WorldWideScience

Sample records for human complex retroviruses

  1. Converging Strategies in Expression of Human Complex Retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Cavallari

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of human retroviruses in the early 1980s revealed the existence of viral-encoded non-structural genes that were not evident in previously described animal retroviruses. Based on the absence or presence of these additional genes retroviruses were classified as ‘simple’ and ‘complex’, respectively. Expression of most of these extra genes is achieved through the generation of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The present review summarizes the genetic organization and expression strategies of human complex retroviruses and highlights the converging mechanisms controlling their life cycles.

  2. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy vir...... are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale....... viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity...

  3. Retroviruses and human disease.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Over the past 25 years animal retroviruses have been favoured subjects of research by virologists, oncologists, and molecular biologists. Retroviruses have given us reverse transcriptase, oncogenes, and cloning vectors that may one day be exploited for human gene therapy. They have also given us leukaemia and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Kawasaki disease and tropical spastic paraparesis are thought to be associated with retrovirus infection, and other diseases such as de Qu...

  4. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Henderson, L.E.; Pavlakis, G.N. [eds.

    1995-01-01

    This compendium, including accompanying floppy diskettes, is the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts it comprises: (I) Nucleic Acid Alignments and Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Alignments; (III) Analysis; (IV) Related Sequences; (V) Database communications.

  5. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, B.; Foley, B.; Leitner, T. [eds.] [and others

    1997-12-01

    This compendium is the result of an effort to compile, organize, and rapidly publish as much relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses as possible. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the four parts that it comprises: (1) Nucleic Acid Alignments, (2) Amino Acid Alignments, (3) Reviews and Analyses, and (4) Related Sequences. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. This year we are not including floppy diskettes as the entire compendium is available both at our Web site and at our ftp site. If you need floppy diskettes please contact either Bette Korber (btk@t10.lanl.gov) or Kersti Rock (karm@t10.lanl.gov) by email or fax ((505) 665-4453). While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. The exception to this are reviews submitted by experts in areas deemed of particular and basic importance to research involving AIDS viral sequence information. These are included in Part III, and are contributed by scientists with particular expertise in the area of interest. In addition to the general descriptions below of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  6. Human retroviruses and AIDS, 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. (eds.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Berzofsky, J.A.; Pavlakis, G.N. (eds.) (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)); Smith, R.F. (ed.) (Harvard Univ. (USA))

    1991-05-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses.The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Sequences; (3) Analyses; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  7. Complex Codon Usage Pattern and Compositional Features of Retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav RoyChoudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses infect a wide range of organisms including humans. Among them, HIV-1, which causes AIDS, has now become a major threat for world health. Some of these viruses are also potential gene transfer vectors. In this study, the patterns of synonymous codon usage in retroviruses have been studied through multivariate statistical methods on ORFs sequences from the available 56 retroviruses. The principal determinant for evolution of the codon usage pattern in retroviruses seemed to be the compositional constraints, while selection for translation of the viral genes plays a secondary role. This was further supported by multivariate analysis on relative synonymous codon usage. Thus, it seems that mutational bias might have dominated role over translational selection in shaping the codon usage of retroviruses. Codon adaptation index was used to identify translationally optimal codons among genes from retroviruses. The comparative analysis of the preferred and optimal codons among different retroviral groups revealed that four codons GAA, AAA, AGA, and GGA were significantly more frequent in most of the retroviral genes inspite of some differences. Cluster analysis also revealed that phylogenetically related groups of retroviruses have probably evolved their codon usage in a concerted manner under the influence of their nucleotide composition.

  8. Human retroviruses, cancer, and AIDS: Approaches to prevention and therapy

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    Bolognesi, D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains eight sections, each consisting of several papers. The section titles are: New Human Retroviruses and Their Properties; Biology and Genetics of HIV; Products of the HIV Genome; Viral Pathogenesis; HIV and Its Receptor; Vaccine Approaches Against HIV; Treatment Approaches Against HIV; and Closing Remarks.

  9. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer prevention: evidence and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cegolon Luca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is a significant and growing problem worldwide. While this increase may, in part, be attributed to increasing longevity, improved case notifications and risk-enhancing lifestyle (such as smoking, diet and obesity, hygiene-related factors resulting in immuno-regulatory failure may also play a major role and call for a revision of vaccination strategies to protect against a range of cancers in addition to infections. Discussion Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs are a significant component of a wider family of retroelements that constitutes part of the human genome. They were originated by the integration of exogenous retroviruses into the human genome millions of years ago. HERVs are estimated to comprise about 8% of human DNA and are ubiquitous in somatic and germinal tissues. Physiologic and pathologic processes are influenced by some biologically active HERV families. HERV antigens are only expressed at low levels by the host, but in circumstances of inappropriate control their genes may initiate or maintain pathological processes. Although the precise mechanism leading to abnormal HERVs gene expression has yet to be clearly elucidated, environmental factors seem to be involved by influencing the human immune system. HERV-K expression has been detected in different types of tumors. Among the various human endogenous retroviral families, the K series was the latest acquired by the human species. Probably because of its relatively recent origin, the HERV-K is the most complete and biologically active family. The abnormal expression of HERV-K seemingly triggers pathological processes leading to melanoma onset, but also contributes to the morphological and functional cellular modifications implicated in melanoma maintenance and progression. The HERV-K-MEL antigen is encoded by a pseudo-gene incorporated in the HERV-K env-gene. HERV-K-MEL is significantly expressed in the majority of dysplastic and normal naevi, as well

  10. Retroviruses and inflammatory myopathies in humans and primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    1993-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the human T cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1), the human foamy retrovirus and the simian immunodeficiency viruses have been associated with the development of an inflammatory myopathy in humans and primates. The myopathy caused by HIV and HTLV-1 is not due to direct infection of the muscle by these viruses, but rather due to an immunopathologic process triggered by the viruses, mediated by autoaggressive CD8+ cells in the context of MHC-class I antigen expression. This has been based on a series of studies utilizing immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction, and co-cultivation of human myotubes with the viruses or with HIV-1 and HTLV-1-infected homologous lymphoid cells. Because the clinical, histological and immunological picture of patients with retroviral-associated inflammatory myopathies is identical to that of patients with retroviral-negative inflammatory myopathy, there is a reasonable possibility that retroviruses may be candidate viruses in triggering inflammatory myopathies. In recent years, the antiretroviral drug AZT (Zidovudine), commonly used for the treatment of AIDS, has been shown to cause a distinct mitochondrial myopathy characterized by depletion of the muscle mitochondrial DNA due to AZT's ability to inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase of the mitochondrial matrix. Distinction of the AZT-myopathy is clinically important because it responds to discontinuation of AZT and to administration of another antiretroviral agent such as ddI or ddC.

  11. Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

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    Signy Bendiksen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of viruses in osteoarthritis remains controversial because the prevalence of viral nucleic acid sequences in peripheral blood or synovial fluid from osteoarthritis patients and that in healthy control subjects are similar. Until now the presence of virus has not been analyzed in cartilage. We screened cartilage and chondrocytes from advanced and non-/early osteoarthritis patients for parvovirus B19, herpes simplex virus-1, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, hepatitis C virus, and human endogenous retroviruses transcripts. Endogenous retroviruses transcripts, but none of the other viruses, were detected in 15 out the 17 patients. Sequencing identified the virus as HERV-WE1 and E2. HERV-W activity was confirmed by high expression levels of syncytin, dsRNA, virus budding, and the presence of virus-like particles in all advanced osteoarthritis cartilages examined. Low levels of HERV-WE1, but not E2 envelope RNA, were observed in 3 out of 8 non-/early osteoarthritis patients, while only 3 out of 7 chondrocytes cultures displayed low levels of syncytin, and just one was positive for virus-like particles. This study demonstrates for the first time activation of HERV-W in cartilage of osteoarthritis patients; however, a causative role for HERV-W in development or deterioration of the disease remains to be proven.

  12. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Group E and Its Involvement in Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Le Dantec

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retrovirus group E (HERV-E elements are stably integrated into the human genome, transmitted vertically in a Mendelian manner, and are endowed with transcriptional activity as alternative promoters or enhancers. Such effects are under the control of the proviral long terminal repeats (LTR that are organized into three HERV-E phylogenetic subgroups, namely LTR2, LTR2B, and LTR2C. Moreover, HERV-E expression is tissue-specific, and silenced by epigenetic constraints that may be disrupted in cancer, autoimmunity, and human placentation. Interest in HERV-E with regard to these conditions has been stimulated further by concerns regarding the capacity of HERV-E elements to modify the expression of neighboring genes and/or to produce retroviral proteins, including immunosuppressive env peptides, which in turn may induce (auto-antibody (Ab production. Finally, better understanding of HERV-E elements may have clinical applications for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy.

  13. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental...... manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus...... was associated with each of the three diseases. Although there was a significant overlap, most loci only occurred in one of the studied disease. Remarkably, within each disease, there was a statistical interaction (synergy) between two loci. Additional synergy between retroviral loci and human lymphocyte...

  14. Molecular cloning and long terminal repeat sequences of human endogenous retrovirus genes related to types A and B retrovirus genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, M.

    1986-06-01

    By using a DNA fragment primarily encoding the reverse transcriptase (pol) region of the Syrian hamster intracisternal A particle (IAP; type A retrovirus) gene as a probe, human endogenous retrovirus genes, tentatively termed HERV-K genes, were cloned from a fetal human liver gene library. Typical HERV-K genes were 9.1 or 9.4 kilobases in length, having long terminal repeats (LTRs) of ca. 970 base pairs. Many structural features commonly observed on the retrovirus LTRs, such as the TATAA box, polyadenylation signal, and terminal inverted repeats, were present on each LTR, and a lysine (K) tRNA having a CUU anticodon was identified as a presumed primer tRNA. The HERV-K LTR, however, had little sequence homology to either the IAP LTR or other typical oncovirus LTRs. By filter hybridization, the number of HERV-K genes was estimated to be ca. 50 copies per haploid human genome. The cloned mouse mammary tumor virus (type B) gene was found to hybridize with both the HERV-K and IAP genes to essentially the same extent.

  15. Molecular functions of human endogenous retroviruses in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntsova, Maria; Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and related genetic elements form 504 distinct families and occupy ~8% of human genome. Recent success of high-throughput experimental technologies facilitated understanding functional impact of HERVs for molecular machinery of human cells. HERVs encode active retroviral proteins, which may exert important physiological functions in the body, but also may be involved in the progression of cancer and numerous human autoimmune, neurological and infectious diseases. The spectrum of related malignancies includes, but not limits to, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, lupus, schizophrenia, multiple cancer types and HIV. In addition, HERVs regulate expression of the neighboring host genes and modify genomic regulatory landscape, e.g., by providing regulatory modules like transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Indeed, recent bioinformatic profiling identified ~110,000 regulatory active HERV elements, which formed at least ~320,000 human TFBS. These and other peculiarities of HERVs might have played an important role in human evolution and speciation. In this paper, we focus on the current progress in understanding of normal and pathological molecular niches of HERVs, on their implications in human evolution, normal physiology and disease. We also review the available databases dealing with various aspects of HERV genetics.

  16. The role of human endogenous retroviruses in brain development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelmans, Kristien; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Johanning, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences are spread throughout the genome of all humans, and make up about 8% of the genome. Despite their prevalence, the function of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in humans is largely unknown. In this review we focus on the brain, and evaluate studies in animal models that address mechanisms of endogenous retrovirus activation in the brain and central nervous system (CNS). One such study in mice found that TRIM28, a protein critical for mouse early development, regulates transcription and silencing of endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells. Another intriguing finding in human brain cells and mouse models was that endogenous retrovirus HERV-K appears to be protective against neurotoxins. We also report on studies that associate HERVs with human diseases of the brain and CNS. There is little doubt of an association between HERVs and a number of CNS diseases. However, a cause and effect relationship between HERVs and these diseases has not yet been established.

  17. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer: Causality and therapeutic possibilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina S Mullins; Michael Linnebacher

    2012-01-01

    A substantial part of the human genome is derived from transposable elements; remnants of ancient retroviral infections.Conservative estimates set the percentage of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs)in the genome at 8%.For the most part,the interplay between mutations,epigenetic mechanisms and posttranscriptional regulations silence HERVs in somatic cells.We first highlight mechanisms by which activation of members of several HERV families may be associated with tumor development before discussing the arising chances for both diagnosis and therapy.It has been shown that at least in some cases,tumor cells expressing HERV open reading frames (ORFs) thus gain tumor-promoting functions.However,since these proteins are not expressed in healthy tissues,they become prime target structures.Of potential pharmacological interest are the prevention of HERV transposition,the inhibition of HERV-encoded protein expression and the interference with these proteins' activities.Evidence from recent studies unequivocally proves that HERV ORFs represent a very interesting source of novel tumor-specific antigens with even the potential to surpass entity boundaries.The development of new tumor (immune-) therapies is a very active field and true tumor-specific targets are of outstanding interest since they minimize the risk of autoimmunity and could reduce side effects.Finally,we postulate on main future research streams in order to stimulate discussion on this hot topic.

  18. Human endogenous retrovirus-K contributes to motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenxue; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Henderson, Lisa; Tyagi, Richa; Bachani, Muzna; Steiner, Joseph; Campanac, Emilie; Hoffman, Dax A; von Geldern, Gloria; Johnson, Kory; Maric, Dragan; Morris, H Douglas; Lentz, Margaret; Pak, Katherine; Mammen, Andrew; Ostrow, Lyle; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Nath, Avindra

    2015-09-30

    The role of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in disease pathogenesis is unclear. We show that HERV-K is activated in a subpopulation of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and that its envelope (env) protein may contribute to neurodegeneration. The virus was expressed in cortical and spinal neurons of ALS patients, but not in neurons from control healthy individuals. Expression of HERV-K or its env protein in human neurons caused retraction and beading of neurites. Transgenic animals expressing the env gene developed progressive motor dysfunction accompanied by selective loss of volume of the motor cortex, decreased synaptic activity in pyramidal neurons, dendritic spine abnormalities, nucleolar dysfunction, and DNA damage. Injury to anterior horn cells in the spinal cord was manifested by muscle atrophy and pathological changes consistent with nerve fiber denervation and reinnervation. Expression of HERV-K was regulated by TAR (trans-activation responsive) DNA binding protein 43, which binds to the long terminal repeat region of the virus. Thus, HERV-K expression within neurons of patients with ALS may contribute to neurodegeneration and disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Implication of Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Proteins in Placental Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adjimon Gatien Lokossou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (ERVs represent 8% of the total human genome. Although the majority of these ancient proviral sequences have only retained non-coding long terminal repeats (LTRs, a number of “endogenized” retroviral genes encode functional proteins. Previous studies have underlined the implication of these ERV-derived proteins in the development and the function of the placenta. In this review, we summarize recent findings showing that two ERV genes, termed Syncytin-1 and Syncytin-2, which encode former envelope (Env proteins, trigger fusion events between villous cytotrophoblasts and the peripheral multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast layer. Such fusion events maintain the stability of this latter cell structure, which plays an important role in fetal development by the active secretion of various soluble factors, gas exchange and regulation of fetomaternal immunotolerance. We also highlight new studies showing that these ERV proteins, in addition to their localization at the cell surface of cytotrophoblasts, are also incorporated on the surface of various extracellular microvesicles, including exosomes. Such exosome-associated proteins could be involved in the various functions attributed to these vesicles and could provide a form of tropism. Additionally, through their immunosuppressive domains, these ERV proteins could also contribute to fetomaternal immunotolerance in a local and more distal manner. These various aspects of the implication of Syncytin-1 and -2 in placental function are also addressed in the context of the placenta-related disorder, preeclampsia.

  20. The multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus and its HERV-W endogenous family: a biological interface between virology, genetics, and immunology in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolei, Antonina; Perron, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of MSRV (multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus), founder member of the type W family of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), its pathogenic potential and association with diseases. As retrotransposable elements, HERVs behave differently from stable genes, and cannot be studied with "Mendelian genetics" concepts only. They also display complex interactions with other HERV families, and with classical viruses. These concepts may contribute to unravelling the etiopathogenesis of complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, and other chronic multifactorial diseases.

  1. The Role of XMRV, a Novel Xenotropic Murine Retrovirus, in Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    knife ,  thus  making  tissue  morphology  very  difficult  to  analyze.    It  is  impossible  to  be  certain  that...closely resembled those of a gamma - retrovirus, Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV), in size and morphology (Fig. 1 B–E). XMRV particles had an...Abstract Xenotropic Murine-Related Leukemia Virus (XMRV) is a novel human gamma retrovirus discovered in association with human prostate tumors. XMRV

  2. No association of polymorphisms in human endogenous retrovirus K18 and CD48 with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Demontis, Ditte; Thestrup, Britta Boserup;

    2012-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K18 is located within intron 1 of CD48 on chromosome 1q and is still active in the human genome. Genetic variation in HERV-K18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has previously been associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia (SZ) and with type 2...

  3. Association of human endogenous retroviruses with multiple sclerosis and possible interactions with herpes viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2005-01-01

    may be members of the Herpesviridae. Several herpes viruses, such as HSV-1, VZV, EBV and HHV-6, have been associated with MS pathogenesis, and retroviruses and herpes viruses have complex interactions. The current understanding of HERVs, and specifically the investigations of HERV activation...

  4. Association of human endogenous retroviruses with multiple sclerosis and possible interactions with herpes viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2005-01-01

    may be members of the Herpesviridae. Several herpes viruses, such as HSV-1, VZV, EBV and HHV-6, have been associated with MS pathogenesis, and retroviruses and herpes viruses have complex interactions. The current understanding of HERVs, and specifically the investigations of HERV activation...... and expression in MS are the major subjects of this review, which also proposes to synergise the herpes and HERV findings, and presents several possible pathogenic mechanisms for HERVs in MS. Copyright (c) 2005 ...

  5. Induction of retrovirus particles in human testicular tumor (Tera-1) cell cultures: an electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, D L; Fraley, E E; Fogh, J; Kalter, S S

    1979-08-01

    The Tera-1 and Tera-2 cell lines, established from germ-cell tumors of the human testis, were examined by electron microscopy for particles with the morphology of retroviruses. Extracellular and budding particles were observed at low frequencies only in cultures of Tera-1 cells that had been treated with 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine and dexamethasone. No particles were detected in untreated cultures of Tera-1 cells or in any preparations of Tera-2 cells.

  6. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Mellors, J.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Jeang, K.T. [ed.] [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Molecular Virology Section; Wain-Hobson, S. [Pasteur Inst., Paris (France)] [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  7. 12th international conference on human retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lairmore Michael D

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 12th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, was held at the Half Moon Hotel in Montego Bay, Jamaica, from June 22nd to June 25th 2005. The scientific conference, sponsored by the International Retrovirology Association, is held biennially at rotating international venues around the world. The meeting brings together basic scientists, epidemiologists and clinical researchers to discuss findings to prevent HTLV infection or develop new therapies against HTLV-mediated diseases. The Association fosters the education and training of young scientists to bring new approaches to the complex problems of HTLV research, such as translational research to bring findings from the laboratory into clinical trials that benefit HTLV-infected patients. The breadth and quality of research presentations and workshops at the 12th International Conference indicate that these goals are being accomplished. As HTLV research enters its third decade a new generation of scientists face many challenges. However, HTLV scientists and clinicians displayed exciting new approaches and discoveries during plenary talks and poster sessions. The conference encouraged research in HTLV infections and disease, fostered collaborations, and stimulated new partnerships between clinicians and scientists to encourage clinical trials and novel therapeutic interventions.

  8. Transcriptional Activity of Human Endogenous Retroviruses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

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    Emanuela Balestrieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs have been implicated in human physiology and in human pathology. A better knowledge of the retroviral transcriptional activity in the general population and during the life span would greatly help the debate on its pathologic potential. The transcriptional activity of four HERV families (H, K, W, and E was assessed, by qualitative and quantitative PCR, in PBMCs from 261 individuals aged from 1 to 80 years. Our results show that HERV-H, HERV-K, and HERV-W, but not HERV-E, are transcriptionally active in the test population already in the early childhood. In addition, the transcriptional levels of HERV-H, HERV-K, and HERV-W change significantly during the life span, albeit with distinct patterns. Our results, reinforce the hypothesis of a physiological correlation between HERVs activity and the different stages of life in humans. Studies aiming at identifying the factors, which are responsible for these changes during the individual’s life, are still needed. Although the observed phenomena are presumably subjected to great variability, the basal transcriptional activity of each individual, also depending on the different ages of life, must be carefully considered in all the studies involving HERVs as causative agents of disease.

  9. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice reconstituted with retrovirus-transduced hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.M.; Danos, O.; Grossman, M.; Raulet, D.H.; Mulligan, R.C. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses encoding human adenosine deaminase have been used to infect murine hematopoietic stem cells. In bone marrow transplant recipients reconstituted with the genetically modified cells, human ADA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the recipients for at least 6 months after transplantation. In animals analyzed in detail 4 months after transplantation, human ADA and proviral sequences were detected in all hematopoietic lineages; in several cases, human ADA activity exceeded the endogenous activity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a functional human ADA gene into hematopoietic stem cells and obtaining expression in multiple hematopoietic lineages long after transplantation. This approach should be helpful in designing effective gene therapies for severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes in humans.

  10. Orthologous endogenous retroviruses exhibit directional selection since the chimp-human split

    OpenAIRE

    Gemmell, Patrick; Hein, Jotun; Katzourakis, Aris

    2015-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are often viewed as selfish DNA that do not contribute to host phenotype. Yet ERVs have also been co-opted to play important roles in the maintenance of stem cell identity and placentation, amongst other things. This has led to debate over whether the typical ERV confers a cost or benefit upon the host. We studied the divergence of orthologous ERVs since the chimp-human split with the aim of assessing whether ERVs exert detectable fitness effects. Res...

  11. GENE EXPRESSION OF NOVEL RETROVIRUS ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN ACUTE MULOID LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓华; 徐荣臻; 王世炯; 郑树; 朱宁希; 周旋

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the potentiality of retroviral etiology in human acute myeloid leukemia(AML). Methods: The expression of clone 6#11 in leukemic cell samples from 19 AML cases and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) from 20 controls was studied by means of Northern blot and reversal transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that the expression level of clone 6#11 was significantly higher in AML patients than that in control. Conclusion: Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of novel retrovirus were associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

  12. Design of retrovirus vectors for transfer and expression of the human. beta. -globin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.D.; Bender, M.A.; Harris, E.A.S.; Kaleko, M.; Gelinas, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    Regulated expression of the human ..beta..-globin gene has been demonstrated in cultured murine erythroleukemia cells and in mice after retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. However, the low titer of recombinant viruses described to date results in relatively inefficient gene transfer, which limits their usefulness for animal studies and for potential gene therapy in humans for diseases involving defective ..beta..-globin genes. The authors found regions that interfered with virus production within intron 2 of the ..beta..-globin gene and on both sides of the gene. The flanking regions could be removed, but intron 2 was required for ..beta..-globin expression. Inclusion of ..beta..-globin introns necessitates an antisense orientation of the gene within the retrovirus vector. However, they found no effect of the antisense ..beta..-globin transcription on virus production. A region downstream of the ..beta..-globin gene that stimulates expression of the gene in transgenic mice was included in the viruses without detrimental effects on virus titer. Virus titers of over 10/sup 6/ CFU/ml were obtained with the final vector design, which retained the ability to direct regulated expression of human ..beta..-globin in murine erythroleukemia cells. The vector also allowed transfer and expression of the human ..beta..-globin gene in hematopoietic cells (CFU-S cells) in mice.

  13. Transfection of promyelocytic leukemia in retrovirus vector inhibits growth of human bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei LI; Da-lin HE

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To construct a recombinant retrovirus vector carrying human promyelocytic leukemia (PML) cDNA and identify its expression and biology role in bladder cancer UM-UC-2 cells for future gene therapy. Methods: PML full-length cDNA was inserted into the EcoR I and BamHI site of pLXSN vector containing the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. The vector was identified by restriction enzyme digestion and then transfected into PA317 packaging cell line by calcium phosphate coprecipitation. PML cDNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the protein was identified by laser confocal microscopy and Western blot in bladder cancer cells, respectively. The morphology was observed by inverted phase contrast microscope, and MTT assay determined growth curve of the bladder cancer cells. Results: Restriction enzyme digestion proved that a 2.1kb PML cDNA was inserted into the pLXSN vector. PCR assay demonstrated that 304 bp fragments were found in UM-UC-2/pLPMLSN transfects. Laser confocal microscopy showed speck dots fluorescence in the UM-UC-2/pLPMLSN nucleus.A 90 kD specific brand was found by Western blot. MTT assay demonstrated the UM-UC-2/pLPMLSN bladder cancer growth inhibition. Conclusion: The retrovirus pLPMLSN vector was successfully constructed and could generate high effective expression of human PML in bladder cancer cell UM-UC-2, suggesting that PML recombinant retrovirus have potential utility in the gene therapy for bladder cancer.

  14. Multifunctional facets of retrovirus integrase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duane; P; Grandgenett; Krishan; K; Pandey; Sibes; Bera; Hideki; Aihara

    2015-01-01

    The retrovirus integrase(IN) is responsible for integration of the reverse transcribed linear c DNA into the host DNA genome. First, IN cleaves a dinucleotide from the 3’ OH blunt ends of the viral DNA exposing the highly conserved CA sequence in the recessed ends. IN utilizes the 3’ OH ends to catalyze the concerted integration of the two ends into opposite strands of the cellular DNA producing 4 to 6 bp staggered insertions, depending on the retrovirus species. The staggered ends are repaired by host cell machinery that results in a permanent copy of the viral DNA in the cellular genome. Besides integration, IN performs other functions in the replication cycle of several studied retroviruses. The proper organization of IN within the viral internal core is essential for the correct maturation of the virus. IN plays a major role in reverse transcription by interacting directly with the reverse transcriptase and by binding to the viral capsid protein and a cellular protein. Recruitment of several other host proteins into the viral particle are also promoted by IN. IN assists with the nuclear transport of the preintegration complex across the nuclear membrane. With several retroviruses, IN specifically interacts with different host protein factors that guide the preintegration complex to preferentially integrate the viral genome into specific regions of the host chromosomal target. Human gene therapy using retrovirus vectors is directly affected by the interactions of IN with these host factors. Inhibitors directed against the human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) IN bind within the active site of IN containing viral DNA ends thus preventing integration and subsequent HIV/AIDS.

  15. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. This technique can now be extended to the study of other HERV genomes within the human chromosomes that may have contributed to

  16. [Human retrovirus HTLV-1: descriptive and molecular epidemiology, origin, evolution, diagnosis and associated diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessain, A

    2011-08-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus discovered in 1980. It is estimated that around 10-20 million people are infected with HTLV-1 worldwide. However, HTLV-1 is not a ubiquitous virus. Indeed, HTLV-1 is present throughout the world with clusters of high endemicity including mainly southern Japan, the Caribbean region, parts of South America and intertropical Africa, with foci in the Middle East and Australia. The origin of this puzzling geographical repartition is probably linked to a founder effect in certain human groups. In the high endemic areas, 0.5 to 50% of the people have antibodies against HTLV-1 antigens. HTLV-1 seroprevalence increases with age, especially in women. HTLV-1 has 3 modes of transmission: mother to child, mainly through prolonged breastfeeding (> 6 months); sexual, mainly but not exclusively occurring from male to female; and by blood products contaminated by infected lymphocytes. HTLV-1 is mainly the etiological agent of two very severe diseases: a malignant T CD4+ cell lymphoproliferation of very poor prognosis, named adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), and a chronic neuro-myelopathy named tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). HTLV-1 is also associated with rare anterior uveitis, infective dermatitis and myositis in some high HTLV-1 endemic areas. The repartition of the different molecular subtypes or genotypes is mainly linked to the geographical origin of the infected persons but not to the associated pathology. HTLV-1 possesses a remarkable genetic stability probably linked to viral amplification via clonal expansion of infected cells rather than by reverse transcription. This stability can be used as a molecular tool to gain better insights into the origin, evolution and modes of dissemination of HTLV-1 and infected populations. HTLV-1 originated in humans through interspecies transmission from STLV-1, a very closely related retrovirus, highly

  17. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer...

  18. The Etiology of Multiple Sclerosis: Genetic Evidence for the Involvement of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-Fc1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn Andersen; Christensen, Tove; Frederiksen, Jette;

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the role of human endogenous retroviruses in multiple sclerosis by analyzing the DNA of patients and controls in 4 cohorts for associations between multiple sclerosis and polymorphisms near viral restriction genes or near endogenous retroviral loci with one or more intact...

  19. Molecular characteristics of Human Endogenous Retrovirus type-W in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, H; Hamdani, N; Faucard, R; Lajnef, M; Jamain, S; Daban-Huard, C; Sarrazin, S; LeGuen, E; Houenou, J; Delavest, M; Moins-Teisserenc, H; Moins-Teiserenc, H; Bengoufa, D; Yolken, R; Madeira, A; Garcia-Montojo, M; Gehin, N; Burgelin, I; Ollagnier, G; Bernard, C; Dumaine, A; Henrion, A; Gombert, A; Le Dudal, K; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Leboyer, M

    2012-12-04

    Epidemiological and genome-wide association studies of severe psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD), suggest complex interactions between multiple genetic elements and environmental factors. The involvement of genetic elements such as Human Endogenous Retroviruses type 'W' family (HERV-W) has consistently been associated with SZ. HERV-W envelope gene (env) is activated by environmental factors and encodes a protein displaying inflammation and neurotoxicity. The present study addressed the molecular characteristics of HERV-W env in SZ and BD. Hundred and thirty-six patients, 91 with BD, 45 with SZ and 73 healthy controls (HC) were included. HERV-W env transcription was found to be elevated in BD (P<10-4) and in SZ (P=0.012) as compared with HC, but with higher values in BD than in SZ group (P<0.01). The corresponding DNA copy number was paradoxically lower in the genome of patients with BD (P=0.0016) or SZ (P<0.0003) than in HC. Differences in nucleotide sequence of HERV-W env were found between patients with SZ and BD as compared with HC, as well as between SZ and BD. The molecular characteristics of HERV-W env also differ from what was observed in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and may represent distinct features of the genome of patients with BD and SZ. The seroprevalence for Toxoplasma gondii yielded low but significant association with HERV-W transcriptional level in a subgroup of BD and SZ, suggesting a potential role in particular patients. A global hypothesis of mechanisms inducing such major psychoses is discussed, placing HERV-W at the crossroads between environmental, genetic and immunological factors. Thus, particular infections would act as activators of HERV-W elements in earliest life, resulting in the production of an HERV-W envelope protein, which then stimulates pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic cascades. This hypothesis needs to be further explored as it may yield major changes in our understanding and treatment of

  20. (Some) cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laska, Magdalena Janina; Nissen, Kari Konstantin; Nexø, Bjørn Andersen

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is not well...... investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional potential of HERV-Fc1 proviral 5'LTR in more detail, and examined the specific influence of CpG methylation on this LTR in number of cell lines. Specifically, the role of demethylating chemicals e.g. 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine...... and Trichostatin-A, in inducing or reactivating expression of HERV-Fc1 specific sequences and the mechanisms were investigated. In our present study, 5-aza-dC is shown to be a powerful inducer of HERV-Fc1, and at the same time it strongly inhibits methylation of DNA. Treatment with this demethylating agent 5-aza...

  1. Insertional polymorphisms: a new lease of life for endogenous retroviruses in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyes, David; Griffiths, David J; Venables, Patrick J

    2007-07-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) result from ancestral infection by infectious viruses over millions of years of primate evolution. Some are transcriptionally active, express proteins and therefore have the potential to cause disease. Here we review the controversial attempts to link them with cancer and autoimmunity. The main difficulty is that most HERVs investigated to date are present at the same locus in 100% of the population. However, a new class of insertionally polymorphic HERV-K family members, present in a minority of individuals, has recently been described. We propose that insertionally polymorphic HERVs could be novel genetic risk factors and hence provide a new lease of life for research into HERVs and disease.

  2. Purification of proteins specifically binding human endogenous retrovirus K long terminal repeat by affinity elution chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, D O; Zavalova, L L; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2002-11-01

    A novel affinity elution procedure for purification of DNA-binding proteins was developed and employed to purify to near homogeneity the proteins recognizing a 21 base pair sequence within the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retroviruses K. The approach involves loading the initial protein mixture on a heparin-agarose column and elution of protein(s) of interest with a solution of double-stranded oligonucleotide containing binding sites of the protein(s). The affinity elution has several advantages over conventional DNA-affinity chromatography: (i) it is easier and faster, permitting to isolate proteins in a 1 day-one stage procedure; (ii) yield of a target protein is severalfold higher than that in DNA-affinity chromatography; (iii) it is not necessary to prepare a special affinity support for each factor to be isolated. Theaffinity elution could be a useful alternative to conventional DNA-affinity chromatography.

  3. The association between human endogenous retroviruses and multiple sclerosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Elena; Tanasescu, Radu; Tarlinton, Rachael E.; Constantinescu, Cris S.; Zhang, Weiya; Tench, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Background The interaction between genetic and environmental factors is crucial to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) are endogenous viral elements of the human genome whose expression is associated with MS. Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis and to assess qualitative and quantitative evidence on the expression of HERV families in MS patients. Methods Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for published studies on the association of HERVs and MS. Meta-analysis was performed on the HERV-W family. Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for association. Results 43 reports were extracted (25 related to HERV-W, 13 to HERV-H, 9 to HERV-K, 5 to HRES-1 and 1 to HER-15 family). The analysis showed an association between expression of all HERV families and MS. For HERV-W, adequate data was available for meta-analysis. Results from meta-analyses of HERV-W were OR = 22.66 (95%CI 6.32 to 81.20) from 4 studies investigating MSRV/HERV-W (MS-associated retrovirus) envelope mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, OR = 44.11 (95%CI 12.95 to 150.30) from 6 studies of MSRV/HERV-W polymerase mRNA in serum/plasma and OR = 6.00 (95%CI 3.35 to 10.74) from 4 studies of MSRV/HERV-W polymerase mRNA in CSF. Conclusions This systematic review and meta-analysis shows an association between expression of HERVs, and in particular the HERV-W family, and MS. PMID:28207850

  4. Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-Fc1 Association with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montojo, Marta; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, María; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Urcelay, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Background Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are repetitive sequences derived from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and different HERV families have been integrated in the genome. HERV-Fc1 in chromosome X has been previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Northern European populations. Additionally, HERV-Fc1 RNA levels of expression have been found increased in plasma of MS patients with active disease. Considering the North-South latitude gradient in MS prevalence, we aimed to evaluate the role of HERV-Fc1on MS risk in three independent Spanish cohorts. Methods A single nucleotide polymorphism near HERV-Fc1, rs391745, was genotyped by Taqman chemistry in a total of 2473 MS patients and 3031 ethnically matched controls, consecutively recruited from: Northern (569 patients and 980 controls), Central (883 patients and 692 controls) and Southern (1021 patients and 1359 controls) Spain. Our results were pooled in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant associations of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism with MS were observed in two Spanish cohorts and the combined meta-analysis with previous data yielded a significant association [rs391745 C-allele carriers: pM-H = 0.0005; ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.27 (1.11–1.45)]. Concordantly to previous findings, when the analysis was restricted to relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS samples, a slight enhancement in the strength of the association was observed [pM-H = 0.0003, ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.32 (1.14–1.53)]. Conclusion Association of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism rs391745 with bout-onset MS susceptibility was confirmed in Southern European cohorts. PMID:24594754

  5. Human endogenous retrovirus HERV-Fc1 association with multiple sclerosis susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén de la Hera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs are repetitive sequences derived from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and different HERV families have been integrated in the genome. HERV-Fc1 in chromosome X has been previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS in Northern European populations. Additionally, HERV-Fc1 RNA levels of expression have been found increased in plasma of MS patients with active disease. Considering the North-South latitude gradient in MS prevalence, we aimed to evaluate the role of HERV-Fc1on MS risk in three independent Spanish cohorts. METHODS: A single nucleotide polymorphism near HERV-Fc1, rs391745, was genotyped by Taqman chemistry in a total of 2473 MS patients and 3031 ethnically matched controls, consecutively recruited from: Northern (569 patients and 980 controls, Central (883 patients and 692 controls and Southern (1021 patients and 1359 controls Spain. Our results were pooled in a meta-analysis with previously published data. RESULTS: Significant associations of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism with MS were observed in two Spanish cohorts and the combined meta-analysis with previous data yielded a significant association [rs391745 C-allele carriers: pM-H = 0.0005; ORM-H (95% CI = 1.27 (1.11-1.45]. Concordantly to previous findings, when the analysis was restricted to relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS samples, a slight enhancement in the strength of the association was observed [pM-H = 0.0003, ORM-H (95% CI = 1.32 (1.14-1.53]. CONCLUSION: Association of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism rs391745 with bout-onset MS susceptibility was confirmed in Southern European cohorts.

  6. Human endogenous retrovirus type W (HERV-W) in schizophrenia: a new avenue of research at the gene-environment interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboyer, Marion; Tamouza, Ryad; Charron, Dominique; Faucard, Raphaél; Perron, Hervé

    2013-03-01

    Provide a synthetic review of recent studies evidencing an association between human endogenous retrovirus-W (HERV-W) and schizophrenia. Bibliography analysis and contextual synthesis. Epidemiological studies suggest that the aetiology of schizophrenia is complex and involves a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors such as infections. Eight percentof the human genome consists of human endogenous retroviruses (HERV), and this part of the genome was previously thought to be without importance, but new research has refuted this. HERVs share similarities with viruses and it is assumed that HERVs are present in the genome as a result of retroviruses infecting germ line cells many million years ago. A specific type of HERVs, called HERV-W, has through several recent studies been associated with schizophrenia. Elevated transcription of HERV-W elements has been documented, and antigens of HERV-W envelope and capsid proteins have been found in blood samples from patients. Viruses that have been implicated in pathology of schizophrenia, such as herpes and influenza, have been shown to activate HERV-W elements, and such activation has been associated with elevated biomarkers of systemic inflammation. New research indicates that HERV-W may be an important genetic factor interplaying with the environmental risk factor of infections and that, through this, HERV-W may be important for disease pathogenesis. A lifelong scenario of a detrimental interaction between infectious agents and HERV-W genes may decipher the actual development and course of schizophrenia. Further research is needed to find out if specific treatment strategies could reduce the expression of HERV-W and if this will be associated with remission.

  7. HTLV-3/4 and simian foamy retroviruses in humans: discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessain, Antoine; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Turpin, Jocelyn; Mahieux, Renaud

    2013-01-05

    Non-human primates are considered to be likely sources of viruses that can infect humans and thus pose a significant threat to human population. This is well illustrated by some retroviruses, as the simian immunodeficiency viruses and the simian T lymphotropic viruses, which have the ability to cross-species, adapt to a new host and sometimes spread. This leads to a pandemic situation for HIV-1 or an endemic one for HTLV-1. Here, we present the available data on the discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology of the recently discovered HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 deltaretroviruses, as well as the simian foamy retroviruses present in different human populations at risk, especially in central African hunters. We discuss also the natural history in humans of these retroviruses of zoonotic origin (magnitude and geographical distribution, possible inter-human transmission). In Central Africa, the increase of the bushmeat trade during the last decades has opened new possibilities for retroviral emergence in humans, especially in immuno-compromised persons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Age-related reduction of antibody response against the human endogenous retrovirus K envelope in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Moon, Byung-In; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-04-05

    In the present study, the correlation between the antibody response against human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) envelope and human age was investigated. Antibody levels were compared in groups in their 20s (n = 25), 30s (n = 39), 40s (n = 68), 50s (n = 32), and 60s and over (n = 25), which included healthy individuals and breast cancer and/or cervical cancer patients. It appeared that both IgM and IgG responses against the HERV-K envelope fell with increasing age. There were no differences in anti-HERV-K envelope antibody levels between healthy individuals and cancer patients. Therefore, our results indicated that the anti-HERV-K antibody levels cannot be considered as cancer-specific marker. Also, IgG1 appeared to be the predominant subtype in the reduction of the IgG response by age. Receiver operating characteristic curves of anti-HERV-K envelope IgM levels indicated that the groups of people in their 20s or 30s could be distinguished from those in their 40s, 50s or 60s and over with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity. These findings indicate that the serum antibody level of HERV-K envelope is a critical parameter reflecting person's age.

  9. (Some cellular mechanisms influencing the transcription of human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-Fc1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Janina Laska

    Full Text Available DNA methylation and histone acetylation are epigenetic modifications that act as regulators of gene expression. DNA methylation is considered an important mechanism for silencing of retroelements in the mammalian genome. However, the methylation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs is not well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional potential of HERV-Fc1 proviral 5'LTR in more detail, and examined the specific influence of CpG methylation on this LTR in number of cell lines. Specifically, the role of demethylating chemicals e.g. 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine and Trichostatin-A, in inducing or reactivating expression of HERV-Fc1 specific sequences and the mechanisms were investigated. In our present study, 5-aza-dC is shown to be a powerful inducer of HERV-Fc1, and at the same time it strongly inhibits methylation of DNA. Treatment with this demethylating agent 5-aza-dC, results in significantly increased levels of HERV-Fc1 expression in cells previously not expressing HERV-Fc1, or with a very low expression level. The extent of expression of HERV-Fc1 RNAs precisely correlates with the apparent extent of demethylation of the related DNA sequences. In conclusion, the results suggest that inhibition of DNA methylation/histone deacetylase can interfere with gene silencing mechanisms affecting HERV-Fc1 expression in human cells.

  10. Annual Conference on Human Retrovirus Testing (7th) held in Chicago, IL on March 3-5, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-05

    Annual Conference on Human Retrovirus Testing 15 TESIING : PANEL~ SESSION IIITESTNG-NON-SEROLOGIC TESTING MET~HODS PANEL CHAIR: Haynes W (Chip) Sheppard...Illinois Coulter Corporation Department of Public Health Myrtam Garcia Negron, Medical Technolog~st, Bryan Peterson. Ph.D.. Abbott Laboratories Puerto ...NC State Laboratory of Public Health Puerto Rico Department of Health Alfred Saah. M.D., Associate Professor of prema M. Singa. M.D.. Director

  11. Glucose Metabolism and Oxygen Availability Govern Reactivation of the Latent Human Retrovirus HTLV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anurag; Mateus, Manuel; Thinnes, Cyrille C; McCullagh, James S; Schofield, Christopher J; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2017-09-06

    The human retrovirus HTLV-1 causes a hematological malignancy or neuroinflammatory disease in ∼10% of infected individuals. HTLV-1 primarily infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes and persists as a provirus integrated in their genome. HTLV-1 appears transcriptionally latent in freshly isolated cells; however, the chronically active anti-HTLV-1 cytotoxic T cell response observed in infected individuals indicates frequent proviral expression in vivo. The kinetics and regulation of HTLV-1 proviral expression in vivo are poorly understood. By using hypoxia, small-molecule hypoxia mimics, and inhibitors of specific metabolic pathways, we show that physiologically relevant levels of hypoxia, as routinely encountered by circulating T cells in the lymphoid organs and bone marrow, significantly enhance HTLV-1 reactivation from latency. Furthermore, culturing naturally infected CD4(+) T cells in glucose-free medium or chemical inhibition of glycolysis or the mitochondrial electron transport chain strongly suppresses HTLV-1 plus-strand transcription. We conclude that glucose metabolism and oxygen tension regulate HTLV-1 proviral latency and reactivation in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Second National Conference on Human Retroviruses. Good news, bad news, and no news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, C

    1995-04-01

    The second annual National Conference on Human Retroviruses and Related Infections was held in Washington, D.C., January 29-February 2, 1995. Lectures addressed such topics as viral dynamics, United States AIDS epidemiology, immunopathogenesis, antiretroviral therapy, and HIV vaccines. Symposia were held on the interactivity of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and AIDS, the causes leading to long-term nonprogressors, and factors causing individuals to be exposed but uninfected. Oral presentations reviewed the following: 1) a study on the efficacy of oral ganciclovir for prevention of CMV disease in CMV-seropositive, HIV-infected individuals with CD4 counts of 50 or less; 2) data supporting rifabutin prophylaxis against MAC infection once the CD4 count is below 100; 3) the safety of the screened blood supply in the United States; 4) ACTG 063, a study examining the use of AZT with and without acyclovir; 5) perinatal transmission; and 6) four independent studies examining the efficacy of 3TC (lamivudine) as part of a combination of antiretroviral drugs in HIV-infected patients who were both AZT-naive and AZT-experienced.

  13. Construction and packaging of pseudotype retrovirus containing human N—ras cDNA antisense sequence and its biological effects on human hepatoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIALIBIN; WANGXIANG; 等

    1990-01-01

    N-ras is one of the transforming genes in human hepatic cancer cells.It has been found that N-ras was overexpressed at the mRNA and protein level in hepatoma cells.In order to explore the biological roles of N-ras in human hepatic carcinogenesis and the potential application in control of cancer cell growth,a preudotype retrovirus containing antisense sequence of human N-ras was constructed and packaged.A recombinant retrovirus vector containing antisense or sense sequences of N-ras cDNA was constructed by pZIP-NeoSV(X)1.The pseudotype virus was packaged ang rescued by transfection and infection in PA317 and ψ 2 helper cells.It has been demonstrated that the pseudotype retrovirus containing antisense N-ras sequence did inhibit the growth of human PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells accompanied with inhibition of p21 expression,while the retrovirus containing sense sequence had none.The pseudotype virus had no effect on human diploid fibroblasts.

  14. Efficient retrovirus-mediated transfer and expression of a human adenosine deaminase gene in diploid skin fibroblasts from an adenosine deaminase-deficient human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T.D.; Hock, R.A.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Miller, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    Skin fibroblasts might be considered suitable recipients for therapeutic genes to cure several human genetic diseases; however, these cells are resistant to gene transfer by most methods. The authors studied the ability of retroviral vectors to transfer genes into normal human diploid skin fibroblasts. Retroviruses carrying genes for neomycin or hygromycin B resistance conferred drug resistance to greater than 50% of the human fibroblasts after a single exposure to virus-containing medium. This represents at least a 500-fold increase in efficiency over other methods. Transfer was achieved in the absence of helper virus by using amphotropic retrovirus-packaging cells. A retrovirus vector containing a human adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA was constructed and used to infect ADA/sup -/ fibroblasts from a patient with ADA deficiency. The infected cells produced 12-fold more ADA enzyme than fibroblasts from normal individuals and were able to rapidly metabolize exogenous deoxyadenosine and adenosine, metabolites that accumulate in plasma in ADA-deficient patients and are responsible for the severe combined immunodeficiency in these patients. These experiments indicate the potential of retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human fibroblasts for gene therapy.

  15. Identification, characterization, and comparative genomic distribution of the HERV-K (HML-2 group of human endogenous retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Ravi P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integration of retroviral DNA into a germ cell may lead to a provirus that is transmitted vertically to that host's offspring as an endogenous retrovirus (ERV. In humans, ERVs (HERVs comprise about 8% of the genome, the vast majority of which are truncated and/or highly mutated and no longer encode functional genes. The most recently active retroviruses that integrated into the human germ line are members of the Betaretrovirus-like HERV-K (HML-2 group, many of which contain intact open reading frames (ORFs in some or all genes, sometimes encoding functional proteins that are expressed in various tissues. Interestingly, this expression is upregulated in many tumors ranging from breast and ovarian tissues to lymphomas and melanomas, as well as schizophrenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and other disorders. Results No study to date has characterized all HML-2 elements in the genome, an essential step towards determining a possible functional role of HML-2 expression in disease. We present here the most comprehensive and accurate catalog of all full-length and partial HML-2 proviruses, as well as solo LTR elements, within the published human genome to date. Furthermore, we provide evidence for preferential maintenance of proviruses and solo LTR elements on gene-rich chromosomes of the human genome and in proximity to gene regions. Conclusions Our analysis has found and corrected several errors in the annotation of HML-2 elements in the human genome, including mislabeling of a newly identified group called HML-11. HML-elements have been implicated in a wide array of diseases, and characterization of these elements will play a fundamental role to understand the relationship between endogenous retrovirus expression and disease.

  16. Activation of the Long Terminal Repeat of Human Endogenous Retrovirus K by Melanoma-Specific Transcription Factor MITF-M

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    Iyoko Katoh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The human and Old World primate genomes possess conserved endogenous retrovirus sequences that have been implicated in evolution, reproduction, and carcinogenesis. Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K with 5′LTR-gag-pro-pol-env-rec/np9-3′LTR sequences represents the newest retrovirus family that integrated into the human genome 1 to 5 million years ago. Although a high-level expression of HERV-K in melanomas, breast cancers, and terato-carcinomas has been demonstrated, the mechanism of the lineage-specific activation of the long terminal repeat (LTR remains obscure. We studied chromosomal HERV-K expression in MeWo melanoma cells in comparison with the basal expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells. Cloned LTR of HERV-K (HML-2.HOM was also characterized by mutation and transactivation experiments. We detected multiple transcriptional initiator (Inr sites in the LTR by rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (5′ RACE. HEK293 and MeWo showed different Inr usage. The most potent Inr was associated with a TATA box and three binding motifs of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF. Both chromosomal HERV-K expression and the cloned LTR function were strongly activated in HEK293 by transfection with MITF-M, a melanocyte/melanoma–specific isoform of MITF. Coexpression of MITF and the HERV-K core antigen was detected in retinal pigmented epithelium by an immunofluorescence analysis. Although malignant melanoma lines MeWo, G361, and SK-MEL-28 showed enhanced HERV-K transcription compared with normal melanocytes, the level of MITF-M messenger RNA persisted from normal to transformed melanocytes. Thus, MITF-M may be a prerequisite for the pigmented cell lineage–specific function of HERV-K LTR, leading to the high-level expression in malignant melanomas.

  17. Human retroviruses in leukaemia and AIDS: reflections on their discovery, biology and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpas, Abraham

    2004-11-01

    The study of retroviruses has had a profound impact by unveiling an unusual form of viral replication: the multiplication of RNA viruses via a proviral DNA, for which Jan Svoboda provided the experimental model over forty years ago. In 1970 Temin, Mizutani and Baltimore discovered that this group of viruses contains a unique enzyme catalysing the synthesis of a DNA copy of the viral RNA: reverse transcriptase (RT). The discovery of RT has itself had an enormous impact on molecular biology in general, but also stimulated many premature claims of its detection in human disease. Claims by Gallo's laboratory that the cytoplasm of human leukaemia cells contained RT proved to be unfounded, as did his report in collaboration with Weiss that myeloid leukaemia contained HL23 virus, this organism proving not to be human but a laboratory contaminant of three monkey viruses. Conclusive demonstration of a retroviral involvement in human leukaemia was first provided in 1981 by Hinuma and his associates, showing that adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL), a rare form of leukaemia endemic to south-west Japan, is caused by a new retrovirus (ATLV). Other publications in December 1980 and through 1981 claimed the discovery of a new human T-cell leukaemia virus involved in mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary's syndrome (SS). This virus was termed HTLV by Gallo. The nucleotide sequence of ATLV is strongly conserved, that of my 1983 isolate from a black British ATL patient being practically identical with the Japanese virus isolates. After AIDS was recognised in 1981 by Gottlieb and coworkers as a new human disease, several papers were published by Gallo and his associates during 1983-4, invoking the oncovirus responsible for adult T-cell leukaemia as the cause of AIDS. In 1983 the French scientist Barré-Sinoussi and her colleagues succeeded in isolating a new agent in the disease, a lentivirus, which they named LAV. The French immunologist Klatzmann and his colleagues discovered that LAV killed

  18. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: Innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Aspects of gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were analysed in serum samples from 46 MS families (25 sporadic MS cases and 42 familial MS cases): antibodies to the MS-associated human endogenous retrovirus HERV-H, and levels of three components in the innate pathogen......-associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env......-H and the antiviral immune response may play a role in MS development, and also underline the tenuous nature of specific genetic contributions to this complex disease....

  19. Gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis: innate and adaptive immune responses to human endogenous retrovirus and herpesvirus antigens and the lectin complement activation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Petersen, Thor; Thiel, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    Aspects of gene-environment interactions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were analysed in serum samples from 46 MS families (25 sporadic MS cases and 42 familial MS cases): antibodies to the MS-associated human endogenous retrovirus HERV-H, and levels of three components in the innate pathogen......-associated molecular pattern recognition: mannan-binding lectin (MBL), and MASP-2 and MASP-3. For representative MS families, we also determined herpesvirus serology for HSV-1, VZV, and EBV; and tissue typed for HLA-B, and HLA DR and DQ. In MS, a significant correlation between elevated immune reactivity to HERV-H Env...... immune response may play a role in MS development, and also underline the tenuous nature of specific genetic contributions to this complex disease. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Feb...

  20. Systematic identification and characterization of regulatory elements derived from human endogenous retroviruses.

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    Jumpei Ito

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs and other long terminal repeat (LTR-type retrotransposons (HERV/LTRs have regulatory elements that possibly influence the transcription of host genes. We systematically identified and characterized these regulatory elements based on publicly available datasets of ChIP-Seq of 97 transcription factors (TFs provided by ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects. We determined transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs using the ChIP-Seq datasets and identified TFBSs observed on HERV/LTR sequences (HERV-TFBSs. Overall, 794,972 HERV-TFBSs were identified. Subsequently, we identified "HERV/LTR-shared regulatory element (HSRE," defined as a TF-binding motif in HERV-TFBSs, shared within a substantial fraction of a HERV/LTR type. HSREs could be an indication that the regulatory elements of HERV/LTRs are present before their insertions. We identified 2,201 HSREs, comprising specific associations of 354 HERV/LTRs and 84 TFs. Clustering analysis showed that HERV/LTRs can be grouped according to the TF binding patterns; HERV/LTR groups bounded to pluripotent TFs (e.g., SOX2, POU5F1, and NANOG, embryonic endoderm/mesendoderm TFs (e.g., GATA4/6, SOX17, and FOXA1/2, hematopoietic TFs (e.g., SPI1 (PU1, GATA1/2, and TAL1, and CTCF were identified. Regulatory elements of HERV/LTRs tended to locate nearby and/or interact three-dimensionally with the genes involved in immune responses, indicating that the regulatory elements play an important role in controlling the immune regulatory network. Further, we demonstrated subgroup-specific TF binding within LTR7, LTR5B, and LTR5_Hs, indicating that gains or losses of the regulatory elements occurred during genomic invasions of the HERV/LTRs. Finally, we constructed dbHERV-REs, an interactive database of HERV/LTR regulatory elements (http://herv-tfbs.com/. This study provides fundamental information in understanding the impact of HERV/LTRs on host transcription, and offers insights into

  1. Construction and expression of retroviruses encoding dual drug resistance genes in human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of retroviral vectors encoding human mdr1 gene alone as well as in combination with either human mgmt gene or human mutant Ser31-dhfr gene are engineered. The resultant retroviruses are used to transduce human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells. It has been shown that expression of dual drug resistance genes in transduced cells confers a broad range of resistance to both kinds of corresponding drugs. These data suggest a rationale for the use of such double chemoresistance gene constructs in an in vivo model in which transduced hematopoietic cells will acquire multiple protection against the cytotoxic side effects of combination chemotherapy and may have future application in chemoprotection of normal tissues, thus killing tumor cells more effectively.

  2. Endogenous retrovirus drives hitherto unknown proapoptotic p63 isoforms in the male germ line of humans and great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Ulrike; Moll-Rocek, Julian; Moll, Ute M; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    TAp63, but not its homolog p53, eliminates oocytes that suffered DNA damage. An equivalent gene for guarding the male germ line is currently not known. Here we identify hitherto unknown human p63 transcripts with unique 5'-ends derived from incorporated exons upstream of the currently mapped TP63 gene. These unique p63 transcripts are highly and specifically expressed in testis. Their most upstream region corresponds to a LTR of the human endogenous retrovirus 9 (ERV9). The insertion of this LTR upstream of the TP63 locus occurred only recently in evolution and is unique to humans and great apes (Hominidae). A corresponding p63 protein is the sole p63 species in healthy human testis, and is strongly expressed in spermatogenic precursors but not in mature spermatozoa. In response to DNA damage, this human male germ-cell-encoded TAp63 protein (designated GTAp63) is activated by caspase cleavage near its carboxyterminal domain and induces apoptosis. Human testicular cancer tissues and cell lines largely lost p63 expression. However, pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases completely restores p63 expression in testicular cancer cells (>3,000-fold increase). Our data support a model whereby testis-specific GTAp63 protects the genomic integrity of the male germ line and acts as a tumor suppressor. In Hominidae, this guardian function was greatly enhanced by integration of an endogenous retrovirus upstream of the TP63 locus that occurred 15 million years ago. By providing increased germ-line stability, this event may have contributed to the evolution of hominids and enabled their long reproductive periods.

  3. Role of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K18 in autoimmune disease susceptibility: study in the Spanish population and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hera, Belén; Varadé, Jezabel; García-Montojo, Marta; Lamas, José Ramón; de la Encarnación, Ana; Arroyo, Rafael; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are genomic sequences that resulted from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and therefore are transmitted in a Mendelian fashion. Increased HERV expression and antibodies to HERV antigens have been found in various autoimmune diseases. HERV-K18 in chromosome 1 was previously associated with type one diabetes and multiple sclerosis (MS). The etiology of these complex conditions has not been completely elucidated even after the powerful genome wide association studies (GWAS) performed. Nonetheless, this approach does not scrutinize the repetitive sequences within the genome, and part of the missing heritability could lie behind these sequences. We aimed at evaluating the role of HERV-K18 in chromosome 1 on autoimmune disease susceptibility. Two HERV-K18 SNPs (97Y/C and 154W/Stop substitutions) conforming three haplotypes were genotyped in Spanish cohorts of multiple sclerosis (n = 942), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 462) and ethnically matched controls (n = 601). Our findings were pooled in a meta-analysis including 5312 autoimmune patients and 4032 controls. Significant associations of both HERV-K18 polymorphisms in chromosome 1 with MS patients stratified by HLA-DRB1*15:01 were observed [97Y/C p = 0.02; OR (95% CI) = 1.5 (1.04-2.17) and 154W/Stop: p = 0.001; OR (95% CI) = 1.6 (1.19-2.16)]. Combined meta-analysis of the previously published association studies of HERV-K18 with different autoimmune diseases, together with data derived from Spanish cohorts, yielded a significant association of the HERV-K18.3 haplotype [97Y-154W: p(M-H) = 0.0008; OR(M-H) (95% CI) = 1.22 (1.09-1.38)]. Association of the HERV-K18.3 haplotype in chromosome 1 with autoimmune-disease susceptibility was confirmed through meta-analysis.

  4. Serologic analysis of anti-porcine endogenous retroviruses immune responses in humans after ex vivo transgenic pig liver perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Sharma, Ajay; Okabe, Jeannine; Cui, Cunqi; Huang, Liping; Wei, Yuan Yuan; Wan, Hua; Lei, Ying; Logan, John S; Levy, Marlon F; Byrne, Guerard W

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in xenotransplantation may significantly increase the availability of organs for human transplantation. The use of porcine organs, however, has raised concern about possible transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) to the recipients. The authors developed monoclonal antibodies specific to the PERV Gag viral product and show that these antibodies can detect PERV antigen under a variety of assay conditions, including enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining methods. Two patients in fulminant hepatic failure were treated by extracorporeal perfusion using transgenic porcine livers before receiving orthotopic liver transplants. Despite the use of immune suppression that allowed survival of the allograft, these patients both showed a strong immune response to the xenograft suggesting a largely intact capability to mount a humoral immune response. However, analysis of patient serum samples over a 3 to 4 year period has showed no evidence of an immune response to PERV antigens, suggesting a lack of PERV infection.

  5. Implications of the evolution pattern of human T-cell leukemia retroviruses on their pathogenic virulence (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azran, Inbal; Schavinsky-Khrapunsky, Yana; Priel, Esther; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Aboud, Mordechai

    2004-11-01

    Simian retroviruses pose a serious threat to public health, as two human pathogenic retroviruses, HIV and HTLV, have been already proved to originate from such non-human viruses. Therefore, studying their natural prevalence among wild non-human primates is important for planning strategies to prevent the emergence of additional human retroviral pathogens. This article is focused on tracing the origin and evolution of the human T-cell leukemia viruses HTLV-I and HTLV-II in comparison to that of the simian lymphotropic viruses STLV-I, STLV-II and STLV-L, which are phylo-genically classified into a common group called primate T-lymphotropic viruses (PTLV). Thus, HTLV-I and STLV-I are referred to as PTLV-I and HTLV-II and STLV-II as PTLV-II, whereas STLV-L, which is highly divergent from both HTLV types, comprises a third subgroup called PTLV-L. The phylogeny of PTLV indicates that both, HTLV-I and HTLV-II emerged from a simian origin, but their subsequent evolution continued in different patterns. HTLV-I includes 6 subtypes which evolved from STLV-I through several times of different geographic interspecies transmission between simian and human hosts. These repeated invasions to new primate species are likely to give rise to viral strains with increasing pathogenic potential. On the other hand, HTLV-II includes 4 subtypes which appear to originate from a common human ancestor virus that emerged from only one simian to human transmission, whereas the subsequent evolution of HTLV-II and STLV-II strains continued separately only within the Homo sapiens and Pan paniscus species respectively, without repeated interspecies jumps. Such evolution pattern likely involves less genetic changes and selection of viral strains with low pathogenic virulence that could co-exist with their hosts for long time. These different evolution patterns can explain the much wider implication of HTLV-I with human clinical disorders than HTLV-II. Of note, however, more recently HTLV-II started

  6. Activation of endogenous human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs) and therapy-resistant phenotypes of malignant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-07-01

    Recent reports revealed consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviral elements in human preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cells. Activity of stem cell associated retroviruses (SCARs) has been implicated in seeding thousands of human-specific regulatory sequences in the hESC genome. Activation of specific SCARs has been demonstrated in patients diagnosed with multiple types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders, and appears associated with clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. A hallmark feature of human-specific SCAR integration sites is deletions of ancestral DNA. Analysis of human-specific genetic loci of SCARs' stemness networks in tumor samples of TCGA cohorts representing 29 cancer types suggests that this approach may facilitate identification of pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations, gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCAR-regulated host genes. Present analyses indicate that multiple lines of strong circumstantial evidence support the hypothesis that activation of SCARs' networks may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, perhaps contributing to the emergence of clinically-lethal therapy-resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes.

  7. A novel function of RNAs arising from the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retrovirus 9 in cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lai; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Candotti, Fabio; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Beaucage, Serge L; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Calvert, Valerie; Juhl, Hartmut; Mills, Frederick; Mason, Karen; Shastri, Neal; Chik, Josh; Xu, Cynthia; Rosenberg, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    The human genome contains approximately 50 copies of the replication-defective human endogenous retrovirus 9 (ERV-9) and thousands of copies of its solitary long term repeat (sLTR) element. While some sLTRs are located upstream of critical genes and have enhancer activity, other sLTRs are located within introns and may be transcribed as RNAs. We found that intronic RNAs arising from U3 sLTRs of ERV-9 were expressed as both sense (S) and antisense (AS) transcripts in all human cells tested but that expression levels differed in malignant versus nonmalignant cells. In nonmalignant cells, AS was expressed at higher levels than S and at higher levels than in malignant cells; in malignant cells, AS was expressed at amounts equivalent to those of S RNA. Critically, U3 AS RNA was found to physically bind to key transcription factors for cellular proliferation, including NF-Y, p53, and sp1, indicating that such RNA transcripts may function as decoy targets or traps for NF-Y and thus inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. Indeed, short U3 oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on these RNA sequences ably inhibited proliferation of cancer cell lines driven by cyclins B1/B2, the gene targets of NF-Y.

  8. Infection of xenotransplanted human cell lines by murine retroviruses: A lesson brought back to light by XMRV

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    Heidi Anne Hempel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection of xenotransplanted human cells by xenotropic retroviruses is a known phenomenon in the scientific literature, with examples cited since the early 1970’s. However, arguably, until recently, the importance of this phenomenon had not been largely recognized. The emergence and subsequent debunking of Xenotropic Murine leukemia virus-Related Virus (XMRV as a cell culture contaminant as opposed to a potential pathogen in several human diseases, notably prostate cancer and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, highlighted a potential problem of murine endogenous gammaretroviruses infecting commonly used human cell lines. Subsequent to the discovery of XMRV, many additional cell lines that underwent xenotransplantation in mice have been shown to harbor murine gammaretroviruses. Such retroviral infection poses the threat of not only confounding experiments performed in these cell lines via virus-induced changes in cellular behavior but also the potential infection of other cell lines cultured in the same laboratory. Thus, the possibility of xenotropic retroviral infection of cell lines may warrant additional precautions, such as periodic testing for retroviral sequences in cell lines cultured in the laboratory.

  9. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus-K is strongly associated with the basal-like breast cancer phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanning, Gary L.; Malouf, Gabriel G.; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Esteva, Francisco J.; Weinstein, John N.; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Su, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which make up approximately 8% of the human genome, are overexpressed in some breast cancer cells and tissues but without regard to cancer subtype. We, therefore, analyzed TCGA RNA-Seq data to evaluate differences in expression of the HERV-K family in breast cancers of the various subtypes. Four HERV-K loci on different chromosomes were analyzed in basal, Her2E, LumA, and LumB breast cancer subtypes of 512 breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The results for all four loci showed higher HERV-K expression in the basal subtype, suggesting similar mechanisms of regulation regardless of locus. Expression of the HERV-K envelope gene (env) was highly significantly increased in basal tumors in comparison with the also-upregulated expression of other HERV-K genes. Analysis of reverse-phase protein array data indicated that increased expression of HERV-K is associated with decreased mutation of H-Ras (wild-type). Our results show elevation of HERV-K expression exclusively in the basal subtype of IDC breast cancer (as opposed to the other subtypes) and suggest HERV-K as a possible target for cancer vaccines or immunotherapy against this highly aggressive form of breast cancer. PMID:28165048

  10. The human endogenous retrovirus link between genes and environment in multiple sclerosis and in multifactorial diseases associating neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Hervé; Lang, Alois

    2010-08-01

    Endogenous retroviruses represent about 8% of the human genome and belong to the superfamily of transposable and retrotransposable genetic elements. Altogether, these mobile genetic elements and their numerous inactivated "junk" sequences represent nearly one half of the human DNA. Nonetheless, a significant part of this "non-conventional" genome has retained potential activity. Epigenetic control is notably involved in silencing most of these genetic elements but certain environmental factors such as viruses are known to dysregulate their expression in susceptible cells. More particularly, embryonal cells with limited gene methylation are most susceptible to uncontrolled activation of these mobile genetic elements by, e.g., viral infections. In particular, certain viruses transactivate promoters from endogenous retroviral family type W (HERV-W). HERV-W RNA was first isolated in circulating viral particles (Multiple Sclerosis-associated RetroViral element, MSRV) that have been associated with the evolution and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. HERV-W elements encode a powerful immunopathogenic envelope protein (ENV) that activates a pro-inflammatory and autoimmune cascade through interaction with Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. This ENV protein has repeatedly been detected in MS brain lesions and may be involved in other diseases. Epigenetic factors controlling HERV-W ENV protein expression then reveal critical. This review addresses the gene-environment epigenetic interface of such HERV-W elements and its potential involvement in disease.

  11. Significant differences in genotoxicity induced by retrovirus integration in human T cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weiyan; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2013-04-25

    Retrovirus is frequently used in the genetic modification of mammalian cells and the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via cell reprogramming. Vector-induced genotoxicity could induce profound effect on the physiology and function of these stem cells and their differentiated progeny. We analyzed retrovirus-induced genotoxicity in somatic cell Jurkat and two iPSC lines. In Jurkat cells, retrovirus frequently activated host gene expression and gene activation was not dependent on the distance between the integration site and the transcription start site of the host gene. In contrast, retrovirus frequently down-regulated host gene expression in iPSCs, possibly due to the action of chromatin silencing that spreads from the provirus to the nearby host gene promoter. Our data raises the issue that some of the phenotypic variability observed among iPSC clones derived from the same parental cell line may be caused by retrovirus-induced gene expression changes rather than by the reprogramming process itself. It also underscores the importance of characterizing retrovirus integration and carrying out risk assessment of iPSCs before they can be applied in basic research and clinics.

  12. The Mechanism of Budding of Retroviruses from Cell Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pincetic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have evolved a mechanism for the release of particles from the cell membrane that appropriates cellular protein complexes, referred to as ESCRT-I, -II, -III, normally involved in the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies. Three different classes of late assembly (L domains encoded in Gag, with core sequences of PPXY, PTAP, and YPXL, recruit different components of the ESCRT machinery to form a budding complex for virus release. Here, we highlight recent progress in identifying the role of different ESCRT complexes in facilitating budding, ubiquitination, and membrane targeting of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV and human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1. These findings show that retroviruses may adopt parallel budding pathways by recruiting different host factors from common cellular machinery for particle release.

  13. Role of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K18 in autoimmune disease susceptibility: study in the Spanish population and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén de la Hera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs are genomic sequences that resulted from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and therefore are transmitted in a Mendelian fashion. Increased HERV expression and antibodies to HERV antigens have been found in various autoimmune diseases. HERV-K18 in chromosome 1 was previously associated with type one diabetes and multiple sclerosis (MS. The etiology of these complex conditions has not been completely elucidated even after the powerful genome wide association studies (GWAS performed. Nonetheless, this approach does not scrutinize the repetitive sequences within the genome, and part of the missing heritability could lie behind these sequences. We aimed at evaluating the role of HERV-K18 in chromosome 1 on autoimmune disease susceptibility. METHODS: Two HERV-K18 SNPs (97Y/C and 154W/Stop substitutions conforming three haplotypes were genotyped in Spanish cohorts of multiple sclerosis (n = 942, rheumatoid arthritis (n = 462 and ethnically matched controls (n = 601. Our findings were pooled in a meta-analysis including 5312 autoimmune patients and 4032 controls. RESULTS: Significant associations of both HERV-K18 polymorphisms in chromosome 1 with MS patients stratified by HLA-DRB1*15:01 were observed [97Y/C p = 0.02; OR (95% CI = 1.5 (1.04-2.17 and 154W/Stop: p = 0.001; OR (95% CI = 1.6 (1.19-2.16]. Combined meta-analysis of the previously published association studies of HERV-K18 with different autoimmune diseases, together with data derived from Spanish cohorts, yielded a significant association of the HERV-K18.3 haplotype [97Y-154W: p(M-H = 0.0008; OR(M-H (95% CI = 1.22 (1.09-1.38]. CONCLUSION: Association of the HERV-K18.3 haplotype in chromosome 1 with autoimmune-disease susceptibility was confirmed through meta-analysis.

  14. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  15. Identification and detection of a novel human endogenous retrovirus-related gene, and structural characterization of its related elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyi Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Up-regulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs is associated with many diseases, including cancer. In this study, an H family HERV (HERV-H-related gene was identified and characterized. Its spliced transcript lacks protein-coding capacity and may belong to the emerging class of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs. The 1.3-kb RNA consisting of four exons is transcribed from an Alu element upstream of a 5.0-kb structurally incomplete HERV-H element. RT-PCR and quantitative RT-PCR results indicated that expression of this HERV-related transcript was negatively associated with colon, stomach, and kidney cancers. Its expression was induced upon treatment with DNA methylation and histone deacetylation inhibitors. A BLAT search using long terminal repeats (LTRs identified 50 other LTR homogenous HERV-H elements. Further analysis of these elements revealed that all are structurally incomplete and only five exert transcriptional activity. The results presented here recommend further investigation into a potentially functional HERV-H-related ncRNA.

  16. Antisense bcl-2 retrovirus vector increases the sensitivity of a human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W G; Ma, L P; Wang, S W; Zhang, Z Y; Cao, G D

    1999-05-01

    The bcl-2 oncoprotein directly prolongs cellular survival by blocking apoptosis and its overexpression is associated with cellular resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic drugs and gamma-irradiation. Meanwhile, it has been shown that bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide can induce apoptosis or increase toxicity of the treatment in tumors in vivo and in vitro. However, it is difficult to obtain stable transfection by this approach and there are no reports about the effect of an antisense bcl-2 on the sensitivity to oxidative stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Here we investigated the effect of an antisense bcl-2 RNA retrovirus vector transfer on the sensitivity of 2-butylamino-2-demethoxy-hypocrellin A (2-BA-2-DMHA) photosensitization in a human gastric adenocarcinoma MGC803 cell line. The results indicate that antisense bcl-2-infected MGC803 cells expressed exogenous antisense bcl-2 mRNA measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and significantly reduced bcl-2 protein determined by western blotting analysis. The decreased expression of bcl-2 protein was accompanied by increased phototoxicity and susceptibility to apoptosis induced by 2-BA-2-DMHA PDT. Our finding suggests that reduction of bcl-2 protein in gastric cancers, and possibly also in a variety of other tumors, may be a novel and rational approach to improve photosensitivity and the treatment outcome.

  17. Anti-inflammatory and vasoprotective activity of a retroviral-derived peptide, homologous to human endogenous retroviruses: endothelial cell effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Cianciolo

    Full Text Available Malignant and inflammatory tissues sometimes express endogenous retroviruses or their proteins. A highly-conserved sequence from retroviral transmembrane (TM proteins, termed the "immunosuppressive domain (ID", is associated with inhibition of immune and inflammatory functions. An octadecapeptide (MN10021 from the ID of retroviral TM protein p15E inhibits in vitro release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increases synthesis of anti-inflammatory IL-10. We sought to determine if MN10021 has significant in vivo effects. MN10021, prepared by solid-phase synthesis, was dimerized through a naturally-occurring, carboxy-terminal cysteine. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity was determined using a murine model of sodium periodate (NaIO(4-induced peritonitis. In vivo vasoprotective effects were determined using: (1 a carrageenan-induced model of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in mice; (2 a reverse passive Arthus model in guinea pigs; and (3 vasoregulatory effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. In vitro studies included: (1 binding/uptake of MN10021 using human monocytes, cultured fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells (VEC; (2 gene expression by RT-PCR of MN10021-treated VEC; and (3 apoptosis of MN10021-treated VEC exposed to staurosporine or TNF-α. One-tenth nmol MN10021 inhibits 50 percent of the inflammatory response in the mouse peritonitis model. Furthermore, 73 nmol MN10021 completely protects mice in a lethal model of carrageenan-induced DIC and inhibits vascular leak in both the mouse DIC model and a guinea pig reverse passive Arthus reaction. MN10021 binds to and is taken up in a specific manner by both human monocytes and VEC but not by cultured human fibroblasts. Surprisingly, orally-administered MN10021 lowers blood pressure in SHR rats by 10-15% within 1 h suggesting a direct or indirect effect on the vascular endothelium. MN10021 and derived octapeptides induce iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in VEC

  18. Interleukin 2 inhibits in vitro growth of human T cell lines carrying retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugamura, K; Nakai, S; Fujii, M; Hinuma, Y

    1985-05-01

    Four human T cell lines, TL-Mor, TL-Su, TL-TerI, and TL-OmI, carrying human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV), were established previously. TL-Mor, TL-Su, and TL-TerI were derived from interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent parental cell lines cloned from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of three healthy HTLV carriers, while TL-OmI was directly established from PBL of a patient with adult T cell leukemia. These four TL cell lines grow autonomously without IL-2. When they were cultured in the presence of IL-2, their growth was inhibited after a few days. This growth inhibition depended on the dose of IL-2, and the effective dose significantly promoted growth of their parental IL-2-dependent cell lines. The growth inhibition is demonstrated to be due to specific binding of IL-2 to receptors on the TL cells.

  19. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. [eds.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wain-Hobson, S. [ed.] [Laboratory of Molecular Retrovirology, Pasteur Inst.; Smith, R.F. [ed.] [Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Pharmacology; Pavlakis, G.N. [ed.] [National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD (United States). Cancer Research Facility

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  20. The Role of XMRV, a Novel Xenotropic Murine Retrovirus, in Human Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    antiviral pathway from human prostate tumors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:1655-60. 2. Dunn, G.P., K.C. Sheehan , L.J. Old, and R.D. Schreiber. 2005. IFN...sequences in blood of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and healthy blood donors. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 5. Lombardi, V.C., F.W. Ruscetti...The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of

  1. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  2. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Amandine, E-mail: amandine.vargas@voila.fr; Thiery, Maxime, E-mail: thiery.maxime@courrier.uqam.ca; Lafond, Julie, E-mail: lafond.julie@uqam.ca; Barbeau, Benoit, E-mail: barbeau.benoit@uqam.ca

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  3. Human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope gene activates the small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel in human neuroblastoma cells through CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Liu, Z C; Yin, S J; Chen, Y T; Yu, H L; Zeng, J; Zhang, Q; Zhu, F

    2013-09-05

    Numerous studies have shown that human endogenous retrovirus W family (HERV-W) envelope gene (env) is related to various diseases but the underlying mechanism has remained poorly understood. Our previous study showed that there was abnormal expression of HERV-W env in sera of patients with schizophrenia. In this paper, we reported that overexpression of the HERV-W env elevated the levels of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel protein 3 (SK3) in human neuroblastoma cells. Using a luciferase reporter system and RNA interference method, we found that functional cAMP response element site was required for the expression of SK3 triggered by HERV-W env. In addition, it was also found that the SK3 channel was activated by HERV-W env. Further study indicated that cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) was required for the activation of the SK3 channel. Thus, a novel signaling mechanism of how HERV-W env influences neuronal activity and contributes to mental illnesses such as schizophrenia was proposed.

  4. Human endogenous retrovirus K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-specific T-cell responses are infrequently detected in HIV-1-infected subjects using standard peptide matrix-based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B. Jones (R. Brad); V.M. John (Vivek); D.V. Hunter (Diana); E. Martin (Eric); S. Mujib (Shariq); V. Mihajlovic (Vesna); P.C. Burgers (Peter); T.M. Luider (Theo); G. Gyenes (Gabor); N.C. Sheppard (Neil); D. SenGupta (Devi); R. Tandon (Ravi); F.-Y. Yue (Feng-Yun); W.S. Benko (William); C. Kovacs (Carrie); R. Nixon; M.A. Ostrowski (Mario)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractT-cell responses to human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) K(HML-2) Gag and Env were mapped in HIV-1-infected subjects using 15mer peptides. Small peptide pools and high concentrations were used to maximize sensitivity. In the 23 subjects studied, only three bona fide HERV-K(HML-2)-specific

  5. Human endogenous retrovirus W env increases nitric oxide production and enhances the migration ability of microglia by regulating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran Xiao; Shan Li; Qian Cao; Xiuling Wang; Qiujin Yan; Xiaoning Tu; Ying Zhu; Fan Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus W env (HERV-W env) plays a critical role in many neuropsychological diseases such as schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis (MS).These diseases are accompanied by immunological reactions in the central nervous system (CNS).Microglia are important immunocytes in brain inflammation that can produce a gasotransmitter-nitric oxide (NO).NO not only plays a role in the function of neuronal cells but also participates in the pathogenesis of various neuropsychological diseases.In this study,we reported increased NO production in CHME-5 microglia cells after they were transfected with HERV-W env.Moreover,HERV-W env increased the expression and function of human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) and enhanced the promoter activity of hiNOS.Microglial migration was also enhanced.These data revealed that HERV-W env might contribute to increase NO production and microglial migration ability in neuropsychological disorders by regulating the expression of inducible NOS.Results from this study might lead to the identification of novel targets for the treatment of neuropsychological diseases,including neuroinflammatory diseases,stroke,and neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Immunotherapies for Targeting Ancient Retrovirus during Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    nature of virus activity in the cancer cell and its involvement in cancer prognosis. Melanoma forms 80% of all skin cancer and about 10% of all... CDK4 pathways in melanoma cells. Cancer investigation 28, 1031-1037 (2010). 7.Hahn, S., et al. Serological response to human endogenous retrovirus K...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0002 TITLE: Immunotherapies for Targeting Ancient Retrovirus during Breast Cancer

  7. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  8. Expression and activation by Epstein Barr virus of human endogenous retroviruses-W in blood cells and astrocytes: inference for multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mameli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proposed co-factors triggering the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS are the Epstein Barr virus (EBV, and the potentially neuropathogenic MSRV (MS-associated retrovirus and syncytin-1, of the W family of human endogenous retroviruses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In search of links, the expression of HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1, with/without exposure to EBV or to EBV glycoprotein350 (EBVgp350, was studied on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from healthy volunteers and MS patients, and on astrocytes, by discriminatory env-specific RT-PCR assays, and by flow cytometry. Basal expression of HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1 occurs in astrocytes and in monocytes, NK, and B, but not in T cells. This uneven expression is amplified in untreated MS patients, and dramatically reduced during therapy. In astrocytes, EBVgp350 stimulates the expression of HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1, with requirement of the NF-κB pathway. In EBVgp350-treated PBMC, MSRVenv and syncytin-1 transcription is activated in B cells and monocytes, but not in T cells, nor in the highly expressing NK cells. The latter cells, but not the T cells, are activated by proinflammatory cytokines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In vitro EBV activates the potentially immunopathogenic and neuropathogenic HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1, in cells deriving from blood and brain. In vivo, pathogenic outcomes would depend on abnormal situations, as in late EBV primary infection, that is often symptomatic, or/and in the presence of particular host genetic backgrounds. In the blood, HERV-Wenv activation might induce immunopathogenic phenomena linked to its superantigenic properties. In the brain, toxic mechanisms against oligodendrocytes could be established, inducing inflammation, demyelination and axonal damage. Local stimulation by proinflammatory cytokines and other factors might activate further HERV-Ws, contributing to the neuropathogenity. In MS pathogenesis, a possible model could include EBV as

  9. Xenotransplantation and pig endogenous retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magre, Saema; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Bartosch, Birke

    2003-01-01

    Xenotransplantation, in particular transplantation of pig cells, tissues and organs into human patients, may alleviate the current shortage of suitable allografts available for human transplantation. This overview addresses the physiological, immunological and virological factors considered with regard to xenotransplantation. Among the issues reviewed are the merits of using pigs as xenograft source species, the compatibility of pig and human organ physiology and the immunological hindrances with regard to the various types of rejection and attempts at abrogating rejection. Advances in the prevention of pig organ rejection by creating genetically modified pigs that are more suited to the human microenvironment are also discussed. Finally, with regard to virology, possible zoonotic infections emanating from pigs are reviewed, with special emphasis on the pig endogenous retrovirus (PERV). An in depth account of PERV studies, comprising their discovery as well as recent knowledge of the virus, is given. To date, all retrospective studies on patients with pig xenografts have shown no evidence of PERV transmission, however, many factors make us interpret these results with caution. Although the lack of PERV infection in xenograft recipients up to now is encouraging, more basic research and controlled animal studies that mimic the pig to human xenotransplantation setting more closely are required for safety assessment.

  10. Human endogenous retrovirus expression is inversely related with the up-regulation of interferon-inducible genes in the skin of patients with lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Marcelle Almeida de Sousa; Gavioli, Camila Fátima Biancardi; Pereira, Nátalli Zanete; de Carvalho, Gabriel Costa; Domingues, Rosana; Aoki, Valéria; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2015-04-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a common inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Reports of a common transactivation of quiescent human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) support the connection of viruses to the disease. HERVs are ancient retroviral sequences in the human genome and their transcription is often deregulated in cancer and autoimmune diseases. We explored the transcriptional activity of HERV sequences as well as the antiviral restriction factor and interferon-inducible genes in the skin from LP patients and healthy control (HC) donors. The study included 13 skin biopsies from patients with LP and 12 controls. Real-time PCR assay identified significant decrease in the HERV-K gag and env mRNA expression levels in LP subjects, when compared to control group. The expressions of HERV-K18 and HERV-W env were also inhibited in the skin of LP patients. We observed a strong correlation between HERV-K gag with other HERV sequences, regardless the down-modulation of transcripts levels in LP group. In contrast, a significant up-regulation of the cytidine deaminase APOBEC 3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing), and the GTPase MxA (Myxovirus resistance A) mRNA expression level was identified in the LP skin specimens. Other transcript expressions, such as the master regulator of type I interferon-dependent immune responses, STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and IRF-7 (interferon regulatory factor 7), IFN-β and the inflammassome NALP3, had increased levels in LP, when compared to HC group. Our study suggests that interferon-inducible factors, in addition to their role in innate immunity against exogenous pathogens, contribute to the immune control of HERVs. Evaluation of the balance between HERV and interferon-inducible factor expression could possibly contribute to surveillance of inflammatory/malignant status of skin diseases.

  11. Secretion of human parathyroid hormone from rat pituitary cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus encoding preproparathyroid hormone.

    OpenAIRE

    Hellerman, J G; Cone, R C; Potts, J. T.; Rich, A; Mulligan, R C; Kronenberg, H M

    1984-01-01

    In order to study the functions of precursors to secreted proteins, we expressed cloned DNA encoding human preproparathyroid hormone (preproPTH) in rat pituitary cells. We first constructed a recombinant plasmid containing human preproPTH cDNA and retroviral control signals. This recombinant plasmid was transfected into psi-2 cells, a packaging cell line that produces Moloney murine leukemia viral particles containing no retroviral RNA. The transfected psi-2 cells generated helper-free recomb...

  12. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    small to be detected. Sequence variation among virus genomes complicates application of sequence-specific, and highly sensitive, PCR methods. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize a method that permits sensitive detection of sequences despite considerable variation. We demonstrate that our low...... biopsies. Nonetheless, our generally applicable method makes sensitive detection possible and permits sequencing of distantly related sequences from complex material....

  13. GENE SILENCING. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchasovnikarova, Iva A; Timms, Richard T; Matheson, Nicholas J; Wals, Kim; Antrobus, Robin; Göttgens, Berthold; Dougan, Gordon; Dawson, Mark A; Lehner, Paul J

    2015-06-26

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster for modifiers of position-effect variegation have revealed the basis of much of our understanding of heterochromatin. We took an analogous approach to identify genes required for epigenetic repression in human cells. A nonlethal forward genetic screen in near-haploid KBM7 cells identified the HUSH (human silencing hub) complex, comprising three poorly characterized proteins, TASOR, MPP8, and periphilin; this complex is absent from Drosophila but is conserved from fish to humans. Loss of HUSH components resulted in decreased H3K9me3 both at endogenous genomic loci and at retroviruses integrated into heterochromatin. Our results suggest that the HUSH complex is recruited to genomic loci rich in H3K9me3, where subsequent recruitment of the methyltransferase SETDB1 is required for further H3K9me3 deposition to maintain transcriptional silencing.

  14. An N-terminally truncated envelope protein encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus W locus on chromosome Xq22.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roebke Christina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that the envelope (env sequence of a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-W locus on chromosome Xq22.3 is transcribed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The env open reading frame (ORF of this locus is interrupted by a premature stop at codon 39, but otherwise harbors a long ORF for an N-terminally truncated 475 amino acid Env protein, starting at an in-frame ATG at codon 68. We set out to characterize the protein encoded by that ORF. Results Transient expression of the 475 amino acid Xq22.3 HERV-W env ORF produced an N-terminally truncated HERV-W Env protein, as detected by the monoclonal anti-HERV-W Env antibodies 6A2B2 and 13H5A5. Remarkably, reversion of the stop at codon 39 in Xq22.3 HERV-W env reconstituted a full-length HERV-W Xq22.3 Env protein. Similar to the full-length HERV-W Env protein Syncytin-1, reconstituted full-length Xq22.3 HERV-W Env is glycosylated, forms oligomers, and is expressed at the cell surface. In contrast, Xq22.3 HERV-W Env is unglycosylated, does not form oligomers, and is located intracellularly, probably due to lack of a signal peptide. Finally, we reconfirm by immunohistochemistry that monoclonal antibody 6A2B2 detects an antigen expressed in placenta and multiple sclerosis brain lesions. Conclusions A partially defective HERV-W env gene located on chromosome Xq22.3, which we propose to designate ERVWE2, has retained coding capacity and can produce ex vivo an N-terminally truncated Env protein, named N-Trenv. Detection of an antigen by 6A2B2 in placenta and multiple sclerosis lesions opens the possibility that N-Trenv could be expressed in vivo. More generally, our findings are compatible with the idea that defective HERV elements may be capable of producing incomplete HERV proteins that, speculatively, may exert functions in human physiology or pathology.

  15. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    Although nearly one fifth of all human cancers have an infectious aetiology, the causes for the majority of cancers remain unexplained. Despite the enormous data output from high-throughput shotgun sequencing, viral DNA in a clinical sample typically constitutes a proportion of host DNA that is too......-stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral...

  16. Increasing drug resistance in human lung cancer cells by mutant-type p53 gene mediated by retrovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高振强; 高志萍; 刘喜富; 张涛

    1997-01-01

    Human mutant-type (mt) p53 cDNA was synthesized and cloned from human lung cancer cell line GL containing mt-p53 gene by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). It was confirmed that the mt-p53 cDNA con-tained the complete coding sequence of p53 gene but mutated at codon 245 (G→T) and resulted in glycine to cysteine by sequencing analysis. The retroviral vector pD53M of the mt-p53 was constructed and introduced into the drug-sen-sitive human lung cancer cells GAO in which p53 gene did not mutate. The transfected GAO cells strongly expressed mutant-type p53 protein by immunohistochemistry, showing that pD53M vector could steadily express in GAO cells. The drug resistance to several anticancer agents of GAO cells infected by pD53M increased in varying degrees, with the highest increase of 4-fold, in vitro and in vivo. By quantitative PCR and flow cytometry (FCM) analyses, the expression of MDR1 gene and the activity of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) did not increase, the expression of MRP gene and the activity of m

  17. Disorder in Complex Human System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, K. Gediz

    2011-11-01

    Since the world of human and whose life becomes more and more complex every day because of the digital technology and under the storm of knowledge (media, internet, governmental and non-governmental organizations, etc...) the simulation is rapidly growing in the social systems and in human behaviors. The formation of the body and mutual interactions are left to digital technological, communication mechanisms and coding the techno genetics of the body. Deconstruction begins everywhere. The linear simulation mechanism with modern realities are replaced by the disorder simulation of human behaviors with awareness realities. In this paper I would like to introduce simulation theory of "Disorder Sensitive Human Behaviors". I recently proposed this theory to critique the role of disorder human behaviors in social systems. In this theory the principle of realty is the chaotic awareness of the complexity of human systems inside of principle of modern thinking in Baudrillard's simulation theory. Proper examples will be also considered to investigate the theory.

  18. Human Endogenous Retrovirus K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-Specific T-Cell Responses Are Infrequently Detected in HIV-1-Infected Subjects Using Standard Peptide Matrix-Based Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Vivek M.; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Burgers, Peter C.; Luider, Theo M.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Yue, Feng-Yun; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell responses to human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) K(HML-2) Gag and Env were mapped in HIV-1-infected subjects using 15mer peptides. Small peptide pools and high concentrations were used to maximize sensitivity. In the 23 subjects studied, only three bona fide HERV-K(HML-2)-specific responses were detected. At these high peptide concentrations, we detected false-positive responses, three of which were mapped to an HIV-1 Gag peptide contaminant. Thus, HERV-K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-specific T-cell responses are infrequently detected by 15mer peptide mapping. PMID:22205657

  19. Genomic analysis of ERVWE2 locus in patients with Multiple sclerosis: absence of genetic association but potential role of Human Endogenous retrovirus type W elements in molecular mimicry with myelin antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S Olival

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs arise from ancient infections of the host germline cells by exogenous retroviruses, constituting 8% of the human genome. Elevated level of envelope transcripts from HERVs-W has been detected in CSF, plasma and brain tissues from patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS, most of them from Xq22.3, 15q21.3 and 6q21 chromosomes. However, since the locus Xq22.3 (ERVWE2 lack the 5' LTR promoter and the putative protein should be truncated due to a stop codon, we investigated the ERVWE2 genomic loci from 84 individuals, including MS patients with active HERV-W expression detected in PBMC. In addition, an automated search for promoter sequences in 20kb nearby region of ERVWE2 reference sequence was performed. Several putative binding sites for cellular cofactors and enhancers were found, suggesting that transcription may occur via alternative promoters. However, ERVWE2 DNA sequencing of MS and healthy individuals revealed that all of them harbor a stop codon at site 39, undermining the expression of a full-length protein. Finally, since plaque formation in CNS of MS patients is attributed to immunological mechanisms triggered by autoimmune attack against myelin, we also investigated the level of similarity between envelope protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG. Comparison of the MOG to the envelope identified five retroviral regions similar to the Ig-like domain of MOG. Interestingly, one of them includes T and B cell epitopes, capable to induce T effector functions and circulating Abs in rats. In sum, although no DNA substitutions that would link ERVWE2 to the MS pathogeny was found, the similarity between the envelope protein to MOG extends the idea that ERVEW2 may be involved on the immunopathogenesis of MS, maybe facilitating the MOG recognizing by the immune system. Although awaiting experimental evidences, the data presented here may expand the scope of the endogenous retroviruses involvement on MS

  20. Human endogenous retrovirus-FRD envelope protein (syncytin 2 expression in normal and trisomy 21-affected placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handschuh Karen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human trophoblast expresses two fusogenic retroviral envelope proteins, the widely studied syncytin 1, encoded by HERV-W and the recently characterized syncytin 2 encoded by HERV-FRD. Here we studied syncytin 2 in normal and Trisomy 21-affected placenta associated with abnormal trophoblast differentiation. Syncytin 2 immunolocalization was restricted throughout normal pregnancy to some villous cytotrophoblastic cells (CT. During the second trimester of pregnancy, syncytin 2 was immunolocalized in some cuboidal CT in T21 placentas, whereas in normal placentas it was observed in flat CT, extending into their cytoplasmic processes. In vitro, CT isolated from normal placenta fuse and differentiate into syncytiotrophoblast. At the same time, syncytin 2 transcript levels decreased significantly with syncytiotrophoblast formation. In contrast, CT isolated from T21-affected placentas fused and differentiated poorly and no variation in syncytin 2 transcript levels was observed. Syncytin 2 expression illustrates the abnormal trophoblast differentiation observed in placenta of fetal T21-affected pregnancies.

  1. Human endogenous retrovirus-FRD envelope protein (syncytin 2) expression in normal and trisomy 21-affected placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malassiné, André; Frendo, Jean-Louis; Blaise, Sandra; Handschuh, Karen; Gerbaud, Pascale; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Heidmann, Thierry; Evain-Brion, Danièle

    2008-01-01

    Human trophoblast expresses two fusogenic retroviral envelope proteins, the widely studied syncytin 1, encoded by HERV-W and the recently characterized syncytin 2 encoded by HERV-FRD. Here we studied syncytin 2 in normal and Trisomy 21-affected placenta associated with abnormal trophoblast differentiation. Syncytin 2 immunolocalization was restricted throughout normal pregnancy to some villous cytotrophoblastic cells (CT). During the second trimester of pregnancy, syncytin 2 was immunolocalized in some cuboidal CT in T21 placentas, whereas in normal placentas it was observed in flat CT, extending into their cytoplasmic processes. In vitro, CT isolated from normal placenta fuse and differentiate into syncytiotrophoblast. At the same time, syncytin 2 transcript levels decreased significantly with syncytiotrophoblast formation. In contrast, CT isolated from T21-affected placentas fused and differentiated poorly and no variation in syncytin 2 transcript levels was observed. Syncytin 2 expression illustrates the abnormal trophoblast differentiation observed in placenta of fetal T21-affected pregnancies. PMID:18215254

  2. High rate of infection with the human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type II in four Indian populations of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, J F; Del Pino, N; Esteban, E; Sherman, M P; Dube, S; Dube, D K; Basombrio, M A; Pimentel, E; Segovia, A; Quirulas, S

    1993-12-01

    Sera from 215 non-drug-injecting Toba and Mataco-Mataguayo pure Indians belonging to four communities in northern Argentina were examined using assays that allow differentiation between reactivities due to type-specific antigens of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV). Three of these populations have very little contact with non-Indian groups and reside in remote, isolated areas. HTLV-II type-specific seroreactivity was present in 24 (13.7%) of the 175 Indians older than 13 years of age and in none of the 40 who were of younger ages. None of the Indians had antibodies reacting with HTLV-I type-specific antigen. Seroreactivity was more prevalent and appeared at younger ages in females than in males. The majority of the HTLV-II-seropositive Indians belonged to the more isolated communities. The seroprevalences among the Tobas and Mataco-Mataguayo Indians were comparable. With the exception of a Toba who was positive in a test for Treponema pallidum, no serological evidence of sexually transmitted infections with this spirochete, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus was found among the Indians tested. None of the 55 non-Indian people tested in the region showed HTLV-II type-specific seroreactivity. PCR analysis of DNA isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes of seropositive Indians confirmed that the virus present in these populations is HTLV-II. Sequence analysis of PCR-amplified genomic segments showed that the virus belongs to the HTLV-II subtype which has been found to be endemic in other Paleo-American Indians.

  3. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  4. Restriction genes for retroviruses influence the risk of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Hansen, Bettina; Nissen, Kari K

    2013-01-01

    We recently described that the autoimmune, central nervous system disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), is genetically associated with the human endogenous retroviral locus, HERV-Fc1, in Scandinavians. A number of dominant human genes encoding factors that restrict retrovirus replication have been...

  5. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Nicholas J.; Wals, Kim; Antrobus, Robin; Göttgens, Berthold; Dougan, Gordon; Dawson, Mark A.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster for modifiers of position-effect variegation have revealed the basis of much of our understanding of heterochromatin. We took an analogous approach to identify genes required for epigenetic repression in human cells. A non-lethal forward genetic screen in near-haploid KBM7 cells identified the Human Silencing Hub (HUSH), a complex of three poorly-characterised proteins, TASOR, MPP8, and periphilin, which is absent from Drosophila but conserved from fish to humans. Loss of HUSH subunits resulted in decreased H3K9me3 at both endogenous genomic loci and retroviruses integrated into heterochromatin. Our results suggest that the HUSH complex is recruited to genomic loci rich in H3K9me3, where subsequent recruitment of the methyltransferase SETDB1 is required for further H3K9me3 deposition to maintain transcriptional silencing. PMID:26022416

  6. Pseudotyped retroviruses for infecting axolotl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Whited, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    The ability to introduce DNA elements into host cells and analyze the effects has revolutionized modern biology. Here we describe a protocol to generate Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV)-based, replication-incompetent pseudotyped retrovirus capable of infecting axolotls and incorporating genetic information into their genome. When pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G glycoprotein, the retroviruses can infect a broad range of proliferative axolotl cell types. However, if the retrovirus is pseudotyped with an avian sarcoma leukosis virus (ASLV)-A envelope protein, only axolotl cells experimentally manipulated to express the cognate tumor virus A (TVA) receptor can be targeted by infections. These strategies enable robust transgene expression over many cell divisions, cell lineage tracing, and cell subtype targeting for gene expression.

  7. MuLV packaging systems as models for estimating/measuring retrovirus recombination frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, C; Takeuch, Y; Cosset, F L; Weiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of retrovirus vectors and endogenous retroviruses present in packaging cell lines and target cells may result in the formation of recombinant viruses. Using sensitive RT-PCR assays, we have investigated human and murine gene therapy packaging cell lines for the incorporation of endogenous retrovirus transcripts into murine leukaemia virus (MLV) vector particles and whether vector genomes are incorporated into human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) particles. VL30 endogenous retrovirus sequences were packaged in particles produced by the murine AM12 packaging system. For every seven MLV-derived -galactosidase beta-Gal vector genomes present in the particles, one copy of VL30 was also packaged. Although human FLY packaging cells expressed HERV transcripts (HERV-K, HuRT, type C, and RTVL-H), none was detectable in the MLV vector particles released from the cells. Non-specific packaging of the MLV gag-pol expression vector transcripts was detected in the FLY virions at a low level (one in 17,000 sequences). In other experiments, gag proteins produced by HERV-K particles present in human teratocarcinoma cells did not appear to package MLV-based vectors that expressed Gal transcripts. These findings indicate that retrovirus vectors interact with human packaging cells to produce retrovirus particles that are far less contaminated by endogenous viral sequences or other types of extraneous particles than murine packaging cells.

  8. Revealing the history of domesticated sheep using retrovirus integrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chessa, Bernado; Pereira, Filipe; Arnaud, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    The domestication of livestock represented a crucial step in human history. By using endogenous retroviruses as genetic markers, we found that sheep differentiated on the basis of their "retrotype" and morphological traits dispersed across Eurasia and Africa via separate migratory episodes. Relic...

  9. Sensitivity analysis of retrovirus HTLV-1 transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradin, Alberto; Di Camillo, Barbara; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Toffolo, Gianna; Cobelli, Claudio

    2011-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is a human retrovirus endemic in many areas of the world. Although many studies indicated a key role of the viral protein Tax in the control of viral transcription, the mechanisms controlling HTLV-1 expression and its persistence in vivo are still poorly understood. To assess Tax effects on viral kinetics, we developed a HTLV-1 model. Two parameters that capture both its deterministic and stochastic behavior were quantified: Tax signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which measures the effect of stochastic phenomena on Tax expression as the ratio between the protein steady-state level and the variance of the noise causing fluctuations around this value; t(1/2), a parameter representative of the duration of Tax transient expression pulses, that is, of Tax bursts due to stochastic phenomena. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the major determinant of Tax SNR is the transactivation constant, the system parameter weighting the enhancement of retrovirus transcription due to transactivation. In contrast, t(1/2) is strongly influenced by the degradation rate of the mRNA. In addition to shedding light into the mechanism of Tax transactivation, the obtained results are of potential interest for novel drug development strategies since the two parameters most affecting Tax transactivation can be experimentally tuned, e.g. by perturbing protein phosphorylation and by RNA interference.

  10. Efficient transfer and expression of human clotting factor ⅨX cDNA in neonatal hemophilia B mice mediated by VSV-G pseudotyped retrovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of in vivo gene therapy for hemophilia B by VSV-G pseudotyped retroviral vector was introduced. The novel packaging cell line 293GPG was used to produce VSV-G/G1NaBAIX pseudotyped virus with the highest titers up to 8.5 × 10s cfu @ mL-1. In contrast to the conventional retrovirus, VSV-G pseudotyped virus was more resistant to inactivation by serum complements (P<0.001).Our results also demonstrated that VSV-G pseudotyped virus was more stable in neonatal mice serum than in adult mice serum (P<0.01). After intraperitoneal injection of different doses of virus, hFIX antigen was detected and lasted for more than 120 d, the highest level reached (72.5±6.1)ng@ mL-1. Moreover, the functional activity was improved to some extent in all hFIX-treated mice, the most remarkable improvement was observed in the mice treated with higher dose of virus whose clotting activity increased to (3.4 ±1.5) %and APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) reducedto (43.2 ± 7.2) s. The anti-hFIX antibody was not detected by the method of Bethesda, no germ line transmission and any side effects associated with gene transfer were found. Our results indicated that neonatal gene therapy for hemophilia B mice by VSV-G pseudotyped retrovirus is promising.``

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of snakehead fish retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, D; Frerichs, G N; Rambaut, A; Onions, D E

    1996-06-01

    The complete genome of the snakehead fish retrovirus has been cloned and sequenced, and its transcriptional profile in cell culture has been determined. The 11.2-kb provirus displays a complex expression pattern capable of encoding accessory proteins and is unique in the predicted location of the env initiation codon and signal peptide upstream of gag and the common splice donor site. The virus is distinguishable from all known retrovirus groups by the presence of an arginine tRNA primer binding site. The coding regions are highly divergent and show a number of unusual characteristics, including a large Gag coiled-coil region, a Pol domain of unknown function, and a long, lentiviral-like, Env cytoplasmic domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the Pol sequence emphasizes the divergent nature of the virus from the avian and mammalian retroviruses. The snakehead virus is also distinct from a previously characterized complex fish retrovirus, suggesting that discrete groups of these viruses have yet to be identified in the lower vertebrates.

  12. Reverse Transcription of Retroviruses and LTR Retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen H

    2015-04-01

    The enzyme reverse transcriptase (RT) was discovered in retroviruses almost 50 years ago. The demonstration that other types of viruses, and what are now called retrotransposons, also replicated using an enzyme that could copy RNA into DNA came a few years later. The intensity of the research in both the process of reverse transcription and the enzyme RT was greatly stimulated by the recognition, in the mid-1980s, that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was a retrovirus and by the fact that the first successful anti-HIV drug, azidothymidine (AZT), is a substrate for RT. Although AZT monotherapy is a thing of the past, the most commonly prescribed, and most successful, combination therapies still involve one or both of the two major classes of anti-RT drugs. Although the basic mechanics of reverse transcription were worked out many years ago, and the first high-resolution structures of HIV RT are now more than 20 years old, we still have much to learn, particularly about the roles played by the host and viral factors that make the process of reverse transcription much more efficient in the cell than in the test tube. Moreover, we are only now beginning to understand how various host factors that are part of the innate immunity system interact with the process of reverse transcription to protect the host-cell genome, the host cell, and the whole host, from retroviral infection, and from unwanted retrotransposition.

  13. Human endogenous retrovirus family HERV-K(HML-2) RNA transcripts are selectively packaged into retroviral particles produced by the human germ cell tumor line Tera-1 and originate mainly from a provirus on chromosome 22q11.21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprecht, Klemens; Ferreira, Humberto; Flockerzi, Aline; Wahl, Silke; Sauter, Marlies; Mayer, Jens; Mueller-Lantzsch, Nikolaus

    2008-10-01

    The human germ cell tumor line Tera-1 produces retroviral particles which are encoded by the human endogenous retrovirus family HERV-K(HML-2). We show here, by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, that HML-2 gag and env RNA transcripts are selectively packaged into Tera-1 retroviral particles, whereas RNAs from cellular housekeeping genes and from other HERV families (HERV-H and HERV-W) are nonselectively copackaged. Assignment of cloned HML-2 gag and env cDNAs from Tera-1 retroviral particles to individual HML-2 loci in the human genome demonstrated that HML-2 RNA transcripts packaged into Tera-1 retroviral particles originate almost exclusively from an HML-2 provirus on chromosome 22q11.21. Based on relative cloning frequencies, this provirus was the most active among a total of eight transcribed HML-2 loci identified in Tera-1 cells. These data suggest that at least one HML-2 element, that is, the HML-2 provirus on 22q11.21, has retained the capacity for packaging RNA into HML-2-encoded retroviral particles. Given its elevated transcriptional activity and the presence of a full-length Gag open reading frame, the 22q11.21 HML-2 provirus may also significantly contribute to Gag protein and thus particle production in Tera-1 cells. Our findings provide important clues to the generation and biological properties of HML-2-encoded particles. In addition, copackaging of non-HML-2 HERV transcripts in HML-2-encoded particles should inform the debate about endogenous retroviral particles putatively encoded by non-HML-2 HERV families that have previously been described for other human diseases, such as multiple sclerosis.

  14. The DNA copy number of human endogenous retrovirus-W (MSRV-type is increased in multiple sclerosis patients and is influenced by gender and disease severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Garcia-Montojo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease more prevalent in women than in men. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Retrovirus element (MSRV is a member of type-W endogenous retrovirus family (HERV-W, known to be associated to MS. Most HERVs are unable to replicate but MSRV expression associated with reverse-transcriptase activity in MS would explain reported DNA copy number increase in MS patients. A potential link between HERV-W copies on chromosome X and gender differential prevalence has been suggested. The present study addresses MSRV-type DNA load in relation with the gender differences and clinical status in MS and healthy controls. RESULTS: 178 MS patients (62.9% women and 124 controls (56.5% women were included. MSRV env load (copies/pg of DNA was analyzed by real time qPCR with specific primers and probe for its env gene, in DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. MSRV load was more elevated in MS patients than in controls (p = 4.15e-7. MS women presented higher MSRV load than control women (p = 0.009 and MS men also had higher load than control men (p = 2.77e-6. Besides, women had higher levels than men, both among patients (p = 0.007 and controls (p = 1.24e-6. Concordantly, EDSS and MSSS scores were higher among female patients with an elevated MSRV load (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: MSRV increases its copy number in PBMC of MS patients and particularly in women with high clinical scores. This may explain causes underlying the higher prevalence of MS in women. The association with the clinical severity calls for further investigations on MSRV load in PBMCs as a biomarker for MS.

  15. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Denner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs, which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas technology.

  16. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  17. Evolutionary Relationships among Extinct and Extant Sloths: The Evidence of Mitogenomes and Retroviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Graham J Slater; Cui, Pin; Forasiepi,Analía M.; Lenz, Dorina; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Voirin, Bryson; Moraes-Barros, Nadia; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Macroevolutionary trends exhibited by retroviruses are complex and not entirely understood. The sloth endogenized foamy-like retrovirus (SloEFV), which demonstrates incongruence in virus–host evolution among extant sloths (Order Folivora), has not been investigated heretofore in any extinct sloth lineages and its premodern history within folivorans is therefore unknown. Determining retroviral coevolutionary trends requires a robust phylogeny of the viral host, but the highly reduced modern sl...

  18. Retrovirus-delivered siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devroe Eric

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of transfected synthetic small interfering (si RNAs to suppress the expression of specific transcripts has proved a useful technique to probe gene function in mammalian cells. However, high production costs limit this technology's utility for many laboratories and experimental situations. Recently, several DNA-based plasmid vectors have been developed that direct transcription of small hairpin RNAs, which are processed into functional siRNAs by cellular enzymes. Although these vectors provide certain advantages over chemically synthesized siRNAs, numerous disadvantages remain including merely transient siRNA expression and low and variable transfection efficiency. Results To overcome several limitations of plasmid-based siRNA, a retroviral siRNA delivery system was developed based on commerically available vectors. As a pilot study, a vector was designed to target the human Nuclear Dbf2-Related (NDR kinase. Cells infected with the anti-NDR siRNA virus dramatically downregulate NDR expression, whereas control viruses have no effect on total NDR levels. To confirm and extend these findings, an additional virus was constructed to target a second gene, transcriptional coactivator p75. Conclusion The experiments presented here demonstrate that retroviruses are efficient vectors for delivery of siRNA into mammalian cells. Retrovirus-delivered siRNA provides significant advancement over previously available methods by providing efficient, uniform delivery and immediate selection of stable "knock-down" cells. This development should provide a method to rapidly assess gene function in established cell lines, primary cells, or animals.

  19. Insertional oncogenesis by non-acute retroviruses: implications for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hung; Johnson, Chassidy

    2011-04-01

    Retroviruses cause cancers in a variety of animals and humans. Research on retroviruses has provided important insights into mechanisms of oncogenesis in humans, including the discovery of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes. The subject of this review is the mechanisms by which retroviruses that do not carry oncogenes (non-acute retroviruses) cause cancers. The common theme is that these tumors result from insertional activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by integration of viral DNA. Early research on insertional activation of proto-oncogenes in virus-induced tumors is reviewed. Research on non-acute retroviruses has led to the discovery of new proto-oncogenes through searches for common insertion sites (CISs) in virus-induced tumors. Cooperation between different proto-oncogenes in development of tumors has been elucidated through the study of retrovirus-induced tumors, and retroviral infection of genetically susceptible mice (retroviral tagging) has been used to identify cellular proto-oncogenes active in specific oncogenic pathways. The pace of proto-oncogene discovery has been accelerated by technical advances including PCR cloning of viral integration sites, the availability of the mouse genome sequence, and high throughput DNA sequencing. Insertional activation has proven to be a significant risk in gene therapy trials to correct genetic defects with retroviral vectors. Studies on non-acute retroviral oncogenesis provide insight into the potential risks, and the mechanisms of oncogenesis.

  20. Pert analysis of endogenous retroviruses induced from K-BALB mouse cells treated with 5-iododeoxyuridine: a potential strategy for detection of inducible retroviruses from vaccine cell substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A S; Sears, J F

    2001-01-01

    The activation of an endogenous, infectious retrovirus in a cell substrate that is used for the production of biologics is an important safety concern, especially in the case of live, viral vaccines, where there are minimal purification and inactivation steps in order to preserve high vaccine potency. Extensive analysis has been done to evaluate various chemical agents for the induction of endogenous retroviruses in murine and avian cells; however, similar studies have not been done with cells of other species, especially human and non-human primates, that are used in vaccine production. To develop a strategy for optimal induction and sensitive detection of endogenous, infectious retroviruses in currently used or potential vaccine cell substrates, we have initially investigated the use of a state-of-the-art, highly-sensitive, product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) assay for evaluating the kinetics of retrovirus induction and replication in 5-iododeoxyuridine (IdU)-treated K-BALB mouse cells, where endogenous retrovirus activation has previously been described. In general, the overall kinetics of virus production were similar to those of previous studies in that two peaks of RT activity were seen on long-term culture of IdU-treated K-BALB cells; however, retrovirus activation was detected earlier under our induction conditions and with greater sensitivity using the PERT assay, where 1-10 virions were detected in 1 microl equivalent of the test sample, without concentration. Furthermore, the PERT activity corresponded to the presence of infectious, murine leukaemia viruses (MuLVs) induced from K-BALB cells. Based upon these results, a strategy is proposed using the PERT assay for detection of inducible, endogenous retroviruses in vaccine cell substrates.

  1. Efficiency of indirect immunofluorescence assay as a confirmatory test for the diagnosis of human retrovirus infection (HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II in different at risk populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GASTALDELLO René

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with Western blot (Wb as a confirmatory method to detect antibodies anti retrovirus (HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II. Positive and negative HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II serum samples from different risk populations were studied. Sensitivity, specificity, positive, negative predictive and kappa index values were assayed, to assess the IFA efficiency versus Wb. The following cell lines were used as a source of viral antigens: H9 ( HTLV-III b; MT-2 and MT-4 (persistently infected with HTLV-I and MO-T (persistently infected with HTLV-II. Sensitivity and specificity rates for HIV-1 were 96.80% and 98.60% respectively, while predictive positive and negative values were 99.50% and 92.00% respectively. No differences were found in HIV IFA performance between the various populations studied. As for IFA HTLV system, the sensitivity and specificity values were 97.91% and 100% respectively with positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 97.92%. Moreover, the sensitivity of the IFA for HTLV-I/II proved to be higher when the samples were tested simultaneously against both antigens (HTLV-I-MT-2 and HTLV-II-MO-T. The overall IFA efficiency for HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II-MT-2 antibody detection probed to be very satisfactory with an excellent correlation with Wb (Kappa indexes 0.93 and 0.98 respectively. These results confirmed that the IFA is a sensitive and specific alternative method for the confirmatory diagnosis of HIV-1 and HTLV-I/II infection in populations at different levels of risk to acquire the infection and suggest that IFA could be included in the serologic diagnostic algorithm.

  2. Vaccination against δ-Retroviruses: The Bovine Leukemia Virus Paradigm

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    Gerónimo Gutiérrez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine leukemia virus (BLV and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 are closely related d-retroviruses that induce hematological diseases. HTLV-1 infects about 15 million people worldwide, mainly in subtropical areas. HTLV-1 induces a wide spectrum of diseases (e.g., HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and leukemia/lymphoma (adult T-cell leukemia. Bovine leukemia virus is a major pathogen of cattle, causing important economic losses due to a reduction in production, export limitations and lymphoma-associated death. In the absence of satisfactory treatment for these diseases and besides the prevention of transmission, the best option to reduce the prevalence of d-retroviruses is vaccination. Here, we provide an overview of the different vaccination strategies in the BLV model and outline key parameters required for vaccine efficacy.

  3. Review of the twelfth West Coast retrovirus meeting

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    Melar Marta

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Every year the Cancer Research Institute from University of California at Irvine organizes the West Coast Retrovirus Meeting where participants have a chance to discuss the latest progress in understanding the pathology of retroviruses. The 12th meeting was held at the Hyatt Regency Suites in Palm Springs, California from October 6th to October 9th 2005, with the major focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pathogenesis. Philippe Gallay from The Scripps Research Institute and Thomas J. Hope from Northwestern University organized the meeting, which covered all the steps involved in the lifecycle of retroviruses with an emphasis on virus:host interactions. The trend in research appeared to be on the restriction of viral infection, both by the endogenous, cellular restriction factors, as well as by the potential antimicrobial compounds of known or unknown mechanisms. Additionally, new stories on the inevitable feedback from the host immune system were presented as well. HIV still represents a challenge that an army of motivated people has been working on for over 20 years. And yet, the field has not reached the plateau in knowledge nor enthusiasm, which was proven again in October 2005 in Palm Springs.

  4. Rapid modification of retroviruses using lipid conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nimisha G.; Lyon, L. Andrew; LeDoux, Joseph M.

    2009-02-01

    Methods are needed to manipulate natural nanoparticles. Viruses are particularly interesting because they can act as therapeutic cellular delivery agents. Here we examine a new method for rapidly modifying retroviruses that uses lipid conjugates composed of a lipid anchor (1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine), a polyethylene glycol chain, and biotin. The conjugates rapidly and stably modified retroviruses and enabled them to bind streptavidin. The implication of this work for modifying viruses for gene therapy and vaccination protocols is discussed.

  5. Approaching human language with complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    The interest in modeling and analyzing human language with complex networks is on the rise in recent years and a considerable body of research in this area has already been accumulated. We survey three major lines of linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) characterization of human language as a multi-level system with complex network analysis; 2) linguistic typological research with the application of linguistic networks and their quantitative measures; and 3) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language (determined by the topology of linguistic networks) and microscopic linguistic (e.g., syntactic) features (as the traditional concern of linguistics). We show that the models and quantitative tools of complex networks, when exploited properly, can constitute an operational methodology for linguistic inquiry, which contributes to the understanding of human language and the development of linguistics. We conclude our review with suggestions for future linguistic research from the complex network approach: 1) relationships between the system-level complexity of human language and microscopic linguistic features; 2) expansion of research scope from the global properties to other levels of granularity of linguistic networks; and 3) combination of linguistic network analysis with other quantitative studies of language (such as quantitative linguistics).

  6. Endogenous Retroviruses: With Us and Against Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Rosenkrantz, Jimi L.; Carbone, Lucia; Chavez, Shawn L.

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian genomes are scattered with thousands of copies of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), mobile genetic elements that are relics of ancient retroviral infections. After inserting copies into the germ line of a host, most ERVs accumulate mutations that prevent the normal assembly of infectious viral particles, becoming trapped in host genomes and unable to leave to infect other cells. While most copies of ERVs are inactive, some are transcribed and encode the proteins needed to generate new insertions at novel loci. In some cases, old copies are removed via recombination and other mechanisms. This creates a shifting landscape of ERV copies within host genomes. New insertions can disrupt normal expression of nearby genes via directly inserting into key regulatory elements or by containing regulatory motifs within their sequences. Further, the transcriptional silencing of ERVs via epigenetic modification may result in changes to the epigenetic regulation of adjacent genes. In these ways, ERVs can be potent sources of regulatory disruption as well as genetic innovation. Here, we provide a brief review of the association between ERVs and gene expression, especially as observed in pre-implantation development and placentation. Moreover, we will describe the roles ERVs may play in somatic tissues, mostly in the context of human disease, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and schizophrenia. Lastly, we discuss the recent discovery that some ERVs may have been pressed into the service of their host genomes to aid in the innate immune response to exogenous viral infections.

  7. Retroviruses and the Third Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin J. Sattentau

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The direct movement of viruses between contacting cells as a mode of dissemination distinct from the release of cell-free virions was hinted at in pioneering experiments first reported almost eighty years ago [1], and confirmed and extended 30 years later [2,3]. This early work was carried out using the tools of the time in the absence of the modern cell biological, immunological and virological techniques available today. As such, although many of the basic concepts were established for cell-to-cell spread prior to the discovery of retroviruses, descriptions of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon were lacking. Papers from two decades ago revealed that HIV-1 could spread between cultured lymphocytes by cell-to-cell spread [4], proposed that this mechanism of dissemination was substantially more efficient than diffusion-limited spread of cell-free virions [5,6], and suggested that this might be a mechanism of evasion from antibody neutralization [4]. [...

  8. Prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in a captive colony of macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, M D; Letvin, N L; Sehgal, P K; Schmidt, D K; Silva, D P; Solomon, K R; Hodi, F S; Ringler, D J; Hunt, R D; King, N W

    1988-04-15

    The prevalence of antibodies to 3 retroviruses in the macaque colony of the New England Regional Primate Research Center (NERPRC) was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedures as well as radioimmunoprecipitation-SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and indirect immunofluorescence tests. Out of 848 macaques, 3 (0.35%) had antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), 27 (3.2%) had antibodies to simian T-lymphotropic virus type I (STLV-1) and approximately 285 (34%) had antibodies to type D retrovirus. Of 3 macaques infected with SIV, 2 were rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and I was a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). STLV-1 and D retrovirus infection occurred in all 4 macaque species examined. SIV, STLV-1 and D retroviruses were isolated from sero-positive macaques. The low prevalence of SIV infection suggests that SIV is not being readily transmitted among macaques at NERPRC; this contrasts markedly with the high SIV prevalence in some captive mangabey colonies. In contrast to African green monkeys from eastern Africa, 160 Caribbean green monkeys examined showed no sign of SIV infection. These results provide a framework for monitoring spontaneous disease associated with infection by these 3 retroviruses and will help in further definition of STLV-1 and SIV infection of non-human primates as animal models for human disease.

  9. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA) Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Darlington, G. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  10. Inhibition of Proliferation of Human Hela Cells by Small Interference RNA against Pokemon Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yi-jing; NI Bing; JIANG Man; YANG Di; LI Fan; WU Yu-zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective:The transcriptional repressor Pokemon(encoded by the Zbtb7 gene)is a critical factor in oncogenesis.Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of retrovirus expressing the siRNA targeting Pokemon in human cervical cancer cells. Methods:We constructed and identified the recombinant retrovirus particle expressing siRNA of Pokemon gene,and then testified the suppression of recombinant plasmid and evaluated the gene-silencing effect. Results:We got the positive evaluation from colony forming experiment we found that the retrovirus expressing siRNA targeting Pokemon had repressing effect. Conclusion:Our work provides basis for the study of suppression effect of retrovirus in vivo and the design of the target-complex.

  11. Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Bisgaard Jensen, Sara; Hansen, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode...... of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus...

  12. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is an Innate Immune Sensor of HIV and Other Retroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daxing; Wu, Jiaxi; Wu, You-Tong; Du, Fenghe; Aroh, Chukwuemika; Yan, Nan; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses, including HIV, can activate innate immune responses, but the host sensors for retroviruses are largely unknown. Here we show that HIV infection activates cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) to produce cGAMP, which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce type-I interferons and other cytokines. Inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase, but not integrase, abrogated interferon-β induction by the virus, suggesting that the reverse transcribed HIV DNA triggers the innate immune response. Knockout or knockdown of cGAS in mouse or human cell lines blocked cytokine induction by HIV, murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). These results indicate that cGAS is an innate immune sensor of HIV and other retroviruses. PMID:23929945

  13. Human Error Mechanisms in Complex Work Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations...

  14. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Zhuo

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100 currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon, yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian

  15. TDP-43 regulates endogenous retrovirus-K viral protein accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghera, Mamneet; Ferguson-Parry, Jennifer; Douville, Renée N

    2016-10-01

    The concomitant expression of neuronal TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and human endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) is a hallmark of ALS. Since the involvement of TDP-43 in retrovirus replication remains controversial, we sought to evaluate whether TDP-43 exerts an effect on ERVK expression. In this study, TDP-43 bound the ERVK promoter in the context of inflammation or proteasome inhibition, with no effect on ERVK transcription. However, over-expression of ALS-associated aggregating forms of TDP-43, but not wild-type TDP-43, significantly enhanced ERVK viral protein accumulation. Human astrocytes and neurons further demonstrated cell-type specific differences in their ability to express and clear ERVK proteins during inflammation and proteasome inhibition. Astrocytes, but not neurons, were able to clear excess ERVK proteins through stress granule formation and autophagy. In vitro findings were validated in autopsy motor cortex tissue from patients with ALS and neuro-normal controls. We further confirmed marked enhancement of ERVK in cortical neurons of patients with ALS. Despite evidence of enhanced stress granule and autophagic response in ALS cortical neurons, these cells failed to clear excess ERVK protein accumulation. This highlights how multiple cellular pathways, in conjunction with disease-associated mutations, can converge to modulate the expression and clearance of viral gene products from genomic elements such as ERVK. In ALS, ERVK protein aggregation is a novel aspect of TDP-43 misregulation contributing towards the pathology of this neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hepadnaviruses and retroviruses share genome homology and features of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, W S; Miller, R H; Marion, P L

    1987-01-01

    The hepadnavirus family includes hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), ground squirrel hepatitis virus (GSHV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). These viruses share unique ultrastructural, molecular and biological features. HBV has great medical importance in many parts of the world. More important numerically than acute hepatitis B in high prevalence geographic regions is the liver disease associated with chronic infection. There appear to be more than 200 million chronically infected humans in the world, and these HBV infections appear to be the single most common cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer in man. All hepadnaviruses share the propensity for silent infection in early life leading to persistence of the virus, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is clearly associated with long-standing persistent infection in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels. Although the viral DNA has been found to be integrated in cellular DNA of many HCC in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels, the precise role of the virus in tumor formation has not been defined. Hepadna viruses have an interesting molecular structure and mechanisms of replication, and they appear to share certain important features with retroviruses as reviewed here. It is of interest to define similarities and differences between hepadnaviruses and retroviruses in order to understand their evolutionary relationship and to determine whether they share a common oncogenic mechanism, since infection with members of both virus families is associated with neoplastic disease.

  17. Endogenous MOV10 inhibits the retrotransposition of endogenous retroelements but not the replication of exogenous retroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The identification of cellular factors that regulate the replication of exogenous viruses and endogenous mobile elements provides fundamental understanding of host-pathogen relationships. MOV10 is a superfamily 1 putative RNA helicase that controls the replication of several RNA viruses and whose homologs are necessary for the repression of endogenous mobile elements. Here, we employ both ectopic expression and gene knockdown approaches to analyse the role of human MOV10 in the replication of a panel of exogenous retroviruses and endogenous retroelements. Results MOV10 overexpression substantially decreased the production of infectious retrovirus particles, as well the propagation of LTR and non-LTR endogenous retroelements. Most significantly, RNAi-mediated silencing of endogenous MOV10 enhanced the replication of both LTR and non-LTR endogenous retroelements, but not the production of infectious retrovirus particles demonstrating that natural levels of MOV10 suppress retrotransposition, but have no impact on infection by exogenous retroviruses. Furthermore, functional studies showed that MOV10 is not necessary for miRNA or siRNA-mediated mRNA silencing. Conclusions We have identified novel specificity for human MOV10 in the control of retroelement replication and hypothesise that MOV10 may be a component of a cellular pathway or process that selectively regulates the replication of endogenous retroelements in somatic cells. PMID:22727223

  18. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue.

  19. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A/C: biochemical properties of its integrase and susceptibility to raltegravir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Antonin; Yajjou-Hamalian, Halima; Gallay, Kathy; Luengo, Catherine; Beven, Véronique; Leroux, Aurélie; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Al Andary, Elsy; Gouet, Patrice; Moreau, Karen; Ronfort, Corinne; Blanchard, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are present in the genomes of pig cells. The PERV-A/C recombinant virus can infect human cells and is a major risk of zoonotic disease in the case of xenotransplantation of pig organs to humans. Raltegravir (RAL) is a viral integrase (IN) inhibitor used in highly active antiretroviral treatment. In the present study, we explored the potential use of RAL against PERV-A/C. We report (i) a three-dimensional model of the PERV-A/C intasome complexed with RAL, (ii) the sensitivity of PERV-A/C IN to RAL in vitro and (iii) the sensitivity of a PERV-A/C-IRES-GFP recombinant virus to RAL in cellulo. We demonstrated that RAL is a potent inhibitor against PERV-A/C IN and PERV-A/C replication with IC50s in the nanomolar range. To date, the use of retroviral inhibitors remains the only way to control the risk of zoonotic PERV infection during pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  20. Interactions of retroviruses with chemical carcinogens. I. Noncovalent binding of unactivated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.M.; Kupfer, D.; Luftig, R.B.

    1979-08-01

    The noncovalent binding of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), e.g., benzo(a)pyrene, to retroviruses was quantitated using a rate zonal centrifugation assay, and the effects of the binding on a retrovirus specific function, reverse transcription, were determined. The level of binding for the enveloped retroviruses was much higher than that found for nonenveloped viruses (2.5 to 40-fold greater), such as bacteriophage T4 and adenovirus type 5; there was no special affinity of PAH compounds for retroviruses as compared with another enveloped virus, Sindbis virus; and there was no binding to the viral glycoproteins (type specific antigens). These results suggest that the binding is best interpreted as partitioning of the hydrophobic PAH compounds between viral envelope lipids and the surrounding aqueous buffer, and this interpretation is supported by the temperature and salt dependence of the binding. Using isolated retroviral cores we also found that there is a relatively small, but significant, level of binding of benzo(a)pyrene to retroviral cores. Further, we observed that the noncovalent binding of benzo(a)pyrene to Tauscher leukemia virus inhibits the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. The inhibition requires preincubation of the virus and PAH, i.e., the formaion of noncovalent virus-PAH complexes, and is consistent with a noncompetive model of enzyme inhibition with an inhibition constant, K/sub i/, of about 40 ..mu..M.

  1. Early steps of retrovirus replicative cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saïb Ali

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the last two decades, the profusion of HIV research due to the urge to identify new therapeutic targets has led to a wealth of information on the retroviral replication cycle. However, while the late stages of the retrovirus life cycle, consisting of virus replication and egress, have been partly unraveled, the early steps remain largely enigmatic. These early steps consist of a long and perilous journey from the cell surface to the nucleus where the proviral DNA integrates into the host genome. Retroviral particles must bind specifically to their target cells, cross the plasma membrane, reverse-transcribe their RNA genome, while uncoating the cores, find their way to the nuclear membrane and penetrate into the nucleus to finally dock and integrate into the cellular genome. Along this journey, retroviruses hijack the cellular machinery, while at the same time counteracting cellular defenses. Elucidating these mechanisms and identifying which cellular factors are exploited by the retroviruses and which hinder their life cycle, will certainly lead to the discovery of new ways to inhibit viral replication and to improve retroviral vectors for gene transfer. Finally, as proven by many examples in the past, progresses in retrovirology will undoubtedly also provide some priceless insights into cell biology.

  2. Exploring the effects of immunity and life history on the dynamics of an endogenous retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, R K; Tristem, M; Coulson, T

    2013-09-19

    Mammalian DNA is littered with the signatures of past retroviral infections. For example, at least 8% of the human genome can be attributed to endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). We take a single-locus approach to develop a simple susceptible-infected-recovered model to investigate the circumstances under which a disease-causing retrovirus can become incorporated into the host genome and spread through the host population if it were to confer an immunological advantage. In the absence of any fitness benefit provided by the long terminal repeat (LTR), we conclude that signatures of ERVs are likely to go to fixation within a population when the probability of evolving cellular/humoral immunity to a related exogenous version of the virus is extremely small. We extend this model to examine whether changing the speed of the host life history influences the likelihood that an exogenous retrovirus will incorporate and spread to fixation. Our results reveal the parameter space under which incorporation of exogenous retroviruses into a host genome may be beneficial to the host. In our final model, we find that the likelihood of an LTR reaching fixation in a host population is not strongly affected by host life history.

  3. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Pär G; Suzuki, Harukazu; Ninomiya, Noriko; Akalin, Altuna; Sessa, Luca; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Brozzi, Alessandro; Luzi, Lucilla; Tan, Sin Lam; Yang, Liang; Kunarso, Galih; Ng, Edwin Lian-Chong; Batalov, Serge; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wells, Christine; Bajic, Vladimir B; Orlando, Valerio; Reid, James F; Lenhard, Boris; Lipovich, Leonard

    2006-04-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs), along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  4. Complex Loci in human and mouse genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär G Engström

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis-antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis-antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse transcriptional units (TUs, along with 6,141 cis-antisense pairs, 2,113 bidirectional promoters, and 1,480 chains from 42,887 human TUs. In both human and mouse, 25% of TUs resided in cis-antisense pairs, only 17% of which were conserved between the two organisms, indicating frequent species specificity of antisense gene arrangements. A sampling approach indicated that over 40% of all TUs might actually be in cis-antisense pairs, and that only a minority of these arrangements are likely to be conserved between human and mouse. Bidirectional promoters were characterized by variable transcriptional start sites and an identifiable midpoint at which overall sequence composition changed strand and the direction of transcriptional initiation switched. In microarray data covering a wide range of mouse tissues, genes in cis-antisense and bidirectionally promoted arrangement showed a higher probability of being coordinately expressed than random pairs of genes. In a case study on homeotic loci, we observed extensive transcription of nonconserved sequences on the noncoding strand, implying that the presence rather than the sequence of these transcripts is of functional importance. Complex loci are ubiquitous, host numerous nonconserved gene structures and lineage-specific exonification events, and may have a cis-regulatory impact on the member genes.

  5. Transspecies Transmission of Gammaretroviruses and the Origin of the Gibbon Ape Leukaemia Virus (GaLV and the Koala Retrovirus (KoRV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Denner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transspecies transmission of retroviruses is a frequent event, and the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 is a well-known example. The gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV and koala retrovirus (KoRV, two gammaretroviruses, are also the result of a transspecies transmission, however from a still unknown host. Related retroviruses have been found in Southeast Asian mice although the sequence similarity was limited. Viruses with a higher sequence homology were isolated from Melomys burtoni, the Australian and Indonesian grassland melomys. However, only the habitats of the koalas and the grassland melomys in Australia are overlapping, indicating that the melomys virus may not be the precursor of the GaLV. Viruses closely related to GaLV/KoRV were also detected in bats. Therefore, given the fact that the habitats of the gibbons in Thailand and the koalas in Australia are far away, and that bats are able to fly over long distances, the hypothesis that retroviruses of bats are the origin of GaLV and KoRV deserves consideration. Analysis of previous transspecies transmissions of retroviruses may help to evaluate the potential of transmission of related retroviruses in the future, e.g., that of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs during xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues or organs.

  6. On the general theory of the origins of retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The order retroviridae comprises viruses based on ribonucleic acids (RNA. Some, such as HIV and HTLV, are human pathogens. Newly emerged human retroviruses have zoonotic origins. As far as has been established, both repeated infections (themselves possibly responsible for the evolution of viral mutations (Vm and host adaptability (Ha; along with interplay between inhibitors and promoters of cell tropism, are needed to effect retroviral cross-species transmissions. However, the exact modus operadi of intertwine between these factors at molecular level remains to be established. Knowledge of such intertwine could lead to a better understanding of retrovirology and possibly other infectious processes. This study was conducted to derive the mathematical equation of a general theory of the origins of retroviruses. Methods and results On the basis of an arbitrarily non-Euclidian geometrical "thought experiment" involving the cross-species transmission of simian foamy virus (sfv from a non-primate species Xy to Homo sapiens (Hs, initially excluding all social factors, the following was derived. At the port of exit from Xy (where the species barrier, SB, is defined by the Index of Origin, IO, sfv shedding is (1 enhanced by two transmitting tensors (Tt, (i virus-specific immunity (VSI and (ii evolutionary defenses such as APOBEC, RNA interference pathways, and (when present expedited therapeutics (denoted e2D; and (2 opposed by the five accepting scalars (At: (a genomic integration hot spots, gIHS, (b nuclear envelope transit (NMt vectors, (c virus-specific cellular biochemistry, VSCB, (d virus-specific cellular receptor repertoire, VSCR, and (e pH-mediated cell membrane transit, (↓pH CMat. Assuming As and Tt to be independent variables, IO = Tt/As. The same forces acting in an opposing manner determine SB at the port of sfv entry (defined here by the Index of Entry, IE = As/Tt. Overall, If sfv encounters no unforeseen effects on

  7. Target‐specific epigenetic silencing of endogenous retroviruses in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Gernot

    Retroviruses are able to stably integrate their genome into the DNA of infected cells. If retroviral integration takes place in cells of the germ line, the retrovirus may become a part of the host genome and be inherited from generation to generation as a genomic parasite. These endogenous retrov...

  8. Distribution of endogenous retroviruses in crocodilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Rodríguez-Zárate, Clara J; Isberg, Sally R; Damayanti, Chandramaya Siska; Miles, Lee G; Chansue, Nantarika; Moran, Chris; Melville, Lorna; Gongora, Jaime

    2009-10-01

    Knowledge of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in crocodilians (Crocodylia) is limited, and their distribution among extant species is unclear. Here we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of these retroelements in 20 species of crocodilians by studying the pro-pol gene. The results showed that crocodilian ERVs (CERVs) cluster into two major clades (CERV 1 and CERV 2). CERV 1 clustered as a sister group of the genus Gammaretrovirus, while CERV 2 clustered distantly with respect to all known ERVs. Interestingly, CERV 1 was found only in crocodiles (Crocodylidae). The data generated here could assist future studies aimed at identifying orthologous and paralogous ERVs among crocodilians.

  9. Modeling the human prothrombinase complex components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Tivadar

    Thrombin generation is the culminating stage of the blood coagulation process. Thrombin is obtained from prothrombin (the substrate) in a reaction catalyzed by the prothrombinase complex (the enzyme). The prothrombinase complex is composed of factor Xa (the enzyme), factor Va (the cofactor) associated in the presence of calcium ions on a negatively charged cell membrane. Factor Xa, alone, can activate prothrombin to thrombin; however, the rate of conversion is not physiologically relevant for survival. Incorporation of factor Va into prothrombinase accelerates the rate of prothrombinase activity by 300,000-fold, and provides the physiological pathway of thrombin generation. The long-term goal of the current proposal is to provide the necessary support for the advancing of studies to design potential drug candidates that may be used to avoid development of deep venous thrombosis in high-risk patients. The short-term goals of the present proposal are to (1) to propose a model of a mixed asymmetric phospholipid bilayer, (2) expand the incomplete model of human coagulation factor Va and study its interaction with the phospholipid bilayer, (3) to create a homology model of prothrombin (4) to study the dynamics of interaction between prothrombin and the phospholipid bilayer.

  10. Single-tube fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay with Ampliwax (STF-PERT) for retrovirus quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Johnna F; Khan, Arifa S

    2003-03-01

    A TaqMan fluorescent probe-based product enhanced reverse transcriptase (RT) assay is described in which the RT and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) steps are set-up in a single tube, in two compartments separated by Ampliwax (designated as single-tube fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay (STF-PERT)). This simplification of the two-step method resulted in increased assay reproducibility and handling efficiency while maintaining the sensitivity of the PERT assay (PERT assay can be used to quantitate low amounts of retrovirus in clinical and research materials and to evaluate retrovirus contamination in cell substrates and biological products in human use.

  11. Further investigations on the macromolecular complex in human bile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, J.C.M.; Wael, J. de; Mijnlieff, P.F.

    1956-01-01

    The formation of complexes in human bile was further studied by the preparation of various synthetic complexes and extracts. These were compared for a number of properties with the natural complex of human gall bladder bile. It appeared that protein is probably and bilirubin quite definitely a const

  12. Reducing the Complexity Gap: Expanding the Period of Human Nurturance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, L. Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Socio-techno-cultural reality, in the current historical era, evolves at a faster rate than do human brain or human institutions. This reality creates a "complexity gap" that reduces human and institutional capacities to adapt to the challenges of late modernity. New insights from the neurosciences may help to reduce the complexity gap.…

  13. Convergent evolution of ribonuclease h in LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustyantsev, Kirill; Novikova, Olga; Blinov, Alexander; Smyshlyaev, Georgy

    2015-05-01

    Ty3/Gypsy long terminals repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are structurally and phylogenetically close to retroviruses. Two notable structural differences between these groups of genetic elements are 1) the presence in retroviruses of an additional envelope gene, env, which mediates infection, and 2) a specific dual ribonuclease H (RNH) domain encoded by the retroviral pol gene. However, similar to retroviruses, many Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons harbor additional env-like genes, promoting concepts of the infective mode of these retrotransposons. Here, we provide a further line of evidence of similarity between retroviruses and some Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons. We identify that, together with their additional genes, plant Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons of the Tat group have a second RNH, as do retroviruses. Most importantly, we show that the resulting dual RNHs of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses emerged independently, providing strong evidence for their convergent evolution. The convergent resemblance of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses may indicate similar selection pressures acting on these diverse groups of elements and reveal potential evolutionary constraints on their structure. We speculate that dual RNH is required to accelerate retrotransposon evolution through increased rates of strand transfer events and subsequent recombination events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Benchmarking human protein complexes to investigate drug-related systems and evaluate predicted protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are key entities to perform cellular functions. Human diseases are also revealed to associate with some specific human protein complexes. In fact, human protein complexes are widely used for protein function annotation, inference of human protein interactome, disease gene prediction, and so on. Therefore, it is highly desired to build an up-to-date catalogue of human complexes to support the research in these applications. Protein complexes from different databases are as expected to be highly redundant. In this paper, we designed a set of concise operations to compile these redundant human complexes and built a comprehensive catalogue called CHPC2012 (Catalogue of Human Protein Complexes. CHPC2012 achieves a higher coverage for proteins and protein complexes than those individual databases. It is also verified to be a set of complexes with high quality as its co-complex protein associations have a high overlap with protein-protein interactions (PPI in various existing PPI databases. We demonstrated two distinct applications of CHPC2012, that is, investigating the relationship between protein complexes and drug-related systems and evaluating the quality of predicted protein complexes. In particular, CHPC2012 provides more insights into drug development. For instance, proteins involved in multiple complexes (the overlapping proteins are potential drug targets; the drug-complex network is utilized to investigate multi-target drugs and drug-drug interactions; and the disease-specific complex-drug networks will provide new clues for drug repositioning. With this up-to-date reference set of human protein complexes, we believe that the CHPC2012 catalogue is able to enhance the studies for protein interactions, protein functions, human diseases, drugs, and related fields of research. CHPC2012 complexes can be downloaded from http://www1.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/xlli/CHPC2012/CHPC2012.htm.

  15. Endogenous retroviruses of the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan I King

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We analyzed the chicken (Gallus gallus genome sequence to search for previously uncharacterized endogenous retrovirus (ERV sequences using ab initio and combined evidence approaches. We discovered 11 novel families of ERVs that occupy more than 21 million base pairs, approximately 2%, of the chicken genome. These novel families include a number of recently active full-length elements possessing identical long terminal repeats (LTRs as well as intact gag and pol open reading frames. The abundance and diversity of chicken ERVs we discovered underscore the utility of an approach that combines multiple methods for the identification of interspersed repeats in vertebrate genomes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Igor Zhulin and Itai Yanai.

  16. Proteasomal degradation of TRIM5alpha during retrovirus restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Rold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The host protein TRIM5alpha inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5alpha. Here, we show that TRIM5alpha is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5alpha-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5alpha was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5alpha in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5alpha degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

  17. Proteasomal degradation of TRIM5alpha during retrovirus restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Rold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The host protein TRIM5alpha inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5alpha. Here, we show that TRIM5alpha is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5alpha-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5alpha was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5alpha in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5alpha degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

  18. Phylogeny-Directed Search for Murine Leukemia Virus-Like Retroviruses in Vertebrate Genomes and in Patients Suffering from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Blomberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gammaretrovirus-like sequences occur in most vertebrate genomes. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV like retroviruses (MLLVs are a subset, which may be pathogenic and spread cross-species. Retroviruses highly similar to MLLVs (xenotropic murine retrovirus related virus (XMRV and Human Mouse retrovirus-like RetroViruses (HMRVs reported from patients suffering from prostate cancer (PC and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS raise the possibility that also humans have been infected. Structurally intact, potentially infectious MLLVs occur in the genomes of some mammals, especially mouse. Mouse MLLVs contain three major groups. One, MERV G3, contained MLVs and XMRV/HMRV. Its presence in mouse DNA, and the abundance of xenotropic MLVs in biologicals, is a source of false positivity. Theoretically, XMRV/HMRV could be one of several MLLV transspecies infections. MLLV pathobiology and diversity indicate optimal strategies for investigating XMRV/HMRV in humans and raise ethical concerns. The alternatives that XMRV/HMRV may give a hard-to-detect “stealth” infection, or that XMRV/HMRV never reached humans, have to be considered.

  19. Isolation of koala retroviruses from koalas in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Takayuki; Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Ohata, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is considered to be associated with leukemia, lymphoma and immunodeficiency-like diseases in koalas. We therefore conducted a pilot study of KoRV infection in five Queensland koalas in Kobe Municipal Oji Zoo. By polymerase chain reaction to detect partial env and pol genes of KoRV in genomic DNA isolated from whole blood and feces, all five koalas were found to be positive for KoRV proviruses. We succeeded in culturing koala lymphocytes from less than 1 ml blood for over 14 days in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-2. By coculturing the lymphocytes with human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, we isolated KoRVs from all five koalas. We designated these isolates as strains OJ-1 to OJ-5. By electron microscopy, we observed C-type retroviral particles in HEK 293T cells chronically infected with KoRV strain OJ-4. This is the first report on the isolation of KoRV from koalas in a Japanese zoo.

  20. Complex Human Dynamics From Mind to Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Winkowska-Nowak, Katarzyna; Brée, David

    2013-01-01

    This book, edited and authored by a closely collaborating network of social scientists and psychologists, recasts typical research topics in these fields into the language of nonlinear, dynamic and complex systems. The aim is to provide scientists with different backgrounds - physics, applied mathematics and computer sciences - with the opportunity to apply the tools of their trade to an altogether new range of possible applications. At the same time, this book will serve as a first reference for a new generation of social scientists and psychologists wishing to familiarize themselves with the new methodology and the "thinking in complexity".

  1. Clinical Aspects of Feline Retroviruses: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hartmann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Feline leukemia virus (FeLV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV are retroviruses with global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma, bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia, and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less commonly diagnosed than in the previous 20 years; prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. However, FeLV importance may be underestimated as it has been shown that regressively infected cats (that are negative in routinely used FeLV tests also can develop clinical signs. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. This article provides a review of clinical syndromes in progressively and regressively FeLV-infected cats as well as in FIV-infected cats.

  2. Complex Systems and Human Performance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    constitute a cognitive architecture or decomposing the work flows and resource constraints that characterize human-system interactions, the modeler...also explored the generation of so-called “ fractal ” series from simple task network models where task times are the calculated by way of a moving

  3. Prevention of 3-methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas in rats pre-inoculated with endogenous rat retrovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Fish, D C; Demarais, J T; Djurickovic, D B; Huebner, R J

    1981-01-01

    Weanling Fischer 344 rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of a 1000-fold concentrated preparation of endogenous nontransforming rat retrovirus. Ten days later, the rats were each given a single subcutaneous injection of 3-methylcholanthrene. The rats inoculated with the endogenous rat retrovirus were significantly protected against the development of cancer, whereas uninoculated rats and rats given one of several murine retroviruses or baboon retrovirus were not protected.

  4. Understanding complexity in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Danielle S; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Although the ultimate aim of neuroscientific enquiry is to gain an understanding of the brain and how its workings relate to the mind, the majority of current efforts are largely focused on small questions using increasingly detailed data. However, it might be possible to successfully address the larger question of mind-brain mechanisms if the cumulative findings from these neuroscientific studies are coupled with complementary approaches from physics and philosophy. The brain, we argue, can be understood as a complex system or network, in which mental states emerge from the interaction between multiple physical and functional levels. Achieving further conceptual progress will crucially depend on broad-scale discussions regarding the properties of cognition and the tools that are currently available or must be developed in order to study mind-brain mechanisms.

  5. About the origin of retroviruses and the co-evolution of the gypsy retrovirus with the Drosophila flamenco host gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélisson, A; Teysset, L; Chalvet, F; Kim, A; Prud'homme, N; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1997-01-01

    The gypsy element of Drosophila melanogaster is the first retrovirus identified so far in invertebrates. According to phylogenetic data, gypsy belongs to the same group as the Ty3 class of LTR-retrotransposons, which suggests that retroviruses evolved from this kind of retroelements before the radiation of vertebrates. There are other invertebrate retroelements that are also likely to be endogenous retroviruses because they share with gypsy some structural and functional retroviral-like characteristics. Gypsy is controlled by a Drosophila gene called flamenco, the restrictive alleles of which maintain the retrovirus in a repressed state. In permissive strains, functional gypsy elements transpose at high frequency and produce infective particles. Defective gypsy proviruses located in pericentromeric heterochromatin of all strains seem to be very old components of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, which indicates that gypsy invaded this species, or an ancestor, a long time ago. At that time, Drosophila melanogaster presumably contained permissive alleles of the flamenco gene. One can imagine that the species survived to the increase of genetic load caused by the retroviral invasion because restrictive alleles of flamenco were selected. The characterization of a retrovirus in Drosophila, one of the most advanced model organisms for molecular genetics, provides us with an exceptional clue to study how a species can resist a retroviral invasion.

  6. One hundred twenty years of koala retrovirus evolution determined from museum skins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen; Ho, Simon Y W; Ishida, Yasuko

    2013-01-01

    Although endogenous retroviruses are common across vertebrate genomes, the koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be currently invading the germ line of its host. KoRV is believed to have first infected koalas in northern Australia less than two centuries ago. We examined KoRV in...

  7. Interaction profiling identifies the human nuclear exosome targeting complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Christensen, Marianne Spangsberg; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard

    2011-01-01

    of a similar activator(s) in humans remains elusive. By establishing an interaction network of the human nuclear exosome, we identify the trimeric Nuclear Exosome Targeting (NEXT) complex, containing hMTR4, the Zn-knuckle protein ZCCHC8, and the putative RNA binding protein RBM7. ZCCHC8 and RBM7 are excluded...... to nucleoli. Our results suggest that human nuclear exosome degradation pathways comprise modules of spatially organized cofactors that diverge from the yeast model....

  8. Role of nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport during the life cycle of retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisatoshi eShida

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have evolved mechanisms for transporting their intron-containing RNAs (including genomic and messenger RNAs, which encode virion components from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the infected cell. Human retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, encode the regulatory proteins Rev and Rex, which form a bridge between the viral RNA and the export receptor CRM1. Recent studies show that these transport systems are not only involved in RNA export, but also in the encapsidation of genomic RNA; furthermore, they influence subsequent events in the cytoplasm, including the translation of the cognate mRNA, transport of Gag proteins to the plasma membrane, and the formation of virus particles. Moreover, the mode of interaction between the viral and cellular RNA transport machinery underlies the species-specific propagation of HIV-1 and HTLV-1, forming the basis for constructing animal models of infection. This review article discusses recent progress regarding these issues.

  9. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells.

  10. Characterizing novel endogenous retroviruses from genetic variation inferred from short sequence reads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Mollerup, Sarah; Vinner, Lasse;

    2015-01-01

    From Illumina sequencing of DNA from brain and liver tissue from the lion, Panthera leo, and tumor samples from the pike-perch, Sander lucioperca, we obtained two assembled sequence contigs with similarity to known retroviruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pike-perch retrovirus belongs...... to the epsilonretroviruses, and the lion retrovirus to the gammaretroviruses. To determine if these novel retroviral sequences originate from an endogenous retrovirus or from a recently integrated exogenous retrovirus, we assessed the genetic diversity of the parental sequences from which the short Illumina reads...

  11. Differences in Cytokine and Chemokine Responses during Neurological Disease Induced by Polytropic Murine Retroviruses Map to Separate Regions of the Viral Envelope Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Karin E Peterson; Robertson, Shelly J.; Portis, John L.; Chesebro, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    Infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by several viruses can lead to upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In immunocompetent adults, these molecules induce prominent inflammatory infiltrates. However, with immunosuppressive retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), little CNS inflammation is observed yet proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines are still upregulated in some patients and may mediate pathogenesis. The present study examined expressio...

  12. Long-term absence of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection in chronically immunosuppressed patients after treatment with the porcine cell-based Academic Medical Center bioartificial liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    di Nicuolo, G.; D'Alessandro, A.; Andria, B.; Scuderi, V.; Scognamiglio, M.; Tammaro, A.; Mancini, A.; Cozzolino, S.; di Florio, E.; Bracco, A.; Calise, F.; Chamuleau, R.A.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Clinical use of porcine cell-based bioartificial liver (BAL) support in acute liver failure as bridging therapy for liver transplantation exposes the patient to the risk of transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) to human. This risk may be enhanced when patients receive l

  13. Proliferation of endogenous retroviruses in the early stages of a host germ line invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasuko; Zhao, Kai; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 8% of the human genome and are common in all vertebrate genomes. The only retrovirus known to be currently transitioning from exogenous to endogenous form is the koala retrovirus (KoRV), making koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) ideal for examining the early stages of retroviral endogenization. To distinguish endogenous from exogenous KoRV proviruses, we isolated koala genomic regions flanking KoRV integration sites. In three wild southern Australian koalas, there were fewer KoRV loci than in three captive Queensland koalas, consistent with reports that southern Australian koalas carry fewer KoRVs. Of 39 distinct KoRV proviral loci examined in a sire-dam-progeny triad, all proved to be vertically transmitted and endogenous; none was exogenous. Of the 39 endogenous KoRVs (enKoRVs), only one was present in the genomes of both the sire and the dam, suggesting that, at this early stage in the retroviral invasion of a host germ line, very large numbers of ERVs have proliferated at very low frequencies in the koala population. Sequence divergence between the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a provirus can be used as a molecular clock. Within each of ten enKoRVs, the 5'-LTR sequence was identical to the 3'-LTR sequence, suggesting a maximum age for enKoRV invasion of the koala germ line of approximately 22,200-49,900 years ago, although a much younger age is possible. Across the ten proviruses, seven LTR haplotypes were detected, indicating that at least seven different retroviral sequences had entered the koala germ line. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Structure of a human rhinovirus complexed with its receptor molecule.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Cryoelectron microscopy has been used to determine the structure of a virus when complexed with its glycoprotein cellular receptor. Human rhinovirus 16 complexed with the two amino-terminal, immunoglobulin-like domains of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 shows that the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 binds into the 12-A deep "canyon" on the viral surface. This result confirms the prediction that the viral-receptor attachment site lies in a cavity inaccessible to the host's antibodies. ...

  15. Efficient inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by hepatitis delta virus ribozymes delivered by targeting retrovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Long-Hua

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis delta virus (HDV ribozyme is an attractive molecular tool that can specifically recognize and catalyze the self-cleavage of the viral RNA phosphodiester backbone. However, a major obstacle in the medical application of the HDV ribozyme is the lack of specificity in the delivery of the ribozyme to defined target cells. Results The objective of this study was to determine whether retroviral vectors can deliver the HDV ribozyme into the target cells and to elucidate whether HDV ribozyme plays a role in hepatitis B virus (HBV replication. In our study, the transduction of helper-free pseudotyped retrovirus, which showed a broad host range, in human hepatoma cells was performed under 2 conditions, that is, in the presence of polymerized human serum albumin (pHSA and in the absence of pHSA. The transduction ability in the presence of pHSA was higher than in the absence of pHSA. Moreover, HBsAg and HBeAg levels after transductions with pHSA were significantly lower than those in the absence of pHSA, thus indicating that the recombinant retrovirus had HBV-specific cleavage activity and targeted HepG2215 cells. Conclusions These data suggest that this system provides a new approach for targeting hepatocytes and has a great potential in gene therapy for HBV infection.

  16. Wolbachia influences the maternal transmission of the gypsy endogenous retrovirus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touret, Franck; Guiguen, François; Terzian, Christophe

    2014-09-02

    The endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are present in most insects and are maternally transmitted through the germline. Moreover, these intracellular bacteria exert antiviral activity against insect RNA viruses, as in Drosophila melanogaster, which could explain the prevalence of Wolbachia bacteria in natural populations. Wolbachia is maternally transmitted in D. melanogaster through a mechanism that involves distribution at the posterior pole of mature oocytes and then incorporation into the pole cells of the embryos. In parallel, maternal transmission of several endogenous retroviruses is well documented in D. melanogaster. Notably, gypsy retrovirus is expressed in permissive follicle cells and transferred to the oocyte and then to the offspring by integrating into their genomes. Here, we show that the presence of Wolbachia wMel reduces the rate of gypsy insertion into the ovo gene. However, the presence of Wolbachia does not modify the expression levels of gypsy RNA and envelope glycoprotein from either permissive or restrictive ovaries. Moreover, Wolbachia affects the pattern of distribution of the retroviral particles and the gypsy envelope protein in permissive follicle cells. Altogether, our results enlarge the knowledge of the antiviral activity of Wolbachia to include reducing the maternal transmission of endogenous retroviruses in D. melanogaster. Animals have established complex relationships with bacteria and viruses that spread horizontally among individuals or are vertically transmitted, i.e., from parents to offspring. It is well established that members of the genus Wolbachia, maternally inherited symbiotic bacteria present mainly in arthropods, reduce the replication of several RNA viruses transmitted horizontally. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that Wolbachia diminishes the maternal transmission of gypsy, an endogenous retrovirus in Drosophila melanogaster. We hypothesize that gypsy cannot efficiently integrate into the germ

  17. Copper(II) complexes encapsulated in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, R P; De Flora, A; Rizzarelli, E; Santoro, A M; Tabbí, G; Tonetti, M

    1995-09-01

    Copper(II) complexes were encapsulated in human red blood cells in order to test their possible use as antioxidant drugs by virtue of their labile character. ESR spectroscopy was used to verify whether encapsulation in red blood cells leads to the modification of such complexes. With copper(II) complexes bound to dipeptides or tripeptides, an interaction with hemoglobin was found to be present, the hemoglobin having a strong coordinative site formed by four nitrogen donor atoms. Instead, with copper(II) complexes with TAD or PheANN3, which have the greatest stability. ESR spectra always showed the original species. Only the copper(II) complex with GHL gave rise to a complicated behavior, which contained signals from iron(III) species probably coming from oxidative processes. Encapsulation of all copper(II) complexes in erythrocytes caused a slight oxidative stress, compared to the unloaded and to the native cells. However, no significant differences were observed in the major metabolic properties (GSH, glycolytic rate, hexose monophosphate shunt, Ca(2+)-ATPase) of erythrocytes loaded with different copper(II) complexes, with the exception of methemoglobin levels, which were markedly increased in the case of [Cu(GHL)H-1] compared to [Cu(TAD)]. This latter finding suggests that methemoglobin formation can be affected by the type of complex used for encapsulation, depending on the direct interaction of the copper(II) complex with hemoglobin.

  18. Modulating drug resistance by targeting BCRP/ABCG2 using retrovirus-mediated RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Xie

    Full Text Available The BCRP/ABCG2 transporter, which mediates drug resistance in many types of cells, depends on energy provided by ATP hydrolysis. Here, a retrovirus encoding a shRNA targeting the ATP-binding domain of this protein was used to screen for highly efficient agents that could reverse drug resistance and improve cell sensitivity to drugs, thus laying the foundation for further studies and applications.To target the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2, pLenti6/BCRPsi shRNA recombinant retroviruses, with 20 bp target sequences starting from the 270th, 745th and 939th bps of the 6th exon, were constructed and packaged. The pLenti6/BCRPsi retroviruses (V-BCRPi that conferred significant knockdown effects were screened using a drug-sensitivity experiment and flow cytometry. The human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR, which highly expresses endogenous BCRP/ABCG2, was injected under the dorsal skin of a hairless mouse to initiate a JAR cytoma. After injecting V-BCRPi-infected JAR tumor cells into the dorsal skin of hairless mice, BCRP/ABCG2 expression in the tumor tissue was determined using immunohistochemistry, fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. After intraperitoneal injection of BCRP/ABCG2-tolerant 5-FU, the tumor volume, weight change, and apoptosis rate of the tumor tissue were determined using in situ hybridization. V-BCRPi increased the sensitivity of the tumor histiocytes to 5-FU and improved the cell apoptosis-promoting effects of 5-FU in the tumor.The goal of the in vivo and in vitro studies was to screen for an RNA interference recombinant retrovirus capable of stably targeting the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2 (V-BCRPi to inhibit its function. A new method to improve the chemo-sensitivity of breast cancer and other tumor cells was discovered, and this method could be used for gene therapy and functional studies of malignant tumors.

  19. Peak Oil and the Everyday Complexity of Human Progress Narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Pruit

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The “big” story of human progress has polarizing tendencies featuring the binary options of progress or decline. I consider human progress narratives in the context of everyday life. Analysis of the “little” stories from two narrative environments focusing on peak oil offers a more complex picture of the meaning and contours of the narrative. I consider the impact of differential blog site commitments to peak oil perspectives and identify five narrative types culled from two narrative dimensions. I argue that the lived experience complicates human progress narratives, which is no longer an either/or proposition.

  20. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  1. Complex human activities recognition using interval temporal syntactic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏利民; 韩芬; 王军

    2016-01-01

    A novel method based on interval temporal syntactic model was proposed to recognize human activities in video flow. The method is composed of two parts: feature extract and activities recognition. Trajectory shape descriptor, speeded up robust features (SURF) and histograms of optical flow (HOF) were proposed to represent human activities, which provide more exhaustive information to describe human activities on shape, structure and motion. In the process of recognition, a probabilistic latent semantic analysis model (PLSA) was used to recognize sample activities at the first step. Then, an interval temporal syntactic model, which combines the syntactic model with the interval algebra to model the temporal dependencies of activities explicitly, was introduced to recognize the complex activities with a time relationship. Experiments results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in comparison with other state-of-the-art methods on the public databases for the recognition of complex activities.

  2. Functional genomics reveals relationships between the retrovirus-like Ty1 element and its host Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Jacqulyn L; Coleman, Laura E; Raymond, Adam S; Goodson, Summer G; Pittard, William S; Tsui, Circe; Devine, Scott E

    2003-07-01

    Retroviruses and their relatives, the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, carry out complex life cycles within the cells of their hosts. We have exploited a collection of gene deletion mutants developed by the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project to perform a functional genomics screen for host factors that influence the retrovirus-like Ty1 element in yeast. A total of 101 genes that presumably influence many different aspects of the Ty1 retrotransposition cycle were identified from our analysis of 4483 homozygous diploid deletion strains. Of the 101 identified mutants, 46 had significantly altered levels of Ty1 cDNA, whereas the remaining 55 mutants had normal levels of Ty1 cDNA. Thus, approximately half of the mutants apparently affected the early stages of retrotransposition leading up to the assembly of virus-like particles and cDNA replication, whereas the remaining half affected steps that occur after cDNA replication. Although most of the mutants retained the ability to target Ty1 integration to tRNA genes, 2 mutants had reduced levels of tRNA gene targeting. Over 25% of the gene products identified in this study were conserved in other organisms, suggesting that this collection of host factors can serve as a starting point for identifying host factors that influence LTR retroelements and retroviruses in other organisms. Overall, our data indicate that Ty1 requires a large number of cellular host factors to complete its retrotransposition cycle efficiently.

  3. Emergence of dynamical complexity related to human heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Peng, C.-K.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    We apply the refined composite multiscale entropy (MSE) method to a one-dimensional directed small-world network composed of nodes whose states are binary and whose dynamics obey the majority rule. We find that the resulting fluctuating signal becomes dynamically complex. This dynamical complexity is caused (i) by the presence of both short-range connections and long-range shortcuts and (ii) by how well the system can adapt to the noisy environment. By tuning the adaptability of the environment and the long-range shortcuts we can increase or decrease the dynamical complexity, thereby modeling trends found in the MSE of a healthy human heart rate in different physiological states. When the shortcut and adaptability values increase, the complexity in the system dynamics becomes uncorrelated.

  4. Messenger RNA- versus retrovirus-based induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming strategies: analysis of genomic integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, Clara; Luce, Eléanor; Maluenda, Jérôme; Tosca, Lucie; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Desterke, Christophe; Dianat, Noushin; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Awan-Toor, Sarah; Burks, Deborah; Marie, Joëlle; Weber, Anne; Tachdjian, Gérard; Melki, Judith; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2014-06-01

    The use of synthetic messenger RNAs to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is particularly appealing for potential regenerative medicine applications, because it overcomes the common drawbacks of DNA-based or virus-based reprogramming strategies, including transgene integration in particular. We compared the genomic integrity of mRNA-derived iPSCs with that of retrovirus-derived iPSCs generated in strictly comparable conditions, by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses. We showed that mRNA-derived iPSCs do not differ significantly from the parental fibroblasts in SNP analysis, whereas retrovirus-derived iPSCs do. We found that the number of CNVs seemed independent of the reprogramming method, instead appearing to be clone-dependent. Furthermore, differentiation studies indicated that mRNA-derived iPSCs differentiated efficiently into hepatoblasts and that these cells did not load additional CNVs during differentiation. The integration-free hepatoblasts that were generated constitute a new tool for the study of diseased hepatocytes derived from patients' iPSCs and their use in the context of stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation. Our findings also highlight the need to conduct careful studies on genome integrity for the selection of iPSC lines before using them for further applications.

  5. Existence of proviral porcine endogenous retrovirus in fresh and decellularised porcine tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Swine are expected to be utilized as xenograft donors for both whole organ and cellular transplantation. A major concern in using porcine organs for transplantation is the potential of transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV. Tissue-engineered or decellularised heart valves have already been implanted in humans and have been marketed by certain companies after Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval. The aim of this study was to examine the existence of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV in fresh and decellularised porcine tissues. Methods: Porcine tissues (both fresh and decellularised were analysed using validated assays specific for PERV: polymerase chain reaction (PCR, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: PERV specific GAG sequences were found in the porcine heart tissue samples using PCR for DNA and RT- PCR for RNA. All tissue samples (both fresh and treated tissues like aortic valve, pulmonary valve and heart muscle showed the presence of PERV DNA. RT PCR for PERV was positive in all fresh tissues and was found to be negative in decellularised treated tissues. Conclusions: PCR is a rapid, specific test for the detection of PERV virus in xenografts. These findings have demonstrated that the presence of proviral DNA form of PERV in porcine tissues needs to be carefully considered when the infectious disease potential of xenotransplantation is being assessed.

  6. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-03

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models.

  7. Differential resistance to cell entry by porcine endogenous retrovirus subgroup A in rodent species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeuchi Yasuhiro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk of zoonotic infection by porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV has been highlighted in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. The use of receptors for cell entry often determines the host range of retroviruses. A human-tropic PERV subgroup, PERV-A, can enter human cells through either of two homologous multitransmembrane proteins, huPAR-1 and huPAR-2. Here, we characterised human PARs and their homologues in the PERV-A resistant rodent species, mouse and rat (muPAR and ratPAR, respectively. Results Upon exogenous expression in PERV-A resistant cells, human and rat PARs, but not muPAR, conferred PERV-A sensitivity. Exogenously expressed ratPAR binds PERV-A Env and allows PERV-A infection with equivalent efficiency to that of huPAR-1. Endogenous ratPAR expression in rat cell lines appeared to be too low for PERV-A infection. In contrast, the presence of Pro at position 109 in muPAR was identified to be the determinant for PERV-A resistance. Pro109. was shown to be located in the second extracellular loop (ECL2 and affected PERV-A Env binding to PAR molecules. Conclusion The basis of resistance to PERV-A infection in two rodent species is different. Identification of a single a.a. mutation in muPAR, which is responsible for mouse cell resistance to PERV-A highlighted the importance of ECL-2 for the viral receptor function.

  8. Human mitochondrial complex I assembles through the combination of evolutionary conserved modules: a framework to interpret complex I deficiencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugalde, C.; Vogel, R.O.; Huijbens, R.J.F.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    With 46 subunits, human mitochondrial complex I is the largest enzyme of the oxidative phosphorylation system. We have studied the assembly of complex I in cultured human cells. This will provide essential information about the nature of complex I deficiencies and will enhance our understanding of

  9. Inorganic Phosphate Export by the Retrovirus Receptor XPR1 in Metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Giovannini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic phosphate uptake is a universal function accomplished by transporters that are present across the living world. In contrast, no phosphate exporter has ever been identified in metazoans. Here, we show that depletion of XPR1, a multipass membrane molecule initially identified as the cell-surface receptor for xenotropic and polytropic murine leukemia retroviruses (X- and P-MLV, induced a decrease in phosphate export and that reintroduction of various XPR1 proteins, from fruit fly to human, rescued this defect. Inhibition of phosphate export was also obtained with a soluble ligand generated from the envelope-receptor-binding domain of X-MLV in all human cell lines tested, as well as in diverse stem cells and epithelial cells derived from renal proximal tubules, the main site of phosphate homeostasis regulation. These results provide new insights on phosphate export in metazoans and the role of Xpr1 in this function.

  10. Long Non-Coding RNAs and Complex Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changning Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a heterogeneous class of RNAs that are generally defined as non-protein-coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. Recently, an increasing number of studies have shown that lncRNAs can be involved in various critical biological processes, such as chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, and protein transport and trafficking. Moreover, lncRNAs are dysregulated in a number of complex human diseases, including coronary artery diseases, autoimmune diseases, neurological disorders, and various cancers, which indicates their important roles in these diseases. Here, we reviewed the current understanding of lncRNAs, including their definition and subclassification, regulatory functions, and potential roles in different types of complex human diseases.

  11. Efficient intracellular retrotransposition of an exogenous primate retrovirus genome

    OpenAIRE

    Heinkelein, Martin; Pietschmann, Thomas; Jármy, Gergely; Dressler, Marco; Imrich, Horst; Thurow, Jana; Lindemann, Dirk,; Bock, Michael; Moebes, Astrid; Roy, Jacqueline; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Rethwilm, Axel

    2000-01-01

    The foamy virus (FV) subgroup of Retroviridae reverse transcribe their RNA (pre-)genome late in the replication cycle before leaving an infected cell. We studied whether a marker gene-transducing FV vector is able to shuttle to the nucleus and integrate into host cell genomic DNA. While a potential intracellular retrotransposition of vectors derived from other retroviruses was below the detection limit of our assay, we found that up to 5% of cells transfected with the FV vector were stably tr...

  12. Induction of endogenous murine retrovirus by hydroxyurea and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rascati, R.J.; Tennant, R.W.

    1978-06-01

    Hydroxyurea and two related compounds, carbamoyloxyurea and formamidoxime, induce endogenous retrovirus expression in AKR mouse embryo cells. Only the induction of ecotropic (N-tropic).virus was detected. The ability of each compound to induce shows a linear dose-response over a limited range of concentrations which correlate with the cytotoxicity of each of the compounds. The data suggest that these compounds may induce virus expression via damage to cellular DNA.

  13. Mitochondrial network complexity and pathological decrease in complex I activity are tightly correlated in isolated human complex I deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Werner J H; Visch, Henk-Jan; Verkaart, Sjoerd; van den Heuvel, Lambertus W P J; Smeitink, Jan A M; Willems, Peter H G M

    2005-10-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest multisubunit assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation system, and its malfunction is associated with a wide variety of clinical syndromes ranging from highly progressive, often early lethal, encephalopathies to neurodegenerative disorders in adult life. The changes in mitochondrial structure and function that are at the basis of the clinical symptoms are poorly understood. Video-rate confocal microscopy of cells pulse-loaded with mitochondria-specific rhodamine 123 followed by automated analysis of form factor (combined measure of length and degree of branching), aspect ratio (measure of length), and number of revealed marked differences between primary cultures of skin fibroblasts from 13 patients with an isolated complex I deficiency. These differences were independent of the affected subunit, but plotting of the activity of complex I, normalized to that of complex IV, against the ratio of either form factor or aspect ratio to number revealed a linear relationship. Relatively small reductions in activity appeared to be associated with an increase in form factor and never with a decrease in number, whereas relatively large reductions occurred in association with a decrease in form factor and/or an increase in number. These results demonstrate that complex I activity and mitochondrial structure are tightly coupled in human isolated complex I deficiency. To further prove the relationship between aberrations in mitochondrial morphology and pathological condition, fibroblasts from two patients with a different mutation but a highly fragmented mitochondrial phenotype were fused. Full restoration of the mitochondrial network demonstrated that this change in mitochondrial morphology was indeed associated with human complex I deficiency.

  14. The cell biology of HIV-1 and other retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouland Andrew J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recognition of the growing influence of cell biology in retrovirus research, we recently organized a Summer conference sponsored by the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB on the Cell Biology of HIV-1 and other Retroviruses (July 20–23, 2006, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. The meeting brought together a number of leading investigators interested in the interplay between cell biology and retrovirology with an emphasis on presentation of new and unpublished data. The conference was arranged from early to late events in the virus replication cycle, with sessions on viral fusion, entry, and transmission; post-entry restrictions to retroviral infection; nuclear import and integration; gene expression/regulation of retroviral Gag and genomic RNA; and assembly/release. In this review, we will attempt to touch briefly on some of the highlights of the conference, and will emphasize themes and trends that emerged at the meeting. Meeting report The conference began with a keynote address from W. Sundquist on the biochemistry of HIV-1 budding. This presentation will be described in the section on Assembly and Release of Retroviruses.

  15. Effect of Type-I Interferon on Retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Doménech

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Type-I interferons (IFN-I play an important role in the innate immune response to several retroviruses. They seem to be effective in controlling the in vivo infection, though many of the clinical signs of retroviral infection may be due to their continual presence which over-stimulates the immune system and activates apoptosis. IFN-I not only affect the immune system, but also operate directly on virus replication. Most data suggest that the in vitro treatment with IFN-I of retrovirus infected cells inhibits the final stages of virogenesis, avoiding the correct assembly of viral particles and their budding, even though the mechanism is not well understood. However, in some retroviruses IFN-I may also act at a previous stage as some retroviral LTRs posses sequences homologous to the IFNstimulated response element (ISRE. When stimulated, ISREs control viral transcription. HIV-1 displays several mechanisms for evading IFN-I, such as through Tat and Nef. Besides IFN-α and IFN-β, some other type I IFN, such as IFN-τ and IFN-ω, have potent antiviral activity and are promising treatment drugs.

  16. Complex-tone pitch representations in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica

    ) listeners and the effect of musical training for pitch discrimination of complex tones with resolved and unresolved harmonics. Concerning the first topic, behavioral and modeling results in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) indicated that temporal envelope cues of complex tones...... for the individual pitch-discrimination abilities, the musically trained listeners still allocated lower processing effort than did the non-musicians to perform the task at the same performance level. This finding suggests an enhanced pitch representation along the auditory system in musicians, possibly as a result......Understanding how the human auditory system processes the physical properties of an acoustical stimulus to give rise to a pitch percept is a fascinating aspect of hearing research. Since most natural sounds are harmonic complex tones, this work focused on the nature of pitch-relevant cues...

  17. How to Save Human Lives with Complexity Science

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, Dirk; Chadefaux, Thomas; Donnay, Karsten; Blanke, Ulf; Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Moussaid, Mehdi; Johansson, Anders; Krause, Jens; Schutte, Sebastian; Perc, Matjaz

    2014-01-01

    We discuss models and data of crowd disasters, crime, terrorism, war and disease spreading to show that conventional recipes, such as deterrence strategies, are not effective and sufficient to contain them. The failure of many conventional approaches results from their neglection of feedback loops, instabilities and/or cascade effects, due to which equilibrium models do often not provide a good picture of the actual system behavior. However, the complex and often counter-intuitive behavior of social systems and their macro-level collective dynamics can be understood by means of complexity science, which enables one to address the aforementioned problems more successfully. We highlight that a suitable system design and management can help to stop undesirable cascade effects and to enable favorable kinds of self-organization in the system. In such a way, complexity science can help to save human lives.

  18. Transmission of zoonoses in xenotransplantation: Porcine endogenous retroviruses from an immunological and molecular point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suji M Prabha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pigs offer an unlimited source of xenografts for humans. The use of transplants from animal origin offers a potential solution to the limited supply of human organs and tissues. However, like many other mammalian species, pigs harbor porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV, which are encoded in their genomic DNA and are assumed to have been integrated into the porcine germ line more than 7.6 × 106 years ago and showing that the age correlates with the time of separation between pigs and peccaries 7.4 × 106 years ago. The ability of the PERV to infect human cells in vitro has heightened safety concerns regarding the transmission of PERV to pig xenograft recipients. In this study, we detected PERV-AC recombinant virus in porcine genomic DNA that may have resulted from exogenous viral recombination. Infectious risk in xenotransplantation will be defined by the activity of PERV loci in vivo. We identified unique Haemophilus aegyptius III HaeIII gag restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP profiles resulting from single nucleotide polymorphisms; these were found only in animals that produced human tropic PERV. Materials and Methods: Porcine tissues were analyzed using validated assays specific for PERV: polymerase chain reaction (PCR (for PERV DNA, RT-PCR (for PERV RNA, cell culture, RFLP analysis, and sequence analysis. Conclusions and Interpretation : These findings have demonstrated that the presence of both DNA and RNA forms of porcine endogenous retrovirus in porcine tissues needs to be carefully considered when the infectious disease potential of xenotransplantation is being assessed.

  19. HIV-1 Vpu promotes release and prevents endocytosis of nascent retrovirus particles from the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type-1 viral protein U (Vpu protein enhances the release of diverse retroviruses from human, but not monkey, cells and is thought to do so by ablating a dominant restriction to particle release. Here, we determined how Vpu expression affects the subcellular distribution of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV Gag proteins in human cells where Vpu is, or is not, required for efficient particle release. In HeLa cells, where Vpu enhances HIV-1 and MLV release approximately 10-fold, concentrations of HIV-1 Gag and MLV Gag fused to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP were initially detected at the plasma membrane, but then accumulated over time in early and late endosomes. Endosomal accumulation of Gag-CFP was prevented by Vpu expression and, importantly, inhibition of plasma membrane to early endosome transport by dominant negative mutants of Rab5a, dynamin, and EPS-15. Additionally, accumulation of both HIV and MLV Gag in endosomes required a functional late-budding domain. In human HOS cells, where HIV-1 and MLV release was efficient even in the absence of Vpu, Gag proteins were localized predominantly at the plasma membrane, irrespective of Vpu expression or manipulation of endocytic transport. While these data indicated that Vpu inhibits nascent virion endocytosis, Vpu did not affect transferrin endocytosis. Moreover, inhibition of endocytosis did not restore Vpu-defective HIV-1 release in HeLa cells, but instead resulted in accumulation of mature virions that could be released from the cell surface by protease treatment. Thus, these findings suggest that a specific activity that is present in HeLa cells, but not in HOS cells, and is counteracted by Vpu, traps assembled retrovirus particles at the cell surface. This entrapment leads to subsequent endocytosis by a Rab5a- and clathrin-dependent mechanism and intracellular sequestration of virions in endosomes.

  20. Expression of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) in melanomas of Munich miniature swine (MMS) Troll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckhoff, Britta; Puhlmann, Jenny; Büscher, Kristina; Hafner-Marx, Angela; Herbach, Nadja; Bannert, Norbert; Büttner, Mathias; Wanke, Rüdiger; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2007-07-20

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are integrated in the genome of all pig breeds. Since some of them are able to infect human cells, they might represent a risk for xenotransplantation using pig cells or organs. However, the expression and biological role of PERVs in healthy pigs as well as in porcine tumours is largely unknown. Since we and others have recently shown overexpression of a human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-K, in human melanomas, we studied the expression of PERVs in melanomas of selectively bred Munich miniature swine (MMS) Troll. This breeding herd of MMS Troll is characterised by a high prevalence of melanomas, which histologically resemble various types of cutaneous melanomas in humans. Several genetic factors have been defined when studying inheritance of melanomas and melanocytic nevi in MMS Troll. Here we show that the polytropic PERV-A and PERV-B as well as the ecotropic PERV-C are present in the genome of all melanoma bearing MMS Troll investigated. Most interestingly, in the spleen, but not in other organs, recombinant PERV-A/C proviruses were found. PERV expression was found elevated in melanomas when compared to normal skin and viral proteins were expressed in melanomas and pulmonary metastasis-derived melanoma cell cultures. During passaging of these cells in vitro the expression of PERV mRNA and protein increased and virus particles were released as shown by RT activity in the supernatant and by electron microscopy. Genomic RNA of PERV-A, -B and -C were found in pelleted virus particles. Although PERV expression was elevated in melanomas and pulmonary metastasis-derived cell cultures, the function of the virus in tumour development is still unclear.

  1. Pedigree models for complex human traits involving the mitochrondrial genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schork, N.J.; Guo, S.W. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Recent biochemical and molecular-genetic discoveries concerning variations in human mtDNA have suggested a role for mtDNA mutations in a number of human traits and disorders. Although the importance of these discoveries cannot be emphasized enough, the complex natures of mitochondrial biogenesis, mutant mtDNA phenotype expression, and the maternal inheritance pattern exhibited by mtDNA transmission make it difficult to develop models that can be used routinely in pedigree analyses to quantify and test hypotheses about the role of mtDNA in the expression of a trait. In the present paper, the authors describe complexities inherent in mitochondrial biogenesis and genetic transmission and show how these complexities can be incorporated into appropriate mathematical models. The authors offer a variety of likelihood-based models which account for the complexities discussed. The derivation of the models is meant to stimulate the construction of statistical tests for putative mtDNA contribution to a trait. Results of simulation studies which make use of the proposed models are described. The results of the simulation studies suggest that, although pedigree models of mtDNA effects can be reliable, success in mapping chromosomal determinants of a trait does not preclude the possibility that mtDNA determinants exist for the trait as well. Shortcomings inherent in the proposed models are described in an effort to expose areas in need of additional research. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Human copy number variation and complex genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girirajan, Santhosh; Campbell, Catarina D; Eichler, Evan E

    2011-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) play an important role in human disease and population diversity. Advancements in technology have allowed for the analysis of CNVs in thousands of individuals with disease in addition to thousands of controls. These studies have identified rare CNVs associated with neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism, schizophrenia, and intellectual disability. In addition, copy number polymorphisms (CNPs) are present at higher frequencies in the population, show high diversity in copy number, sequence, and structure, and have been associated with multiple phenotypes, primarily related to immune or environmental response. However, the landscape of copy number variation still remains largely unexplored, especially for smaller CNVs and those embedded within complex regions of the human genome. An integrated approach including characterization of single nucleotide variants and CNVs in a large number of individuals with disease and normal genomes holds the promise of thoroughly elucidating the genetic basis of human disease and diversity.

  3. The relationship between the flamenco gene and gypsy in Drosophila: how to tame a retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucheton, A

    1995-09-01

    For a long time, retroviruses have been considered to be restricted to vertebrates. However, the genome of insects contains elements like gypsy in Drosophila melanogaster that are strikingly similar to vertebrate proviruses of retroviruses, which were considered to be transposable elements. Recent results indicate that gypsy has infective properties and is therefore a retrovirus, the first to be identified in invertebrates. It is normally repressed by a host gene called flamenco, which apparently controls the transposition and infective properties of gypsy. This provides an exceptional experimental model to investigate the genetic relationships between retroviruses and their hosts.

  4. Environmental layout complexity affects neural activity during navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Edward; Burles, Ford; Iaria, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Navigating large-scale surroundings is a fundamental ability. In humans, it is commonly assumed that navigational performance is affected by individual differences, such as age, sex, and cognitive strategies adopted for orientation. We recently showed that the layout of the environment itself also influences how well people are able to find their way within it, yet it remains unclear whether differences in environmental complexity are associated with changes in brain activity during navigation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain responds to a change in environmental complexity by asking participants to perform a navigation task in two large-scale virtual environments that differed solely in interconnection density, a measure of complexity defined as the average number of directional choices at decision points. The results showed that navigation in the simpler, less interconnected environment was faster and more accurate relative to the complex environment, and such performance was associated with increased activity in a number of brain areas (i.e. precuneus, retrosplenial cortex, and hippocampus) known to be involved in mental imagery, navigation, and memory. These findings provide novel evidence that environmental complexity not only affects navigational behaviour, but also modulates activity in brain regions that are important for successful orientation and navigation.

  5. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  6. Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of the cytokine genes interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha into human neuroblastoma cells: consequences for cell line behavior and immunomodulatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coze, C; Leimig, T; Jimeno, M T; Mannoni, P

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the value of a gene therapy approach for neuroblastoma (NB), based on retroviral transduction of the IL-1beta or TNF-alpha cytokine genes into human NB lines. Secretion of the corresponding cytokine, was demonstrated in all lines, although with considerable quantitative variations. Cytokine gene expression significantly reduced the proliferation index (p = 0.0001); this effect was associated with either terminal neuronal (one TNF-alpha line) or fibroblast-like differentiation (two IL-1beta lines), leading to growth arrest after a few weeks. Cell surface levels of CD54 and HLA class II remained unaffected, but HLA class I (p < 0.001) and CD58 expression (p = 0.01) increased on SKNSH after TNF-alpha gene transfer. Mononuclear cells from normal allogeneic donors cocultured with both IL-1beta (p < 0.001) and TNF-alpha lines (p < 0.01), showed a significant increase in the proportion of activated T cells (CD3+DR+); however, their cytotoxicity and proliferation rate remained unchanged. Immunotherapy of neuroblastoma will require identification of transduced lines in which cytokine secretion induces phenotypic changes in such a way as to augment their likely immunomodulatory properties without impeding cell growth. Because of the limited efficacy of IL-1beta or TNF-alpha gene transfer alone, further studies should focus on combination with other immunomodulatory agents, to improve their potential efficacy in neuroblastoma.

  7. Human Serum Albumin Complexed with Myristate and AZT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Lili; Yang, Feng; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Huang, Mingdong (UGA); (UAH)

    2008-06-16

    3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) is the first clinically effective drug for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. The drug interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) has been an important component in understanding its mechanism of action, especially in drug distribution and in drug-drug interaction on HSA in the case of multi-drug therapy. We present here crystal structures of a ternary HSA-Myr-AZT complex and a quaternary HSA-Myr-AZT-SAL complex (Myr, myristate; SAL, salicylic acid). From this study, a new drug binding subsite on HSA Sudlow site 1 was identified. The presence of fatty acid is needed for the creation of this subsite due to fatty acid induced conformational changes of HSA. Thus, the Sudlow site 1 of HSA can be divided into three non-overlapped subsites: a SAL subsite, an indomethacin subsite and an AZT subsite. Binding of a drug to HSA often influences simultaneous binding of other drugs. From the HSA-Myr-AZT-SAL complex structure, we observed the coexistence of two drugs (AZT and SAL) in Sudlow site 1 and the competition between these two drugs in subdomain IB. These results provide new structural information on HSA-drug interaction and drug-drug interaction on HSA.

  8. Proposal for analysis of human talent from complex thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Del Río Cortina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is expose a displaying scheme of the actions of the individual in the context of the productive world*, considering a series of demonstrations framed in the learning process, this, with respect to the complexity of the human development derived from the interactions of the individual, the family, the community, the labor environment, and society in general from the perspective of volitional, cognitive, and procedural dimensions. The proposed visualization, is conceived as a relational map that includes six pillars of human interaction immersed in the above dimensions, being them, know-to be, know-to know, Know-to live, Know-to create, know-to manage, and know-to communicate, being all these reflected as a synergic structure made manifest in the know-how, from the interplay of values, emotional skills or soft skills, attitudes, knowledge, and finally, ways of proceeding. All of the above, in order to generate an approach to the relational complexity of the human talent development in society. * The productive world, in this document, is conceived as the one in which people get articulated in order to live in family, community, entrepreneurial organization, a diverse kind of institutions, and society in general.

  9. Evolutionary Relationships among Extinct and Extant Sloths: The Evidence of Mitogenomes and Retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Graham J; Cui, Pin; Forasiepi, Analía M; Lenz, Dorina; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Voirin, Bryson; de Moraes-Barros, Nadia; MacPhee, Ross D E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-02-14

    Macroevolutionary trends exhibited by retroviruses are complex and not entirely understood. The sloth endogenized foamy-like retrovirus (SloEFV), which demonstrates incongruence in virus-host evolution among extant sloths (Order Folivora), has not been investigated heretofore in any extinct sloth lineages and its premodern history within folivorans is therefore unknown. Determining retroviral coevolutionary trends requires a robust phylogeny of the viral host, but the highly reduced modern sloth fauna (6 species in 2 genera) does not adequately represent what was once a highly diversified clade (∼100 genera) of placental mammals. At present, the amount of molecular data available for extinct sloth taxa is limited, and analytical results based on these data tend to conflict with phylogenetic inferences made on the basis of morphological studies. To augment the molecular data set, we applied hybridization capture and next-generation Illumina sequencing to two extinct and three extant sloth species to retrieve full mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from the hosts and the polymerase gene of SloEFV. The results produced a fully resolved and well-supported phylogeny that supports dividing crown families into two major clades: 1) The three-toed sloth, Bradypus, and Nothrotheriidae and 2) Megalonychidae, including the two-toed sloth, Choloepus, and Mylodontidae. Our calibrated time tree indicates that the Miocene epoch (23.5 Ma), particularly its earlier part, was an important interval for folivoran diversification. Both extant and extinct sloths demonstrate multiple complex invasions of SloEFV into the ancestral sloth germline followed by subsequent introgressions across different sloth lineages. Thus, sloth mitogenome and SloEFV evolution occurred separately and in parallel among sloths.

  10. Gene transfer by retrovirus-derived shuttle vectors in the generation of murine bispecific monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMonte, L B; Nistico, P; Tecce, R; Dellabona, P; Momo, M; Anichini, A; Mariani, M; Natali, P G; Malavasi, F

    1990-01-01

    The present study reports on the use of gene transfer by retrovirus-derived shuttle vectors in the generation of hybrid hybridomas secreting bispecific monoclonal antibodies. neo- and dhfr- genes were infected into distinct murine hybridomas, thus conferring a dominant resistance trait to geneticin (G418) and to methotrexate. The vectors employed were replication-deficient and dependent on complementation by a helper virus provided by the irradiated packaging lines. After cocultivation with the relevant packaging cell lines, stable hybridoma lines expressing the selectable markers were easily obtained and were then suitable for conventional somatic fusion. This high-efficiency method was used to generate two bispecific monoclonal antibodies simultaneously targeting molecules expressed on cytotoxic cells (i.e., T lymphocytes and natural killer cells) against a human melanoma-associated antigen. Images PMID:2326256

  11. An effective method for the quantitative detection of porcine endogenous retrovirus in pig tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yu, Ping; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Li, Shengfu; Bu, Hong

    2010-05-01

    Xenotransplantation shows great promise for providing a virtually limitless supply of cells, tissues, and organs for a variety of therapeutical procedures. However, the potential of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) as a human-tropic pathogen, particularly as a public health risk, is a major concern for xenotransplantation. This study focus on the detection of copy number in various tissues and organs in Banna Minipig Inbreed (BMI) from 2006 to 2007 in West China Hospital, Sichuan University. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SYBR Green I) was performed in this study. The results showed that the pol gene had the most copy number in tissues compared with gag, envA, and envB. Our experiment will offer a rapid and accurate method for the detection of the copy number in various tissues and was especially suitable for the selection of tissues or organs in future clinical xenotransplantation.

  12. Rendezvous Integration Complexities of NASA Human Flight Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzel, Jack P.; Goodman, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Propellant-optimal trajectories, relative sensors and navigation, and docking/capture mechanisms are rendezvous disciplines that receive much attention in the technical literature. However, other areas must be considered. These include absolute navigation, maneuver targeting, attitude control, power generation, software development and verification, redundancy management, thermal control, avionics integration, robotics, communications, lighting, human factors, crew timeline, procedure development, orbital debris risk mitigation, structures, plume impingement, logistics, and in some cases extravehicular activity. While current and future spaceflight programs will introduce new technologies and operations concepts, the complexity of integrating multiple systems on multiple spacecraft will remain. The systems integration task may become more difficult as increasingly complex software is used to meet current and future automation, autonomy, and robotic operation requirements.

  13. Genetics of human episodic memory: dealing with complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2011-09-01

    Episodic memory is a polygenic behavioral trait with substantial heritability estimates. Despite its complexity, recent empirical evidence supports the notion that behavioral genetic studies of episodic memory might successfully identify trait-associated molecules and pathways. The development of high-throughput genotyping methods, of elaborated statistical analyses and of phenotypic assessment methods at the neural systems level will facilitate the reliable identification of novel memory-related genes. Importantly, a necessary crosstalk between behavioral genetic studies and investigation of causality by molecular genetic studies will ultimately pave the way towards the identification of biologically important, and hopefully druggable, genes and molecular pathways related to human episodic memory.

  14. Preeclampsia (PE is a complex illness of the human gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gil Urbano

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is a complex illness of the human gestation. It is responsible for a high perinatal morbimortality.It is the illness of the multiple theories; in one environmentaland genetic factors are associated to explain it. To find genes candidates to be associated with PE, two methodology types are used: association and binding studies. In this paper we presented the foundation of both studies that explain the main genes candidates to involve in the genesis of this illness,like that ones that code for the methylenetetrahydrofolatereductase, lipoprotein lipase and endothelial nitric oxidesintase, Leiden‘s V factor, angiotensinogen, HLA-G, alphatumoral necrosis factor.

  15. Understanding Complex Human Ecosystems: The Case of Ecotourism on Bonaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Abel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that ecotourism development on the island of Bonaire can be productively understood as a perturbation of a complex human ecosystem. Inputs associated with ecotourism have fueled transformations of the island ecology and sociocultural system. The results of this study indicate that Bonaire's social and economic hierarchy is approaching a new, stable systems state following a 50-yr transition begun by government and industry that stabilized with the appearance of ecotourism development and population growth. Ecotourism can be understood to have "filled in" the middle of the production hierarchy of Bonaire. Interpreted from this perspective, population growth has completed the transformation by expanding into production niches at smaller scales in the production hierarchy. Both a consequence and a cause, ecotourism has transformed the island's social structure and demography. The theory and methods applied in this case study of interdisciplinary research in the field of human ecosystems are also presented.

  16. Human more complex than mouse at cellular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E Vinogradov

    Full Text Available The family of transcription factors with the C2H2 zinc finger domain is expanding in the evolution of vertebrates, reaching its highest numbers in the mammals. The question arises: whether an increased amount of these transcription factors is related to embryogenesis, nervous system, pathology or more of them are expressed in individual cells? Among mammals, the primates have a more complex anatomical structure than the rodents (e.g., brain. In this work, I show that a greater number of C2H2-ZF genes are expressed in the human cells than in the mouse cells. The effect is especially pronounced for C2H2-ZF genes accompanied with the KRAB domain. The relative difference between the numbers of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes in the human and mouse cellular transcriptomes even exceeds their difference in the genomes (i.e. a greater subset of existing in the genome genes is expressed in the human cellular transcriptomes compared to the mouse transcriptomes. The evolutionary turnover of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes acts in the direction of the revealed phenomenon, i.e. gene duplication and loss enhances the difference in the relative number of C2H2-ZF(-KRAB genes between human and mouse cellular transcriptomes. A higher amount of these genes is expressed in the brain and embryonic cells (compared with other tissues, whereas a lower amount--in the cancer cells. It is specifically the C2H2-ZF transcription factors whose repertoire is poorer in the cancer and richer in the brain (other transcription factors taken together do not show this trend. These facts suggest that increase of anatomical complexity is accompanied by a more complex intracellular regulation involving these transcription factors. Malignization is associated with simplification of this regulation. These results agree with the known fact that human cells are more resistant to oncogenic transformation than mouse cells. The list of C2H2-ZF genes whose suppression might be involved in malignization is provided.

  17. A pilot study on indunction and differentiation of human fibroblasts to iPS cells and iPS-RPE cells mediated by retrovirus infection%逆转录病毒感染法对RP患者人体细胞向iPS细胞和iPS-RPE细胞诱导分化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田媛媛; 蒋超; 陈雪; 丁思加; 徐敏; 赵晨

    2016-01-01

    胎瘤.免疫荧光染色显示,诱导分化后30 d时iPS-RPE细胞中RPE细胞特异性标志物RPE65、闭锁小带蛋白1(ZO-1)和卵磷脂视黄醇酰基转移酶(LRAT)蛋白均呈阳性表达.结论 利用逆转录病毒将Oct4、Sox2、c-Myc和Klf44种基因转入SNRNP200 p.S1087L突变的RP患者皮肤成纤维细胞后可以获得iPSCs,建立的iPSCs有ESCs的形态和多能分化的特征.采用同样的转染技术可在无SNRNP200 p.S1087L突变的人皮肤成纤维细胞中建立体外高分化、高效能的iPS-RPE细胞.%Background Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell transplantation is the primary means of human trial for the treatment of retinal degeneration.Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) will become an important source for cell transplantation.In addition,iPS-RPE cells may provide a personalized treatment platform for the patient's own cells treatment.Objective This study was to evaluate the feasibility of human fibroblasts differentiate toward iPSCs from retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients and toward iPSC-RPE cells from non-RP individual by retroviral transfection of Oct4,Sox2,c-Myc and KLF4 genes.Methods Human thigh skin tissues were obtained from a RP patient with hotspot mutation of SNRNP200 p.S1087L and individual without SNRNP200 p.S1087L mutation,respectively,with the size 2 c m×3 cm.Human dermal fibroblasts were isolated and cultured by trypsin digestion and explant method.The fibroblasts were transfected by a series of retrovirus and cultured by human embyonic cellconditioned medium to generate and induce iPSCs,and then the iPSCs were identified by morphology,alkaline phosphatase (AP) staining and immunofluorescence assay of specific markers of pluripotent stem cells.iPSCs suspension were injected into SCID mouse to observe the tumorigenesis.The iPSCs from non-RP subject were induced to differentiate toward iPS-RPE cells by embryonic body (EB) inducing method,and iPS-RPE cells were identified by detecting the expression of RPE65

  18. The retrovirus MA and PreTM proteins follow immature MVL cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Bahl

    2013-01-01

    Detergent can dissolve retrovirus, exept the immature core. Here we show that the Matrix protein (MA) and the Transmembrane protein in its immature form (PreTM) bind to the retrovirus core. These attachments explain the attachment in the virus particle and the dynamics of the ability to fuse...

  19. Characterizing novel endogenous retroviruses from genetic variation inferred from short sequence reads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Mollerup, Sarah; Vinner, Lasse;

    2015-01-01

    From Illumina sequencing of DNA from brain and liver tissue from the lion, Panthera leo, and tumor samples from the pike-perch, Sander lucioperca, we obtained two assembled sequence contigs with similarity to known retroviruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pike-perch retrovirus belongs...

  20. Complexity of serrated sutures of a human skull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochenkova О.V.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the variability mechanism of complexity of serrated sutures of a human skull in the correlation with cranial form. Materials and methods. Researches of 253 arches of male and female skulls of patients at the age of 1 day-105 years without signs of cranial trauma or skeletal systemic diseases with absence of morphological signs of increase of intracranial pressure. Minimal (Min and maximal (Max values, average arithmetic (M, a mistake of average arithmetic (m have been studied. For definition of reliability of average size difference parametrical and non-parametric statistical criteria were used: parametrical criterion (t-criterion of Student applied for parameters submitting to the law of normal distribution (Lakin G. R, 1990. Distinctions of average arithmetic size were considered statistically authentic from 95% (p<0,05 a level of correct judgement (Plokhinskiy N.A., 1970. Results. On the surface of the arch lambdoid and coronal sutures in male skulls and lambdoid and sagittal sutures in female were found out to be of the greatest degree of complexity. Conclusion. The increase of complexity of sutures has been observed in children and adolescents; the directed asymmetry of sutures form is absent

  1. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-09-09

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person's interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks.

  2. Human serum albumin complexes with chlorophyll and chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouameur, A Ahmed; Marty, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2005-02-15

    Porphyrins and their metal derivatives are strong protein binders. Some of these compounds have been used for radiation sensitization therapy of cancer and are targeted to interact with cellular DNA and protein. The presence of several high-affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it possible target for many organic and inorganic molecules. Chlorophyll a and chlorophyllin (a food-grade derivative of chlorophyll), the ubiquitous green plant pigment widely consumed by humans, are potent inhibitors of experimental carcinogenesis and interact with protein and DNA in many ways. This study was designed to examine the interaction of HSA with chlorophyll (Chl) and chlorophyllin (Chln) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the pigment binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of porphyrin complexation on protein secondary structure. Spectroscopic results showed that chlorophyll and chlorophyllin are located along the polypeptide chains with no specific interaction. Stronger protein association was observed for Chl than for Chln, with overall binding constants of K(Chl) = 2.9 x 10(4)M(-1) and K(Chln) = 7.0 x 10(3)M(-1). The protein conformation was altered (infrared data) with reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 41-40% and increase of beta-structure from 22% (free HSA) to 29-35% in the pigment-protein complexes. Using the CDSSTR program (CD data) also showed major reduction of alpha-helix from 66% (free HSA) to 58 and 55% upon complexation with Chl and Chln, respectively.

  3. Recent advances in the study of active endogenous retrovirus envelope glycoproteins in the mammalian placenta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yufei; Zhang; Jing; Shi; Shuying; Liu

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses(ERVs) are a component of the vertebrate genome and originate from exogenous infections of retroviruses in the germline of the host. ERVs have coevolved with their hosts over millions of years. Envelope glycoproteins of endogenous retroviruses are often expressed in the mammalian placenta, and their potential function has aroused considerable research interest, including the manipulation of maternal physiology to benefit the fetus. In most mammalian species, trophoblast fusion in the placenta is an important event, involving the formation of a multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast layer to fulfill essential fetomaternal exchange functions. The key function in this process derives from the envelope genes of endogenous retroviruses, namely syncytins, which show fusogenic properties and placenta-specific expression. This review discusses the important role of the recognized endogenous retrovirus envelope glycoproteins in the mammalian placenta.

  4. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Kotti

    Full Text Available This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis

  5. The complexity of human walking: a knee osteoarthritis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotti, Margarita; Duffell, Lynsey D; Faisal, Aldo A; McGregor, Alison H

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a framework for deconstructing complex walking patterns to create a simple principal component space before checking whether the projection to this space is suitable for identifying changes from the normality. We focus on knee osteoarthritis, the most common knee joint disease and the second leading cause of disability. Knee osteoarthritis affects over 250 million people worldwide. The motivation for projecting the highly dimensional movements to a lower dimensional and simpler space is our belief that motor behaviour can be understood by identifying a simplicity via projection to a low principal component space, which may reflect upon the underlying mechanism. To study this, we recruited 180 subjects, 47 of which reported that they had knee osteoarthritis. They were asked to walk several times along a walkway equipped with two force plates that capture their ground reaction forces along 3 axes, namely vertical, anterior-posterior, and medio-lateral, at 1000 Hz. Data when the subject does not clearly strike the force plate were excluded, leaving 1-3 gait cycles per subject. To examine the complexity of human walking, we applied dimensionality reduction via Probabilistic Principal Component Analysis. The first principal component explains 34% of the variance in the data, whereas over 80% of the variance is explained by 8 principal components or more. This proves the complexity of the underlying structure of the ground reaction forces. To examine if our musculoskeletal system generates movements that are distinguishable between normal and pathological subjects in a low dimensional principal component space, we applied a Bayes classifier. For the tested cross-validated, subject-independent experimental protocol, the classification accuracy equals 82.62%. Also, a novel complexity measure is proposed, which can be used as an objective index to facilitate clinical decision making. This measure proves that knee osteoarthritis subjects exhibit more

  6. The screening and identification of endogenous retrovirus free CEMPs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Quanzhi; HAN; Hongbing; LIAN; Zhengxing; LI; Ning; ZHA

    2004-01-01

    The provirus DNA sequence of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) distributed in the pig genome is the major obstacle that restricts the swine as the organ donors in xenotransplantation, and the copy number of PERV varies greatly among different breeds and individuals. In the experiment, 67 healthy, female Chinese Experimental Mini-Pigs (CEMPs) aged at 3-6 months were selected from the Animal Husbandry Station of China Agricultural University, the copy number of PERV and types of envelope protein gene (env) were then investigated by means of PCR analysis and Southern blotting. It is showed that the distribution of types of envelope protein gene in Landrace and CEMPs makes little difference, but the proportion of individuals carrying two types of envelope protein gene (env-A and env-B, which is denoted as env-AB) is much larger than those which carry only one type of envelope protein gene (env-A or env-B). Meanwhile, two endogenous retrovirus free pigs were found for the first time during our research, and the copy number of others is relatively low, which is about 10 to 20. All the results illuminate the genetic diversity of indigenous pig breeds in China and the potential of CEMPs to serve as organ donors in xenotransplantation.

  7. Protection against retrovirus pathogenesis by SR protein inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Keriel

    Full Text Available Indole derivatives compounds (IDC are a new class of splicing inhibitors that have a selective action on exonic splicing enhancers (ESE-dependent activity of individual serine-arginine-rich (SR proteins. Some of these molecules have been shown to compromise assembly of HIV infectious particles in cell cultures by interfering with the activity of the SR protein SF2/ASF and by subsequently suppressing production of splicing-dependent retroviral accessory proteins. For all replication-competent retroviruses, a limiting requirement for infection and pathogenesis is the expression of the envelope glycoprotein which strictly depends on the host splicing machinery. Here, we have evaluated the efficiency of IDC on an animal model of retroviral pathogenesis using a fully replication-competent retrovirus. In this model, all newborn mice infected with a fully replicative murine leukemia virus (MLV develop erythroleukemia within 6 to 8 weeks of age. We tested several IDC for their ability to interfere ex vivo with MLV splicing and virus spreading as well as for their protective effect in vivo. We show here that two of these IDC, IDC13 and IDC78, selectively altered splicing-dependent production of the retroviral envelope gene, thus inhibiting early viral replication in vivo, sufficiently to protect mice from MLV-induced pathogenesis. The apparent specificity and clinical safety observed here for both IDC13 and IDC78 strongly support further assessment of inhibitors of SR protein splicing factors as a new class of antiretroviral therapeutic agents.

  8. The emergence of complex patterns in online human communication

    CERN Document Server

    Mathiesen, Joachim; Jensen, Mogens H

    2012-01-01

    Social media have become essential conduits in the worldwide exchange of ideas, opinions and consumer marketing. Complex networks are important tools for analyzing the information flow in many aspects of nature and human society. Here, we introduce a method based on networks and social media to gauge how ideas, opinions and new trends impact society. We show that correlations between different international brands, nouns or US major cities follow a universal scale free distribution. The correlations indicate a self-organizing dynamics in large social organizations where the exchange of information between individuals is highly volatile. Our method provides new fundamental insight on the propagation of opinions and the emergence of trends in online communities.

  9. Forward-time simulations of human populations with complex diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Peng

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing power of personal computers, as well as the availability of flexible forward-time simulation programs like simuPOP, it is now possible to simulate the evolution of complex human diseases using a forward-time approach. This approach is potentially more powerful than the coalescent approach since it allows simulations of more than one disease susceptibility locus using almost arbitrary genetic and demographic models. However, the application of such simulations has been deterred by the lack of a suitable simulation framework. For example, it is not clear when and how to introduce disease mutants-especially those under purifying selection-to an evolving population, and how to control the disease allele frequencies at the last generation. In this paper, we introduce a forward-time simulation framework that allows us to generate large multi-generation populations with complex diseases caused by unlinked disease susceptibility loci, according to specified demographic and evolutionary properties. Unrelated individuals, small or large pedigrees can be drawn from the resulting population and provide samples for a wide range of study designs and ascertainment methods. We demonstrate our simulation framework using three examples that map genes associated with affection status, a quantitative trait, and the age of onset of a hypothetical cancer, respectively. Nonadditive fitness models, population structure, and gene-gene interactions are simulated. Case-control, sibpair, and large pedigree samples are drawn from the simulated populations and are examined by a variety of gene-mapping methods.

  10. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, K; Wagner, M; Brabant, G

    1997-01-01

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation.

  11. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G. [Medical School Hannover (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Complexity of human and ecosystem interactions in an agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Richard H.; Barlow, Jeannie R.; Capel, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of human interaction in the commercial agricultural landscape and the resulting impacts on the ecosystem services of water quality and quantity is largely ignored by the current agricultural paradigm that maximizes crop production over other ecosystem services. Three examples at different spatial scales (local, regional, and global) are presented where human and ecosystem interactions in a commercial agricultural landscape adversely affect water quality and quantity in unintended ways in the Delta of northwestern Mississippi. In the first example, little to no regulation of groundwater use for irrigation has caused declines in groundwater levels resulting in loss of baseflow to streams and threatening future water supply. In the second example, federal policy which subsidizes corn for biofuel production has encouraged many producers to switch from cotton to corn, which requires more nutrients and water, counter to national efforts to reduce nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico and exacerbating groundwater level declines. The third example is the wholesale adoption of a system for weed control that relies on a single chemical, initially providing many benefits and ultimately leading to the widespread occurrence of glyphosate and its degradates in Delta streams and necessitating higher application rates of glyphosate as well as the use of other herbicides due to increasing weed resistance. Although these examples are specific to the Mississippi Delta, analogous situations exist throughout the world and point to the need for change in how we grow our food, fuel, and fiber, and manage our soil and water resources.

  13. Perception of complex motion in humans and pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankoo, Jean-François; Madan, Christopher R; Spetch, Marcia L; Wylie, Douglas R

    2014-06-01

    In the primate visual system, local motion signals are pooled to create a global motion percept. Like primates, many birds are highly dependent on vision for their survival, yet relatively little is known about motion perception in birds. We used random-dot stimuli to investigate pigeons' ability to detect complex motion (radial, rotation, and spiral) compared to humans. Our human participants had a significantly lower threshold for rotational and radial motion when compared to spiral motion. The data from the pigeons, however, showed that the pigeons were most sensitive to rotational motion and least sensitive to radial motion, while sensitivity for spiral motion was intermediate. We followed up the pigeon results with an investigation of the effect of display aperture shape for rotational motion and velocity gradient for radial motion. We found no effect of shape of the aperture on thresholds, but did observe that radial motion containing accelerating dots improved thresholds. However, this improvement did not reach the thresholds levels observed for rotational motion. In sum, our experiments demonstrate that the pooling mechanism in the pigeon motion system is most efficient for rotation.

  14. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy infection alters endogenous retrovirus expression in distinct brain regions of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montag Judith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases which are presumably caused by an infectious conformational isoform of the cellular prion protein. Previous work has provided evidence that in murine prion disease the endogenous retrovirus (ERV expression is altered in the brain. To determine if prion-induced changes in ERV expression are a general phenomenon we used a non-human primate model for prion disease. Results Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fasicularis were infected intracerebrally with BSE-positive brain stem material from cattle and allowed to develop prion disease. Brain tissue from the basis pontis and vermis cerebelli of the six animals and the same regions from four healthy controls were subjected to ERV expression profiling using a retrovirus-specific microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. We could show that Class I gammaretroviruses HERV-E4-1, ERV-9, and MacERV-4 increase expression in BSE-infected macaques. In a second approach, we analysed ERV-K-(HML-2 RNA and protein expression in extracts from the same cynomolgus macaques. Here we found a significant downregulation of both, the macaque ERV-K-(HML-2 Gag protein and RNA in the frontal/parietal cortex of BSE-infected macaques. Conclusions We provide evidence that dysregulation of ERVs in response to BSE-infection can be detected on both, the RNA and the protein level. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the differential expression of ERV-derived structural proteins in prion disorders. Our findings suggest that endogenous retroviruses may induce or exacerbate the pathological consequences of prion-associated neurodegeneration.

  15. Discrimination of complex human behavior by pigeons (Columba livia and humans.

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    Muhammad A J Qadri

    Full Text Available The cognitive and neural mechanisms for recognizing and categorizing behavior are not well understood in non-human animals. In the current experiments, pigeons and humans learned to categorize two non-repeating, complex human behaviors ("martial arts" vs. "Indian dance". Using multiple video exemplars of a digital human model, pigeons discriminated these behaviors in a go/no-go task and humans in a choice task. Experiment 1 found that pigeons already experienced with discriminating the locomotive actions of digital animals acquired the discrimination more rapidly when action information was available than when only pose information was available. Experiments 2 and 3 found this same dynamic superiority effect with naïve pigeons and human participants. Both species used the same combination of immediately available static pose information and more slowly perceived dynamic action cues to discriminate the behavioral categories. Theories based on generalized visual mechanisms, as opposed to embodied, species-specific action networks, offer a parsimonious account of how these different animals recognize behavior across and within species.

  16. Characterization of Insertional Variation of Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses in Six Different Pig Breeds

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    W. Y. Jung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pigs may need to be exploited as xenotransplantation donors due to the shortage of human organs, tissues and cells. Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs are a significant obstacle to xenotransplantation because they can infect human cells in vitro and have the potential for transmission of unexpected pathogens to humans. In this research, 101 pigs, including four commercial breeds (23 Berkshire, 13 Duroc, 22 Landrace and 14 Yorkshire pigs, one native breed (19 Korean native pigs and one miniature breed (10 NIH miniature pigs were used to investigate insertional variations for 11 PERV loci (three PERV-A, six PERV-B and two PERV-C. Over 60% of the pigs harbored one PERV-A (907F8 integration and five PERV-B (B3-3G, B3-7G, 742H1, 1155D9 and 465D1 integrations. However, two PERV-A loci (A1-6C and 1347C1 and one PERV-B locus (B3-7F were absent in Duroc pigs. Moreover, two PERV-C loci (C2-6C and C4-2G only existed in Korean native pigs and NIH miniature pigs. The results suggest that PERV insertional variations differ among pig breeds as well as among individuals within a breed. Also, the results presented here can be used for the selection of animals that do not have specific PERV integration for xenotransplantation research.

  17. Epidemiological aspects of retrovirus (HTLV infection among Indian populations in the Amazon Region of Brazil

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    Ricardo Ishak

    Full Text Available HTLV was initially described in association with a form of leukemia in Japan and a neurological disease in the Caribbean. It was soon shown that HTLV-II was endemic among Amerindians and particularly among Brazilian Indians. The Amazon Region of Brazil is presently the largest endemic area for this virus and has allowed several studies concerning virus biology, the search for overt disease, epidemiological data including detailed demographic data on infected individuals, clear-cut geographic distribution, definition of modes of transmission and maintenance within small, epidemiologically-closed groups, and advances in laboratory diagnosis of the infection. A new molecular subtype named HTLV-IIc was further described on the basis of genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. This subtype is present in other areas of Brazil, indicating that the virus is additionally both a valuable marker for tracing past human migration routes in the Americas and a probable marker for social habits of the present human population. HIV, the other human retrovirus, is still not prevalent among indigenous communities in the Brazilian Amazon, but these groups are also easy targets for the virus.

  18. Epidemiological aspects of retrovirus (HTLV infection among Indian populations in the Amazon Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available HTLV was initially described in association with a form of leukemia in Japan and a neurological disease in the Caribbean. It was soon shown that HTLV-II was endemic among Amerindians and particularly among Brazilian Indians. The Amazon Region of Brazil is presently the largest endemic area for this virus and has allowed several studies concerning virus biology, the search for overt disease, epidemiological data including detailed demographic data on infected individuals, clear-cut geographic distribution, definition of modes of transmission and maintenance within small, epidemiologically-closed groups, and advances in laboratory diagnosis of the infection. A new molecular subtype named HTLV-IIc was further described on the basis of genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. This subtype is present in other areas of Brazil, indicating that the virus is additionally both a valuable marker for tracing past human migration routes in the Americas and a probable marker for social habits of the present human population. HIV, the other human retrovirus, is still not prevalent among indigenous communities in the Brazilian Amazon, but these groups are also easy targets for the virus.

  19. Koala retroviruses: characterization and impact on the life of koalas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denner, Joachim; Young, Paul R

    2013-10-23

    Koala retroviruses (KoRV) have been isolated from wild and captive koalas in Australia as well as from koala populations held in zoos in other countries. They are members of the genus Gammaretrovirus, are most closely related to gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) and are likely the result of a relatively recent trans-species transmission from rodents or bats. The first KoRV to be isolated, KoRV-A, is widely distributed in the koala population in both integrated endogenous and infectious exogenous forms with evidence from museum specimens older than 150 years, indicating a relatively long engagement with the koala population. More recently, additional subtypes of KoRV that are not endogenized have been identified based on sequence differences and host cell receptor specificity (KoRV-B and KoRV-J). A specific association with fatal lymphoma and leukemia has been recently suggested for KoRV-B. In addition, it has been proposed that the high viral loads found in many animals may lead to immunomodulation resulting in a higher incidence of diseases such as chlamydiosis. Although the molecular basis of this immunomodulation is still unclear, purified KoRV particles and a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain in the envelope protein have been shown to modulate cytokine expression in vitro, similar to that induced by other gammaretroviruses. While much is still to be learned, KoRV induced lymphoma/leukemia and opportunistic disease arising as a consequence of immunomodulation are likely to play an important role in the stability of koala populations both in the wild and in captivity.

  20. Improved integration time estimation of endogenous retroviruses with phylogenetic data.

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    Hugo Martins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs are genetic fossils of ancient retroviral integrations that remain in the genome of many organisms. Most loci are rendered non-functional by mutations, but several intact retroviral genes are known in mammalian genomes. Some have been adopted by the host species, while the beneficial roles of others remain unclear. Besides the obvious possible immunogenic impact from transcribing intact viral genes, endogenous retroviruses have also become an interesting and useful tool to study phylogenetic relationships. The determination of the integration time of these viruses has been based upon the assumption that both 5' and 3' Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs sequences are identical at the time of integration, but evolve separately afterwards. Similar approaches have been using either a constant evolutionary rate or a range of rates for these viral loci, and only single species data. Here we show the advantages of using different approaches. RESULTS: We show that there are strong advantages in using multiple species data and state-of-the-art phylogenetic analysis. We incorporate both simple phylogenetic information and Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC methods to date the integrations of these viruses based on a relaxed molecular clock approach over a Bayesian phylogeny model and applied them to several selected ERV sequences in primates. These methods treat each ERV locus as having a distinct evolutionary rate for each LTR, and make use of consensual speciation time intervals between primates to calibrate the relaxed molecular clocks. CONCLUSIONS: The use of a fixed rate produces results that vary considerably with ERV family and the actual evolutionary rate of the sequence, and should be avoided whenever multi-species phylogenetic data are available. For genome-wide studies, the simple phylogenetic approach constitutes a better alternative, while still being computationally feasible.

  1. Reducing sample complexity of polyclonal human autoantibodies by chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Sascha; Faude, Alexander; Rabenstein, Monika; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Nölker, Carmen; Bacher, Michael; Dodel, Richard

    2010-08-15

    Chromatofocusing was performed in order to separate a polyclonal antigen-specific mixture of human immunoglobulins (IgGs) that would then allow for further analyses of as few different IgGs as possible. Because polyclonal IgGs only differ by amino acid sequence and possible post-translational modifications but not by molecular weight, we chose chromatofocusing for protein separation by different isoelectric points. We isolated antigen-specific IgGs from commercially available intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) using a combination of affinity- and size exclusion-chromatography and in order to reduce the complexity of the starting material IVIG was then replaced by single-donor plasmapheresis material. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), we observed a clear decrease in the number of different light and heavy chains in the chromatofocusing peak as compared to the starting material. In parallel, we monitored slight problems with the selected peak in isoelectric focusing as the first dimension of 2-DE, displayed in by the less proper focusing of the spots. When we tested whether IgGs were binding to their specific antigen after chromatofocusing, we were able to show that they were still in native conformation. In conclusion, we showed that chromatofocusing can be used as a first step in the analysis of mixtures of very similar proteins, e.g. polyclonal IgG preparations, in order to minimize the amount of different proteins in separated fractions in a reproducible way. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Model of human collective decision-making in complex environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Giannoccaro, Ilaria

    2015-12-01

    A continuous-time Markov process is proposed to analyze how a group of humans solves a complex task, consisting in the search of the optimal set of decisions on a fitness landscape. Individuals change their opinions driven by two different forces: (i) the self-interest, which pushes them to increase their own fitness values, and (ii) the social interactions, which push individuals to reduce the diversity of their opinions in order to reach consensus. Results show that the performance of the group is strongly affected by the strength of social interactions and by the level of knowledge of the individuals. Increasing the strength of social interactions improves the performance of the team. However, too strong social interactions slow down the search of the optimal solution and worsen the performance of the group. In particular, we find that the threshold value of the social interaction strength, which leads to the emergence of a superior intelligence of the group, is just the critical threshold at which the consensus among the members sets in. We also prove that a moderate level of knowledge is already enough to guarantee high performance of the group in making decisions.

  3. Complexation of insecticide chlorantraniliprole with human serum albumin: Biophysical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Fei [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Liu Wei [College of Economics and Management, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Diao Jianxiong [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100193 (China); Yin Bin [Key Laboratory of Pesticide Chemistry and Application Technology, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Zhang Li, E-mail: zhli.work@gmail.co [Key Laboratory of Pesticide Chemistry and Application Technology, Ministry of Agriculture, Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Sun Ying, E-mail: sunying@cau.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Chlorantraniliprole is a novel insecticide belonging to the diamide class of selective ryanodine receptor agonists. A biophysical study on the binding interaction of a novel diamide insecticide, chlorantraniliprole, with staple in vivo transporter, human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated utilizing a combination of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular modeling methods. The interaction of chlorantraniliprole with HSA gives rise to fluorescence quenching through static mechanism, this corroborates the fluorescence lifetime outcomes that the ground state complex formation and the predominant forces in the HSA-chlorantraniliprole conjugate are van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, as derived from thermodynamic analysis. The definite binding site of chlorantraniliprole in HSA has been identified from the denaturation of protein, competitive ligand binding, and molecular modeling, subdomain IIIA (Sudlow's site II) was designated to possess high-affinity binding site for chlorantraniliprole. Moreover, using synchronous fluorescence, CD, and three-dimensional fluorescence we testified some degree of HSA structure unfolding upon chlorantraniliprole binding. - Highlights: {yields} Our study highlights for the first time how binding dynamics can predominate for the new diamide insecticide, chlorantraniliprole. {yields} Chlorantraniliprole is situated within subdomain IIIA, Sudlow's site II, which is the same as that of indole-benzodiazepine site. {yields} Biophysical and molecular modeling approaches are useful to resolve the ligand interaction with biomacromolecule. {yields} It serves as a protective device in binding and in inactivating potential toxic compounds to which the body is exposed.

  4. Induced prion protein controls immune-activated retroviruses in the mouse spleen.

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    Marius Lötscher

    Full Text Available The prion protein (PrP is crucially involved in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE, but neither its exact role in disease nor its physiological function are known. Here we show for mice, using histological, immunochemical and PCR-based methods, that stimulation of innate resistance was followed by appearance of numerous endogenous retroviruses and ensuing PrP up-regulation in germinal centers of the spleen. Subsequently, the activated retroviruses disappeared in a PrP-dependent manner. Our results reveal the regular involvement of endogenous retroviruses in murine immune responses and provide evidence for an essential function of PrP in the control of the retroviral activity. The interaction between PrP and ubiquitous endogenous retroviruses may allow new interpretations of TSE pathophysiology and explain the evolutionary conservation of PrP.

  5. Cofactors, coreceptors, and new retroviruses. An interview with Robin A Weiss, PhD. Interview by Mark Mascolini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R A

    1995-02-01

    Dr. Robin A. Weiss, Director of Research at the Chester Beatty Laboratories of the Institute of Cancer Research in London, England presents his thoughts on the subjects of cofactors, coreceptors, and new retroviruses in HIV infection. Dr. Weiss responds to questions in the following areas: balancing basic research and clinical trials, the importance of sheer viral load, the importance of pathogenic cofactors in HIV progression, genetic factors and susceptibility to HIV, possible reasons for long-term nonprogression, the importance of immunotherapy, the difficulty in finding a second receptor as a cofactor necessary for disease progression, and whether more human retroviruses are likely to be discovered. Among Weiss' observations are his beliefs that there should be more of a funding shift into basic research, that evidence is getting stronger for the theory that beating back the viral burden as soon as possible forestalls progression, that it appears possible that some people may have a genetic disposition against becoming HIV infected, that it is just as important to find a preinfection vaccine as it is a post-infection vaccine, and his belief that CD26 is not a coreceptor in AIDS progression.

  6. COM, a heterochromatic locus governing the control of independent endogenous retroviruses from Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Desset, Sophie; Meignin, Carine; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2003-01-01

    ZAM and Idefix are two endogenous retroviruses whose expression is tightly controlled in Drosophila melanogaster. However, a line exists in which this control has been perturbed, resulting in a high mobilization rate for both retroviruses. This line is called the U (unstable) line as opposed to the other S (stable) lines. In the process of analyzing this control and tracing the genetic determinant involved, we found that ZAM and Idefix expression responded to two types of controls: one restri...

  7. Divergent and dynamic activity of endogenous retroviruses in burn patients and their inflammatory potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Rah, HyungChul; Green, Tajia; Lee, Young-Kwan; Lim, Debora; Nemzek, Jean; Wahl, Wendy; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2014-04-01

    Genes constitute ~3% of the human genome, whereas human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent ~8%. We examined post-burn HERV expression in patients' blood cells, and the inflammatory potentials of the burn-associated HERVs were evaluated. Buffy coat cells, collected at various time points from 11 patients, were screened for the expression of eight HERV families, and we identified their divergent expression profiles depending on patient, HERV, and time point. The population of expressed HERV sequences was patient-specific, suggesting HERVs' inherent genomic polymorphisms and/or differential expression potentials depending on characteristics of patients and courses of injury response. Some HERVs were shared among the patients, while the others were divergent. Interestingly, one burn-associated HERV gag gene from a patient's genome induced IL-6, IL-1β, Ptgs-2, and iNOS. These findings demonstrate that injury stressors initiate divergent HERV responses depending on patient, HERV, and disease course and implicate HERVs as genetic elements contributing to polymorphic injury pathophysiology.

  8. Evidence for Retrovirus and Paramyxovirus Infection of Multiple Bat Species in China

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    Lihong Yuan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bats are recognized reservoirs for many emerging zoonotic viruses of public health importance. Identifying and cataloguing the viruses of bats is a logical approach to evaluate the range of potential zoonoses of bat origin. We characterized the fecal pathogen microbiome of both insectivorous and frugivorous bats, incorporating 281 individual bats comprising 20 common species, which were sampled in three locations of Yunnan province, by combining reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays and next-generation sequencing. Seven individual bats were paramyxovirus-positive by RT-PCR using degenerate primers, and these paramyxoviruses were mainly classified into three genera (Rubulavirus, Henipavirus and Jeilongvirus. Various additional novel pathogens were detected in the paramyxovirus-positive bats using Illumina sequencing. A total of 7066 assembled contigs (≥200 bp were constructed, and 105 contigs matched eukaryotic viruses (of them 103 belong to 2 vertebrate virus families, 1 insect virus, and 1 mycovirus, 17 were parasites, and 4913 were homologous to prokaryotic microorganisms. Among the 103 vertebrate viral contigs, 79 displayed low identity (<70% to known viruses including human viruses at the amino acid level, suggesting that these belong to novel and genetically divergent viruses. Overall, the most frequently identified viruses, particularly in bats from the family Hipposideridae, were retroviruses. The present study expands our understanding of the bat virome in species commonly found in Yunnan, China, and provides insight into the overall diversity of viruses that may be capable of directly or indirectly crossing over into humans.

  9. Expression and regulation of the endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3 in Hodgkin’s lymphoma cells

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    Stefanie eKewitz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (ERV are an integral part of our genome. Expression of ERV is usually switched off but reactivation of ERV has been observed in varying human diseases including cancer. Recently, reactivation of ERV associated promoters in Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL cells has been described. Despite relatively good prognosis, not all patients with HL can be cured with the established therapy and this therapy is associated with severe late side effects. Therefore, new targets are required for the development of future treatment strategies. Reactivated ERV might represent such target structures. Therefore, we asked which ERV loci are expressed in HL cells. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found no evidence for a general activation of ERV transcription in HL cells. In contrast, we observed down-regulation of ERV3, an ERV with potential tumor suppressor function, in HL cells in comparison to normal blood cells. Interestingly, ERV3 was also differentially expressed in published DNA microarray data from resting versus cycling B cells. Treatment of HL cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat strongly up-regulated ERV3 expression. In addition, we observed up-regulation in HL cells after treatment with hypoxia-mimetic cobalt(II chloride. Like vorinostat, cobalt(II chloride inhibited cell growth of HL cells. Our results suggest that cell cycle inhibition of HL cells is accompanied by up-regulation of ERV3.

  10. Characterization of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Clones from the NIH Miniature Pig BAC Library

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    Seong-Lan Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigs have been considered as donors for xenotransplantation in the replacement of human organs and tissues. However, porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs might transmit new infectious disease to humans during xenotransplantation. To investigate PERV integration sites, 45 PERV-positive BAC clones, including 12 PERV-A, 16 PERV-B, and 17 PERV-C clones, were identified from the NIH miniature pig BAC library. The analysis of 12 selected full-length sequences of PERVs, including the long terminal repeat (LTR region, identified the expected of open reading frame length, an indicative of active PERV, in all five PERV-C clones and one of the four PERV-B clones. Premature stop codons were observed in only three PERV-A clones. Also, eleven PERV integration sites were mapped using a 5000-rad IMpRH panel. The map locations of PERV-C clones have not been reported before, thus they are novel PERV clones identified in this study. The results could provide basic information for the elimination of site-specific PERVs in selection of pigs for xenotransplantation.

  11. Similarities between GCS and human motor cortex: complex movement coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jose A.; Macias, Rosa; Molgo, Jordi; Guerra, Dailos

    2014-07-01

    The "Gran Telescopio de Canarias" (GTC1) is an optical-infrared 10-meter segmented mirror telescope at the ORM observatory in Canary Islands (Spain). The GTC control system (GCS), the brain of the telescope, is is a distributed object & component oriented system based on RT-CORBA and it is responsible for the management and operation of the telescope, including its instrumentation. On the other hand, the Human motor cortex (HMC) is a region of the cerebrum responsible for the coordination of planning, control, and executing voluntary movements. If we analyze both systems, as far as the movement control of their mechanisms and body parts is concerned, we can find extraordinary similarities in their architectures. Both are structured in layers, and their functionalities are comparable from the movement conception until the movement action itself: In the GCS we can enumerate the Sequencer high level components, the Coordination libraries, the Control Kit library and the Device Driver library as the subsystems involved in the telescope movement control. If we look at the motor cortex, we can also enumerate the primary motor cortex, the secondary motor cortices, which include the posterior parietal cortex, the premotor cortex, and the supplementary motor area (SMA), the motor units, the sensory organs and the basal ganglia. From all these components/areas we will analyze in depth the several subcortical regions, of the the motor cortex, that are involved in organizing motor programs for complex movements and the GCS coordination framework, which is composed by a set of classes that allow to the high level components to transparently control a group of mechanisms simultaneously.

  12. Retrovirus silencer blocking by the cHS4 insulator is CTCF independent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shuyuan; Osborne, Cameron S.; Bharadwaj, Rikki R.; Pasceri, Peter; Sukonnik, Tanya; Pannell, Dylan; Recillas-Targa, Félix; West, Adam G.; Ellis, James

    2003-01-01

    Silencing of retrovirus vectors poses a significant obstacle to genetic manipulation of stem cells and their use in gene therapy. We describe a mammalian silencer blocking assay using insulator elements positioned between retrovirus silencer elements and an LCRβ-globin reporter transgene. In transgenic mice, we show that retrovirus silencers are blocked by the cHS4 insulator. Silencer blocking is independent of the CTCF binding site and is most effective when flanking the internal reporter transgene. These data distinguish silencer blocking activity by cHS4 from its enhancer blocking activity. Retrovirus vectors can be created at high titer with one but not two internal dimer cHS4 cores. cHS4 in the LTRs has no effect on expression in transduced F9 cells, suggesting that position effect blocking is not sufficient to escape silencing. The Drosophila insulators gypsy and Scs fail to block silencing in transgenic mice, but gypsy stimulates vector expression 2-fold when located in the LTRs of an infectious retrovirus. The silencer blocking assay complements existing insulator assays in mammalian cells, provides new insight into mechanisms of insulation and is a valuable tool to identify additional silencer blocking insulators that cooperate with cHS4 to improve stem cell retrovirus vector design. PMID:12954767

  13. Quantitative analysis of human endogeneous retrovirus family W env1 in placentas of patients with preeclampsia in iodine deficiency areas%碘缺乏病病区孕妇子痫前期胎盘组织人内源性逆转录缺陷病毒W家族包膜蛋白基因表达的定量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟丽屏; 刘凌霄; 乔瑞花; 郑世存

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察碘缺乏病病区孕妇子痫前期胎盘组织中人内源性逆转录缺陷病毒W家族包膜蛋白1 (HERVWE1)的表达,探讨HERVWE1基因在子痫前期发病中的变化.方法 52例胎盘组织来自山东省济南市的章丘、长清和平阴3个碘缺乏病病区县(市),由山东省妇产医院提供.其中子痫前期第三期胎盘30例(子痫前期组),足月分娩正常妊娠第三期胎盘22例(对照组).采用实时定量PCR法检测子痫前期组和对照组胎盘组织中HERVWE1、人绒毛膜促乳素(HCS)、绒毛膜特异性转录因子(GCMa)、氨基酰载体2(ASCT-2)mRNA表达;采用蛋白免疫印迹法(Western blot)检测HERVWE1蛋白表达.结果 子痫前期组与对照组比较,胎盘组织HERVWE1(0.149±0.045比0.409±0.028)和HCS mRNA(336.600±50.100比815.600±101.300)表达明显降低(t=25.60、20.40,P均<0.05);GCMa (0.022±0.007比0.024±0.009)和ASCT-2 mRNA表达(0.423±0.050比0.438±0.060)差异无统计学意义(t=0.87、0.95,P均>0.05).Western blot检测结果显示子痫前期组HERVWE1蛋白表达(0.340±0.010)与对照组(0.580±0.010)比较,差异有统计学意义(t=85.50,P<0.05).结论 在碘缺乏病病区孕妇子痫前期的胎盘组织中HERVWE1基因mRNA和蛋白表达明显降低;子痫前期的发病可能与HERVWE1基因表达降低有关.%Objective To detect the expression of human endogeneous retrovirus family W env1 (HERVWE1) in placentas of normal pregnant women and patients with preeclampsia and explore its role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.Methods Fifty-two cases of placental tissues provided by Shandong Maternity Hospital were from iodine deficiency areas (county or city:.Zhangqu, Changqing, Pingyin) of Shandong Province, including 30 cases of preeclampsia placentas as case group, 22 cases of normal term pregnancy placentas as control group.The mRNA expression of HERVWE1, human chorionic somator mammotropin (HCS), chorionic specific transcription factor (GCMa) and amino acyl

  14. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

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    Cooper David N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease.

  15. Information-Theoretic Measures Predict the Human Judgment of Rhythm Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fleurian, Remi; Blackwell, Tim; Ben-Tal, Oded; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    To formalize the human judgment of rhythm complexity, we used five measures from information theory and algorithmic complexity to measure the complexity of 48 artificially generated rhythmic sequences. We compared these measurements to human prediction accuracy and easiness judgments obtained from a listening experiment, in which 32 participants guessed the last beat of each sequence. We also investigated the modulating effects of musical expertise and general pattern identification ability. Entropy rate and Kolmogorov complexity were correlated with prediction accuracy, and highly correlated with easiness judgments. A logistic regression showed main effects of musical training, entropy rate, and Kolmogorov complexity, and an interaction between musical training and both entropy rate and Kolmogorov complexity. These results indicate that information-theoretic concepts capture some salient features of the human judgment of rhythm complexity, and they confirm the influence of musical expertise on complexity judgments. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Worms under stress: C. elegans stress response and its relevance to complex human disease and aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Sanchez, M.; Snoek, L.B.; Bono, de M.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms have stress response pathways, components of which share homology with players in complex human disease pathways. Research on stress response in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans has provided detailed insights into the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying complex human d

  17. Formation mechanism and biological activity of novel thiolated human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Liu, Lingyun; Deng, Jianjun; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Hui, Junfeng; Fan, Daidi

    2016-03-01

    To develop an iron supplement that is effectively absorbed and utilized, thiolated human-like collagen was created to improve the iron binding capacity of human-like collagen. A thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex was prepared in a phosphate buffer, and one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 28.83 moles of iron. The characteristics of thiolated human-like collagen-iron were investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex retained the secondary structure of human-like collagen and had greater thermodynamic stability than human-like collagen, although interactions between iron ions and human-like collagen occurred during the formation of the complex. In addition, to evaluate the bioavailability of thiolated human-like collagen-iron, an in vitro Caco-2 cell model and an in vivo iron deficiency anemia mouse model were employed. The data demonstrated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex exhibited greater bioavailability and was more easily utilized than FeSO4, ferric ammonium citrate, or ferrous glycinate. These results indicated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex is a potential iron supplement in the biomedical field.

  18. Enhanced dynamic complexity in the human EEG during creative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölle, M; Marshall, L; Lutzenberger, W; Pietrowsky, R; Fehm, H L; Born, J

    1996-04-12

    This study shows that divergent thinking, considered the general process underlying creative production, can be distinguished from convergent, analytical thought based on the dimensional complexity of ongoing electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. EEG complexity over the central and posterior cortex was higher while subjects solved tasks of divergent than convergent thinking, and also higher than during mental relaxation. Over the frontal cortex, EEG complexity was comparable during divergent thinking and mental relaxation, but reduced during convergent thinking. Results indicate that the basic process underlying the generation of novel ideas expresses itself in a strong increase in the EEG's complexity, reflecting higher degrees of freedom in the competitive interactions among cortical neuron assemblies. Frontocortical EEG complexity being comparable with that during mental relaxation, speaks for a loosened attentional control during creative thinking.

  19. Human Navigational Performance in a Complex Network with Progressive Disruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramesh, Amitash; Iyengar, Sudarshan; Sekhar, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The current paper is an investigation towards understanding the navigational performance of humans on a network when the "landmark" nodes are blocked. We observe that humans learn to cope up, despite the continued introduction of blockages in the network. The experiment proposed involves the task of navigating on a word network based on a puzzle called the wordmorph. We introduce blockages in the network and report an incremental improvement in performance with respect to time. We explain this phenomenon by analyzing the evolution of the knowledge in the human participants of the underlying network as more and more landmarks are removed. We hypothesize that humans learn the bare essentials to navigate unless we introduce blockages in the network which would whence enforce upon them the need to explore newer ways of navigating. We draw a parallel to human problem solving and postulate that obstacles are catalysts for humans to innovate techniques to solve a restricted variant of a familiar problem.

  20. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr T. M. Saeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases.

  1. Matriptase Complexes and Prostasin Complexes with HAI-1 and HAI-2 in Human Milk: Significant Proteolysis in Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hsin; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Chou, Feng-Pai; Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Tseng, Chun-Che; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Significant proteolysis may occur during milk synthesis and secretion, as evidenced by the presence of protease-protease inhibitor complex containing the activated form of the type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase and the transmembrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. In order to identify other proteolysis events that may occur during lactation, human milk was analyzed for species containing HAI-1 and HAI-2 which is closely related to HAI-1. In addition to the previously demonstrated matriptase-HAI-1 complex, HAI-1 was also detected in complex with prostasin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease. HAI-2 was also detected in complexes, the majority of which appear to be part of higher-order complexes, which do not bind to ionic exchange columns or immunoaffinity columns, suggesting that HAI-2 and its target proteases may be incorporated into special protein structures during lactation. The small proportion HAI-2 species that could be purified contain matriptase or prostasin. Human mammary epithelial cells are the likely cellular sources for these HAI-1 and HAI-2 complexes with matriptase and prostasin given that these protease-inhibitor complexes with the exception of prostasin-HAI-2 complex were detected in milk-derived mammary epithelial cells. The presence of these protease-inhibitor complexes in human milk provides in vivo evidence that the proteolytic activity of matriptase and prostasin are significantly elevated at least during lactation, and possibly contribute to the process of lactation, and that they are under tight control by HAI-1 and HAI-2.

  2. Matriptase Complexes and Prostasin Complexes with HAI-1 and HAI-2 in Human Milk: Significant Proteolysis in Lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsin Lai

    Full Text Available Significant proteolysis may occur during milk synthesis and secretion, as evidenced by the presence of protease-protease inhibitor complex containing the activated form of the type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase and the transmembrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. In order to identify other proteolysis events that may occur during lactation, human milk was analyzed for species containing HAI-1 and HAI-2 which is closely related to HAI-1. In addition to the previously demonstrated matriptase-HAI-1 complex, HAI-1 was also detected in complex with prostasin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored serine protease. HAI-2 was also detected in complexes, the majority of which appear to be part of higher-order complexes, which do not bind to ionic exchange columns or immunoaffinity columns, suggesting that HAI-2 and its target proteases may be incorporated into special protein structures during lactation. The small proportion HAI-2 species that could be purified contain matriptase or prostasin. Human mammary epithelial cells are the likely cellular sources for these HAI-1 and HAI-2 complexes with matriptase and prostasin given that these protease-inhibitor complexes with the exception of prostasin-HAI-2 complex were detected in milk-derived mammary epithelial cells. The presence of these protease-inhibitor complexes in human milk provides in vivo evidence that the proteolytic activity of matriptase and prostasin are significantly elevated at least during lactation, and possibly contribute to the process of lactation, and that they are under tight control by HAI-1 and HAI-2.

  3. Mitochondrial Complex I plays an Essential Role in Human Respirasome Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Lastres, David; Fontanesi, Flavia; García Consuegra, Inés; Martín, Miguel A.; Arenas, Joaquín; Barrientos, Antoni; Ugalde, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The assembly and function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) involve the organization of RC enzyme complexes in supercomplexes or respirasomes through an unknown biosynthetic process. This leads to structural interdependences between RC complexes, which are highly relevant from biological and biomedical perspectives, because RC defects lead to severe human disorders. We show that in human cells, respirasome biogenesis involves a complex I assembly intermediate acting as a scaffold fo...

  4. Cellular restriction of retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Melanie; Schambach, Axel; Towers, Greg J; Baum, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Analyzing cellular restriction mechanisms provides insight into viral replication strategies, identifies targets for antiviral drug design, and is crucial for the development of novel tools for experimental or therapeutic delivery of genetic information. We have previously shown that retroviral vector mutants that are unable to initiate reverse transcription mediate a transient expression of any sequence which replaces the gag-pol transcription unit, a process we call retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer (RMT). Here, we further examined the mechanism of RMT by testing its sensitivity to cellular restriction factors and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). We found that both human TRIM5alpha and, to a lesser extent, Fv1 effectively restrict RMT if the RNA is delivered by a restriction-sensitive capsid. While TRIM5alpha restriction of RMT led to reduced levels of retroviral mRNA in target cells, restriction by Fv1 did not. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 partially relieved TRIM5alpha-mediated restriction of RMT. Finally, cells expressing shRNAs specifically targeting the retroviral mRNA inhibited RMT particles, but not reverse-transcribing particles. Retroviral mRNA may thus serve as a translation template if not used as a template for reverse transcription. Our data imply that retroviral nucleic acids become accessible to host factors, including ribosomes, as a result of particle remodeling during cytoplasmic trafficking.

  5. An endogenous retrovirus and exogenous scrapie in a mouse model of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carp, R I; Meeker, H C; Kozlowski, I; Sersen, E A

    2000-01-01

    As we enter the post-genomic era, there is an increasing need for accurate methods of identifying host and pathogen factors that contribute to bacterial, viral and fungal disease. In addition, there is a requirement for fast and precise techniques to evaluate potential therapies for the prevention of infectious diseases. The development of useful and cost-effective model systems will be crucial in advancing our knowledge of all aspects of microbial pathogenesis. In this series, we will learn of animal models used to investigate diseases caused by a wide variety of pathogens, including HIV, Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A description of a model system specifically designed to study intracellular pathogens will be presented, as will a variety of the techniques currently used to exploit other useful models of infection. Additionally, a description of the mathematical models used to analyse the population biology of human onchocerciasis will be discussed. The series begins with an intriguing look at the possible connections between an endogenous retrovirus, the infectious agent of scrapie and accelerated senescence in a mouse model of early aging.

  6. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prud`homme, N.; Gans, M.; Masson, M.; Terzian, C.; Bucheton, A. [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is table and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovo{sup D1} female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovo{sup D1} reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. 40 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, N; Gans, M; Masson, M; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is stable and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovoD1 female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovoD1 reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy.

  8. Efficient intracellular retrotransposition of an exogenous primate retrovirus genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinkelein, Martin; Pietschmann, Thomas; Jármy, Gergely; Dressler, Marco; Imrich, Horst; Thurow, Jana; Lindemann, Dirk; Bock, Michael; Moebes, Astrid; Roy, Jacqueline; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Rethwilm, Axel

    2000-01-01

    The foamy virus (FV) subgroup of Retroviridae reverse transcribe their RNA (pre-)genome late in the replication cycle before leaving an infected cell. We studied whether a marker gene-transducing FV vector is able to shuttle to the nucleus and integrate into host cell genomic DNA. While a potential intracellular retrotransposition of vectors derived from other retroviruses was below the detection limit of our assay, we found that up to 5% of cells transfected with the FV vector were stably transduced, harboring 1 to ∼10 vector integrants. Generation of the integrants depended on expression of functional capsid, reverse transcriptase and integrase proteins, and did not involve an extracellular step. PCR analysis of the U3 region of the 5′ long terminal repeat and determination of proviral integration sites showed that a reverse transcription step had taken place to generate the integrants. Co-expression of a mutated envelope allowing particle egress and avoiding extracellular infection resulted in a significantly increased rescue of cells harboring integrants, suggesting that accumulation of proviruses via intracellular retrotransposition represents an integral part of the FV replication strategy. PMID:10880456

  9. Linguistic complex networks: Rationale, application, interpretation, and directions. Reply to comments on "Approaching human language with complex networks"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jin; Liu, Haitao

    2014-12-01

    Amid the enthusiasm for real-world networks of the new millennium, the enquiry into linguistic networks is flourishing not only as a productive branch of the new networks science but also as a promising approach to linguistic research. Although the complex network approach constitutes a potential opportunity to make linguistics a science, the world of linguistics seems unprepared to embrace it. For one thing, linguistics has been largely unaffected by quantitative methods. Those who are accustomed to qualitative linguistic methods may find it hard to appreciate the application of quantitative properties of language such as frequency and length, not to mention quantitative properties of language modeled as networks. With this in mind, in our review [1] we restrict ourselves to the basics of complex networks and the new insights into human language with the application of complex networks. For another, while breaking new grounds and posing new challenges for linguistics, the complex network approach to human language as a new tradition of linguistic research is faced with challenges and unsolved issues of its own. It is no surprise that the comments on our review, especially their skepticism and suggestions, focus on various different aspects of the complex network approach to human language. We are grateful to all the insightful and penetrating comments, which, together with our review, mark a significant impetus to linguistic research from the complex network approach. In this reply, we would like to address four major issues of the complex network approach to human language, namely, a) its theoretical rationale, b) its application in linguistic research, c) interpretation of the results, and d) directions of future research.

  10. A complex genome-microRNA interplay in human mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Santosh; Bhadra, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding regulatory RNA exist in wide spectrum of organisms ranging from prokaryote bacteria to humans. In human, a systematic search for noncoding RNA is mainly limited to the nuclear and cytosolic compartments. To investigate whether endogenous small regulatory RNA are present in cell organelles, human mitochondrial genome was also explored for prediction of precursor microRNA (pre-miRNA) and mature miRNA (miRNA) sequences. Six novel miRNA were predicted from the organelle genome by bioinformatics analysis. The structures are conserved in other five mammals including chimp, orangutan, mouse, rat, and rhesus genome. Experimentally, six human miRNA are well accumulated or deposited in human mitochondria. Three of them are expressed less prominently in Northern analysis. To ascertain their presence in human skeletal muscles, total RNA was extracted from enriched mitochondria by an immunomagnetic method. The expression of six novel pre-miRNA and miRNA was confirmed by Northern blot analysis; however, low level of remaining miRNA was found by sensitive Northern analysis. Their presence is further confirmed by real time RT-PCR. The six miRNA find their multiple targets throughout the human genome in three different types of software. The luciferase assay was used to confirm that MT-RNR2 gene was the potential target of hsa-miR-mit3 and hsa-miR-mit4.

  11. Significance of respirasomes for the assembly/stability of human respiratory chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schägger, Hermann; de Coo, René; Bauer, Matthias F; Hofmann, Sabine; Godinot, Catherine; Brandt, Ulrich

    2004-08-27

    We showed that the human respiratory chain is organized in supramolecular assemblies of respiratory chain complexes, the respirasomes. The mitochondrial complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase) and III (cytochrome c reductase) form a stable core respirasome to which complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) can also bind. An analysis of the state of respirasomes in patients with an isolated deficiency of single complexes provided evidence that the formation of respirasomes is essential for the assembly/stability of complex I, the major entry point of respiratory chain substrates. Genetic alterations leading to a loss of complex III prevented respirasome formation and led to the secondary loss of complex I. Therefore, primary complex III assembly deficiencies presented as combined complex III/I defects. This dependence of complex I assembly/stability on respirasome formation has important implications for the diagnosis of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

  12. Mitochondrial network complexity and pathological decrease in complex I activity are tightly correlated in isolated human complex I deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, W.J.H.; Visch, H.J.; Verkaart, S.A.J.; Heuvel, L.W. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest multisubunit assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation system, and its malfunction is associated with a wide variety of clinical syndromes ranging from highly progressive, often early lethal, encephalopathies to neurodegenerative disorders in

  13. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenfeld, Anika; Wohlgemuth, Sabine [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Wehenkel, Annemarie [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 3348/INSERM U1005, Bâtiment 110, Centre Universitaire, 91405 Orsay CEDEX (France); Vetter, Ingrid R. [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Musacchio, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.musacchio@mpi-dortmund.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto Hahn Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitätstrasse 1, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2015-03-20

    The 800 kDa complex of the human Rod, Zwilch and ZW10 proteins (the RZZ complex) was reconstituted in insect cells, purified, crystallized and subjected to preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis. The spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors kinetochore–microtubule attachment during mitosis. In metazoans, the three-subunit Rod–Zwilch–ZW10 (RZZ) complex is a crucial SAC component that interacts with additional SAC-activating and SAC-silencing components, including the Mad1–Mad2 complex and cytoplasmic dynein. The RZZ complex contains two copies of each subunit and has a predicted molecular mass of ∼800 kDa. Given the low abundance of the RZZ complex in natural sources, its recombinant reconstitution was attempted by co-expression of its subunits in insect cells. The RZZ complex was purified to homogeneity and subjected to systematic crystallization attempts. Initial crystals containing the entire RZZ complex were obtained using the sitting-drop method and were subjected to optimization to improve the diffraction resolution limit. The crystals belonged to space group P3{sub 1} (No. 144) or P3{sub 2} (No. 145), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 215.45, c = 458.7 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°.

  14. Not so bad after all: retroviruses and long terminal repeat retrotransposons as a source of new genes in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naville, M; Warren, I A; Haftek-Terreau, Z; Chalopin, D; Brunet, F; Levin, P; Galiana, D; Volff, J-N

    2016-04-01

    Viruses and transposable elements, once considered as purely junk and selfish sequences, have repeatedly been used as a source of novel protein-coding genes during the evolution of most eukaryotic lineages, a phenomenon called 'molecular domestication'. This is exemplified perfectly in mammals and other vertebrates, where many genes derived from long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements (retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons) have been identified through comparative genomics and functional analyses. In particular, genes derived from gag structural protein and envelope (env) genes, as well as from the integrase-coding and protease-coding sequences, have been identified in humans and other vertebrates. Retroelement-derived genes are involved in many important biological processes including placenta formation, cognitive functions in the brain and immunity against retroelements, as well as in cell proliferation, apoptosis and cancer. These observations support an important role of retroelement-derived genes in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate lineage.

  15. Host-pathogen interactome mapping for HTLV-1 and -2 retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonis Nicolas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 and type 2 both target T lymphocytes, yet induce radically different phenotypic outcomes. HTLV-1 is a causative agent of Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, whereas HTLV-2, highly similar to HTLV-1, causes no known overt disease. HTLV gene products are engaged in a dynamic struggle of activating and antagonistic interactions with host cells. Investigations focused on one or a few genes have identified several human factors interacting with HTLV viral proteins. Most of the available interaction data concern the highly investigated HTLV-1 Tax protein. Identifying shared and distinct host-pathogen protein interaction profiles for these two viruses would enlighten how they exploit distinctive or common strategies to subvert cellular pathways toward disease progression. Results We employ a scalable methodology for the systematic mapping and comparison of pathogen-host protein interactions that includes stringent yeast two-hybrid screening and systematic retest, as well as two independent validations through an additional protein interaction detection method and a functional transactivation assay. The final data set contained 166 interactions between 10 viral proteins and 122 human proteins. Among the 166 interactions identified, 87 and 79 involved HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 -encoded proteins, respectively. Targets for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proteins implicate a diverse set of cellular processes including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, the apoptosis, different cancer pathways and the Notch signaling pathway. Conclusions This study constitutes a first pass, with homogeneous data, at comparative analysis of host targets for HTLV-1 and -2 retroviruses, complements currently existing data for formulation of systems biology models of retroviral induced diseases and presents new insights on biological pathways involved in retroviral infection.

  16. Colloque S&T Symposium 2008: Understanding the Human Dimension in 21st Century Conflict/Warfare: The Complexities of Human-with-Human Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Colloque S&T Symposium 2008 Undestanding the Human Dimension in 21st Century Conflict/Warfare: The Complexities of Human-with-Human Relationships ...conditions for self-sustaining stability. By working towards the development of models and concepts to better understand and influence the human in...This page intentionally left blank. Colloque S&T Symposium 2008 Undestanding the Human Dimension in 21st Century Conflict

  17. A novel approach to achieving modular retrovirus clearance for a parvovirus filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Juliana; Strauss, Daniel; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Gao, Jinxin; Luo, Wen; Quertinmont, Michelle; O'Donnell, Sean; Chen, Dayue

    2014-01-01

    Viral filtration is routinely incorporated into the downstream purification processes for the production of biologics produced in mammalian cell cultures (MCC) to remove potential viral contaminants. In recent years, the use of retentive filters designed for retaining parvovirus (~20 nm) has become an industry standard in a conscious effort to further improve product safety. Since retentive filters remove viruses primarily by the size exclusion mechanism, it is expected that filters designed for parvovirus removal can effectively clear larger viruses such as retroviruses (~100 nm). In an attempt to reduce the number of viral clearance studies, we have taken a novel approach to demonstrate the feasibility of claiming modular retrovirus clearance for Asahi Planova 20N filters. Porcine parvovirus (PPV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) were co-spiked into six different feedstreams and then subjected to laboratory scale Planova 20N filtration. Our results indicate that Planova 20N filters consistently retain retroviruses and no retrovirus has ever been detected in the filtrates even when significant PPV breakthrough is observed. Based on the data from multiple in-house viral validation studies and the results from the co-spiking experiments, we have successfully claimed a modular retrovirus clearance of greater than 6 log10 reduction factors (LRF) to support clinical trial applications in both USA and Europe. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Expression, purification and characterization of the human MTA2-RBBP7 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasen, Christoffer; Dorosz, Jerzy; Wiuf, Anders; Boesen, Thomas; Mirza, Osman; Gajhede, Michael

    2017-02-04

    The repressive Nucleosome Remodeling and histone Deacetylation (NuRD) complex remodels the chromatin structure by coupling ATP-dependent remodeling activity with histone deacetylase function and plays important roles in regulating gene transcription, DNA damage repair and chromatin assembly. The complex is composed of six subunits: Metastasis Associated proteins MTA1/2/3 initially recruit histone chaperones RBBP4/7 followed by the histone deacetylases HDAC1/2 forming a core complex. Further association of the CpG-binding protein MBD2/3, p66α/β and the ATP-dependent helicase CDH3/4 constitutes the NuRD complex. Recent structural studies on truncated human proteins or orthologous have revealed that the stoichiometry of the MTA1-RBBP4 complex is 2:4. This study reports expression and purification of the intact human MTA2-RBBP7 complex using HEK293F cells as expression system. In analogy with findings on the Drosophila NuRD complex, we find that also the human MTA-RBBP can be isolated in vitro. Taken together with previous findings this suggests, that MTA-RBBP is a stable complex, with a central role in the initial assembly of the human NuRD complex. Refined 3D volumes of the complex generated from negative stain electron microscopy (EM) data reveals an elongated architecture that is capable of hinge like motion around the center of the particle.

  19. Genome-based identification of cancer genes by proviral tagging in mouse retrovirus-induced T-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Rachel; Trubetskoy, Alla; Suzuki, Takeshi; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Lenz, Jack

    2003-02-01

    The identification of tumor-inducing genes is a driving force for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer. Many retroviruses induce tumors by insertion of viral DNA adjacent to cellular oncogenes, resulting in altered expression and/or structure of the encoded proteins. The availability of the mouse genome sequence now allows analysis of retroviral common integration sites in murine tumors to be used as a genetic screen for identification of large numbers of candidate cancer genes. By positioning the sequences of inverse PCR-amplified, virus-host junction fragments within the mouse genome, 19 target genes were identified in T-cell lymphomas induced by the retrovirus SL3-3. The candidate cancer genes included transcription factors (Fos, Gfi1, Lef1, Myb, Myc, Runx3, and Sox3), all three D cyclins, Ras signaling pathway components (Rras2/TC21 and Rasgrp1), and Cmkbr7/CCR7. The most frequent target was Rras2. Insertions as far as 57 kb away from the transcribed portion were associated with substantially increased transcription of Rras2, and no coding sequence mutations, including those typically involved in Ras activation, were detected. These studies demonstrate the power of genome-based analysis of retroviral insertion sites for cancer gene discovery, identify several new genes worth examining for a role in human cancer, and implicate the pathways in which those genes act in lymphomagenesis. They also provide strong genetic evidence that overexpression of unmutated Rras2 contributes to tumorigenesis, thus suggesting that it may also do so if it is inappropriately expressed in human tumors.

  20. Increased titers of neutralizing antibodies after immunization with both envelope proteins of the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denner Joachim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite enormous difficulties to induce antibodies neutralizing HIV-1, especially broadly neutralizing antibodies directed against the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER of the transmembrane envelope protein, such antibodies can be easily induced in the case of gammaretroviruses, among them the porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs. In addition to neutralizing antibodies directed against the transmembrane envelope protein p15E, neutralizing antibodies were also induced by immunization with the surface envelope protein gp70. PERVs represent a special risk for xenotransplantation using pig tissues or organs since they are integrated in the genome of all pigs and infect human cells and a vaccine may protect from transmission to the recipient. To investigate the effect of simultaneous immunization with both proteins in detail, a study was performed in hamsters. Gp70 and p15E of PERV were produced in E. coli, purified and used for immunization. All animals developed binding antibodies against the antigens used for immunization. Sera from animals immunized with p15E recognized epitopes in the MPER and the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR of p15E. One MPER epitope showed a sequence homology to an epitope in the MPER of gp41 of HIV-1 recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies found in HIV infected individuals. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in all sera. Most importantly, sera from animals immunized with gp70 had a higher neutralizing activity when compared with the sera from animals immunized with p15E and sera from animals immunized with gp70 together with p15E had a higher neutralizing activity compared with sera from animals immunized with each antigen alone. These immunization studies are important for the development of vaccines against other retroviruses including the human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1.

  1. Engineering Complex Human-Technological Work Systems: A Sensemaking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    by Rene Descartes , Immanuel Kant, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, and mathematically by Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell. Logical rationalism...reductionism—originally introduced by Descartes in 1673)— asserts that complex objects, phenomena, theories, and meanings can always be reduced to a...Positivism Essentialism Analytic Philosophy Social Constructivism Nominalism Autopoiesis Descartes Plato Aristotle Aquinas Bacon Locke Wittgenstein

  2. Complexity of Human Circulation Design: Tips for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Gros, Mario; Maric, Svjetlana

    2009-01-01

    Medical students are faced with a challenge to comprehend the enormous complexity of the circulatory systems. There is a gap between courses of anatomy, with detailed description of all normally present macroscopic vessels, and histology, which is focused on microscopic tissue architecture. Both courses leave arterioles, capillaries, and venules…

  3. Accessory subunits are integral for assembly and function of human mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, David A; Surgenor, Elliot E; Formosa, Luke E; Reljic, Boris; Frazier, Ann E; Dibley, Marris G; Osellame, Laura D; Stait, Tegan; Beilharz, Traude H; Thorburn, David R; Salim, Agus; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-10-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the first enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and is composed of 45 subunits in humans, making it one of the largest known multi-subunit membrane protein complexes. Complex I exists in supercomplex forms with respiratory chain complexes III and IV, which are together required for the generation of a transmembrane proton gradient used for the synthesis of ATP. Complex I is also a major source of damaging reactive oxygen species and its dysfunction is associated with mitochondrial disease, Parkinson's disease and ageing. Bacterial and human complex I share 14 core subunits that are essential for enzymatic function; however, the role and necessity of the remaining 31 human accessory subunits is unclear. The incorporation of accessory subunits into the complex increases the cellular energetic cost and has necessitated the involvement of numerous assembly factors for complex I biogenesis. Here we use gene editing to generate human knockout cell lines for each accessory subunit. We show that 25 subunits are strictly required for assembly of a functional complex and 1 subunit is essential for cell viability. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cell lines revealed that loss of each subunit affects the stability of other subunits residing in the same structural module. Analysis of proteomic changes after the loss of specific modules revealed that ATP5SL and DMAC1 are required for assembly of the distal portion of the complex I membrane arm. Our results demonstrate the broad importance of accessory subunits in the structure and function of human complex I. Coupling gene-editing technology with proteomics represents a powerful tool for dissecting large multi-subunit complexes and enables the study of complex dysfunction at a cellular level.

  4. Accommodating complexity and human behaviors in decision analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Siirola, John Daniel; Schoenwald, David Alan; Strip, David R.; Hirsch, Gary B.; Bastian, Mark S.; Braithwaite, Karl R.; Homer, Jack [Homer Consulting

    2007-11-01

    This is the final report for a LDRD effort to address human behavior in decision support systems. One sister LDRD effort reports the extension of this work to include actual human choices and additional simulation analyses. Another provides the background for this effort and the programmatic directions for future work. This specific effort considered the feasibility of five aspects of model development required for analysis viability. To avoid the use of classified information, healthcare decisions and the system embedding them became the illustrative example for assessment.

  5. Colostrum and milk can transmit jaagsiekte retrovirus to lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grego, Elena; De Meneghi, Daniele; Alvarez, Vega; Benito, Alfredo A; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Ortín, Aurora; Mattoni, Mario; Moreno, Bernardino; Pérez de Villarreal, Maider; Alberti, Alberto; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Caporale, Marco; Juste, Ramón; Rosati, Sergio; De las Heras, Marcelo

    2008-08-25

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a contagious disease caused by jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). In the three studies performed, we have obtained data of the importance of colostrum/milk (C/M) in the transmission of JSRV. In the first study, a group of sheep from a flock with a long history of OPA, samples from colostrum and peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) were collected. Two specific PCRs (U3-LTR and env of the JSRV) were carried out. Using U3PCR 8/34 sheep were positive in colostrum whereas with envPCR 7/34 were positive. From these animals only one was positive with U3PCR in the PBLs. Evidence of the transmission of JSRV infection by C/M was obtained in two more separate studies. In the second study, PBLs from five lambs from JSRV+ ewes and two from JSRV-ewes were tested by the U3PCR. They were fed C/M by their mothers during 3 months and slaughtered 7 months after birth. Three out of five lambs from the JSRV+ sheep become PBL positive at 3-4 months old and the other two were also positive at 4-6 months of age. One lamb of the JSRV-sheep became also PBL positive at an age of 3 months. In the third study, a group of lambs from JSRV negative mothers were fed with C/M from JSRV+ sheep and housed in separate unit. For comparison, another group of the same origin and maintained in another different unit, were fed with C/M containing a JSRV virus preparation. All lambs were blood sampled monthly and JSRV infection was detected as early as 15 days and several times onwards in both groups. Control groups fed with C/M from JSRV free flock and JSRV blood test negative sheep were always negative. Together these results indicate that suckling is an important natural transmission route for JSRV.

  6. Prevalence of koala retrovirus in geographically diverse populations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, G S; Young, P R; Hanger, J J; Jones, K; Clarke, D; McKee, J J; Meers, J

    2012-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of koala retrovirus (KoRV) in selected koala populations and to estimate proviral copy number in a subset of koalas. Blood or tissue samples from 708 koalas in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia were tested for KoRV pol provirus gene using standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nested PCR and real-time PCR (qPCR). Prevalence of KoRV provirus-positive koalas was 100% in four regions of Queensland and New South Wales, 72.2% in mainland Victoria, 26.6% on four Victorian islands and 14.8% on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Estimated proviral copy number per cell in four groups of koalas from Queensland and Victoria showed marked variation, ranging from a mean of 165 copies per cell in the Queensland group to 1.29 × 10(-4) copies per cell in one group of Victorian koalas. The higher prevalence of KoRV-positive koalas in the north of Australia and high proviral loads in Queensland koalas may indicate KoRV entered and became endogenous in the north and is spreading southwards. It is also possible there are genetic differences between koalas in northern and southern Australia that affect susceptibility to KoRV infection or endogenisation, or that environmental factors affecting transmission in northern states are absent or uncommon in southern regions. Although further studies are required, the finding of proviral copy numbers orders of magnitude lower than what would be expected for the presence of a single copy in every cell for many Victorian animals suggests that KoRV is not endogenous in these animals and likely reflects ongoing exogenous infection. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Dean BOUDOULAS; Peter J MOHLER

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects ("channelopathies" - the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2),ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAPg), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease.

  8. Alteration to the SWI/SNF complex in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S. Gordon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The SWI/SNF complex is a key catalyst for gene expression and regulates a variety of pathways, many of which have anticancer roles. Its central roles in cellular growth control, DNA repair, differentiation, cell adhesion and development are often targeted, and inactivated, during cancer development and progression. In this review, we will discuss what is known about how SWI/SNF is inactivated, and describe the potential impact of abrogating this complex. BRG1 and BRM are the catalytic subunits which are essential for SWI/SNF function, and thus, it is not surprising that they are lost in a variety of cancer types. As neither gene is mutated when lost, the mechanism of suppression, as well as the impact of potential gene activity restoration, are reviewed.

  9. Complex-tone pitch representations in the human auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bianchi, Federica; Dau, Torsten; Santurette, Sébastien;

    , specifically those showing enhanced pitch cues (i.e., musicians) and those typically having disrupted pitch cues (i.e., hearing-impaired listeners). In particular, two main topics were addressed: the relative importance of resolved and unresolved harmonics for normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI......) listeners and the effect of musical training for pitch discrimination of complex tones with resolved and unresolved harmonics. Concerning the first topic, behavioral and modeling results in listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) indicated that temporal envelope cues of complex tones...... discrimination to that of NH listeners. In the second part of this work, behavioral and objective measures of pitch discrimination were carried out in musicians and non-musicians. Musicians showed an increased pitch-discrimination performance relative to non-musicians for both resolved and unresolved harmonics...

  10. Modeling Reduced Human Performance as a Complex Adaptive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    fittingly, the latest research paper describes these types of components as LEGOs (listener event graph objects). “The name is also a metaphor for how...Buss, A. H. and P. J. Sanchez (2002). Building Complex Models With LEGOs (Listener Event Graph Objects). Winter Simulation Conference. Buss, D. (1999...Kaarlela, C. (1997). New Gene Therapy Technique Could Eliminate Insulin Injections for many Diabetics, Jeffrey Norris and Jennifer O’Brien (415) 476-481

  11. Improved methodology for the affinity isolation of human protein complexes expressed at near endogenous levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanski, Michal; Molloy, Kelly; Jiang, Hua;

    2012-01-01

    An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous......-level tagged proteins. Isolations of triple-FLAG and GFP-tagged fusion proteins involved in RNA metabolism are presented.......An efficient and reliable procedure for the capture of affinity-tagged proteins and associated complexes from human cell lines is reported. Through multiple optimizations, high yield and low background affinity-purifications are achieved from modest quantities of human cells expressing endogenous...

  12. Endogenous retroviruses in fish genomes: from relics of past infections to evolutionary innovations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Naville

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of fish genome sequences has allowed to gain new insights into the diversity and host distribution of retroviruses in fish and other vertebrates. This distribution can be assessed through the identification and analysis of endogenous retroviruses, which are proviral remnants of past infections integrated in genomes. Retroviral sequences are probably important for evolution through their ability to induce rearrangements and to contribute regulatory and coding sequences; they may also protect their host against new infections. We argue that the current mass of genome sequences will soon strongly improve our understanding of retrovirus diversity and evolution in aquatic animals, with the identification of new/re-emerging elements and host resistance genes that restrict their infectivity.

  13. Expression, purification and characterization of the human MTA2-RBBP7 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Christoffer; Dorosz, Jerzy; Wiuf, Anders

    2017-01-01

    . The complex is composed of six subunits: Metastasis Associated proteins MTA1/2/3 initially recruit histone chaperones RBBP4/7 followed by the histone deacetylases HDAC1/2 forming a core complex. Further association of the CpG-binding protein MBD2/3, p66α/β and the ATP-dependent helicase CDH3/4 constitutes...... the NuRD complex. Recent structural studies on truncated human proteins or orthologous have revealed that the stoichiometry of the MTA1-RBBP4 complex is 2:4. This study reports expression and purification of the intact human MTA2-RBBP7 complex using HEK293F cells as expression system. In analogy...... with findings on the Drosophila NuRD complex, we find that also the human MTA-RBBP can be isolated in vitro. Taken together with previous findings this suggests, that MTA-RBBP is a stable complex, with a central role in the initial assembly of the human NuRD complex. Refined 3D volumes of the complex generated...

  14. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-06-10

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdc(scid) and Il2rg(null) alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation.

  15. Epigenetic silencing by the HUSH complex mediates position-effect variegation in human cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tchasovnikarova, I. A; Timms, R. T; Matheson, N. J; Wals, K; Antrobus, R; Gottgens, B; Dougan, G; Dawson, M. A; Lehner, P. J

    2015-01-01

    ... (see the Perspective by Brummelkamp). They identified a complex of proteins in human cells they called HUSH that kept particular parts of the genome silent by changing associated histone methylation marks...

  16. Structural Biology of Proteins of the Multi-enzyme Assembly Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Objectives and research challenges of this effort include: 1. Need to establish Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 2. Need to test value of microgravity for improving crystal quality of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex protein crystals; 3. Need to improve flight hardware in order to control and understand the effects of microgravity on crystallization of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex proteins; 4. Need to integrate sets of national collaborations with the restricted and specific requirements of flight experiments; 5. Need to establish a highly controlled experiment in microgravity with a rigor not yet obtained; 6. Need to communicate both the rigor of microgravity experiments and the scientific value of results obtained from microgravity experiments to the national community; and 7. Need to advance the understanding of Human Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex structures so that scientific and commercial advance is identified for these proteins.

  17. Concordance of gene expression in human protein complexes reveals tissue specificity and pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnigen, Daniela; Pers, Tune Hannes; Thorrez, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing variants in human genes usually lead to phenotypes specific to only a few tissues. Here, we present a method for predicting tissue specificity based on quantitative deregulation of protein complexes. The underlying assumption is that the degree of coordinated expression among...... proteins in a complex within a given tissue may pinpoint tissues that will be affected by a mutation in the complex and coordinated expression may reveal the complex to be active in the tissue. We identified known disease genes and their protein complex partners in a high-quality human interactome. Each...... susceptibility gene's tissue involvement was ranked based on coordinated expression with its interaction partners in a non-disease global map of human tissue-specific expression. The approach demonstrated high overall area under the curve (0.78) and was very successfully benchmarked against a random model...

  18. Simultaneous presence of endogenous retrovirus and herpes virus antigens has profound effect on cell-mediated immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Christensen, Tove; Hansen, Hans Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Retroviruses have been suggested as possible pathogenic factors in multiple sclerosis (MS), supported by the observation that endogenous retroviruses are activated in MS patients. Different members of the herpes family of which several are neurotropic have also been suggested as factors in MS...... pathogenesis. Further, interactions between retroviruses and herpes viruses have been implied in the development of MS. The objective of the study was investigation of cell-mediated immune responses of MS patients to retrovirus and herpes virus antigens, particularly antigen combinations, with analyses...... retrovirus HERV-H and herpes virus antigens resulted in highly increased cellular immune responses among both the MS patients and healthy subjects. The increase was synergistic in character in most samples. Very pronounced effects were obtained using HHV-6A and HSV-1 antigens. Blast transformation assays...

  19. Inhibition of human aromatase complex (CYP19) by antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Birkved, Franziska Maria A Kramer

    2008-01-01

    transfected insect cells using dibenzylfluorescein as substrate. The drugs inhibiting CYP19 were: lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, tiagabine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, ethosuximide, and valproate. The inhibitory effects (50% reduction in activity compared to enzymes without inhibitor present) were in the range...... with valproate and phenobarbital. When adding carbamazepine to a range of valproate concentrations no additional inhibition was seen. The data for some of the AEDs show that side effects on steroid synthesis in humans due to inhibition of aromatase should be considered....

  20. DTPA complexation of bismuth in human blood serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, G; Le Du, A; Champion, J; Rabung, T; Morgenstern, A

    2012-07-28

    The in vivo(212)Pb/(212)Bi generator is promising for application in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) of cancer. One main limitation of its therapeutic application is due to potential release of (212)Bi from the radioconjugate upon radioactive decay of the mother nuclide (212)Pb, potentially leading to irradiation of healthy tissue. The objective of the present work is to assess whether the chelate CHX-A''-DTPA (N-(2-aminoethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N',N''-pentaacetic acid) bound to a biological carrier molecule may be able to re-complex released (212)Bi under in vivo conditions to limit its translocation from the target site. CHX-A''-DTPA was bound to bovine gamma globulin (BGG) to mimic a model conjugate and the stability of the Bi-CHX-A''-DTPA-BGG conjugate was studied in blood serum by ultrafiltration. TRLFS experiments using Cm(III) as a fluorescent probe demonstrated that linking CHX-A''-DTPA to BGG does not affect the coordination properties of the ligand. Furthermore, comparable stability constants were observed between Bi(III) and free CHX-A''-DTPA, BGG-bound CHX-A''-DTPA and DTPA. The complexation constants determined between Bi(III) and the chelate molecules are sufficiently high to allow ultra trace amounts of the ligand to efficiently compete with serum transferrin controlling Bi(III) speciation in blood plasma conditions. Nevertheless, CHX-A''-DTPA is not able to complex Bi(III) generated in blood serum because of the strong competition between Bi(III) and Fe(II) for the ligand. In other words, CHX-A''-DTPA is not "selective" enough to limit Bi(iii) release in the body when applying the (212)Pb/(212)Bi in vivo generator.

  1. Detection of koala retrovirus subgroup B (KoRV-B) in animals housed at European zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Denner, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    Many koalas carry an endogenous retrovirus, KoRV-A, in their genome. Recently, a second retrovirus, KoRV-B, was detected in koalas in Japanese and U.S. zoos. However, this virus is not endogenous, differs in the receptor binding site of the surface envelope protein, and uses a receptor different from that of KoRV-A. We describe here a KoRV-B found in koalas at zoos in Germany and Belgium that differs slightly from that found in the Los Angeles zoo.

  2. Fate of the surface protein gp70 during entry of retrovirus into mouse fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, K.B.

    1985-04-15

    The kinetics of the viral surface protein gp70 and the viral core proteins p30 and p15C were followed during retrovirus entry into mouse fibroblasts. All three proteins were internalized, but whereas essentially all the gp70 was degraded, approximately one-third of the core proteins remained stable in the cells. These diverging routes of the different proteins are in agreement with the proposed route, that retrovirus enters the cells by endocytosis followed by a membrane fusion between the virus membrane and the vesicle membrane.

  3. Genetic mapping of complex discrete human diseases by discriminant analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to propose and evaluate a novel multivariate approach for genetic mapping of complex categorical diseases. This approach results from an application of standard stepwise discriminant analysis to detect linkage based on the differential marker identity-by-descent (IBD) distributions among the different groups of sib pairs. Two major advantages of this method are that it allows for simultaneously testing all markers, together with other genetic and environmental factors in a single multivariate setting and it avoids explicitly modeling the complex relationship between the affection status of sib pairs and the underlying genetic determinants. The efficiency and properties of the method are demonstrated via simulations. The proposed multivariate approach has successfully located the true position(s) under various genetic scenarios. The more important finding is that using highly densely spaced markers (1~2 cM) leads to only a marginal loss of statistical efficiency of the proposed methods in terms of gene localization and statistical power. These results have well established its utility and advantages as a fine-mapping tool. A unique property of the proposed method is the ability to map multiple linked trait loci to their precise positions due to its sequential nature, as demonstrated via simulations.

  4. Random mutagenesis and screening of complex glycoproteins : expression of human gonadotropins in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Grootenhuis, Peter D.J.; Blaauw, Mieke; Huisman-de Winkel, Bianca; Ravestein, Arno van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Heikoop, Judith C.

    1999-01-01

    The soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a host cell that provides simple genetics in combination with complex protein synthesis. We show that the complex human heterodimeric gonadotropins can be produced and secreted by this organism, Furthermore, both follicle stimulation hormone and choriogona

  5. Global properties and functional complexity of human gene regulatory variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Gaffney

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification and functional interpretation of gene regulatory variants is a major focus of modern genomics. The application of genetic mapping to molecular and cellular traits has enabled the detection of regulatory variation on genome-wide scales and revealed an enormous diversity of regulatory architecture in humans and other species. In this review I summarise the insights gained and questions raised by a decade of genetic mapping of gene expression variation. I discuss recent extensions of this approach using alternative molecular phenotypes that have revealed some of the biological mechanisms that drive gene expression variation between individuals. Finally, I highlight outstanding problems and future directions for development.

  6. Unraveling the complexity of lipid body organelles in human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Rossana C N; Weller, Peter F

    2014-11-01

    Lipid-rich organelles are common in many cell types. In cells, such as adipocytes, these organelles are termed LDs, whereas in other cells, such as leukocytes, they are called LBs. The study of leukocyte LBs has attracted attention as a result of their association with human diseases. In leukocytes, such as eosinophils, LB accumulation has been documented extensively during inflammatory conditions. In these cells, LBs are linked to the regulation of immune responses by compartmentalization of several proteins and lipids involved in the control and biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). However, it has been unclear how diverse proteins, including membrane-associated enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs, especially if the internal content of LBs is assumed to consist solely of stores of neutral lipids, as present within adipocyte LDs. Studies of the formation, function, and ultrastructure of LBs in eosinophils have been providing insights pertinent to LBs in other leukocytes. Here, we review current knowledge of the composition and function of leukocyte LBs as provided by studies of human eosinophil LBs, including recognitions of the internal architecture of eosinophil LBs based on 3D electron tomographic analyses.

  7. EFECT OF ERYTHROMYCIN ON INTERDIGESTIVE MIGRATING MOTOR COMPLEX IN HUMANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of erythromycin (EM) on interdigestive migrating motor complex (MMC) in healthy volunteers. Methods 20 healthy volunteers were randomly divided into 2 groups: EM group (n=11) and placebo group (n=9). The changes of MMC were observed by gastrointestinal manometry before and after oral administration of EM or placebo. Results Gastric antral MMCs that evoked by EM were similar to spontaneous MMCs. EM orally intaking decreased MMC cycle duration significantly (P<0.05). EM orally intaking decreased the percentage of phase Ⅱ duration to MMC cycle duration significantly (P<0.05). But EM orally intaking increased the percentage of phase Ⅲ duration to MMC cycle duration significantly (P<0.05). The amplitude of antral waves of phase Ⅲ increased significantly after EM orally intaking (P<0.05). Placebo orally and percentages of phase Ⅰ, phase Ⅱ, phase Ⅲ duration to MMC cycle duration. Conclusion EM has stimulating effect on gastrointestinal motor activity.

  8. The Cultural Historical Complexity of Human Personality Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E. Wynn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on implicit intelligence has conceptualized students’ beliefs about the nature of intelligence as either fixed or malleable. This research has largely not included African American adolescents, a group for whom beliefs about intelligence have a cultural historical complexity related to both scientific racism and master narratives of race and intelligence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of implicit theories of intelligence for 63 African American adolescents who are seventh and eighth graders in a public charter school. The two-way ANOVA revealed that these adolescents held a malleable view of intelligence, which did not vary by gender or grade. Exploratory correlation analysis showed some consistent relationships with achievement motivation variables found in other studies. These findings may be explained by African American cultural values and the personality characteristic adaptations that they make living within a racialized society.

  9. Network properties of complex human disease genes identified through genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Barrenas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies of network properties of human disease genes have mainly focused on monogenic diseases or cancers and have suffered from discovery bias. Here we investigated the network properties of complex disease genes identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAs, thereby eliminating discovery bias. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We derived a network of complex diseases (n = 54 and complex disease genes (n = 349 to explore the shared genetic architecture of complex diseases. We evaluated the centrality measures of complex disease genes in comparison with essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. The complex disease network showed that diseases belonging to the same disease class do not always share common disease genes. A possible explanation could be that the variants with higher minor allele frequency and larger effect size identified using GWAs constitute disjoint parts of the allelic spectra of similar complex diseases. The complex disease gene network showed high modularity with the size of the largest component being smaller than expected from a randomized null-model. This is consistent with limited sharing of genes between diseases. Complex disease genes are less central than the essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. Genes associated with the same disease, compared to genes associated with different diseases, more often tend to share a protein-protein interaction and a Gene Ontology Biological Process. CONCLUSIONS: This indicates that network neighbors of known disease genes form an important class of candidates for identifying novel genes for the same disease.

  10. Network properties of complex human disease genes identified through genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrenas, Fredrik; Chavali, Sreenivas; Holme, Petter; Mobini, Reza; Benson, Mikael

    2009-11-30

    Previous studies of network properties of human disease genes have mainly focused on monogenic diseases or cancers and have suffered from discovery bias. Here we investigated the network properties of complex disease genes identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAs), thereby eliminating discovery bias. We derived a network of complex diseases (n = 54) and complex disease genes (n = 349) to explore the shared genetic architecture of complex diseases. We evaluated the centrality measures of complex disease genes in comparison with essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. The complex disease network showed that diseases belonging to the same disease class do not always share common disease genes. A possible explanation could be that the variants with higher minor allele frequency and larger effect size identified using GWAs constitute disjoint parts of the allelic spectra of similar complex diseases. The complex disease gene network showed high modularity with the size of the largest component being smaller than expected from a randomized null-model. This is consistent with limited sharing of genes between diseases. Complex disease genes are less central than the essential and monogenic disease genes in the human interactome. Genes associated with the same disease, compared to genes associated with different diseases, more often tend to share a protein-protein interaction and a Gene Ontology Biological Process. This indicates that network neighbors of known disease genes form an important class of candidates for identifying novel genes for the same disease.

  11. EEG correlates of spatial orientation in the human retrosplenial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-T; Chiu, T-C; Gramann, K

    2015-10-15

    Studies on spatial navigation reliably demonstrate that the retrosplenial complex (RSC) plays a pivotal role for allocentric spatial information processing by transforming egocentric and allocentric spatial information into the respective other spatial reference frame (SRF). While more and more imaging studies investigate the role of the RSC in spatial tasks, high temporal resolution measures such as electroencephalography (EEG) are missing. To investigate the function of the RSC in spatial navigation with high temporal resolution we used EEG to analyze spectral perturbations during navigation based on allocentric and egocentric SRF. Participants performed a path integration task in a clearly structured virtual environment providing allothetic information. Continuous EEG recordings were decomposed by independent component analysis (ICA) with subsequent source reconstruction of independent time source series using equivalent dipole modeling. Time-frequency transformation was used to investigate reference frame-specific orientation processes during navigation as compared to a control condition with identical visual input but no orientation task. Our results demonstrate that navigation based on an egocentric reference frame recruited a network including the parietal, motor, and occipital cortices with dominant perturbations in the alpha band and theta modulation in frontal cortex. Allocentric navigation was accompanied by performance-related desynchronization of the 8-13 Hz frequency band and synchronization in the 12-14 Hz band in the RSC. The results support the claim that the retrosplenial complex is central to translating egocentric spatial information into allocentric reference frames. Modulations in different frequencies with different time courses in the RSC further provide first evidence of two distinct neural processes reflecting translation of spatial information based on distinct reference frames and the computation of heading changes.

  12. A role for Aurora C in the chromosomal passenger complex during human preimplantation embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Margarida Avo; van de Werken, Christine; de Vries, Marieke; Jahr, Holger; Vromans, Martijn J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Fauser, Bart C.; Kops, Geert J.; Lens, Susanne M.; Baart, Esther B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human embryos generated by IVF demonstrate a high incidence of chromosomal segregation errors during the cleavage divisions. To analyse underlying molecular mechanisms, we investigated the behaviour of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) in human oocytes and embryos. This important m

  13. Discovery of a novel retrovirus sequence in an Australian native rodent (Melomys burtoni: a putative link between gibbon ape leukemia virus and koala retrovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Simmons

    Full Text Available Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV and koala retrovirus (KoRV share a remarkably close sequence identity despite the fact that they occur in distantly related mammals on different continents. It has previously been suggested that infection of their respective hosts may have occurred as a result of a species jump from another, as yet unidentified vertebrate host. To investigate possible sources of these retroviruses in the Australian context, DNA samples were obtained from 42 vertebrate species and screened using PCR in order to detect proviral sequences closely related to KoRV and GALV. Four proviral partial sequences totalling 2880 bases which share a strong similarity with KoRV and GALV were detected in DNA from a native Australian rodent, the grassland melomys, Melomys burtoni. We have designated this novel gammaretrovirus Melomys burtoni retrovirus (MbRV. The concatenated nucleotide sequence of MbRV shares 93% identity with the corresponding sequence from GALV-SEATO and 83% identity with KoRV. The geographic ranges of the grassland melomys and of the koala partially overlap. Thus a species jump by MbRV from melomys to koalas is conceivable. However the genus Melomys does not occur in mainland South East Asia and so it appears most likely that another as yet unidentified host was the source of GALV.

  14. A Scale and Pose Invariant Algorithm for Fast Detecting Human Faces in a Complex Background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Xin; SHEN Lansun; JIA Kebin

    2001-01-01

    Human face detection is an interesting and challenging task in computer vision. A scale and pose invariant algorithm is proposed in this paper.The algorithm is able to detect human faces in a complex background in about 400ms with a detection rate of 92%. The algorithm can be used in a wide range of applications such as human-computer interface, video coding, etc.

  15. Recognition of complex human behaviours using 3D imaging for intelligent surveillance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bo; Lepley, Jason J.; Peall, Robert; Butler, Michael; Hagras, Hani

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a system that exploits 3-D imaging technology as an enabler for the robust recognition of the human form. We combine this with pose and feature recognition capabilities from which we can recognise high-level human behaviours. We propose a hierarchical methodology for the recognition of complex human behaviours, based on the identification of a set of atomic behaviours, individual and sequential poses (e.g. standing, sitting, walking, drinking and eating) that provides a framework from which we adopt time-based machine learning techniques to recognise complex behaviour patterns.

  16. Invited commentary: Positive youth development and human complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Reed W; Tran, Steve P

    2014-06-01

    The process of positive development for adolescents includes struggling to address a wide variety of complex, often unstated bio-psycho-social-cultural challenges. These include formulating workable values, learning self-regulation, preparation for adult work roles-and innumerable other un-tidy puzzles. Variable-based research can only scratch the surface of how youth go about these processes; nonetheless, systematic longitudinal research like this can provide valuable information about developmental pathways and directions of change. Highlights from these papers include the finding that older youth report more goals aimed at meaningful connection with others and contributing to society; yet also that moral character did not differ by age. The papers suggest that relationships adults, hope, school engagement, participation in out-of-school programs, and intentional self-regulation can serve as mediators of positive development. Yet, a striking finding was that comparatively few youth in the study manifest a pattern of change marked by the coupling of increases in positive youth development and decreases in risk/problem behavior. We believe there is much beneath the surface to be uncovered.

  17. Complex posttraumatic stress disorder and survivors of human rights violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Matthew; Robjant, Katy; Katona, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent findings on Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (CPTSD) and proposes future research which would help to establish the nature of CPTSD in relation to Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Research on survivors of torture and war has found that CPTSD can occur when there is no history of childhood abuse. fMRI studies appear to highlight differences in neural activity in individuals exhibiting primary dissociation compared with individuals exhibiting secondary dissociation. Research has begun to show that, when symptoms of secondary dissociation are appropriately managed, exposure-based therapies are an effective treatment for individuals with CPTSD. Much research on CPTSD has emphasized its developmental basis and the disruptive effects of trauma in childhood and adolescence on subsequent emotional development. However, some studies on survivors of torture in adult life identify similar symptom patterns, despite there being no history of childhood trauma. It is argued that comparative research is required between victims of developmental trauma (such as childhood sexual abuse) and victims who experienced prolonged interpersonal trauma in adulthood (such as torture), as this could be useful in establishing the cause of CPTSD and in delineating clinically and therapeutically meaningful subtypes. It is also proposed that a focus on underlying neurobiological processes would help in developing and refining CPTSD as a construct and informing treatment.

  18. Complex formation between human prostate-specific antigen and protease inhibitors in mouse plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekim, Can; Riipi, Tero; Zhu, Lei; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    When secreted from the prostate, most of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is free and enzymatically active. Upon reaching circulation, active PSA is inactivated by complex formation with protease inhibitors. To justify the use of mouse models for evaluation of the function of PSA and for studies on therapeutic modalities based on modulation of PSA activity, it is important to know whether PSA complexation is similar in mouse and man. To characterize the circulating forms of PSA in mouse, we used subcutaneous LNCaP and 22RV1 human prostate cancer cell xenograft tumor models. We also added PSA directly to mouse serum. Free and total PSA were measured by immunoassay, and PSA complexes were extracted by immunopurification followed by SDS-PAGE, in-gel trypsin digestion and identification of signature peptides by mass spectrometry. In mice bearing xenograft tumors, 68% of the immunoreactive PSA occurred in complex, and when added to mouse serum, over 70% of PSA forms complexes that comprises alpha(2)-macroglobulin and members of the alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) family. In mouse plasma, PSA forms complexes similar to those in man, but the major immunoreactive complex contains AAT rather than alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, which is the main complex forming serpin in man. The complex formation of PSA produced by xenograft tumor models in mice is similar to that of human prostate tumors with respect to the complexation of PSA. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Connectivity in the human brain dissociates entropy and complexity of auditory inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastase, Samuel A; Iacovella, Vittorio; Davis, Ben; Hasson, Uri

    2015-03-01

    Complex systems are described according to two central dimensions: (a) the randomness of their output, quantified via entropy; and (b) their complexity, which reflects the organization of a system's generators. Whereas some approaches hold that complexity can be reduced to uncertainty or entropy, an axiom of complexity science is that signals with very high or very low entropy are generated by relatively non-complex systems, while complex systems typically generate outputs with entropy peaking between these two extremes. In understanding their environment, individuals would benefit from coding for both input entropy and complexity; entropy indexes uncertainty and can inform probabilistic coding strategies, whereas complexity reflects a concise and abstract representation of the underlying environmental configuration, which can serve independent purposes, e.g., as a template for generalization and rapid comparisons between environments. Using functional neuroimaging, we demonstrate that, in response to passively processed auditory inputs, functional integration patterns in the human brain track both the entropy and complexity of the auditory signal. Connectivity between several brain regions scaled monotonically with input entropy, suggesting sensitivity to uncertainty, whereas connectivity between other regions tracked entropy in a convex manner consistent with sensitivity to input complexity. These findings suggest that the human brain simultaneously tracks the uncertainty of sensory data and effectively models their environmental generators.

  20. Mitochondrial complex I plays an essential role in human respirasome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Lastres, David; Fontanesi, Flavia; García-Consuegra, Inés; Martín, Miguel A; Arenas, Joaquín; Barrientos, Antoni; Ugalde, Cristina

    2012-03-01

    The biogenesis and function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) involve the organization of RC enzyme complexes in supercomplexes or respirasomes through an unknown biosynthetic process. This leads to structural interdependences between RC complexes, which are highly relevant from biological and biomedical perspectives, because RC defects often lead to severe neuromuscular disorders. We show that in human cells, respirasome biogenesis involves a complex I assembly intermediate acting as a scaffold for the combined incorporation of complexes III and IV subunits, rather than originating from the association of preassembled individual holoenzymes. The process ends with the incorporation of complex I NADH dehydrogenase catalytic module, which leads to the respirasome activation. While complexes III and IV assemble either as free holoenzymes or by incorporation of free subunits into supercomplexes, the respirasomes constitute the structural units where complex I is assembled and activated, thus explaining the significance of the respirasomes for RC function.

  1. Contribution of the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS to research on blood transfusion safety in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Loureiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS program was established in the United States in 1989 with the purpose of increasing blood transfusion safety in the context of the HIV/AIDS and human T-lymphotropic virus epidemics. REDS and its successor, REDS-II were at first conducted in the US, then expanded in 2006 to include international partnerships with Brazil and China. In 2011, a third wave of REDS renamed the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III was launched. This seven-year research program focuses on both blood banking and transfusion medicine research in the United States of America, Brazil, China, and South Africa. The main goal of the international programs is to reduce and prevent the transmission of HIV/AIDS and other known and emerging infectious agents through transfusion, and to address research questions aimed at understanding global issues related to the availability of safe blood. This article describes the contribution of REDS-II to transfusion safety in Brazil. Articles published from 2010 to 2013 are summarized, including database analyses to characterize blood donors, deferral rates, and prevalence, incidence and residual risk of the main blood-borne infections. Specific studies were developed to understand donor motivation, the impact of the deferral questions, risk factors and molecular surveillance among HIV-positive donors, and the natural history of Chagas disease. The purpose of this review is to disseminate the acquired knowledge and briefly summarize the findings of the REDS-II studies conducted in Brazil as well as to introduce the scope of the REDS-III program that is now in progress and will continue through 2018.

  2. The N2-P3 complex of the evoked potential and human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odonnell, Brian F.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    The N2-P3 complex and other endogenous components of human evoked potential provide a set of tools for the investigation of human perceptual and cognitive processes. These multidimensional measures of central nervous system bioelectrical activity respond to a variety of environmental and internal factors which have been experimentally characterized. Their application to the analysis of human performance in naturalistic task environments is just beginning. Converging evidence suggests that the N2-P3 complex reflects processes of stimulus evaluation, perceptual resource allocation, and decision making that proceed in parallel, rather than in series, with response generation. Utilization of these EP components may provide insights into the central nervous system mechanisms modulating task performance unavailable from behavioral measures alone. The sensitivity of the N2-P3 complex to neuropathology, psychopathology, and pharmacological manipulation suggests that these components might provide sensitive markers for the effects of environmental stressors on the human central nervous system.

  3. Microtomography of the human tooth-alveolar bone complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstra, Michel; Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Beckmann, Felix; Sakima, Maurício T.; Lemor, Carsten; Laursen, Morten G.; Melsen, Birte

    2006-08-01

    In this study the structure of the adult human dentoalveolar process is examined using conventional and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography (SRμCT). Mandibular and maxillary segments containing two to five adjacent teeth were harvested at autopsy from 49 adult donors. These segments were embedded in blocks of methylmetacrylate and scanned using a conventional table-top μCT-scanner at a pixel size and slice thickness of 35 μm. A few segments were also scanned at a synchrotron facility at an initial pixel size of 16.4 μm, which was binned by a factor 2 to result in an effective voxel size of almost 32.8 μm. The three-dimensional reconstructions revealed how intricately the teeth are supported by the alveolar bone. Furthermore, this support is highly inhomogeneous with respect to the buccal, mesial, lingual and distal quadrants. Reflecting their various degrees of mineralization, tissues like bone, dentine, enamel and cementum, could well be identified, especially in the scans made with SRμCT. Despite comparable voxel sizes, the reconstructed data-sets obtained with conventional μCT were less detailed and somewhat fuzzy in appearance compared to the data-sets of SRμCT. However, for quantification of macroscopical features like the thickness of the alveolar wall or the presence of dehiscences/fenestrations this seemed sufficient.

  4. Host Control of Insect Endogenous Retroviruses: Small RNA Silencing and Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Fablet

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses are relics of ancient infections from retroviruses that managed to integrate into the genome of germline cells and remained vertically transmitted from parent to progeny. Subsequent to the endogenization process, these sequences can move and multiply in the host genome, which can have deleterious consequences and disturb genomic stability. Natural selection favored the establishment of silencing pathways that protect host genomes from the activity of endogenous retroviruses. RNA silencing mechanisms are involved, which utilize piRNAs. The response to exogenous viral infections uses siRNAs, a class of small RNAs that are generated via a distinct biogenesis pathway from piRNAs. However, interplay between both pathways has been identified, and interactions with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal immune responses are also suspected. This review focuses on Diptera (Arthropods and intends to compile pieces of evidence showing that the RNA silencing pathway of endogenous retrovirus regulation is not independent from immunity and the response to infections. This review will consider the mechanisms that allow the lasting coexistence of viral sequences and host genomes from an evolutionary perspective.

  5. COM, a heterochromatic locus governing the control of independent endogenous retroviruses from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desset, Sophie; Meignin, Carine; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2003-06-01

    ZAM and Idefix are two endogenous retroviruses whose expression is tightly controlled in Drosophila melanogaster. However, a line exists in which this control has been perturbed, resulting in a high mobilization rate for both retroviruses. This line is called the U (unstable) line as opposed to the other S (stable) lines. In the process of analyzing this control and tracing the genetic determinant involved, we found that ZAM and Idefix expression responded to two types of controls: one restricting their expression to specific somatic cells in the ovaries and the other silencing their expression in S lines but permitting it in U lines. While studying this second control in the U or S backgrounds, we found that the heterochromatic locus 20A2-3 on the X chromosome, previously implicated in the regulation of a third retroelement, gypsy, also controlled both ZAM and Idefix. We report here that genetic determinants necessary for endogenous retrovirus silencing occur at the 20A2-3 locus, which we call COM, for centre organisateur de mobilisation. We propose that if this point of control becomes mutated during the life of the fly, it may trigger processes reactivating dormant endogenous retroviruses and thus bring about sudden bursts of mobilization.

  6. Complex relationship between meiotic recombination frequency and autosomal synaptonemal complex length per cell in normal human males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhenzhen; Yang, Qingling; Ye, Nan; Wang, Liu; Li, Jianhua; Yu, Dexin; Cooke, Howard J; Shi, Qinghua

    2012-03-01

    Although the relationship between meiotic recombination frequency and synaptonemal complex (SC) length has been of interest for a long time, how recombination frequency is related to SC length has not been carefully explored. To address this question, we have measured the meiotic recombination frequency as represented by MLH1 foci in 889 pachytene spermatocytes and measured the length of 19,558 autosomal SCs from 10 human males. A complex relationship between the number of MLH1 foci and total autosomal SC length per cell was observed. A positive correlation with significant correlation coefficients between the two variables was found in eight of the ten donors examined, with three donors showing weak correlation, and five showing moderate correlation. Two donors who did not show any correlation between the two variables were identified for the first time. Moreover, most cells with similar total autosomal SC length showed very different numbers of MLH1 foci both between individuals and even within an individual, and vice versa. Our data provide the first evidence for a complex relationship between the recombination frequency and total length of autosomal SCs per cell in human males.

  7. [Elderly human being with ostomy and environments of care: reflection on the perspective of complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Edaiane Joana Lima; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo

    2012-01-01

    This is discussion about the relationship between elderly human beings with ostomy and their environments care, under the perspective of Complexity Edgar Morin. An axis holds the reflection: environments of care for elderly humans with ostomy. In this sense, we present three types of environment that surround the context of elderly humans with ostomy: home environment, group environment and hospital environment. This brings, as a social contribution, a new look about resizing caring of elderly humans with ostomy in their environment. It is considered that the environment hosting this human being contains a diversity of feelings, emotions, experiences; it binds multiple meanings, from the Complexity perspective, about the relationship between the environment and the caring process.

  8. Highly efficient in vitro and in vivo delivery of functional RNAs using new versatile MS2-chimeric retrovirus-like particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Prel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA delivery is an attractive strategy to achieve transient gene expression in research projects and in cell- or gene-based therapies. Despite significant efforts investigating vector-directed RNA transfer, there is still a requirement for better efficiency of delivery to primary cells and in vivo. Retroviral platforms drive RNA delivery, yet retrovirus RNA-packaging constraints limit gene transfer to two genome-molecules per viral particle. To improve retroviral transfer, we designed a dimerization-independent MS2-driven RNA packaging system using MS2-Coat-retrovirus chimeras. The engineered chimeric particles promoted effective packaging of several types of RNAs and enabled efficient transfer of biologically active RNAs in various cell types, including human CD34+ and iPS cells. Systemic injection of high-titer particles led to gene expression in mouse liver and transferring Cre-recombinase mRNA in muscle permitted widespread editing at the ROSA26 locus. We could further show that the VLPs were able to activate an osteoblast differentiation pathway by delivering RUNX2- or DLX5-mRNA into primary human bone-marrow mesenchymal-stem cells. Thus, the novel chimeric MS2-lentiviral particles are a versatile tool for a wide range of applications including cellular-programming or genome-editing.

  9. Structural analysis of the human SYCE2-TEX12 complex provides molecular insights into synaptonemal complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Owen R; Maman, Joseph D; Pellegrini, Luca

    2012-07-01

    The successful completion of meiosis is essential for all sexually reproducing organisms. The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a large proteinaceous structure that holds together homologous chromosomes during meiosis, providing the structural framework for meiotic recombination and crossover formation. Errors in SC formation are associated with infertility, recurrent miscarriage and aneuploidy. The current lack of molecular information about the dynamic process of SC assembly severely restricts our understanding of its function in meiosis. Here, we provide the first biochemical and structural analysis of an SC protein component and propose a structural basis for its function in SC assembly. We show that human SC proteins SYCE2 and TEX12 form a highly stable, constitutive complex, and define the regions responsible for their homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Biophysical analysis reveals that the SYCE2-TEX12 complex is an equimolar hetero-octamer, formed from the association of an SYCE2 tetramer and two TEX12 dimers. Electron microscopy shows that biochemically reconstituted SYCE2-TEX12 complexes assemble spontaneously into filamentous structures that resemble the known physical features of the SC central element (CE). Our findings can be combined with existing biological data in a model of chromosome synapsis driven by growth of SYCE2-TEX12 higher-order structures within the CE of the SC.

  10. Human guidance of mobile robots in complex 3D environments using smart glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopinsky, Ryan; Sharma, Aneesh; Gupta, Nikhil; Ordonez, Camilo; Collins, Emmanuel; Barber, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In order for humans to safely work alongside robots in the field, the human-robot (HR) interface, which enables bi-directional communication between human and robot, should be able to quickly and concisely express the robot's intentions and needs. While the robot operates mostly in autonomous mode, the human should be able to intervene to effectively guide the robot in complex, risky and/or highly uncertain scenarios. Using smart glasses such as Google Glass∗, we seek to develop an HR interface that aids in reducing interaction time and distractions during interaction with the robot.

  11. Cellular and biomolecular responses of human ovarian cancer cells to cytostatic dinuclear platinum(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miaoxin; Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Jianhui; Fan, Damin; Zhang, Yangmiao; Zhang, Junfeng; Guo, Zijian

    2011-03-01

    Polynuclear platinum(II) complexes represent a class of potential anticancer agents that have shown promising pharmacological properties in preclinical studies. The nature of cellular responses induced by these complexes, however, is poorly understood. In this research, the cellular responses of human ovarian cancer COC1 cells to dinuclear platinum(II) complexes {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L¹}(NO₃)₂ (1) and {[cis-Pt(NH₃)₂Cl]₂L²}(NO₃)₂ (2) (L¹ = α,α'-diamino-p-xylene, L² = 4,4'-methylenedianiline) has been studied using cisplatin as a reference. The effect of platinum complexes on the proliferation, death mode, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell cycle progression has been examined by MTT assay and flow cytometry. The activation of cell cycle checkpoint kinases (CHK1/2), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) of the cells by the complexes has also been analyzed using phospho-specific flow cytometry. Complex 1 is more cytotoxic than complex 2 and cisplatin at most concentrations; complex 2 and cisplatin are comparably cytotoxic. These complexes kill the cells through an apoptotic or apoptosis-like pathway characterized by exposure of phosphatidylserine and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Complex 1 shows the strongest inductive effect on the morphological changes of the cells, followed by cisplatin and complex 2. Complexes 1 and 2 arrest the cell cycle in G2 or M phase, while cisplatin arrests the cell cycle in S phase. The influence of these complexes on CHK1/2, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK varies with the dose of the drugs or reaction time. Activation of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-p38 MAPK by these complexes is closely related to the cytostatic activity. The results demonstrate that dinuclear platinum(II) complexes can induce some cellular responses different from those caused by cisplatin.

  12. A Phase-Dependent Hypothesis for Locomotor Functions of Human Foot Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Ren; David Howard; Lu-quan Ren; Chris Nester; Li-mei Tian

    2008-01-01

    The human foot is a very complex structure comprising numerous bones, muscles, ligaments and synovial joints. As the only component in contact with the ground, the foot complex delivers a variety of biomechanical functions during human locomotion, e.g. body support and propulsion, stability maintenance and impact absorption. These need the human foot to be rigid and damped to transmit ground reaction forces to the upper body and maintain body stability, and also to be compliant and resilient to moderate risky impacts and save energy. How does the human foot achieve these apparent conflicting functions? In this study, we propose a phase-dependent hypothesis for the overall locomotor functions of the human foot complex based on in-vivo measurements of human natural gait and simulation results of a mathematical foot model. We propse that foot functions are highly dependent on gait phase, which is a major characteristics of human locomotion. In early stance just after heel strike,the foot mainly works as a shock absorber by moderating high impacts using the viscouselastic heel pad in both. vertical and horizontal directions. In mid-stance phase(~80% of stance phase), the foot complex can be considered as a springy rocker,reserving external mechanical work using the foot arch whilst moving ground contact point forward along a curved path to maintain body stability. In late stance after heel off, the foot complex mainly serves as a force modulator like a gear box,modulating effective mechanical advantages of ankle plantiflexor muscles using metatarsal-phalangeal joints. A sound understanding of how diverse functions are implemented in a simple foot segment during human locomotion might be useful to gain insight into the overall foot locomotor functions and hence to facilitate clinical diagnosis, rehabilitation product design and humanoid robot development.

  13. Detailed analysis of the human mitochondrial contact site complex indicate a hierarchy of subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Christine; Dorsch, Eva; Fraunholz, Martin; Straub, Sebastian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial inner membrane folds into cristae, which significantly increase its surface and are important for mitochondrial function. The stability of cristae depends on the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex. In human mitochondria, the inner membrane MICOS complex interacts with the outer membrane sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) complex, to form the mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging complex (MIB). We have created knockdown cell lines of most of the MICOS and MIB components and have used them to study the importance of the individual subunits for the cristae formation and complex stability. We show that the most important subunits of the MIB complex in human mitochondria are Mic60/Mitofilin, Mic19/CHCHD3 and an outer membrane component Sam50. We provide additional proof that ApoO indeed is a subunit of the MICOS and MIB complexes and propose the name Mic23 for this protein. According to our results, Mic25/CHCHD6, Mic27/ApoOL and Mic23/ApoO appear to be periphery subunits of the MICOS complex, because their depletion does not affect cristae morphology or stability of other components.

  14. Social-network complexity in humans is associated with the neural response to social information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziura, Sarah L; Thompson, James C

    2014-11-01

    Humans have evolved to thrive in large and complex social groups, and it is likely that this increase in group complexity has come with a greater need to decode and respond to complex and uncertain communicatory signals. In this functional MRI study, we examined whether complexity of social networks in humans is related to the functioning of brain regions key to the perception of basic, nonverbal social stimuli. Greater activation to biological than to scrambled motion in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and right amygdala were positively correlated with the diversity of social-network roles. In the pSTS, in particular, this association was not due to a relationship between network diversity and network size. These findings suggest that increased functioning of brain regions involved in decoding social signals might facilitate the detection and decoding of subtle signals encountered in varied social settings.

  15. Identification of Hyal2 as the cell-surface receptor for jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus and ovine nasal adenocarcinoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D

    2003-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and ovine nasal adenocarcinoma virus (ONAV) replicate in the airway and cause epithelial cell tumors through the activity of their envelope (Env) proteins. Identification of the receptor(s) that mediate cell entry by these viruses is crucial to understanding the oncogenic activity of Env and for the development of gene therapy vectors based on these viruses that are capable of targeting airway cells. To identify the viral receptor(s) and to further study the biology of JSRV and ONAV, we developed retroviral vectors containing Moloney murine leukemia virus components and the Env proteins of JSRV or ONAV. We used a new technique involving positional cloning by phenotypic mapping in radiation hybrid cells to identify and clone the human receptor for JSRV, Hyal2, which also serves as the receptor for ONAV. Hyal2 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell-surface protein that has low hyaluronidase activity and is a member of a large family that includes sperm hyaluronidase (Spam) and serum hyaluronidase (Hyal1). Hyal2 is located in a region of human chromosome 3p21.3 that is often deleted in lung cancer, suggesting that it may be a tumor suppressor. However, its role in JSRV or ONAV tumorigenesis, if any, is still unclear. JSRV vectors are capable of transducing various human cells, and are being further evaluated for gene therapy purposes.

  16. Vitamin B-complex initiates growth and development of human embryonic brain cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielyan, K E; Abramyan, R A; Galoyan, A A; Kevorkian, G A

    2011-09-01

    We studied a combined effect of subcomponents of vitamin B complex on the growth, development, and death of human embryonic brain-derived cells (E90) cultured using a modified method of Matson. Cell death was detected by trypan blue staining. According to our results, vitamin B-complex in low-doses promote the development, maturation, and enlargement of human embryonic brain cells, on the one hand, and increases the percent of cell death, which attests to accelerated maturation and metabolism, on the other.

  17. Resolving the complexity of the human genome using single-molecule sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, Mark J P; Huddleston, John; Dennis, Megan Y; Sudmant, Peter H; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Antonacci, Francesca; Surti, Urvashi; Sandstrom, Richard; Boitano, Matthew; Landolin, Jane M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Eichler, Evan E

    2015-01-29

    The human genome is arguably the most complete mammalian reference assembly, yet more than 160 euchromatic gaps remain and aspects of its structural variation remain poorly understood ten years after its completion. To identify missing sequence and genetic variation, here we sequence and analyse a haploid human genome (CHM1) using single-molecule, real-time DNA sequencing. We close or extend 55% of the remaining interstitial gaps in the human GRCh37 reference genome--78% of which carried long runs of degenerate short tandem repeats, often several kilobases in length, embedded within (G+C)-rich genomic regions. We resolve the complete sequence of 26,079 euchromatic structural variants at the base-pair level, including inversions, complex insertions and long tracts of tandem repeats. Most have not been previously reported, with the greatest increases in sensitivity occurring for events less than 5 kilobases in size. Compared to the human reference, we find a significant insertional bias (3:1) in regions corresponding to complex insertions and long short tandem repeats. Our results suggest a greater complexity of the human genome in the form of variation of longer and more complex repetitive DNA that can now be largely resolved with the application of this longer-read sequencing technology.

  18. The SMC5/6 complex is involved in crucial processes during human spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verver, Dideke E; Langedijk, Nathalia S M; Jordan, Philip W; Repping, Sjoerd; Hamer, Geert

    2014-07-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for safe reproduction. Therefore, chromatin structure and dynamics should be tightly regulated during germ cell development. Chromatin structure and function are in large part determined by the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, of which SMC5/6 recently has been shown to be involved in both spermatogonial differentiation and meiosis during mouse spermatogenesis. We therefore investigated the role of this complex in human spermatogenesis. We found SMC6 to be expressed in the human testis and present in a subset of type Adark and type Apale spermatogonia, all spermatocytes, and round spermatids. During human meiosis, SMC5/6 is located at the synaptonemal complex (SC), the XY body, and at the centromeres during meiotic metaphases. However, in contrast to mouse spermatogenesis, SMC6 is not located at pericentromeric heterochromatin in human spermatogenic cells, indicating subtle but perhaps important differences in not only SMC5/6 function but maybe also in maintenance of genomic integrity at the repetitive pericentromeric regions. Nonetheless, our data clearly indicate that the SMC5/6 complex, as shown in mice, is involved in numerous crucial processes during human spermatogenesis, such as in spermatogonial development, on the SC between synapsed chromosomes, and in DNA double-strand break repair on unsynapsed chromosomes during pachynema.

  19. In vivo formation of complex microvessels lined by human endothelial cells in an immunodeficient mouse

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have identified conditions for forming cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) into tubes within a three-dimensional gel that on implantation into immunoincompetent mice undergo remodeling into complex microvessels lined by human endothelium. HUVEC suspended in mixed collagen/fibronectin gels organize into cords with early lumena by 24 h and then apoptose. Twenty-hour constructs, s.c. implanted in immunodeficient mice, display HUVEC-lined thin-walled microvessels within the...

  20. How do precision medicine and system biology response to human body's complex adaptability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing

    2016-12-01

    In the field of life sciences, although system biology and "precision medicine" introduce some complex scientifific methods and techniques, it is still based on the "analysis-reconstruction" of reductionist theory as a whole. Adaptability of complex system increase system behaviour uncertainty as well as the difficulties of precise identifification and control. It also put systems biology research into trouble. To grasp the behaviour and characteristics of organism fundamentally, systems biology has to abandon the "analysis-reconstruction" concept. In accordance with the guidelines of complexity science, systems biology should build organism model from holistic level, just like the Chinese medicine did in dealing with human body and disease. When we study the living body from the holistic level, we will fifind the adaptability of complex system is not the obstacle that increases the diffificulty of problem solving. It is the "exceptional", "right-hand man" that helping us to deal with the complexity of life more effectively.

  1. Effects of human serun albumin in some biological properties of rhodium(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espósito Breno P.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The affinities for human albumin (HSA of five rhodium(II complexes of general formula [Rh2(bridge4] (bridge = acetate, propionate, butyrate, trifluoroacetate and trifluoroacetamidate were determined by spectrophotometry. In the case of the alkylcarboxylates, an inverse correlation of affinity with their liposolubilities was observed. Diffusion of the free or protein-bound complexes into Ehrlich cells in vitro seems to be primarily governed by the hydrophobic character of the complex. The complex [Rh2(tfc4] exhibited affinity towards the protein (K = 214.1 as well as cell partition both in the absence (32.1% and presence (48.6% of HSA. The compound HSA: [Rh2(tfc4] has had its antitumoral action in tumor-bearing Balb-c mice investigated, showing that HSA can be a drug reservoir for the rhodium complex.

  2. Feline immunodeficiency virus and retrovirus-mediated adventitial ex vivo gene transfer to rabbit carotid artery using autologous vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankkonen, Hanna M; Turunen, Mikko P; Hiltunen, Mikko O; Lehtolainen, Pauliina; Koponen, Jonna; Leppänen, Pia; Turunen, Anna-Mari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2004-03-01

    We have developed an ex vivo gene transfer technique to rabbit arterial wall using autologous smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs were harvested from rabbit ear artery, transduced in vitro with vesicular stomatitis virus G-glycoprotein pseudotyped retrovirus or feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and returned to the adventitial surface of the carotid artery using a periadventitial silicone collar or collagen sheet placed around the artery. Beta-galactosidase (lacZ) and human apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) cDNAs were used as transgenes. After retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of lacZ the selected cells implanted with high efficiency and expressed lacZ marker gene at a very high level 7 and 14 days after the operation. The level of lacZ expression decreased thereafter but was still detectable 12 weeks after the gene transfer, and was exclusively localized to the site of cell implantation inside the collar. Utilizing FIV vector expressing apoE3, low levels of apoE were measured from serum collected from a low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits 1 month after the gene transfer. The physiological effect of apoE expression was detected as transiently elevated serum cholesterol levels. The results indicate that the model can be used for high efficiency local gene transfer in arteries, e.g. during vascular surgery. The model is also valuable for studying expression, stability and safety of new gene transfer vectors and their expression products in vivo.

  3. Transcription factor binding sites are genetic determinants of retroviral integration in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Felice

    Full Text Available Gamma-retroviruses and lentiviruses integrate non-randomly in mammalian genomes, with specific preferences for active chromatin, promoters and regulatory regions. Gene transfer vectors derived from gamma-retroviruses target at high frequency genes involved in the control of growth, development and differentiation of the target cell, and may induce insertional tumors or pre-neoplastic clonal expansions in patients treated by gene therapy. The gene expression program of the target cell is apparently instrumental in directing gamma-retroviral integration, although the molecular basis of this phenomenon is poorly understood. We report a bioinformatic analysis of the distribution of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs flanking >4,000 integrated proviruses in human hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. We show that gamma-retroviral, but not lentiviral vectors, integrate in genomic regions enriched in cell-type specific subsets of TFBSs, independently from their relative position with respect to genes and transcription start sites. Analysis of sequences flanking the integration sites of Moloney leukemia virus (MLV- and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-derived vectors carrying mutations in their long terminal repeats (LTRs, and of HIV vectors packaged with an MLV integrase, indicates that the MLV integrase and LTR enhancer are the viral determinants of the selection of TFBS-rich regions in the genome. This study identifies TFBSs as differential genomic determinants of retroviral target site selection in the human genome, and suggests that transcription factors binding the LTR enhancer may synergize with the integrase in tethering retroviral pre-integration complexes to transcriptionally active regulatory regions. Our data indicate that gamma-retroviruses and lentiviruses have evolved dramatically different strategies to interact with the host cell chromatin, and predict a higher risk in using gamma-retroviral vs. lentiviral vectors for human

  4. Interactions of the human MCM-BP protein with MCM complex components and Dbf4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Nguyen

    Full Text Available MCM-BP was discovered as a protein that co-purified from human cells with MCM proteins 3 through 7; results which were recapitulated in frogs, yeast and plants. Evidence in all of these organisms supports an important role for MCM-BP in DNA replication, including contributions to MCM complex unloading. However the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood. Here we show that human MCM-BP is capable of interacting with individual MCM proteins 2 through 7 when co-expressed in insect cells and can greatly increase the recovery of some recombinant MCM proteins. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that MCM-BP interacts most strongly with MCM4 and MCM7. Similar gradient analyses of human cell lysates showed that only a small amount of MCM-BP overlapped with the migration of MCM complexes and that MCM complexes were disrupted by exogenous MCM-BP. In addition, large complexes containing MCM-BP and MCM proteins were detected at mid to late S phase, suggesting that the formation of specific MCM-BP complexes is cell cycle regulated. We also identified an interaction between MCM-BP and the Dbf4 regulatory component of the DDK kinase in both yeast 2-hybrid and insect cell co-expression assays, and this interaction was verified by co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins from human cells. In vitro kinase assays showed that MCM-BP was not a substrate for DDK but could inhibit DDK phosphorylation of MCM4,6,7 within MCM4,6,7 or MCM2-7 complexes, with little effect on DDK phosphorylation of MCM2. Since DDK is known to activate DNA replication through phosphorylation of these MCM proteins, our results suggest that MCM-BP may affect DNA replication in part by regulating MCM phosphorylation by DDK.

  5. Immunolocalisation pattern of complex I-V in ageing human retina: Correlation with mitochondrial ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Tapas Chandra; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2016-11-01

    Earlier studies reported accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in ageing and age-related macular degeneration. To know about the mitochondrial status with age, we examined immunoreactivity (IR) to markers of mitochondria (anti-mitochondrial antibody and voltage-dependent anion channel-1) and complex I-V (that mediate oxidative phosphorylation, OXPHOS) in donor human retinas (age: 19-94years; N=26; right eyes). In all samples, at all ages, IR to anti-mitochondrial antibody and voltage-dependent anion channel-1 was prominent in photoreceptor cells. Between second and seventh decade of life, strong IR to complex I-V was present in photoreceptors over macular to peripheral retina. With progressive ageing, the photoreceptors showed a decrease in complex I-IR (subunit NDUFB4) at eighth decade, and a weak or absence of IR in 10 retinas between ninth and tenth decade. Patchy IR to complex III and complex IV was detected at different ages. IR to ND1 (complex I) and complex II and V remained unaltered with ageing. Nitrosative stress (evaluated by IR to a nitro-tyrosine antibody) was found in photoreceptors. Superoxide dismutase-2 was found upregulated in photoreceptors with ageing. Mitochondrial ultrastructure was examined in two young retinas with intact complex IR and six aged retinas whose counterparts showed weak to absence of IR. Observations revealed irregular, photoreceptor inner segment mitochondria in aged maculae and mid-peripheral retina between eighth and ninth decade; many cones possessed autophagosomes with damaged mitochondria, indicating age-related alterations. A trend in age-dependent reduction of complex I-IR was evident in aged photoreceptors, whereas patchy complex IV-IR (subunits I and II) was age-independent, suggesting that the former is prone to damage with ageing perhaps due to oxidative stress. These changes in OXPHOS system may influence the energy budget of human photoreceptors, affecting their viability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and

  6. Very stable high molecular mass multiprotein complex with DNase and amylase activities in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, Svetlana E; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Verkhovod, Timofey D; Buneva, Valentina N; Sedykh, Sergey E; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2015-01-01

    For breastfed infants, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of proteins, peptides, antibodies, and other components promoting neonatal growth and protecting infants from viral and bacterial infection. It has been proposed that most biological processes are performed by protein complexes. Therefore, identification and characterization of human milk components including protein complexes is important for understanding the function of milk. Using gel filtration, we have purified a stable high molecular mass (~1000 kDa) multiprotein complex (SPC) from 15 preparations of human milk. Light scattering and gel filtration showed that the SPC was stable in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl and MgCl2 but dissociated efficiently under the conditions that destroy immunocomplexes (2 M MgCl2 , 0.5 M NaCl, and 10 mM DTT). Such a stable complex is unlikely to be a casual associate of different proteins. The relative content of the individual SPCs varied from 6% to 25% of the total milk protein. According to electrophoretic and mass spectrometry analysis, all 15 SPCs contained lactoferrin (LF) and α-lactalbumin as major proteins, whereas human milk albumin and β-casein were present in moderate or minor amounts; a different content of IgGs and sIgAs was observed. All SPCs efficiently hydrolyzed Plasmid supercoiled DNA and maltoheptaose. Some freshly prepared SPC preparations contained not only intact LF but also small amounts of its fragments, which appeared in all SPCs during their prolonged storage; the fragments, similar to intact LF, possessed DNase and amylase activities. LF is found in human epithelial secretions, barrier body fluids, and in the secondary granules of leukocytes. LF is a protein of the acute phase response and nonspecific defense against different types of microbial and viral infections. Therefore, LF complexes with other proteins may be important for its functions not only in human milk.

  7. Mixed-complexity artificial grammar learning in humans and macaque monkeys: evaluating learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-03-01

    Artificial grammars (AG) can be used to generate rule-based sequences of stimuli. Some of these can be used to investigate sequence-processing computations in non-human animals that might be related to, but not unique to, human language. Previous AG learning studies in non-human animals have used different AGs to separately test for specific sequence-processing abilities. However, given that natural language and certain animal communication systems (in particular, song) have multiple levels of complexity, mixed-complexity AGs are needed to simultaneously evaluate sensitivity to the different features of the AG. Here, we tested humans and Rhesus macaques using a mixed-complexity auditory AG, containing both adjacent (local) and non-adjacent (longer-distance) relationships. Following exposure to exemplary sequences generated by the AG, humans and macaques were individually tested with sequences that were either consistent with the AG or violated specific adjacent or non-adjacent relationships. We observed a considerable level of cross-species correspondence in the sensitivity of both humans and macaques to the adjacent AG relationships and to the statistical properties of the sequences. We found no significant sensitivity to the non-adjacent AG relationships in the macaques. A subset of humans was sensitive to this non-adjacent relationship, revealing interesting between- and within-species differences in AG learning strategies. The results suggest that humans and macaques are largely comparably sensitive to the adjacent AG relationships and their statistical properties. However, in the presence of multiple cues to grammaticality, the non-adjacent relationships are less salient to the macaques and many of the humans.

  8. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  9. Temporal coherence for complex signals in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilans, Erikson G; Dent, Micheal L

    2015-05-01

    The auditory scene is filled with an array of overlapping acoustic signals, yet relatively little work has focused on how animals are able to perceptually isolate different sound sources necessary for survival. Much of the previous work on auditory scene analysis has investigated how sequential pure tone stimuli are perceived, but how temporally overlapping complex communication signals are segregated has been largely ignored. In this study, budgerigars and humans were tested using psychophysical procedures to measure their perception of synchronous, asynchronous, and partially overlapping complex signals, including bird calls and human vowels. Segregation thresholds for complex stimuli were significantly lower than those for pure tone stimuli in both humans and birds. Additionally, a species effect was discovered such that relative to humans, budgerigars required significantly less temporal separation between 2 sounds in order to segregate them. Overall, and similar to previous behavioral results investigating temporal coherence, the results from this experiment illustrate that temporal cues are particularly important for auditory scene analysis across multiple species and for both simple and complex acoustic signals.

  10. Localising versus standardising electronic human resource management: complexities and tensions between HRM and IT departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tate, Mary; Furtmueller, E.; Wilderom, C.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an analysis of the complexities involved during global e-HRM (Electronic Human Resource Management) implementation. We present findings from a case study on the challenge of global integration versus local responsiveness of e-HRM systems. We take a local site lens, analysin

  11. The genetics of complex human behaviour: Cannabis use, personality, sexuality and mating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    I investigated the genetic and environmental etiology of individual differences in a variety of complex human behaviours, broadly captured within three domains - 1) cannabis use, 2) personality, and 3) sexuality and mating. Research questions and hypotheses are addressed with large community-based,

  12. Training Social Workers and Human Service Professionals to Address the Complex Financial Needs of Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Hopkins, Karen; Osteen, Philip; Callahan, Christine; Hageman, Sally; Ko, Jungyai

    2017-01-01

    In social work and other community-based human services settings, clients often present with complex financial problems. As a need for more formal training is beginning to be addressed, evaluation of existing training is important, and this study evaluates outcomes from the Financial Stability Pathway (FSP) project. Designed to prepare…

  13. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF A RECURRING COMPLEX CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION IN 2 HUMAN EXTRAGONADAL GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINKE, RJ; WEGHUIS, DO; SUIJKERBUIJK, RF; TANIGAMI, A; NAKAMURA, Y; LARSSON, C; WEBER, G; DEJONG, B; OOSTERHUIS, JW; MOLENAAR, WM; VANKESSEL, AG

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6p23, and 11q13 in two independent bur similar extragonadal human germ cell rumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  14. Molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation in two human extragonadal germ cell tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Tanigami, A; Nakamura, Y; Larsson, C; Weber, G; Jong, B de; Oosterhuis, J W; Molenaar, W M

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6q23, and 11q13 in two independent but similar extragonadal human germ cell tumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  15. Plasticity in Single Axon Glutamatergic Connection to GABAergic Interneurons Regulates Complex Events in the Human Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, Viktor; Paizs, Melinda; Csakvari, Eszter; Molnar, Gabor; Barzo, Pal; Tamas, Gabor; Lamsa, Karri

    2016-11-01

    In the human neocortex, single excitatory pyramidal cells can elicit very large glutamatergic EPSPs (VLEs) in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons capable of triggering their firing with short (3-5 ms) delay. Similar strong excitatory connections between two individual neurons have not been found in nonhuman cortices, suggesting that these synapses are specific to human interneurons. The VLEs are crucial for generating neocortical complex events, observed as single pyramidal cell spike-evoked discharge of cell assemblies in the frontal and temporal cortices. However, long-term plasticity of the VLE connections and how the plasticity modulates neocortical complex events has not been studied. Using triple and dual whole-cell recordings from synaptically connected human neocortical layers 2-3 neurons, we show that VLEs in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons exhibit robust activity-induced long-term depression (LTD). The LTD by single pyramidal cell 40 Hz spike bursts is specific to connections with VLEs, requires group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, and has a presynaptic mechanism. The LTD of VLE connections alters suprathreshold activation of interneurons in the complex events suppressing the discharge of fast-spiking GABAergic cells. The VLEs triggering the complex events may contribute to cognitive processes in the human neocortex, and their long-term plasticity can alter the discharging cortical cell assemblies by learning.

  16. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF A RECURRING COMPLEX CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION IN 2 HUMAN EXTRAGONADAL GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINKE, RJ; WEGHUIS, DO; SUIJKERBUIJK, RF; TANIGAMI, A; NAKAMURA, Y; LARSSON, C; WEBER, G; DEJONG, B; OOSTERHUIS, JW; MOLENAAR, WM; VANKESSEL, AG

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6p23, and 11q13 in two independent bur similar extragonadal human germ cell rumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  17. Recent Emergence of Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 398 in Human Blood Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Verkade (Erwin); A.M.C. Bergmans (Anneke); A.E. Budding (Andries); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); P.H.M. Savelkoul (Paul); A.G.M. Buiting (Anton); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recently, a clone of MRSA with clonal complex 398 (CC398) has emerged that is related to an extensive reservoir in animals, especially pigs and veal calves. It has been reported previously that methicillin-susceptible variants of CC398 circulate among humans at low frequency,

  18. Using Complexity Measure to Characterize Information Transmission of Human Brain Cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐京华; 吴祥宝

    1994-01-01

    The information transmission among various parts of the cortex are computed with the the-ory of mutual information from the data of the electroencephalogram(EEG)time series of normal humansubjects.The intensities of these transmissions are characterized by the"complexity"measures.These mea-sures have revealed to be sensitively related to the functional conditions of human beings.

  19. Multi-view 3D human pose estimation in complex environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hofmann; D.M. Gavrila

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a framework for unconstrained 3D human upper body pose estimation from multiple camera views in complex environment. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single-frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model texture adaptation. Single-frame pose recovery co

  20. Multi-view 3D Human Pose Estimation in Complex Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a framework for unconstrained 3D human upper body pose estimation from multiple camera views in complex environment. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single-frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model texture adaptation. Single-frame pose recovery co

  1. Impact of familiarity on information complexity in human-computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakaev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative measure of information complexity remains very much desirable in HCI field, since it may aid in optimization of user interfaces, especially in human-computer systems for controlling complex objects. Our paper is dedicated to exploration of subjective (subject-depended aspect of the complexity, conceptualized as information familiarity. Although research of familiarity in human cognition and behaviour is done in several fields, the accepted models in HCI, such as Human Processor or Hick-Hyman’s law do not generally consider this issue. In our experimental study the subjects performed search and selection of digits and letters, whose familiarity was conceptualized as frequency of occurrence in numbers and texts. The analysis showed significant effect of information familiarity on selection time and throughput in regression models, although the R2 values were somehow low. Still, we hope that our results might aid in quantification of information complexity and its further application for optimizing interaction in human-machine systems.

  2. The genetics of complex human behaviour: Cannabis use, personality, sexuality and mating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    I investigated the genetic and environmental etiology of individual differences in a variety of complex human behaviours, broadly captured within three domains - 1) cannabis use, 2) personality, and 3) sexuality and mating. Research questions and hypotheses are addressed with large community-based,

  3. DNA induces conformational changes in a recombinant human minichromosome maintenance complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Emma L; Parker-Manuel, Richard P; Chaban, Yuriy; Satti, Rabab; Coverley, Dawn; Orlova, Elena V; Chong, James P J

    2015-03-20

    ATP-dependent DNA unwinding activity has been demonstrated for recombinant archaeal homohexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complexes and their yeast heterohexameric counterparts, but in higher eukaryotes such as Drosophila, MCM-associated DNA helicase activity has been observed only in the context of a co-purified Cdc45-MCM-GINS complex. Here, we describe the production of the recombinant human MCM (hMCM) complex in Escherichia coli. This protein displays ATP hydrolysis activity and is capable of unwinding duplex DNA. Using single-particle asymmetric EM reconstruction, we demonstrate that recombinant hMCM forms a hexamer that undergoes a conformational change when bound to DNA. Recombinant hMCM produced without post-translational modifications is functional in vitro and provides an important tool for biochemical reconstitution of the human replicative helicase.

  4. Human factors issues for resolving adverse effects of human work underload and workload transitions in complex human-machine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    A workshop was conducted whose specific purpose was to build on earlier work of the United States National Research Council, United States Federal government agencies, and the larger human factors community to: (1) clarify human factors issues pertaining to degraded performance in advanced human-machine systems (e.g., nuclear production, transportation, aerospace) due to human work underload and workload transition, and (2) develop strategies for resolving these issues. Recent history demonstrates that: (1) humans often react adversely to their diminishing roles in advanced human-machine systems, and therefore (2) new allocation models and strategies are required if humans are to be willing and able to assume diminishing and shifting roles assigned to them in these systems, and are to accept new technologies making up these systems. Problems associated with theses diminishing and shifting human roles are characterized as work underload and workload transitions. The workshop affirmed that: (1) work underload and workload transition are issues that will have to be addressed by designers of advanced human-machine systems, especially those relying on automation, if cost, performance, safety, and operator acceptability are to be optimized, (2) human machine allocation models, standards, and guidelines which go beyond simple capability approaches will be needed to preclude or seriously diminish the work underload and workload transition problems, and (3) the 16 workload definition, measurement, situational awareness, and trust issues identified during the workshop, need resolution if these models, standards, and guidelines are to be achieved.

  5. Synergy and antagonism in regulation of recombinant human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoft, Oliver; Bythell-Douglas, Rohan; McCormack, Elizabeth A.; Wigley, Dale B.

    2016-01-01

    We have purified a minimal core human Ino80 complex from recombinant protein expressed in insect cells. The complex comprises one subunit each of an N-terminally truncated Ino80, actin, Arp4, Arp5, Arp8, Ies2 and Ies6, together with a single heterohexamer of the Tip49a and Tip49b proteins. This core complex has nucleosome sliding activity that is similar to that of endogenous human and yeast Ino80 complexes and is also inhibited by inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). We show that IP6 is a non-competitive inhibitor that acts by blocking the stimulatory effect of nucleosomes on the ATPase activity. The IP6 binding site is located within the C-terminal region of the Ino80 subunit. We have also prepared complexes lacking combinations of Ies2 and Arp5/Ies6 subunits that reveal regulation imposed by each of them individually and synergistically that couples ATP hydrolysis to nucleosome sliding. This coupling between Ies2 and Arp5/Ies6 can be overcome in a bypass mutation of the Arp5 subunit that is active in the absence of Ies2. These studies reveal several underlying mechanisms for regulation of ATPase activity involving a complex interplay between these protein subunits and IP6 that in turn controls nucleosome sliding. PMID:27257055

  6. Does human migration affect international trade? A complex-network perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Fagiolo

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationships between international human migration and merchandise trade, using a complex-network approach. We firstly compare the topological structure of worldwide networks of human migration and bilateral trade over the period 1960-2000. Next, we ask whether the position of any pair of countries in the migration network affects their bilateral trade flows. We show that: (i both weighted and binary versions of the networks of international migration and trade are strongly correlated; (ii such correlations can be mostly explained by country economic/demographic size and geographical distance; and (iii pairs of countries that are more central in the international-migration network trade more. Our findings suggest that bilateral trade between any two countries is not only affected by the presence of migrants from either countries but also by their relative embeddedness in the complex web of corridors making up the network of international human migration.

  7. Retrospective analysis of main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human complex traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Christiansen, Lene; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology of multifactorial human diseases involves complex interactions between numerous environmental factors and alleles of many genes. Efficient statistical tools are demanded in identifying the genetic and environmental variants that affect the risk of disease development....... This paper introduces a retrospective polytomous logistic regression model to measure both the main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human discrete and continuous complex traits. In this model, combinations of genotypes at two interacting loci or of environmental exposure...... regression model can be used as a convenient tool for assessing both main and interaction effects in genetic association studies of human multifactorial diseases involving genetic and non-genetic factors as well as categorical or continuous traits....

  8. Complex for monitoring visual acuity and its application for evaluation of human psycho-physiological state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokoumov, P. S.; Khabibullin, T. R.; Tolstaya, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The existing psychological theories associate the movement of a human eye with its reactions to external change: what we see, hear and feel. By analyzing the glance, we can compare the external human response (which shows the behavior of a person), and the natural reaction (that they actually feels). This article describes the complex for detection of visual activity and its application for evaluation of the psycho-physiological state of a person. The glasses with a camera capture all the movements of the human eye in real time. The data recorded by the camera are transmitted to the computer for processing implemented with the help of the software developed by the authors. The result is given in an informative and an understandable report, which can be used for further analysis. The complex shows a high efficiency and stable operation and can be used both, for the pedagogic personnel recruitment and for testing students during the educational process.

  9. Does human migration affect international trade? A complex-network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolo, Giorgio; Mastrorillo, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between international human migration and merchandise trade, using a complex-network approach. We firstly compare the topological structure of worldwide networks of human migration and bilateral trade over the period 1960-2000. Next, we ask whether the position of any pair of countries in the migration network affects their bilateral trade flows. We show that: (i) both weighted and binary versions of the networks of international migration and trade are strongly correlated; (ii) such correlations can be mostly explained by country economic/demographic size and geographical distance; and (iii) pairs of countries that are more central in the international-migration network trade more. Our findings suggest that bilateral trade between any two countries is not only affected by the presence of migrants from either countries but also by their relative embeddedness in the complex web of corridors making up the network of international human migration.

  10. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  11. Early modern human diversity suggests subdivided population structure and a complex out-of-Africa scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunz, Philipp; Bookstein, Fred L; Mitteroecker, Philipp; Stadlmayr, Andrea; Seidler, Horst; Weber, Gerhard W

    2009-04-14

    The interpretation of genetic evidence regarding modern human origins depends, among other things, on assessments of the structure and the variation of ancient populations. Because we lack genetic data from the time when the first anatomically modern humans appeared, between 200,000 and 60,000 years ago, instead we exploit the phenotype of neurocranial geometry to compare the variation in early modern human fossils with that in other groups of fossil Homo and recent modern humans. Variation is assessed as the mean-squared Procrustes distance from the group average shape in a representation based on several hundred neurocranial landmarks and semilandmarks. We find that the early modern group has more shape variation than any other group in our sample, which covers 1.8 million years, and that they are morphologically similar to recent modern humans of diverse geographically dispersed populations but not to archaic groups. Of the currently competing models of modern human origins, some are inconsistent with these findings. Rather than a single out-of-Africa dispersal scenario, we suggest that early modern humans were already divided into different populations in Pleistocene Africa, after which there followed a complex migration pattern. Our conclusions bear implications for the inference of ancient human demography from genetic models and emphasize the importance of focusing research on those early modern humans, in particular, in Africa.

  12. A Modified γ-Retrovirus Vector for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, S.; Pai, S.-Y.; Gaspar, H.B.; Armant, M.; Berry, C.C.; Blanche, S.; Bleesing, J.; Blondeau, J.; de Boer, H.; Buckland, K.F.; Caccavelli, L.; Cros, G.; De Oliveira, S.; Fernández, K.S.; Guo, D.; Harris, C.E.; Hopkins, G.; Lehmann, L.E.; Lim, A.; London, W.B.; van der Loo, J.C.M.; Malani, N.; Male, F.; Malik, P.; Marinovic, M.A.; McNicol, A.-M.; Moshous, D.; Neven, B.; Oleastro, M.; Picard, C.; Ritz, J.; Rivat, C.; Schambach, A.; Shaw, K.L.; Sherman, E.A.; Silberstein, L.E.; Six, E.; Touzot, F.; Tsytsykova, A.; Xu-Bayford, J.; Baum, C.; Bushman, F.D.; Fischer, A.; Kohn, D.B.; Filipovich, A.H.; Notarangelo, L.D.; Cavazzana, M.; Williams, D.A.; Thrasher, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In previous clinical trials involving children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a Moloney murine leukemia virus–based γ-retrovirus vector expressing interleukin-2 receptor γ-chain (γc) complementary DNA successfully restored immunity in most patients but resulted in vector-induced leukemia through enhancer-mediated mutagenesis in 25% of patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a self-inactivating retrovirus for the treatment of SCID-X1. METHODS We enrolled nine boys with SCID-X1 in parallel trials in Europe and the United States to evaluate treatment with a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retrovirus vector containing deletions in viral enhancer sequences expressing γc (SIN-γc). RESULTS All patients received bone marrow–derived CD34+ cells transduced with the SIN-γc vector, without preparative conditioning. After 12.1 to 38.7 months of follow-up, eight of the nine children were still alive. One patient died from an overwhelming adenoviral infection before reconstitution with genetically modified T cells. Of the remaining eight patients, seven had recovery of peripheral-blood T cells that were functional and led to resolution of infections. The patients remained healthy thereafter. The kinetics of CD3+ T-cell recovery was not significantly different from that observed in previous trials. Assessment of insertion sites in peripheral blood from patients in the current trial as compared with those in previous trials revealed significantly less clustering of insertion sites within LMO2 , MECOM, and other lymphoid proto-oncogenes in our patients. CONCLUSIONS This modified γ-retrovirus vector was found to retain efficacy in the treatment of SCID-X1. The long-term effect of this therapy on leukemogenesis remains unknown. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01410019, NCT01175239, and NCT01129544.) PMID:25295500

  13. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Tsangaras

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV. Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos and black bear (Ursus americanus but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals.

  14. Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    Schiff bases and their complex compounds have been studied for their .... establishing coordination of the N–(2 – hydroxybenzyl) - L - α - valine Schiff base ..... (1967); “Spectrophotometric Identification of Organic Compounds”, Willey, New.

  15. How Humans Solve Complex Problems: The Case of the Knapsack Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Carsten; Bossaerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Life presents us with problems of varying complexity. Yet, complexity is not accounted for in theories of human decision-making. Here we study instances of the knapsack problem, a discrete optimisation problem commonly encountered at all levels of cognition, from attention gating to intellectual discovery. Complexity of this problem is well understood from the perspective of a mechanical device like a computer. We show experimentally that human performance too decreased with complexity as defined in computer science. Defying traditional economic principles, participants spent effort way beyond the point where marginal gain was positive, and economic performance increased with instance difficulty. Human attempts at solving the instances exhibited commonalities with algorithms developed for computers, although biological resource constraints–limited working and episodic memories–had noticeable impact. Consistent with the very nature of the knapsack problem, only a minority of participants found the solution–often quickly–but the ones who did appeared not to realise. Substantial heterogeneity emerged, suggesting why prizes and patents, schemes that incentivise intellectual discovery but discourage information sharing, have been found to be less effective than mechanisms that reveal private information, such as markets. PMID:27713516

  16. Inclusion complexes of Ketoprofen with β-cyclodextrins: Oral pharmacokinetics of Ketoprofen in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayade P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion behavior of hydroxypropyl b-cyclodextrin and natural b-cyclodextrin was studied toward ketoprofen, in order to develop a new oral dosage form with enhanced dissolution rate and bioavailability, and to study the oral pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen in humans, following cyclodextrin complexation. Drug-cyclodextrin solid systems were prepared by kneading, co-evaporation, and freeze-drying. The formation of inclusion complexes with b-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl b-cyclodextrin in the solid state, were confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy studies, and comparative studies on the in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of ketoprofen in humans volunteers, were carried out. The initial dissolution rate of ketoprofen in the inclusion complexes was 15 fold higher, than that of plain drug powder. The maximal plasma concentration of ketoprofen after the oral administration of inclusion complexes to human volunteers increased about 1.5 fold (7.15 vs 4.65 mg/ml, and there was no significant increase in area under concentration-time curve, AUC0-5 (10.35 vs. 9.35 mg. hr/ml, compared to those of ketoprofen powder alone.

  17. Current theoretical models fail to predict the topological complexity of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsuaga, Javier; Jayasinghe, Reyka G; Scharein, Robert G; Segal, Mark R; Stolz, Robert H; Vazquez, Mariel

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the folding of the human genome is a key challenge of modern structural biology. The emergence of chromatin conformation capture assays (e.g., Hi-C) has revolutionized chromosome biology and provided new insights into the three dimensional structure of the genome. The experimental data are highly complex and need to be analyzed with quantitative tools. It has been argued that the data obtained from Hi-C assays are consistent with a fractal organization of the genome. A key characteristic of the fractal globule is the lack of topological complexity (knotting or inter-linking). However, the absence of topological complexity contradicts results from polymer physics showing that the entanglement of long linear polymers in a confined volume increases rapidly with the length and with decreasing volume. In vivo and in vitro assays support this claim in some biological systems. We simulate knotted lattice polygons confined inside a sphere and demonstrate that their contact frequencies agree with the human Hi-C data. We conclude that the topological complexity of the human genome cannot be inferred from current Hi-C data.

  18. Three-dimensional cartography of functional territories in the human striatopallidal complex by using calbindin immunoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachi, Carine; François, Chantal; Parain, Karine; Bardinet, Eric; Tandé, Dominique; Hirsch, Etienne; Yelnik, Jérôme

    2002-08-19

    This anatomic study presents an analysis of the distribution of calbindin immunohistochemistry in the human striatopallidal complex. Entire brains were sectioned perpendicularly to the mid-commissural line into 70-microm-thick sections. Every tenth section was immunostained for calbindin. Calbindin labeling exhibited a gradient on the basis of which three different regions were defined: poorly labeled, strongly labeled, and intermediate. Corresponding contours were traced in individual sections and reformatted as three-dimensional structures. The poorly labeled region corresponded to the dorsal part of the striatum and to the central part of the pallidum. The strongly labeled region included the ventral part of the striatum, the subcommissural part of the external pallidum but also the adjacent portion of its suscommissural part, and the anterior pole of the internal pallidum. The intermediate region was located between the poorly and strongly labeled regions. As axonal tracing and immunohistochemical studies in monkeys show a similar pattern, poorly, intermediate, and strongly labeled regions were considered as the sensorimotor, associative, and limbic territories of the human striatopallidal complex, respectively. However, the boundaries between these territories were not sharp but formed gradients of labeling, which suggests overlapping between adjacent territories. Similarly, the ventral boundary of the striatopallidal complex was blurred, suggesting a structural intermingling with the substantia innominata. This three-dimensional partitioning of the human striatopallidal complex could help to define functional targets for high-frequency stimulation with greater accuracy and help to identify new stimulation sites.

  19. Ontogeny of neuro-insular complexes and islets innervation in the human pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E. Proshchina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of the neuro-insular complexes (NIC and the islets innervation in human pancreas has not been studied in detail. Our aim was to describe the developmental dynamics and distribution of the nervous system structures in the endocrine part of human pancreas. We used doublestaining with antibodies specific to pan-neural markers (neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S100 protein and to hormones of pancreatic endocrine cells. NSE and S100-positive nerves and ganglia were identified in the human fetal pancreas from gestation week (gw 10 onwards. Later the density of S100 and NSE-positive fibers increased. In adults this network was sparse. The islets innervation started to form from gw 14. NSE-containing endocrine cells were identified from gw 12 onwards. Additionally, S100-positive cells were detected both in the periphery and within some of the islets starting at gw 14. The analysis of islets innervation has shown that the fetal pancreas contained neuro-insular complexes and the number of these complexes was reduced in adults. The highest density of neuro-insular complexes is detected during middle and late fetal periods, when the mosaic islets, typical for adults, form. The close integration between the developing pancreatic islets and the nervous system structures may play an important role not only in the hormone secretion, but also in the islets morphogenesis.

  20. Adsorption of an amphiphilic penicillin onto human serum albumin: characterisation of the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, J M; Taboada, P; Varela, L M; Attwood, D; Mosquera, V

    2001-08-30

    The complex formed by the interaction of the amphiphilic penicillin drug nafcillin and human serum albumin (HSA) in water at 25 degrees C has been characterised using a range of physicochemical techniques. Measurements of the solution conductivity and the electrophoretic mobility of the complexes have shown an ionic adsorption of the drug on the protein surface leading to a surface saturation at a nafcillin concentration of 0.012 mmol kg(-1) and subsequent formation of drug micelles in solutions of higher nafcillin concentration. Measurements of the size of the complex and the thickness of the adsorbed layer by static and dynamic light scattering have shown a gradual change in hydrodynamic radius of the complex with increasing drug concentration typical of a saturation rather than a denaturation process, the magnitude of the change being insufficient to account for any appreciable extension or unfolding of the HSA molecule. The interaction potential between the HSA/nafcillin complexes, and the stability of the complexes were determined from the dependence of diffusion coefficients on protein concentration by application of the DLVO colloidal stability theory. The results indicate decreasing stability of the colloidal dispersion of the drug/protein complexes with an increase in the concentration of added drug.

  1. Noncovalent interactions between a trinuclear monofunctional platinum complex and human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yongmei; He, Weijiang; Guo, Zijian

    2011-12-19

    Interactions between platinum complexes and human serum albumin (HSA) play crucial roles in the metabolism, distribution, and efficacy of platinum-based anticancer drugs. Polynuclear monofunctional platinum(II) complexes represent a new class of anticancer agents that display distinct molecular characters of pharmacological action from those of cisplatin. In this study, the interaction between a trinuclear monofunctional platinum(II) complex, [Pt(3)LCl(3)](ClO(4))(3) (L = N,N,N',N',N",N"-hexakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3,5-tris(aminomethyl)benzene) (1), and HSA was investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular docking, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The spectroscopic and thermodynamic data show that the interaction is a spontaneous process with the estimated enthalpy and entropy changes being 14.6 kJ mol(-1) and 145.5 J mol(-1) K(-1), respectively. The reactive sites of HSA to complex 1 mainly locate within its hydrophobic cavity in domain II. Noncovalent actions such as π-π stacking and hydrophobic bonding are the primary contributors to the interaction between HSA and complex 1, which is different from the scenario for cisplatin in similar conditions. The results suggest that the connection between complex 1 and HSA is reversible, and therefore the cytotoxic activity of the complex could be preserved during blood circulation.

  2. Regulation of human ornithine decarboxylase expression by the c-Myc.Max protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, A; Reddy, C D; Wu, S; Hickok, N J; Reddy, E P; Yumet, G; Soprano, D R; Soprano, K J

    1993-12-25

    The presence of a CACGTG element within a region of the human ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promoter located at -491 to -474 base pairs 5' to the start site of transcription suggested that the c-Myc.Max protein complex may play a role in the regulation of ODC expression during growth. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and methylation interference analysis showed that the nuclei of WI-38 cells expressing ODC contained proteins that bound to this region of the ODC gene in a manner that correlated with growth-associated ODC expression. Also, use of antibodies against c-Myc and Max and purified recombinant c-Myc and Max protein in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that these proteins can specifically bind this portion of the human ODC promoter. Transient transfection studies showed that increase in the level of c-Myc and/or Max led to a significant enhancement of expression of a human ODC promoter-CAT reporter construct. Moreover, treatment of actively growing WI-38 cells with an antisense oligomer to c-Myc reduced the amount of endogenous protein complex formed and the amount of endogenous ODC mRNA expressed. These studies show that the c-Myc.Max protein complex plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of human ODC in vivo.

  3. Stereological estimation of the number of neurons in the human amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Cynthia Mills; Amaral, David G

    2005-10-31

    Pathological changes in neuronal density in the amygdaloid complex have been associated with various neurological disorders. However, due to variable shrinkage during tissue processing, the only way to determine changes in neuron number unambiguously is to estimate absolute counts, rather than neuronal density. As the first stage in evaluating potential neuropathology of the amygdala in autism, the total number of neurons was estimated in the control human amygdaloid complex by using stereological sampling. The intact amygdaloid complex from one hemisphere of 10 brains was frozen and sectioned. One 100-microm section was selected every 500 microm and stained by the standard Nissl method. The entire amygdaloid complex was outlined and then further partitioned into five reliably defined subdivisions: 1) the lateral nucleus, 2) the basal nucleus, 3) the accessory basal nucleus, 4) the central nucleus, and 5) the remaining nuclei (including anterior cortical, anterior amygdaloid area, periamygdaloid cortex, medial, posterior cortical, nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract, amygdalohippocampal area, and intercalated nuclei). The number of neurons was measured by using an optical fractionator with Stereoinvestigator software. The mean number of neurons (x 10(6)) for each region was as follows: lateral nucleus 4.00, basal nucleus 3.24, accessory basal nucleus 1.28, central nucleus 0.36, remaining nuclei 3.33, and total amygdaloid complex 12.21. The stereological assessment of neuron number in the human amygdala provides an essential baseline for comparison of patient populations, such as autism, in which the amygdala may develop abnormally. To facilitate these types of analyses, this paper provides a detailed anatomical description of the methods used to define subdivisions of the human amygdaloid complex.

  4. Uptake of Plasmin-PN-1 Complexes in Early Human Atheroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukais, Kamel; Bayles, Richard; Borges, Luciano de Figueiredo; Louedec, Liliane; Boulaftali, Yacine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Arocas, Véronique; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Zymogens are delivered to the arterial wall by radial transmural convection. Plasminogen can be activated within the arterial wall to produce plasmin, which is involved in evolution of the atherosclerotic plaque. Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) protect the vessels from proteolytic injury due to atherosclerosis development by highly expressing endocytic LDL receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1), and by producing anti-proteases, such as Protease Nexin-1 (PN-1). PN-1 is able to form covalent complexes with plasmin. We hypothesized that plasmin-PN-1 complexes could be internalized via LRP-1 by vSMCs during the early stages of human atheroma. LRP-1 is also responsible for the capture of aggregated LDL in human atheroma. Plasmin activity and immunohistochemical analyses of early human atheroma showed that the plasminergic system is activated within the arterial wall, where intimal foam cells, including vSMCs and platelets, are the major sites of PN-1 accumulation. Both PN-1 and LRP-1 are overexpressed in early atheroma at both messenger and protein levels. Cell biology studies demonstrated an increased expression of PN-1 and tissue plasminogen activator by vSMCs in response to LDL. Plasmin-PN-1 complexes are internalized via LRP-1 in vSMCs, whereas plasmin alone is not. Tissue PN-1 interacts with plasmin in early human atheroma via two complementary mechanisms: plasmin inhibition and tissue uptake of plasmin-PN-1 complexes via LRP-1 in vSMCs. Despite this potential protective effect, plasminogen activation by vSMCs remains abnormally elevated in the intima in early stages of human atheroma.

  5. DNA methylation profiling of the human major histocompatibility complex: a pilot study for the human epigenome project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardhman K Rakyan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human Epigenome Project aims to identify, catalogue, and interpret genome-wide DNA methylation phenomena. Occurring naturally on cytosine bases at cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, DNA methylation is intimately involved in diverse biological processes and the aetiology of many diseases. Differentially methylated cytosines give rise to distinct profiles, thought to be specific for gene activity, tissue type, and disease state. The identification of such methylation variable positions will significantly improve our understanding of genome biology and our ability to diagnose disease. Here, we report the results of the pilot study for the Human Epigenome Project entailing the methylation analysis of the human major histocompatibility complex. This study involved the development of an integrated pipeline for high-throughput methylation analysis using bisulphite DNA sequencing, discovery of methylation variable positions, epigenotyping by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry, and development of an integrated public database available at http://www.epigenome.org. Our analysis of DNA methylation levels within the major histocompatibility complex, including regulatory exonic and intronic regions associated with 90 genes in multiple tissues and individuals, reveals a bimodal distribution of methylation profiles (i.e., the vast majority of the analysed regions were either hypo- or hypermethylated, tissue specificity, inter-individual variation, and correlation with independent gene expression data.

  6. Modelling of spatially complex human-ecosystem, rural-urban and rich-poor interactions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naude, AH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available ., Forsyth, G., Mans, G. and Hugo, W. (2008) Modeling of spatially complex human-ecosystem, rural-urban snd rich-poor interactions. Paper submitted to International Conference: “Studying, Modelling and Sense Making of Planet Earth”; 1 – 6 June, 2008... human-ecosystem, rural-urban snd rich-poor interactions. Paper submitted to International Conference: “Studying, Modelling and Sense Making of Planet Earth”; 1 – 6 June, 2008, Department of Geography, University of the Aegean. 2 Initially, most...

  7. A model of the complex between human beta-microseminoprotein and CRISP-3 based on NMR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghasriani, Houman; Fernlund, Per; Udby, Lene

    2008-01-01

    beta-Microseminoprotein (MSP), a 10kDa seminal plasma protein, forms a tight complex with cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP-3) from granulocytes. The 3D structure of human MSP has been determined but there is as yet no 3D structure for CRISP-3. We have now studied the complex between human...

  8. Pluripotency and the endogenous retrovirus HERVH: Conflict or serendipity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Wang, Jichang; Singh, Manvendra; Mager, Dixie L; Hurst, Laurence D

    2016-01-01

    Remnants of ancient retroviral infections during evolution litter all mammalian genomes. In modern humans, such endogenous retroviral (ERV) sequences comprise at least 8% of the genome. While ERVs and other types of transposable elements undoubtedly contribute to the genomic "junk yard", functions for some ERV sequences have been demonstrated, with growing evidence that ERVs can be important players in gene regulatory processes. Here we focus on one particular large family of human ERVs, termed HERVH, which several recent studies suggest has a key regulatory role in human pluripotent stem cells. Remarkably, this is not the first instance of an ERV controlling pluripotency. We speculate as to why this convergent evolution might have come about, suggesting that it may reflect selection on the virus to extend the time available for transposition. Alternatively it may reflect serendipity alone.

  9. Recombination Origin of Retrovirus XMRV | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus–related virus (XMRV) was first reported in samples from a human prostate tumor in 2006, and, at that time, claims were made that XMRV infection rates ranged from 6 to 27 percent of human prostate cancers.  Later research reported XMRV in the blood of 67 percent of people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). When follow-up studies failed to detect XMRV in multiple sets of specimens from people with prostate cancer or CFS and healthy controls, the original reports came under closer scrutiny.

  10. The Fungal Sexual Pheromone Sirenin Activates the Human CatSper Channel Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Shameem Sultana; Carlson, Erick J; Miller, Melissa R; Francis, Rawle; Clapham, David E; Lishko, Polina V; Hawkinson, Jon E; Hook, Derek; Georg, Gunda I

    2016-02-19

    The basal fungus Allomyces macrogynus (A. macrogynus) produces motile male gametes displaying well-studied chemotaxis toward their female counterparts. This chemotaxis is driven by sirenin, a sexual pheromone released by the female gametes. The pheromone evokes a large calcium influx in the motile gametes, which could proceed through the cation channel of sperm (CatSper) complex. Herein, we report the total synthesis of sirenin in 10 steps and 8% overall yield and show that the synthetic pheromone activates the CatSper channel complex, indicated by a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular calcium in human sperm. Sirenin activation of the CatSper channel was confirmed using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology with human sperm. Based on this proficient synthetic route and confirmed activation of CatSper, analogues of sirenin can be designed as blockers of the CatSper channel that could provide male contraceptive agents.

  11. Better decision making in complex, dynamic tasks training with human-facilitated interactive learning environments

    CERN Document Server

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes interactive learning environments (ILEs) and their underlying concepts. It explains how ILEs can be used to improve the decision-making process and how these improvements can be empirically verified. The objective of this book is to enhance our understanding of and to gain insights into the process by which human facilitated ILEs are effectively designed and used in improving users’ decision making in complex, dynamic tasks. This book is divided into four major parts. Part I serves as an introduction to the importance and complexity of decision making in dynamic tasks. Part II provides background material, drawing upon relevant literature, for the development of an integrated process model on the effectiveness of human facilitated ILEs in improving decision making in dynamic tasks. Part III focuses on the design, development, and application of FishBankILE in laboratory experiments to gather empirical evidence for the validity of the process model. Finally, part IV presents a comprehensi...

  12. Tonotopic representation of missing fundamental complex sounds in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Ross, Bernhard; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Takeshima, Yasuyuki; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2003-07-01

    The N1m component of the auditory evoked magnetic field in response to tones and complex sounds was examined in order to clarify whether the tonotopic representation in the human secondary auditory cortex is based on perceived pitch or the physical frequency spectrum of the sound. The investigated stimulus parameters were the fundamental frequencies (F0 = 250, 500 and 1000 Hz), the spectral composition of the higher harmonics of the missing fundamental sounds (2nd to 5th, 6th to 9th and 10th to 13th harmonic) and the frequencies of pure tones corresponding to F0 and to the lowest component of each complex sound. Tonotopic gradients showed that high frequencies were more medially located than low frequencies for the pure tones and for the centre frequency of the complex tones. Furthermore, in the superior-inferior direction, the tonotopic gradients were different between pure tones and complex sounds. The results were interpreted as reflecting different processing in the auditory cortex for pure tones and complex sounds. This hypothesis was supported by the result of evoked responses to complex sounds having longer latencies. A more pronounced tonotopic representation in the right hemisphere gave evidence for right hemispheric dominance in spectral processing.

  13. A major prolactin-binding complex on human milk fat globule membranes contains cyclophilins A and B: the complex is not the prolactin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, Mary Y; Ueda, Eric K; Chen, KuanHui E; Walker, Ameae M

    2012-03-01

    Prolactin (PRL) in milk influences maturation of gastrointestinal epithelium and development of both the hypothalamo-pituitary and immune systems of offspring. Here, we demonstrate that most PRL in human milk is part of a novel, high-affinity, multicomponent binding complex found on the milk fat globule membrane and not in whey. To examine properties of the complex, a sensitive ELISA was developed such that human PRL (hPRL) binding to the complex was measured by loss of hPRL detectability; thus, as much as 50 ng of hPRL was undetectable in the presence of 10 μl of human milk. Using the same methodology, no comparable complex formation was observed with human serum or amniotic fluid. hPRL complexation in milk was rapid, time dependent, and cooperative. Antibodies to or competitors of the hPRL receptor (placental lactogen and growth hormone) showed the hPRL receptor was not involved in the complex. However, hPRL complexation was antagonized by cyclosporine A and anti-cyclophilins. The complex was very stable, resisting dissociation in SDS, urea, and dithiothreitol. Western analysis revealed an ∼75-kDa complex that included hPRL, cyclophilins A and B, and a 16-kDa cyclophilin A. Compared with noncomplexed hPRL, complexed hPRL in whole milk showed similar activation of STAT5 but markedly delayed activation of ERK. Alteration of signaling suggests that complex formation may alter hPRL biological activity. This is the first report of a unique, multicomponent, high-capacity milk fat reservoir of hPRL; all other analyses of milk PRL have utilized defatted milk.

  14. Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Kill Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Samuel R. Denmeade, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University...Annual 3. DATES COVERED t 2011- 29 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER . Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to...Support: DOD Idea Award W81XWH-10-PCRP-IDA to SRD; DOD Predoctoral Fellowship W81XWH-09-1-0219 to MLM ; DOD Post-Doctoral Fellowship to MBK; Prostate

  15. Validating cognitive support for operators of complex human-machine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Wachtel, J. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Modem nuclear power plants (NPPs) are complex systems whose performance is the result of an intricate interaction of human and system control. A complex system may be defined as one which supports a dynamic process involving a large number of elements that interact in many different ways. Safety is addressed through defense-in-depth design and preplanning; i.e., designers consider the types of failures that are most likely to occur and those of high consequence, and design their solutions in advance. However, complex interactions and their failure modes cannot always be anticipated by the designer and may be unfamiliar to plant personnel. These situations may pose cognitive demands on plant personnel, both individually and as a crew. Other factors may contribute to the cognitive challenges of NPP operation as well, including hierarchal processes, dynamic pace, system redundancy and reliability, and conflicting objectives. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  16. Saving Human Lives: What Complexity Science and Information Systems can Contribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, Dirk; Brockmann, Dirk; Chadefaux, Thomas; Donnay, Karsten; Blanke, Ulf; Woolley-Meza, Olivia; Moussaid, Mehdi; Johansson, Anders; Krause, Jens; Schutte, Sebastian; Perc, Matjaž

    We discuss models and data of crowd disasters, crime, terrorism, war and disease spreading to show that conventional recipes, such as deterrence strategies, are often not effective and sufficient to contain them. Many common approaches do not provide a good picture of the actual system behavior, because they neglect feedback loops, instabilities and cascade effects. The complex and often counter-intuitive behavior of social systems and their macro-level collective dynamics can be better understood by means of complexity science. We highlight that a suitable system design and management can help to stop undesirable cascade effects and to enable favorable kinds of self-organization in the system. In such a way, complexity science can help to save human lives.

  17. Complex forms of mitochondrial DNA in human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Zeuthen, J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed lymphoblast......Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed...... lymphoblastoid cell lines. These complex forms of mtDNA were present in much lower frequencies in lymphocytes isolated from donor blood (1.3%-4.6%). Similar low frequencies were found with primary fibroblasts (1.1%) or freshly isolated monkey liver cells (2.1%). Samples from cultures of Burkitt lymphoma (BL......) cell lines of EBV-positive or -negative origin contained intermediate (5%-7%) frequencies of complex forms of mtDNA....

  18. Parkin Mutations Reduce the Complexity of Neuronal Processes in iPSC-derived Human Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Jiang, Houbo; Hu, Zhixing; Fan, Kevin; Wang, Jun; Janoschka, Stephen; Wang, Xiaomin; Ge, Shaoyu; Feng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and non-DA neurons in many parts of the brain. Mutations of parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that strongly binds to microtubules, are the most frequent cause of recessively inherited Parkinson’s disease. The lack of robust PD phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests a unique vulnerability of human neurons to parkin mutations. Here, we show that the complexity of neuronal processes as measured by total neurite length, number of terminals, number of branch points and Sholl analysis, was greatly reduced in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived TH+ or TH− neurons from PD patients with parkin mutations. Consistent with these, microtubule stability was significantly decreased by parkin mutations in iPSC-derived neurons. Overexpression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant nor GFP, restored the complexity of neuronal processes and the stability of microtubules. Consistent with these, the microtubule-depolymerizing agent colchicine mimicked the effect of parkin mutations by decreasing neurite length and complexity in control neurons while the microtubule-stabilizing drug taxol mimicked the effect of parkin overexpression by enhancing the morphology of parkin-deficient neurons. The results suggest that parkin maintains the morphological complexity of human neurons by stabilizing microtubules. PMID:25332110

  19. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-09-04

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of (1)H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The nasal complex of Neanderthals: an entry portal to their place in human ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Samuel; Pagano, Anthony S; Delson, Eric; Lawson, William; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2014-11-01

    Neanderthals are one of the most intensely studied groups of extinct humans, as aspects of their phylogeny and functional morphology remain controversial. They have long been described as cold adapted but recent analyses of their nasal anatomy suggest that traits formerly considered adaptations may be the result of genetic drift. This study performs quantitative and qualitative analysis of aspects of the nasal complex (NC) in Neanderthals and other later Pleistocene fossils from Europe and Africa. A geographically diverse sample of modern human crania was used to establish an anatomical baseline for populations inhabiting cold and tropical climates. Nasofrontal angle, piriform aperture dimensions, and relative maxillary sinus volume were analyzed along with qualitative features of the piriform aperture rim. Results indicate that Neanderthals and other later Pleistocene Homo possessed NC's that align them with tropical modern humans. Thus comparison of Neanderthal nasal morphology with that of modern humans from cold climates may not be appropriate as differences in overall craniofacial architecture may constrain the narrowing of the piriform apertures in Neanderthals. They retain primitively long, low crania, large maxillary sinuses, and large piriform aperture area similar to mid-Pleistocene Homo specimens such as Petralona 1 and Kabwe 1. Adaptation to cold climate may have necessitated other adaptations such as bony medial projections at the piriform aperture rim and, potentially, midfacial prognathism. Nasal complex components of the upper respiratory tract remain a critical but poorly understood area that may yet offer novel insight into one of the greatest continuing controversies in paleoanthropology.

  1. Ru-indoloquinoline complex as a selective and effective human telomeric G-quadruplex binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui-juan; Zhao, Ying; Mo, Wei-jie; Hao, Zhi-feng; Yu, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Indoloquinoline and its derivatives have been reported to be a kind of efficient G-quadruplex binder and have been found to interact preferentially to intramolecular G-quadruplex and inhibit telomerase activity in human K562 cells and SW620 cells. In contrast to indoloquinoline derivatives, much less is known about the metal complex based on indoloquinoline or its derivative. In this report, we studied the interaction of ruthenium complex [Ru(bpy)2(itatp)]2+ containing indoloquinoline moiety with human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA (Telo22) and c-myc G-quadruplex DNA (Pu27) by UV-visible (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID), thermal denaturation studies and CD spectroscopy. The results suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(itatp)]2+ displays a strong π-π stacking interaction with human telomeric G-quadruplex with a high binding constant (∼107 M-1), but just exhibits moderate binding affinity to c-myc G-quadruplex, thus showing significant selectivity to human telomeric G-quadruplex. The CD titration results indicate that [Ru(bpy)2(itatp)]2+ could effectively convert Telo22 into antiparallel G-quadruplex conformation, while in the c-myc G-quadruplex case, instead of promoting Pu27 to fold into G-quadruplex, [Ru(bpy)2(itatp)]2+ destroys the parallel G-quadruplex structure of Pu27.

  2. Crystal structure of a complex of human chymase with its benzimidazole derived inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Kakuda, Shinji; Koizumi, Masahiro; Mizuno, Tsuyoshi; Muroga, Yumiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori, E-mail: m.kamimura@teijin.co.jp [Teijin Institute for Bio-medical Research, 4-3-2 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-8512 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure of human chymase complexed with a novel benzimidazole inhibitor, TJK002, was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The present study shows that the benzimidazole ring of the inhibitor takes the stable stacking interaction with the protonated His57 in the catalytic domain of human chymase. The crystal structure of human chymase complexed with a novel benzimidazole inhibitor, TJK002, was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The X-ray crystallographic study shows that the benzimidazole inhibitor forms a non-covalent interaction with the catalytic domain of human chymase. The hydrophobic fragment of the inhibitor occupies the S1 pocket. The carboxylic acid group of the inhibitor forms hydrogen bonds with the imidazole N(∊) atom of His57 and/or the O(γ) atom of Ser195 which are members of the catalytic triad. This imidazole ring of His57 induces π–π stacking to the benzene ring of the benzimidazole scaffold as P2 moiety. Fragment molecular orbital calculation of the atomic coordinates by X-ray crystallography shows that this imidazole ring of His57 could be protonated with the carboxyl group of Asp102 or hydroxyl group of Ser195 and the stacking interaction is stabilized. A new drug design strategy is proposed where the stacking to the protonated imidazole of the drug target protein with the benzimidazole scaffold inhibitor causes unpredicted potent inhibitory activity for some enzymes.

  3. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field.

  4. Aviation Safety: Modeling and Analyzing Complex Interactions between Humans and Automated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungta, Neha; Brat, Guillaume; Clancey, William J.; Linde, Charlotte; Raimondi, Franco; Seah, Chin; Shafto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The on-going transformation from the current US Air Traffic System (ATS) to the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NextGen) will force the introduction of new automated systems and most likely will cause automation to migrate from ground to air. This will yield new function allocations between humans and automation and therefore change the roles and responsibilities in the ATS. Yet, safety in NextGen is required to be at least as good as in the current system. We therefore need techniques to evaluate the safety of the interactions between humans and automation. We think that current human factor studies and simulation-based techniques will fall short in front of the ATS complexity, and that we need to add more automated techniques to simulations, such as model checking, which offers exhaustive coverage of the non-deterministic behaviors in nominal and off-nominal scenarios. In this work, we present a verification approach based both on simulations and on model checking for evaluating the roles and responsibilities of humans and automation. Models are created using Brahms (a multi-agent framework) and we show that the traditional Brahms simulations can be integrated with automated exploration techniques based on model checking, thus offering a complete exploration of the behavioral space of the scenario. Our formal analysis supports the notion of beliefs and probabilities to reason about human behavior. We demonstrate the technique with the Ueberligen accident since it exemplifies authority problems when receiving conflicting advices from human and automated systems.

  5. [The evolution of human cultural behavior: notes on Darwinism and complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Mikael; Murrieta, Rui Sérgio Sereni

    2015-12-01

    The article analyzes three schools that can be understood as central in studies of the evolution of human behavior within the paradigm of evolution by natural selection: human behavioral ecology (HBE), evolutionary psychology, and dual inheritance. These three streams of thought are used to depict the Darwinist landscape and pinpoint its strong suits and limitations. Theoretical gaps were identified that seem to reduce these schools' ability to account for the diversity of human evolutionary behavior. Their weak points include issues related to the concept of reproductive success, types of adaptation, and targets of selection. An interdisciplinary approach is proposed as the solution to this dilemma, where complex adaptive systems would serve as a source.

  6. Humans with chimpanzee-like major histocompatibility complex-specificities control HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Kesmir, Can; Lund, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules allow immune surveillance by presenting a snapshot of the intracellular state of a cell to circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The MHC class I alleles of an HIV-1 infected individual strongly influence the level of viremia...... and the progression rate to AIDS. Chimpanzees control HIV-1 viral replication and develop a chronic infection without progressing to AIDS. A similar course of disease is observed in human long-term non-progressors. Objective: To investigate if long-term non-progressors and chimpanzees have functional similarities...... in their MHC class I repertoire. Methods: We compared the specificity of groups of human MHC molecules associated with different levels of viremia in HIV-1 infected individuals with those of chimpanzee. Results and conclusion: We demonstrate that human MHC with control of HIV-1 viral load share binding motifs...

  7. The complexity of the calretinin-expressing progenitors in the human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena V Radonjic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The complex structure and function of the cerebral cortex critically depend on the balance of excitation and inhibition provided by the pyramidal projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons, respectively. The calretinin-expressing (CalR+ cell is a subtype of GABAergic cortical interneurons that is more prevalent in humans than in rodents. In rodents, CalR+ interneurons originate in the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE from Gsx2+ progenitors, but in humans it has been suggested that a subpopulation of CalR+ cells can also be generated in the cortical ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ. The progenitors for cortically generated CalR+ subpopulation in primates are not yet characterized. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify patterns of expression of the transcription factors (TFs that commit cortical stem cells to the CalR fate, with a focus on Gsx2. First, we studied the expression of Gsx2 and its downstream effectors, Ascl1 and Sp8 in the cortical regions of the fetal human forebrain at midgestation. Next, we established that a subpopulation of cells expressing these TFs are proliferating in the cortical SVZ, and can be co-labeled with CalR. The presence and proliferation of Gsx2+ cells, not only in the ventral telencephalon (GE as previously reported, but also in the cerebral cortex suggests cortical origin of a subpopulation of CalR+ neurons in humans. In vitro treatment of human cortical progenitors with Sonic hedgehog (Shh, an important morphogen in the specification of interneurons, decreased levels of Ascl1 and Sp8 proteins, but did not affect Gsx2 levels. Taken together, our ex-vivo and in vitro results on human fetal brain suggest complex endogenous and exogenous regulation of TFs implied in the specification of different subtypes of CalR+ cortical interneurons.

  8. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning; Sun, Jingchuan; Elkayam, Elad; Li, Huilin; Stillman, Bruce; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2017-01-23

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a top layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations.

  9. Complexity in neurobiology: perspectives from the study of noise in human motor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Torre, Kjerstin

    2012-01-01

    This article serves as an introduction to the themed special issue on "Complex Systems in Neurobiology." The study of complexity in neurobiology has been sensitive to the stochastic processes that dominate the micro-level architecture of neurobiological systems and the deterministic processes that govern the macroscopic behavior of these systems. A large body of research has traversed these scales of interest, seeking to determine how noise at one spatial or temporal scale influences the activity of the system at another scale. In introducing this special issue, we pay special attention to the history of inquiry in complex systems and why scientists have tended to favor linear, causally driven, reductionist approaches in Neurobiology. We follow this with an elaboration of how an alternative approach might be formulated. To illustrate our position on how the sciences of complexity and the study of noise can inform neurobiology, we use three systematic examples from the study of human motor control and learning: 1) phase transitions in bimanual coordination; 2) balance, intermittency, and discontinuous control; and 3) sensorimotor synchronization and timing. Using these examples and showing that noise is adaptively utilized by the nervous system, we make the case for the studying complexity with a perspective of understanding the macroscopic stability in biological systems by focusing on component processes at extended spatial and temporal scales. This special issue continues this theme with contributions in topics as diverse as neural network models, physical biology, motor learning, and statistical physics.

  10. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Höllsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher...... affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described...... that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction....

  11. Structure of the active form of human origin recognition complex and its ATPase motor module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocilj, Ante; On, Kin Fan; Yuan, Zuanning; Sun, Jingchuan; Elkayam, Elad; Li, Huilin; Stillman, Bruce; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2017-01-01

    Binding of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) to origins of replication marks the first step in the initiation of replication of the genome in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the structure of the active form of human ORC determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. The complex is composed of an ORC1/4/5 motor module lobe in an organization reminiscent of the DNA polymerase clamp loader complexes. A second lobe contains the ORC2/3 subunits. The complex is organized as a double-layered shallow corkscrew, with the AAA+ and AAA+-like domains forming one layer, and the winged-helix domains (WHDs) forming a top layer. CDC6 fits easily between ORC1 and ORC2, completing the ring and the DNA-binding channel, forming an additional ATP hydrolysis site. Analysis of the ATPase activity of the complex provides a basis for understanding ORC activity as well as molecular defects observed in Meier-Gorlin Syndrome mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20818.001 PMID:28112645

  12. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  13. Assessment of the microclimatic and human comfort conditions in a complex urban environment: Modelling and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyas, Agnes; Unger, Janos [University of Szeged, Szeged (Hungary). Department of Climatology and Landscape Ecology; Matzarakis, Andreas [Meteorological Institute, University of Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Several complex thermal indices (e.g. Predicted Mean Vote and Physiological Equivalent Temperature) were developed in the last decades to describe and quantify the thermal environment of humans and the energy fluxes between body and environment. Compared to open spaces/landscapes the complex surface structure of urban areas creates an environment with special microclimatic characteristics, which have a dominant effect on the energy balance of the human body. In this study, outdoor thermal comfort conditions are examined through two field-surveys in Szeged, a South-Hungarian city (population 160,000). The intensity of radiation fluxes is dependent on several factors, such as surface structure and housing density. Since our sample area is located in a heavily built-up city centre, radiation fluxes are mainly influenced by narrow streets and several 20-30-year-old (20-30m tall) trees. Special emphasis is given to the human-biometeorological assessment of the microclimate of complex urban environments through the application of the thermal index PET. The analysis is carried out by the utilization of the RayMan model. Firstly, bioclimatic conditions of sites located close to each other but shaded differently by buildings and plants are compared. The results show that differences in the PET index amongst these places can be as high as 15-20{sup |}C due to the different irradiation. Secondly, the investigation of different modelled environments by RayMan (only buildings, buildings+trees and only trees) shows significant alterations in the human comfort sensation between the situations. (author)

  14. Pharmacological NAD-Boosting Strategies Improve Mitochondrial Homeostasis in Human Complex I-Mutant Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Roberta; Lapucci, Andrea; Cavone, Leonardo; Pratesi, Sara; Berlinguer-Palmini, Rolando; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are devastating genetic diseases for which efficacious therapies are still an unmet need. Recent studies report that increased availability of intracellular NAD obtained by inhibition of the NAD-consuming enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 or supplementation with the NAD-precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) ameliorates energetic derangement and symptoms in mouse models of mitochondrial disorders. Whether these pharmacological approaches also improve bioenergetics of human cells harboring mitochondrial defects is unknown. It is also unclear whether the same signaling cascade is prompted by PARP-1 inhibitors and NR supplementation to improve mitochondrial homeostasis. Here, we show that human fibroblasts mutant for the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein 1 (NDUFS1) subunit of respiratory complex I have similar ATP, NAD, and mitochondrial content compared with control cells, but show reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Interestingly, mutant cells also show increased transcript levels of mitochondrial DNA but not nuclear DNA respiratory complex subunits, suggesting activation of a compensatory response. At variance with prior work in mice, however, NR supplementation, but not PARP-1 inhibition, increased intracellular NAD content in NDUFS1 mutant human fibroblasts. Conversely, PARP-1 inhibitors, but not NR supplementation, increased transcription of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory complexes constitutively induced in mutant cells. Still, both NR and PARP-1 inhibitors restored mitochondrial membrane potential and increased organelle content as well as oxidative activity of NDUFS1-deficient fibroblasts. Overall, data provide the first evidence that in human cells harboring a mitochondrial respiratory defect exposure to NR or PARP-1, inhibitors activate different signaling pathways that are not invariantly prompted by NAD increases, but equally able to improve energetic

  15. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  16. Lateral gene transfer of an ABC transporter complex between major constituents of the human gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meehan Conor J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several links have been established between the human gut microbiome and conditions such as obesity and inflammatory bowel syndrome. This highlights the importance of understanding what properties of the gut microbiome can affect the health of the human host. Studies have been undertaken to determine the species composition of this microbiome and infer functional profiles associated with such host properties. However, lateral gene transfer (LGT between community members may result in misleading taxonomic attributions for the recipient organisms, thus making species-function links difficult to establish. Results We identified a peptides/nickel transport complex whose components differed in abundance based upon levels of host obesity, and assigned the encoded proteins to members of the microbial community. Each protein was assigned to several distinct taxonomic groups, with moderate levels of agreement observed among different proteins in the complex. Phylogenetic trees of these proteins produced clusters that differed greatly from taxonomic attributions and indicated that habitat-directed LGT of this complex is likely to have occurred, though not always between the same partners. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that certain membrane transport systems may be an important factor within an obese-associated gut microbiome and that such complexes may be acquired several times by different strains of the same species. Additionally, an example of individual proteins from different organisms being transferred into one operon was observed, potentially demonstrating a functional complex despite the donors of the subunits being taxonomically disparate. Our results also highlight the potential impact of habitat-directed LGT on the resident microbiota.

  17. Multistructure index in revealing complexity of regulatory mechanisms of human cardiovascular system at rest and orthostatic stress in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, Danuta; Graff, Beata; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2017-02-01

    Biological regulation is sufficiently complex to pose an enduring challenge for characterization of both its equilibrium and transient non-equilibrium dynamics. Two univariate but coupled observables, heart rate and systolic blood pressure, are commonly characterized in the benchmark example of the human cardiovascular regulatory system. Asymmetric distributions of accelerations and decelerations of heart rate, as well as rises and falls in systolic blood pressure, recorded in humans during a head-up tilt test provide insights into the dynamics of cardiovascular response to a rapid, controlled deregulation of the system's homeostasis. The baroreflex feedback loop is assumed to be the fundamental physiological mechanism for ensuring homeostatic blood supply to distant organs at rest and during orthostatic stress, captured in a classical beat-to-beat autoregressive model of baroreflex by de Boer et al. (1987). For model corroboration, a multistructure index statistic is proposed, seamlessly evaluating the size spectrum of magnitudes of neural reflexes such as baroreflex, responsible for maintaining the homeostatic dynamics. The multistructure index exposes a distinctly different dynamics of multiscale asymmetry between results obtained from real-life signals recorded from healthy subjects and those simulated using both the classical and perturbed versions of the model. Nonlinear effects observed suggest the pronounced presence of complex mechanisms resulting from baroreflex regulation when a human is at rest, which is aggravated in the system's response to orthostatic stress. Using our methodology of multistructure index, we therefore show a marked difference between model and real-life scenarios, which we attribute to multiscale asymmetry of non-linear origin in real-life signals, which we are not reproducible by the classical model.

  18. The mongoose, the pheasant, the pox, and the retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Lucie; Emerman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Paleovirology is the study of ancient viruses. The existence of a paleovirus can sometimes be detected by virtue of its accidental insertion into the germline of different animal species, which allows one to date when the virus actually existed. However, the ancient and the modern often connect, as modern viruses have unexpected origins that can be traced to ancient infections. The genomes of two species of mongooses and an egg-laying mammal called an echidna show that a virus currently present in poultry, the reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), is actually of ancient exotic mammalian origin. REV apparently spread to poultry through a circuitous route involving the isolation of malaria parasites from a pheasant from Borneo housed at the Bronx Zoo that was contaminated with REV. Repeated passage of this virus in poultry adapted the virus to its new host. At some point, the virus got inserted into another virus, called fowlpox virus, which has spread back into the wild. Although REV may still exist somewhere in a mammalian host, its modern form links an 8 million-year-old infection of the ancestor of a mongoose to a virus that now is circulating in wild birds through malaria studies in the mid-20(th) century. These lessons of ancient and modern viruses have implications for modern human pandemics from viral reservoirs and for human interventions that may come with unintended consequences.

  19. Distribution of CPP-Protein Complexes in Freshly Resected Human Tissue Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülo Langel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interest in cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs as delivery agents has fuelled a large number of studies conducted on cultured cells and in mice. However, only a few studies have been devoted to the behaviour of CPPs in human tissues. Therefore, we performed ex vivo tissue-dipping experiments where we studied the distribution of CPP-protein complexes in samples of freshly harvested human tissue material. We used the carcinoma or hyperplasia-containing specimens of the uterus and the cervix, obtained as surgical waste from nine hysterectomies. Our aim was to evaluate the tissue of preference (epithelial versus muscular/connective tissue, carcinoma versus adjacent histologically normal tissue for two well-studied CPPs, the transportan and the TAT-peptide. We complexed biotinylated CPPs with avidin--galactosidase (ABG, which enabled us to apply whole-mount X-gal staining as a robust detection method. Our results demonstrate that both peptides enhanced the tissue distribution of ABG. The enhancing effect of the tested CPPs was more obvious in the normal tissue and in some specimens we detected a striking selectivity of CPP-ABG complexes for the normal tissue. This unexpected finding encourages the evaluation of CPPs as local delivery agents in non-malignant situations, for example in the intrauterine gene therapy of benign gynaecological diseases.

  20. Equivalent dynamical complexity in a many-body quantum and collective human system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil F. Johnson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of Complexity Science believe that the huge variety of emergent phenomena observed throughout nature, are generated by relatively few microscopic mechanisms. Skeptics however point to the lack of concrete examples in which a single mechanistic model manages to capture relevant macroscopic and microscopic properties for two or more distinct systems operating across radically different length and time scales. Here we show how a single complexity model built around cluster coalescence and fragmentation, can cross the fundamental divide between many-body quantum physics and social science. It simultaneously (i explains a mysterious recent finding of Fratini et al. concerning quantum many-body effects in cuprate superconductors (i.e. scale of 10−9 − 10−4 meters and 10−12 − 10−6 seconds, (ii explains the apparent universality of the casualty distributions in distinct human insurgencies and terrorism (i.e. scale of 103 − 106 meters and 104 − 108 seconds, (iii shows consistency with various established empirical facts for financial markets, neurons and human gangs and (iv makes microscopic sense for each application. Our findings also suggest that a potentially productive shift can be made in Complexity research toward the identification of equivalent many-body dynamics in both classical and quantum regimes.

  1. Ancient, highly polymorphic human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 intron sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, M.D.; Quinn, D.L.; Lebo, R.V. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Simons, M.J. [GeneType Pty. Ltd., Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia)

    1994-10-01

    A 438 basepair intron 1 sequence adjacent to exon 2 in the human major histocompatibility complex DQA1 gene defined 16 allelic variants in 69 individuals from wide ethnic backgrounds. In contrast, the most variable coding region spanned by the 247 basepair exon 2 defined 11 allelic variants. Our phylogenetic human intron 1 tree derived by the Bootstrap algorithm reflects the same relative allelic relationships as the reported DQA1 exon 2 have cosegregated since divergence of the human races. Comparison of human alleles to a Rhesus monkey DQA1 first intron sequence found only 10 nucleotide substitutions unique to Rhesus, with the other 428 positions (98%) found in at least one human allele. This high degree of homology reflects the evolutionary stability of intron sequences since these two species diverged over 20 million years ago. Because more intron 1 alleles exist than exon 2 alleles, these polymorphic introns can be used to improve tissue typing for transplantation, paternity testing, and forensics and to derive more complete phylogenetic trees. These results suggest that introns represent a previously underutilized polymorphic resource. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. TREATMENT OF RAT HEPATOMA BY LOCALLY INJECTION OF MURINE IL-12 RETROVIRUS PACKAGING CELL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of the murine IL-12 (mIL-12) retrovirus packaging cell line on hepatoma injected locally. Methods: The retrovirus vector encoding mIL-12 gene was constructed and transfected into packaging cell line PA317. The cells were then used to treat the rats with experimental orthotopic hepatoma at different time. The therapeutic effects, immune functions of the hosts, pathological and toxicological responses were documented. Results: the results showed that the mIL-12 retrovirus packaging cell line could significantly inhibit the growth of the hepatoma cells injected locally to the hepatoma. The early treatment made the rats survive long, while the medium or late stage treatment could prolong the life time of the rats compared with the bland control group or bland vector control group, though the rats did not survive. The number of NK cells and T cells increased significantly in the treatment group. The effects of the early treatment were superior to those of the medium and late stage treatment. Moreover, the transfection of IL-12 gene locally in the hepatoma tissue could make the hepatoma disappear from other liver lobe. This phenomenon demonstrated that IL-12 could activate the immune cells of the host to kill the untransfected tumor cells. This is very important for IL-12 to be used in gene therapy clinically. Meanwhile, the hepatoma would not recur in the rats that had survived more than 2 months from the early treatment after being re-challenged with tumor cells. Conclusion: the results showed that IL-12 gene injected locally in the hepatoma tissue could enhance the anti-tumor immunity of the host.

  3. Computational and Statistical Analyses of Insertional Polymorphic Endogenous Retroviruses in a Non-Model Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Bao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs are a class of transposable elements found in all vertebrate genomes that contribute substantially to genomic functional and structural diversity. A host species acquires an ERV when an exogenous retrovirus infects a germ cell of an individual and becomes part of the genome inherited by viable progeny. ERVs that colonized ancestral lineages are fixed in contemporary species. However, in some extant species, ERV colonization is ongoing, which results in variation in ERV frequency in the population. To study the consequences of ERV colonization of a host genome, methods are needed to assign each ERV to a location in a species’ genome and determine which individuals have acquired each ERV by descent. Because well annotated reference genomes are not widely available for all species, de novo clustering approaches provide an alternative to reference mapping that are insensitive to differences between query and reference and that are amenable to mobile element studies in both model and non-model organisms. However, there is substantial uncertainty in both identifying ERV genomic position and assigning each unique ERV integration site to individuals in a population. We present an analysis suitable for detecting ERV integration sites in species without the need for a reference genome. Our approach is based on improved de novo clustering methods and statistical models that take the uncertainty of assignment into account and yield a probability matrix of shared ERV integration sites among individuals. We demonstrate that polymorphic integrations of a recently identified endogenous retrovirus in deer reflect contemporary relationships among individuals and populations.

  4. Retrovirus-Mediated Gene Transfer in Immortalization of Progenitor Hair Cell Lines in Newborn Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan; ZHAI Suo-qiang; SONG Wei; GUO Wei; ZHENG Gui-liang; HU Yin-yan

    2008-01-01

    Objective To present an experimental method that allows isolation of greater epithelial ridge (GER) and lesser epithelial ridge(LER) cells from postnatal rat cochleae using a combinatorial approach of enzymatic digestion and mechanical separation and to investigate a retrovirus-mediated gene transfer technique for its possibl utility in immortalization of the GER and LER cell lines, in an effort to establish an in vitro model system of hair cell differentiation. Methods GER and LER cells were dissected from postnatal rat cochleae and immortalized by transferring the SV40 large T antigen using a retrovirus. The established cell lines were confirmed through morphology observation, immunnocytochemical staining and RT-PCR analysis. The Hathl gene was transferred into the cell lines using adenovirus-mediated techniques to explore their potential to differentiate into hair cells. Results The established cell lines were stably maintained for more than 20 passages and displayed many features similar to primary GER and LER cells. They grew in patches and assumed a polygonal morphology. Immunostaining showed labeling by SV40 large T antigen and Islet1 (a specific marker for GER and LER). All passages of the cell lines expressed SV40 large T antigen on RT-PCR analysis. The cells also showed the capability to differenti-ate into hair cell-like cells when forced to express Hathl. Conclusion Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer can be used in establishing immortalized progenitor hair cell lines in newborn rat, which may provide an invaluable system for studying hair cell differentiation and regeneration for new treatment of sensory hearing loss caused by hair cell loss.

  5. Crystal structure of HIV-1 Tat complexed with human P-TEFb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahirov, Tahir H.; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Varzavand, Katayoun; Cooper, Jeffrey J.; Sedore, Stanley C.; Price, David H. (Nebraska-Med); (Iowa)

    2010-08-23

    Regulation of the expression of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is accomplished in large part by controlling transcription elongation. The viral protein Tat hijacks the host cell's RNA polymerase II elongation control machinery through interaction with the positive transcription elongation factor, P-TEFb, and directs the factor to promote productive elongation of HIV mRNA. Here we describe the crystal structure of the Tat-P-TEFb complex containing HIV-1 Tat, human Cdk9 (also known as CDK9), and human cyclin T1 (also known as CCNT1). Tat adopts a structure complementary to the surface of P-TEFb and makes extensive contacts, mainly with the cyclin T1 subunit of P-TEFb, but also with the T-loop of the Cdk9 subunit. The structure provides a plausible explanation for the tolerance of Tat to sequence variations at certain sites. Importantly, Tat induces significant conformational changes in P-TEFb. This finding lays a foundation for the design of compounds that would specifically inhibit the Tat-P-TEFb complex and block HIV replication.

  6. Drosophila germline invasion by the endogenous retrovirus gypsy: involvement of the viral env gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelisson, A; Mejlumian, L; Robert, V; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    2002-10-01

    The endogenous retrovirus gypsy is expressed at high levels in mutant flamenco female flies. Gypsy viral particles extracted from such flies can infect naive flamenco individuals raised in the presence of these extracts mixed into their food. This results in the integration of new proviruses into the germline genome. These proviruses can then increase their copy number by (1) expression in the flamenco female somatic cells, (2) transfer into the oocyte and (3) integration into the genome of the progeny. Surprisingly, unlike the infection observed in the feeding experiments, this strategy of endogenous proviral multiplication does not seem to involve the expression of the viral env gene.

  7. Gypsy endogenous retrovirus maintains potential infectivity in several species of Drosophilids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Frutos Rosa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequences homologous to the gypsy retroelement from Drosophila melanogaster are widely distributed among drosophilids. The structure of gypsy includes an open reading frame resembling the retroviral gene env, which is responsible for the infectious properties of retroviruses. Results In this study we report molecular and phylogeny analysis of the complete env gene from ten species of the obscura group of the genus Drosophila and one species from the genus Scaptomyza. Conclusion The results indicate that in most cases env sequences could produce a functional Env protein and therefore maintain the infectious capability of gypsy in these species.

  8. Identification of a novel subgroup of Koala retrovirus from Koalas in Japanese zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Ohata, Takuji; Nakaoka, Rie; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    We identified a new subgroup of koala retrovirus (KoRV), named KoRV-J, which utilizes thiamine transport protein 1 as a receptor instead of the Pit-1 receptor used by KoRV (KoRV-A). By subgroup-specific PCR, KoRV-J and KoRV-A were detected in 67.5 and 100% of koalas originating from koalas from northern Australia, respectively. Altogether, our results indicate that the invasion of the koala population by KoRV-J may have occurred more recently than invasion by KoRV-A.

  9. Reticuloendotheliosis virus: Detection of immunological relationship to mammalian type C retroviruses. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charman, H.P.; Gilden, R.V.; Oroszlan, S.

    1979-03-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) p30 shares cross-reactive determinants and a common NH/sub 2/-terminal tripeptide with mammalian type C viral p30's. An interspecies competition radioimmunoassay was developed, using iodinated REV p30 and a broadly reactive antiserum to mammalian virus p30's. The avian leukosis-sarcoma viruses and mammalian non-type C retroviruses did not compete in this assay. Previous data indicating that the REV group is not represented completely in normal avian cell DNA lead us to speculate that this may be the first example of interclass transmission, albeit in the remote past, among the Retroviridae.

  10. Complex epithelial remodeling underlie the fusion event in early fetal development of the human penile urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Joel; Overland, Maya; Sinclair, Adriane; Cao, Mei; Yue, Xuan; Cunha, Gerald; Baskin, Laurence

    We recently described a two-step process of urethral plate canalization and urethral fold fusion to form the human penile urethra. Canalization ("opening zipper") opens the solid urethral plate into a groove, and fusion ("closing zipper") closes the urethral groove to form the penile urethra. We hypothesize that failure of canalization and/or fusion during human urethral formation can lead to hypospadias. Herein, we use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analysis of transverse serial sections to better characterize development of the human fetal penile urethra as contrasted to the development of the human fetal clitoris. Eighteen 7-13 week human fetal external genitalia specimens were analyzed by SEM, and fifteen additional human fetal specimens were sectioned for histologic analysis. SEM images demonstrate canalization of the urethral/vestibular plate in the developing male and female external genitalia, respectively, followed by proximal to distal fusion of the urethral folds in males only. The fusion process during penile development occurs sequentially in multiple layers and through the interlacing of epidermal "cords". Complex epithelial organization is also noted at the site of active canalization. The demarcation between the epidermis of the shaft and the glans becomes distinct during development, and the epithelial tag at the distal tip of the penile and clitoral glans regresses as development progresses. In summary, SEM analysis of human fetal specimens supports the two-zipper hypothesis of formation of the penile urethra. The opening zipper progresses from proximal to distal along the shaft of the penis and clitoris into the glans in identical fashion in both sexes. The closing zipper mechanism is active only in males and is not a single process but rather a series of layered fusion events, uniquely different from the simple fusion of two epithelial surfaces as occurs in formation of the palate and neural tube. Copyright © 2016 International Society

  11. Complex epithelial remodeling underlie the fusion event in early fetal development of the human penile urethra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Adriane; Cao, Mei; Yue, Xuan; Cunha, Gerald; Baskin, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    We recently described a two-step process of urethral plate canalization and urethral fold fusion to form the human penile urethra. Canalization (“opening zipper”) opens the solid urethral plate into a groove, and fusion (“closing zipper”) closes the urethral groove to form the penile urethra. We hypothesize that failure of canalization and/or fusion during human urethral formation can lead to hypospadias. Herein, we use scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analysis of transverse serial sections to better characterize development of the human fetal penile urethra as contrasted to the development of the human fetal clitoris. Eighteen 7-13 week human fetal external genitalia specimens were analyzed by SEM, and fifteen additional human fetal specimens were sectioned for histologic analysis. SEM images demonstrate canalization of the urethral/vestibular plate in the developing male and female external genitalia, respectively, followed by proximal to distal fusion of the urethral folds in males only. The fusion process during penile development occurs sequentially in multiple layers and through the interlacing of epidermal “cords”. Complex epithelial organization is also noted at the site of active canalization. The demarcation between the epidermis of the shaft and the glans becomes distinct during development, and the epithelial tag at the distal tip of the penile and clitoral glans regresses as development progresses. In summary, SEM analysis of human fetal specimens supports the two-zipper hypothesis of formation of the penile urethra. The opening zipper progresses from proximal to distal along the shaft of the penis and clitoris into the glans in identical fashion in both sexes. The closing zipper mechanism is active only in males and is not a single process but rather a series of layered fusion events, uniquely different from the simple fusion of two epithelial surfaces as occurs in formation of the palate and neural tube. PMID:27397682

  12. Multiple UBXN family members inhibit retrovirus and lentivirus production and canonical NFκΒ signaling by stabilizing IκBα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yani; O’Boyle, Kaitlin; Auer, Jim; You, Fuping; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-01-01

    UBXN proteins likely participate in the global regulation of protein turnover, and we have shown that UBXN1 interferes with RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling by interacting with MAVS and impeding its downstream effector functions. Here we demonstrate that over-expression of multiple UBXN family members decreased lentivirus and retrovirus production by several orders-of-magnitude in single cycle assays, at the level of long terminal repeat-driven transcription, and three family members, UBXN1, N9, and N11 blocked the canonical NFκB pathway by binding to Cullin1 (Cul1), inhibiting IκBα degradation. Multiple regions of UBXN1, including its UBA domain, were critical for its activity. Elimination of UBXN1 resulted in early murine embryonic lethality. shRNA-mediated knockdown of UBXN1 enhanced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) production up to 10-fold in single cycle assays. In primary human fibroblasts, knockdown of UBXN1 caused prolonged degradation of IκBα and enhanced NFκB signaling, which was also observed after CRISPR-mediated knockout of UBXN1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts. Knockout of UBXN1 significantly up- and down-regulated hundreds of genes, notably those of several cell adhesion and immune signaling pathways. Reduction in UBXN1 gene expression in Jurkat T cells latently infected with HIV resulted in enhanced HIV gene expression, consistent with the role of UBXN1 in modulating the NFκB pathway. Based upon co-immunoprecipitation studies with host factors known to bind Cul1, models are presented as to how UBXN1 could be inhibiting Cul1 activity. The ability of UBXN1 and other family members to negatively regulate the NFκB pathway may be important for dampening the host immune response in disease processes and also re-activating quiescent HIV from latent viral reservoirs in chronically infected individuals. PMID:28152074

  13. Complexity and multifractality of neuronal noise in mouse and human hippocampal epileptiform dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Demitre; Bardakjian, Berj L.; Valiante, Taufik A.; Carlen, Peter L.

    2012-10-01

    Fractal methods offer an invaluable means of investigating turbulent nonlinearity in non-stationary biomedical recordings from the brain. Here, we investigate properties of complexity (i.e. the correlation dimension, maximum Lyapunov exponent, 1/fγ noise and approximate entropy) and multifractality in background neuronal noise-like activity underlying epileptiform transitions recorded at the intracellular and local network scales from two in vitro models: the whole-intact mouse hippocampus and lesional human hippocampal slices. Our results show evidence for reduced dynamical complexity and multifractal signal features following transition to the ictal epileptiform state. These findings suggest that pathological breakdown in multifractal complexity coincides with loss of signal variability or heterogeneity, consistent with an unhealthy ictal state that is far from the equilibrium of turbulent yet healthy fractal dynamics in the brain. Thus, it appears that background noise-like activity successfully captures complex and multifractal signal features that may, at least in part, be used to classify and identify brain state transitions in the healthy and epileptic brain, offering potential promise for therapeutic neuromodulatory strategies for afflicted patients suffering from epilepsy and other related neurological disorders. This paper is based on chapter 5 of Serletis (2010 PhD Dissertation Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto).

  14. [Regularities of formation of chlorophyll-human serum albumin functionally active complexes in the aqueous medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semichaevskiĭ, V D

    1975-01-01

    In the system with constant content of the chlorophyll a and increasing amounts of human serum albumin, dependence of pigment incorporation into the complex upon interaction of its aqueous associates with protein solutions was studied by applying the gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and by measuring light scattering and rate of sensitized photoreduction of the methyl red by ascorbic-acid. The curves were obtained after extraction of the chlorophyll by acetone from dry pigment-protein films formed after desiccation of the aqueous systems. Sigmoid character of the above dependences, their linearization in Hill's coordinates and the value of cooperativity coefficient close to 2 testifies in favour of the cooperative character of the complex formation, two pigment molecules reacting with a single protein molecule. Measurement of adsorption isotherms and their treatment with use of the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory of polymolecular adsorption make it possible to evaluate the maximum molar ratio of the pigment to the protein in the complex (close to 2). The pigment-pigment interaction suggests that the chlorophyll molecules adsorbed on the protein are in the state of loosely packed dimers. Deaggregation of aqueus pigment associates by the protein in the course of complex formation results in a considerable increase of the protosensitizing chlorophyll activity.

  15. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional profile of the Mediator complex across human cancer types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syring, Isabella; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; Braun, Martin; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Queisser, Angela; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Brägelmann, Johannes; Vogel, Wenzel; Schmidt, Doris; Majores, Michael; Schindler, Anne; Kristiansen, Glen; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Perner, Sven

    2016-04-26

    The Mediator complex is a key regulator of gene transcription and several studies demonstrated altered expressions of particular subunits in diverse human diseases, especially cancer. However a systematic study deciphering the transcriptional expression of the Mediator across different cancer entities is still lacking.We therefore performed a comprehensive in silico cancer vs. benign analysis of the Mediator complex subunits (MEDs) for 20 tumor entities using Oncomine datasets. The transcriptional expression profiles across almost all cancer entities showed differentially expressed MEDs as compared to benign tissue. Differential expression of MED8 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and MED12 in lung cancer (LCa) were validated and further investigated by immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays containing large numbers of specimen. MED8 in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) associated with shorter survival and advanced TNM stage and showed higher expression in metastatic than primary tumors. In vitro, siRNA mediated MED8 knockdown significantly impaired proliferation and motility in ccRCC cell lines, hinting at a role for MED8 to serve as a novel therapeutic target in ccRCC. Taken together, our Mediator complex transcriptome proved to be a valid tool for identifying cancer-related shifts in Mediator complex composition, revealing that MEDs do exhibit cancer specific transcriptional expression profiles.

  16. The critical phase for visual control of human walking over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L.; Fajen, Brett R.

    2017-01-01

    To walk efficiently over complex terrain, humans must use vision to tailor their gait to the upcoming ground surface without interfering with the exploitation of passive mechanical forces. We propose that walkers use visual information to initialize the mechanical state of the body before the beginning of each step so the resulting ballistic trajectory of the walker’s center-of-mass will facilitate stepping on target footholds. Using a precision stepping task and synchronizing target visibility to the gait cycle, we empirically validated two predictions derived from this strategy: (1) Walkers must have information about upcoming footholds during the second half of the preceding step, and (2) foot placement is guided by information about the position of the target foothold relative to the preceding base of support. We conclude that active and passive modes of control work synergistically to allow walkers to negotiate complex terrain with efficiency, stability, and precision. PMID:28739912

  17. The critical phase for visual control of human walking over complex terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L; Fajen, Brett R

    2017-08-08

    To walk efficiently over complex terrain, humans must use vision to tailor their gait to the upcoming ground surface without interfering with the exploitation of passive mechanical forces. We propose that walkers use visual information to initialize the mechanical state of the body before the beginning of each step so the resulting ballistic trajectory of the walker's center-of-mass will facilitate stepping on target footholds. Using a precision stepping task and synchronizing target visibility to the gait cycle, we empirically validated two predictions derived from this strategy: (1) Walkers must have information about upcoming footholds during the second half of the preceding step, and (2) foot placement is guided by information about the position of the target foothold relative to the preceding base of support. We conclude that active and passive modes of control work synergistically to allow walkers to negotiate complex terrain with efficiency, stability, and precision.

  18. Studies on stabilities of some human chorionic gonadotropin complexes with {beta}-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Moumita [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Kamalika [Department of Chemistry, University of Calcutta, 92 APC Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Sen, Souvik [Malda Town Divisional Railway Hospital, Malda 732102 (India); Lahiri, Susanta, E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.i [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a peptide hormone, whose one of the structural subunits is identical to that of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). As a consequence, the receptors of TSH also act as receptor for hCG hormone. Keeping in mind this interesting property of hCG we have studied the complex formation ability of various no-carrier-added {beta}-emitting isotopes of {sup 61}Cu (3.3 h), {sup 62}Zn (9.2 h), {sup 90}Nb (14.60 h) and {sup 99}Mo (66.02 h) with hCG molecule. Stability of the hCG-M (M=metal ions) complexes was investigated by dialysis with respect to triple distilled water and ringer lactate solution, which has the same composition as extracellular fluid.

  19. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N

    2017-04-03

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency.

  20. Juvenile nephropathy in a Boxer dog resembling the human nephronophthisis-medullary cystic kidney disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Angelo; Onetti-Muda, Andrea; Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Faraggiana, Tullio; Aresu, Luca

    2011-12-01

    A juvenile nephropathy in a 4-year-old male Boxer dog, closely resembling the Nephronophthisis (NPHP)-Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease Complex (MCKD) in humans is described. Gross examination of the kidneys revealed several multiple cysts at the corticomedullary junction and in the medulla. Histological examination was characterized by a widespread tubular atrophy and dilatation, with a marked thickening of the tubular basement membrane, interstitial lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis. Ultrastructural studies revealed dilated tubules with irregular basement membrane thickening and splitting. Lectin histochemistry investigation revealed that the cysts originated in the distal convoluted tubule and collecting duct. Having excluded all other known cystic diseases of the kidney, and based on the lectin histochemistry results, the macroscopic and histological findings of our case are highly compatible with a diagnosis of the NPHP-MCKD complex. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing this particular lesion.

  1. Cognitive engineering models: A prerequisite to the design of human-computer interaction in complex dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter examines a class of human-computer interaction applications, specifically the design of human-computer interaction for the operators of complex systems. Such systems include space systems (e.g., manned systems such as the Shuttle or space station, and unmanned systems such as NASA scientific satellites), aviation systems (e.g., the flight deck of 'glass cockpit' airplanes or air traffic control) and industrial systems (e.g., power plants, telephone networks, and sophisticated, e.g., 'lights out,' manufacturing facilities). The main body of human-computer interaction (HCI) research complements but does not directly address the primary issues involved in human-computer interaction design for operators of complex systems. Interfaces to complex systems are somewhat special. The 'user' in such systems - i.e., the human operator responsible for safe and effective system operation - is highly skilled, someone who in human-machine systems engineering is sometimes characterized as 'well trained, well motivated'. The 'job' or task context is paramount and, thus, human-computer interaction is subordinate to human job interaction. The design of human interaction with complex systems, i.e., the design of human job interaction, is sometimes called cognitive engineering.

  2. Structures of native human thymidine phosphorylase and in complex with 5-iodouracil

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsiki, Eirini; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.; Iyer, Shalini; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Prior, Steven H.; Sleep, Darrell; Finnis, Chris; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) first identified as platelet derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) plays a key role in nucleoside metabolism. Human TP (hTP) is implicated in angiogenesis and is overexpressed in several solid tumors. Here, we report the crystal structures of recombinant hTP and its complex with a substrate 5-iodouracil (5IUR) at 3.0 and 2.5 Å, respectively. In addition, we provide information on the role of specific residues in the enzymatic activity of hTP through mut...

  3. The Major Histocompatibility Complex and Perfumers' Descriptions of Human Body Odors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Wedekind

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The MHC (major histocompatibility complex is a group of genes that play a crucial role in immune recognition and in tolerance of tissue grafting. The MHC has also been found to influence body odors, body odor preferences, and mate choice in mice and humans. Here we test whether verbal descriptions of human body odors can be linked to the MHC. We asked 45 male students to live as odor neutral as possible for two consecutive days and to wear a T-shirt during the nights. The odors of these T-shirts were then described by five evaluators: two professional perfumers and three laymen. One of the perfumers was able to describe the T-shirt odors in such a way that some of the allelic specificity of the MHC was significantly revealed (after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. This shows that, although difficult, some people are able to describe MHC-correlated body odor components.

  4. Ubiquitous polygenicity of human complex traits: genome-wide analysis of 49 traits in Koreans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yang

    Full Text Available Recent studies in population of European ancestry have shown that 30% ~ 50% of heritability for human complex traits such as height and body mass index, and common diseases such as schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis, can be captured by common SNPs and that genetic variation attributed to chromosomes are in proportion to their length. Using genome-wide estimation and partitioning approaches, we analysed 49 human quantitative traits, many of which are relevant to human diseases, in 7,170 unrelated Korean individuals genotyped on 326,262 SNPs. For 43 of the 49 traits, we estimated a nominally significant (P<0.05 proportion of variance explained by all SNPs on the Affymetrix 5.0 genotyping array ([Formula: see text]. On average across 47 of the 49 traits for which the estimate of h(G(2 is non-zero, common SNPs explain approximately one-third (range of 7.8% to 76.8% of narrow sense heritability. The estimate of h(G(2 is highly correlated with the proportion of SNPs with association P<0.031 (r(2 = 0.92. Longer genomic segments tend to explain more phenotypic variation, with a correlation of 0.78 between the estimate of variance explained by individual chromosomes and their physical length, and 1% of the genome explains approximately 1% of the genetic variance. Despite the fact that there are a few SNPs with large effects for some traits, these results suggest that polygenicity is ubiquitous for most human complex traits and that a substantial proportion of the "missing heritability" is captured by common SNPs.

  5. Organic cadmium complexes as proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Buac, Daniela; Fan, Yuhua; Zhang, Xia; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Nan; Dong, Lili; Dou, Q Ping

    2013-06-01

    Although cadmium (Cd) is a widespread environmental contaminant and human carcinogen, our studies indicate an organic Cd complex to be a potent inhibitor of proteasomal chymotrypsin-like (CT-like) activity, further capable of inducing apoptosis in a cancer cell-specific manner. It has been reported that the ligands indole-3-butyric acid (L1) and indole-3-propionic acid (L2) have cancer-fighting effects when tested in a rat carcinoma model. In addition, 3, 5-diaminobenzoic acid o-vanillin Schiff bases (L3) have high antimicrobial activity and a large number of Schiff base complexes have been reported to have proteasome-inhibitory activity. We therefore hypothesized that synthetic forms of Cd in combination with L1, L2 and L3 may have proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities, which would be cancer cell-specific. To test this hypothesis, we have synthesized three novel Cd-containing complexes: [Cd2(C12H12O2N)4(H2O)2]·2H2O (Cd1), [Cd2(C11H10O2N)4(H2O)2]·2H2O (Cd2) and [Cd(C7H4N2O2)(C8H6O2)2]·2H2O (Cd3), by using these three ligands. We sought out to characterize and assess the proteasome-inhibitory and anti-proliferative properties of these three Cd complexes in human breast cancer cells. Cd1, Cd2 and Cd3 were found to effectively inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome with IC50 values of 2.6, 3.0 and 3.3 μΜ, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of cancer cell proliferation also correlated with this effect. As a result of proteasomal shutdown, the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the proteasome target IκB-α protein as well as induction of apoptosis were observed. To account for the cancer specificity of this effect, immortalized, non-tumorigenic breast MCF10A cells were used under the same experimental conditions. Our results indicate that MCF10A cells are much less sensitive to the Cd1, Cd2 and Cd3 complexes when compared to MDA MB 231 breast cancer cells. Therefore, our study suggests that these Cd organic

  6. Specificity-Determining DNA Triplet Code for Positioning of Human Preinitiation Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldshtein, Matan; Lukatsky, David B

    2017-05-23

    The notion that transcription factors bind DNA only through specific, consensus binding sites has been recently questioned. No specific consensus motif for the positioning of the human preinitiation complex (PIC) has been identified. Here, we reveal that nonconsensus, statistical, DNA triplet code provides specificity for the positioning of the human PIC. In particular, we reveal a highly nonrandom, statistical pattern of repetitive nucleotide triplets that correlates with the genomewide binding preferences of PIC measured by Chip-exo. We analyze the triplet enrichment and depletion near the transcription start site and identify triplets that have the strongest effect on PIC-DNA nonconsensus binding. Using statistical mechanics, a random-binder model without fitting parameters, with genomic DNA sequence being the only input, we further validate that the nonconsensus nucleotide triplet code constitutes a key signature providing PIC binding specificity in the human genome. Our results constitute a proof-of-concept for, to our knowledge, a new design principle for protein-DNA recognition in the human genome, which can lead to a better mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vitro Culture Conditions for Maintaining a Complex Population of Human Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A stable intestinal microbiota is important in maintaining human physiology and health. Although there have been a number of studies using in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine the impact of diet and xenobiotics on intestinal microbiota, there is no consensus for the best in vitro culture conditions for growth of the human gastrointestinal microbiota. To investigate the dynamics and activities of intestinal microbiota, it is important for the culture conditions to support the growth of a wide range of intestinal bacteria and maintain a complex microbial community representative of the human gastrointestinal tract. Here, we compared the bacterial community in three culture media: brain heart infusion broth and high- and low-carbohydrate medium with different growth supplements. The bacterial community was analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE, pyrosequencing and real-time PCR. Based on the molecular analysis, this study indicated that the 3% fecal inoculum in low-concentration carbohydrate medium with 1% autoclaved fecal supernatant provided enhanced growth conditions to conduct in vitro studies representative of the human intestinal microbiota.

  8. Molecular architecture of the human sperm IZUMO1 and egg JUNO fertilization complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Halil; Sultana, Azmiri; Li, Sheng; Thavalingam, Annoj; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-23

    Fertilization is an essential biological process in sexual reproduction and comprises a series of molecular interactions between the sperm and egg. The fusion of the haploid spermatozoon and oocyte is the culminating event in mammalian fertilization, enabling the creation of a new, genetically distinct diploid organism. The merger of two gametes is achieved through a two-step mechanism in which the sperm protein IZUMO1 on the equatorial segment of the acrosome-reacted sperm recognizes its receptor, JUNO, on the egg surface. This recognition is followed by the fusion of the two plasma membranes. IZUMO1 and JUNO proteins are indispensable for fertilization, as constitutive knockdown of either protein results in mice that are healthy but infertile. Despite their central importance in reproductive medicine, the molecular architectures of these proteins and the details of their functional roles in fertilization are not known. Here we present the crystal structures of human IZUMO1 and JUNO in unbound and bound conformations. The human IZUMO1 structure exhibits a distinct boomerang shape and provides structural insights into the IZUMO family of proteins. Human IZUMO1 forms a high-affinity complex with JUNO and undergoes a major conformational change within its N-terminal domain upon binding to the egg-surface receptor. Our results provide insights into the molecular basis of sperm-egg recognition, cross-species fertilization, and the barrier to polyspermy, thereby promising benefits for the rational development of non-hormonal contraceptives and fertility treatments for humans and other mammals.

  9. Complex events initiated by individual spikes in the human cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Molnár

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic interactions between neurons of the human cerebral cortex were not directly studied to date. We recorded the first dataset, to our knowledge, on the synaptic effect of identified human pyramidal cells on various types of postsynaptic neurons and reveal complex events triggered by individual action potentials in the human neocortical network. Brain slices were prepared from nonpathological samples of cortex that had to be removed for the surgical treatment of brain areas beneath association cortices of 58 patients aged 18 to 73 y. Simultaneous triple and quadruple whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed testing mono- and polysynaptic potentials in target neurons following a single action potential fired by layer 2/3 pyramidal cells, and the temporal structure of events and underlying mechanisms were analyzed. In addition to monosynaptic postsynaptic potentials, individual action potentials in presynaptic pyramidal cells initiated long-lasting (37 +/- 17 ms sequences of events in the network lasting an order of magnitude longer than detected previously in other species. These event series were composed of specifically alternating glutamatergic and GABAergic postsynaptic potentials and required selective spike-to-spike coupling from pyramidal cells to GABAergic interneurons producing concomitant inhibitory as well as excitatory feed-forward action of GABA. Single action potentials of human neurons are sufficient to recruit Hebbian-like neuronal assemblies that are proposed to participate in cognitive processes.

  10. A rationally engineered yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p introduces sialylation-like properties in neo-human-type complex oligosaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshinaga, Sho; Yoritsune, Ken-Ichi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Kanekiyo, Miho; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2016-05-19

    Pyruvylation onto the terminus of oligosaccharide, widely seen from prokaryote to eukaryote, confers negative charges on the cell surface and seems to be functionally similar to sialylation, which is found at the end of human-type complex oligosaccharide. However, detailed molecular mechanisms underlying pyruvylation have not been clarified well. Here, we first determined the crystal structure of fission yeast pyruvyltransferase Pvg1p at a resolution of 2.46 Å. Subsequently, by combining molecular modeling with mutational analysis of active site residues, we obtained a Pvg1p mutant (Pvg1p(H168C)) that efficiently transferred pyruvyl moiety onto a human-type complex glycopeptide. The resultant pyruvylated human-type complex glycopeptide recognized similar lectins on lectin arrays as the α2,6-sialyl glycopeptides. This newly-generated pyruvylation of human-type complex oligosaccharides would provide a novel method for glyco-bioengineering.

  11. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  12. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  13. NDUFAF5 Hydroxylates NDUFS7 at an Early Stage in the Assembly of Human Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Virginie F; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2016-07-08

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 45 proteins. One arm lies in the inner membrane, and the other extends about 100 Å into the matrix of the organelle. The extrinsic arm contains binding sites for NADH, the primary electron acceptor FMN, and seven iron-sulfur clusters that form a pathway for electrons linking FMN to the terminal electron acceptor, ubiquinone, which is bound in a tunnel in the region of the junction between the arms. The membrane arm contains four antiporter-like domains, energetically coupled to the quinone site and involved in pumping protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space contributing to the proton motive force. Seven of the subunits, forming the core of the membrane arm, are translated from mitochondrial genes, and the remaining subunits, the products of nuclear genes, are imported from the cytosol. Their assembly is coordinated by at least thirteen extrinsic assembly factor proteins that are not part of the fully assembled complex. They assist in insertion of co-factors and in building up the complex from smaller sub-assemblies. One such factor, NDUFAF5, belongs to the family of seven-β-strand S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases. However, similar to another family member, RdmB, it catalyzes the introduction of a hydroxyl group, in the case of NDUFAF5, into Arg-73 in the NDUFS7 subunit of human complex I. This modification occurs early in the pathway of assembly of complex I, before the formation of the juncture between peripheral and membrane arms.

  14. Cryo-EM structure of a human cytoplasmic actomyosin complex at near-atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Ecken, Julian; Heissler, Sarah M; Pathan-Chhatbar, Salma; Manstein, Dietmar J; Raunser, Stefan

    2016-06-30

    The interaction of myosin with actin filaments is the central feature of muscle contraction and cargo movement along actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. The energy for these movements is generated during a complex mechanochemical reaction cycle. Crystal structures of myosin in different states have provided important structural insights into the myosin motor cycle when myosin is detached from F-actin. The difficulty of obtaining diffracting crystals, however, has prevented structure determination by crystallography of actomyosin complexes. Thus, although structural models exist of F-actin in complex with various myosins, a high-resolution structure of the F-actin–myosin complex is missing. Here, using electron cryomicroscopy, we present the structure of a human rigor actomyosin complex at an average resolution of 3.9 Å. The structure reveals details of the actomyosin interface, which is mainly stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. The negatively charged amino (N) terminus of actin interacts with a conserved basic motif in loop 2 of myosin, promoting cleft closure in myosin. Surprisingly, the overall structure of myosin is similar to rigor-like myosin structures in the absence of F-actin, indicating that F-actin binding induces only minimal conformational changes in myosin. A comparison with pre-powerstroke and intermediate (Pi-release) states of myosin allows us to discuss the general mechanism of myosin binding to F-actin. Our results serve as a strong foundation for the molecular understanding of cytoskeletal diseases, such as autosomal dominant hearing loss and diseases affecting skeletal and cardiac muscles, in particular nemaline myopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  15. Hybridization capture reveals evolution and conservation across the entire Koala retrovirus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Tsangaras

    Full Text Available The koala retrovirus (KoRV is the only retrovirus known to be in the midst of invading the germ line of its host species. Hybridization capture and next generation sequencing were used on modern and museum DNA samples of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus to examine ca. 130 years of evolution across the full KoRV genome. Overall, the entire proviral genome appeared to be conserved across time in sequence, protein structure and transcriptional binding sites. A total of 138 polymorphisms were detected, of which 72 were found in more than one individual. At every polymorphic site in the museum koalas, one of the character states matched that of modern KoRV. Among non-synonymous polymorphisms, radical substitutions involving large physiochemical differences between amino acids were elevated in env, potentially reflecting anti-viral immune pressure or avoidance of receptor interference. Polymorphisms were not detected within two functional regions believed to affect infectivity. Host sequences flanking proviral integration sites were also captured; with few proviral loci shared among koalas. Recently described variants of KoRV, designated KoRV-B and KoRV-J, were not detected in museum samples, suggesting that these variants may be of recent origin.

  16. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Adaptive Evolution of Skin in Terrestrial Vertebrates and Possible Involvement of Endogenous Retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The first terrestrial vertebrates emerged from water and adapted to living on land approximately 360 million years ago (late Devonian). In particular, amphibians are thought to have surface epithelia that changed from multilayered epithelia into keratinized stratified squamous epithelia by acquiring stratum corneum (SC), which is composed of several dead cell layers that serve as an air liquid interface barrier. Then, reptiles appeared and became a major terrestrial vertebrate group approximately 340 million years ago by forming hard SC. About 220 million years ago, mammals radiated by acquiring soft and moisturized SC, and endogenous retroviruses were thought to be actively integrated into mammalian genomes. Skin ASpartic Protease (SASPase)/ASPRV1 is the mammalian-specific endogenous retroviral-derived protease. SASPase-deficient mice had dry skin and aberrant accumulation of profilaggrin, which is another mammalian-specific gene that regulates SC barrier function and is a major predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that the retroviral element SASPase was integrated into the first mammalian species and was involved in the adaptive evolution of mammals, as it facilitates moisturization of skin SC. It is possible that other uncharacterized endogenous retroviruses were also involved in epidermal barrier function.

  18. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (U. of Texas-SMED); (UNC)

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  19. Human-chromatin-related protein interactions identify a demethylase complex required for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Edyta; Ni, Zuyao; Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L; Trimble, Sandra Smiley; Olsen, Jonathan B; Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind; Silverman-Gavrila, Lorelei; Phanse, Sadhna; Guo, Hongbo; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Xinghua; Young, Peter; Bailey, Swneke; Roudeva, Denitza; Zhao, Dorothy; Hewel, Johannes; Li, Joyce; Gräslund, Susanne; Paduch, Marcin; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Lupien, Mathieu; Emili, Andrew; Wodak, Shoshana J; Greenblatt, Jack

    2014-07-10

    Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision) network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  20. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  1. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  2. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. EXPERIMENTAL: FINDINGS: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas that express AR. CONCLUSION: This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines

  3. PKCα-specific phosphorylation of the troponin complex in human myocardium: a functional and proteomics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Kooij

    Full Text Available Protein kinase Cα (PKCα is one of the predominant PKC isoforms that phosphorylate cardiac troponin. PKCα is implicated in heart failure and serves as a potential therapeutic target, however, the exact consequences for contractile function in human myocardium are unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of PKCα phosphorylation of cardiac troponin (cTn on myofilament function in human failing cardiomyocytes and to resolve the potential targets involved.Endogenous cTn from permeabilized cardiomyocytes from patients with end-stage idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy was exchanged (∼69% with PKCα-treated recombinant human cTn (cTn (DD+PKCα. This complex has Ser23/24 on cTnI mutated into aspartic acids (D to rule out in vitro cross-phosphorylation of the PKA sites by PKCα. Isometric force was measured at various [Ca(2+] after exchange. The maximal force (Fmax in the cTn (DD+PKCα group (17.1±1.9 kN/m(2 was significantly reduced compared to the cTn (DD group (26.1±1.9 kN/m(2. Exchange of endogenous cTn with cTn (DD+PKCα increased Ca(2+-sensitivity of force (pCa50 = 5.59±0.02 compared to cTn (DD (pCa50 = 5.51±0.02. In contrast, subsequent PKCα treatment of the cells exchanged with cTn (DD+PKCα reduced pCa50 to 5.45±0.02. Two PKCα-phosphorylated residues were identified with mass spectrometry: Ser198 on cTnI and Ser179 on cTnT, although phosphorylation of Ser198 is very low. Using mass spectrometry based-multiple reaction monitoring, the extent of phosphorylation of the cTnI sites was quantified before and after treatment with PKCα and showed the highest phosphorylation increase on Thr143.PKCα-mediated phosphorylation of the cTn complex decreases Fmax and increases myofilament Ca(2+-sensitivity, while subsequent treatment with PKCα in situ decreased myofilament Ca(2+-sensitivity. The known PKC sites as well as two sites which have not been previously linked to PKCα are phosphorylated in human cTn complex treated

  4. Preparation of the Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress Complex and Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayuri; Kamil, Jeremy P; Coen, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses, like most DNA viruses, replicate their genomes in the host cell nucleus. Their DNA is then packaged and assembled into viral nucleocapsids, which, in most cases, are too large to pass through the nuclear pore complex. Instead, herpesviruses use a complex multistep pathway, termed nuclear egress, to exit the nucleus. Key players in this process include two conserved viral proteins that form the nuclear egress complex (NEC). In human cytomegalovirus, these NEC proteins are UL50, embedded in the inner nuclear membrane, and its nucleoplasmic partner UL53. Both are essential for viral nuclear egress. However, other viral components as well as host nuclear envelope proteins may also participate in nuclear egress. Identifying these viral and cellular factors may provide important insight into the herpesvirus lifecycle and its relationship to the underlying, yet still-mysterious, host nuclear egress pathway. We developed an immunoprecipitation-based protocol, described herein, to identify protein-protein interactions involving the NEC from the nuclear fraction of infected cells that express an epitope-tagged version of NEC subunit UL53.

  5. Multiplex matrix network analysis of protein complexes in the human TCR signalosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen E P; Neier, Steven C; Reed, Brendan K; Davis, Tessa R; Sinnwell, Jason P; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Sciallis, Gabriel F; Wieland, Carilyn N; Torgerson, Rochelle R; Gil, Diana; Neuhauser, Claudia; Schrum, Adam G

    2016-08-02

    Multiprotein complexes transduce cellular signals through extensive interaction networks, but the ability to analyze these networks in cells from small clinical biopsies is limited. To address this, we applied an adaptable multiplex matrix system to physiologically relevant signaling protein complexes isolated from a cell line or from human patient samples. Focusing on the proximal T cell receptor (TCR) signalosome, we assessed 210 pairs of PiSCES (proteins in shared complexes detected by exposed surface epitopes). Upon stimulation of Jurkat cells with superantigen-loaded antigen-presenting cells, this system produced high-dimensional data that enabled visualization of network activity. A comprehensive analysis platform generated PiSCES biosignatures by applying unsupervised hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis, an adaptive nonparametric with empirical cutoff analysis, and weighted correlation network analysis. We generated PiSCES biosignatures from 4-mm skin punch biopsies from control patients or patients with the autoimmune skin disease alopecia areata. This analysis distinguished disease patients from the controls, detected enhanced basal TCR signaling in the autoimmune patients, and identified a potential signaling network signature that may be indicative of disease. Thus, generation of PiSCES biosignatures represents an approach that can provide information about the activity of protein signaling networks in samples including low-abundance primary cells from clinical biopsies.

  6. Enhancing the copper(II) complexes cytotoxicity to cancer cells through bound to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Zhang, Yao; Qi, Jinxu; Zhou, Zuping; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    We use Schiff-base salicylaldehyde benzoylhydrazone (HL) as the ligand for copper(II), resulting in the complexes [CuCl(L)]·H2O (C1), [CuNO3(L)]·H2O (C2) and [CuBr(L)]2 (C3). We characterize the Cu(II) compounds' interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking. These studies revealed that Cu(II) compounds propensity bound to IIA subdomain of HSA possible by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bond. Cu(II) compounds produce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells. Complexes of HSA and copper(II) compounds enhance about 2-fold cytotoxicity in cancer cells but do not raise cytotoxicity levels in normal cells in vitro. Compared with C3 alone, HSA-C3 complex promotes HepG2 cell apoptosis and has a stronger capacity to promote cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of HepG2.

  7. Genome-wide uniformity of human ‘open’ pre-initiation complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, William K.M.; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2017-01-01

    Transcription of protein-coding and noncoding DNA occurs pervasively throughout the mammalian genome. Their sites of initiation are generally inferred from transcript 5′ ends and are thought to be either locally dispersed or focused. How these two modes of initiation relate is unclear. Here, we apply permanganate treatment and chromatin immunoprecipitation (PIP-seq) of initiation factors to identify the precise location of melted DNA separately associated with the preinitiation complex (PIC) and the adjacent paused complex (PC). This approach revealed the two known modes of transcription initiation. However, in contrast to prevailing views, they co-occurred within the same promoter region: initiation originating from a focused PIC, and broad nucleosome-linked initiation. PIP-seq allowed transcriptional orientation of Pol II to be determined, which may be useful near promoters where sufficient sense/anti-sense transcript mapping information is lacking. PIP-seq detected divergently oriented Pol II at both coding and noncoding promoters, as well as at enhancers. Their occupancy levels were not necessarily coupled in the two orientations. DNA sequence and shape analysis of initiation complex sites suggest that both sequence and shape contribute to specificity, but in a context-restricted manner. That is, initiation sites have the locally “best” initiator (INR) sequence and/or shape. These findings reveal a common core to pervasive Pol II initiation throughout the human genome. PMID:27927716

  8. Twin-Based DNA Methylation Analysis Takes the Center Stage of Studies of Human Complex Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongfeng Zhang; Shuxia Li; Qihua Tan; Zengchang Pang

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of complex diseases is characterized by the interaction between the genome and environmental conditions and the interface of epigenetics may be a central mechanism.Current technologies already allow us high-throughput profiling of epigenetic patterns at genome level.However,our understanding of the epigenetic processes remains limited.Twins are special samples in genetic studies due to their genetic similarity and rearing-environment sharing.In the past decades,twins have made a great contribution in dissecting the genetic and environmental contributions to human diseases and complex traits.In the era of functional genomics,the valuable samples of twins are helping to bridge the gap between gene activity and environmental conditions through epigenetic mechanisms unlimited to DNA sequence variations.We review the recent progresses in using twins to study disease-related molecular epigenetic phenotypes and link them with environmental exposures especially early life events.Various study designs and application issues will be highlighted and discussed with aim at making uses of twins in assessing the environmental impact on epigenetic changes during the development of complex diseases.

  9. Literature and Cinema from "Adaptation" to Re-creation: Coping with the Complexity of Human Recollection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Testa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Early 20th-century avant-gardes put a premium on the notion of "originality" and so created a cultural context in which "adaptation" -- in particular, lit-to cinema adaptation -- later came to be construed by film theory as a kind of derivative, inferior notion. This article offers the proof, based on work on the little-known original Russian sources, that none other than Èizenshtein opined differently, so much so that he preferred to argue instead for the use of the term "re-creation"; and that later semiotic theory, especially thanks to Iurii Lotman, provides us with the tools to develop the "re-creation" concept fully. In the process of re-creation, which is always a process of cultural re-contextualization, the original literary complexity lost in the transmutation must be made up in specific cinematic ways, in order to offer a final re-created artefact worthy of recollection by human society. In times of an overburdened human ability to remember historic sufferings, re-created artefacts that lose information vis-a-vis the original will be quite justly forgotten. On this basis, the article concludes with an elaboration on contemporary Italian cinema -- especially some commercially successful noirs -- drawn from literature (or rather, books of fiction and pinpoints the nature of one of that type of cinema's recurrent shortcomings. The essential defect of such films is identified in their inability to make up by cinematic means for the loss of complexity which they endure in the transition from one medium to another. This is all the more true when, as in the case of the noirs examined here, complexity is already scant in the original books in the first place.

  10. The synaptonemal complex and meiotic recombination in humans: new approaches to old questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallente, Rhea U; Cheng, Edith Y; Hassold, Terry J

    2006-06-01

    Meiotic prophase serves as an arena for the interplay of two important cellular activities, meiotic recombination and synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Synapsis is mediated by the synaptonemal complex (SC), originally characterized as a structure linked to pairing of meiotic chromosomes (Moses (1958) J Biophys Biochem Cytol 4:633-638). In 1975, the first electron micrographs of human pachytene stage SCs were presented (Moses et al. (1975) Science 187:363-365) and over the next 15 years the importance of the SC to normal meiotic progression in human males and females was established (Jhanwar and Chaganti (1980) Hum Genet 54:405-408; Pathak and Elder (1980) Hum Genet 54:171-175; Solari (1980) Chromosoma 81:315-337; Speed (1984) Hum Genet 66:176-180; Wallace and Hulten (1985) Ann Hum Genet 49(Pt 3):215-226). Further, these studies made it clear that abnormalities in the assembly or maintenance of the SC were an important contributor to human infertility (Chaganti et al. (1980) Am J Hum Genet 32:833-848; Vidal et al. (1982) Hum Genet 60:301-304; Bojko (1983) Carlsberg Res Commun 48:285-305; Bojko (1985) Carlsberg Res Commun 50:43-72; Templado et al. (1984) Hum Genet 67:162-165; Navarro et al. (1986) Hum Reprod 1:523-527; Garcia et al. (1989) Hum Genet 2:147-53). However, the utility of these early studies was limited by lack of information on the structural composition of the SC and the identity of other SC-associated proteins. Fortunately, studies of the past 15 years have gone a long way toward remedying this problem. In this minireview, we highlight the most important of these advances as they pertain to human meiosis, focusing on temporal aspects of SC assembly, the relationship between the SC and meiotic recombination, and the contribution of SC abnormalities to human infertility.

  11. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans.

  12. Immune-Complexed Adenovirus Induce AIM2-Mediated Pyroptosis in Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichholz, Karsten; Bru, Thierry; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Fernandes, Paulo; Mennechet, Franck J. D.; Manel, Nicolas; Alves, Paula; Perreau, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are nonenveloped proteinaceous particles containing a linear double-stranded DNA genome. HAdVs cause a spectrum of pathologies in all populations regardless of health standards. Following repeat exposure to multiple HAdV types, we develop robust and long-lived humoral and cellular immune responses that provide life-long protection from de novo infections and persistent HAdV. How HAdVs, anti-HAdV antibodies and antigen presenting cells (APCs) interact to influence infection is still incompletely understood. In our study, we used physical, pharmacological, biochemical, fluorescence and electron microscopy, molecular and cell biology approaches to dissect the impact of immune-complexed HAdV (IC-HAdV) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). We show that IC-HAdV generate stabilized complexes of ~200 nm that are efficiently internalized by, and aggregate in, MoDCs. By comparing IC-HAdV, IC-empty capsid, IC-Ad2ts1 (a HAdV-C2 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation that impacts protease encapsidation) and IC-AdL40Q (a HAdV-C5 impaired in endosomal escape due to a mutation in protein VI), we demonstrate that protein VI-dependent endosomal escape is required for the HAdV genome to engage the DNA pattern recognition receptor AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2). AIM2 engagement induces pyroptotic MoDC death via ASC (apoptosis-associated speck protein containing a caspase activation/recruitment domain) aggregation, inflammasome formation, caspase 1 activation, and IL-1β and gasdermin D (GSDMD) cleavage. Our study provides mechanistic insight into how humoral immunity initiates an innate immune response to HAdV-C5 in human professional APCs. PMID:27636895

  13. The FACT Complex Promotes Avian Leukosis Virus DNA Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, Shelby; Larue, Ross C; Abraham, Carly M; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Skopp, Amelie; Winkler, Duane; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Beemon, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    All retroviruses need to integrate a DNA copy of their genome into the host chromatin. Cellular proteins regulating and targeting lentiviral and gammaretroviral integration in infected cells have been discovered, but the factors that mediate alpharetroviral avian leukosis virus (ALV) integration are unknown. In this study, we have identified the FACT protein complex, which consists of SSRP1 and Spt16, as a principal cellular binding partner of ALV integrase (IN). Biochemical experiments with purified recombinant proteins show that SSRP1 and Spt16 are able to individually bind ALV IN, but only the FACT complex effectively stimulates ALV integration activity in vitro Likewise, in infected cells, the FACT complex promotes ALV integration activity, with proviral integration frequency varying directly with cellular expression levels of the FACT complex. An increase in 2-long-terminal-repeat (2-LTR) circles in the depleted FACT complex cell line indicates that this complex regulates the ALV life cycle at the level of integration. This regulation is shown to be specific to ALV, as disruption of the FACT complex did not inhibit either lentiviral or gammaretroviral integration in infected cells.IMPORTANCE The majority of human gene therapy approaches utilize HIV-1- or murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors, which preferentially integrate near genes and regulatory regions; thus, insertional mutagenesis is a substantial risk. In contrast, ALV integrates more randomly throughout the genome, which decreases the risks of deleterious integration. Understanding how ALV integration is regulated could facilitate the development of ALV-based vectors for use in human gene therapy. Here we show that the FACT complex directly binds and regulates ALV integration efficiency in vitro and in infected cells. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. The evolution of the complex sensory and motor systems of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaas, Jon H

    2008-03-18

    Inferences about how the complex sensory and motor systems of the human brain evolved are based on the results of comparative studies of brain organization across a range of mammalian species, and evidence from the endocasts of fossil skulls of key extinct species. The endocasts of the skulls of early mammals indicate that they had small brains with little neocortex. Evidence from comparative studies of cortical organization from small-brained mammals of the six major branches of mammalian evolution supports the conclusion that the small neocortex of early mammals was divided into roughly 20-25 cortical areas, including primary and secondary sensory fields. In early primates, vision was the dominant sense, and cortical areas associated with vision in temporal and occipital cortex underwent a significant expansion. Comparative studies indicate that early primates had 10 or more visual areas, and somatosensory areas with expanded representations of the forepaw. Posterior parietal cortex was also expanded, with a caudal half dominated by visual inputs, and a rostral half dominated by somatosensory inputs with outputs to an array of seven or more motor and visuomotor areas of the frontal lobe. Somatosensory areas and posterior parietal cortex became further differentiated in early anthropoid primates. As larger brains evolved in early apes and in our hominin ancestors, the number of cortical areas increased to reach an estimated 200 or so in present day humans, and hemispheric specializations emerged. The large human brain grew primarily by increasing neuron number rather than increasing average neuron size.

  15. Genomic approaches uncover increasing complexities in the regulatory landscape at the human SCL (TAL1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawandeep Dhami

    Full Text Available The SCL (TAL1 transcription factor is a critical regulator of haematopoiesis and its expression is tightly controlled by multiple cis-acting regulatory elements. To elaborate further the DNA elements which control its regulation, we used genomic tiling microarrays covering 256 kb of the human SCL locus to perform a concerted analysis of chromatin structure and binding of regulatory proteins in human haematopoietic cell lines. This approach allowed us to characterise further or redefine known human SCL regulatory elements and led to the identification of six novel elements with putative regulatory function both up and downstream of the SCL gene. They bind a number of haematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, E2A LMO2, SCL, LDB1, CTCF or components of the transcriptional machinery and are associated with relevant histone modifications, accessible chromatin and low nucleosomal density. Functional characterisation shows that these novel elements are able to enhance or repress SCL promoter activity, have endogenous promoter function or enhancer-blocking insulator function. Our analysis opens up several areas for further investigation and adds new layers of complexity to our understanding of the regulation of SCL expression.

  16. Neandertal demise: an archaeological analysis of the modern human superiority complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Paola; Roebroeks, Wil

    2014-01-01

    Neandertals are the best-studied of all extinct hominins, with a rich fossil record sampling hundreds of individuals, roughly dating from between 350,000 and 40,000 years ago. Their distinct fossil remains have been retrieved from Portugal in the west to the Altai area in central Asia in the east and from below the waters of the North Sea in the north to a series of caves in Israel in the south. Having thrived in Eurasia for more than 300,000 years, Neandertals vanished from the record around 40,000 years ago, when modern humans entered Europe. Modern humans are usually seen as superior in a wide range of domains, including weaponry and subsistence strategies, which would have led to the demise of Neandertals. This systematic review of the archaeological records of Neandertals and their modern human contemporaries finds no support for such interpretations, as the Neandertal archaeological record is not different enough to explain the demise in terms of inferiority in archaeologically visible domains. Instead, current genetic data suggest that complex processes of interbreeding and assimilation may have been responsible for the disappearance of the specific Neandertal morphology from the fossil record.

  17. Neandertal demise: an archaeological analysis of the modern human superiority complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Villa

    Full Text Available Neandertals are the best-studied of all extinct hominins, with a rich fossil record sampling hundreds of individuals, roughly dating from between 350,000 and 40,000 years ago. Their distinct fossil remains have been retrieved from Portugal in the west to the Altai area in central Asia in the east and from below the waters of the North Sea in the north to a series of caves in Israel in the south. Having thrived in Eurasia for more than 300,000 years, Neandertals vanished from the record around 40,000 years ago, when modern humans entered Europe. Modern humans are usually seen as superior in a wide range of domains, including weaponry and subsistence strategies, which would have led to the demise of Neandertals. This systematic review of the archaeological records of Neandertals and their modern human contemporaries finds no support for such interpretations, as the Neandertal archaeological record is not different enough to explain the demise in terms of inferiority in archaeologically visible domains. Instead, current genetic data suggest that complex processes of interbreeding and assimilation may have been responsible for the disappearance of the specific Neandertal morphology from the fossil record.

  18. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (VCU); (Scripps); (UNC); (Res. Tri. Inst.)

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  19. Tracking a Subset of Skeleton Joints: An Effective Approach towards Complex Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Latif Anjum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a robust algorithm for complex human activity recognition for natural human-robot interaction. The algorithm is based on tracking the position of selected joints in human skeleton. For any given activity, only a few skeleton joints are involved in performing the activity, so a subset of joints contributing the most towards the activity is selected. Our approach of tracking a subset of skeleton joints (instead of tracking the whole skeleton is computationally efficient and provides better recognition accuracy. We have developed both manual and automatic approaches for the selection of these joints. The position of the selected joints is tracked for the duration of the activity and is used to construct feature vectors for each activity. Once the feature vectors have been constructed, we use a Support Vector Machines (SVM multiclass classifier for training and testing the algorithm. The algorithm has been tested on a purposely built dataset of depth videos recorded using Kinect camera. The dataset consists of 250 videos of 10 different activities being performed by different users. Experimental results show classification accuracy of 83% when tracking all skeleton joints, 95% when using manual selection of subset joints, and 89% when using automatic selection of subset joints.

  20. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation. PMID:28212312

  1. Rare and low-frequency variants in human common diseases and other complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    In humans, most of the genetic variation is rare and often population-specific. Whereas the role of rare genetic variants in familial monogenic diseases is firmly established, we are only now starting to explore the contribution of this class of genetic variation to human common diseases and other complex traits. Such large-scale experiments are possible due to the development of next-generation DNA sequencing. Early findings suggested that rare and low-frequency coding variation might have a large effect on human phenotypes (eg, PCSK9 missense variants on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and coronary heart diseases). This observation sparked excitement in prognostic and diagnostic medicine, as well as in genetics-driven strategies to develop new drugs. In this review, I describe results and present initial conclusions regarding some of the recent rare and low-frequency variant discoveries. We can already assume that most phenotype-associated rare and low-frequency variants have modest-to-weak phenotypical effect. Thus, we will need large cohorts to identify them, as for common variants in genome-wide association studies. As we expand the list of associated rare and low-frequency variants, we can also better recognise the current limitations: we need to develop better statistical methods to optimally test association with rare variants, including non-coding variation, and to account for potential confounders such as population stratification.

  2. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the human Rod-Zwilch-ZW10 (RZZ) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenfeld, Anika; Wohlgemuth, Sabine; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Vetter, Ingrid R; Musacchio, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors kinetochore-microtubule attachment during mitosis. In metazoans, the three-subunit Rod-Zwilch-ZW10 (RZZ) complex is a crucial SAC component that interacts with additional SAC-activating and SAC-silencing components, including the Mad1-Mad2 complex and cytoplasmic dynein. The RZZ complex contains two copies of each subunit and has a predicted molecular mass of ∼800 kDa. Given the low abundance of the RZZ complex in natural sources, its recombinant reconstitution was attempted by co-expression of its subunits in insect cells. The RZZ complex was purified to homogeneity and subjected to systematic crystallization attempts. Initial crystals containing the entire RZZ complex were obtained using the sitting-drop method and were subjected to optimization to improve the diffraction resolution limit. The crystals belonged to space group P3₁ (No. 144) or P3₂ (No. 145), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 215.45, c = 458.7 Å, α = β = 90.0, γ = 120.0°.

  3. Two Retroviruses Packaged in One Cell Line can Combined Inhibit the Replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhipin Liang; Zhiyuan Guo; Xin Wang; Xiaohong Kong; Chang Liu

    2012-01-01

    The cellular protein tetherin tethers the HIV-1 viral particles on the cellular membrane to inhibit the replication of HIV-1.However,the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu counteracts the antiviral function of tetherin.In this study,two retroviral vector plasmids were constructed.One inhibited the vpu gene expression; the other one over-expressed the tetherin.Both retroviral vector plasmids could be packaged in the packaging cell line PT67 to obtain the corresponding retroviruses.The retroviral vector plasmids'functions of tetherin over-expression or vpu-RNAi were detected at the cell level.Retroviral vector plasmids were transfected to PT67 cells at different ratios from 0T3V to 3T0V,and then mixed retroviruses were harvested.The antiviral functions of mixed retroviruses were detected in HIV-1 infected TZM-bl cells.The results showed that packaged mixed retroviruses could repress the replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells.

  4. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation-a detailed in vitro analysis of murine and human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauler, Maximilian; Seyfert, Julia; Haenel, David; Seeba, Hannah; Guenther, Janine; Stallmann, Daniela; Schoenichen, Claudia; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Platelets form complexes with neutrophils during inflammatory processes. These aggregates migrate into affected tissues and also circulate within the organism. Several studies have evaluated platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker of cardiovascular diseases in human and mouse. Although multiple publications have reported platelet-neutrophil complex counts, we noticed that different methods were used to analyze platelet-neutrophil complex formation, resulting in significant differences, even in baseline values. We established a protocol for platelet-neutrophil complex measurement with flow cytometry in murine and human whole blood samples. In vitro platelet-neutrophil complex formation was stimulated with ADP or PMA. We tested the effect of different sample preparation steps and cytometer settings on platelet-neutrophil complex detection and noticed false-positive counts with increasing acquisition speed. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation depends on platelet P-selectin expression, and antibody blocking of P-selectin consequently prevented ADP-induced platelet-neutrophil complex formation. These findings may help generating more comparable data among different research groups that examine platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker for cardiovascular disease and novel therapeutic interventions.

  5. Molecular architecture of the recombinant human MCM2-7 helicase in complex with nucleotides and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boskovic, Jasminka; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Saligram Prabhakar, Bhargav

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is a key biological process that involves different protein complexes whose assembly is rigorously regulated in a successive order. One of these complexes is a replicative hexameric helicase, the MCM complex, which is essential for the initiation and elongation phases of replication....... After the assembly of a double heterohexameric MCM2-7 complex at replication origins in G1, the 2 heterohexamers separate from each other and associate with Cdc45 and GINS proteins in a CMG complex that is capable of unwinding dsDNA during S phase. Here, we have reconstituted and characterized...... the purified human MCM2-7 (hMCM2-7) hexameric complex by co-expression of its 6 different subunits in insect cells. The conformational variability of the complex has been analyzed by single particle electron microscopy in the presence of different nucleotide analogs and DNA. The interaction with nucleotide...

  6. A novel V(IV)O-pyrimidinone complex: synthesis, solution speciation and human serum protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Gisela; Tomaz, Isabel; Correia, Isabel; Veiros, Luís F; Castro, M Margarida C A; Avecilla, Fernando; Palacio, Lorena; Maestro, Miguel; Kiss, Tamás; Jakusch, Tamás; Garcia, M Helena V; Pessoa, João Costa

    2013-09-07

    The pyrimidinones mhcpe, 2-methyl-3H-5-hydroxy-6-carboxy-4-pyrimidinone ethyl ester (mhcpe, 1), 2,3-dimethyl-5-benzyloxy-6-carboxy-4-pyrimidinone ethyl ester (dbcpe, 2) and N-methyl-2,3-dimethyl-5-hydroxy-6-carboxyamido-4-pyrimidinone (N-MeHOPY, 3), are synthesized and their structures determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The acid-base properties of 1 are studied by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods, the pK(a) values being 1.14 and 6.35. DFT calculations were carried out to determine the most stable structure for each of the H2L(+), HL and L(-) forms (HL = mhcpe) and assign the groups involved in the protonation-deprotonation processes. The mhcpe(-) ligand forms stable complexes with V(IV)O(2+) in the pH range 2 to 10, and potentiometry, EPR and UV-Vis techniques are used to identify and characterize the V(IV)O-mhcpe species formed. The results are consistent with the formation of V(IV)O, (V(IV)O)L, (V(IV)O)L2, (V(IV)O)2L2H(-2), (V(IV)O)L2H(-1), (V(IV)O)2L2H(-3), (V(IV)O)LH(-2) species and V(IV)O-hydrolysis products. Calculations indicate that the global binding ability of mhcpe towards V(IV)O(2+) is similar to that of maltol (Hmaltol = 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one) and lower than that of 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone (Hdhp). The interaction of V(IV)O-complexes with human plasma proteins (transferrin and albumin) is studied by circular dichroism (CD), EPR and (51)V NMR spectroscopy. V(IV)O-mhcpe-protein ternary complexes are formed in both cases. The binding of V(IV)O(2+) to transferrin (hTF) in the presence of mhcpe involves mainly (V(IV)O)1(hTF)(mhcpe)1, (V(IV)O)2(hTF)(mhcpe)1 and (V(IV)O)2(hTF)(mhcpe)2 species, bound at the Fe(III) binding sites, and the corresponding conditional formation constants are determined. Under the conditions expected to prevail in human blood serum, CD data indicate that the V(IV)O-mhcpe complexes mainly bind to hTF; the formation of V(IV)O-hTF-mhcpe complexes occurs in the presence of Fe(III) as well

  7. Cellular responses induced by Cu(II quinolinonato complexes in human tumor and hepatic cells

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    Trávníček Zdeněk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspired by the unprecedented historical success of cisplatin, one of the most important research directions in bioinorganic and medicinal chemistry is dedicated to the development of new anticancer compounds with the potential to surpass it in antitumor activity, while having lower unwanted side-effects. Therefore, a series of copper(II mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Cu(qui(L]Y · xH2O (1–6, where Hqui = 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolinone, Y = NO3 (1, 3, 5 or BF4 (2, 4, 6, and L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen (1, 2, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen (3, 4 and bathophenanthroline (bphen (5, 6, was studied for their in vitro cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines (A549 lung carcinoma, HeLa cervix epitheloid carcinoma, G361 melanoma cells, A2780 ovarian carcinoma, A2780cis cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma, LNCaP androgen-sensitive prostate adenocarcinoma and THP-1 monocytic leukemia. Results The tested complexes displayed a stronger cytotoxic effect against all the cancer cells as compared to cisplatin. The highest cytotoxicity was found for the complexes 4 (IC50 = 0.36 ± 0.05 μM and 0.56 ± 0.15 μM, 5 (IC50 = 0.66 ± 0.07 μM and 0.73 ± 0.08 μM and 6 (IC50 = 0.57 ± 0.11 μM and 0.70 ± 0.20 μM against A2780, and A2780cis respectively, as compared with the values of 12.0 ± 0.8 μM and 27.0 ± 4.6 μM determined for cisplatin. Moreover, the tested complexes were much less cytotoxic to primary human hepatocytes than to the cancer cells. The complexes 5 and 6 exhibited significantly high ability to modulate secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (2873 ± 238 pg/mL and 3284 ± 139 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively and IL-1β (1177 ± 128 pg/mL and 1087 ± 101 pg/mL for 5, and 6 respectively tested on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells as compared with the values of 1173

  8. Recent emergence of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 in human blood cultures.

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    Erwin Verkade

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, a clone of MRSA with clonal complex 398 (CC398 has emerged that is related to an extensive reservoir in animals, especially pigs and veal calves. It has been reported previously that methicillin-susceptible variants of CC398 circulate among humans at low frequency, and these have been isolated in a few cases of bloodstream infections (BSI. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. aureus CC398 in blood cultures taken from patients in a geographic area with a high density of pigs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In total, 612 consecutive episodes of S. aureus BSI diagnosed before and during the emergence of CC398 were included. Three strains (2 MSSA and 1 MRSA that were isolated from bacteremic patients between 2010-2011 were positive in a CC398 specific PCR. There was a marked increase in prevalence of S. aureus CC398 BSI isolated between 2010-2011 compared to the combined collections that were isolated between 1996-1998 and 2002-2005 (3/157, 1.9% vs. 0/455, 0.0%; p = 0.017. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, in an area with a relative high density of pigs, S. aureus CC398 was found as a cause of BSI in humans only recently. This indicates that S. aureus CC398 is able to cause invasive infections in humans and that the prevalence is rising. Careful monitoring of the evolution and epidemiology of S. aureus CC398 in animals and humans is therefore important.

  9. Complexity, Compassion and Self-Organisation: Human Evolution and the Vulnerable Ape Hypothesis

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    Nick P. Winder

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans are agents capable of helping others, learning new behaviours and forgetting old ones. The evolutionary approach to archaeological systems has therefore been hampered by the 'modern synthesis' - a gene-centred model of evolution as a process that eliminates those that cannot handle stress. The result has been a form of environmental determinism that explains human evolution in terms of heroic struggles and selective winnowing. Biologists committed to the modern synthesis have either dismissed agency as a delusion wrought in our bodies by natural selection, or imposed a sharp, Cartesian split between 'natural' and 'artificial' ecologies. We revisit the seminal literature of evolutionary biology and show that the paradigmatic fault lines of 21st century anthropology can be traced back to the 19th century and beyond. Lamarck had developed a two-factor evolutionary theory - one factor an endogenous tendency to become more advanced and complex, the other an exogenous constraint that drove organisms into conformity with environment. Darwin tried to eliminate the progressive tendency and imposed linearity constraints on evolution that Thomas Henry Huxley rejected. When experimental evidence falsified Darwin's linear hypothesis, the race began to develop a new, gene-centred model of evolution. This became the modern synthesis. The modern synthesis is now under pressure from the evidence of anthropology, sociology, palaeontology, ecology and genetics. An 'extended synthesis' is emerging. If evolution is adequately summarised by the aphorism survival of the fittest, then 'fitness' cannot always be defined in the heroic sense of 'better able to compete and reproduce'. The fittest organisms are often those that evade selective winnowing, even when their ability to compete and reproduce has been compromised by their genes. Characteristically human traits like language, abstraction, compassion and altruism may have arisen as coping strategies that

  10. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

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    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  11. Using virtual humans and computer animations to learn complex motor skills: a case study in karate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanlang Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning motor skills is a complex task involving a lot of cognitive issues. One of the main issues consists in retrieving the relevant information from the learning environment. In a traditional learning situation, a teacher gives oral explanations and performs actions to provide the learner with visual examples. Using virtual reality (VR as a tool for learning motor tasks is promising. However, it raises questions about the type of information this kind of environments can offer. In this paper, we propose to analyze the impact of virtual humans on the perception of the learners. As a case study, we propose to apply this research problem to karate gestures. The results of this study show no significant difference on the after training performance of learners confronted to three different learning environments (traditional group, video and VR.

  12. A model of human collective decision-making in complex environments

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    A continuous-time Markov process is proposed to analyze how a group of humans solves a complex task, consisting in the search of the optimal set of decisions on a fitness landscape. Individuals change their opinions driven by two different forces: (i) the rational behavior which pushes them to change their opinions as to increase their own fitness values, and (ii) the social interactions which push individuals to reduce the diversity of their opinions in order to reach consensus. Results show that the performance of the group is strongly affected by the strength of social interactions and by the level of knowledge of the individuals. Increasing the strength of social interactions improves the performance of the team. However, too strong social interactions slow down the search of the optimal solution and worsen the performance of the group. We prove that a moderate level of knowledge is already enough to guarantee high performance of the group in making decisions.

  13. A novel therapeutic strategy for experimental stroke using docosahexaenoic acid complexed to human albumin

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    Belayev Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous efforts in ischemic stroke research and significant improvements in patient care within the last decade, therapy is still insufficient. There is a compelling, urgent need for safe and effective neuroprotective strategies to limit brain injury, facilitate brain repair, and improve functional outcome. Recently, we reported that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3 complexed to human albumin (DHA-Alb is highly neuroprotective after temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo in young rats. This review highlights the potency of DHA-Alb therapy in permanent MCAo and aged rats and whether protection persists with chronic survival. We discovered that a novel therapy with DHA-Alb improved behavioral outcomes accompanied by attenuation of lesion volumes even when animals were allowed to survive three weeks after experimental stroke. This treatment might provide the basis for future therapeutics for patients suffering from ischemic stroke.

  14. Interplay between Human Cytomegalovirus and Intrinsic/Innate Host Responses: A Complex Bidirectional Relationship

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    Giada Rossini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and its host is a complex process that begins with viral attachment and entry into host cells, culminating in the development of a specific adaptive response that clears the acute infection but fails to eradicate HCMV. We review the viral and cellular partners that mediate early host responses to HCMV with regard to the interaction between structural components of virions (viral glycoprot