damage was found. In contrast, no mice were resistant to infection with the highly virulent TgCTBR9 strain. The TgCTBr16 strain resulted in 80% survival in mice. However, this strain presented low infectivity, especially by the oral route of infection. Despite being identified with the same genotype, TgCTBr5 and TgCTBr16 strains showed biological differences. Histopathologic analysis revealed liver and lungs to be the most affected organs, and the pattern of tissue injury was similar to that found in mice inoculated perorally with strains belonging to clonal genotypes. However, there was a variation in the intensity of ileum lesions according to T. gondii strain and mouse lineage. C57BL/6 mice showed higher susceptibility than BALB/c for histological lesions. Taken together, these results revealed that the pathogenesis of T. gondii strains belonging to atypical genotypes can induce similar tissue damage to those from clonal genotypes, although intrinsic aspects of the strains seem critical to the induction of ileitis in the infected host.

  15. A novel mutation of p.F32I in GJA8 in human dominant congenital cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Feng-Tao; Yang, Fa-Yu; Yang, Ye-Qin; Ge, Xiang-Lian; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Liu; Yu, Xin-Ping; Gu, Feng; Zhu, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify a causative mutation in a three-generation family with autosomal dominant congenital total cataract and dissect the molecular consequence of the identified mutation. METHODS Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on the affected and unaffected family members. Mutation were screened in recruited family members by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the two reported genes (CRYAA and GJA8) which were linked to human total cataracts and direct sequencing of the PCR product. The molecular consequences of the identified mutation was dissected. The plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORF of Gja8, coding for connexin 50 (Cx50), were generated and ectopic expressed in 293 cells. Recombinant protein expression and cellular localization of recombinated Cx50 were assessed by confocal microscopy. RESULTS Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on the affected and unaffected family members. Mutation were screened in recruited family members by PCR of the two reported genes (CRYAA and GJA8) which were linked to human total cataracts and direct sequencing of the PCR product. The molecular consequences of the identified mutation was dissected. The plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORF of Gja8, coding for Cx50, were generated and ectopic expressed in 293 cells. Recombinant protein expression and cellular localization of recombinated Cx50 were assessed by confocal microscopy. CONCLUSION This study has identified a novel cataract mutation in GJA8, which adds a novel mutation to the existing spectrum of Cx50 mutations with cataract. The molecular consequences of p.F32I mutation in GJA8 exclude instability and the mislocalization of mutant Cx50 protein. PMID:27990357

  16. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

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    Tovar Juan A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is

  17. Werner and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndromes: mechanistic basis of human progeroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlow, Brian A; Kennedy, Brian K; Monnat, Raymond J

    2007-05-01

    Progeroid syndromes have been the focus of intense research in part because they might provide a window into the pathology of normal ageing. Werner syndrome and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome are two of the best characterized human progeroid diseases. Mutated genes that are associated with these syndromes have been identified, mouse models of disease have been developed, and molecular studies have implicated decreased cell proliferation and altered DNA-damage responses as common causal mechanisms in the pathogenesis of both diseases.

  18. A syndrome of hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, seizures, delayed and dysharmonic skeletal maturation, and congenital fibre type disproportion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Q H; Markouizos, D; Rao, C; Sheikh, T; Beller, E; Kula, R

    1994-01-01

    Three unrelated Puerto Rican boys, ranging in age from 3 to 4 years, had marked, central, non-progressive hypotonia, chronic constipation, severe psychomotor retardation, seizures or abnormal electroencephalograph or both, abnormal dermatoglyphics, delayed bone age, dysharmonic skeletal maturation, and preponderance and larger size of type 2 muscle fibres. Additional findings included narrow, high arched palate, prominent nasal root, long philtrum, distended abdomen, and drooling from open mouth. Two of the three patients also had undescended testes, hypertelorism, and tapered fingers. Birth weight, postnatal physical growth, and head size were average. Family and gestational histories and laboratory evaluations were normal. The combination of features observed in the three boys appears to be distinct and to represent a new syndrome. Images PMID:8064821

  19. Characterization of Human Vaginal Mucosa Cells for Autologous In Vitro Cultured Vaginal Tissue Transplantation in Patients with MRKH Syndrome

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    Cristina Nodale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH is a rare syndrome characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and vagina. The most common procedure used for surgical reconstruction of the neovagina is the McIndoe vaginoplasty, which consists in creation of a vaginal canal covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Here we characterized the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue proposed as alternative material in our developed modified McIndoe vaginoplasty in order to underlie its importance in autologous total vaginal replacement. To this aim human vaginal mucosa cells (HVMs were isolated from vaginal mucosa of patients affected by MRKH syndrome and characterized with respect to growth kinetics, morphology, PAS staining, and expression of specific epithelial markers by immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR analyses. The presence of specific epithelial markers along with the morphology and the presence of mucified cells demonstrated the epithelial nature of HMVs, important for an efficient epithelialization of the neovagina walls and for creating a functional vaginal cavity. Moreover, these cells presented characteristics of effective proliferation as demonstrated by growth kinetics assay. Therefore, the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue might represent a highly promising and valid material for McIndoe vaginoplasty.

  20. [Congenital epulis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Tavares, H; Santos, H; M-Pinto, I; Ramos, M; de Sousa, P

    2009-01-01

    Congenital epulis or gingival granular cell tumor is an uncommon benign tumor, usually diagnosed at birth as a pediculated maxilar gingival mass. Although some cases of spontaneous regression have been described, most of the lesions are surgically removed with excelent prognosis and cosmetic final result. The authors describe a case report as well as a short revision on this pathology.

  1. Congenital amusias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap."

  2. Identification of a Novel GJA8 (Cx50) Point Mutation Causes Human Dominant Congenital Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zhang, Yilan; Wu, Yaming; Lv, Jineng; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary cataracts are clinically and genetically heterogeneous lens diseases that cause a significant proportion of visual impairment and blindness in children. Human cataracts have been linked with mutations in two genes, GJA3 and GJA8, respectively. To identify the causative mutation in a family with hereditary cataracts, family members were screened for mutations by PCR for both genes. Sequencing the coding regions of GJA8, coding for connexin 50, revealed a C > A transversion at nucleotide 264, which caused p.P88T mutation. To dissect the molecular consequences of this mutation, plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORFs of Gja8 were generated and ectopically expressed in HEK293 cells and human lens epithelial cells, respectively. The recombinant proteins were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blotting. The results demonstrate that the molecular consequences of the p.P88T mutation in GJA8 include changes in connexin 50 protein localization patterns, accumulation of mutant protein, and increased cell growth.

  3. Ocular pathology in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Bitar, F F; Traboulsi, E I; Kassak, K M; Obeid, M Y; Megarbane, A; Salti, H I

    2005-01-01

    To describe the ocular findings in subjects with congenital heart disease (CHD). In a prospective study, the same observer examined 240 consecutive patients with CHD admitted to the medical centre. Two independent geneticists performed identification of syndromes. The commonest anatomic cardiac anomalies were ventricular or atrial septal defects (62), tetralogy of Fallot (39), pulmonary stenosis (25), and transposition of the great arteries (24). The heart lesions were divided physiologically into volume overload (90), cyanotic (87), and obstructive (63). In all, 105 syndromic subjects included the velocardiofacial syndrome (18), Down's syndrome (17), CHARGE association (6), DiGeorge syndrome (5), Williams syndrome (3), Edwards syndrome (3), Noonan syndrome (3), VACTERL association (2), and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) (2). The paediatric team recognized 51 patients as syndromic. Two independent geneticists recognized additional 54 patients as syndromic. Positive eye findings were present in 55% (132) and included retinal vascular tortuosity (46), optic disc hypoplasia (30), trichomegaly (15), congenital ptosis (12), strabismus (11), retinal haemorrhages (8), prominent eyes (7), and congenital cataract (6). There was a strong correlation between the retinal vascular tortuosity and both a low haematocrit (P=0.000) and a low arterial oxygen saturation (P=0.002). Patients with CHD are at a high risk for ocular pathology and need screening for various ocular abnormalities.

  4. Lateral diffusion, function, and expression of the slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome αC418W nicotinic receptor mutation with changes in lipid raft components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola-Cintrón, Jessica; Caballero-Rivera, Daniel; Ballester, Leomar; Baéz-Pagán, Carlos A; Martínez, Hernán L; Vélez-Arroyo, Karla P; Quesada, Orestes; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2015-10-30

    Lipid rafts, specialized membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, are hot spots for a number of important cellular processes. The novel nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) mutation αC418W, the first lipid-exposed mutation identified in a patient that causes slow channel congenital myasthenia syndrome was shown to be cholesterol-sensitive and to accumulate in microdomains rich in the membrane raft marker protein caveolin-1. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the mechanism by which lateral segregation into specialized raft membrane microdomains regulates the activable pool of nAChRs. We performed fluorescent recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), quantitative RT-PCR, and whole cell patch clamp recordings of GFP-encoding Mus musculus nAChRs transfected into HEK 293 cells to assess the role of cholesterol and caveolin-1 (CAV-1) in the diffusion, expression, and functionality of the nAChR (WT and αC418W). Our findings support the hypothesis that a cholesterol-sensitive nAChR might reside in specialized membrane microdomains that upon cholesterol depletion become disrupted and release the cholesterol-sensitive nAChRs to the pool of activable receptors. In addition, our results in HEK 293 cells show an interdependence between CAV-1 and αC418W that could confer end plates rich in αC418W nAChRs to a susceptibility to changes in cholesterol levels that could cause adverse drug reactions to cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins. The current work suggests that the interplay between cholesterol and CAV-1 provides the molecular basis for modulating the function and dynamics of the cholesterol-sensitive αC418W nAChR.

  5. Isolated congenital heart block in undifferentiated connective tissue disease and in primary Sjögren’s syndrome: a clinical study of 81 pregnancies in 41 patients

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    S. Todesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the incidence and the features of congenital heart block (CHB in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. Methods: We studied 81 pregnancies of 41 women attending the Outpatients’ Clinic of the Rheumatology Unit of University Hospital of Padova from July 1989 to March 2004. Twenty five of these (61% were affected with UCTD and 16 (39% with pSS. Serologic inclusion criteria was anti-Ro/La positivity, assessed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA. Results: CHB was found in 2 out of the 46 (4,3% pregnancies followed by our Staff and in 2 out of the 35 (5,7% included in the retrospective part of the study. In 3 cases CHB was a 3rd degree block, causing pregnancy termination in 2. The only 2nd degree block was identified in one patient at the 22nd week of gestation and treated with dexamethasone and plasma-exchange. All of the women were positive to 52 kd and 60 kd Ro autoantibodies. CHB mothers had higher titer antibodies to 52 kd Ro protein than did the mothers with healthy infants (P = 0,026. Electrocardiographic abnormalities at birth were found in 3 out of 29 asymptomatic infants. One presented sinus bradycardia, the second abnormalities of ventricular repolarization, both regressed spontaneously, while the third ventricular extrasystoles which continue even now at 5 months. Conclusion: These results showed that in UCTD and pSS there is a higher incidence of CHB than that reported in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Electrocardiographic screening in all infants born to mothers with anti-Ro/La antibodies would seem an important measure to identify those with irreversible heart conduction abnormalities.

  6. Global N-linked Glycosylation is Not Significantly Impaired in Myoblasts in Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes Caused by Defective Glutamine-Fructose-6-Phosphate Transaminase 1 (GFPT1

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    Qiushi Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1 is the first enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. It transfers an amino group from glutamine to fructose-6-phosphate to yield glucosamine-6-phosphate, thus providing the precursor for uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc synthesis. UDP-GlcNAc is an essential substrate for all mammalian glycosylation biosynthetic pathways and N-glycan branching is especially sensitive to alterations in the concentration of this sugar nucleotide. It has been reported that GFPT1 mutations lead to a distinct sub-class of congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS termed “limb-girdle CMS with tubular aggregates”. CMS are hereditary neuromuscular transmission disorders in which neuromuscular junctions are impaired. To investigate whether alterations in protein glycosylation at the neuromuscular junction might be involved in this impairment, we have employed mass spectrometric strategies to study the N-glycomes of myoblasts and myotubes derived from two healthy controls, three GFPT1 patients, and four patients with other muscular diseases, namely CMS caused by mutations in DOK7, myopathy caused by mutations in MTND5, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A, and Pompe disease. A comparison of the relative abundances of bi-, tri-, and tetra-antennary N-glycans in each of the cell preparations revealed that all samples exhibited broadly similar levels of branching. Moreover, although some differences were observed in the relative abundances of some of the N-glycan constituents, these variations were modest and were not confined to the GFPT1 samples. Therefore, GFPT1 mutations in CMS patients do not appear to compromise global N-glycosylation in muscle cells.

  7. Using Seroprevalence and Immunisation Coverage Data to Estimate the Global Burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome, 1996-2010: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynnycky, Emilia; Adams, Elisabeth J.; Cutts, Felicity T.; Reef, Susan E.; Navar, Ann Marie; Simons, Emily; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Brown, David W. J.; Jackson, Charlotte; Strebel, Peter M.; Dabbagh, Alya J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden of Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS) is typically underestimated in routine surveillance. Updated estimates are needed following the recent WHO position paper on rubella and recent GAVI initiatives, funding rubella vaccination in eligible countries. Previous estimates considered the year 1996 and only 78 (developing) countries. Methods We reviewed the literature to identify rubella seroprevalence studies conducted before countries introduced rubella-containing vaccination (RCV). These data and the estimated vaccination coverage in the routine schedule and mass campaigns were incorporated in mathematical models to estimate the CRS incidence in 1996 and 2000–2010 for each country, region and globally. Results The estimated CRS decreased in the three regions (Americas, Europe and Eastern Mediterranean) which had introduced widespread RCV by 2010, reaching <2 per 100,000 live births (the Americas and Europe) and 25 (95% CI 4–61) per 100,000 live births (the Eastern Mediterranean). The estimated incidence in 2010 ranged from 90 (95% CI: 46–195) in the Western Pacific, excluding China, to 116 (95% CI: 56–235) and 121 (95% CI: 31–238) per 100,000 live births in Africa and SE Asia respectively. Highest numbers of cases were predicted in Africa (39,000, 95% CI: 18,000–80,000) and SE Asia (49,000, 95% CI: 11,000–97,000). In 2010, 105,000 (95% CI: 54,000–158,000) CRS cases were estimated globally, compared to 119,000 (95% CI: 72,000–169,000) in 1996. Conclusions Whilst falling dramatically in the Americas, Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean after vaccination, the estimated CRS incidence remains high elsewhere. Well-conducted seroprevalence studies can help to improve the reliability of these estimates and monitor the impact of rubella vaccination. PMID:26962867

  8. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4 due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rajab

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4 of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT. PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  9. Adverse cardiac events in children with Williams syndrome undergoing cardiovascular surgery: An analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with Williams syndrome (WS) undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Prevalence and risk factors for such events have not been well described. We sought to define frequency and risk of MACE in patients with WS using a multicenter clinical registry. We identified cardiac operations performed in patients with WS using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2000-2012). Operations were divided into 4 groups: isolated supravalvular aortic stenosis, complex left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), isolated right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), and combined LVOT/RVOT procedures. The proportion of patients with MACE (in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest, or postoperative mechanical circulatory support) was described and the association with preoperative factors was examined. Of 447 index operations (87 centers), median (interquartile range) age and weight at surgery were 2.4 years (0.6-7.4 years) and 10.6 kg (6.5-21.5 kg), respectively. Mortality occurred in 20 patients (5%). MACE occurred in 41 patients (9%), most commonly after combined LVOT/RVOT (18 out of 87; 21%) and complex LVOT (12 out of 131; 9%) procedures, but not after isolated RVOT procedures. Odds of MACE decreased with age (odds ratio [OR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-0.99), weight (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99), but increased in the presence of any preoperative risk factor (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.06-4.00), and in procedures involving coronary artery repair (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 2.05-14.06). In this multicenter analysis, MACE occurred in 9% of patients with WS undergoing cardiac surgery. Demographic and operative characteristics were associated with risk. Further study is needed to elucidate mechanisms of MACE in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Expressing human SHOX in Shox2SHOX KI/KI mice leads to congenital osteoarthritis‑like disease of the temporomandibular joint in postnatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenna; Li, Xihai; Chen, Houhuang; Shao, Xiang; Lin, Xuejuan; Shen, Jianying; Ding, Shanshan; Kang, Jie; Li, Candong

    2016-10-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), a unique synovial joint whose development differs from that of other synovial joints, develops from two distinct mesenchymal condensations that grow toward each other and ossify through different mechanisms. The short stature homeobox 2 (Shox2) gene serves an important role in TMJ development and previous studies have demonstrated that Shox2SHOX KI/KI mice display a TMJ defective phenotype, congenital dysplasia and premature eroding of the articular disc, which is clinically defined as a TMJ disorder. In the present study, Shox2SHOX KI/KI mouse models were used to investigate the mechanisms of congenital osteoarthritis (OA)‑like disease during postnatal TMJ growth. Shox2SHOX KI/KI mice were observed to develop a severe muscle wasting syndrome from day 7 postnatal. Histological examination indicated that the condyle and glenoid fossa of Shox2SHOX KI/KI mice was reduced in size in the second week after birth. The condyles of Shox2SHOX KI/KI mice exhibited reduced expression levels of collagen type II and Indian hedgehog, and increased expression of collagen type I. A marked increase in matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and MMP13 in the condyles was also observed. These cellular and molecular defects may contribute to the observed (OA)‑like phenotype of Shox2SHOX KI/KI mouse TMJs.

  11. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masoud Poureisa

    2009-01-01

    "nDescription and Definition: Synonym: patau syndrome with an incidence of 1 in 5000 births, this syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital abnormalities involving virtually every organ system...

  12. Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Tomokazu; Jeffries, Emiko; Amano, Misa; Ko, Akihiro C; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S H

    2015-10-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, has previously been considered irremediable. Here, we report findings that euploid cells increased among cultured aneuploid cells after exposure to the protein ZSCAN4, encoded by a mammalian-specific gene that is ordinarily expressed in preimplantation embryos and occasionally in stem cells. For footprint-free delivery of ZSCAN4 to cells, we developed ZSCAN4 synthetic mRNAs and Sendai virus vectors that encode human ZSCAN4. Applying the ZSCAN4 biologics to established cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, most of which had become aneuploid and polyploid, dramatically increased the number of euploid cells within a few days. We then tested the biologics on non-immortalized primary human fibroblast cells derived from four individuals with Down syndrome—the most frequent autosomal trisomy of chromosome 21. Within weeks after ZSCAN4 application to the cells in culture, fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific probe detected the emergence of up to 24% of cells with only two rather than three copies. High-resolution G-banded chromosomes further showed up to 40% of cells with a normal karyotype. These findings were confirmed by whole-exome sequencing. Similar results were obtained for cells with the trisomy 18 of Edwards syndrome. Thus a direct, efficient correction of aneuploidy in human fibroblast cells seems possible in vitro using human ZSCAN4.

  13. Accelerated aging syndromes, are they relevant to normal human aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreesen, Oliver; Stewart, Colin L

    2011-09-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria (HGPS) and Werner syndromes are diseases that clinically resemble some aspects of accelerated aging. HGPS is caused by mutations in theLMNA gene resulting in post-translational processing defects that trigger Progeria in children. Werner syndrome, arising from mutations in the WRN helicase gene, causes premature aging in young adults. What are the molecular mechanism(s) underlying these disorders and what aspects of the diseases resemble physiological human aging? Much of what we know stems from the study of patient derived fibroblasts with both mutations resulting in increased DNA damage, primarily at telomeres. However, in vivo patients with Werner's develop arteriosclerosis, among other pathologies. In HGPS patients, including iPS derived cells from HGPS patients, as well as some mouse models for Progeria, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) appears to be among the most severely affected tissues. Defective Lamin processing, associated with DNA damage, is present in VSM from old individuals, indicating processing defects may be a factor in normal aging. Whether persistent DNA damage, particularly at telomeres, is the root cause for these pathologies remains to be established, since not all progeroid Lmna mutations result in DNA damage and genome instability.

  14. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  15. [Congenital hydrocephalus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagón-Valdez, J

    2006-04-10

    Congenital hydrocephalus or ventriculomegaly is a disorder that now can be diagnosed in uterus with ultrasonography, this gives the chance of being able to give a treatment the earliest as possible. The clinical manifestations are reviewed, the diagnosis, the frequent treatment and causes of congenital hydrocephalus, being the first agenesis of the Sylvius' aqueduct, followed by Arnold-Chiari's malformations with mielomeningocele. In most of the cases the peritoneal-ventricle shunt is the best surgery treatment and now, the treatment with ventriculostomy of third ventricle by endoscopy has fewer complications apparently and in several cases it is the definitive treatment. The evolution of the diagnosis with the support of specific therapies is effective and the early treatment is good, of course taking into account the etiology.

  16. [Congenital aniridia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiruţa, Daria; Stan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Aniridia is a rare congenital, hereditary, bilateral disease which is associated with various systemic and ocular defects. We present the case of a 61 year old patient who was admitted in the hospital of ophthalmology Cluj Napoca, for the symptoms caused by the ocular defects associated with aniridia. In this case, aniridia is autosomal dominant transmitted with incomplete penetrance and it is not accompanied by any systemic defects. The disease also affects three of her sons and two nephews of the patient.

  17. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure.

  18. Congenital Thrombocytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆钺

    2011-01-01

    @@ Platelets are essential for normal hemostasis.Platelets adhere to damaged blood vessels, and then aggregate and promote activation of coagulation factors, resulting to ceasing bleeding.Both quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of platelets can cause bleeding problems.Among them, immune thrombocytopenias are the most common conditions.However, congenital thrombocytopenias are often neglected because of their relative rarity and complex laboratory tests.That causes misdiagnosis and unnecessary and potentially harmful treatments for many patients.

  19. Congenital diplopodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jason S.; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Costouros, John G.; Boakes, Jennette; Greenspan, Adam [University of California, Davis, Department of Radiology, 4860 Y. Street, Suite 3100, CA 95817, Davis (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Diplopodia, or duplicated foot, is a rare congenital anomaly. It differs from polydactyly in that supernumerary metatarsal and tarsal bones are present as well as extra digits. Only a few cases of this anomaly have been reported in the literature to date. We present a newborn male without intrauterine teratogen exposure who was born with a duplicate foot of the left lower extremity and imperforate anus. (orig.)

  20. [Congenital ranula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maria Inês; Morais, Sofia; Coutinho, Sílvia; de Castro, Ochoa; Rei, Ana Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of congenital ranula diagnosed by a routine prenatal ultrasonography at 21 weeks of gestation. The fetal kariotype was normal. Follow-up ultrasound scans revealed no changes in the size or the position of the cyst. Fetal growth was normal as was the amniotic fluid volume. Surgical treatment was performed 3 days after a normal vaginal delivery, with excellent results.

  1. Human quadrupeds, primate quadrupedalism, and Uner Tan Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza J Shapiro

    Full Text Available Since 2005, an extensive literature documents individuals from several families afflicted with "Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS," a condition that in its most extreme form is characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia, loss of balance and coordination, impaired cognitive abilities, and habitual quadrupedal gait on hands and feet. Some researchers have interpreted habitual use of quadrupedalism by these individuals from an evolutionary perspective, suggesting that it represents an atavistic expression of our quadrupedal primate ancestry or "devolution." In support of this idea, individuals with "UTS" are said to use diagonal sequence quadrupedalism, a type of quadrupedal gait that distinguishes primates from most other mammals. Although the use of primate-like quadrupedal gait in humans would not be sufficient to support the conclusion of evolutionary "reversal," no quantitative gait analyses were presented to support this claim. Using standard gait analysis of 518 quadrupedal strides from video sequences of individuals with "UTS", we found that these humans almost exclusively used lateral sequence-not diagonal sequence-quadrupedal gaits. The quadrupedal gait of these individuals has therefore been erroneously described as primate-like, further weakening the "devolution" hypothesis. In fact, the quadrupedalism exhibited by individuals with UTS resembles that of healthy adult humans asked to walk quadrupedally in an experimental setting. We conclude that quadrupedalism in healthy adults or those with a physical disability can be explained using biomechanical principles rather than evolutionary assumptions.

  2. Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Type 19 Is Caused by Mutations in COL13A1, Encoding the Atypical Non-fibrillar Collagen Type XIII α1 Chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logan, Clare V; Cossins, Judith; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M; Parry, David A; Maxwell, Susan; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Riepsaame, Joey; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Lake, Alice V R; Moran, Maria; Robb, Stephanie; Chow, Gabriel; Sewry, Caroline; Hopkins, Philip M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Jayawant, Sandeep; Palace, Jacqueline; Johnson, Colin A; Beeson, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) consists of a tripartite synapse with a presynaptic nerve terminal, Schwann cells that ensheathe the terminal bouton, and a highly specialized postsynaptic membrane. Synaptic structural integrity is crucial for efficient signal transmission. Congenital myasthenic syn

  3. Addition of oral iron to plasma transfusion in human congenital hypotransferrinemia: A 10-year observational follow-up with the effects on hematological parameters and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Deniz

    2017-09-12

    Congenital hypotransferrinemia (OMIM 209300) is an extremely rare disorder of inherited iron metabolism. Since its description in 1961, only 16 cases have been reported. The defective gene and molecular defect causing this disorder and clinicolaboratory findings seen in the homozygous and heterozygous states have been documented in both humans and mice. However, due to the lack of follow-up studies of the described cases, the long-term prognosis remains unknown. We present a 10-year observational follow-up of a patient previously diagnosed on a molecular basis who was treated with a unique therapy of plasma transfusion fortified with oral iron, with satisfactory clinicolaboratory responses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Síndrome de deleção 22q11.2 e cardiopatias congênitas 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and congenital heart defects

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Carla Graziadio; Giorgio Adriano Paskulin

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Revisar as características clínicas, etiológicas e diagnósticas da síndrome de deleção 22q11 e sua associação com as cardiopatias congênitas. FONTES DOS DADOS: Foram pesquisados artigos científicos presentes nos portais Medline, Lilacs e SciELO, utilizando-se descritores específicos como "22q11", "DiGeorge syndrome", "velocardiofacial syndrome", "congenital heart defects" e "cardio-vascular malformations". O período adotado para a revisão foi de 1980 a 2009. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: As ma...

  5. Mutations in the heat-shock protein A9 (HSPA9) gene cause the EVEN-PLUS syndrome of congenital malformations and skeletal dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Castillo-Taucher, Silvia; Moreno-Salinas, Rodrigo; Cho, Tae-Joon; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Murim; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Dikoglu, Esra; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Girardi, Enrico; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Bonafé, Luisa; Rivolta, Carlo; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We and others have reported mutations in LONP1, a gene coding for a mitochondrial chaperone and protease, as the cause of the human CODAS (cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular and skeletal) syndrome (MIM 600373). Here, we delineate a similar but distinct condition that shares the epiphyseal, vertebral and ocular changes of CODAS but also included severe microtia, nasal hypoplasia, and other malformations, and for which we propose the name of EVEN-PLUS syndrome for epiphyseal, vertebral, ear, nose, plus associated findings. In three individuals from two families, no mutation in LONP1 was found; instead, we found biallelic mutations in HSPA9, the gene that codes for mHSP70/mortalin, another highly conserved mitochondrial chaperone protein essential in mitochondrial protein import, folding, and degradation. The functional relationship between LONP1 and HSPA9 in mitochondrial protein chaperoning and the overlapping phenotypes of CODAS and EVEN-PLUS delineate a family of “mitochondrial chaperonopathies” and point to an unexplored role of mitochondrial chaperones in human embryonic morphogenesis. PMID:26598328

  6. Síndrome de deleção 22q11.2 e cardiopatias congênitas 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar as características clínicas, etiológicas e diagnósticas da síndrome de deleção 22q11 e sua associação com as cardiopatias congênitas. FONTES DOS DADOS: Foram pesquisados artigos científicos presentes nos portais Medline, Lilacs e SciELO, utilizando-se descritores específicos como "22q11", "DiGeorge syndrome", "velocardiofacial syndrome", "congenital heart defects" e "cardio-vascular malformations". O período adotado para a revisão foi de 1980 a 2009. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: As malformações cardíacas são os defeitos congênitos observados mais frequentemente ao nascimento e representam um problema importante de Saúde Pública. Dentre suas principais causas conhecidas destaca-se a síndrome de deleção 22q11, também chamada de síndrome de DiGeorge, síndrome velocardiofacial e CATCH22. Trata-se de uma doença autossômica domi-nante caracterizada por um fenótipo altamente variável, o que dificulta em muito seu reconhecimento clínico. Além disso, a maior parte dos pacientes apresenta uma microdeleção identificada principalmente por técnicas de citogenética molecular, como a hibridização in situ fluorescente, pouco disponíveis em nosso meio. De forma similar a outras síndromes, a síndrome de deleção 22q11 associa-se a certos defeitos cardíacos específicos, no caso os do tipo conotruncal. Apesar disso, não há ainda na literatura um consenso sobre quais os pacientes com car-diopatia congênita que deveriam ser investigados para a síndrome de deleção 22q11. CONCLUSÕES: Cardiologistas e cirurgiões cardíacos, espe-cialmente pediátricos, devem estar cientes das peculiaridades e dos cuidados dispensados à síndrome de deleção 22q11. Os indivíduos com a síndrome apresentam comumente alterações envolvendo vários sistemas, o que pode levar a dificuldades e a complicações durante seu manejo clínico e cirúrgico.OBJECTIVE: To review clinical, etiological and diagnostic characteristics of

  7. SHORT RIB POLYDACTYLY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Moinfar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Short rib polydactyly syndrome (SRPS is a very rare congenital anomaly that is classified into four subtypes. It is an autosomal recessive inherited disease. We report a case of this syndrome without a previous family history of congenital defects.

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome as a primary manifestation of acute human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, A M; Ventura, A; Almeida, C; Correia, M; Tavares, V; Mota, M; Seabra, J

    2009-05-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection but it occurs in advanced stages of human immunodeficiency virus disease. As in other forms of hemolytic uremic syndrome plasmapheresis seems to be the treatment of choice. The authors present an unusual case of hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with acute human immunodeficiency virus infection in a 38 year-old black male. The patient was admitted with fever, asthenia, nausea, diarrhea, and reduced urinary output. He was found to have anemia, thrombocytopenia and severe renal failure. Hemolytic uremic syndrome was diagnosed and he was started on plasmapheresis and hemodialysis. Serological tests were consistent with acute human immunodeficiency virus infection: the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for human immunodeficiency virus was weakly positive, Western Blot test was negative and human immunodeficiency virus RNA quantification was positive, with > 1,000,000 copies/microl. After 4 daily treatment sessions, patient's clinical condition improved and hemoglobin, platelets, lactic dehydrogenase and renal function normalized.

  9. Loss of MAFB Function in Humans and Mice Causes Duane Syndrome, Aberrant Extraocular Muscle Innervation, and Inner-Ear Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong G; Tischfield, Max A; Nugent, Alicia A; Cheng, Long; Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Chan, Wai-Man; Maconachie, Gail; Bosley, Thomas M; Summers, C Gail; Hunter, David G; Robson, Caroline D; Gottlob, Irene; Engle, Elizabeth C

    2016-06-02

    Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) is a congenital eye-movement disorder defined by limited outward gaze and retraction of the eye on attempted inward gaze. Here, we report on three heterozygous loss-of-function MAFB mutations causing DRS and a dominant-negative MAFB mutation causing DRS and deafness. Using genotype-phenotype correlations in humans and Mafb-knockout mice, we propose a threshold model for variable loss of MAFB function. Postmortem studies of DRS have reported abducens nerve hypoplasia and aberrant innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by the oculomotor nerve. Our studies in mice now confirm this human DRS pathology. Moreover, we demonstrate that selectively disrupting abducens nerve development is sufficient to cause secondary innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by aberrant oculomotor nerve branches, which form at developmental decision regions close to target extraocular muscles. Thus, we present evidence that the primary cause of DRS is failure of the abducens nerve to fully innervate the lateral rectus muscle in early development.

  10. [Sex differences in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P; Demian, H

    2016-12-01

    Gender influences the clinical presentation and the management of some acquired cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, resulting in different outcomes. Differences between women and men are also noticed in congenital heart disease. They are mainly related to the prevalence and severity of some congenital heart defects at birth, and in adulthood to the prognosis, incidence of Eisenmenger syndrome and risks of pregnancy. The role of gender on the risk of operative mortality of congenital heart surgery remains debated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Aftereffects of congenital infections in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdzenidze, E; Zhvania, M

    2006-12-01

    Congenital infections are among the most pressing health care problems. Congenital infections are not reason of congenital malformation and perinatal mortality only, but also pathologies that can be revealed during first year of life. Frequency for congenital viral infection displayed from birth varies between 23% and 92%. The aim of the study was the investigation of inherent infection consequences (citomegaloviral infection, herpes infection and chlamidia) in children in different age groups. Under our observation were 81 children with congenital infections. Among them 29 were with citomegaloviral infection, 17 with herpes infection; 15 chlamidia infection and 22 infections mix (citomegalovirus + herpes, citomegalovirus + chlamidia and chlamidia + herpes). In all observed children neurological simptomatic such as neuro-reflectory hyperexcitability syndrom, hypertension-hydrocephalic syndrom, musculary dystonia syndrom, hydrocephaly, retardation of psychomotor development etc. were present. After birth the worst prevalent are pathologies of cardiovascular system: functional cardiopathy, carditis, congenital heart disease (among them multivalvular disease), affection of hepatobilliar system, organs of vision and hearing etc are present also.

  12. Use of cephalosporins during pregnancy and in the presence of congenital abnormalities: a population-based, case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to study the human teratogenic potential of cephalosporin treatment during pregnancy. Study Design: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched controls without congenital abnormalities was performed. The population-based data set of the Hungarian...... delivered of babies affected with Down syndrome (patient controls). Results: In the case group, 308 (1.35%) pregnant women were treated with cephalosporin. In the population and patient control groups, 440 (1.15%) and 16 (1.97%) pregnant women had similar treatments. The somewhat higher use...

  13. Prevalence and Aetiology of Congenitally Deafblind People in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    were found. Causes of congenital deafblindness were different among adults compared to causes among children. Rubella syndrome (28%, n = 36) and Down syndrome (8%, n = 10) were the largest groups among people above 18 years of age. Among children CHARGE syndrome (16%, n = 13) was the largest group......A study of prevalence and aetiology was performed on 63 children and 127 adults in Denmark with congenital deafblindness. Using a Scandinavian definition of deafblindness, the prevalence of congenital deafblindness was found to be 1:29,000. Thirty-five different aetiological causes of deafblindness...

  14. Poland syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra Madhur Sharma; Shrawan Kumar; Meghwani, Manoj K.; Agrawal, Ravi P.

    2014-01-01

    Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  15. Poland syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Madhur Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poland′s syndrome is a rare congenital condition, characterized by the absence of the sternal or breastbone portion of the pectoralis major muscle, which may be associated with the absence of nearby musculoskeletal structures. We hereby report an 8-year-old boy with typical features of Poland syndrome, the first documented case from Uttar Pradesh, India.

  16. Congenital syphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Hur, Don [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    In recent years, marked increase in incidence of congenital syphilis has occurred throughout the world due to changes in social norms and development of penicillin-resistant strains. Early diagnosis plays an important role in congenital syphilis as the clinical manifestations may simulate many other conditions in the paediatric age group. The authors analyzed 52 cases of congenital syphilis admitted to the department of paediatrics, Chosun University Hospital, clinically and radiologically. Among them, 18 cases were born in this hospital and 34 cases were admitted from OPD, during the period of 8 years from January, 1975 to December, 1982. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 28 of 34 cases (82%), the first clinical manifestations were below the age of 3 months. 2. Among the 52 cases, a male predominance was observed with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. 3. The serologic test (VDRL) of the 52 studied cases showed reactive response in 49 cases (94%), and that of syphilitic mothers except 6 cases, reactive in all studied cases. 4. The major manifestations of the 52 cases were bone tenderness (12%) and swelling of the joints (7%) in skeletal system, hepatosplenomegaly (79%) and skin lesions (73%) in extraskeletal one. 5. The radiological skeletal changes were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were metaphysitis (83%) and periostitis (81%). The most characteristic type of metaphysitis were transverse trophic line (74%) and zone of rarefaction (65%). 6. The commonest bones to be affected were growing metaphyses of the long bones, particulary about the wrist and the knee. The order of frequency were radius (80%), uina (80%), tibia (77%), femur (69%) and humerus (40%)

  17. Recombinant human growth hormone in the treatment of Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessie E Spiliotis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bessie E SpiliotisDivision of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Pediatrics, University of Patras, School of Medicine, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Turner syndrome (TS is a common chromosomal disorder in women that is associated with the absence of one of the X chromosomes. Severe short stature and a lack of pubertal development characterize TS girls, causing psychosocial problems and reduced bone mass. The growth impairment in TS seems to be due to multiple factors including an abnormal growth hormone (GH – insulin-like growth factor (IGF – IGF binding protein axis and haploinsufficiency of the short stature homeobox-containing gene. Growth hormone and sex steroid replacement therapy has enhanced growth, pubertal development, bone mass, and the quality of life of TS girls. Recombinant human GH (hGH has improved the height potential of TS girls with varied results though, depending upon the dose of hGH and the age of induction of puberty. The best final adult height and peak bone mass achievement results seem to be achieved when hGH therapy is started early and puberty is induced at the normal age of puberty in a regimen mimicking physiologic puberty. The initiation of estradiol therapy at an age-appropriate time may also help the TS patients avoid osteoporosis during adulthood. Recombinant hGH therapy in TS seems to be safe. Studies so far show no adverse effects on cardiac function, glucose metabolism or any association with neoplasms but research is still in progress to provide conclusive data on long-term safety.Keywords: Turner syndrome, recombinant growth hormone, growth hormone deficiency, SHOX gene, hormonal replacement therapy

  18. Congenital hypoaldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethupathi, Vanathi; Vijayakumar, M; Janakiraman, Lalitha; Nammalwar, B R

    2008-08-01

    Congenital hypoaldosteronism due to an isolated aldosterone biosynthesis defect is rare. We report a 4 month old female infant who presented with failure to thrive, persistent hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. Investigations revealed normal serum 17 hydroxy progesterone and cortisol. A decreased serum aldosterone and serum 18 hydroxy corticosterone levels with a low 18 hydroxy corticosterone: aldosterone ratio was suggestive of corticosterone methyl oxidase type I deficiency. She was started on fludrocortisone replacement therapy with a subsequent normalization of electrolytes. Further molecular analysis is needed to ascertain the precise nature of the mutation.

  19. CLOVES syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jacob; Upton, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    A cohort of patients with overgrowth syndromes has been identified with congenital lipomatous overgrowth, dysregulated fat deposits, and mixed vascular malformations. The acronym CLOVES was given on a heuristic basis to stand for congenital lipomatous overgrowth (CLO), vascular malformation (V), epidermal nevi (E), and scoliosis and spinal deformities (S). These patients have upper limb anomalies with variable phenotypes. Although hand anomalies alone cannot make the diagnosis, the foot, truncal, cutaneous and spinal anomalies are particularly diagnostic. CLOVES syndrome has emerged as a distinct clinical entity diagnosed by clinical and radiographic examinations. The overgrowth pattern is now easily distinguished from other overgrowth syndromes.

  20. Development and Congenital Anomalies of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tadokoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the pancreas develops is essential to understand the pathogenesis of congenital pancreatic anomalies. Recent studies have shown the advantages of investigating the development of frogs, mice, and chickens for understanding early embryonic development of the pancreas and congenital anomalies, such as choledochal cysts, anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction, annular pancreas, and pancreas divisum. These anomalies arise from failure of complete rotation and fusion during embryogenesis. There are many theories in the etiology of congenital anomalies of the pancreas. We review pancreas development in humans and other vertebrates. In addition, we attempt to clarify how developmental failure is related to congenital pancreatic anomalies.

  1. First isolation and genetic characterization of a Toxoplasma gondii strain from a symptomatic human case of congenital toxoplasmosis in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costache, Carmen Anca; Colosi, Horaţiu Alexandru; Blaga, Ligia; Györke, Adriana; Paştiu, Anamaria Ioana; Colosi, Ioana Alina; Ajzenberg, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Very limited data exists on the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii from Eastern Europe. We present the first Romanian case of symptomatic congenital toxoplasmosis in which the T. gondii strain was isolated after inoculation in mice of a cerebrospinal fluid sample from a living neonate. The T. gondii strain was genotyped with 15 microsatellite markers distributed on 10 of the 14 chromosomes of T. gondii. The strain had a type II genotype. PMID:23537840

  2. Congenital Myasthenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page NINDS Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome Information Page NINDS Whiplash Information Page NINDS Infantile Spasms Information Page NINDS ... Support Library Clinical Research Next Steps Pre-Funding: After Review Terms of Award Pre-Award Start-up ...

  3. Asplenia syndrome with complex congenital heart disease:a case report and literature review%无脾综合征伴复杂性先天性心脏病1例报道并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娜; 黄玉柱; 高奎武; 孙景巍

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To improve the recognition of asplenia syndrome, which is beneficial to early diagnosis and treatment.Meth-ods:A case of a 3-year-old child patient of asplenia syndrome with complex congenital heart disease was studied and related literature was reviewed in terms of the etiology,pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, prevention and treatment.Results:Asplenia syn-drome is a rare congenital disease with poor prognosis.Patients with the disease tend to be born with bruising, short of breath, congeni-tal spleen hypoplasia or absence, abnormal structure and position of the thoracic and abdominal organs.Severe cardiovascular system malformation is often present.Finding Howell-Jolly small body in peripheral blood is considered to be diagnostic.There is currently a lack of effective treatments.Conclusion:Preventing some teratogenic factors and taking prenatal test timely may contribute to the pre-vention of asplenia syndrome.Operative correction can also be used to improve patients'quality of life.%目的:提高临床医生对于无脾综合征的认识,帮助及早诊断与治疗。方法:报道1例3岁1月无脾综合征伴复杂性先天性心脏病患儿,结合文献资料复习无脾综合征的病因、发病机制、临床表现、诊断及预防治疗。结果:本病病因不明;临床表现无脾综合征发病率低,预后差。出生时即有青紫、气急;先天性脾发育不全或缺如,胸腹腔器官结构和位置异常;心血管系统严重发育畸形。外周血涂片找到Howell-Jolly小体常具有诊断意义。本病目前缺乏有效的治疗手段。结论:孕期预防某些致畸因子的影响、及时进行产前检查,进行必要的干预以预防无脾综合征的发生、及时手术矫治提高生命质量。

  4. Leptin in congenital and HIV-associated lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukas, Michael A; Farr, Olivia M; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone secreted by adipocytes that regulates energy metabolism via peripheral action on glucose synthesis and utilization as well as through central regulation of food intake. Patients with decreased amounts of fat in their adipose tissue (lipoatrophy) will have low leptin levels, and hypoleptinemic states have been associated with a variety of metabolic dysfunctions. Pronounced complications of insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and fatty liver are observed in patients suffering from congenital or acquired generalized lipodystrophy while somewhat less pronounced abnormalities are associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the so-called HIV-associated lipodystrophy. Previous uncontrolled open-label studies have demonstrated that physiological doses of leptin repletion have corrected many of the metabolic derangements observed in subjects with rare fat maldistribution syndromes such as generalized lipodystrophy. In the much more commonly encountered HIV-associated lipodystrophy, leptin replacement has been shown to decrease central fat mass and to improve insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and glucose levels. The United States Food and Drug Administration has recently granted approval for recombinant leptin therapy for congenital and acquired generalized lipodystrophy, however large, well-designed, placebo-controlled studies are needed to assess long-term efficacy, safety and adverse effects of leptin replacement. In this review, we present the role of leptin in the metabolic complications of congenital and acquired lipodystrophy and discuss current and emerging clinical therapeutic uses of leptin in humans with lipodystrophy.

  5. Synaptogenesis and Myelination in the Nucleus/Tractus Solitarius: Potential Role in Apnea of Prematurity, Congenital Central Hypoventilation, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Fetuses as early as 15 weeks' gestation exhibit rhythmical respiratory movements shown by real-time ultrasonography. The nucleus/tractus solitarius is the principal brainstem respiratory center; other medullary nuclei also participate. The purpose was to determine temporal maturation of synaptogenesis. Delayed synaptic maturation may explain neurogenic apnea or hypoventilation of prematurity and some cases of sudden infant death syndrome. Sections of medulla oblongata were studied from 30 human fetal and neonatal brains 9 to 41 weeks' gestation. Synaptophysin demonstrated the immunocytochemical sequence of synaptogenesis. Other neuronal markers and myelin stain also were applied. The nucleus/tractus solitarius was similarly studied in fetuses with chromosomopathies, metabolic encephalopathies, and brain malformations. Synapse formation in the nucleus solitarius begins at about 12 weeks' gestation and matures by 15 weeks; myelination initiated at 33 weeks. Synaptogenesis was delayed in 3 fetuses with different conditions, but was not specific for only nucleus solitarius. Delayed synaptogenesis or myelination in the nucleus solitarius may play a role in neonatal hypoventilation, especially in preterm infants and in some sudden infant death syndrome cases.

  6. Auditory function in the Tc1 mouse model of down syndrome suggests a limited region of human chromosome 21 involved in otitis media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kuhn

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is one of the most common congenital disorders leading to a wide range of health problems in humans, including frequent otitis media. The Tc1 mouse carries a significant part of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21 in addition to the full set of mouse chromosomes and shares many phenotypes observed in humans affected by Down syndrome with trisomy of chromosome 21. However, it is unknown whether Tc1 mice exhibit a hearing phenotype and might thus represent a good model for understanding the hearing loss that is common in Down syndrome. In this study we carried out a structural and functional assessment of hearing in Tc1 mice. Auditory brainstem response (ABR measurements in Tc1 mice showed normal thresholds compared to littermate controls and ABR waveform latencies and amplitudes were equivalent to controls. The gross anatomy of the middle and inner ears was also similar between Tc1 and control mice. The physiological properties of cochlear sensory receptors (inner and outer hair cells: IHCs and OHCs were investigated using single-cell patch clamp recordings from the acutely dissected cochleae. Adult Tc1 IHCs exhibited normal resting membrane potentials and expressed all K(+ currents characteristic of control hair cells. However, the size of the large conductance (BK Ca(2+ activated K(+ current (I(K,f, which enables rapid voltage responses essential for accurate sound encoding, was increased in Tc1 IHCs. All physiological properties investigated in OHCs were indistinguishable between the two genotypes. The normal functional hearing and the gross structural anatomy of the middle and inner ears in the Tc1 mouse contrast to that observed in the Ts65Dn model of Down syndrome which shows otitis media. Genes that are trisomic in Ts65Dn but disomic in Tc1 may predispose to otitis media when an additional copy is active.

  7. Natal teeth in an infant with congenital hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teeth erupting at birth are referred to as natal teeth. It is a common and benign finding in the neonatal period. However, they may be associated with genetic syndromes like Ellis Van Creveld syndrome and Hallermann-Streiff syndrome. We report here a case of natal teeth in an infant with congenital hypothyroidism.

  8. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-01-29

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases.

  9. Severe congenital neutropenia (Kostmann Syndrome)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is not thought to be the direct result of G-CSF therapy but related to the underlying .... phage progenitor cell is defective, with few colonies formed .... In the study of Rosenberg, et al.29, the hazard of .... neutropenia. A report from the French.

  10. Pyramidal tract abnormalities in the human fetus and infant with trisomy 18 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Hajime; Miyata, Mio; Ohama, Eisaku

    2014-06-01

    Trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome is known to exhibit various developmental abnormalities in the central nervous system. We report dominant uncrossed pyramidal tract in trisomy 18 syndrome, based on the postmortem neuropathologic study of eight consecutive autopsied fetuses and infants with trisomy 18 ranging in age from 16 to 39 weeks of gestation, including six males and two females, along with autopsy cases of a stillborn triploid infant with 69XXX and two stillborn infants without chromosomal or neurodevelopmental abnormalities. Five out of eight cases with trisomy 18 showed a larger proportion of uncrossed than crossed pyramidal tract. All of these cases were male, and the anterior corticospinal tract on one side was constantly larger than the contralateral lateral corticospinal tract in the spinal cord on both sides, while the pyramidal tract was hypoplastic in female cases with trisomy 18 and a case with 69XXX. Abnormal pyramidal decussation has been found in cases with posterior fossa malformations such as occipital encephaloceles, Dandy-Walker malformation, Joubert syndrome and Möbius syndrome, but has not been described in cases with trisomy 18. Our data, together with the previous reports describing uncrossed aberrant ipsilateral pyramidal tract in patients with congenital mirror movements caused by DCC gene mutation in chromosome 18, and hypolasia and hyperplasia of the pyramidal tract in X-linked recessive disorders caused by L1CAM and Kal1 gene mutations, respectively, suggest a role of trisomy 18 in association with X-chromosome in the abnormal development of the pyramidal tract.

  11. Metabolic syndrome--psycho neuropathogenesis and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Madhusoothanan Bhagavathi

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Heightened hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activity is associated with pathogenesis of MS. Life style, food habits and physical activity also play critical role in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the precise neurophysiology behind chronic stress leading on to such effects is unknown. Review of recent animal and human studies have shown the subtle differences in morphological changes associated with chronic stress between medial prefrontal cortex and amygdaloid complex. The loss of dendritic spines in pyramidal neurons of medial prefrontal cortex, dendritic hypertrophy in basolateral amygdala and dendritic loss in central nucleus of amygdala causes increased basal output from amygdaloid complex to HPA axis and other targets whose networks are evolutionarily well conserved. The increased HPA axis activity, elevated blood pressure and appetite for high calorie diet leads to MS. The evolution of isocortex in primates and associated regression in size of limbic structures predisposed to increased synaptic noise in amygdaloid complex which in turn cause heighetened output from amygdala during chronic stress. Copyright © 2010 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cancer risk among patients with congenital heart defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Morten; Garne, Ester; Sværke, Claus

    2013-01-01

    -based interventions, the standardised incidence ratio was 1.45 (95% confidence interval: 0.86-2.29). Conclusion The overall risk of cancer among congenital heart defect patients without Down's syndrome was not statistically significantly elevated. Cancer risk in the congenital heart defect cohort as a whole...

  13. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latt...

  14. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  15. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Gregory D; Karns, Christina M; Dow, Mark W; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen J

    2014-01-01

    Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl's gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity), a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case), as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual stimulation (11-15° vs. 2-7°) in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl's gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl's gyrus) indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory, and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex (PPC), frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal, and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in congenitally deaf adults.

  16. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D. Scott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl’s gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity, a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case, as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral versus perifoveal visual stimulation (11-15° vs. 2°-7° in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl’s gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl’s gyrus indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral versus perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex, frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in

  17. "CONGENTIAL PANHYPOPITUITARISM ASSOCIATED WITH IMPAIRED LIVER FUNCTION TESTS AND CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Khalili-Matinzadeh

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The term congenital hypopituitarism defines deficiency of all of the pituitary hormones. Hypoglycemia and microphallus (in males are common findings, and some infants have shown evidence of the neonatal hepatitis syndrome. We report a case of congenital panhypopituitarism with deficiency of six major hormones and association with severe hypoglycemia, impaired liver function tests and congenital heart disease.

  18. Spectrum of congenital heart diseases in children with Down ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Key words:Down syndrome, congenital heart diseases, pattern, Sokoto ... Research Journal of Health Sciences subscribed to terms and conditions of Open Access publication. Articles are .... information such as age, gender, mobile phone.

  19. Neuroimaging findings in Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garavelli, Livia; Ivanovski, Ivan; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial features, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and congenital malformations, including Hirschsprung disease, genital and eye anomalies, and congenital heart defects, caused by haploinsufficiency o...

  20. Neuroimaging findings in Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garavelli, Livia; Ivanovski, Ivan; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a genetic disease characterized by distinctive facial features, moderate to severe intellectual disability, and congenital malformations, including Hirschsprung disease, genital and eye anomalies, and congenital heart defects, caused by haploinsufficiency o...