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Sample records for human common femoral

  1. MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF MEDIAL CIRCUMFLEX FEMORAL ARTERY IN HUMAN CADAVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh R. Aghera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medial circumflex femoral artery is an important branch of Profunda femoris artery. It is an important artery in supplying blood to the head and neck of the femur, the adductor muscles and form anastomosis around head of femur. So study of variation of medial circumflex femoral artery great value for surgeon and orthopaedic surgeries. Materials and Methods: The present study includes 102 lower limbs of adult formalin fixed human cadavers used for the routine dissection procedure for under graduate and post graduate students in the department of Anatomy, M.R. Medical College, KBN Medical college and H K E Homeopathic College, Gulbarga (India during 2011-2014.The study was done by dissection method as per Cunningham’s manual of practical Anatomy. Result: In present study, we found that 25 extremities (25.49% medial circumflex femoral artery was originated directly from femoral artery. In 10 extremities (9.80% a common trunk was observed form medial circumflex femoral with femoral artery. Normal study was observed in 66 extremities (64.70%. Conclusion: In present study and other past studies we conclude that knowledge of variation in this artery is very important to preventing injury to vessels during surgical procedures around hip joint and also has important value in plastic surgery operations as the vascular pedicle of grafts such as the transverse upper gracilis (TUG flap, medial thigh flap and medial circumflex femoral (gracilis perforator free flap. During case of selective arteriography in ischaemic necrosis of the femoral head to know the arterial supply of the femoral head it is used.

  2. Common femoral vein reconstruction using internal jugular vein after blast injury.

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    Holt, Andrew M; West, Charles A; Davis, James A; Gilani, Ramyar; Askenasy, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Common femoral vein traumatic injuries are rare. Surgical management is controversial and by nature case specific. In this report, we present an unusual case of an isolated common femoral vein injury from a gunshot blast repaired with an interposition internal jugular vein bypass. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an isolated common femoral vein reconstructed in this manner.

  3. Subchondral bone density distribution in the human femoral head

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    Wright, David A.; Meguid, Michael; Lubovsky, Omri; Whyne, Cari M. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    This study aims to quantitatively characterize the distribution of subchondral bone density across the human femoral head using a computed tomography derived measurement of bone density and a common reference coordinate system. Femoral head surfaces were created bilaterally for 30 patients (14 males, 16 females, mean age 67.2 years) through semi-automatic segmentation of reconstructed CT data and used to map bone density, by shrinking them into the subchondral bone and averaging the greyscale values (linearly related to bone density) within 5 mm of the articular surface. Density maps were then oriented with the center of the head at the origin, the femoral mechanical axis (FMA) aligned with the vertical, and the posterior condylar axis (PCA) aligned with the horizontal. Twelve regions were created by dividing the density maps into three concentric rings at increments of 30 from the horizontal, then splitting into four quadrants along the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. Mean values for each region were compared using repeated measures ANOVA and a Bonferroni post hoc test, and side-to-side correlations were analyzed using a Pearson's correlation. The regions representing the medial side of the femoral head's superior portion were found to have significantly higher densities compared to other regions (p < 0.05). Significant side-to-side correlations were found for all regions (r {sup 2} = 0.81 to r {sup 2} = 0.16), with strong correlations for the highest density regions. Side-to-side differences in measured bone density were seen for two regions in the anterio-lateral portion of the femoral head (p < 0.05). The high correlation found between the left and right sides indicates that this tool may be useful for understanding 'normal' density patterns in hips affected by unilateral pathologies such as avascular necrosis, fracture, developmental dysplasia of the hip, Perthes disease, and slipped capital femoral head epiphysis. (orig.)

  4. Risk Factors for Surgical-Site Infection Following Common Femoral Artery Endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Wouter J. M.; Verhoeven, Bart A. N.; van de Mortel, Rob H. W.; Moll, Frans L.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a major complication following endarterectomy of the common femoral artery. The aim of this single-center study was to determine risk factors for surgical-site infection after endarterectomy of the common femoral artery and especially the possible association between patch

  5. Iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein resulting in acute lower leg edema

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    Hwang, Seung Bae; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Jeong, Yeon Jun [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    The clinical manifestations related to iliopsoas bursitis can vary due to compression of the adjacent structure such as the common femoral vein, nerve and bladder. We report here on a rare case of iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein that resulted in acute lower leg edema.

  6. From puncture to closure of the common femoral artery in endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lönn, Lars; Larzon, Thomas; Van Den Berg, Jos C

    2010-01-01

    or epidural anesthesia. The evolving stent-technology with smaller sheath sizes has broadened the scenario for alternative approaches for access and closure of the common femoral arteries. The following review presents an introduction on technical aspects of puncture of the femoral artery and closure...

  7. Adventitial cystic disease of the common femoral vein presenting as deep vein thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Kyun Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adventitial cystic disease of the common femoral vein is a rare condition. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with painless swelling in her left lower leg that resembled deep vein thrombosis. She underwent femoral exploration and excision of the cystic wall. The presentation, investigation, treatment, and pathology of this condition are discussed with a literature review.

  8. Valsalva and gravitational variability of the internal jugular vein and common femoral vein: Ultrasound assessment

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    Beddy, P. [Department of Radiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland)]. E-mail: pbeddy@eircom.net; Geoghegan, T. [Department of Radiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Ramesh, N. [Department of Radiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Buckley, O. [Department of Radiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); O' Brien, J. [Department of Radiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Colville, J. [Department of Radiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Torreggiani, W.C. [Department of Radiology, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24 (Ireland)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: Central venous cannulation via the common femoral vein is an important starting point for many interventions. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum conditions for cannulation of the femoral vein and to compare these with the relative changes in the internal jugular vein. Methods: High-resolution 2D ultrasound was utilised to determine variability of the calibre of the femoral and internal jugular veins in 10 healthy subjects. Venous diameter was assessed during the Valsalva manoeuvre and in different degrees of the Trendelenburg position. Results: The Valsalva manoeuvre significantly increased the size of the femoral and internal jugular veins. There was a relatively greater increase in femoral vein diameter when compared with the internal jugular vein of 40 and 29%, respectively. Changes in body inclination (Trendelenburg position) did not significantly alter the luminal diameter of the femoral vein. However, it significantly increased internal jugular vein diameter. Conclusions: Femoral vein cannulation is augmented by the Valsalva manoeuvre but not significantly altered by the gravitational position of the subject.

  9. Is there already a place for endovascular treatment of the common femoral artery?

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    Geiger, M; Deloose, K; Callaert, J; Bosiers, M

    2015-02-01

    Surgical endarterectomy has been considered the prefered technique for treating the common femoral artery (CFA). Although favorable endovascular treatment results of the CFA have recently become available, losing the groin area as an important acess site is still the major concern for this technique to become the golden standart. Nevertheless, the endovascular approach has shown, through several studies, including our experience, the capacity to establish itself as a complementery treatment for the modern vascular surgeon.

  10. Blood flow and microdialysis in the human femoral head

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: If it would be possible to detect lack of flow and/or the development of ischemia in bone, we might have a way of predicting whether a broken bone will heal. We established microdialysis (MD) and laser Doppler (LD) flow measurement in the human femoral head in order to be able to detect...... ischemia and measure changes in blood flow. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 9 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty for primary osteoarthrosis, two MD catheters were inserted into the femoral head through two drill holes after the blood flow had been visualized by LD. Then primary samples were collected...... detected within 2 h of cessation of blood flow in most patients....

  11. Elemental distribution in human femoral head

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    Santos, C., E-mail: catia.santos@itn.pt [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, IST/CTN, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Fonseca, M. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Universidade Europeia|Laureate International Universities, 1500-210 Lisboa (Portugal); Corregidor, V. [Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, IST/CTN, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Silva, H. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, IST/CTN, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Luís, H.; Jesus, A.P. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2014-07-15

    Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease with severe symptoms and harmful effects on the patient quality of life. Because abnormal distribution and concentration of the major and trace elements may help to characterize the disease, ion beam analysis is applied to the study of bone samples. Proton Induced X-ray Emission and Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry are applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of an osteoporotic bone sample, for the determination of the Ca/P ratio and analysis of the distribution of major and trace elements. The analysis was made both in trabecular and cortical bone and the results are in agreement with the information found in literature.

  12. Elemental distribution in human femoral head

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    Santos, C.; Fonseca, M.; Corregidor, V.; Silva, H.; Luís, H.; Jesus, A. P.; Branco, J.; Alves, L. C.

    2014-07-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common bone disease with severe symptoms and harmful effects on the patient quality of life. Because abnormal distribution and concentration of the major and trace elements may help to characterize the disease, ion beam analysis is applied to the study of bone samples. Proton Induced X-ray Emission and Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry are applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of an osteoporotic bone sample, for the determination of the Ca/P ratio and analysis of the distribution of major and trace elements. The analysis was made both in trabecular and cortical bone and the results are in agreement with the information found in literature.

  13. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism caused by an intravascular synovial sarcoma of the common femoral vein.

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    Schoneveld, J M; Debing, E; Verfaillie, G; Geers, C; Van den Brande, P

    2012-11-01

    Malignant tumors arising in deep veins of the lower extremities are very uncommon. To our best knowledge, this is the seventh case of a primary venous intravascular synovial sarcoma (SS) reported in literature. A 32-year-old woman was admitted with a second episode of deep venous thrombosis of the right lower limb and pulmonary embolism. Physical and radiological examinations showed besides the thrombosis a tumor arising from the right common femoral vein involving the bifurcation of the common femoral artery. At surgery, en block resection of the tumor including the deep femoral vein and arterial bifurcation was done with an arterial reconstruction using a synthetic graft. Histopathological examination revealed an intravascular SS of the common femoral vein. The mainstay of curative therapy is complete surgical resection of all tumor manifestations with negative histological margins.

  14. Evaluation of electric field distribution in electromagnetic stimulation of human femoral head.

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    Su, Yukun; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Ellenrieder, Martin; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; van Rienen, Ursula; Bader, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation is a common therapy used to support bone healing in the case of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. In the present study, we investigated a bipolar induction screw system with an integrated coil. The aim was to analyse the influence of the screw parameters on the electric field distribution in the human femoral head. In addition, three kinds of design parameters (the shape of the screw tip, position of the screw in the femoral head, and size of the screw insulation) were varied. The electric field distribution in the bone was calculated using the finite element software Comsol Multiphysics. Moreover, a validation experiment was set up for an identical bone specimen with an implanted screw. The electric potential of points inside and on the surface of the bone were measured and compared to numerical data. The electric field distribution within the bone was clearly changed by the different implant parameters. Repositioning the screw by a maximum of 10 mm and changing the insulation length by a maximum of 4 mm resulted in electric field volume changes of 16% and 7%, respectively. By comparing the results of numerical simulation with the data of the validation experiment, on average, the electric potential difference of 19% and 24% occurred when the measuring points were at a depth of approximately 5 mm within the femoral bone and directly on the surface of the femoral bone, respectively. The results of the numerical simulations underline that the electro-stimulation treatment of bone in clinical applications can be influenced by the implant parameters. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Management of Isolated Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Common Femoral Artery: A Review of the Literature.

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    Halpin, David; Erben, Young; Jayasuriya, Sasanka; Cua, Bennett; Jhamnani, Sunny; Mena-Hurtado, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    Common femoral endarterectomy (CFE) remains the standard of care for treatment of atherosclerotic stenosis of the common femoral artery (CFA). Endovascular interventions have become the first-line therapy for atherosclerotic disease of the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal systems. Recent reports have documented high rates of technical success and low rates of complications with endovascular management of CFA stenosis. This study is a contemporary review of the surgical and endovascular literature on the management CFA stenosis and compares the results of these methods. A search of OVID Medline identified all published reports of revascularization of isolated atherosclerotic CFA stenosis. For each study selected for review, the number of patients, number of limbs treated, percentage of patients with critical limb ischemia, and mean length of follow-up was recorded. Study end points included survival, primary patency, freedom from target lesion revascularization (TLR), freedom from amputation, and complications. The review included 7 CFE studies and 4 endovascular studies. Survival was similar between the groups. Primary patency was consistently higher with CFE compared to endovascular therapy. Freedom from TLR was lower with CFE compared to endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality was also higher with CFE compared to endovascular therapy. Freedom from amputation was not consistently reported in the endovascular studies. There is limited data to support endovascular treatment of isolated CFA atherosclerosis. CFE has durable results, but there is significant morbidity and mortality resulting from this procedure. Endovascular interventions have low rates of complications, high rates of technical success, good short-term patency but increased need for repeat interventions when compared to surgery. Further trial data comparing CFE with endovascular therapy is needed to guide the management of CFA stenosis.

  16. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Antegrade Common Femoral Artery Puncture Techniques

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    Slattery, Michael M.; Goh, Gerard S.; Power, Sarah; Given, Mark F.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo prospectively compare the procedural time and complication rates of ultrasound-guided and fluoroscopy-assisted antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture techniques.Materials and MethodsHundred consecutive patients, undergoing a vascular procedure for which an antegrade approach was deemed necessary/desirable, were randomly assigned to undergo either ultrasound-guided or fluoroscopy-assisted CFA puncture. Time taken from administration of local anaesthetic to vascular sheath insertion in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), patients’ age, body mass index (BMI), fluoroscopy radiation dose, haemostasis method and immediate complications were recorded. Mean and median values were calculated and statistically analysed with unpaired t tests.ResultsSixty-nine male and 31 female patients underwent antegrade puncture (mean age 66.7 years). The mean BMI was 25.7 for the ultrasound-guided (n = 53) and 25.3 for the fluoroscopy-assisted (n = 47) groups. The mean time taken for the ultrasound-guided puncture was 7 min 46 s and for the fluoroscopy-assisted technique was 9 min 41 s (p = 0.021). Mean fluoroscopy dose area product in the fluoroscopy group was 199 cGy cm{sup 2}. Complications included two groin haematomas in the ultrasound-guided group and two retroperitoneal haematomas and one direct SFA puncture in the fluoroscopy-assisted group.ConclusionUltrasound-guided technique is faster and safer for antegrade CFA puncture when compared to the fluoroscopic-assisted technique alone.

  17. Nitrite and S-Nitrosohemoglobin Exchange Across the Human Cerebral and Femoral Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Peter, Rasmussen; Overgaard, Morten

    2017-01-01

    their relative contribution in vivo, we quantified arterial-venous concentration gradients across the human cerebral and femoral circulation at rest and during exercise, an ideal model system characterized by physiological extremes of O2 tension and blood flow. METHODS: Ten healthy participants (5 men, 5 women...... simultaneously from the brachial artery and internal jugular and femoral veins with plasma and RBC nitric oxide metabolites measured by tri-iodide reductive chemiluminescence. Blood flow was determined by transcranial Doppler ultrasound (cerebral blood flow) and constant infusion thermodilution (femoral blood......) in proportion to the reduction in RBC oxygenation (r=0.680-0.769, Parterial>venous; Parterial; P

  18. Common site of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head based on three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

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    Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the common sites of subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head (SIF) based on three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of MR images. In 33 hips of 31 consecutive patients diagnosed with SIF, 3-D reconstruction of the bone, fracture, and acetabular edge was performed using MR images. These 3-D images were used to measure the fractured areas and clarify the positional relationship between the fracture and degree of acetabular coverage. The fractured area in the anterior portion was significantly larger than in the posterior area. In 11 cases, the fractures contacted the acetabular edge and were distributed on the lateral portion. The indices of acetabular coverage (center-edge angle and acetabular head index) in these cases were less than the normal range. In the remaining 22 cases, the fractures were apart from the acetabular edge and distributed on the mediolateral centerline of the femoral head. The majority of these cases had normal acetabular coverage. The common site of SIF is the anterior portion. In addition, two types of SIF are proposed: (1) Lateral type: the contact stress between the acetabular edge and lateral portion of the femoral head causes SIF based on the insufficient acetabular coverage, and (2) Central type: the contact stress between the acetabular surface and the mediolateral center of the femoral head causes SIF independent from the insufficiency of acetabular coverage. These findings may be useful for considering the treatment and prevention of SIF. (orig.)

  19. Femoral curvature in Neanderthals and modern humans: a 3D geometric morphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Isabelle

    2011-05-01

    Since their discovery, Neanderthals have been described as having a marked degree of anteroposterior curvature of the femoral shaft. Although initially believed to be pathological, subsequent discoveries of Neanderthal remains lead femoral curvature to be considered as a derived Neanderthal feature. A recent study on Neanderthals and middle and early Upper Palaeolithic modern humans found no differences in femoral curvature, but did not consider size-corrected curvature. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to use 3D morphometric landmark and semi-landmark analysis to quantify relative femoral curvature in Neanderthals, Upper Palaeolithic and recent modern humans, and to compare adult bone curvature as part of the overall femoral morphology among these populations. Comparisons among populations were made using geometric morphometrics (3D landmarks) and standard multivariate methods. Comparative material involved all available complete femora from Neanderthal and Upper Palaeolithic modern human, archaeological (Mesolithic, Neolithic, Medieval) and recent human populations representing a wide geographical and lifestyle range. There are significant differences in the anatomy of the femur between Neanderthals and modern humans. Neanderthals have more curved femora than modern humans. Early modern humans are most similar to recent modern humans in their anatomy. Femoral curvature is a good indicator of activity level and habitual loading of the lower limb, indicating higher activity levels in Neanderthals than modern humans. These differences contradict robusticity studies and the archaeological record, and would suggest that femoral morphology, and curvature in particular, in Neanderthals may not be explained by adult behavior alone and could be the result of genetic drift, natural selection or differences in behavior during ontogeny.

  20. Common ecology quantifies human insurgency.

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    Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Gourley, Sean; Dixon, Alexander R; Spagat, Michael; Johnson, Neil F

    2009-12-17

    Many collective human activities, including violence, have been shown to exhibit universal patterns. The size distributions of casualties both in whole wars from 1816 to 1980 and terrorist attacks have separately been shown to follow approximate power-law distributions. However, the possibility of universal patterns ranging across wars in the size distribution or timing of within-conflict events has barely been explored. Here we show that the sizes and timing of violent events within different insurgent conflicts exhibit remarkable similarities. We propose a unified model of human insurgency that reproduces these commonalities, and explains conflict-specific variations quantitatively in terms of underlying rules of engagement. Our model treats each insurgent population as an ecology of dynamically evolving, self-organized groups following common decision-making processes. Our model is consistent with several recent hypotheses about modern insurgency, is robust to many generalizations, and establishes a quantitative connection between human insurgency, global terrorism and ecology. Its similarity to financial market models provides a surprising link between violent and non-violent forms of human behaviour.

  1. Feasibility and Safety of Vascular Closure Devices in an Antegrade Approach to Either the Common Femoral Artery or the Superficial Femoral Artery

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    Gutzeit, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.gutzeit@ksw.ch; Schie, Bram van, E-mail: Bram.vanschie@hotmail.com; Schoch, Eric, E-mail: eric.schoch@ksw.ch [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Hergan, Klaus, E-mail: k.hergan@salk.at [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology (Austria); Graf, Nicole, E-mail: graf@biostatistics.ch; Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: christoph.binkert@ksw.ch [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to analyze complications following antegrade puncture of the common femoral artery (CFA) and the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using vascular closure systems (VCS). Methods: A single-center, retrospective study was performed after obtaining approval from the institutional review board and informed consent from all patients. At our center, the CFA or SFA are used for arterial access. All patients were evaluated clinically on the same day. If there was any suspicion of an access site problem, Duplex ultrasound was performed. Results: Access location was the CFA in 50 patients and the SFA in 130 patients. The sheath size ranged from 4F to 10F. Two patients had to be excluded because of lack of follow-up. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 162 of 178 cases (91 %). The following complications were observed in 16 patients (8.9 %): 4 pseudoaneurysms (2.2 %), 11 hematomas (6.2 %), and 1 vascular occlusion (0.5 %). The two pseudoaneurysms healed spontaneously, in one case an ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was performed, and one aneurysm was compressed manually. No further medical therapy was needed for the hematomas. The one vascular occlusion was treated immediately with angioplasty using a contralateral approach. No significant difference was noted between the CFA and the SFA group with respect to complications (p = 1.000). Conclusions: The use of closure devices for an antegrade approach up to 10F is feasible and safe. No differences in low complication rates were observed between CFA and SFA.

  2. Cortical and trabecular load sharing in the human femoral neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawathe, Shashank; Nguyen, Bich Phuong; Barzanian, Nasim; Akhlaghpour, Hosna; Bouxsein, Mary L; Keaveny, Tony M

    2015-03-18

    The relative role of the cortical vs trabecular bone in the load-carrying capacity of the proximal femur-a fundamental issue in both basic-science and clinical biomechanics-remains unclear. To gain insight into this issue, we performed micro-CT-based, linear elastic finite element analysis (61.5-micron-sized elements; ~280 million elements per model) on 18 proximal femurs (5M, 13F, ages 61-93 years) to quantify the fraction of frontal-plane bending moment shared by the cortical vs trabecular bone in the femoral neck, as well as the associated spatial distributions of stress. Analyses were performed separately for a sideways fall and stance loading. For both loading modes and across all 18 bones, we found consistent patterns of load-sharing in the neck: most proximally, the trabecular bone took most of the load; moving distally, the cortical bone took increasingly more of the load; and more distally, there was a region of uniform load-sharing, the cortical bone taking the majority of the load. This distal region of uniform load-sharing extended more for fall than stance loading (77 ± 8% vs 51 ± 6% of the neck length for fall vs. stance; mean ± SD) but the fraction of total load taken by the cortical bone in that region was greater for stance loading (88 ± 5% vs. 64 ± 9% for stance vs. fall). Locally, maximum stress levels occurred in the cortical bone distally, but in the trabecular bone proximally. Although the distal cortex showed qualitative stress distributions consistent with the behavior of an Euler-type beam, quantitatively beam theory did not apply. We conclude that consistent and well-delineated regions of uniform load-sharing and load-transfer between the cortical and trabecular bone exist within the femoral neck, the details of which depend on the external loading conditions.

  3. Femoral morphology and femoropelvic musculoskeletal anatomy of humans and great apes: a comparative virtopsy study.

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    Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Nishimura, Takeshi; Zollikofer, Christoph P E

    2011-09-01

    The proximal femoral morphology of fossil hominins is routinely interpreted in terms of muscular topography and associated locomotor modes. However, the detailed correspondence between hard and soft tissue structures in the proximal femoral region of extant great apes is relatively unknown, because dissection protocols typically do not comprise in-depth osteological descriptions. Here, we use computed tomography and virtopsy (virtual dissection) for non-invasive examination of the femoropelvic musculoskeletal anatomy in Pan troglodytes, P. paniscus, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens. Specifically, we analyze the topographic relationship between muscle attachment sites and surface structures of the proximal femoral shaft such as the lateral spiral pilaster. Our results show that the origin of the vastus lateralis muscle is anterior to the insertion of gluteus maximus in all examined great ape specimens and humans. In gorillas and orangutans, the insertion of gluteus maximus is on the inferior (anterolateral) side of the lateral spiral pilaster. In chimpanzees, however, the maximus insertion is on its superior (posteromedial) side, similar to the situation in modern humans. These findings support the hypothesis that chimpanzees and humans exhibit a shared-derived musculoskeletal topography of the proximal femoral region, irrespective of their different locomotor modes, whereas gorillas and orangutans represent the primitive condition. Caution is thus warranted when inferring locomotor behavior from the surface topography of the proximal femur of fossil hominins, as the morphology of this region may contain a strong phyletic signal that tends to blur locomotor adaptation.

  4. An analysis of factors affecting the mercury content in the human femoral bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, A; Dąbrowski, M; Kubaszewski, Ł; Rogala, P; Kowalski, A; Frankowski, M

    2017-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the content of mercury in bone tissue of the proximal femur (head and neck bone) of 95 patients undergoing total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis, using CF-AFS analytical technique. Furthermore, the investigations were aimed at assessing the impact of selected factors, such as age, gender, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to chemical substance at work, type of degenerative changes, clinical evaluation and radiological parameters, type of medications, on the concentration of mercury in the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Mercury was obtained in all samples of the head and neck of the femur (n = 190) in patients aged 25-91 years. The mean content of mercury for the whole group of patients was as follows: 37.1 ± 35.0 ng/g for the femoral neck and 24.2 ± 19.5 ng/g for the femoral head. The highest Hg contents were found in femoral neck samples, both in women and men, and they amounted to 169.6 and 176.5 ng/g, respectively. The research showed that the mercury content of bones can be associated with body mass index, differences in body anatomy, and gender. The uses of statistical analysis gave the possibility to define the influence of factors on mercury content in human femoral bones.

  5. Iatrogenic injuries of the common femoral artery (CFA) and external iliac artery (EIA) during endograft placement: an underdiagnosed entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Patel, Nirav; Gopal, Kapil; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-09-01

    Early limb occlusions following endovascular treatment of aorto-iliac aneurysmal disease is not uncommon (4%-13%). To assess whether the femoral artery entry site could potentially cause this complication, we prospectively evaluated the ipsilateral common femoral artery (CFA) and distal external iliac artery (EIA) with intraoperative duplex scans (IDS). There were 134 patients with infrarenal nonruptured abdominal aorto-iliac aneurysms treated with endografts since 2002 at our institution. Age ranged from 65 to 89 years (mean: 77 +/- 7 years). Aneuryx (n = 41), Zenith (n = 50), and Excluder (n = 43) endografts were used for repair. All procedures were performed via open exposure of the CFA. Introducer diameter varied from 12 mm to 22 mm. All patients underwent IDS of the CFA and distal EIA after repair of the arteriotomies. In 34 patients (25%), we documented intimal dissections causing severe (>70%) stenoses. Of the 271 arteries that were examined, 38 (14%) had abnormal findings that demanded intervention. These were repaired with flap excision, tacking sutures revision, or patch angioplasty (n = 36). Repeat IDS confirmed the adequacy of the repair. No statistical difference was noted if the site of larger introducer sheath and the incidence of flap formation. In addition, 10 small flaps or plaques were visualized but did not create significant stenosis. No differences were noted in the incidence of positive duplex exams between each type graft (P = .4). No early or late iliac limb occlusions were noted. Follow-up of 94% was obtained. Completion arterial duplex scans are helpful in detecting a substantial number of clinically unsuspected technical defects caused by introducer sheaths. Timely diagnosis and repair of these defects may decrease the incidence of early limb occlusion following endograft placement.

  6. Quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscenti, G; De Maria, C; Sebastiani, E; Tei, M; Placella, G; Speziali, A; Vozzi, G; Cerulli, G

    2015-12-16

    The evaluation of viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament is fundamental to understand its physiological function and contribution as stabilizer for the selection of the methods of repair and reconstruction and for the development of scaffolds with adequate mechanical properties. In this work, 12 human specimens were tested to evaluate the time- and history-dependent non linear viscoelastic properties of human medial patello-femoral ligament using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory formulated by Fung et al. (1972) and modified by Abramowitch and Woo (2004). The five constant of the QLV theory, used to describe the instantaneous elastic response and the reduced relaxation function on stress relaxation experiments, were successfully evaluated. It was found that the constant A was 1.21±0.96MPa and the dimensionless constant B was 26.03±4.16. The magnitude of viscous response, the constant C, was 0.11±0.02 and the initial and late relaxation time constants τ1 and τ2 were 6.32±1.76s and 903.47±504.73s respectively. The total stress relaxation was 32.7±4.7%. To validate our results, the obtained constants were used to evaluate peak stresses from a cyclic stress relaxation test on three different specimens. The theoretically predicted values fit the experimental ones demonstrating that the QLV theory could be used to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the human medial patello-femoral ligament.

  7. Collagen fiber orientation in the femoral necks of apes and humans: do their histological structures reflect differences in locomotor loading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmey, J K; Lovejoy, C O

    2002-08-01

    Human hip joint anatomy differs substantially from that in other primates. Humans modulate pelvic tilt during walking with a highly developed abductor apparatus, but other primates (such as chimpanzees) clearly lack such an apparatus (they exhibit a Trendelenburg gait during bipedal progression). Because the primate femoral neck is cantilevered whenever it supports body mass, it must be consistently subjected to substantial bending at the neck/shaft interface during stance phase in quadrupedal or bipedal locomotion. It has been argued, however, that the powerful abduction during the single support phase in humans results in almost entirely compressive stress on the human femoral neck. We examined collagen fiber orientation in human and chimpanzee femoral neck cortices using circularly polarized light, which has been shown to be a strong correlate of bone loading patterns. Chimpanzee superior femoral neck cortex was shown to be largely nonbirefringent (dark), but the inferior cortex was strongly birefringent. Human femoral necks showed strong birefringence both superiorly and inferiorly. These results are consistent with loading patterns suggested from anatomical structure, and provide corroborative evidence of bone's ability to preferentially orient collagen fibers during extracellular matrix deposition.

  8. Distinct Differences on Neointima Formation in Immunodeficient and Humanized Mice after Carotid or Femoral Arterial Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jill; van Ark, Joris; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is widely adopted to treat patients with coronary artery disease. However, restenosis remains an unsolved clinical problem after vascular interventions. The role of the systemic and local immune response in the development of restenosis is not fully understood. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the human immune system on subsequent neointima formation elicited by vascular injury in a humanized mouse model. Immunodeficient NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIL2rgtm1Wjl(NSG) mice were reconstituted with human (h)PBMCs immediately after both carotid wire and femoral cuff injury were induced in order to identify how differences in the severity of injury influenced endothelial regeneration, neointima formation, and homing of human inflammatory and progenitor cells. In contrast to non-reconstituted mice, hPBMC reconstitution reduced neointima formation after femoral cuff injury whereas hPBMCs promoted neointima formation after carotid wire injury 4 weeks after induction of injury. Neointimal endothelium and smooth muscle cells in the injured arteries were of mouse origin. Our results indicate that the immune system may differentially respond to arterial injury depending on the severity of injury, which may also be influenced by the intrinsic properties of the arteries themselves, resulting in either minimal or aggravated neointima formation. PMID:27759053

  9. Biomechanical and system analysis of the human femoral bone: correlation and anatomical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad John J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human femur is the subsystem of the locomotor apparatus and has got four levels of its organization. This phenomenon is the result of the evolution of the locomotor apparatus, encompassing both constitutional and individual variability. The main aim of this investigation was to study the organization of the human femur as a system of collaborating anatomical structures and, on the basis of system analysis, to define the less stable parameters, whose reorganization can cause the exchange of the system's status. Methods Twenty-five (25 linear and non-linear (angle parameters were, therefore, investigated by specially designed tool and caliper on a material of 166 macerated human femurs of adult individuals of both sexes. The absolute values were transformed into the relative one (1.0 by the meaning of the transverse diameter of the femoral diaphysis, and handled with current methods of descriptive statistical analysis. By the value of variance (q2, the results were distributed into four major classes. Results The belonging of each group to the class was subsequently estimated in grades. According to this method, the excerpt was distributed into four classes as well depending on the total grades. The Pearson's coefficient in each class was calculated between the relative values of the investigated parameters. Two generations of system parameters were subsequently defined and analyzed. Conclusion This study has derived that the system meaning of each level of the femoral organization is related to the 'shaping effect' of femoral units' functions. Inasmuch as the angular parameters were most instable at this system, they were defined as morphological substrates of the individual variety.

  10. Safety and efficacy of distal perfusion catheterization to prevent limb ischemia after common femoral artery cannulation for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Chang Ho; Seong, Nak Jong; Yoon, Chang Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) cannula has the potential for obstructing flow to the lower limb, thus causing severe ischemia and possible limb loss. We evaluated the safety and clinical efficacy of percutaneous distal perfusion catheterization in preventing limb ischemia. Between March 2013 and February 2015, 28 patients with distal perfusion catheterization after ECMO were included in this retrospective study. The technical success was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound at the popliteal level after saline injection via distal perfusion catheter. Clinical success was assessed when at least one of the following conditions was met: restoration of continuous peripheral limb oximetry value or presence of distal arterial pulse on Doppler ultrasound evaluation or resolution of early ischemic sign after connecting the catheter with ECMO. Twenty-six patients with early ischemia were successfully cannulated with a distal perfusion catheter (92.8%). Clinical success was achieved in 12/28 (42.8%) patients; 8/10 (80.0%) patients with survival duration exceeding 7 days and 4/18 (22.2%) patients with survival duration less than 7 days, respectively. A percutaneous distal perfusion catheter placement was a feasible tool with safety and efficacy in preventing lower limb ischemia for patients with prolonged common femoral arterial cannulation for ECMO.

  11. Femoral hernia causing pneumoperitoneum.

    OpenAIRE

    King, H. A.; Boulter, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    Richter's hernia, in which only a portion of the circumference of the intestine lies within the sac, is a common complication of femoral hernia. This case report is of 39 year old female who presented with a pneumoperitoneum and was found at laparotomy to have a right femoral Richter's hernia containing a knuckle of perforated small bowel. This is a previously unreported presentation of femoral hernia.

  12. Common Metrics for Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, Aaron; Lewis, Michael; Fong, Terrence; Scholtz, Jean; Schultz, Alan; Kaber, David; Goodrich, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to identify common metrics for task-oriented human-robot interaction (HRI). We begin by discussing the need for a toolkit of HRI metrics. We then describe the framework of our work and identify important biasing factors that must be taken into consideration. Finally, we present suggested common metrics for standardization and a case study. Preparation of a larger, more detailed toolkit is in progress.

  13. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  14. Microdialysis in the femoral head of the minipig and in a blood cloth of human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgehøj, Morten Foged; Emmeluth, Claus; Overgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Microdialysis can detect ischemia in soft tissue. In a previous study, we have shown the development of ischemia in the femoral head removed from patients undergoing total hip replacement. That study also raised some methodological questions that this study tries to answer: what...... is happening in the dead space around the catheter in the drill canal, and is there an equilibrium period after the insertion of the catheter? Material and methods In an ex-vivo study using 5 syringes with 5 mL human blood, a microdialysis catheter was inserted and microdialysis was performed over 3 h....... In an in-vivo study, a drill hole was made in the proximal part of the femur in 6 mature Göttingen minipigs and microdialysis was performed over 3 h. The pigs were kept normoventilated during the experiment. Results The ex-vivo microdialysis results showed that lactate kept a steady level and glucose...

  15. Humanism as a common factor in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2012-12-01

    There are many forms of psychotherapies, each distinctive in its own way. From the origins of psychotherapy, it has been suggested that psychotherapy is effective through factors that are common to all therapies. In this article, I suggest that the commonalities that are at the core of psychotherapy are related to evolved human characteristics, which include (a) making sense of the world, (b) influencing through social means, and (c) connectedness, expectation, and mastery. In this way, all psychotherapies are humanistic. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Human resources: a common-sense discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Lisa R

    2004-02-01

    Being able to hire the right team members, keeping them engaged ina professional and productive environment, and avoiding litigation help keep the team functioning and meeting the everyday goals of providing quality patient care. Although these topics may seem complex, medical providers and professionals have resources available to them, such as the Human Resources department, the Medical Director, senior management,and legal counsel. Hiring the right people, creating a positive work environment, and avoiding litigation are all common sense principals that are relevant regardless of profession, industry, or company. Understanding how to apply the principles and concepts of Human Resources and personnel management can seem overwhelming: however, asking for help from the resources mentioned previously and applying the common sense information found in this article will help one to be a successful leader and practitioner.

  17. Shared human-chimpanzee pattern of perinatal femoral shaft morphology and its implications for the evolution of hominin locomotor adaptations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Morimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of bipedality is a hallmark of human evolution. How bipedality evolved from great ape-like locomotor behaviors, however, is still highly debated. This is mainly because it is difficult to infer locomotor function, and even more so locomotor kinematics, from fossil hominin long bones. Structure-function relationships are complex, as long bone morphology reflects phyletic history, developmental programs, and loading history during an individual's lifetime. Here we discriminate between these factors by investigating the morphology of long bones in fetal and neonate great apes and humans, before the onset of locomotion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative morphometric analysis of the femoral diaphysis indicates that its morphology reflects phyletic relationships between hominoid taxa to a greater extent than taxon-specific locomotor adaptations. Diaphyseal morphology in humans and chimpanzees exhibits several shared-derived features, despite substantial differences in locomotor adaptations. Orangutan and gorilla morphologies are largely similar, and likely represent the primitive hominoid state. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings are compatible with two possible evolutionary scenarios. Diaphyseal morphology may reflect retained adaptive traits of ancestral taxa, hence human-chimpanzee shared-derived features may be indicative of the locomotor behavior of our last common ancestor. Alternatively, diaphyseal morphology might reflect evolution by genetic drift (neutral evolution rather than selection, and might thus be more informative about phyletic relationships between taxa than about locomotor adaptations. Both scenarios are consistent with the hypothesis that knuckle-walking in chimpanzees and gorillas resulted from convergent evolution, and that the evolution of human bipedality is unrelated to extant great ape locomotor specializations.

  18. Gene Expression Changes in Femoral Head Necrosis of Human Bone Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadett Balla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH is the result of an interruption of the local circulation and the injury of vascular supply of bone. Multiple factors have been implicated in the development of the disease. However the mechanism of ischemia and necrosis in non-traumatic ONFH is not clear. The aim of our investigation was to identify genes that are differently expressed in ONFH vs. non-ONFH human bone and to describe the relationships between these genes using multivariate data analysis. Six bone tissue samples from ONFH male patients and 8 bone tissue samples from non-ONFH men were examined. The expression differences of selected 117 genes were analyzed by TaqMan probe-based quantitative real-time RT-PCR system. The significance test indicated marked differences in the expression of nine genes between ONFH and non-ONFH individuals. These altered genes code for collagen molecules, an extracellular matrix digesting metalloproteinase, a transcription factor, an adhesion molecule, and a growth factor. Canonical variates analysis demonstrated that ONFH and non-ONFH bone tissues can be distinguished by the multiple expression profile analysis of numerous genes controlled via canonical TGFB pathway as well as genes coding for extracellular matrix composing collagen type molecules. The markedly altered gene expression profile observed in the ONFH of human bone tissue may provide further insight into the pathogenetic process of osteonecrotic degeneration of bone.

  19. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Hernández-Cortés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA—assessed implant stability (ISQ values with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP (n=7 or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA (n=10. Sixty 4.5×13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA (P0.5 in all cases, and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P>0.08. Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA. This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies.

  20. Characterization of plaque components with intravascular ultrasound elastography in human femoral and coronary arteries in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. de Korte (Chris); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); H.A. Woutman; N. Bom (Klaas); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The composition of plaque is a major determinant of coronary-related clinical syndromes. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elastography has proven to be a technique capable of reflecting the mechanical properties of phantom material and the femoral arterial

  1. Effect of boundary conditions on yield properties of human femoral trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyasantisuk, J; Pahr, D H; Zysset, P K

    2016-10-01

    Trabecular bone plays an important mechanical role in bone fractures and implant stability. Homogenized nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis of whole bones can deliver improved fracture risk and implant loosening assessment. Such simulations require the knowledge of mechanical properties such as an appropriate yield behavior and criterion for trabecular bone. Identification of a complete yield surface is extremely difficult experimentally but can be achieved in silico by using micro-FE analysis on cubical trabecular volume elements. Nevertheless, the influence of the boundary conditions (BCs), which are applied to such volume elements, on the obtained yield properties remains unknown. Therefore, this study compared homogenized yield properties along 17 load cases of 126 human femoral trabecular cubic specimens computed with classical kinematic uniform BCs (KUBCs) and a new set of mixed uniform BCs, namely periodicity-compatible mixed uniform BCs (PMUBCs). In stress space, PMUBCs lead to 7-72 % lower yield stresses compared to KUBCs. The yield surfaces obtained with both KUBCs and PMUBCs demonstrate a pressure-sensitive ellipsoidal shape. A volume fraction and fabric-based quadric yield function successfully fitted the yield surfaces of both BCs with a correlation coefficient [Formula: see text]. As expected, yield strains show only a weak dependency on bone volume fraction and fabric. The role of the two BCs in homogenized FE analysis of whole bones will need to be investigated and validated with experimental results at the whole bone level in future studies.

  2. Topography of the femoral nerve in relation to components of the iliopsoas muscle in human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, M

    1991-01-01

    Studies were performed on 60 human fetuses of both sexes of 35 to 365 mm C.-R. length (9-40 weeks). The psoas minor muscle was found in 25.8% of cases independently of sex and body side. In 6.45% of cases the muscle continued into psoas major muscle by short, weakly developed tendon. In 97.5% of studied fetuses junctions between tendons of psoas major and iliacus muscles was observed. In 2.5% of cases an independent, short tendon was found in the half of length of the iliacus muscle. In 7.5% of cases connection between the psoas major and iliacus muscles was found. In all cases femoral nerve originated from the lumbar plexus between two layers of the psoas major muscle and it ran in the groove between the psoas major and iliacus muscles towards the muscular lacuna. In 5.0% of cases the nerve divided into crura. In 2.5% of cases the crura embraced anteriorly and posteriorly bundles of the psoas major muscle as well as in 2.5% of cases bundles of the iliacus muscle.

  3. Diagnosis of abdominal mural aortic thrombus following discovery of common femoral artery and vein thrombosis by point-of-care ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Nadia Maria; Taha, Farook; Vortsman, Eugene; Desai, Poonam; Kindschuh, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Acute limb ischemia (ALI) is a limb-threatening and life-threatening disease process. Mural aortic thrombosis (MAT) is a rare cause of ALI. While there is limited evidence on the use of bedside ultrasound for the detection of ALI or MAT, duplex ultrasound remains the standard in the diagnosis and ultimate medical decision-making in patients with acute and chronic limb ischemia. Point-of-care ultrasound may be used in the evaluation of patients with signs and symptoms of this disease entity. This is a case of a 79-year-old female with a complicated medical history, who presented with a pulseless right leg and abdominal tenderness. The patient quickly decompensated requiring intubation for airway protection. A post-intubation arterial blood gas (ABG) was unsuccessfully attempted in the right femoral artery, prompting an ultrasound-guided ABG. On B-mode ultrasound evaluation, echogenic material was visualized in the right common femoral artery without evidence of Doppler flow signal. Additionally, a partially obstructing echogenic material was also noted at the femoro-saphenous vein junction with only partial compressibility by compression sonography. A computed tomography angiography of the aorta was performed indicating extensive infrarenal aortic thrombosis. The patient expired despite the relatively prompt diagnosis, highlighting the importance of early identification of acute arterial occlusion.

  4. Glucocorticoids Significantly Influence the Transcriptome of Bone Microvascular Endothelial Cells of Human Femoral Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Sheng Yu; Wan-Shou Guo; Li-Ming Cheng; Yu-Feng Lu; Jian-Ying Shen; Ping Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:Appropriate expression and regulation of the transcriptome,which mainly comprise ofmRNAs and lncRNAs,are important for all biological and cellular processes including the physiological activities of bone microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs).Through an intricate intracellular signaling systems,the transcriptome regulates the pharmacological response of the cells.Although studies have elucidated the impact of glucocorticoids (GCs) cell-specific gene expression signatures,it remains necessary to comprehensively characterize the impact of lncRNAs to transcriptional changes.Methods:BMECs were divided into two groups.One was treated with GCs and the other left untreated as a paired control.Differential expression was analyzed with GeneSpring software V12.0 (Agilent,Santa Clara,CA,USA) and hierarchical clustering was conducted using Cluster 3.0 software.The Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was performed with Molecular Annotation System provided by CapitalBio Corporation.Results:Our results highlight the involvement of genes implicated in development,differentiation and apoptosis following GC stimulation.Elucidation of differential gene expression emphasizes the importance of regulatory gene networks induced by GCs.We identified 73 up-regulated and 166 down-regulated long noncoding RNAs,the expression of 107 of which significantly correlated with 172 mRNAs induced by hydrocortisone.Conclusions:Transcriptome analysis of BMECs from human samples was performed to identify specific gene networks induced by GCs.Our results identified complex RNA crosstalk underlying the pathogenesis of steroid-induced necrosis of femoral head.

  5. Factors affecting the aluminium content of human femoral head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Rogala, Piotr; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    Tissues for the study were obtained intraoperatively during hip replacement procedures from 96 patients. In all the cases, the indication for this treatment was primary or secondary degenerative changes in the hip joint. The subject of the study was the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Aluminium concentrations measured in femoral head and neck samples from patients aged between 25 and 91 were varied. Statistical methods were applied to determine the variations in relation to the parameters from the background survey. Significant differences in the aluminium content of femoral head samples were observed between patients under and over 60 years of age. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the aluminium accumulates in bones over a lifetime. The study showed that the content of aluminium in the head and neck of the femur depends on the factors such as: type of medicines taken, contact with chemicals at work, differences in body anatomy and sex. The study on the levels of aluminium in bones and the factors affecting its concentration is a valuable source of information for further research on the role of aluminium in bone diseases. Based on the investigations, it was found that the GF-AAS technique is the best analytical tool for routine analysis of aluminium in complex matrix samples. The use of femoral heads in the investigations was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the University of Medical Sciences in Poznań (Poland). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.X. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: yxzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Wang, Y.S. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: wangyinsong@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, Y.P. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangyongping@sinap.ac.cn; Zhang, G.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)]. E-mail: zhangguilin@sinap.ac.cn; Huang, Y.Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: huangyy@mail.ihep.ac.cn; He, W. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)]. E-mail: hew@mail.ihep.ac.cn

    2007-07-15

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  7. Relationship between mechanical properties and bone mineral density of human femoral bone retrieved from patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yvonne; Lindner, Tobias; Fritsche, Andreas; Schiebenhöfer, Ann-Kristin; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Skripitz, Ralf; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse retrieved human femoral bone samples using three different test methods, to elucidate the relationship between bone mineral density and mechanical properties. Human femoral heads were retrieved from 22 donors undergoing primary total hip replacement due to hip osteoarthritis and stored for a maximum of 24 hours postoperatively at + 6 °C to 8 °C.Analysis revealed an average structural modulus of 232±130 N/mm(2) and ultimate compression strength of 6.1±3.3 N/mm(2) with high standard deviations. Bone mineral densities of 385±133 mg/cm(2) and 353±172 mg/cm(3) were measured using thedual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT), respectively. Ashing resulted in a bone mineral density of 323±97 mg/cm(3). In particular, significant linear correlations were found between DXA and ashing with r = 0.89 (p < 0.01, n = 22) and between structural modulus and ashing with r = 0.76 (p < 0.01, n = 22).Thus, we demonstrated a significant relationship between mechanical properties and bone density. The correlations found can help to determine the mechanical load capacity of individual patients undergoing surgical treatments by means of noninvasive bone density measurements.

  8. External fixation of femoral defects in athymic rats: Applications for human stem cell implantation and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terasa Foo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate animal model is critical for the research of stem/progenitor cell therapy and tissue engineering for bone regeneration in vivo. This study reports the design of an external fixator and its application to critical-sized femoral defects in athymic rats. The external fixator consists of clamps and screws that are readily available from hardware stores as well as Kirschner wires. A total of 35 rats underwent application of the external fixator with creation of a 6-mm bone defect in one femur of each animal. This model had been used in several separate studies, including implantation of collagen gel, umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or bone morphogenetic protein-2. One rat developed fracture at the proximal pin site and two rats developed deep tissue infection. Pin loosening was found in nine rats, but it only led to the failure of external fixation in two animals. In 8 to 10 weeks, various degrees of bone growth in the femoral defects were observed in different study groups, from full repair of the bone defect with bone morphogenetic protein-2 implantation to fibrous nonunion with collagen gel implantation. The external fixator used in these studies provided sufficient mechanical stability to the bone defects and had a comparable complication rate in athymic rats as in immunocompetent rats. The external fixator does not interfere with the natural environment of a bone defect. This model is particularly valuable for investigation of osteogenesis of human stem/progenitor cells in vivo.

  9. Ipsilateral common iliac artery plus femoral artery clamping for inducing sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats: a reliable and simple method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barzegar-Fallah Anita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to develop a practical model of sciatic ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury producing serious neurologic deficits and being technically feasible compared with the current time consuming or ineffective models. Thirty rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 5. Animal were anesthetized by using ketamine (50 mg/kg and xylazine (4 mg/kg. Experimental groups included a sham-operated group and five I/R groups with different reperfusion time intervals (0 h, 3 h, 1 d, 4 d, 7 d. In I/R groups, the right common iliac artery and the right femoral artery were clamped for 3 hrs. Sham-operated animals underwent only laparotomy without induction of ischemia. Just before euthanasia, behavioral scores (based on gait, grasp, paw position, and pinch sensitivity were obtained and then sciatic nerves were removed for light-microscopy studies (for ischemic fiber degeneration (IFD and edema. Behavioral score deteriorated among the ischemic groups compared with the control group (p

  10. Functional integrative analysis of the human hip joint: the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum and its relation with the orientation of the femoral neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Noémie; Baylac, Michel; Gagey, Olivier; Tardieu, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.

  11. Catecholamine effects on lipolysis and blood flow in human abdominal and femoral adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, L; Barbe, P; Lafontan, M; Berlan, M; Galitzky, J

    1998-07-01

    With the use of the microdialysis method, the present study, performed on young, healthy, nonobese subjects of both genders, compares the effects of locally infused catecholamines on glycerol concentration and blood flow in abdominal (Abd) and femoral (Fem) adipose tissue. Physiological activation of the sympathetic nervous system through active tilt was also investigated. In both genders, extracellular glycerol concentration was higher in Fem than in Abd adipose tissue. Local blood flow was lower in Fem than in Abd adipose tissue. Isoproterenol perfusion increased extracellular glycerol levels, but no differences were found by gender or fat-deposit site. Isoproterenol induced a greater increase in local blood flow in Fem adipose tissue in both genders. Epinephrine and norepinephrine perfusion increased extracellular glycerol and reduced blood flow. No major differences were found according to gender and fat-deposit site. Active tilt increased plasma glycerol, free fatty acid, norepinephrine levels, and extracellular glycerol concentration to the same extent whatever the gender and fat deposit. Thus, Fem adipose tissue is characterized by a higher extracellular glycerol concentration and a lower blood flow than is Abd tissue in men and women. In these tissues, in situ lipolysis and local blood flow were similar in response to adrenergic stimulation.

  12. Human Odorant Reception in the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Liu; Nannan Liu

    2015-01-01

    The common bed bug Cimex lectularius is a temporary ectoparasite on humans and currently resurgent in many developed countries. The ability of bed bugs to detect human odorants in the environment is critical for their host-seeking behavior. This study deciphered the chemical basis of host detection by investigating the neuronal response of olfactory sensilla to 104 human odorants using single sensillum recording and characterized the electro-physiological responses of bed bug odorant receptor...

  13. Effect of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2/poly-lactide-co-glycolic acid (rhBMP-2/PLGA) with core decompression on repair of rabbit femoral head necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Xun Pan; Hong-Xin Zhang; Ye-Xin Wang; Long-Di Zhai; Wei Du

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2/poly-lactide-co-glycolic acid (rhBMP-2/PLGA) with core decompression on repair of rabbit femoral head necrosis. Methods: Bilateral femoral head necrosis models of rabbit were established by steroid injection. A total of 48 rabbits (96 femoral head necrosis) were randomly divided into 4 groups: Group A, control group with12 rabbits, 24 femoral head necrosis;Group B, treated with rhBMP-2/PLGA implantation after core depression, with 12 rabbits, 24 femoral head necrosis;Group C, treated with rhBMP-2 implantation after core depression, with 12 rabbits, 24 femoral head necrosis;Group D treated with core depression group without implantation, with 12 rabbits, 24 femoral head necrosis. All animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The ability of repairing bone defect was evaluated by X-ray radiograph. Bone mineral density analysis of the defect regions were used to evaluate the level of ossification. The morphologic change and bone formation was assessed by HE staining. The angiogenesis was evaluated by VEGF immunohistochemistry. Results: The osteogenetic ability and quality of femoral head necrosis in group B were better than those of other groups after 12 weeks by X-ray radiograph and morphologic investigation. And the angiogenesis in group B was better than other groups. Group C had similar osteogenetic quality of femoral head necrosis and angiogenesis with group D. Conclusions:The treatment of rhBMP-2/PLGA implantation after core depression can promote the repair of rabbit femoral head necrosis. It is a promising and efficient synthetic bone material to treat the femoral head necrosis.

  14. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, D.P.; Stein, J.L.; Renteria, M.E.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Desrivieres, S.; Jahanshad, N.; Toro, R.; Wittfeld, K.; Abramovic, L.; Andersson, M.; Aribisala, B.S.; Armstrong, N.J.; Bernard, M.; Bohlken, M.M.; Boks, M.P.; Bralten, J.; Brown, A.A.; Chakravarty, M.M.; Chen, Q.; Ching, C.R.; Cuellar-Partida, G.; Braber, A.; Giddaluru, S.; Goldman, A.L.; Grimm, O.; Guadalupe, T.; Hass, J.; Woldehawariat, G.; Holmes, A.J.; Hoogman, M.; Janowitz, D.; Jia, T.; Kim, S.; Klein, M.; Kraemer, B.; Lee, P.H.; Olde Loohuis, L.M.; Luciano, M.; Macare, C.; Mather, K.A.; Mattheisen, M.; Milaneschi, Y.; Nho, K.; Papmeyer, M.; Ramasamy, A.; Risacher, S.L.; Roiz-Santianez, R.; Rose, E.J.; Salami, A.; Samann, P.G.; Schmaal, L.; Schork, A.J.; Shin, J.; Strike, L.T.; Teumer, A.; Donkelaar, M.M.J. van; Eijk, K.R. van; Walters, R.K.; Westlye, L.T.; Whelan, C.D.; Winkler, A.M.; Zwiers, M.P.; Alhusaini, S.; Athanasiu, L.; Ehrlich, S.; Hakobjan, M.M.; Hartberg, C.B.; Haukvik, U.K.; Heister, A.J.; Hoehn, D.; Kasperaviciute, D.; Liewald, D.C.; Lopez, L.M.; Makkinje, R.R.; Matarin, M.; Naber, M.; McKay, D.R.; Needham, M.; Nugent, A.C.; Putz, B.; Royle, N.A.; Shen, L.; Sprooten, E.; Trabzuni, D.; Marel, S.S. van der; Hulzen, K.J.E. van; Walton, E.; Wolf, C.; Almasy, L.; Ames, D.; Arepalli, S.; Assareh, A.A.; Bastin, M.E.; Brodaty, H.; Bulayeva, K.B.; Carless, M.A.; Cichon, S.; Corvin, A.; Curran, J.E.; Czisch, M.; Fisher, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common

  15. Common Social Values of Human Being Reflected in Cinderella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳凤霞

    2012-01-01

      By an investigation of various versions of Cinderella, it can be found that although the details in these stories are different, they carry with the same theme. With its various versions, Cinderella reflected the common social values of human being based on a patriarchal society.

  16. Human Odorant Reception in the Common Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Nannan

    2015-11-02

    The common bed bug Cimex lectularius is a temporary ectoparasite on humans and currently resurgent in many developed countries. The ability of bed bugs to detect human odorants in the environment is critical for their host-seeking behavior. This study deciphered the chemical basis of host detection by investigating the neuronal response of olfactory sensilla to 104 human odorants using single sensillum recording and characterized the electro-physiological responses of bed bug odorant receptors to human odorants with the Xenopus expression system. The results showed that the D type of olfactory sensilla play a predominant role in detecting the human odorants tested. Different human odorants elicited different neuronal responses with different firing frequencies and temporal dynamics. Particularly, aldehydes and alcohols are the most effective stimuli in triggering strong response while none of the carboxylic acids showed a strong stimulation. Functional characterization of two bed bug odorant receptors and co-receptors in response to human odorants revealed their specific responses to the aldehyde human odorants. Taken together, the findings of this study not only provide exciting new insights into the human odorant detection of bed bugs, but also offer valuable information for developing new reagents (attractants or repellents) for the bed bug control.

  17. Human rights: common meaning and differences in positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Doise

    Full Text Available Human rights are defined as normative social representations embedded in institutional juridical definitions. Research findings show that human rights can be studied as normative social representations implying a degree of common understanding across cultures together with organized differences within and between cultures. Important factors in modulating individual positioning in the realm of human rights are experiences of social conflict and injustice, beliefs about the efficiency of various social actors to have rights enforced and attitudes of liberalism or collectivism. On the other hand, an ethnocentric use of human rights is well documented and has been experimentally studied. Generally, concerns about these rights expressed by citizens of Western countries become much stronger when non-Western countries are involved, whereas violations of these rights in their own country are often not severely condemned.

  18. A morphological study on femoral heads in human hip joint osteoarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, S; Pannarale, L; Braidotti, P; Marinozzi, A; Gaudio, E

    1996-01-01

    Several pathogenetical and clinical interpretation of osteoarthritic modifications are given in the literature. In this work we tried to compare in humans macroscopic, structural and ultrastructural observations on eight osteoarthritic with four femural heads from control patients. The sample for Light Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy observations came from selected regions of the femural head, which included both cartilage and bone tissue of loaded and unloaded regions. The cartilage showed superficial lesions, such as erosions and fissures, and deep lesions that included matrix alterations and chondrocyte proliferation. In relation to the thickening of the subchondral bone we noticed an irregular bone-cartilage surface with signs of bone tissue proliferation. The trabeculae appeared thickened in loaded zones and rarefied in unloaded ones. Cavities were sometimes present at different depths in cancellous bone. Our observations allow us to conclude that cartilage lesions are precocious, diffusely located and relatively independent of the considered zone of the femural head, while bone tissue alterations seem evenly sited and chronologically subsequent. The cavities in the cancellous bone could produce load modifications and consequent bone deformity.

  19. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro,; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume de...

  20. Human long bone development in vivo: analysis of the distal femoral epimetaphysis on MR images of fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Ursula; Nemec, Stefan F; Weber, Michael; Brugger, Peter C; Kasprian, Gregor; Bettelheim, Dieter; Rimoin, David L; Lachman, Ralph S; Malinger, Gustavo; Prayer, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    To investigate human long bone development in vivo by analyzing distal femoral epimetaphyseal structures and bone morphometrics on magnetic resonance (MR) images of fetuses. An institutional review board approved this retrospective study, and informed consent was waived. Included were 272 MR imaging examinations (April 2004-July 2011) in 253 fetuses with a mean gestational age (GA) of 26 weeks 6 days (range, 19 weeks 2 days to 35 weeks 6 days) without known musculoskeletal abnormalities. Two independent readers qualitatively analyzed epiphyseal and metaphyseal shape, secondary ossification, and the perichondrium on 1.5-T echo-planar MR images and correlated the results with the GA that was derived from previous fetal ultrasonography (US). Diaphyseal and epiphyseal morphometric measurements were correlated with GA by means of the Pearson correlation and linear regression. MR imaging measurements of diaphyseal length and US normative values were compared graphically. Interreader agreement analysis was performed with weighted κ statistics and the intraclass correlation coefficient. With advancing GA, the epiphyseal shape changed from spherical (r(2) = 0.664) to hemispherical with a notch (r(2) = 0.804), and the metaphyseal shape changed from flat (r(2) = 0.766) to clearly undulated (r(2) = 0.669). Secondary ossification (r(2) = 0.777) was not observed until 25 weeks 3 days. The perichondrium decreased (r(2) = 0.684) from 20 weeks onward. Correlation coefficients were 0.897 for diaphyseal length, 0.738 for epiphyseal length, and 0.801 for epiphyseal width with respect to GA. The range of measurements of diaphyseal length was larger than that of the reported US normative values. Interreader agreement was good for bone morphometrics (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.906-0.976), and moderate for bone characteristics (weighted κ, 0.448-0.848). Prenatal MR imaging allows visualization of human bone development in vivo by means of epimetaphyseal characteristics and

  1. Variation of the anterior aspect of the femoral head-neck junction in a modern human identified skeletal collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radi, Nico; Mariotti, Valentina; Riga, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    of this study is to analyze the variability of the anterior aspect of the femoral neck through a new scoring method taking into account three main traits: Poirier's facet, plaque, and cribra (including the Allen's fossa). This method has been applied to a sample of 225 adult individuals of both sexes coming...

  2. Variation of the anterior aspect of the femoral head-neck junction in a modern human identified skeletal collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radi, Nico; Mariotti, Valentina; Riga, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the so-called skeletal markers of activity as functional indicators is widely debated. Among them, certain morphological features of the anterior aspect of the femoral head-neck junction (Poirier's facet, cervical fossa of Allen, etc.) have been considered in relation to some...

  3. Evaluation of a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major cause of osteonecrosis of the femoral head is interruption of a blood supply to the proximal femur. In order to evaluate blood circulation and pathogenetic alterations, a pig femoral head osteonecrosis model was examined to address whether ligature of the femoral neck (vasculature deprivation induces a reduction of blood circulation in the femoral head, and whether transphyseal vessels exist for communications between the epiphysis and the metaphysis. We also tested the hypothesis that the vessels surrounding the femoral neck and the ligamentum teres represent the primary source of blood flow to the femoral head. Methods Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head was induced in Yorkshire pigs by transecting the ligamentum teres and placing two ligatures around the femoral neck. After heparinized saline infusion and microfil perfusion via the abdominal aorta, blood circulation in the femoral head was evaluated by optical and CT imaging. Results An angiogram of the microfil casted sample allowed identification of the major blood vessels to the proximal femur including the iliac, common femoral, superficial femoral, deep femoral and circumflex arteries. Optical imaging in the femoral neck showed that a microfil stained vessel network was visible in control sections but less noticeable in necrotic sections. CT images showed a lack of microfil staining in the epiphysis. Furthermore, no transphyseal vessels were observed to link the epiphysis to the metaphysis. Conclusion Optical and CT imaging analyses revealed that in this present pig model the ligatures around the femoral neck were the primary cause of induction of avascular osteonecrosis. Since the vessels surrounding the femoral neck are comprised of the branches of the medial and the lateral femoral circumflex vessels, together with the extracapsular arterial ring and the lateral epiphyseal arteries, augmentation of blood circulation in those arteries will improve

  4. Neglecting human ecology: The common element of global health failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Attempts to control malaria, AIDS, and maternal mortality in Africa have been woefully inadequate. This has involved adopting an almost exclusively technical preventive approach in the context of AIDS even though emphasizing human behavior holds the most promise. But on the other hand, it has also involved abandoning highly effective technical measures, as in the case of malaria. This suggests that the failure, at root, is anthropological in nature. The common element, it is argued here, is the failure to place the human ecology resolutely above destructive ideologies. Sound public-health approaches have been spurned in favor of predetermined preventive approaches in the service of ideological aims rather than of man and the common good. This article examines the ideological forces that have ultimately driven global health policy, and proposes that a more humane anthropology would be beneficial. Lay Summary: The scourges of malaria, AIDS, and maternal mortality have persisted in Africa, even though sensible and available means of addressing these epidemics, when stressed, have met with success. The reluctance to consistently emphasize the soundest public-health approaches—whether technical or behavioral in nature—indicate that global health policy has to a large extent been improperly concerned with advancing ideological agendas. The challenge we face today is not primarily technical but philosophical; the healing professions would perform a service by cultivating a higher view of man and an appreciation for objective moral truths that protect him. PMID:27833184

  5. Human sclera maintains common characteristics with cartilage throughout evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sclera maintains and protects the eye ball, which receives visual inputs. Although the sclera does not contribute significantly to visual perception, scleral diseases such as refractory scleritis, scleral perforation and pathological myopia are considered incurable or difficult to cure. The aim of this study is to identify characteristics of the human sclera as one of the connective tissues derived from the neural crest and mesoderm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated microarray data of cultured human infant scleral cells. Hierarchical clustering was performed to group scleral cells and other mesenchymal cells into subcategories. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed similarity between scleral cells and auricular cartilage-derived cells. Cultured micromasses of scleral cells exposed to TGF-betas and BMP2 produced an abundant matrix. The expression of cartilage-associated genes, such as Indian hedge hog, type X collagen, and MMP13, was up-regulated within 3 weeks in vitro. These results suggest that human 'sclera'-derived cells can be considered chondrocytes when cultured ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study shows a chondrogenic potential of human sclera. Interestingly, the sclera of certain vertebrates, such as birds and fish, is composed of hyaline cartilage. Although the human sclera is not a cartilaginous tissue, the human sclera maintains chondrogenic potential throughout evolution. In addition, our findings directly explain an enigma that the sclera and the joint cartilage are common targets of inflammatory cells in rheumatic arthritis. The present global gene expression database will contribute to the clarification of the pathogenesis of developmental diseases such as high myopia.

  6. The 'Human Mind' as a common denominator in plant domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbo, Shahal; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Gopher, Avi

    2014-05-01

    The role of conscious versus unconscious selection is a central issue in plant domestication. While some authors hold that domesticated plants arose due to unconscious dynamics driven by selection pressures exerted by the ancient 'cultivation regime', others attribute an indispensable role to conscious and knowledge-based selection as an imperative component of Neolithic Near Eastern plant domestication. Recent experimental work demonstrated that, contrary to commonly held views, deep seed burial as part of the ancient cultivation regime cannot be considered as a general selection pressure underlying the increased seed size of domesticated legumes compared with their wild ancestors. This is a robust conclusion since, in three out of the eight legume species studied from different world regions, there was no association between larger seed size and better seedling emergence from depth. We concur with the authors that these legume crops were most likely under various and multiple (often interacting) selection pressures under domestication, thereby causing the observed parallel/convergent evolution of their larger grain size. However, it is puzzling that these authors did not mention the ever-present common denominator in plant domestication, i.e. conscious human decision-making. In our view, the human 'Mind' and the 'Science of the Concrete' à la Lévi-Strauss deserved to be discussed as an integral component of plant domestication.

  7. Incarcerated Femoral Hernia Containing Ipsilateral Fallopian Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Atmatzidis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Femoral hernias are more common in women and lead to a substantial higher rate for an emergency operation, due to strangulation. Incarcerated femoral hernia with fallopian tube as a content is an extremely rare condition. A 20-year-old woman presented to the emergency department complaining of a 6-day right groin swelling, which became painful and tender to palpation during the last 48 hours. Preoperative ultrasonography detected an oedematous hernia sac, above the femoral vessels, suggesting the presence of an incarcerated femoral hernia. The patient eventually underwent emergency surgery and the diagnosis of a strangulated femoral hernia sac, containing fallopian tube, was established. No resection of the uterine tube was performed and the hernia was repaired with polypropylene plug. The postoperative period was uneventful and the woman was discharged on the second postoperative day.

  8. The Additive Value of Femoral Ultrasound for Subclinical Atherosclerosis Assessment in a Single Center Cohort of 962 Adults, Including High Risk Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios D Protogerou

    Full Text Available Presence of femoral atheromatic plaques, an emerging cardiovascular disease (CVD biomarker additional to carotid plaques, is poorly investigated in conditions associating with accelerated atherosclerosis such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM.To assess the frequency of femoral/carotid subclinical atheromatosis phenotypes in RA, HIV and T2DM and search for each disease-specific probability of either femoral and/or carotid subclinical atheromatosis, we examined by ultrasound a single-center cohort of CVD-free individuals comprised of consecutive non-diabetic patients with RA (n=226 and HIV (n=133, T2DM patients (n=109 and non-diabetic individuals with suspected/known hypertension (n=494 who served as reference group.Subclinical atheromatosis--defined as local plaque presence in at least on arterial bed--was diagnosed in 50% of the overall population. Among them, femoral plaques only were found in 25% of either RA or HIV patients, as well as in 16% of T2DM patients and 35% of reference subjects. After adjusting for all classical CVD risk factors, RA and HIV patients had comparable probability to reference group of having femoral plaques, but higher probability (1.75; 1.17-2.63 (odds ratio; 95% confidence intervals, 2.04; 1.14-3.64, respectively of having carotid plaques, whereas T2DM patients had higher probability to have femoral and carotid plaques, albeit, due to their pronounced dyslipidemic profile.RA and HIV accelerate predominantly carotid than femoral. A "two windows" carotid/femoral, rather than carotid alone ultrasound, screening improves substantially subclinical atheromatosis detection in patients at high CVD risk.

  9. Small Habitat Commonality Reduces Cost for Human Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Lepsch, Roger; Martin, John; Howard, Robert; Rucker, Michelle; Zapata, Edgar; McCleskey, Carey; Howe, Scott; Mary, Natalie; Nerren, Philip (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Most view the Apollo Program as expensive. It was. But, a human mission to Mars will be orders of magnitude more difficult and costly. Recently, NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) mapped out a step-wise approach for exploring Mars and the Mars-moon system. It is early in the planning process but because approximately 80% of the total life cycle cost is committed during preliminary design, there is an effort to emphasize cost reduction methods up front. Amongst the options, commonality across small habitat elements shows promise for consolidating the high bow-wave costs of Design, Development, Test and Evaluation (DDT&E) while still accommodating each end-item's functionality. In addition to DDT&E, there are other cost and operations benefits to commonality such as reduced logistics, simplified infrastructure integration and with inter-operability, improved safety and simplified training. These benefits are not without a cost. Some habitats are sub-optimized giving up unique attributes for the benefit of the overall architecture and because the first item sets the course for those to follow, rapidly developing technology may be excluded. The small habitats within the EMC include the pressurized crew cabins for the ascent vehicle,

  10. Aetiology of femoral hernias revisited: bilateral femoral hernia in a young male (two cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochupapy, R T; Ranganathan, G; Dias, S; Shanahan, D

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral femoral hernias are less common in men than in women and rare in young adults. Only one case of a bilateral femoral hernia in a young man has been reported in the literature before. Three main theories have been postulated for femoral hernias. The theory that they are an acquired disease is the most accepted due to the common occurrence of such hernias in multiparous women but the theory lacks enough evidence. We report two cases in young men. Anatomical variations in the femoral canal could be the primary aetiological factor in these patients. A unilateral femoral hernia in young men with acquired aetiological factors requires a clinical examination of the opposite side.

  11. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  12. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alp Akman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21-84 years. Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78-102°. On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP; instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P0 < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively. Combined correlation is perfect (R[2] = 1 as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component

  13. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals regulatory differences in the chondrocyte secretome from human medial and lateral femoral condyles in osteoarthritic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Johan; Rüetschi, Ulla; Skiöldebrand, Eva; Kärrholm, Johan; Lindahl, Anders

    2013-10-04

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a destructive joint disease and there are no known biomarkers available for an early diagnosis. To identify potential disease biomarkers and gain further insight into the disease mechanisms of OA we applied quantitative proteomics with SILAC technology on the secretomes from chondrocytes of OA knees, designated as high Mankin (HM) scored secretome. A quantitative comparison was made between the secretomes of the medial and lateral femur condyle chondrocytes in the same knee since the medial femur condyle is usually more affected in OA than the lateral condyle, which was confirmed by Mankin scoring. The medial/lateral comparison was also made on the secretomes from chondrocytes taken from one individual with no clinically apparent joint-disease, designated as low Mankin (LM) scored secretome. We identified 825 proteins in the HM secretome and 69 of these showed differential expression when comparing the medial and lateral femoral compartment. The LM scored femoral condyle showed early signs of OA in the medial compartment as assessed by Mankin score. We here report the identification and relative quantification of several proteins of interest for the OA disease mechanism e.g. CYTL1, DMD and STAB1 together with putative early disease markers e.g. TIMP1, PPP2CA and B2M. The present study reveals differences in protein abundance between medial/lateral femur condyles in OA patients. These regulatory differences expand the knowledge regarding OA disease markers and mechanisms.

  15. Unsupervised definition of the tibia-femoral joint regions of the human knee and its applications to cartilage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Peña, José G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2006-03-01

    Abnormal MR findings including cartilage defects, cartilage denuded areas, osteophytes, and bone marrow edema (BME) are used in staging and evaluating the degree of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. The locations of the abnormal findings have been correlated to the degree of pain and stiffness of the joint in the same location. The definition of the anatomic region in MR images is not always an objective task, due to the lack of clear anatomical features. This uncertainty causes variance in the location of the abnormality between readers and time points. Therefore, it is important to have a reproducible system to define the anatomic regions. This works present a computerized approach to define the different anatomic knee regions. The approach is based on an algorithm that uses unique features of the femur and its spatial relation in the extended knee. The femur features are found from three dimensional segmentation maps of the knee. From the segmentation maps, the algorithm automatically divides the femur cartilage into five anatomic regions: trochlea, medial weight bearing area, lateral weight bearing area, posterior medial femoral condyle, and posterior lateral femoral condyle. Furthermore, the algorithm automatically labels the medial and lateral tibia cartilage. The unsupervised definition of the knee regions allows a reproducible way to evaluate regional OA changes. This works will present the application of this automated algorithm for the regional analysis of the cartilage tissue.

  16. Focal femoral condyle resurfacing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, S A

    2013-03-01

    Focal femoral inlay resurfacing has been developed for the treatment of full-thickness chondral defects of the knee. This technique involves implanting a defect-sized metallic or ceramic cap that is anchored to the subchondral bone through a screw or pin. The use of these experimental caps has been advocated in middle-aged patients who have failed non-operative methods or biological repair techniques and are deemed unsuitable for conventional arthroplasty because of their age. This paper outlines the implant design, surgical technique and biomechanical principles underlying their use. Outcomes following implantation in both animal and human studies are also reviewed. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:301-4.

  17. Common raven juvenile survival in a human-augmented landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, William C.; Boarman, William I.; Rotenberry, John T.

    2004-01-01

    Anthropogenic resource subsidies have contributed to the dramatic increase in the abundance of Common Ravens (Corvus corax) in the western Mojave Desert, California, during the past 30 years. To better understand the effects of these subsidies on raven demography, we examined whether survival to juvenile departure from the natal territory could be predicted by a set of environmental and morphological variables, such as nest proximity to anthropogenic resources and juvenile condition. We captured 240 juvenile ravens over 2 years and marked them prior to fledging. Nest proximity to anthropogenic resources and earlier fledging dates significantly predicted raven juvenile survival to departure from the natal territory. The best-fitting mark-recapture models predicted postdeparture survival as a function of time since fledging, nest proximity to anthropogenic resources, and year hatched. The positive effect of nest proximity to anthropogenic resources influenced postdeparture survival for at least 9 months after fledging, as revealed by the mark-recapture analysis. Annual survival was 47% for first-year, 81% for second-year, and 83% for third-year birds. Our results support the hypothesis that anthropogenic resources contribute to increasing raven numbers via increased juvenile survival to departure as well as increased postdeparture survival. We expect raven numbers to grow in concert with the growing human presence in the Mojave Desert unless raven access to anthropogenic resources is diminished.

  18. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  19. Femoral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  20. Exosomes from Human Synovial-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shang-Chun; Tao, Shi-Cong; Yin, Wen-Jing; Qi, Xin; Sheng, Jia-Gen; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) represents a debilitating complication following glucocorticoid (GC)-based therapy. Synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) can exert protective effect in the animal model of GC-induced ONFH by inducing cell proliferation and preventing cell apoptosis. Recent studies indicate the transplanted cells exert therapeutic effects primarily via a paracrine mechanism and exosomes are an important paracrine factor that can be directly used as therapeutic agents for tissue engineering. Herein, we provided the first demonstration that the early treatment of exosomes secreted by human synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC-Exos) could prevent GC-induced ONFH in the rat model. Using a series of in vitro functional assays, we found that SMSC-Exos could be internalized into bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and enhance their proliferation and have anti-apoptotic abilities. Finally, SMSC-Exos may be promising for preventing GC-induced ONFH.

  1. Surgical management of multiple posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulas of femoral vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, A V; Shubin, A A; Kuntsevich, G I; Subbotin, V V; Suntsov, D S

    2008-01-01

    Presented herein are two case reports concerning surgical management of posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulas of femoral vessels. Case 1. A 45-year-old female patient attended with a history of a shotgun injury wound of her left femur and crus sustained when a girl of eight. She sought medical attention for a progressively deteriorating condition, accompanied by pain, and breathlessness dyspnea at rest. Detected were multiple fistulas between the deep femoral artery and superficial femoral artery and femoral vein. Management consisted in separation of the arteriovenous fistulas, followed by prosthetic repair of the deep femoral artery. Case 2. A 32-year-old male patient after an accidentally inflicted shotgun injury of the his left femur underwent within a time period of 3 year three vascular operations including ligation of the deep femoral artery and femoral vein followed by having later on developed secondary lymphedema of his left lower limb and pronounced manifested chronic venous insufficiency. Management included dissociation of the numerous arteriovenous fistulas between the branches of the deep femoral artery and the common femoral artery, as well as between the superficial femoral artery and femoral vein.

  2. Hydrocoele of a femoral hernia sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, D G; Chakravarty, K B

    2009-12-01

    Hydrocoele of a femoral hernia sac is an extremely rare entity. Extensive literature review and Internet searching revealed only a few authentically reported cases. It mostly occurs in females during the fourth to sixth decades of life. The most common clinical presentation is groin swelling. It is diagnosed as an irreducible or incarcerated femoral hernia or subcutaneous lipoma. In almost all of the reported cases, the diagnosis of hydrocoele of a femoral hernia sac has been made only after surgical exploration. The present case is a 40-year-old lady who presented with a painless lump in the right groin and was diagnosed as a case of hydrocoele of a femoral hernia sac only after exploration.

  3. The use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for the treatment of a delayed union following femoral neck open-wedge osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel W.A. Baltzer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the clinical potential of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs has been known for decades, their use in humans has only been approved for a limited number of orthopaedic conditions. Promising results in animals demonstrate the utility of BMP-2 in regional bone repair without using osteoconductors. To our knowledge, no comparable human case has been described. We report the case of a 50- year-old who suffered a femoral neck fracture. After 9 months of extensive treatment, he was still not pain-free. The following open-wedge osteotomy resulted in a therapy-resistant delayed union. We therefore conducted 4 computer tomography-guided injections of recombinant human (rh BMP-2 into the bone gap. No osteoconductor was employed. Six weeks later, there was a 55-60% defect filling. Followup examination showed a complete union of the bone defect. Our case report shows that in a complicated delayed union rhBMP-2 can be successfully used to induce bone formation without any osteoconductor.

  4. Radiographic femoral varus measurement is affected unpredictably by femoral rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward

    Radiographic measurements of femoral varus are used to determine if intervention to correct femoral deformity is required, and to calculate the required correction. The varus angle is defined as the angle between the proximal femoral long axis (PFLA) and an axis tangential to the distal femoral c...

  5. Glutamine repeat variants in human RUNX2 associated with decreased femoral neck BMD, broadband ultrasound attenuation and target gene transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel A Morrison

    Full Text Available RUNX2 is an essential transcription factor required for skeletal development and cartilage formation. Haploinsufficiency of RUNX2 leads to cleidocranial displaysia (CCD a skeletal disorder characterised by gross dysgenesis of bones particularly those derived from intramembranous bone formation. A notable feature of the RUNX2 protein is the polyglutamine and polyalanine (23Q/17A domain coded by a repeat sequence. Since none of the known mutations causing CCD characterised to date map in the glutamine repeat region, we hypothesised that Q-repeat mutations may be related to a more subtle bone phenotype. We screened subjects derived from four normal populations for Q-repeat variants. A total of 22 subjects were identified who were heterozygous for a wild type allele and a Q-repeat variant allele: (15Q, 16Q, 18Q and 30Q. Although not every subject had data for all measures, Q-repeat variants had a significant deficit in BMD with an average decrease of 0.7SD measured over 12 BMD-related parameters (p = 0.005. Femoral neck BMD was measured in all subjects (-0.6SD, p = 0.0007. The transactivation function of RUNX2 was determined for 16Q and 30Q alleles using a reporter gene assay. 16Q and 30Q alleles displayed significantly lower transactivation function compared to wild type (23Q. Our analysis has identified novel Q-repeat mutations that occur at a collective frequency of about 0.4%. These mutations significantly alter BMD and display impaired transactivation function, introducing a new class of functionally relevant RUNX2 mutants.

  6. Phosphorylated dihydroceramides from common human bacteria are recovered in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C Nichols

    Full Text Available Novel phosphorylated dihydroceramide (PDHC lipids produced by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis include phosphoethanolamine (PE DHC and phosphoglycerol dihydroceramides (PG DHC lipids. These PDHC lipids mediate cellular effects through Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 including promotion of IL-6 secretion from dendritic cells and inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and function in vitro and in vivo. The PE DHC lipids also enhance (TLR2-dependent murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model for multiple sclerosis. The unique non-mammalian structures of these lipids allows for their specific quantification in bacteria and human tissues using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM-mass spectrometry (MS. Synthesis of these lipids by other common human bacteria and the presence of these lipids in human tissues have not yet been determined. We now report that synthesis of these lipids can be attributed to a small number of intestinal and oral organisms within the Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Prevotella, Tannerella and Porphyromonas genera. Additionally, the PDHCs are not only present in gingival tissues, but are also present in human blood, vasculature tissues and brain. Finally, the distribution of these TLR2-activating lipids in human tissues varies with both the tissue site and disease status of the tissue suggesting a role for PDHCs in human disease.

  7. Common Kibra alleles are associated with human memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hoerndli, Frederic J; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Brunner, Fabienne; Corneveaux, Jason; Osborne, David; Wollmer, M Axel; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Hänggi, Jürgen; Mondadori, Christian R A; Buchmann, Andreas; Reiman, Eric M; Caselli, Richard J; Henke, Katharina; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2006-10-20

    Human memory is a polygenic trait. We performed a genome-wide screen to identify memory-related gene variants. A genomic locus encoding the brain protein KIBRA was significantly associated with memory performance in three independent, cognitively normal cohorts from Switzerland and the United States. Gene expression studies showed that KIBRA was expressed in memory-related brain structures. Functional magnetic resonance imaging detected KIBRA allele-dependent differences in hippocampal activations during memory retrieval. Evidence from these experiments suggests a role for KIBRA in human memory.

  8. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Puetz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goering, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzah, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mahnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Noethen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdes Hernandez, Maria C.; van't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, Rene S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Voelzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Joensson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To investigat

  9. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); J.L. Stein; M.E. Rentería (Miguel); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); N. Jahanshad (Neda); R. Toro (Roberto); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); L. Abramovic (Lucija); M. Andersson (Micael); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); M. Bernard (Manon); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.A. Brown (Andrew); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); A. den Braber (Anouk); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); O. Grimm (Oliver); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); J. Hass (Johanna); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil H.); L.M. Olde Loohuis (Loes M.); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); K. Nho (Kwangsik); M. Papmeyer (Martina); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); E.J. Rose (Emma); A. Salami (Alireza); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); J. Shin (Jean); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); R.K. Walters (Raymond); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); S. Alhusaini (Saud); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); M. Hakobjan (Marina); C.B. Hartberg (Cecilie B.); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); A.J.G.A.M. Heister (Angelien J. G. A. M.); D. Hoehn (David); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); R.R.R. Makkinje (Remco R. R.); M. Matarin (Mar); M.A.M. Naber (Marlies A. M.); D. Reese McKay; M. Needham (Margaret); A.C. Nugent (Allison); B. Pütz (Benno); N.A. Royle (Natalie); L. Shen (Li); R. Sprooten (Roy); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S.S.L. Van Der Marel (Saskia S. L.); K.J.E. Van Hulzen (Kimm J. E.); E. Walton (Esther); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); L. Almasy (Laura); D. Ames (David); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; M.E. Bastin (Mark); H. Brodaty (Henry); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); M.A. Carless (Melanie); S. Cichon (Sven); A. Corvin (Aiden); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); A. Dillman (Allissa); A. Duggirala (Aparna); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); S. Erk; I. Fedko (Iryna); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); M. Fukunaga (Masaki); J. Raphael Gibbs; H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); F. Holsboer; G. Homuth (Georg); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M. Ikeda (Masashi); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); R. Kanai (Ryota); M. Keil (Maria); J.W. Kent (Jack W.); P. Kochunov (Peter); J.B. Kwok (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); K.L. Mcmahon (Katie); E. Meisenzahl (Eva); I. Melle (Ingrid); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J.C. Mostert (Jeanette C.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); M.A. Nalls (Michael); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); L.G. Nilsson; M.M. Nöthen (Markus); K. Ohi (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R. Perez-Iglesias (Rocio); G. Bruce Pike; S.G. Potkin (Steven); I. Reinvang (Ivar); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (M.); N. Seiferth (Nina); G.D. Rosen (Glenn D.); D. Rujescu (Dan); K. Schnell (Kerry); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Smith (Colin); V.M. Steen (Vidar); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); J. Turner (Jessica); M.C. Valdés Hernández (Maria); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); D.J. Veltman (Dick); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); E. Westman (Eric); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman (Alan B.); D.G. Ashbrook (David G.); R. Hager (Reinmar); L. Lu (Lu); F.J. Mcmahon (Francis J); D.W. Morris (Derek W); R.W. Williams (Robert W.); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan K.); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); T. Espeseth (Thomas); R.L. Gollub (Randy); B.C. Ho (Beng ); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate

  10. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Puetz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goering, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzah, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mahnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Noethen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdes Hernandez, Maria C.; van't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, Rene S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Voelzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Joensson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To

  11. Common Fallacies About Heredity, Environment, and Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Anne

    Much of our thinking about contemporary social problems reflects tacit presuppositions regarding the operation of heredity and environment in human behavior. These beliefs have important implications for practical decisions. Advances in genetics, psychology, anthropology, and other disciplines have contributed much to a clarification of the…

  12. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); J.L. Stein; M.E. Rentería (Miguel); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); N. Jahanshad (Neda); R. Toro (Roberto); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); L. Abramovic; M. Andersson (Micael); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); M. Bernard (Manon); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.A. Brown (Andrew); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); A. den Braber (Anouk); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); O. Grimm (Oliver); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); J. Hass (Johanna); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil H.); L.M. Olde Loohuis (Loes M.); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); K. Nho (Kwangsik); M. Papmeyer (Martina); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); E.J. Rose (Emma); A. Salami (Alireza); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); J. Shin (Jean); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); R.K. Walters (Raymond); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); S. Alhusaini (Saud); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); M. Hakobjan (Marina); C.B. Hartberg (Cecilie B.); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); A.J.G.A.M. Heister (Angelien J. G. A. M.); D. Hoehn (David); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); R.R.R. Makkinje (Remco R. R.); M. Matarin (Mar); M.A.M. Naber (Marlies A. M.); D. Reese McKay; M. Needham (Margaret); A.C. Nugent (Allison); B. Pütz (Benno); N.A. Royle (Natalie); L. Shen (Li); R. Sprooten (Roy); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S.S.L. Van Der Marel (Saskia S. L.); K.J.E. Van Hulzen (Kimm J. E.); E. Walton (Esther); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); L. Almasy (Laura); D. Ames (David); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; M.E. Bastin (Mark); H. Brodaty (Henry); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); M.A. Carless (Melanie); S. Cichon (Sven); A. Corvin (Aiden); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); A. Dillman (Allissa); A. Duggirala (Aparna); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); S. Erk; I. Fedko (Iryna); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); M. Fukunaga (Masaki); J. Raphael Gibbs; H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); F. Holsboer; G. Homuth (Georg); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M. Ikeda (Masashi); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); R. Kanai (Ryota); M. Keil (Maria); J.W. Kent (Jack W.); P. Kochunov (Peter); J.B. Kwok (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); K.L. Mcmahon (Katie); E. Meisenzahl (Eva); I. Melle (Ingrid); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J.C. Mostert (Jeanette C.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); M.A. Nalls (Michael); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); L.G. Nilsson; M.M. Nöthen (Markus); K. Ohi (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R. Perez-Iglesias (Rocio); G. Bruce Pike; S.G. Potkin (Steven); I. Reinvang (Ivar); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (M.); N. Seiferth (Nina); G.D. Rosen (Glenn D.); D. Rujescu (Dan); K. Schnell (Kerry); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Smith (Colin); V.M. Steen (Vidar); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); J. Turner (Jessica); M.C. Valdés Hernández (Maria); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); D.J. Veltman (Dick); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); E. Westman (Eric); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman (Alan B.); D.G. Ashbrook (David G.); R. Hager (Reinmar); L. Lu (Lu); F.J. Mcmahon (Francis J); D.W. Morris (Derek W); R.W. Williams (Robert W.); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan K.); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); T. Espeseth (Thomas); R.L. Gollub (Randy); B.C. Ho (Beng ); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); N. Hosten (Norbert); R. Kahn; S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); A. Meyer-Lindenberg; B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); M. Nauck (Matthias); L. Nyberg (Lars); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); J.W. Smoller; H. van Bokhoven (Hans); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); H. Völzke (Henry); H.J. Walter (Henrik); M.W. Weiner (Michael); W. Wen (Wei); T.J.H. White (Tonya); I. Agartz (Ingrid); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); J. Blangero (John); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); D.M. Cannon (Dara); M.R. Cookson (Mark); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); G. Fernandez (Guillén); S.E. Fisher (Simon); C. Francks (Clyde); D.C. Glahn (David); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); O. Gruber (Oliver); J. Hardy (John); R. Hashimoto (Ryota); H.E. Hulshoff Pol (Hilleke); E.G. Jönsson (Erik); I. Kloszewska (Iwona); S. Lovestone (Simon); V.S. Mattay (Venkata S.); P. Mecocci (Patrizia); C. McDonald (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); M. Ryten (Mina); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); A. Simmons (Andrew); A. Singleton (Andrew); H. Soininen (H.); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); M.E. Weale (Michael); D.R. Weinberger (Daniel); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S. Seiler (Stephan); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); J.T. Becker (James); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); S. van der Lee (Sven); M. Ebling (Maritza); B. Fischl (Bruce); W.T. Longstreth Jr; D. Greve (Douglas); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); P. Nyquist (Paul); L.N. Vinke (Louis N.); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); L. Xue (Luting); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); J.C. Bis (Joshua); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Seshadri (Sudha); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M.J. Wright (Margaret); G. Schumann (Gunter); B. Franke (Barbara); P.M. Thompson (Paul); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate h

  13. Adult neurogenesis in humans- common and unique traits in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available New neurons are continuously generated in specific regions in the adult brain. Studies in rodents have demonstrated that adult-born neurons have specific functional features and mediate neural plasticity. Data on the extent and dynamics of adult neurogenesis in adult humans are starting to emerge, and there are clear similarities and differences compared to other mammals. Why do these differences arise? And what do they mean?

  14. Common Benefits of Prayer and Yoga on Human Organism

    OpenAIRE

    İMAMOĞLU, Osman; DİLEK, Ahmet Naci

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Prayer and Yoga benefits study aimed to explore the mutual on the human organism.Methods: A literature search was conducted. Results: Muslim prayers and yoga are as through them the same benefits, In terms of shape and utility of the movement.  Even each prayer (namaz) positions-corresponding yoga position and the positions together “activate” all seven “chakras” (energy fields) in the body-as per yoga practices. Prayer is in the standing room section (Takbir and qiyam) qiyam and exp...

  15. Human adaptive behavior in common pool resource systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Brandt

    Full Text Available Overexploitation of common-pool resources, resulting from uncooperative harvest behavior, is a major problem in many social-ecological systems. Feedbacks between user behavior and resource productivity induce non-linear dynamics in the harvest and the resource stock that complicate the understanding and the prediction of the co-evolutionary system. With an adaptive model constrained by data from a behavioral economic experiment, we show that users' expectations of future pay-offs vary as a result of the previous harvest experience, the time-horizon, and the ability to communicate. In our model, harvest behavior is a trait that adjusts to continuously changing potential returns according to a trade-off between the users' current harvest and the discounted future productivity of the resource. Given a maximum discount factor, which quantifies the users' perception of future pay-offs, the temporal dynamics of harvest behavior and ecological resource can be predicted. Our results reveal a non-linear relation between the previous harvest and current discount rates, which is most sensitive around a reference harvest level. While higher than expected returns resulting from cooperative harvesting in the past increase the importance of future resource productivity and foster sustainability, harvests below the reference level lead to a downward spiral of increasing overexploitation and disappointing returns.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  17. Intraoperative arteriography during femoral-popliteal bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, J E; Bekassy, S M; DeBakey, M E

    1975-07-01

    Minor technical errors may jeopardize the patency of femoral-popliteal bypass grafts. In an attempt to detect such errors, intraoperative arteriography has been routinely employed. It allows immediate recognition and correction of the most common abnormal findings: intraluminal debris, intimal dissection, distal thrombosis, arterial spasm, and kinking of the graft.

  18. Common occurrence of antibacterial agents in human intestinal microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima eDrissi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments have revealed many active mechanisms by which bacteria can inhibit the growth of other organisms. Bacteriocins are a diverse group of natural ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by a wide range of bacteria and which seem to play an important role in mediating competition within bacterial communities. In this study, we have identified and established the structural classification of putative bacteriocins encoded by 317 microbial genomes in the human intestine. On the basis of homologies to available bacteriocin sequences, mainly from lactic acid bacteria, we report the widespread occurrence of bacteriocins across the gut microbiota: 175 bacteriocins were found to be encoded in Firmicutes, 79 in Proteobacteria, 34 in Bacteroidetes and 25 in Actinobacteria. Bacteriocins from gut bacteria displayed wide differences among phyla with regard to class distribution, net positive charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure, but the α-helix was the most abundant structure. The peptide structures and physiochemical properties of bacteriocins produced by the most abundant bacteria in the gut, the Firmicutes and the Bacteroidetes, seem to ensure low antibiotic activity and participate in permanent intestinal host defence against the proliferation of harmful bacteria. Meanwhile, the potentially harmful bacteria, including the Proteobacteria, displayed highly effective bacteriocins, probably supporting the virulent character of diseases. These findings highlight the eventual role played by bacteriocins in gut microbial competition and their potential place in antibiotic therapy.

  19. Humanism: A tradition common to both Islam and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiber Hans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest of the Arabs in Arabic translations from Greek since the 8th century has been interpreted as a sign of humanism in Islam. This is comparable to humanists in Europe who, since the 14th century, considered the Greek and Latin literature the foundation of spiritual and moral education. We will have to address the question of whether a similar ideal of education has been developed in harmony with religion in the Islamic cultural sphere. The perceived tension between the humanists of antiquity and Christianity has a parallel in the tensions between Islamic religiosity and a rational Islamic worldview. However, there are past and present approaches to developing an educational ideal, which is comparable to the European concept of a moral shaping of the individual. The Qur’ān and Islamic tradition do not impede the free development of personality and creative responsibility if their historicity is taken into account and if they are not elevated to an unreflected norm.

  20. [Subtrochanteric femoral fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmar, B; Simon, S; Eschler, A; Mittlmeier, T

    2013-12-01

    Subtrochanteric femoral fractures are proximal femoral fractures which are located between the trochanter minor and an area of 3 cm below the minor trochanter on the femoral shaft. About 10-15% of all proximal femoral fractures correspond to this fracture site. Elderly or geriatric patients are generally affected and the injury is often the result of a fall in the home, while high-energy trauma is the cause in a small group of generally younger patients. Clinical evaluation of the affected extremity shows disability of axial weight-bearing and pain during compression and rotation of the hip joint. Basic diagnostics include conventional x-rays of the injured femur in the anterior-posterior and lateral planes. These subtrochanteric femoral fractures are almost always treated surgically due to the inherent high degree of instability. The main goals of surgical intervention are to achieve anatomic fracture reduction and primary full weight-bearing stability of the corresponding leg. Intramedullary interlocking nails are used for primary treatment, while extramedullary implants are often used in revision surgery. Early mobilization and intensive respiratory exercises are necessary to prevent early postoperative complications.

  1. Femoral Prosthesis Infection by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Sozio, Federica; Catavitello, Chiara; Talia, Marzia; Manna, Assunta; Febbo, Fabio; Balbinot, Andrea; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni; Piccolomini, Raffaele; Parruti, Giustino; D'Antonio, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    This case report is a case history of a femoral prosthesis infection caused by Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a human immunodeficiency virus patient. Though the pathogenicity of this organism for bone tissue has been previously reported, this is the first reported case of an orthopedic prosthesis infection by this species of the genus Rhodotorula. PMID:18753353

  2. Spontaneous Enterocutaneous Fistula: A Rare Presentation of Incarcerated Femoral Hernia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meriç Emre Bostanci; Ilker Özel; Birkan Bozkurt; Sinan Soylu; Mustafa Turan

    2015-01-01

      Although femoral hernias are less commonly seen compared with other types of hernias, they have an inversely proportional importance to its lower frequency because of its higher risk of strangulation...

  3. Femoral varus: what's the angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Svalastoga, Eiliv Lars; Eriksen, Thomas

    Agreement and reliability of femoral varus measurements: a comparison of four techniques Three different techniques have been described for measuring femoral varus radiographically in the dog, but how the measurements from these techniques compare is unknown. Further, measurement reliability has ...

  4. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xue-Fei; Liu, Jia-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, ...

  5. Use of human methylation arrays for epigenome research in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Junko; Murata, Yui; Bundo, Miki; Oh-Nishi, Arata; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Ikegame, Tempei; Zhao, Zhilei; Jinde, Seiichiro; Aiba, Atsu; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kasai, Kiyoto; Kato, Tadafumi; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2017-02-17

    We examined the usefulness of commercially available DNA methylation arrays designed for the human genome (Illumina HumanMethylation450 and MethylationEPIC) for high-throughput epigenome analysis of the common marmoset, a nonhuman primate suitable for research on neuropsychiatric disorders. From among the probes on the methylation arrays, we selected those available for the common marmoset. DNA methylation data were obtained from genomic DNA extracted from the frontal cortex and blood samples of adult common marmosets as well as the frontal cortex of neonatal marmosets. About 10% of the probes on the arrays were estimated to be useful for DNA methylation assay in the common marmoset. Strong correlations existed between human and marmoset DNA methylation data. Illumina methylation arrays are useful for epigenome research using the common marmoset.

  6. 人股动脉粥样硬化相关蛋白的鉴定及其生物学作用%Proteomics analysis on pathogenesis of human atherosclerosis obliterans in human femoral artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵振; 赵海光; 蒋米尔

    2011-01-01

    Objective We used proteomic profiling in an attempt to differentiate and identify histological proteins that were associated with atherosclerosis obliterans (ASO) of human femoral artery.Methods We comparatively analyzed the proteome of 8 atherosclerotic and 5 normal femoral arteries. The differentially expressed proteins were visualized by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and sequenced by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The protein identification program was used to search the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database and International Protein Index (IPI). Results A total of 53 distinct spots corresponding to 13 different proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS using the NCBI and IPI databases. The function information of these 13 proteins mainly involved the pathogenetic mechanisms such as inflammation, innate immunity, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, amyloid degeneration and so on. Conclusion ASO is associated with distinct patterns of protein expression in the femoral arteries, and differentially expressed 13 proteins may contribute to the pathogenesis. These findings might provide needed biomarkers for ASO and new insight into its pathophysiology.%目的 应用比较蛋白质组学方法探讨人动脉粥样硬化闭塞症(ASO)差异蛋白质的表达及其在ASO发病机制中的作用.方法 选取ASO股动脉8例及正常股动脉5例,提取组织蛋白质,行双向凝胶电泳分离、质谱分析及数据库查询,获得差异蛋白信息.结果 成功建立ASO和正常股动脉双向电泳图谱,含量相差大于2倍以上的蛋白质53个,27个上调,26个下调,质谱鉴定出13种蛋白质,主要与炎症、免疫、氧化应激、脂质代谢等相关.结论 ASO与正常股动脉蛋白质组明显差异,差异蛋白质可能在ASO中起重要作用.

  7. Continuum analysis of common branching patterns in the human arch of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, M; Sinclair, P

    1990-01-01

    A model is proposed for describing common variations in the arrangement of branches on the arch of the human aorta, and the model is used to analyze data from 123 human arches. The analysis allows the observed variations to fall freely along a continuous spectrum, rather than be confined to discrete categories as is commonly done at present. The results thus describe these variations in a more natural way and throw some new light on their likely source.

  8. Common ragweed invasion in Sweden: impacts of the lag phase on human health

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbach, Sandro; Champetier de Ribes, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is a neophyte from North America that has spread rapidly throughout Europe. Because the pollen of common ragweed is highly allergic, many countries have adopted containment and mitigation measures. The neophyte has only recently established flowering populations in Sweden. We use this well documented case to study the early impacts of an invasive species on human health. Our identification strategy relies on spatial and temporal variation in common rag...

  9. Estimation of pretraumatic femoral antetorsion in bilateral femoral shaft fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citak, Musa; Jagodzinski, Michael; Krettek, Christian; Huefner, Tobias [Hannover Medical School, Trauma Department, Hannover (Germany); Citak, Mustafa [BG-University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Department of Surgery, Bochum (Germany); Kendoff, Daniel; O' Loughlin, Padhraig F. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Orthopaedic Department, New York, NY (United States); Tavassol, Frank [Hannover Medical School, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hannover (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    To describe a system for measurement of the pretraumatic femoral antetorsion angle post-bilateral femoral shaft fracture with the use of new imaging software which allows segmentation and three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) images. This case involved a 20-year-old patient with bilateral femoral shaft fractures. Following initial clinical examination, CT scans of both femurs were performed. Subsequently, the DICOM datasets were uploaded to the new software tool. Following segmentation and 3D reconstruction, pretraumatic femoral antetorsion angles were determined. Femoral antetorsion was described and assessed in two ways by referring to the intersection of the posterior condylar plane and (1) a line drawn between the center of the femoral head and femoral neck, (2) a line drawn between the centers of the femoral head and greater trochanter. Using these definitions, values for femoral antetorsion were found to be, respectively, 20 at the right fracture site and 19 on the left site, and 33 bilaterally. The investigators describe in this current technical report the use of new imaging software which enables the calculation of femoral AV following reduction of virtual fracture fragments which are created from standard DICOM images. We believe that this 3D reconstruction method of measuring the antetorsion angle can be integrated into a regular treatment algorithm and may potentially optimize clinical outcomes. (orig.)

  10. Treatment of postcatheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas with simple prolonged bandaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Tao; LIU Zhen-jiang; ZHOU Sheng-hua; SHEN Xiang-qian; LIU Qi-ming; FANG Zhen-fei; HU Xin-qun; LI Jiang; L(U) Xiao-lin

    2007-01-01

    Background The methods for the treatment of postcatheterization femoral arteriovenous fistulas (AVF-s) - simple observation, ultrasound guided compression, covered stents implantation and coil embolization have poor outcome.Surgery is the standard method for treatment of femoral AVFs, but it is a traumatic operation. In this study, we report the results of the treatment of postcatheterization femoral AVFs by simple prolonged compressing bandage.Methods To treat iatrogenic femoral AVFs caused by transfemoral catheterization, prolonged binding with elastic or common bandage was applied in 16 cases. Catheterization was performed in 7 cases for radiofrequency current catheter ablation, in 4 for occlusion of congenital heart disease, in 3 for percutaneous coronary intervention, in 1 for coronary angiography and in 1 for right heart catheterization.Results All iatrogenic femoral AVFs were healed after simple binding with elastic or common bandage for 4-46 days (mean (15±10) days). During the period of binding, local skins ulceration occurred at puncture site in two cases and femoral vein thrombus was found in one patient. During 6-24 months (mean (11.8±3.6) months) followup with colour Doppler ultrasonography, no recurrent arteriovenous shunting or other complications were observed.Conclusion The results suggest that simple prolonged bandaging for postcatheterization femoral AVFs is an effective and economical procedure.

  11. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Devkota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  12. Radiation induced femoral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranda, B.; Esnault, S.; Brunet, P. (Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France))

    1982-01-01

    We report four cases of femoral palsy due to compressive fibrosis, after pelvic radiation therapy. Three patients had Hodgkin's disease, and one testicular seminoma. Prominent clinical features include major groin induration and underlying swelling. Unlike what is usually seen in tumoral relapse, little or no pain is associated with these neuropathies. The femoral post-radic palsy develops earlier and faster than brachial plexus palsy of same aetiology. In one case, progressive aggravation led to surgical neurolysis which resulted in dramatic and long lasting improvement. The principal preventive and therapeutic management methods are discussed: since compressive fibrosis is related to the use of isolated and massive electron beam therapy, various associations of cobalt and electron beam therapy are designed to best prevent the side effects of each of these methods. The early treatment of developing fibrosis by D. penicillamine is discussed.

  13. Proximal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Teixidor, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In hip fracture surgery, the exact choice of implant often remains somewhat unclear for the individual surgeon, but the growing literature consensus has enabled publication of evidence-based surgical treatment pathways. The aim of this article was to review author pathways and national...... guidelines for hip fracture surgery and discuss a method for future pathway/guideline implementation and evaluation. METHODS: By a PubMed search in March 2015 six studies of surgical treatment pathways covering all types of proximal femoral fractures with publication after 1995 were identified. Also we...... searched the homepages of the national heath authorities and national orthopedic societies in West Europe and found 11 national or regional (in case of no national) guidelines including any type of proximal femoral fracture surgery. RESULTS: Pathway consensus is outspread (internal fixation for un...

  14. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contrast arthrography orMagnetic Resonance Imaging is indicated when radiological features are questionable and to disclose thepresence and location of the femoral head and any cartilagenous anlage. The disorder is more commonlyunilateral and is apparent at birth. However, bilateral involvement is rarely seen. Therapy of the disorder isdirected towards satisfactory ambulation and specific treatment depending on the severity of dysplasia.

  15. Early Outcomes of Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Song Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have reported that patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have a high incidence of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH. Total hip arthroplasty (THA is an effective management of ONFH. However, little data exist regarding the use of THA for the HIV patients with ONFH in China. This study reviewed the outcomes of HIV-positive patients who underwent THA for ONFH, compared with HIV-negative individuals. Methods: The patients who underwent THA for ONFH from September 2012 to September 2014 in Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University were retrospectively studied. Twenty-eight HIV-positive patients and 35 HIV-negative patients underwent 48 THAs and 45 THAs with cementless components, respectively. Medical records and follow-up data were reviewed. Harris Hip Score (HHS was applied to evaluate the pain and function of the hips before and after THA. Complications such as wound healing, surgical site infection, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, mortality, and complications from the prosthesis were reviewed. The operation time, blood loss, and hospital stay were compared between the two groups. Results: The mean follow-up period was 19.5 ± 5.8 months (ranging from 6 to 30 months. The mean age of the HIV-positive patients with osteonecrosis at the time of surgery was 35 years old, which was significantly lower than that of the HIV-negative group (42 years old (P 0.05. The HHSs of two groups significantly improved after THAs (P < 0.05, without significant difference between two groups. No wound complication, sepsis, mortality, prosthesis complication, and occupational exposure occurred, except for two cases of heterotopic ossification and one case of humeral head necrosis. Conclusions: ONFH is more likely to occur bilaterally in younger HIV-positive males. The development of osteonecrosis seems faster in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients. This should be cautionary for asymptomatic

  16. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contra...

  17. Variations of femoral condyle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscević, Mirza; Hebibović, Mujo; Smrke, Dragica

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to mathematically approximate the shape of the femoral articulating line and compare radiuses of condylar curves within and between males and females. Ten male and ten female participants were included in the study. Radiuses of medial and lateral condylar curves were calculated from the side view knee X-ray by original mathematical equation. Average radiuses of condylar curves were between 4.5 and 1.7 cm medially, and between 3.2 and 1.8 cm laterally, for 0 degrees and 90 degrees flexion contact point respectively. Males had longer curve radiuses of both condyles (p knee geometry, and other ellipsoidal structures in human body, like wrist, scull segments, dental arches, etc.

  18. Revisiting the importance of common body motion in human action perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Steven M; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    Human actions are complex dynamic stimuli comprised of two principle motion components: 1) common body motion, which represents the translation of the body when a person moves through space, and 2) relative limb movements, resulting from articulation of limbs after factoring out common body motion. Historically, most research in biological motion has focused primarily on relative limb movements while discounting the role of common body motion in human action perception. The current study examined the relative contribution of posture change resulting from relative limb movements and translation of body position resulting from common body motion in discriminating human walking versus running actions. We found that faster translation speeds of common body motion evoked significantly more responses consistent with running when discriminating ambiguous actions morphed between walking and running. Furthermore, this influence was systematically modulated by the uncertainty associated with intrinsic cues as determined by the degree of limited-lifetime spatial sampling. The contribution of common body motion increased monotonically as the reliability of inferring posture changes on the basis of intrinsic cues decreased. These results highlight the importance of translational body movements and their interaction with posture change as a result of relative limb movements in discriminating human actions when visual input information is sparse and noisy.

  19. [Avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubský, Peter; Trč, Tomáš; Havlas, Vojtěch; Smetana, Pavel

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in adults is not common, but not too rare diseases. In orthopedic practice, it is one of the diseases that are causing implantation of hip replacement at a relatively early age. In the early detection and initiation of therapy can delay the implantation of prosthesis for several years, which is certainly more convenient for the patient and beneficial. This article is intended to acquaint the reader with the basic diagnostic procedures and therapy.

  20. The place of human rights and the common good in global health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasioulas, John; Vayena, Effy

    2016-08-01

    This article offers an integrated account of two strands of global health justice: health-related human rights and health-related common goods. After sketching a general understanding of the nature of human rights, it proceeds to explain both how individual human rights are to be individuated and the content of their associated obligations specified. With respect to both issues, the human right to health is taken as the primary illustration. It is argued that (1) the individuation of the right to health is fixed by reference to the subject matter of its corresponding obligations, and not by the interests it serves, and (2) the specification of the content of that right must be properly responsive to thresholds of possibility and burden. The article concludes by insisting that human rights cannot constitute the whole of global health justice and that, in addition, other considerations-including the promotion of health-related global public goods-should also shape such policy. Moreover, the relationship between human rights and common goods should not be conceived as mutually exclusive. On the contrary, there sometimes exists an individual right to some aspect of a common good, including a right to benefit from health-related common goods such as programmes for securing herd immunity from diphtheria.

  1. A biomechanical evaluation of proximal femoral nail antirotation with respect to helical blade position in femoral head: A cadaveric study

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    Jin-Ho Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Despite new developments in the management of osteoporotic fractures, complications like screw cutout are still found in the fixation of proximal femur fractures even with biomechanically proven better implants like proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to investigate the biomechanical stability of this device in relation to two common positions (center-center and inferior-center of the helical blade in the femoral head in unstable trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Eight pairs of human cadaveric femurs were used; in one group [center-center (C-C group], the helical blade of PFNA was fixed randomly in central position both in anteroposterior and lateral view, whereas in the other group it was fixed in inferior one-third position in anteroposterior and in central position in lateral view [inferior-center (I-C group]. Unstable intertrochanteric fracture was created and each specimen was loaded cyclically till load to failure Results: Angular and rotational displacements were significantly higher within the C-C group compared to the I-C group in both unloaded and loaded condition. Loading to failure was higher in the I-C group compared to the C-C group. No statistical significance was found for this parameter. Correlations between tip apex distance, cyclic loading which lead to femoral head displacement, and ultimate load to failure showed a significant positive relationship. Conclusion: The I-C group was superior to the C-C group and provided better biomechanical stability for angular and rotational displacement. This study would be a stimulus for further experimental studies with larger number specimens and complex loading protocols at multicentres.

  2. Early Outcomes of Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Song Zhao; Xin Li; Qiang Zhang; Sheng Sun; Ru-Gang Zhao; Juan Cai

    2015-01-01

    Background:Studies have reported that patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a high incidence of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH).Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an effective management of ONFH.However,little data exist regarding the use of THA for the HIV patients with ONFH in China.This study reviewed the outcomes of HIV-positive patients who underwent THA for ONFH,compared with HIV-negative individuals.Methods:The patients who underwent THA for ONFH from September 2012 to September 2014 in Beijing Ditan Hospital,Capital Medical University were retrospectively studied.Twenty-eight HIV-positive patients and 35 HIV-negative patients underwent 48 THAs and 45 THAs with cementless components,respectively.Medical records and follow-up data were reviewed.Harris Hip Score (HHS) was applied to evaluate the pain and function of the hips before and after THA.Complications such as wound healing,surgical site infection,deep venous thrombosis,pulmonary embolism,sepsis,mortality,and complications from the prosthesis were reviewed.The operation time,blood loss,and hospital stay were compared between the two groups.Results:The mean follow-up period was 19.5 ± 5.8 months (ranging from 6 to 30 months).The mean age of the HIV-positive patients with osteonecrosis at the time of surgery was 35 years old,which was significantly lower than that of the HIV-negative group (42 years old) (P < 0.05).The HIV-positive patients underwent surgery a mean of 2.5 years after their original symptoms,which was significantly shorter than the HIV-negatives' (mean 4 years) (P < 0.05).Among HIV-positive patients,the prevalence of being male and rate of bilateral procedures were significantly higher than those in the HIV-negative group (P < 0.05).The operation time in HIV-positive patients was significantly longer than that in HIV-negative patients (P < 0.05).There were no significant differences in blood loss or hospital stay between the two groups (P > 0.05).The HHSs

  3. Femoral pseudoaneurysms in drug addicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Rørdam, Peter; Jensen, L P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of treatment of femoral pseudoaneurysms in drug addicts. METHODS: The records of eight patients undergoing vascular surgery for femoral pseudoaneurysms from substance abuse identified from a vascular database were reviewed. RESULTS: Were good in four out of five...

  4. Intima-Media Thickness in the Carotid and Femoral Arteries for Detection of Arteriosclerosis in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Emmanuelle Tenório Albuquerque Madruga; Brandt, Carlos Teixeira; Lacerda, Heloisa Ramos; Godoi, Jocelene Tenório Albuquerque Madruga; de Oliveira, Dinaldo Cavalcanti; Costa, Gabriela Farias Araujo Sousa; dos Santos Junior, Gerson Gomes; Leite, Kaliene Maria Estevão; Godoi, Juannicelle Tenório Albuquerque Madruga; de Vasconcelos, Adriana Ferraz

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of atherosclerosis is higher in HIV-positive people, who also experience it earlier than the general population. Objectives To assess and compare the prevalence of atherosclerosis evaluated by the intima-media thickness of carotid and femoral arteries, and by the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) in HIV patients treated or not treated with protease inhibitors (PIs) and controls. Methods Eighty HIV+ subjects (40 using PIs and 40 not using PIs) and 65 controls were included in the study. Atherosclerosis was diagnosed by (carotid and femoral) ITM measurement and ABPI. Classical risk factors for atherosclerosis and HIV were compared between the groups by statistical tests. A p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results An IMT > P75 or the presence of plaque was higher in the HIV+ than in the control group (37.5% vs 19%, p = 0.04). Comparative analysis showed a significant difference (p=0.014) in carotid IMT between HIV+ with PIs (0.71 ± 0.28 mm), without PIs 0.63 ± 0.11 mm and, and controls (0.59 ± 0.11 mm). There was no significant difference in femoral IMT between the groups or in ABPI between HIV+ subjects and controls. However, a significant difference (p=0.015) was found between HIV+ patients not treated with PIs (1.17 [1.08 - 1.23]), and controls 1.08 [1.07 - 1.17]). Conclusion In HIV patients, atherosclerosis is more prevalent and seems to occur earlier with particular characteristics compared with HIV-negative subjects. PMID:28146208

  5. Current Concepts of Using Large Femoral Heads in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Myung-Rae; Choi, Won Kee; Kim, Jae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Instability and dislocation after total hip arthroplasty are the most common causes of revisions and major complications for failure of inserted prostheses, leading to a reduction in quality of life. Because the use of artificial femoral head sizes smaller than patient's own size is the important cause for dislocation, the use of large femoral head have increased. Femoral head sizes greater than 32 mm offer multiple advantages in physical function and activity levels of patients by improving ...

  6. Exosomes Secreted from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head by Promoting Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Qing; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Chen, Shengbao; Song, Wenqi; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Local ischemia is the main pathological performance in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). There is currently no effective therapy to promote angiogenesis in the femoral head. Recent studies revealed that exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPS-MSC-Exos) have great therapeutic potential in ischemic tissues, but whether they could promote angiogenesis in ONFH has not been reported, and little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Methods: iPS-MSC-Exos were intravenously injected to a steroid-induced rat osteonecrosis model. Samples of the femoral head were obtained 3 weeks after all the injections. The effects were assessed by measuring local angiogenesis and bone loss through histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, micro-CT and three-dimensional microangiography. The effects of exosomes on endothelial cells were studied through evaluations of proliferation, migration and tube-forming analyses. The expression levels of angiogenic related PI3K/Akt signaling pathway of endothelial cells were evaluated following stimulation of iPS-MSC-Exos. The promoting effects of exosomes were re-evaluated following blockade of PI3K/Akt. Results: The in vivo study revealed that administration of iPS-MSC-Exos significantly prevented bone loss, and increased microvessel density in the femoral head compared with control group. We found that iPS-MSC-Exos significantly enhanced the proliferation, migration and tube-forming capacities of endothelial cells in vitro. iPS-MSC-Exos could activate PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in endothelial cells. Moreover, the promoting effects of iPS-MSC-Exos were abolished after blockade of PI3K/Akt on endothelial cells. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that transplantation of iPS-MSC-Exos exerts a preventative effect on ONFH by promoting local angiogenesis and preventing bone loss. The promoting effect might be attributed to activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway on

  7. Aneurisma da veia femoral simulando uma hérnia inguinal Femoral vein aneurysm simulating an inguinal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Assad Buffara-Jr

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Somente seis casos de aneurismas da veia femoral simulando hérnia inguinal foram descritos na literatura. RELATO DO CASO: Um caso de aneurisma da veia femoral comum direita que simulava uma hérnia inguinal é descrito em jovem de 19 anos de idade com uma massa dolorosa de consistência mole na região inguinal direita de seis meses de duração. Durante a consulta médica, o paciente morreu durante em episódio de convulsão generalizada. Na necropsia, tromboembolismo pulmonar maciço e um aneurisma da veia femoral comum de 8x8x7 cm com trombos foram diagnosticados.BACKGROUND: Only six cases of femoral vein aneurysm are related on medical literature. CASE REPORT: A case of a right common femoral vein aneurysm simulating an inguinal hernia in a 19 year-old male. He had a soft and painful mass in the right inguinal area of six months of duration. At medical consultation, the patient died during a generalized convulsive episode. At necropsy, massive pulmonary thromboembolism and an 8x8x7 cm common femoral vein aneurysm with thrombus were recognized.

  8. Derivation of Neural Progenitors and Retinal Pigment Epithelium from Common Marmoset and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laughing Bear Torrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs derived from mammalian species are valuable tools for modeling human disease, including retinal degenerative eye diseases that result in visual loss. Restoration of vision has focused on transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE to the retina. Here we used transgenic common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus and human pluripotent stem cells carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP reporter as a model system for retinal differentiation. Using suspension and subsequent adherent differentiation cultures, we observed spontaneous in vitro differentiation that included NPCs and cells with pigment granules characteristic of differentiated RPE. Retinal cells derived from human and common marmoset pluripotent stem cells provide potentially unlimited cell sources for testing safety and immune compatibility following autologous or allogeneic transplantation using nonhuman primates in early translational applications.

  9. Quantitative Determination of Common Urinary Odorants and Their Glucuronide Conjugates in Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wagenstaller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study on the identification of common odorants and their conjugates in human urine demonstrated that this substance fraction is a little-understood but nonetheless a promising medium for analysis and diagnostics in this easily accessible physiological medium. Smell as an indicator for diseases, or volatile excretion in the course of dietary processes bares high potential for a series of physiological insights. Still, little is known today about the quantitative composition of odorous or volatile targets, as well as their non-volatile conjugates, both with regard to their common occurrence in urine of healthy subjects, as well as in that of individuals suffering from diseases or other physiological misbalancing. Accordingly, the aim of our study was to develop a highly sensitive and selective approach to determine the common quantitative composition of selected odorant markers in healthy human subjects, as well as their corresponding glucuronide conjugates. We used one- and two-dimensional high resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in combination with stable isotope dilution assays to quantify commonly occurring and potent odorants in human urine. The studies were carried out on both native urine and on urine that had been treated by glucuronidase assays, with analysis of the liberated odor-active compounds using the same techniques. Analytical data are discussed with regard to their potential translation as future diagnostic tool.

  10. Simultaneous proximal femoral rotational and distal femoral varus osteotomies for femoral retroversion and genu valgum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Russell; Barcak, Eric A

    2012-04-01

    Whereas excess femoral anteversion and its related symptoms have been described many times, excess femoral retroversion is less well documented. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman who had a history of chronic bilateral hip and knee pain and evidence of excess femoral retroversion, genu valgum, early-onset lateral and patellofemoral compartment osteoarthritis of both knees, and hip arthritis. She experienced symptomatic relief after undergoing staged bilateral simultaneous proximal femoral rotational and distal femoral lateral opening wedge osteotomies. Although this combination of alignment problems is not an infrequent clinical occurrence, we have found no literature on this condition or treatment. The patient provided written informed consent for print and electronic publication of this case report.

  11. Ancient Humans Influenced the Current Spatial Genetic Structure of Common Walnut Populations in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pollegioni

    Full Text Available Common walnut (Juglans regia L is an economically important species cultivated worldwide for its wood and nuts. It is generally accepted that J. regia survived and grew spontaneously in almost completely isolated stands in its Asian native range after the Last Glacial Maximum. Despite its natural geographic isolation, J. regia evolved over many centuries under the influence of human management and exploitation. We evaluated the hypothesis that the current distribution of natural genetic resources of common walnut in Asia is, at least in part, the product of ancient anthropogenic dispersal, human cultural interactions, and afforestation. Genetic analysis combined with ethno-linguistic and historical data indicated that ancient trade routes such as the Persian Royal Road and Silk Road enabled long-distance dispersal of J. regia from Iran and Trans-Caucasus to Central Asia, and from Western to Eastern China. Ancient commerce also disrupted the local spatial genetic structure of autochthonous walnut populations between Tashkent and Samarkand (Central-Eastern Uzbekistan, where the northern and central routes of the Northern Silk Road converged. A significant association between ancient language phyla and the genetic structure of walnut populations is reported even after adjustment for geographic distances that could have affected both walnut gene flow and human commerce over the centuries. Beyond the economic importance of common walnut, our study delineates an alternative approach for understanding how the genetic resources of long-lived perennial tree species may be affected by the interaction of geography and human history.

  12. The Human Phenotype Ontology: Semantic Unification of Common and Rare Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Tudor; Köhler, Sebastian; Moldenhauer, Dawid; Vasilevsky, Nicole; Baynam, Gareth; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Schriml, Lynn Marie; Kibbe, Warren Alden; Schofield, Paul N.; Beck, Tim; Vasant, Drashtti; Brookes, Anthony J.; Zankl, Andreas; Washington, Nicole L.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa A.; Parkinson, Helen; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) is widely used in the rare disease community for differential diagnostics, phenotype-driven analysis of next-generation sequence-variation data, and translational research, but a comparable resource has not been available for common disease. Here, we have developed a concept-recognition procedure that analyzes the frequencies of HPO disease annotations as identified in over five million PubMed abstracts by employing an iterative procedure to optimize precision and recall of the identified terms. We derived disease models for 3,145 common human diseases comprising a total of 132,006 HPO annotations. The HPO now comprises over 250,000 phenotypic annotations for over 10,000 rare and common diseases and can be used for examining the phenotypic overlap among common diseases that share risk alleles, as well as between Mendelian diseases and common diseases linked by genomic location. The annotations, as well as the HPO itself, are freely available. PMID:26119816

  13. VARIATIONS IN ORIGIN OF FEMORAL NERVE FROM THE LUMBER PLEXUS (A CADAVERIC STUDY

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    Dr. Gurbachan Singh Gindha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The variations in origin of femoral nerve from lumbar plexuses is very much common. The normal root value of origin of femoral nerve is L2, L2 and L4. It can be prefixed or postfixed. Mostly the femoral nerve is used for the nerve block in several surgeries and is vulnerable to compression in tight ilio-psoas compartment. The knowledge of origin and variations of femoral nerve in iliac fossa is important for anatomists, anaesthetists and surgeons to prevent iatrogenic femoral nerve injuries.3 0 embalmed with 10% formal in and fixed cadavers were dissecte donboth sides and 60 lumbar plexuses with their branches formed the mat e r i a l f o r t h e study. The p s oas major muscle was dissected to see the formation of femoral nerve from theroots and to observe the variations in the formation of femoral nerve. The aim of this study was to look for the variations in origin and branching pattern of the femoral nerve in the iliac fossa and proper exposure of the femoral nerve in the femoral triangle.

  14. The potential application of a Cobalt Chrome Molybdenum femoral stem with functionally graded orthotropic structures manufactured using Laser Melting technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlehurst, K B; Wang, C J; Stanford, M

    2013-12-01

    The cementless fixation of porous coated femoral stems is a common technique employed for Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). With the rate of revision surgery appearing to rise and younger more active patients requiring primary surgery it can be thought that alternative methods for increasing implant longevity need to be considered. The stress shielding of periprosthetic bone still remains a contributing factor to implant loosening, caused through a mismatch in stiffness between the implant and the bone. However, the ability to achieve stiffness matching characteristics is being realised through the use of Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies and Functionally Graded Materials (FGM). This paper proposes an alternative design methodology for a monoblock Cobalt Chrome Molybdenum (CoCrMo) femoral stem. It hypothesises that a femoral stem suitable for cementless fixation can be manufactured using Laser Melting (LM) technology offering orthotropic functionally graded porous structures with similar mechanical properties to human bone. The structure and mechanical properties of the natural femur have been used as a basis for the design criteria which hypothesises that through a combination of numerical analysis and physical testing, an optimal design can be proposed to provide a lightweight, customised femoral stem that can reduce the risk of implant loosening through stress shielding whilst maintaining bone-implant interface stability.

  15. Common Visual Preference for Curved Contours in Humans and Great Apes.

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    Enric Munar

    Full Text Available Among the visual preferences that guide many everyday activities and decisions, from consumer choices to social judgment, preference for curved over sharp-angled contours is commonly thought to have played an adaptive role throughout human evolution, favoring the avoidance of potentially harmful objects. However, because nonhuman primates also exhibit preferences for certain visual qualities, it is conceivable that humans' preference for curved contours is grounded on perceptual and cognitive mechanisms shared with extant nonhuman primate species. Here we aimed to determine whether nonhuman great apes and humans share a visual preference for curved over sharp-angled contours using a 2-alternative forced choice experimental paradigm under comparable conditions. Our results revealed that the human group and the great ape group indeed share a common preference for curved over sharp-angled contours, but that they differ in the manner and magnitude with which this preference is expressed behaviorally. These results suggest that humans' visual preference for curved objects evolved from earlier primate species' visual preferences, and that during this process it became stronger, but also more susceptible to the influence of higher cognitive processes and preference for other visual features.

  16. Understanding rare and common diseases in the context of human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Murci, Lluis

    2016-11-07

    The wealth of available genetic information is allowing the reconstruction of human demographic and adaptive history. Demography and purifying selection affect the purge of rare, deleterious mutations from the human population, whereas positive and balancing selection can increase the frequency of advantageous variants, improving survival and reproduction in specific environmental conditions. In this review, I discuss how theoretical and empirical population genetics studies, using both modern and ancient DNA data, are a powerful tool for obtaining new insight into the genetic basis of severe disorders and complex disease phenotypes, rare and common, focusing particularly on infectious disease risk.

  17. Iatrogenic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm and Secondary Ipsilateral Deep Vein Thrombosis: An Indication for Early Surgical Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Zirngibl, Hubert; Floros, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation often complicates transfemoral interventional procedures. Nonsurgical treatment consists of femoral compression and thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance. We report a 74-year-old man who was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm, following coronary angiography. Duplex ultrasound revealed deep vein thrombosis of the ipsilateral common femoral vein. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was unsuccessfully performed, and the patient subsequently underwent surgical exploration for repair of the pseudoaneurysm and release of the venous compression. The increased local inflammation, because of the thrombosis, added in surgical difficulties. We conclude that early surgical intervention should be considered as a primary strategy in patients with femoral pseudoaneurysms and deep vein thrombosis secondary to femoral compression.

  18. Axon guidance pathways served as common targets for human speech/language evolution and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huimeng; Yan, Zhangming; Sun, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Jianhong; Ma, Caihong; Xu, Qunyuan; Wang, Rui; Jarvis, Erich D; Sun, Zhirong

    2017-07-07

    Human and several nonhuman species share the rare ability of modifying acoustic and/or syntactic features of sounds produced, i.e. vocal learning, which is the important neurobiological and behavioral substrate of human speech/language. This convergent trait was suggested to be associated with significant genomic convergence and best manifested at the ROBO-SLIT axon guidance pathway. Here we verified the significance of such genomic convergence and assessed its functional relevance to human speech/language using human genetic variation data. In normal human populations, we found the affected amino acid sites were well fixed and accompanied with significantly more associated protein-coding SNPs in the same genes than the rest genes. Diseased individuals with speech/language disorders have significant more low frequency protein coding SNPs but they preferentially occurred outside the affected genes. Such patients' SNPs were enriched in several functional categories including two axon guidance pathways (mediated by netrin and semaphorin) that interact with ROBO-SLITs. Four of the six patients have homozygous missense SNPs on PRAME gene family, one youngest gene family in human lineage, which possibly acts upon retinoic acid receptor signaling, similarly as FOXP2, to modulate axon guidance. Taken together, we suggest the axon guidance pathways (e.g. ROBO-SLIT, PRAME gene family) served as common targets for human speech/language evolution and related disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. HUMAN MICROBIOMES AND THEIR ROLES IN DYSBIOSIS, COMMON DISEASES AND NOVEL THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES

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    Jose Ernesto Belizario

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body is the residence of a large number of commensal (non-pathogenic and pathogenic microbial species that have co-evolved with the human genome, adaptive immune system and diet. With recent advances in DNA-based technologies, we initiated the exploration of bacterial gene functions and their role in human health. The main goal of the human microbiome project is to characterize the abundance, diversity and functionality of the genes present in all microorganisms that permanently live in different sites of the human body. The gut microbiota expresses over 3.3 million bacterial genes, while the human genome expresses only 20 thousand genes. Microbe gene-products exert pivotal functions via the regulation of food digestion and immune system development. Studies are confirming that manipulation of non-pathogenic bacterial strains in the host can stimulate the recovery of the immune response to pathogenic bacteria causing diseases. Different approaches, including the use of nutraceutics (prebiotics and probiotics as well as phages engineered with CRISPR/cas systems and quorum sensing systems have been developed as new therapies for controlling dysbiosis (alterations in microbial community and common diseases (e.g. diabetes and obesity. The designing and production of pharmaceuticals based on our own body’s microbiome is an emerging field and is rapidly growing to be fully explored in the near future. This review provides an outlook on recent findings on the human microbiomes, their impact on health and diseases, and on the development of targeted therapies.

  20. Dissociation between the time courses of femoral artery blood flow and pulmonary VO2 during repeated bouts of heavy knee extension exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuba, Yoshiyuki; Ohe, Yukie; Miura, Akira; Kitano, Asami; Endo, Masako; Sato, Hironori; Miyachi, Motohiko; Koga, Shunsaku; Fukuda, Osamu

    2004-05-01

    It has frequently been demonstrated that prior heavy cycling exercise facilitates pulmonary O(2) kinetics at the onset of subsequent heavy exercise. This might be due to improved muscle perfusion via acidosis-induced vasodilating effects. However, it is difficult to measure the blood flow (BF) to the working muscles (via the femoral artery) during cycling exercise. We therefore selected supine knee extension (KE) exercise as an alternative, and investigated whether the faster O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout was matched by proportionally faster BF kinetics to the exercising muscle. Nine healthy subjects (aged 21-44 years) volunteered to participate in this study. The protocol consisted of two consecutive 6-min KE exercise bouts in a supine position (work rate: 70-75% of peak power) separated by a 6-min baseline rest (EX1 to EX2). During the protocol, a pulsed Doppler ultrasound technique was utilized to continuously measure the BF in the right femoral artery. The protocol was repeated at least 6 times to characterize the precise kinetics. In agreement with previous studies using cycling exercise, the O(2) kinetics in the 2nd bout were facilitated compared with that in the 1st bout [mean +/-s.d. of the 'effective' time constant (tau): EX1, 68.6 +/- 15.9, versus EX2, 58.0 +/- 14.4 s. Phase II-tau: EX1, 48.7 +/- 9.0, versus EX2, 41.2 +/- 13.3 s. Empirical index of the slow component (Delta O(2(6-3))): EX1, 78 +/- 44, versus EX2, 57 +/- 36 ml min(-1) (P 0.05)]. It was concluded that the faster pulmonary O(2) kinetics during heavy KE exercise following prior heavy exercise was not associated with a similar modulation in the BF to the working muscles.

  1. 人体膝关节股骨后髁角度的MRI测量%Femoral posterior condylar angle of human knee joint:magnetic resonance imaging measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许红生; 赵志江; 孟位明; 张磊; 张小伟

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The good rotational alignment of femoral prosthesis was very important in total knee arthroplasty. The research has shown that the posterior condylar angle was important to determine the alignment. The posterior condylar angle is the angle between the posterior condylar axis and the femoral epicondylar axis. MRI can clearly show the condylar cartilage, the projections of lateral epicondyle and the medial epicondyle depression, thus ensuring accuracy of measurement data. OBJECTIVE:To measure the posterior condylar angle of knee joint in the northern part of Baoding City in China, and to provide image evidence for identifying the rotational alignment of femoral prosthesis during total knee arthroplasty. METHODS:The knee was extended on a neutral position when MRI machine was applied to scan knee joint. The scanning plane was perpendicular to the mechanical axis of the knee. The best T1 axial plane of the knee was chosen, and two observers analyzed images independently. Existence rate of femoral medial epicondyle was observed using Bravo viewer 6.0 imaging software. The posterior condylar angle between posterior condylar axis and the femoral condyle axis was measured. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The posterior condylar angle was (2.73±1.28)° in males and (2.35±1.37)° in females on average, which did not show significant difference. The results showed that the MRI had great superiority in measuring the posterior condylar angle. The variability of the epicondylar axis was smal in total knee arthroplasty. Posterior condylar angle can be referenced to position femoral prosthesis and to avoid the complications after knee replacement.%背景:全膝关节置换过程中股骨假体旋转力线良好非常重要,研究显示后髁角度是确定力线的重要依据,后髁角度为股骨后髁轴与股骨手术髁上轴之间角度,MRI测量可清晰显示后髁软骨、外上髁突起及内上髁凹陷,从而保证测量数据的准确。目的:测量

  2. Metabolic Modeling of Common Escherichia coli Strains in Human Gut Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Dong Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent high-throughput sequencing has enabled the composition of Escherichia coli strains in the human microbial community to be profiled en masse. However, there are two challenges to address: (1 exploring the genetic differences between E. coli strains in human gut and (2 dynamic responses of E. coli to diverse stress conditions. As a result, we investigated the E. coli strains in human gut microbiome using deep sequencing data and reconstructed genome-wide metabolic networks for the three most common E. coli strains, including E. coli HS, UTI89, and CFT073. The metabolic models show obvious strain-specific characteristics, both in network contents and in behaviors. We predicted optimal biomass production for three models on four different carbon sources (acetate, ethanol, glucose, and succinate and found that these stress-associated genes were involved in host-microbial interactions and increased in human obesity. Besides, it shows that the growth rates are similar among the models, but the flux distributions are different, even in E. coli core reactions. The correlations between human diabetes-associated metabolic reactions in the E. coli models were also predicted. The study provides a systems perspective on E. coli strains in human gut microbiome and will be helpful in integrating diverse data sources in the following study.

  3. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces-from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or "homophily").

  4. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces—from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or “homophily”).

  5. Femoralni trikotnik: The femoral triangle:

    OpenAIRE

    Mlakar, Boštjan; Ravnik, Dean

    1999-01-01

    The topography and structures of the femoral triangle are presented. The femorai triangle lies between the inguinal ligament at the base, the sartoriusmuscle at the lateral border and the long adductor muscle at the medial border. The apex of the femoral triangle is situated at the meeting point of the medial borders of the sartorius and long adductor muscles. The subinguinal space, which is divided into the lacuna musculorum and lacuna vasorum, provides a passageway for the lateral cutaneous...

  6. Do human polyoma viruses and human immunodeficiency virus share common co-receptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissov, Kalin; Tsekov, Iliya; Gavazova, Rayna; Kalvatchev, Zlatko; Argirova, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Host and/or viral factors involved in human polyomavirus (HPoV) infection in persons living with HIV remain unknown. A hypothesis is outlined suggesting the importance of the co-receptors CCR5, CCR2, and CXCR4 not only for HIV, but also for HPoV. Functionally capable receptors coded by wild-type (wt) genotypes could facilitate internalization of HPoV in the cell resulting in brain and/or kidney infection/s in HIV infected individuals. Forty-nine Bulgarians with HIV, all treated by HAART, without neurological and/or kidney disorders, were tested for JCV and BKV and genotyped for CCR5 (CCR5del32), CCR2 (CCR2-64I), and CXCR4 (SDF1-3'A). In 27/49 (55.1%) individuals a co-infection with HPoV was identified-BKV in 12/49 (24.5%), JCV-in another 12/49 (24.5%), and both viruses-in 3/49 (6.1%). A high frequency of wt CCR5 was found in patients with HPoV (91.7% for BKV and JCV and in 100% with both viruses). V/V of CCR2 was presented in 75% for BKV and JCV and in 66.7% for BKV plus JCV. SDF1-3'G/G predominated in JCV infected patients (75%), while G/A and A/A genotypes were more frequent in patients with BKV (41.7%). Also, 21/22 (95.4%) persons without HPoV infection were heterozygous for SDF1 and CCR2. The number of individuals bearing wt of all co-receptors in the group of persons not infected with HPoV was lower (P = 0.03) than that with polymorphism/s in one or two genes (SDF1 and CCR2) in the same group. The results suggest a probable role of co-receptors used by HIV to facilitate infection with HPoV.

  7. Neanderthal and Denisova genetic affinities with contemporary humans: introgression versus common ancestral polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Robert K; Uribe, Gabriel; Jimenez, Eric B; Weiss, Mark A; Herrera, Kristian J; Regueiro, Maria; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-11-01

    Analyses of the genetic relationships among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans have suggested that 1-4% of the non-Sub-Saharan African gene pool may be Neanderthal derived, while 6-8% of the Melanesian gene pool may be the product of admixture between the Denisovans and the direct ancestors of Melanesians. In the present study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity among a worldwide collection of contemporary human populations with respect to the genetic constitution of these two archaic hominins and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee). We partitioned SNPs into subsets, including those that are derived in both archaic lineages, those that are ancestral in both archaic lineages and those that are only derived in one archaic lineage. By doing this, we have conducted separate examinations of subsets of mutations with higher probabilities of divergent phylogenetic origins. While previous investigations have excluded SNPs from common ancestors in principal component analyses, we included common ancestral SNPs in our analyses to visualize the relative placement of the Neanderthal and Denisova among human populations. To assess the genetic similarities among the various hominin lineages, we performed genetic structure analyses to provide a comparison of genetic patterns found within contemporary human genomes that may have archaic or common ancestral roots. Our results indicate that 3.6% of the Neanderthal genome is shared with roughly 65.4% of the average European gene pool, which clinally diminishes with distance from Europe. Our results suggest that Neanderthal genetic associations with contemporary non-Sub-Saharan African populations, as well as the genetic affinities observed between Denisovans and Melanesians most likely result from the retention of ancient mutations in these populations.

  8. The suggestion of common cause of disease, characteristics of human body, and medical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Jun Cho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives & Methods: This suggestion was attempted to be elevated the recognition of common characteristics in disease. So, we performed to analyze the correlation of common cause of disease, characteristics of human body, and medical treatment. And the results are as follows. Results: 1. The cause of disease is consist of genetic factor, aging, habit, food of not good in health, weather, environment, deficit of the physical activity, stress and so on. 2. Generally, human has common and individual weakness. Individual weakness is appeared similar to the occurrence of volcano and lapse. 3. The correlation of disease and medical treatments is possible to explain using the quotation of the law of motion made by Isaac Newton, the great physicist. 4. When the process of the medical treatment was not progressed, the prognosis is determined by the correlation of the homeostasis(H' in human body and the homeostasis(H of disease. 5. The prognosis of disease is determined by the relationship between the energy of disease(F and medical treatment(F'. 6. The exact diagnosis is possible to predict the treatment sequence, and the facts that homeostasis in human body and disease, relationship between the energy of disease(F and medical treatment(F', action and reaction are important to determine the prognosis. 7. The careful observation of improving response and worsening action of disease becomes available for exact prognosis. Conclusion: The above described contents may be useful in clinical studies, and the concrete clinical reports about this will be made afterward.

  9. Human Coronavirus 229E Remains Infectious on Common Touch Surface Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Little, Zoë R; Keevil, C William

    2015-11-10

    The evolution of new and reemerging historic virulent strains of respiratory viruses from animal reservoirs is a significant threat to human health. Inefficient human-to-human transmission of zoonotic strains may initially limit the spread of transmission, but an infection may be contracted by touching contaminated surfaces. Enveloped viruses are often susceptible to environmental stresses, but the human coronaviruses responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) have recently caused increasing concern of contact transmission during outbreaks. We report here that pathogenic human coronavirus 229E remained infectious in a human lung cell culture model following at least 5 days of persistence on a range of common nonbiocidal surface materials, including polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon; PTFE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), ceramic tiles, glass, silicone rubber, and stainless steel. We have shown previously that noroviruses are destroyed on copper alloy surfaces. In this new study, human coronavirus 229E was rapidly inactivated on a range of copper alloys (within a few minutes for simulated fingertip contamination) and Cu/Zn brasses were very effective at lower copper concentration. Exposure to copper destroyed the viral genomes and irreversibly affected virus morphology, including disintegration of envelope and dispersal of surface spikes. Cu(I) and Cu(II) moieties were responsible for the inactivation, which was enhanced by reactive oxygen species generation on alloy surfaces, resulting in even faster inactivation than was seen with nonenveloped viruses on copper. Consequently, copper alloy surfaces could be employed in communal areas and at any mass gatherings to help reduce transmission of respiratory viruses from contaminated surfaces and protect the public health. Respiratory viruses are responsible for more deaths globally than any other infectious agent. Animal coronaviruses that "host jump" to humans result in

  10. Valgus Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in Patient with Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Hayashida, Tatsuro; Murakami, Koji; Makio, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuichi; Oka, Yoshinobu; Kim, Wook-Choel; Ogura, Taku; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common disease of adolescent and the epiphysis is positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with varus SCFE; however, posterolateral displacement of the capital epiphysis, valgus SCFE, occurs less frequently. We report a case of valgus SCFE in a 17-year-old boy with hypopituitarism. After falling down, he experienced difficulty in walking. The radiographs were inconclusive; however three-dimensional computed tomography images showed lateral displacement of the epiphysis on the right femoral head. Valgus SCFE was diagnosed. The patient underwent in situ pinning of both sides. In situ pinning on the left side was performed as a prophylactic pinning because of endocrine abnormalities. At the 1-year follow-up, he could walk without any difficulty and there were no signs of pain. The epiphysis is commonly positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with most SCFE, but, in this case, the epiphysis slipped laterally. Differential diagnosis included femoral neck fracture (Delbet-Colonna type 1); however, this was less likely due to the absence of other clinical signs. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient as SCFE. When children complain of leg pain and limp, valgus SCFE that may not be visualized on anteroposterior radiographs needs to be considered. PMID:28154765

  11. Valgus Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in Patient with Hypopituitarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Kotoura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE is a common disease of adolescent and the epiphysis is positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with varus SCFE; however, posterolateral displacement of the capital epiphysis, valgus SCFE, occurs less frequently. We report a case of valgus SCFE in a 17-year-old boy with hypopituitarism. After falling down, he experienced difficulty in walking. The radiographs were inconclusive; however three-dimensional computed tomography images showed lateral displacement of the epiphysis on the right femoral head. Valgus SCFE was diagnosed. The patient underwent in situ pinning of both sides. In situ pinning on the left side was performed as a prophylactic pinning because of endocrine abnormalities. At the 1-year follow-up, he could walk without any difficulty and there were no signs of pain. The epiphysis is commonly positioned more posteromedially in relation to the femoral neck shaft with most SCFE, but, in this case, the epiphysis slipped laterally. Differential diagnosis included femoral neck fracture (Delbet-Colonna type 1; however, this was less likely due to the absence of other clinical signs. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient as SCFE. When children complain of leg pain and limp, valgus SCFE that may not be visualized on anteroposterior radiographs needs to be considered.

  12. Femoral artery recanalisation with percutaneous angioplasty and segmentally enclosed plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, B; Tønnesen, K H; Bülow, J;

    1989-01-01

    To establish whether re-occlusion of the femoral artery could be prevented, in 6 consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for superficial femoral artery occlusion the recanalised segment was isolated, with a 7-French double-balloon catheter. 5 mg recombined human...

  13. Recent mitochondrial DNA mutations increase the risk of developing common late-onset human diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Hudson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is highly polymorphic at the population level, and specific mtDNA variants affect mitochondrial function. With emerging evidence that mitochondrial mechanisms are central to common human diseases, it is plausible that mtDNA variants contribute to the "missing heritability" of several complex traits. Given the central role of mtDNA genes in oxidative phosphorylation, the same genetic variants would be expected to alter the risk of developing several different disorders, but this has not been shown to date. Here we studied 38,638 individuals with 11 major diseases, and 17,483 healthy controls. Imputing missing variants from 7,729 complete mitochondrial genomes, we captured 40.41% of European mtDNA variation. We show that mtDNA variants modifying the risk of developing one disease also modify the risk of developing other diseases, thus providing independent replication of a disease association in different case and control cohorts. High-risk alleles were more common than protective alleles, indicating that mtDNA is not at equilibrium in the human population, and that recent mutations interact with nuclear loci to modify the risk of developing multiple common diseases.

  14. Comparison of the effectiveness of some common animal data scaling techniques in estimating human radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Aydogan, B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, animal studies are typically performed to get a first approximation of the expected radiation dose in humans. This study evaluates the performance of some commonly used data extrapolation techniques to predict residence times in humans using data collected from animals. Residence times were calculated using animal and human data, and distributions of ratios of the animal results to human results were constructed for each extrapolation method. Four methods using animal data to predict human residence times were examined: (1) using no extrapolation, (2) using relative organ mass extrapolation, (3) using physiological time extrapolation, and (4) using a combination of the mass and time methods. The residence time ratios were found to be log normally distributed for the nonextrapolated and extrapolated data sets. The use of relative organ mass extrapolation yielded no statistically significant change in the geometric mean or variance of the residence time ratios as compared to using no extrapolation. Physiologic time extrapolation yielded a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01, paired t test) in the geometric mean of the residence time ratio from 0.5 to 0.8. Combining mass and time methods did not significantly improve the results of using time extrapolation alone. 63 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The venality of human body parts and products in French law and common law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haoulia, Naima

    2012-03-01

    The successive bioethics laws in France have constantly argued that the human body is not for sale and consecrated an absolute principle of free and anonymous donations, whether of semen, ova, blood, tissues or organs. Nonetheless, this position is not shared by all countries. These legal divergences upset today our moral principles and the development of these practices leads us to question the legal status of human biological material and its gradual commodification. This paper outlines the current law principles that protect people's interests in their bodies, excised body parts and tissues without conferring the rights of full legal ownership in French law and in Common law. Contrary to what many people believe, people do not legally 'own' their bodies, body parts or tissues. However, they do have some legal rights in relation to their bodies and excised body material. For lawyers, the exact relationship people have with their bodies has raised a host of complex questions and long debates about the status we should grant to human body parts. The significance of this issue is due to two reasons:first, because of the imperative protection we have to assure to human dignity and then, because of the economic value which is attached to human products.

  16. Human Rights versus Corporate Rights: Life Value, the Civil Commons and Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McMurtry

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This analysis maps the deepening global crisis and the principles of its resolution by life-value analysis and method. Received theories of economics and justice and modern rights doctrines are shown to have no ground in life value and to be incapable of recognizing universal life goods and the rising threats to them. In response to this system failure at theoretical and operational levels, the unifying nature and measure of life value are defined to provide the long-missing basis for understanding the common interest, human rights and social justice—that is, the universal life necessities of humanity across cultures and the evolving civil commons infrastructures to ensure them. In contrast, the treaty-imposed corporate rights system miscalled “globalization” is structured to predate life means and support systems at all levels with no accountability beyond itself. Only the logic of life value, human rights and life-protective law, it is concluded, can comprehend or govern this inherently life-blind and cumulatively eco-genocidal regime.

  17. Human glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misquitta Stephanie A

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutaminyl cyclase (QC forms the pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus of numerous secretory peptides and proteins. We previously proposed the mammalian QC has some features in common with zinc aminopeptidases. We now have generated a structural model for human QC based on the aminopeptidase fold (pdb code 1AMP and mutated the apparent active site residues to assess their role in QC catalysis. Results The structural model proposed here for human QC, deposited in the protein databank as 1MOI, is supported by a variety of fold prediction programs, by the circular dichroism spectrum, and by the presence of the disulfide. Mutagenesis of the six active site residues present in both 1AMP and QC reveal essential roles for the two histidines (140 and 330, QC numbering and the two glutamates (201 and 202, while the two aspartates (159 and 248 appear to play no catalytic role. ICP-MS analysis shows less than stoichiometric zinc (0.3:1 in the purified enzyme. Conclusions We conclude that human pituitary glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site residues. In contrast to the aminopeptidase, however, QC does not appear to require zinc for enzymatic activity.

  18. Common errors in textbook descriptions of muscle fiber size in nontrained humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Gordon R; Row, Brandi S

    2011-09-01

    Exercise science and human anatomy and physiology textbooks commonly report that type IIB muscle fibers have the largest cross-sectional area of the three fiber types. These descriptions of muscle fiber sizes do not match with the research literature examining muscle fibers in young adult nontrained humans. For men, most commonly type IIA fibers were significantly larger than other fiber types (six out of 10 cases across six different muscles). For women, either type I, or both I and IIA muscle fibers were usually significantly the largest (five out of six cases across four different muscles). In none of these reports were type IIB fibers significantly larger than both other fiber types. In 27 studies that did not include statistical comparisons of mean fiber sizes across fiber types, in no cases were type IIB or fast glycolytic fibers larger than both type I and IIA, or slow oxidative and fast oxidative glycolytic fibers. The likely reason for mistakes in textbook descriptions of human muscle fiber sizes is that animal data were presented without being labeled as such, and without any warning that there are interspecies differences in muscle fiber properties. Correct knowledge of muscle fiber sizes may facilitate interpreting training and aging adaptations.

  19. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  20. Rare and low-frequency variants in human common diseases and other complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    In humans, most of the genetic variation is rare and often population-specific. Whereas the role of rare genetic variants in familial monogenic diseases is firmly established, we are only now starting to explore the contribution of this class of genetic variation to human common diseases and other complex traits. Such large-scale experiments are possible due to the development of next-generation DNA sequencing. Early findings suggested that rare and low-frequency coding variation might have a large effect on human phenotypes (eg, PCSK9 missense variants on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and coronary heart diseases). This observation sparked excitement in prognostic and diagnostic medicine, as well as in genetics-driven strategies to develop new drugs. In this review, I describe results and present initial conclusions regarding some of the recent rare and low-frequency variant discoveries. We can already assume that most phenotype-associated rare and low-frequency variants have modest-to-weak phenotypical effect. Thus, we will need large cohorts to identify them, as for common variants in genome-wide association studies. As we expand the list of associated rare and low-frequency variants, we can also better recognise the current limitations: we need to develop better statistical methods to optimally test association with rare variants, including non-coding variation, and to account for potential confounders such as population stratification.

  1. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-06-08

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  2. Human Parechovirus 3: The Most Common Viral Cause of Meningoencephalitis in Young Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Christian; Harrison, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) were initially classified as echoviruses. HPeVs occur worldwide, comprising up to 17 genotypes. HPeV1 and HPeV3 are most common. Clinical disease varies somewhat among genotypes. HPeV1 causes mostly gastrointestinal infections. HPeV3's prominence is due to its causing sepsis syndromes and central nervous system (CNS) infections in young infants. Currently, HPeV3 is the most common single cause of aseptic meningitis/meningoencephalitis in infants less than 90 days old in North America, usually with biannual summer-fall seasonality. HPeV3 CNS infections usually lack cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Mortality and sequelae are uncommon, usually accompanying initially severe or neurologically complicated acute illnesses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Common multifractality in the heart rate variability and brain activity of healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. C.; Sharif, A.

    2010-06-01

    The influence from the central nervous system on the human multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) is examined under the autonomic nervous system perturbation induced by the head-up-tilt body maneuver. We conducted the multifractal factorization analysis to factor out the common multifractal factor in the joint fluctuation of the beat-to-beat heart rate and electroencephalography data. Evidence of a central link in the multifractal HRV was found, where the transition towards increased (decreased) HRV multifractal complexity is associated with a stronger (weaker) multifractal correlation between the central and autonomic nervous systems.

  4. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2006-01-01

    been investigated. Owing to the limitations in computational methods, comparative genomics has been lacking the ability to compare such nonconserved sequence regions for conserved structural RNA elements. We have investigated the presence of structural RNA elements by conducting a local structural...... alignment, using FOLDALIGN, on a subset of these 100,000 corresponding regions and estimate that 1800 contain common RNA structures. Comparing our results with the recent mapping of transcribed fragments (transfrags) in human, we find that high-scoring candidates are twice as likely to be found in regions...... expressed non-coding RNA sequences not alignable in primary sequence....

  5. A comparative assessment of cytotoxicity of commonly used agricultural insecticides to human and insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xinming; Huang, Qingchun; Rao, Wenbing; Xiao, Ciying; Zhang, Tao; Mao, Zhifan; Wan, Ziyi

    2017-03-01

    The cytotoxic potential of 13 commonly used agricultural insecticides was examined using cell-based systems with three human HepG2, Hek293, HeLa cells and three insect Tn5B1-4, Sf-21, and Drosophila S2 cells. Data showed that (1) an enhancement of some insecticides (e.g. pyrethroids) on cells proliferation; (2) an inhibition of some insecticides on cells viability; (3) various levels of susceptibility of different cells to the same insecticide; and (4) the cell type dependent sensitivity to different insecticides. The degree of cytotoxicity of insecticides on human cells was significantly lower than that on insect cells (Pinsecticides against intact cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Femoral artery pseudoaneurysms encountered in orthopedics and traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raherinantenaina, F; Rajaonanahary, T M A; Rakoto Ratsimba, H N

    2015-12-01

    Most published articles regarding orthopedic- and trauma-related femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (FAPs) are case reports in English. Reported cases are often associated with a literature review but actually provide little robust data. We wanted to summarize the current knowledge on diagnostic and therapeutic features of these FAPs. A new case of superficial FAP is described followed by a review of the literature. A bibliographic search was performed online (PubMed, ScinceDirect) from 1964 to 2015 using the descriptors "traumatic femoral pseudoaneurysm, orthopedic surgery, osteochondroma". A total of 64 cases of FAPs was analyzed. There were 50 men with an average age of 40.72±26.45 years old. The most common clinical presentation was painful swelling (34%). Arteriography was the commonest radiological investigation used (63%). The main etiologies were orthopedic injuries (47%), surgery of the upper thigh (30%) and femoral osteochondromas (23%). Arterial injuries included superficial femoral (47%) and profunda femoris artery (50%). The treatment was open surgery (56%) or endovascular repair (36%). Deep femoral artery and its branches were embolized (47%) or ligated (38%). Endovascular stenting was performed in 30% of posttraumatic FAPs. All FAPs relating to osteochondromas were repaired surgically. Postoperative courses were uneventful in 95% of patients. Endovascular embolization is preferred in management of postsurgical FAPs which have usually involved the deep femoral artery. Endovascular stenting graft may be proposed for posttraumatic FAPs, for which the superficial femoral trunk is the most often involved vessel. Surgical repair should be performed when endovascular stenting graft is not feasible. Surgical repair is mandatory for all FAPs secondary to traumatic exostoses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The Femoral Hernia-a rare hernia and its treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Hoeferlin

    2009-01-01

    @@ Introduction Hernias age protrusions through weak areas of our abdominal wall.The most common hernia is Inguinal Hernia in men.A rather rare hernia is the Femoral Hernia,a protrusion into the femotal canal next to the blood vessels in our groin (Picl).

  8. Can femoral dialysis catheter insertion cause a life threatening complication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurkay Katrancıoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous catheter (VC insertion may be necessary for the patients with renal failure facing vascular access problem. Femoral VCs are commonly used for their lower complication rates especially in emergency clinics. The incidence of bleeding associated with VC is reported 0.5-1.6%, however, life threatening hemorrhage and complications requiring surgical intervention are very rare. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated with retroperitoneal hematoma after femoral VC insertion. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 472-474

  9. Femoral neck radiography: effect of flexion on visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garry, S.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Jhangri, G.S. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. Public Health Sciences, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Lambert, R.G.W. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept.of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Walter C Mackenzie Health Sciences Centre, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)]. E-mail: rglamber@cha.ab.ca

    2005-06-15

    To determine whether flexion improves radiographic visualization of the femoral neck when the femur is externally rotated. Five human femora, with varying neck-shaft and anteversion angles, were measured and immobilized. Degree of flexion required to bring the femoral neck horizontal was measured, varying the rotation. Next, one bone was radiographed in 16 positions, varying rotation in 15{sup o} and flexion in 10{sup o} increments. Radiographs were presented in randomized blinded fashion to 15 staff radiologists for scoring of femoral neck visualization. Following this, all 5 bones were radiographed in 4 positions of rotation and at 0{sup o} and 20{sup o} flexion, and blinded randomized review of radiographs was repeated. Comparisons between angles and rotations were made using the Mann-Whitney test. The flexion angle required to bring the long axis of the femoral neck horizontal correlated directly with the degree of external rotation ({rho} < 0.05). Visualization of the femoral neck in the extended position progressively deteriorated from 15{sup o} internal rotation to 30{sup o} external rotation ({rho} <0.01). However, when 20{sup o} flexion was applied to bones in external rotation, visualization significantly improved at 15{sup o} ({rho} <0.05) and 30{sup o} ({rho} <0.01). Flexion of the externally rotated femur can bring the femoral neck into horizontal alignment, and a relatively small amount (20{sup o}) of flexion can significantly improve radiographic visualization. This manoeuvre could be useful for radiography of the femoral neck when initial radiographs are inadequate because of external rotation of the leg. (author)

  10. Genetic evidence for common pathways in human age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Simon C; Dong, Xiao; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the single largest risk factor for chronic disease. Studies in model organisms have identified conserved pathways that modulate aging rate and the onset and progression of multiple age-related diseases, suggesting that common pathways of aging may influence age-related diseases in humans as well. To determine whether there is genetic evidence supporting the notion of common pathways underlying age-related diseases, we analyzed the genes and pathways found to be associated with five major categories of age-related disease using a total of 410 genomewide association studies (GWAS). While only a small number of genes are shared among all five disease categories, those found in at least three of the five major age-related disease categories are highly enriched for apoliprotein metabolism genes. We found that a more substantial number of gene ontology (GO) terms are shared among the 5 age-related disease categories and shared GO terms include canonical aging pathways identified in model organisms, such as nutrient-sensing signaling, translation, proteostasis, stress responses, and genome maintenance. Taking advantage of the vast amount of genetic data from the GWAS, our findings provide the first direct evidence that conserved pathways of aging simultaneously influence multiple age-related diseases in humans as has been demonstrated in model organisms. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Common polymorphism in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) is associated with human social recognition skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuse, David H; Lori, Adriana; Cubells, Joseph F; Lee, Irene; Conneely, Karen N; Puura, Kaija; Lehtimäki, Terho; Binder, Elisabeth B; Young, Larry J

    2014-02-04

    The neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin are evolutionarily conserved regulators of social perception and behavior. Evidence is building that they are critically involved in the development of social recognition skills within rodent species, primates, and humans. We investigated whether common polymorphisms in the genes encoding the oxytocin and vasopressin 1a receptors influence social memory for faces. Our sample comprised 198 families, from the United Kingdom and Finland, in whom a single child had been diagnosed with high-functioning autism. Previous research has shown that impaired social perception, characteristic of autism, extends to the first-degree relatives of autistic individuals, implying heritable risk. Assessments of face recognition memory, discrimination of facial emotions, and direction of gaze detection were standardized for age (7-60 y) and sex. A common SNP in the oxytocin receptor (rs237887) was strongly associated with recognition memory in combined probands, parents, and siblings after correction for multiple comparisons. Homozygotes for the ancestral A allele had impairments in the range -0.6 to -1.15 SD scores, irrespective of their diagnostic status. Our findings imply that a critical role for the oxytocin system in social recognition has been conserved across perceptual boundaries through evolution, from olfaction in rodents to visual memory in humans.

  12. Common genetic variation in the human CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Z Lutz

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines was described to protect beta-cells from apoptosis, to improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance, and to prevent streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Here, we studied whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CTF1 locus, encoding cardiotrophin-1, influence insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in humans. METHODS: We genotyped 1,771 German subjects for three CTF1 tagging SNPs (rs1046276, rs1458201, and rs8046707. The subjects were metabolically characterized by an oral glucose tolerance test. Subgroups underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging/spectroscopy and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment, the minor allele of CTF1 SNP rs8046707 was significantly associated with decreased in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. The other tested SNPs were not associated with OGTT-derived sensitivity parameters, nor did the three tested SNPs show any association with OGTT-derived parameters of insulin release. In the MR subgroup, SNP rs8046707 was nominally associated with lower visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, the SNP rs1458201 showed a nominal association with increased VLDL levels. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study, even though preliminary and awaiting further confirmation by independent replication, provides first evidence that common genetic variation in CTF1 could contribute to insulin sensitivity in humans. Our SNP data indicate an insulin-desensitizing effect of cardiotrophin-1 and underline that cardiotrophin-1 represents an interesting target to influence insulin sensitivity.

  13. Femoral hernia containing strangulated ileum along with the uterus and both ovaries: a first case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, A; Agac Ay, A; Kaptanoglu, B; Ozer, S; Akalin, C

    2012-06-01

    Strangulated femoral hernia is a common surgical emergency. The contents of the hernial sac commonly include omentum and small bowel, but, occasionally, strangulation of other organs such as Meckel's diverticulum, stomach, ovary, or appendix may occur, resulting in unusual clinical presentations. We report of a case with strangulated femoral hernia containing the uterus and both ovaries, and this is the first report of such a case. We believe that it is important to take into consideration herniation of the uterus and ovaries with omentum or small bowel into the femoral canal to prevent various complications related to the reproductive functions of the patient.

  14. Recurrent femoral hernia and associated ovarian pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gately, Ryan Patrick; Concannon, Elizabeth Sarah; Hogan, A; Ryan, R S; O'Leary, M; Barry, K

    2012-08-27

    The following case describes an ovarian tumour presenting in a highly unusual manner-in the form of a recurrent femoral hernia. Recurrent femoral herniae are unusual and should prompt awareness of underlying pathology causing increased intra-abdominal pressure.

  15. Femoral hernia; Clinical significance of radiologic diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenfeldt, M.; Lasson, A. (Lund University (Sweden). Department of Surgery Malmo General Hospital (Sweden)); Ekberg, O.; Kesek, P. (Lund University (Sweden). Department of Radiology Malmo General Hospital (Sweden))

    A retrospective study of 18 patients with femoral hernia assessed by herniography is presented. Although a palpable lump was present in 11 patients (61%), the diagnosis of a femoral hernia was not made before herniography. Surgical exploration was performed in 12 patients and a femoral hernia was found and repaired with beneficial outcome in 9 of them. In conclusion: herniography is of value for the diagnosis of a femoral hernia in patients with obscure groin pain. (author). 14 refs.; 2 figs.

  16. In vitro cytotoxicity of selected chemicals commonly produced during fire combustion using human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, F; Hayes, A J; Green, A R; Markovic, B

    2005-08-01

    Fire combustion products contain a broad range of chemicals, which have a multitude of possible toxic interactions in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of selected substances commonly produced during fire combustion. A range of human cell lines and cultures including: skin fibroblasts, HepG2 (liver derived), and A549 (lung derived cells) were used to represent different human target organs. The colorimetric MTS assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) was used to detect the cytotoxic effects of selected substances including: acetic acid, ammonia, formaldehyde, hydrobromic acid, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, potassium cyanide, sodium fluoride, sodium nitrite, sodium sulphide, and sulphurous acid. In this study, the NOAEC (No Observable Adverse Effect Concentration), IC(10) (10% inhibitory concentration), IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration), and TLC (Total Lethal Concentration) values were determined. The ratio between in vitro IC50 to in vivo human toxicity data (Lowest Lethal Dose-LDLo and Lowest Lethal Concentration--LCLo) was also established. Results indicated a strong relationship between IC50 values on the cell types used: fibroblast and A549 (R2: 0.92), A549 and HepG2 (R2: 0.72), fibroblast and HepG2 (R2: 0.69). Good correlation was obtained between the IC50 against LDLo and LCLo when an appropriate adjustment factor was implemented. Results of this study indicated that in vitro methods could be a potential technique for assessing the toxicity of fire combustion products.

  17. Differential decomposition of bacterial and viral fecal indicators in common human pollution types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjugi, Pauline; Sivaganesan, Mano; Korajkic, Asja; Kelty, Catherine A; McMinn, Brian; Ulrich, Robert; Harwood, Valerie J; Shanks, Orin C

    2016-11-15

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decomposition of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fecal pollution originating from fresh human feces, septage, and primary effluent sewage in a subtropical marine environment was assessed over a six day period with an emphasis on the influence of ambient sunlight and indigenous microbiota. Ambient water mixed with each fecal pollution type was placed in dialysis bags and incubated in situ in a submersible aquatic mesocosm. Genetic and cultivated fecal indicators including fecal indicator bacteria (enterococci, E. coli, and Bacteroidales), coliphage (somatic and F+), Bacteroides fragilis phage (GB-124), and human-associated genetic indicators (HF183/BacR287 and HumM2) were measured in each sample. Simple linear regression assessing treatment trends in each pollution type over time showed significant decay (p ≤ 0.05) in most treatments for feces and sewage (27/28 and 32/40, respectively), compared to septage (6/26). A two-way analysis of variance of log10 reduction values for sewage and feces experiments indicated that treatments differentially impact survival of cultivated bacteria, cultivated phage, and genetic indicators. Findings suggest that sunlight is critical for phage decay, and indigenous microbiota play a lesser role. For bacterial cultivated and genetic indicators, the influence of indigenous microbiota varied by pollution type. This study offers new insights on the decomposition of common human fecal pollution types in a subtropical marine environment with important implications for water quality management applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. High Leptospira Diversity in Animals and Humans Complicates the Search for Common Reservoirs of Human Disease in Rural Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriboga, Jorge; Miller, Erin; Olivas, Sonora; Birdsell, Dawn; Hepp, Crystal; Hornstra, Heidie; Schupp, James M.; Morales, Melba; Gonzalez, Manuel; Reyes, Soraya; de la Cruz, Carmen; Keim, Paul; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Trueba, Gabriel; Pearson, Talima

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease responsible for high morbidity around the world, especially in tropical and low income countries. Rats are thought to be the main vector of human leptospirosis in urban settings. However, differences between urban and low-income rural communities provide additional insights into the epidemiology of the disease. Methodology/Principal findings Our study was conducted in two low-income rural communities near the coast of Ecuador. We detected and characterized infectious leptospira DNA in a wide variety of samples using new real time quantitative PCR assays and amplicon sequencing. We detected infectious leptospira in a high percentage of febrile patients (14.7%). In contrast to previous studies on leptospirosis risk factors, higher positivity was not found in rats (3.0%) but rather in cows (35.8%) and pigs (21.1%). Six leptospira species were identified (L. borgpetersenii, L kirschnerii, L santarosai, L. interrogans, L noguchii, and an intermediate species within the L. licerasiae and L. wolffii clade) and no significant differences in the species of leptospira present in each animal species was detected (χ2 = 9.89, adj.p-value = 0.27). Conclusions/Significance A large portion of the world’s human population lives in low-income, rural communities, however, there is limited information about leptospirosis transmission dynamics in these settings. In these areas, exposure to peridomestic livestock is particularly common and high prevalence of infectious leptospira in cows and pigs suggest that they may be the most important reservoir for human transmission. Genotyping clinical samples show that multiple species of leptospira are involved in human disease. As these genotypes were also detected in samples from a variety of animals, genotype data must be used in conjunction with epidemiological data to provide evidence of transmission and the importance of different potential leptospirosis reservoirs. PMID:27622673

  19. Transverse femoral implant prominence: four cases demonstrating a preventable complication for ACL reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argintar, Evan; Scherer, Benjamin; Jordan, Tom; Klimkiewicz, John

    2010-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a commonly occurring injury that often demands surgical reconstruction. Although the utility of this operation is widely accepted, many specific components, including graft fixation technique, remain controversial. Many clinicians favor transverse femoral implant fixation for soft tissue ACL grafts. This technique can be accomplished successfully; however, in a minority of the cases, the femoral implant can be excessively prominent, leading to iatrogenic postoperative iliotibial band syndrome. This article presents 4 patients that developed postoperative iliotibial band syndrome resulting from transverse femoral implant prominence. Despite achievement of knee ligamentous stability, implant prominence compromised final clinical results following ACL reconstruction. Through change in Lysholm value, we reviewed the clinical outcomes of these patients following femoral implant hardware removal for treatment of iliotibial band syndrome. On hardware removal, all patients demonstrated complete symptomatic improvement, mirroring an average Lysholm value increase of 38. We believe transverse femoral implant prominence is avoidable, and subsequent iliotibial band syndrome is a preventable postoperative complication.

  20. Hip Arthroscopic Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation for Treating Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Femoral Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takanori; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Watanuki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Akinori; Uchida, Soshi

    2015-12-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the femoral head is not a common source of hip pain. Hip arthroscopy is becoming a more frequent indication for intra-articular pathologies of the hip. Osteochondral autologous transplantation is a promising technique that theoretically can reconstruct osteochondral lesions of the femoral head. We describe our technique for arthroscopic antegrade osteochondral autologous transplantation for the treatment of OCD of the femoral head. The advantages of this technique include that it is a less invasive method with the ability to assess and treat intra-articular pathologies associated with OCD of the femoral head at same time. Case series and outcomes after this technique are not currently reported in the literature; however, it could be a less invasive method and provide favorable clinical outcomes for patients with OCD lesions of the femoral head.

  1. Strangulation of a Meckel's diverticulum in a femoral hernia (Littre's hernia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Piotr; Piskorz, Lukasz; Kutwin, Leszek; Jabłoński, Sławomir; Kordiak, Jacek; Brocki, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Femoral hernia is usually presented as a flexible, round, domed shape lying on the medial side of the thigh about 2-3 cm below the inguinal ligament. Among the external hernias, femoral hernia is the second most common inguinal hernia. Its prevalence reaches 20%. Among all inguinal hernias, femoral hernias are characterised by a high level of incarceration and strangulation. This can be as high as 60%. We would like to present a case of 71-year-old patient who was admitted to the Clinic urgently due to strangulation of Meckel's diverticulum in a right-sided femoral hernia. Strangulation of Meckel's diverticulum in femoral hernia is an extremely rare entity. It was described for the very first time in 1700 by Littre.

  2. An economic experiment reveals that humans prefer pool punishment to maintain the commons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Milinski, Manfred

    2012-09-22

    Punishment can stabilize costly cooperation and ensure the success of a common project that is threatened by free-riders. Punishment mechanisms can be classified into pool punishment, where the punishment act is carried out by a paid third party, (e.g. a police system or a sheriff), and peer punishment, where the punishment act is carried out by peers. Which punishment mechanism is preferred when both are concurrently available within a society? In an economic experiment, we show that the majority of subjects choose pool punishment, despite being costly even in the absence of defectors, when second-order free-riders, cooperators that do not punish, are also punished. Pool punishers are mutually enforcing their support for the punishment organization, stably trapping each other. Our experimental results show how organized punishment could have displaced individual punishment in human societies.

  3. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer.

  4. Social Differentiation in Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) that Engage in Human-Related Foraging Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Carolyn J; Perrtree, Robin M; Cox, Tara M

    2017-01-01

    Both natural and human-related foraging strategies by the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) have resulted in social segregation in several areas of the world. Bottlenose dolphins near Savannah, Georgia beg at an unprecedented rate and also forage behind commercial shrimp trawlers, providing an opportunity to study the social ramifications of two human-related foraging behaviors within the same group of animals. Dolphins were photo-identified via surveys conducted throughout estuarine waterways around Savannah in the summers of 2009-2011. Mean half-weight indices (HWI) were calculated for each foraging class, and community division by modularity was used to cluster animals based on association indices. Pairs of trawler dolphins had a higher mean HWI (0.20 ± 0.07) than pairs of non-trawler dolphins (0.04 ± 0.02) or mixed pairs (0.02 ± 0.02). In contrast, pairs of beggars, non-beggars, and mixed pairs all had similar means, with HWI between 0.05-0.07. Community division by modularity produced a useful division (0.307) with 6 clusters. Clusters were predominately divided according to trawler status; however, beggars and non-beggars were mixed throughout clusters. Both the mean HWI and social clusters revealed that the social structure of common bottlenose dolphins near Savannah, Georgia was differentiated based on trawler status but not beg status. This finding may indicate that foraging in association with trawlers is a socially learned behavior, while the mechanisms for the propagation of begging are less clear. This study highlights the importance of taking into account the social parameters of a foraging behavior, such as how group size or competition for resources may affect how the behavior spreads. The positive or negative ramifications of homophily may influence whether the behaviors are exhibited by individuals within the same social clusters and should be considered in future studies examining social relationships and foraging behaviors.

  5. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  6. Rare Syndromes and Common Variants of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J C

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders that cause BDNF haploinsufficiency, such as WAGR syndrome, 11p deletion, and 11p inversion, serve as models for understanding the role of BDNF in human energy balance and neurocognition. Patients with BDNF haploinsufficiency or inactivating mutations of the BDNF receptor exhibit hyperphagia, childhood-onset obesity, intellectual disability, and impaired nociception. Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and ROHHAD syndromes are separate genetic disorders that do not directly affect the BDNF locus but share many similar clinical features with BDNF haploinsufficiency, and BDNF insufficiency is believed to possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of each of these conditions. In the general population, common variants of BDNF that affect BDNF gene expression or BDNF protein processing have also been associated with modest alterations in energy balance and cognitive functioning. Thus, variable degrees of BDNF insufficiency appear to contribute to a spectrum of excess weight gain and cognitive impairment that ranges in phenotypic severity. In this modern era of precision medicine, genotype-specific therapies aimed at increasing BDNF signaling in patients with rare and common disorders associated with BDNF insufficiency could serve as useful approaches for treating obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Xiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts (OCs originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+ BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3+ cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (Rαhigh subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rαhigh cells also generated macrophages (MΦs and dendritic cells (DCs but lacked granulocyte (GR-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rαlow subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP and gave rise to the IL3Rαhigh subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP. Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b−CD34+c-KIT+FLT3+ IL3Rαlow and IL3Rαhigh subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  8. Rare and common regulatory variation in population-scale sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B Montgomery

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Population-scale genome sequencing allows the characterization of functional effects of a broad spectrum of genetic variants underlying human phenotypic variation. Here, we investigate the influence of rare and common genetic variants on gene expression patterns, using variants identified from sequencing data from the 1000 genomes project in an African and European population sample and gene expression data from lymphoblastoid cell lines. We detect comparable numbers of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs when compared to genotypes obtained from HapMap 3, but as many as 80% of the top expression quantitative trait variants (eQTVs discovered from 1000 genomes data are novel. The properties of the newly discovered variants suggest that mapping common causal regulatory variants is challenging even with full resequencing data; however, we observe significant enrichment of regulatory effects in splice-site and nonsense variants. Using RNA sequencing data, we show that 46.2% of nonsynonymous variants are differentially expressed in at least one individual in our sample, creating widespread potential for interactions between functional protein-coding and regulatory variants. We also use allele-specific expression to identify putative rare causal regulatory variants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that outlier expression values can be due to rare variant effects, and we approximate the number of such effects harboured in an individual by effect size. Our results demonstrate that integration of genomic and RNA sequencing analyses allows for the joint assessment of genome sequence and genome function.

  9. Identification of the Common Origins of Osteoclasts, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells in Human Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanling; Zijl, Sebastiaan; Wang, Liqin; de Groot, Daniel C; van Tol, Maarten J; Lankester, Arjan C; Borst, Jannie

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclasts (OCs) originate from the myeloid cell lineage, but the successive steps in their lineage commitment are ill-defined, especially in humans. To clarify OC origin, we sorted cell populations from pediatric bone marrow (BM) by flow cytometry and assessed their differentiation potential in vitro. Within the CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+) BM cell population, OC-differentiation potential was restricted to FLT3(+) cells and enriched in an IL3 receptor (R)α(high) subset that constituted less than 0.5% of total BM. These IL3Rα(high) cells also generated macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) but lacked granulocyte (GR)-differentiation potential, as demonstrated at the clonal level. The IL3Rα(low) subset was re-defined as common progenitor of GR, MΦ, OC, and DC (GMODP) and gave rise to the IL3Rα(high) subset that was identified as common progenitor of MΦ, OC, and DC (MODP). Unbiased transcriptome analysis of CD11b(-)CD34(+)c-KIT(+)FLT3(+) IL3Rα(low) and IL3Rα(high) subsets corroborated our definitions of the GMODP and MODP and their developmental relationship.

  10. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Andrew R; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V A; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J P; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A F; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul I W; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J F; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E; Visscher, Peter M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Frayling, Timothy M

    2014-11-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ∼2,000, ∼3,700 and ∼9,500 SNPs explained ∼21%, ∼24% and ∼29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured 60% of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci were enriched for genes, pathways and tissue types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/β-catenin and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants.

  11. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian’an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna AE; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex SF; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor VA; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John JP; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela AF; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul IW; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth JF; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explain one-fifth of heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ~2,000, ~3,700 and ~9,500 SNPs explained ~21%, ~24% and ~29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured the majority (60%) of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci enriched for genes, pathways, and tissue-types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/beta-catenin, and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

  12. Common vampire bat attacks on humans in a village of the Amazon region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Maria Cristina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people in Amazonian communities have reported bat bites in the last decade. Bites by vampire bats can potentially transmit rabies to humans. The objective of this study was to analyze factors associated with bat biting in one of these communities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a village of gold miners in the Amazonian region of Brazil (160 inhabitants. Bats were captured near people's houses and sent to a lab. Of 129 people interviewed, 41% had been attacked by a bat at least once, with 92% of the bites located on the lower limbs. A logistic regression found that adults were bitten around four times more often than children (OR = 3.75, CI 95%: 1.46-9.62, p = 0.036. Males were bitten more frequently than females (OR = 2.08, CI 95%: 0.90-4.76, p = 0.067. Nine Desmodus rotundus and three frugivorous bats were captured and tested negative for rabies. The study suggests that, in an area of gold miners, common vampire bats are more likely to attack adults and males. The control strategy for human rabies developed in this region should therefore place special emphasis on adult males. There should also be more research on how the search for gold in the Amazonian region places people and the environment at risk.

  13. Femoral Reconstruction Using External Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy Palatnik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of an external fixator for the purpose of distraction osteogenesis has been applied to a wide range of orthopedic problems caused by such diverse etiologies as congenital disease, metabolic conditions, infections, traumatic injuries, and congenital short stature. The purpose of this study was to analyze our experience of utilizing this method in patients undergoing a variety of orthopedic procedures of the femur. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed our experience of using external fixation for femoral reconstruction. Three subgroups were defined based on the primary reconstruction goal lengthening, deformity correction, and repair of nonunion/bone defect. Factors such as leg length discrepancy (LLD, limb alignment, and external fixation time and complications were evaluated for the entire group and the 3 subgroups. Results. There was substantial improvement in the overall LLD, femoral length discrepancy, and limb alignment as measured by mechanical axis deviation (MAD and lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA for the entire group as well as the subgroups. Conclusions. The Ilizarov external fixator allows for decreased surgical exposure and preservation of blood supply to bone, avoidance of bone grafting and internal fixation, and simultaneous lengthening and deformity correction, making it a very useful technique for femoral reconstruction.

  14. VARIATIONS IN ORIGIN OF FEMORAL NERVE FROM THE LUMBER PLEXUS (A CADAVERIC STUDY (ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Gurbachan Singh Gindha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The variations in origin of femoral nerve from lumbar plexus is very much common. The normal root value of origin of femoral nerve is L2, L3 and L4. It can be prefixed or postfixed. Mostly the femoral nerve is used for the nerve block in several surgeries and is vulnerable to compression in tight ilio-psoascompartment. The knowledge of origin and variations of femoral nerve in iliac fossa is important for anatomists, anesthetists and surgeons to prevent iatrogenic femoral nerve injuries. 3 0 embalmed and 10% forma l in f i x e d c a d ave r s w e r e d is s e c ted on b o th s ides and 60 lumba r pl exus e s with their branches formed the material for the study. Thepsoas major muscle was dissected to see the formation of femoral nerve from theroots and to observe the variations in formation of femoral nerve. The aim of this study was to look for the variations in origin and branching pattern of the femoral nerve in the iliac fossa.

  15. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  16. Dogs and humans share a common susceptibility gene SRBD1 for glaucoma risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Kanemaki

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a degenerative optic neuropathy that is associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Primary open angle glaucoma is the most common type of glaucoma in canines, and its highest incidence among dog breeds has been reported in Shiba-Inus, followed by Shih-Tzus. These breeds are known to have an abnormal iridocorneal angle and dysplastic prectinate ligament. However, the hereditary and genetic backgrounds of these dogs have not yet been clarified. In this study, we investigated the association between polymorphisms of the glaucoma candidate genes, SRBD1, ELOVL5, and ADAMTS10, and glaucoma in Shiba-Inus and Shih-Tzus. We analyzed 11 polymorphisms in these three genes using direct DNA sequencing. Three SRBD1 SNPs, rs8655283, rs22018514 and rs22018513 were significantly associated with glaucoma in Shiba-Inus, while rs22018513, a synonymous SNP in exon 4, showed the strongest association (P = 0.00039, OR = 3.03. Conditional analysis revealed that rs22018513 could account for most of the association of these SNPs with glaucoma in Shiba-Inus. In Shih-Tzus, only rs9172407 in the SRBD1 intron 1 was significantly associated with glaucoma (P = 0.0014, OR = 5.25. There were no significant associations between the ELOVL5 or ADAMTS10 polymorphisms and glaucoma in Shiba-Inus and Shih-Tzus. The results showed that SRBD1 polymorphisms play an important role in glaucoma pathology in both Shiba-Inus and Shih-Tzus. SRBD1 polymorphisms have also been associated with normal- and high-tension glaucomas in humans. Therefore, SRBD1 may be a common susceptibility gene for glaucoma in humans and dogs. We anticipate that the nucleotide sequencing data from this study can be used in genetic testing to determine for the first time, the genetic status and susceptibility of glaucoma in dogs, with high precision. Moreover, canine glaucoma resulting from SRBD1 polymorphisms could be a useful animal model to study human glaucoma.

  17. Retrograde femoral nailing in elderly patients: outcome and functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Thomas; Krawany, Manfred; Leitner, Lukas; Karlbauer, Alois; Wagner, Michael; Plecko, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Functional outcome after retrograde femoral intramedullary nailing was investigated in 35 patients older than 60 years (mean, 86 years) with 36 fractures, comprising 15 (41.7%) shaft and 21 (58.3%) distal fractures; overall, 7 (19.4%) periprosthetic fractures occured. Twenty-two (62.9%) of 35 patients were evaluated at a mean 16.5-month follow-up with the Lyshom-Gillquist score and the SF-8 questionaire. Primary union rate was 97.8%, with no significant differences in duration of surgery, bone healing, mobilization, and weight bearing among different fracture types; periprosthetic fractures revealed a significantly delayed mobilization (P=.03). Complications occured significantly more often among distal femoral fractures (P=.009), including all revision surgeries. The most frequently encountered complication was loosening of distal locking bolts (n=3). Lysholm score results were mainly influenced by age-related entities and revealed fair results in all fractures (mean in the femoral shaft fracture group, 78.1 vs mean in the distal femoral fracture group, 74.9; P=.69), except in the periprosthetic subgroup, which had good results (mean, 84.8; P=.23). This group also had increased physical parameters according to SF-8 score (P=.026). No correlation existed between SF-8 physical parameters and patient age or surgery delay, whereas a negative correlation existed between patient age and SF-8 mental parameters (P=.012). Retrograde femoral intramedullary nailing is commonly used in elderly patients due to reliable bone healing, minimal soft tissue damage, and immediate full weight bearing. It also offers a valid alternative to antegrade nailing in femoral shaft fractures.

  18. Open femoral hernia repair: one skin incision for all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Masry Nabil S

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral hernias are relatively uncommon, however they are the most common incarcerated abdominal hernia, with strangulation of a viscus carrying significant mortality. Classically three approaches are described to open femoral hernia repair: Lockwood's infra-inguinal, Lotheissen's trans-inguinal and McEvedy's high approach. Each approach describes a separate skin incision and dissection to access the femoral sac. The decision as to which approach to adopt, predominantly dependent on the suspicion of finding strangulated bowel, is often a difficult one and in our opinion an unnecessary one. Methods We propose a technique for open femoral hernia repair that involves a single skin incision 1 cm above the medial half of the inguinal ligament that allows all of the above approaches to the hernia sac depending on the operative findings. Thus the repair of simple femoral hernias can be performed from below the inguinal ligament. If found, inguinal hernias can be repaired. More importantly, resection of compromised bowel can be achieved by accessing the peritoneal cavity with division of the linea semilunaris 4 cm above the inguinal ligament. This avoids compromise of the inguinal canal, and with medial retraction of the rectus abdominis muscle enables access to the peritoneal cavity and compromised bowel. Discussion This simple technique minimises the preoperative debate as to which incision will allow the best approach to the femoral hernia sac, allow for alteration to a simple inguinal hernia repair if necessary, and more importantly obviate the need for further skin incisions if compromised bowel is encountered that requires resection.

  19. Periprosthetic femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás Hernández, Jordi; Holck, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Cortical onlay strut allografts, as the primary method of fixation or as a supplementary fixation when a plate is used, have been a common option to treat B1 and C type PFF in the past decades since the technique was described by Penenberg et al. in 1989 [5]. Strut grafts were described as a usef...

  20. SEXUAL DIMORPHISM OF MAXIMUM FEMORAL LENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandya A M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sexual identification from the skeletal parts has medico legal and anthropological importance. Present study aims to obtain values of maximum femoral length and to evaluate its possible usefulness in determining correct sexual identification. Study sample consisted of 184 dry, normal, adult, human femora (136 male & 48 female from skeletal collections of Anatomy department, M. P. Shah Medical College, Jamnagar, Gujarat. Maximum length of femur was considered as maximum vertical distance between upper end of head of femur and the lowest point on femoral condyle, measured with the osteometric board. Mean Values obtained were, 451.81 and 417.48 for right male and female, and 453.35 and 420.44 for left male and female respectively. Higher value in male was statistically highly significant (P< 0.001 on both sides. Demarking point (D.P. analysis of the data showed that right femora with maximum length more than 476.70 were definitely male and less than 379.99 were definitely female; while for left bones, femora with maximum length more than 484.49 were definitely male and less than 385.73 were definitely female. Maximum length identified 13.43% of right male femora, 4.35% of right female femora, 7.25% of left male femora and 8% of left female femora. [National J of Med Res 2011; 1(2.000: 67-70

  1. Exploiting common targets in human fertilization and HIV infection: development of novel contraceptive microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncel, Gustavo F

    2006-01-01

    The continued high rates of unintended pregnancies and the unrelentless expansion of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, especially in less developed countries, warrant the development of novel strategies to help individuals avoid these risks. Dually active compounds displaying contraceptive and microbicidal anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) properties constitute one such strategy. Sharing the same anatomical and functional context, sperm fertilization and genital infection by HIV offer an opportunity for simultaneous intervention. Some of the molecules and mechanisms used by sperm to fertilize the oocyte are similar, if not identical, to those used by HIV while infecting host cells. An example of common structures is the lipid membrane surrounding the spermatozoon and the HIV core. Disruption of its architecture by surface-active compounds exerts both spermicidal and virucidal activity. A more specific alteration of lipid rafts [membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins] by beta-cyclodextrins also results in similar effects. During fertilization and infection, both sperm and HIV interact with their target cell receptors through chemical charges, hydrophobic forces and carbohydrate recognition. Anionic polymers such as cellulose sulphate and polystyrene sulphonate (PSS) inhibit sperm and HIV cell binding. Because some of the molecules involved in this interaction, e.g. heparin sulphate proteoglycan, are also used by other pathogens to infect their target tissues, polyanions exert broad antimicrobial activity as well. During fertilization and infection, sperm and HIV, as well as other microbes, use signal transduction molecules and mechanisms such as adenyl cyclase/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent kinase, calcium and tyrosine phosphorylation, whose inhibition has been shown to impair sperm function and HIV replication. These commonalities at the level of sperm

  2. Relative risk of aortic and femoral insertion of intraaortic balloon pump after coronary artery bypass grafting procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, J; Utley, J R; Leyland, S A; Morgan, M; Johnson, H

    1993-04-01

    We compared the preoperative, operative, and postoperative characteristics of patients who required balloon pumps after coronary artery bypass graft procedures to determine the relative risks of femoral and aortic insertion. The balloon pump was inserted into the ascending aorta when femoral insertion was not possible because of occlusive disease or small femoral arteries. Femoral insertion was performed in 81 patients and aortic insertion in 42 patients. Patients with aortic insertion were more likely to be small and female (p < 0.05) and were more likely to have carotid bruits and a history of strokes or transient ischemic attacks (p < 0.05). Death was more common in the patients with aortic insertion (18/42, 42.9%) than in those with femoral insertion (19/81, 23.4%) (p < 0.05), as calculated with single regression analysis. Route of insertion was not a predictor of operative death, according to multiple regression analysis. Leg complications were more common in patients with femoral artery insertion (23/81, 28.4%) than in those with aortic insertion (0/42, 0.0%) (p < 0.05). No sternal complications occurred in either group. New neurologic abnormalities were not significantly different between the patients with aortic and femoral insertion. Aortic insertion is a safe alternative to femoral insertion of intraaortic balloon pumps and is associated with fewer leg complications in small or diseased iliac and femoral arteries. The greater mortality rate with aortic insertion is related to greater comorbidity rate in these patients.

  3. Sustained Release of Vancomycin from Polyurethane Scaffolds Inhibits Infection of Bone Wounds in a Rat Femoral Segmental Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    a one shot two component reaction between the triisocyanate and the hardener comprising polyester triol, water, TEGOAMIN33 tertiary amine catalyst ...Sustained release of vancomycin from polyurethane scaffolds inhibits infection of bone wounds in a rat femoral segmental defect model Bing Li a,b...2010 Keywords: Polyurethane Vancomycin Sustained release Infection control Rat femoral segmental defect Bone tissue engineering Infection is a common

  4. The enterobacterial common antigen-like gene cluster of Haemophilus ducreyi contributes to virulence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Keith E; Fortney, Kate R; Baker, Beth; Billings, Steven D; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2008-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a cluster of homologues of genes required for the synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), suggesting that H. ducreyi may express a putative ECA-like glycoconjugate. WecA initiates the synthesis of ECA by transferring N-acetylglucosamine to undecaprenyl-P, to form lipid I. A wecA mutant (35000HPwecA) was constructed, and 5 volunteers were inoculated at 3 sites with fixed doses of 35000HP on one arm and at 3 sites with varying doses of 35000HPwecA on the other arm. 35000HPwecA caused pustules to form at 3 sites inoculated with a dose 2.5-fold higher than that of 35000HP. However, at sites inoculated with similar doses of 35000HP and 35000HPwecA, pustules developed at 46.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3%-70.0%) of 15 parent-strain sites and at 8.3% (95% CI, 0.01%-23.6%) of 12 mutant-strain sites (P = .013). Thus, the expression of wecA contributes to the ability of H. ducreyi to cause pustules in humans.

  5. Recombinant human leptin attenuates stress axis activity in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorissen, Marnix; Bernier, Nicholas J; Manuel, Remy; de Gelder, Stefan; Metz, Juriaan R; Huising, Mark O; Flik, Gert

    2012-08-01

    Proper functioning of the endocrine stress axis requires communication between the stress axis and other regulatory mechanisms. We here describe an intimate interplay between the stress axis and recombinant human leptin (rhLeptin) in a teleostean fish, the common carp Cyprinus carpio. Restraint stress (by netting up to 96h) increased plasma cortisol but did not affect hepatic leptin expression. Perifusion of pituitary glands or head kidneys with rhLeptin revealed direct effects of rhLeptin on both tissues. RhLeptin suppresses basal and CRF-induced ACTH-secretion in a rapid and concentration-dependent manner. The rhLeptin effect persisted for over an hour after administration had been terminated. RhLeptin decreases basal interrenal cortisol secretion in vitro, and by doing so attenuates ACTH-stimulated cortisol production; rhLeptin does not affect interrenal ACTH-sensitivity. Our findings show that the endocrine stress axis activity and leptin are inseparably linked in a teleostean fish, a notion relevant to further our insights in the evolution of leptin physiology in vertebrates.

  6. At 6–9 months, human infants know the meanings of many common nouns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, Elika; Swingley, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that infants begin learning their native language not by learning words, but by discovering features of the speech signal: consonants, vowels, and combinations of these sounds. Learning to understand words, as opposed to just perceiving their sounds, is said to come later, between 9 and 15 mo of age, when infants develop a capacity for interpreting others’ goals and intentions. Here, we demonstrate that this consensus about the developmental sequence of human language learning is flawed: in fact, infants already know the meanings of several common words from the age of 6 mo onward. We presented 6- to 9-mo-old infants with sets of pictures to view while their parent named a picture in each set. Over this entire age range, infants directed their gaze to the named pictures, indicating their understanding of spoken words. Because the words were not trained in the laboratory, the results show that even young infants learn ordinary words through daily experience with language. This surprising accomplishment indicates that, contrary to prevailing beliefs, either infants can already grasp the referential intentions of adults at 6 mo or infants can learn words before this ability emerges. The precocious discovery of word meanings suggests a perspective in which learning vocabulary and learning the sound structure of spoken language go hand in hand as language acquisition begins. PMID:22331874

  7. At 6-9 months, human infants know the meanings of many common nouns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelson, Elika; Swingley, Daniel

    2012-02-28

    It is widely accepted that infants begin learning their native language not by learning words, but by discovering features of the speech signal: consonants, vowels, and combinations of these sounds. Learning to understand words, as opposed to just perceiving their sounds, is said to come later, between 9 and 15 mo of age, when infants develop a capacity for interpreting others' goals and intentions. Here, we demonstrate that this consensus about the developmental sequence of human language learning is flawed: in fact, infants already know the meanings of several common words from the age of 6 mo onward. We presented 6- to 9-mo-old infants with sets of pictures to view while their parent named a picture in each set. Over this entire age range, infants directed their gaze to the named pictures, indicating their understanding of spoken words. Because the words were not trained in the laboratory, the results show that even young infants learn ordinary words through daily experience with language. This surprising accomplishment indicates that, contrary to prevailing beliefs, either infants can already grasp the referential intentions of adults at 6 mo or infants can learn words before this ability emerges. The precocious discovery of word meanings suggests a perspective in which learning vocabulary and learning the sound structure of spoken language go hand in hand as language acquisition begins.

  8. Physical Basis behind Achondroplasia, the Most Common Form of Human Dwarfism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijuan; Horton, William; Hristova, Kalina

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in long bone development. The G380R mutation in FGFR3 transmembrane domain is known as the genetic cause for achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism. Despite many studies, there is no consensus about the exact mechanism underlying the pathology. To gain further understanding into the physical basis behind the disorder, here we measure the activation of wild-type and mutant FGFR3 in mammalian cells using Western blots, and we analyze the activation within the frame of a physical-chemical model describing dimerization, ligand binding, and phosphorylation probabilities within the dimers. The data analysis presented here suggests that the mutation does not increase FGFR3 dimerization, as proposed previously. Instead, FGFR3 activity in achondroplasia is increased due to increased probability for phosphorylation of the unliganded mutant dimers. This finding has implications for the design of targeted molecular treatments for achondroplasia. PMID:20624921

  9. Physical basis behind achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijuan; Horton, William; Hristova, Kalina

    2010-09-24

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in long bone development. The G380R mutation in FGFR3 transmembrane domain is known as the genetic cause for achondroplasia, the most common form of human dwarfism. Despite many studies, there is no consensus about the exact mechanism underlying the pathology. To gain further understanding into the physical basis behind the disorder, here we measure the activation of wild-type and mutant FGFR3 in mammalian cells using Western blots, and we analyze the activation within the frame of a physical-chemical model describing dimerization, ligand binding, and phosphorylation probabilities within the dimers. The data analysis presented here suggests that the mutation does not increase FGFR3 dimerization, as proposed previously. Instead, FGFR3 activity in achondroplasia is increased due to increased probability for phosphorylation of the unliganded mutant dimers. This finding has implications for the design of targeted molecular treatments for achondroplasia.

  10. Common oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism and social support interact to reduce stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frances S; Kumsta, Robert; von Dawans, Bernadette; Monakhov, Mikhail; Ebstein, Richard P; Heinrichs, Markus

    2011-12-13

    The neuropeptide oxytocin has played an essential role in the regulation of social behavior and attachment throughout mammalian evolution. Because recent studies in humans have shown that oxytocin administration reduces stress responses and increases prosocial behavior, we investigated whether a common single nucleotide polymorphism (rs53576) in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) might interact with stress-protective effects of social support. Salivary cortisol samples and subjective stress ratings were obtained from 194 healthy male participants before, during, and after a standardized psychosocial laboratory stress procedure. Participants were randomly assigned either to prepare alone or to receive social support from their female partner or close female friend while preparing for the stressful task. Differential stress responses between the genotype groups were observed depending on the presence or absence of social support. Only individuals with one or two copies of the G allele of rs53576 showed lower cortisol responses to stress after social support, compared with individuals with the same genotype receiving no social support. These results indicate that genetic variation of the oxytocin system modulates the effectiveness of positive social interaction as a protective buffer against a stressful experience.

  11. Common raven occurrence in relation to energy transmission line corridors transiting human-altered sagebrush steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Howe, Kristy B.; Casazza, Michael L.; Delehanty, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Energy-related infrastructure and other human enterprises within sagebrush steppe of the American West often results in changes that promote common raven (Corvus corax; hereafter, raven) populations. Ravens, a generalist predator capable of behavioral innovation, present a threat to many species of conservation concern. We evaluate the effects of detailed features of an altered landscape on the probability of raven occurrence using extensive raven survey (n= 1045) and mapping data from southern Idaho, USA. We found nonlinear relationships between raven occurrence and distances to transmission lines, roads, and facilities. Most importantly, raven occurrence was greater with presence of transmission lines up to 2.2 km from the corridor.We further explain variation in raven occurrence along anthropogenic features based on the amount of non-native vegetation and cover type edge, such that ravens select fragmented sagebrush stands with patchy, exotic vegetative introgression. Raven occurrence also increased with greater length of edge formed by the contact of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate spp.) with non-native vegetation cover types. In consideration of increasing alteration of sagebrush steppe, these findings will be useful for planning energy transmission corridor placement and other management activities where conservation of sagebrush obligate species is a priority.

  12. Antibody and cytokine levels in humans fed on by the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheele, J M; Ridge, G E; Coppolino, K; Bonfield, T; Young, A B; Gaines, S L; McCormick, T S

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about cimicosis, the resultant dermal reaction from feeding activity by the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius L. We fed C. lectularius on human study subjects four times over four weeks and measured serum cytokine and antibody levels, and subjects recorded any cimicosis. The average time for subjects to develop cimicosis decreased with each feeding from 8.4, to 2.1, 1.5 and 1.3 days, respectively. There were no significant changes in total IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG4 or IgE levels between the first and fourth bedbug feedings, but there was a significant decrease in total IgG3 levels (Plectularius feeding. Lower post-C. lectularius feeding IL-6 levels were associated with increased pruritis (P=.001) and the time to maximum pruritis (P=.04), respectively. Higher post-C. lectularius feeding IL-5 levels were associated with a longer duration of pruritis (P=.05).

  13. The management of femoral bone stock in THA revision: indications and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luca; Galante, Claudio; Zagra, Luigi

    2014-10-02

    Following the increasing number of total hip arthroplasties, the amount of hip revision procedures continue to rise. Careful patient selection and bone loss evaluation is crucial for a correct management of femoral revision procedures. The key point in femoral revision is to obtain a reliable primary stability of the stem, with the least invasive implant as possible, to preserve and if possible to restore the bone stock. In this article we present the indications and the techniques for the femoral revisions most commonly used in Europe, referring to the evidence in the literature and our personal experiences.

  14. Strangulation of a Meckel's diverticulum in a femoral hernia (Littre's hernia)

    OpenAIRE

    Misiak, Piotr; Piskorz, Łukasz; Kutwin, Leszek; Jabłoński, Sławomir; Kordiak, Jacek; Brocki, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Femoral hernia is usually presented as a flexible, round, domed shape lying on the medial side of the thigh about 2–3 cm below the inguinal ligament. Among the external hernias, femoral hernia is the second most common inguinal hernia. Its prevalence reaches 20%. Among all inguinal hernias, femoral hernias are characterised by a high level of incarceration and strangulation. This can be as high as 60%. We would like to present a case of 71-year-old patient who was admitted to the Clinic urgen...

  15. Acute Iliac and Femoral Arterial Thrombosis Secondary to Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Fatic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presented case report, we evaluated the mechanism of the external iliac, the common femoral and the superficial femoral arterial thrombosis secondary to total hip arthroplasty. A 75-year-old female sufferd from 5.5 cm shorter left lower limb and same sade coxarthritis. Next day after arthroplasty and eqalisation of the lower limbs, an acute ishemia of the treated leg was presented. Multyscan CT angiography revealed the presence of the external iliac, the common femoral and the superficial femoral arterial thrombosis. From the best of our knowledge, it seems to be the only case of this arterial segment thrombosis after total hip arthroplasty and equalistaion of the lower limbs reported.

  16. MR imaging findings of the femoral marrow in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Takagi, Shojiro; Matsuura, Katsuhiko; Ichikawa, Tamaki; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Nagai, Jun [Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    MR imaging of the femoral marrow was performed in 30 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 11 cases of which evolved to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The MRI appearance was classified into five patterns: fatty marrow; faint signal; nodular pattern; heterogeneous infiltration; and diffuse infiltration. For each type of MDS, MRI patterns of the femoral marrow were evaluated and compared with those in normal subjects as well as in patients with aplastic anemia. Signal intensity alteration, a low signal on T1-weighted SE image and a high signal on STIR image, began in the proximal femoral marrow almost symmetrically in patients with MDS. The area of abnormal signal intensity tended to gradually extend towards the distal portion of the femur as the disease progressed. MRI patterns of the femoral marrow correlated with marrow cellularity, and diffuse marrow infiltration was noted in patients with a more advanced type of MDS or with severe anemia. There were limitations to making an accurate diagnosis of the MDS type on the basis of the MRI pattern. Progression of the MRI appearance in the course of MDS was thought to be a sign suggesting evolution to AML. It was difficult to differentiate hypoplastic MDS from aplastic anemia, although the nodular pattern was commonly seen in the latter disease. (author).

  17. Proximal focal femoral deficiency: evaluation by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biko, David M. [National Naval Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bethesda, MD (United States); Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States); Davidson, Richard [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pena, Andres; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by abnormal development of the proximal femur. The most common radiographic classification (Aitken) does not evaluate the cartilaginous and soft-tissue abnormalities. To demonstrate MR findings of PFFD focusing on features not seen with radiographs. Nine MR examinations of the hip and femurs of seven children with PFFD were retrospectively reviewed. Imaging was quantitatively and qualitatively assessed comparing the affected limb to the contralateral limb and age-matched controls. The children were classified via the Aitken classification. All children had at least mild acetabular dysplasia, and one type D patient had no acetabulum. MR demonstrated that 4/6 children had labral hypertrophy with a decreased distance from the greater trochanter to the acetabular rim, suggesting impingement (P < 0.05). The proximal femoral physis was abnormal in all cases. The connection between the femoral head and shaft if present was fibrous or fibrocartilaginous. MRI can help in evaluation of PFFD by defining the anatomy. MR demonstrates features of the acetabulum and cartilaginous femoral epiphysis and depicts ligamentous abnormalities of the knee. (orig.)

  18. Quadratus lumborum block for femoral–femoral bypass graft placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Mitsuda, Shingo; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atherosclerosis has a complex etiology that leads to arterial obstruction and often results in inadequate perfusion of the distal limbs. Patients with atherosclerosis can have severe complications of this condition, with widespread systemic manifestations, and the operations undertaken are often challenging for anesthesiologists. Case report: A 79-year-old woman with chronic heart failure and respiratory dysfunction presented with bilateral gangrene of the distal lower extremities with obstruction of the left common iliac artery due to atherosclerosis. Femoral–femoral bypass graft and bilateral foot amputations were planned. Spinal anesthesia failed due to severe scoliosis and deformed vertebrae. General anesthesia was induced after performing multiple nerve blocks including quadratus lumborum, sciatic nerve, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and obturator nerve blocks. However, general anesthesia was abandoned because of deterioration in systemic perfusion. The surgery was completed; the patient remained comfortable and awake without the need for further analgesics. Conclusion: Quadratus lumborum block may be a useful anesthetic technique to perform femoral–femoral bypass. PMID:27583851

  19. Progressive slippage after pinning for slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James O; Smith, William J; Stanley, Earl A; Bueche, Matthew J; Karol, Lori A; Chambers, Henry G

    2002-01-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed seven cases of progressive slipped capital femoral epiphysis after screw fixation. All seven patients initially presented with chronic symptoms, and five had an acute exacerbation of symptoms with the appearance of an acute-on-chronic slip. Of the other two, one had obvious motion at the proximal femoral physis and the other had increased symptoms but did not have an obvious acute slip radiographically. All underwent percutaneous screw fixation. In four patients a single screw was placed, and in three patients two screws were placed. No patient became symptom-free after surgery. Slip progression was noted on average 5 months after treatment. Radiographs in all patients revealed an increase in slip severity and loss of screw purchase in the femoral neck while fixation in the proximal femoral epiphysis remained secure. One patient had hypothyroidism and another Cushing disease, both diagnosed after the slipped epiphysis. Slips occurring in children with underlying endocrinopathies, and unstable slips in children with a history of antecedent knee or hip pain (commonly called an acute-on-chronic slip) may be susceptible to screw fixation failure. In such patients, close radiographic follow-up, particularly in the presence of continued symptoms, is required to document slip progression and fixation failure as soon as possible.

  20. Human Rights and the Environment: In Search of a New Relationship. Synergies and Common Themes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evadne Grant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2012 Oñati Workshop on Human Rights and the Environment sought to begin the important task of developing a new framework that could contribute to re-imagining the relationship between human rights and the environment. Doing full justice to the vibrant and sustained discussion that took place in response to the papers delivered in the Workshop is near impossible in an ex post facto account that can only convey the merest flavour of the richness and complexity of what took place. Nonetheless, the following sections briefly recollect common themes and valuable insights that emerged during the workshop discussions and attempt to reflect the energy and creativity that accompanied them, with a view to setting out the general context within which the various individual papers in this volume should be considered. We have arranged the subsequent discussion to centre on the core discrete yet interrelated themes that emerged and developed during our workshop deliberations, namely: vulnerability; the limits of the law; the limits of rights; responsibility; interconnection; and thinking ecologically. El seminario sobre Derechos Humanos y Medio Ambiente celebrado en Oñati en 2012, buscó iniciar la importante tarea de desarrollar un nuevo marco que podría contribuir a re-imaginar la relación entre los derechos humanos y el medio ambiente. Haciendo justicia a la discusión vibrante y prolongada que tuvo lugar en respuesta a las ponencias presentadas en el taller, es casi imposible en un recuento ex post facto que sólo puede transmitir una mínima parte de la riqueza y complejidad de lo acontecido en Oñati. No obstante, las siguientes secciones recogen brevemente temas comunes y valiosas ideas que surgieron durante las discusiones del taller y tratan de reflejar la energía y creatividad que los acompañaba, con el fin de establecer el marco general dentro del cual las diversas ponencias individuales de este volumen deberían ser consideradas. Hemos

  1. Reamed versus unreamed intramedullary nailing for the treatment of femoral fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A-Bing; Zhang, Wei-Jiang; Guo, Wei-Jun; Wang, Xin-Hua; Jin, Hai-Ming; Zhao, You-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective: Intramedullary nailing is commonly used for treating femoral shaft fractures, one of the most common long bone fractures in adults. The reamed intramedullary nail is considered the standard implant for femoral fractures. This meta-analysis was performed to verify the superiority of reamed intramedullary nailing over unreamed intramedullary nailing in fractures of the femoral shaft in adults. Subgroup analysis of implant failure and secondary procedure was also performed. Methods: Electronic literature databases were used to identify relevant publications and included MEDLINE (Ovid interface), EMBASE (Ovid interface), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Wiley Online Library). The versions available on January 30, 2016, were utilized. Only human studies, which were designed as randomized controlled clinical trials, were included. Two authors independently evaluated the quality of original research publications and extracted data from the studies that met the criteria. Results: Around 8 randomized controlled trials involving 1078 patients were included. Reamed intramedullary nailing was associated with shorter time to consolidation of the fracture (SMD = –0.62, 95% CI = –0.89 to –0.35, P < 0.00001), lower secondary procedure rate (OR = 0.25, 95% CI 0.10–0.62, P = 0.003), lower nonunion rate (OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.05–0.40, P < 0.01), and lower delayed-union rate (OR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.07–0.49, P < 0.01) compared to unreamed intramedullary nailing. The 2 groups showed no significant differences in risk of implant failure (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.14–1.74, P = 0.27), mortality risk (OR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.19–4.68, P = 0.94), risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; OR = 1.55, 95% CI 0.36–6.57, P = 0.55), or blood loss (SMD = 0.57, 95% CI = –0.22 to 1.36, P = 0.15). Conclusion: Reamed intramedullary nailing

  2. Scapular shape of extant hominoids and the African ape/modern human last common ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David J; Spiewak, Ted A; Seitelman, Brielle; Gunz, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    Newly discovered early hominin fossil scapulae have bolstered investigations of scapular shape, which have long been used to interpret behavioral variation among primates. However, unexpected similarities between Pongo and Homo - particularly in scapular spine orientation - have raised questions about the functional utility of scapular morphology and its phylogenetic context in the hominin lineage. Not surprisingly, significant disagreement surrounds disparate morphological reconstructions of the modern human/African ape last common ancestor (LCA). Our study utilizes geometric morphometric (GM) approaches - two employing homologous, anatomical landmarks and a "spine-free" alternative using 98 sliding semilandmarks along the boundary of the subscapular fossa. The landmark-based "wireframe" GM analysis principally sorted groups by spine orientation: Homo and Pongo were similar to one another with more transversely-oriented spines as compared to Hylobates and the African apes. In contrast, Homo and Gorilla clustered together in our semilandmark analysis with superoinferiorly broad blades. Pan scapulae were similar, but had more mediolaterally compressed blades and laterally-positioned superior angles. Hylobates was superoinferiorly narrow, yet obliquely expanded relative to the vertebral border. Pongo scapulae were unique among hominoids in being nearly as broad as they were long. Previously documented 'convergence' of Homo and Pongo scapulae appears to be principally driven by similarities in spine orientation, rather than overall blade shape. Therefore, we contend that it is more parsimonious to reconstruct the African ape/Homo LCA scapula as being Gorilla-like, especially in light of similar characterizations of certain fossil hominin scapulae. Accordingly, the evolution of Pan (highly oblique spine and laterally-situated superior angle) and Homo (transversely-oriented spine) scapular morphology would have involved relatively minor shifts from this ancestral

  3. ChromaSig: a probabilistic approach to finding common chromatin signatures in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Hon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods to identify functional genomic elements using genetic information have been very successful in determining gene structure and in identifying a handful of cis-regulatory elements. But the vast majority of regulatory elements have yet to be discovered, and it has become increasingly apparent that their discovery will not come from using genetic information alone. Recently, high-throughput technologies have enabled the creation of information-rich epigenetic maps, most notably for histone modifications. However, tools that search for functional elements using this epigenetic information have been lacking. Here, we describe an unsupervised learning method called ChromaSig to find, in an unbiased fashion, commonly occurring chromatin signatures in both tiling microarray and sequencing data. Applying this algorithm to nine chromatin marks across a 1% sampling of the human genome in HeLa cells, we recover eight clusters of distinct chromatin signatures, five of which correspond to known patterns associated with transcriptional promoters and enhancers. Interestingly, we observe that the distinct chromatin signatures found at enhancers mark distinct functional classes of enhancers in terms of transcription factor and coactivator binding. In addition, we identify three clusters of novel chromatin signatures that contain evolutionarily conserved sequences and potential cis-regulatory elements. Applying ChromaSig to a panel of 21 chromatin marks mapped genomewide by ChIP-Seq reveals 16 classes of genomic elements marked by distinct chromatin signatures. Interestingly, four classes containing enrichment for repressive histone modifications appear to be locally heterochromatic sites and are enriched in quickly evolving regions of the genome. The utility of this approach in uncovering novel, functionally significant genomic elements will aid future efforts of genome annotation via chromatin modifications.

  4. Common molecular pathways involved in human CD133+/CD34+ progenitor cell expansion and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vêncio Ricardo Z

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uncovering the molecular mechanism underlying expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is critical to extend current therapeutic applications and to understand how its deregulation relates to leukemia. The characterization of genes commonly relevant to stem/progenitor cell expansion and tumor development should facilitate the identification of novel therapeutic targets in cancer. Methods CD34+/CD133+ progenitor cells were purified from human umbilical cord blood and expanded in vitro. Correlated molecular changes were analyzed by gene expression profiling using microarrays covering up to 55,000 transcripts. Genes regulated during progenitor cell expansion were identified and functionally classified. Aberrant expression of such genes in cancer was indicated by in silico SAGE. Differential expression of selected genes was assessed by real-time PCR in hematopoietic cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients and healthy individuals. Results Several genes and signaling pathways not previously associated with ex vivo expansion of CD133+/CD34+ cells were identified, most of which associated with cancer. Regulation of MEK/ERK and Hedgehog signaling genes in addition to numerous proto-oncogenes was detected during conditions of enhanced progenitor cell expansion. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed down-regulation of several newly described cancer-associated genes in CD133+/CD34+ cells, including DOCK4 and SPARCL1 tumor suppressors, and parallel results were verified when comparing their expression in cells from chronic myeloid leukemia patients Conclusion Our findings reveal potential molecular targets for oncogenic transformation in CD133+/CD34+ cells and strengthen the link between deregulation of stem/progenitor cell expansion and the malignant process.

  5. Exosomes derived from human platelet-rich plasma prevent apoptosis induced by glucocorticoid-associated endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat osteonecrosis of the femoral head via the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 signal pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi-Cong; Yuan, Ting; Rui, Bi-Yu; Zhu, Zhen-Zhong; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    An excess of glucocorticoids (GCs) is reported to be one of the most common causes of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). In addition, GCs can induce bone cell apoptosis through modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Among the three main signal pathways in ER stress, the PERK (protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase)/CHOP (CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein) pathway has been considered to be closely associated with apoptosis. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been referred to as a concentration of growth factors and the exosomes derived from PRP (PRP-Exos) have a similar effect to their parent material. The enriched growth factors can be encapsulated into PRP-Exos and activate Akt and Erk pathways to promote angiogenesis. Activation of the Akt pathway may promote the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, while CHOP can inhibit B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression to increase the level of cleaved caspase-3 and lead to cell death. Consequently, we hypothesized that PRP-Exos prevent apoptosis induced by glucocorticoid-associated ER stress in rat ONFH via the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 signal pathway. To verify this hypothesis, a dexamethasone (DEX)-treated in vitro cell model and methylprednisolone (MPS)-treated in vivo rat model were adopted. Characterization of PRP-Exos, and effects of PRP-Exos on proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis of cells treated with GCs in vitro and in vivo were examined. Furthermore, the mechanism by which PRP-Exos rescue the GC-induced apoptosis through the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 pathway was also investigated. The results indicate that PRP-Exos have the capability to prevent GC-induced apoptosis in a rat model of ONFH by promoting Bcl-2 expression via the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 signal pathway under ER stress. PMID:28255363

  6. Risk of femoral hernia after inguinal herniorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T; Bay-Nielsen, M; Kehlet, H

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small case series have suggested an increased risk of femoral hernia after previous inguinal herniorrhaphy, but no large-scale data with complete follow-up are available. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Hernia Database covering the interval from 1 January 1998 to 1 July...... 2001, and included 34 849 groin hernia repairs. RESULTS: Of 1297 femoral hernia repairs, 71 patients had previously had an operation for inguinal hernia within the observation period. These 71 femoral hernias represented 7.9 per cent of all reoperations for groin hernia recorded in the database....... The median time to reoperation for a 'recurrent' femoral hernia after previous inguinal herniorrhaphy was 7 months, compared with 10 months for inguinal recurrences. The risk of developing a 'recurrent' femoral hernia after previous inguinal herniorrhaphy was 15 times higher than the rate of femoral hernia...

  7. Risk of femoral hernia after inguinal herniorrhaphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, T; Bay-Nielsen, M; Kehlet, H

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small case series have suggested an increased risk of femoral hernia after previous inguinal herniorrhaphy, but no large-scale data with complete follow-up are available. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Hernia Database covering the interval from 1 January 1998 to 1 July...... 2001, and included 34 849 groin hernia repairs. RESULTS: Of 1297 femoral hernia repairs, 71 patients had previously had an operation for inguinal hernia within the observation period. These 71 femoral hernias represented 7.9 per cent of all reoperations for groin hernia recorded in the database....... The median time to reoperation for a 'recurrent' femoral hernia after previous inguinal herniorrhaphy was 7 months, compared with 10 months for inguinal recurrences. The risk of developing a 'recurrent' femoral hernia after previous inguinal herniorrhaphy was 15 times higher than the rate of femoral hernia...

  8. Femoral prosthesis subsidence in asymptomatic patients. A stereophotogrammetric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafetz, N; Baumrind, S; Murray, W R; Genant, H K

    1984-01-01

    A radiographic stereophotogrammetric technique (SPG) was used to evaluate quantitatively the presence of early femoral prosthesis subsidence after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This paper focuses on the measurement of subsidence in 12 patients who remained asymptomatic during the first two years after surgery. Only one of these had SPG estimated subsidence in excess of one millimeter at any timepoint. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that early postoperative subsidence is not a common finding among asymptomatic THA patients.

  9. Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli, a Common Human Pathogen: Challenges for Vaccine Development and Progress in the Field

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the most common gram-negative bacterial pathogen in humans. ExPEC causes the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), is a leading cause of adult bacteremia, and is the second most common cause of neonatal meningitis. Increasing multidrug resistance among ExPEC strains constitutes a major obstacle to treatment and is implicated in increasing numbers of hospitalizations and deaths and increasing healthcare costs associated with Ex...

  10. The antiarrhythmic peptide analog rotigaptide (ZP123) stimulates gap junction intercellular communication in human osteoblasts and prevents decrease in femoral trabecular bone strength in ovariectomized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2005-01-01

    and strength in vivo. Cell coupling and calcium signaling were assessed in vitro on human, primary, osteoblastic cells. In vivo effects of rotigaptide on bone strength and density were determined 4 wk after ovariectomy in rats treated with either vehicle, sc injection twice daily (300 nmol per kilogram body......Gap junctions play an important role in bone development and function, but the lack of pharmacological tools has hampered the gap junction research. The antiarrhythmic peptides stimulate gap junction communication between cardiomyocytes, but effects in noncardiac tissue are unknown. The purpose...... of this study was to examine whether antiarrhythmic peptides, which are small peptides increasing gap junctional conductivity, show specific binding to osteoblasts and investigate the effect of the stable analog rotigaptide (ZP123) on gap junctional intercellular communication in vitro and on bone mass...

  11. Femoral rotation unpredictably affects radiographic anatomical lateral distal femoral angle measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effects of internal and external femoral rotation on radiographic measurements of the anatomical lateral distal femoral angle (a-LDFA) using two methods for defining the anatomical proximal femoral axis (a-PFA). Methods: Digital radiographs were obtained of 14 right fem...

  12. New contributions to the study of common double mutants in the human LDL receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor, M. Teresa; Cenarro, Ana; Tejedor, Diego; Stef, Marianne; Palacios, Lourdes; de Castro, Isabel; García-Otín, Ángel L.; Monteagudo, Luis V.; Civeira, Fernando; Pocovi, Miguel

    2011-11-01

    Variations in the gene encoding the low-density lipoprotein receptor ( LDLR) can cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders in humans. The functional effects of the p.Gln92Glu and p.Asn564His alterations are predicted as benign, but the c.313 + 1G>C and p.Lys799_Phe801del changes are believed to cause disease. Although p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C have been observed only in Spain, p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del are widespread in Western Europe. In order to estimate the ages ( t generations) of these four variants of the gene, to determine their possible origin and to consider the influence of age and selective pressure on their spread, we analyzed 86 healthy individuals and 126 FH patients in Spain. Most of the FH patients investigated carried two of these four LDLR variants simultaneously, while only one patient carried three of them simultaneously. Haplotype analyses were based on five LDLR SNPs: c.81T>C, c.1413G>A, c.1725C>T, c.1959T>C and c.2232G>A. The results suggest that p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C arose at about the same time (99 and 103 generations ago, respectively) in the CACTG haplotype and that p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del appeared in the CGCCG haplotype and might be slightly more recent variations (92 and 95 generations ago, respectively). Low selective pressures could explain the maintenance of these variants in spite of their ages. The origin of p.Gln92Glu and c.313 + 1G>C appears to be in Spain whereas p.Asn564His and p.Lys799_Phe801del could have been introduced in Spain by Celtic migrations in the seventh to fifth centuries BC.

  13. [Caffeine--common ingredient in a diet and its influence on human health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzejska, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed by people of all ages. In the last period a market of caffeine-containing products, particularly energy drinks and food supplements increased. Caffeine for years is under discussion, whether has positive whether adverse impact on health. Children are a group of special anxieties. Caffeine is a stimulant of central nervous system and therefore is probably the most commonly used psychoactive substance in the world. The physiological effect of caffeine and the lack of nutrition value causes a great interest its impact on health, especially with reference to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Results of scientific research are not clear. The influence of caffeine on the human body is conditioned with the individual metabolism of caffeine which also depends on many endogenic and environmental factors. According to the current knowledge moderate caffeine intake by healthy adults at a dose level of 400 mg a day is not associated with adverse effects, but it also depends on other health determinants of a lifestyle. Excessive caffeine consumption can cause negative health consequences such as psychomotor agitation, insomnia, headache, gastrointestinal complaints. Adverse effect of caffeine intoxication is classified in World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Metabolism of caffeine by pregnant woman is slowed down. Caffeine and its metabolites pass freely across the placenta into a fetus. For this reason pregnant women should limit caffeine intake. Children and adolescents should also limit daily caffeine consumption. It results from the influence of caffeine on the central nervous system in the period of rapid growth and the final stage of brain development, calcium balance and sleep duration. Average daily caffeine consumption in European countries ranging from 280-490 mg. The highest caffeine intake is in Scandinavian countries what results from the great consumption of the coffee. As far as caffeine

  14. Our Experience with Patello femoral joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Pablo; Arteaga, Gonzalo; Vargas, Medardo; Naranjo, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ten to fifteen percent of knee arthritis is reported to be isolated patellofemoral arthritis. Total knee arthroplasty is not recommended for isolated patella femoral arthritis particularly in young patients. We present the retrospective review our series in 7 years. Objectives: The aim of this presentation is to describe our experience in the management of patellofemoral osteoarthritis with the use of the partial patellofemoral arthroplasty, as well as to delineate the pitfalls and causes of revision in our initial series of 153 cases. Methods: between 2009 and 2016, our group performed 157 patellofemoral arthroplasties (PFA) 74% being in women, and 26% in men, the mean age for women was 58 yrs. And 38 yrs. for men, our initial 13 cases were managed with the Avon prosthesis (Stryker Corporation Kalamazoo, Michigan), and then we switched to the Vanguard PF (Zimmer-Biomet Warsaw In), both systems are an On-Lay design that is more flexible for addressing dysplastic trochleas that are more common in our population. Results: We performed a Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) for the assessment of the success of the procedure and obtained 87% of patients with excellent results (95 to 100), 10% with fair results (70 to 90) and 3% with poor outcomes (50), we performed a total of 3 revisions due to pain or progress to global arthritis. Conclusion: The PFA is a successful, safe and reproducible surgery that can be used in the group of patients that have isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. It requires a thorough knowledge of the patello femoral joint biomechanics, and physiopathology.

  15. Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head Occurred after Stent Placement of Femoral Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Shimatani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH that occurred after stent angiography of femoral artery for the treatment of arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO of left inferior limb in a 76-year-old woman. No case of late collapse of femoral head as a complication of endovascular procedure such as stent placement has been previously documented. We considered that ONFH occurred after detaining stent at a junction of left deep femoral artery for the treatment of the ischemia of left lateral and medial femoral circumflex artery.

  16. STUDY OF PROFUNDA FEMORIS ARTERY OF HUMAN CADAVERS IN RAJKOT CITY, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip R. Chauhan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The profunda femoris artery is the major branch of the femoral artery. It is at critical place in relation to femoral artery for various interventions. Aim: To study the origin of profunda femoris artery. And to compare the cross sectional area of profunda femoris artery between right and left limbs. Material and methods: In this cross sectional study, 51 human femoral triangles from 26 (18 male and 08 female human cadavers in P.D.U. Government Medical College, Rajkot were dissected and studied during regular dissection classes. Site of origin of profunda femoris artery was noted in relation to femoral artery. The distance of origin of profunda femoris artery from the midpoint of inguinal point was measured and noted. Circumference of profunda femoris artery at the level of origin was measured. The cross sectional area was calculated. Collected data was analyzed by standard statistical formulas with the help of Microsoft excel 2007 and Epi info TM 7 software. Result: Most common (52.95% cases site of origin was posterolateral from femoral artery. The mean distance of origin of profunda femoris artery from the midpoint of inguinal ligament was 30.17 mm. There was no significant difference in cross sectional area of right and left profunda femoris artery (at 95% confidence interval Conclusion: Profunda femoris artery is used for angiography, ultrasonography and cardiac catheterization also. It is the major blood supply of the thigh. Its relations with femoral artery, femoral vein and femoral nerve makes it important structure for clinicians. Variations in origin of profunda femoris artery must be considered to avoid complication like aneurism and faulty passage of the catheter. High origin of profunda femoris artery is more prone to damage while accessing femoral artery.

  17. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head: diagnosis and classification systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Ho-Rim; Steinberg, Marvin E; Y. Cheng, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head is a rare but disabling condition that usually results in progressive femoral head collapse and secondary arthritis necessitating total hip arthroplasty if not treated...

  18. Developing a sensation information message for femoral arteriography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C R; Gregor, F M

    1988-03-01

    Sensation information is proposed as a way of decreasing the patient's distress during a threatening health care event. A first step in developing a sensation information message is to determine the content of the message. This study, using a systematic theory-based methodology, was conducted to describe and validate the common physical sensations experienced by patients undergoing the diagnostic procedure of femoral arteriography. (A conceptual framework based on how an individual perceives or senses a situation was used.) A three-stage survey design was used including: (1) tool development following observation of the procedure and pilot-testing of the interview schedule, (2) interview of patients who had undergone femoral arteriography about the sensations experienced during the procedure, and (3) validation of the responses. Twenty-one steps in the femoral arteriography procedure of which patients were aware were identified. Nine 'feeling' sensations commonly experienced during the procedure and the sights and sounds associated with the procedure were determined. The sequencing and duration of procedure steps were observed and the environment in which the procedure was performed was described.

  19. The femoral sulcus in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingaraj, Krishna; Bartlett, John

    2009-05-01

    The position of the femoral sulcus relative to the midline of the distal femoral resection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was studied to determine if centralized placement of the femoral component on the distal femur was justified in terms of aligning the prosthetic sulcus with the native femoral sulcus. The location of the femoral sulcus was studied in 112 consecutive patients undergoing TKA. The mean sulcus position was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline of the distal femoral resection (SD 1.4, 95% CI, 0.5-1.0 mm). However, the variation in sulcus positions ranged from 4 mm medial to 4 mm lateral to the midline. The mean sulcus position in valgus knees was 1.0 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.8), and that in varus knees was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.2) (P = 0.501). It appears prudent to centre the femoral component on the native sulcus rather than the midline of the distal femoral resection, so as to ensure accurate alignment of the prosthetic sulcus with the native sulcus and to encourage normal patella tracking.

  20. Femoral revision surgery with impaction bone grafting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L.E.F. ten Have (Bas); R.W. Brouwer (Reinoud); F.C. van Biezen (Frans); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of revision of the femoral component of a total hip replacement using impaction bone grafting. Femoral revision with an impacted allograft was performed on 29 patients (31 hips). In all

  1. Postmortem retrieved canine THR: femoral and acetabular component interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurla, Carolyn P; James, Susan P

    2004-01-01

    Dogs are the preferred animal model for testing of human total hip replacements (THRs). A postmortem retrieval program for clinical, cemented, canine THR was established to analyze the long-term performance of THRs in dogs and to compare that performance to postmortem retrievals of human THRs. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the interaction between the femoral and acetabular components. Thirty-eight postmortem retrievals from 29 dogs were donated and analyzed. The acetabular components (ACs) were measured for volumetric wear and graded for articulating surface damage. Femoral and acetabular components were mechanically tested for implant stability. Digital image analysis was performed on contact radiographs of transverse femoral slices. Of 14 cases with a firmly implanted femoral component (FC). 6 articulated against loose ACs. Of 24 cases with a loose FC, 16 articulated against loose ACs. Only 4 specimens had both components firmly implanted, and 14 specimens had both components loose. There was a significant positive correlation between AC volumetric wear and FC loosening; however, there was no evidence of osteolysis or wear debris induced osteolysis as seen in human postmortem retrieval studies. There was a significant but weak negative correlation between FC loosening at the cement/bone interface and AC scores reflecting damage to the rim and creep across the entire AC. Although implant-on-implant damage to the AC was expected to positively correlate with FC loosening, this was not found. Researchers need to look at interactions between AC and FC to understand how the failure of one component affects performance of the other.

  2. One common structural feature of "words" in protein sequences and human texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemková, M; Trifonov, E N; Zahradník, D

    2014-01-01

    Frequently discussed analogy between genetic and human texts is explored by comparison of alternation of polar and non-polar amino-acid residues in proteins and alternation of consonants and vowels in human texts. In human languages, the usage of possible combinations of consonants and vowels is influenced by pronounceability of the combinations. Similarly, oligopeptide composition of proteins is influenced by requirements of protein folding and stability. One special type of structure often present in proteins is amphipathic α-helices in which polar and non-polar amino acids alternate with the period 3.5 residues, not unlike alternation of consonants and vowels. In this study, we evaluated the contribution made by amphipathic alternations to the protein sequence texts (20-24%). Their proportion is lower than respective values for alternating words in human texts (57-89%). The proteomes (full sets of proteins for selected organisms) were transformed into ranked sequences of n-grams (words of length n), including periodical amphipathic structures. Similarly, human texts were transformed into sequences of alternating consonants and vowels. Analysis of the vocabularies shows that in both types of texts (human languages and proteins) the alternating words are dominant or highly preferred, thus, strengthening the analogy between these two types of texts. The contribution of amphipathic words in the upper parts of the ranked lists for 10 analyzed proteomes varies between 58 and 74%. In human texts respective values range between 90 and 100%.

  3. Classification of subtrochanteric femoral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, C L; McNamara, I; Ahmed, K; Pryor, G A; Parker, M J

    2010-07-01

    A review of the literature identified 15 different classification methods for subtrochanteric femoral fractures. Only eight of those classifications defined the area of bone, which constituted a subtrochanteric fracture. The actual length of femur defined as the subtrochanteric zone varied from 3 cm up to the level of the femoral isthmus. There was no agreement between the different classifications regarding the proximal and distal border or for those fractures, which traverse anatomical boundaries. In the various classifications, fractures were subdivided into 2-15 subgroups. The majority of the identified studies were unable to find the classifications useful in either determining treatment or predicting the outcome after treatment. We subdivided subtrochanteric fractures into three types based on the degree of fracture comminution. We examined the inter- and intra-observer agreement of our recommended classification. One orthopaedic consultant, one specialist hip fracture surgeon, two trainee registrar orthopaedic surgeons and one specialty trainee in orthopaedics, on two different occasions, 8 weeks apart, independently classified the radiographs of 20 patients with a subtrochanteric fracture. The mean kappa value for inter- and intra-observer variation was 0.71 and 0.79, respectively, with both showing substantial agreement and, therefore, this simpler classification is recommended. Based on the review of previous classification methods, we also recommend that the subtrochanteric zone be defined as the one in which the fracture line crossing the femur is predominantly within the area of bone extending 5 cm below the lower border of the lesser trochanter.

  4. Relaxation response in femoral angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandle, C L; Domar, A D; Harrington, D P; Leserman, J; Bozadjian, E M; Friedman, R; Benson, H

    1990-03-01

    Immediately before they underwent femoral angiography, 45 patients were given one of three types of audiotapes: a relaxation response tape recorded for this study, a tape of contemporary instrumental music, or a blank tape. All patients were instructed to listen to their audiotape during the entire angiographic procedure. Each audiotape was played through earphones. Radiologists were not told the group assignment or tape contents. The patients given the audiotape with instructions to elicit the relaxation response (n = 15) experienced significantly less anxiety (P less than .05) and pain (P less than .001) during the procedure, were observed by radiology nurses to exhibit significantly less pain (P less than .001) and anxiety (P less than .001), and requested significantly less fentanyl citrate (P less than .01) and diazepam (P less than .01) than patients given either the music (n = 14) or the blank (n = 16) control audiotapes. Elicitation of the relaxation response is a simple, inexpensive, efficacious, and practical method to reduce pain, anxiety, and medication during femoral angiography and may be useful in other invasive procedures.

  5. Tibial tubercle osteotomy for patello-femoral joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew J; Mandalia, Vipul I

    2016-03-01

    Tibial tubercle osteotomy has a long history in the management of patella instability and patello-femoral arthritis. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature describing the biomechanics of the patello-femoral joint and the rationale behind the use of the tibial tubercle osteotomy in modern day practice. Several different tibial tubercle osteotomies are available and we aim to detail the concepts behind their use and the subsequent clinical results. With continued developments of chondrocyte implantation techniques, the potential to fill defects on the chondral surface of either the patella or trochlea in conjunction with a tibial tubercle osteotomy may well become more commonplace in a group that is commonly young and difficult to manage. Level of evidence III.

  6. Varus distal femoral osteotomy in young adults with valgus knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hasankhani, Ibrahim G; Mazlumi, Mahdi; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamad H

    2009-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders specially knee osteoarthritis are the most common causes of morbidity in old patients. Disturbance of the mechanical axis of the lower extremity is one of the most important causes in progression of knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the surgical results of distal femoral varus osteotomy in patients with genu valgum. Methods In this study, after recording history and physical examination, appropriate radiographs were taken. We did varus distal femoral osteotomy by standard medial subvastus approach and 90-angle blade plate fixation then followed the patients clinically and radiographically. Results This study was done on 23 knees (16 patients) age 23.3 years (range, 17 to 41 years). The mean duration of following up was 16.3 months (range, 8 to 25 months). Based on paired T test, there were statistically significant difference between pre- and postoperative tibiofemoral and congruence angles (p genu valgum correction, the patella should be stabilized simultaneously. PMID:19435527

  7. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2006-01-01

    overlapped by transfrags than regions that are not overlapped by transfrags. To verify the coexpression between predicted candidates in human and mouse, we conducted expression studies by RT-PCR and Northern blotting on mouse candidates, which overlap with transfrags on human chromosome 20. RT-PCR results...... confirmed expression of 32 out of 36 candidates, whereas Northern blots confirmed four out of 12 candidates. Furthermore, many RT-PCR results indicate differential expression in different tissues. Hence, our findings suggest that there are corresponding regions between human and mouse, which contain...

  8. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  9. Differential Decay of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of different human fecal pollution sources is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decay of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fe...

  10. Differential Decomposition of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of microorganisms associated with different human fecal pollution types is necessary for proper implementation of many water qualitymanagement practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, thedecomposition of select cultiva...

  11. Differential Decay of Bacterial and Viral Fecal Indicators in Common Human Pollution Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the decomposition of different human fecal pollution sources is necessary for proper implementation of many water quality management practices, as well as predicting associated public health risks. Here, the decay of select cultivated and molecular indicators of fe...

  12. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, J.L.; Medland, S.E.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Hibar, D.P.; Senstad, R.E.; Winkler, A.M.; Toro, R.; Appel, K.; Bartecek, R.; Bergmann, O.; Bernard, M.; Brown, A.A.; Cannon, D.M.; Chakravarty, M.M.; Christoforou, A.; Domin, M.; Grimm, O.; Hollinshead, M.; Holmes, A.J.; Homuth, G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Langan, C.; Lopez, L.M.; Hansell, N.K.; Hwang, K.S.; Kim, S.; Laje, G.; Lee, P.H.; Liu, X.; Loth, E.; Lourdusamy, A.; Mattingsdal, M.; Mohnke, S.; Maniega, S.M.; Nho, K.; Nugent, A.C.; O'Brien, C.; Papmeyer, M.; Putz, B.; Ramasamy, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Risacher, S.L.; Roddey, J.C.; Rose, E.J.; Ryten, M.; Shen, L.; Sprooten, E.; Strengman, E.; Teumer, A.; Trabzuni, D.; Turner, J.; Eijk, K. van; Erp, T.G. van; Tol, M.J. van; Wittfeld, K.; Wolf, C. de; Woudstra, S.; Aleman, A.; Alhusaini, S.; Almasy, L.; Binder, E.B.; Brohawn, D.G.; Cantor, R.M.; Carless, M.A.; Corvin, A.; Czisch, M.; Curran, J.E.; Davies, G.; Almeida, M.A. de; Delanty, N.; Depondt, C.; Duggirala, R.; Dyer, T.D.; Erk, S.; Fagerness, J.; Fox, P.T.; Freimer, N.B.; Gill, M.; Goring, H.H.; Hagler, D.J.; Hoehn, D.; Holsboer, F.; Hoogman, M.; Hosten, N.; Jahanshad, N.; Johnson, M.P.; Kasperaviciute, D.; Kent Jr., J.W.; Kochunov, P.; Lancaster, J.L.; Lawrie, S.M.; Liewald, D.C.; Mandl, R.C.W.; Matarin, M.; Mattheisen, M.; Meisenzahl, E.; Melle, I.; Moses, E.K.; Muhleisen, T.W.; Nauck, M.; Nothen, M.M.; Olvera, R.L.; Pandolfo, M.; Pike, G.B.; Puls, R.; Reinvang, I.; Renteria, M.E.; Rietschel, M.; Roffman, J.L.; Royle, N.A.; Rujescu, D.; Savitz, J.; Schnack, H.G.; Schnell, K.; Seiferth, N.; Smith, C.; Steen, V.M.; Valdes Hernandez, M.C.; Heuvel, M. van den; Wee, N.J. van der; Haren, N.E. Van; Veltman, J.A.; Volzke, H.; Walker, R.; Westlye, L.T.; Whelan, C.D.; Agartz, I.; Boomsma, D.I.; Cavalleri, G.L.; Dale, A.M.; Djurovic, S.; Drevets, W.C.; Hagoort, P.; Hall, J.; Heinz, A.; Jack Jr., C.R.; Foroud, T.M.; Hellard, S. Le; Macciardi, F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Poline, J.B.; Porteous, D.J.; Sisodiya, S.M.; Starr, J.M.; Sussmann, J.; Toga, A.W.; Veltman, D.J.; Walter, H.; Weiner, M.W.; Bis, J.C.; Ikram, M.A.; Smith, A.V.; Gudnason, V.; Tzourio, C.; Vernooij, M.W.; Launer, L.J.; DeCarli, C.; Seshadri, S.; Andreassen, O.A.; Apostolova, L.G.; Bastin, M.E.; Blangero, J.; Brunner, H.G.; Buckner, R.L.; Cichon, S.; Coppola, G.; Zubicaray, G.I. de; Deary, I.J.; Donohoe, G.; Geus, E.J. de; Espeseth, T.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Glahn, D.C.; Grabe, H.J.; Hardy, J.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.; Jenkinson, M.; Kahn, R.S.; McDonald, C.; McIntosh, A.M.; McMahon, F.J.; McMahon, K.L.; Meyer-Lindenberg, A.; Morris, D.W.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Nichols, T.E.; Ophoff, R.A.; Paus, T.; Pausova, Z.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Potkin, S.G.; Samann, P.G.; Saykin, A.J.; Schumann, G.; Smoller, J.W.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Weale, M.E.; Martin, N.G.; Franke, B.; Wright, M.J.; Thompson, P.M.; Klaasen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer's disease and is reduced in schizophrenia, major depression and mesial temporal

  13. Improving Human-Computer Interaction by Developing Culture-sensitive Applications based on Common Sense Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Anacleto, Junia Coutinho

    2010-01-01

    The advent of Web 3.0, claiming for personalization in interactive systems (Lassila & Hendler, 2007), and the need for systems capable of interacting in a more natural way in the future society flooded with computer systems and devices (Harper et al., 2008) show that great advances in HCI should be done. This chapter presents some contributions of LIA for the future of HCI, defending that using common sense knowledge is a possibility for improving HCI, especially because people assign meaning to their messages based on their common sense and, therefore, the use of this knowledge in developing user interfaces can make them more intuitive to the end-user. Moreover, as common sense knowledge varies from group to group of people, it can be used for developing applications capable of giving different feedback for different target groups, as the applications presented along this chapter illustrate, allowing, in this way, interface personalization taking into account cultural issues. For the purpose of using com...

  14. Radiographic bone texture analysis is correlated with 3D microarchitecture in the femoral head, and improves the estimation of the femoral neck fracture risk when combined with bone mineral density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollivier, Matthieu [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13284 Marseille (France); APHM, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, Orthopedic Surgery Department, 13009 Marseille (France); Le Corroller, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.LeCorroller@ap-hm.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13284 Marseille (France); APHM, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, Radiology Department, 13009 Marseille (France); Blanc, Guillaume [APHM, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, Orthopedic Surgery Department, 13009 Marseille (France); Parratte, Sébastien [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13284 Marseille (France); APHM, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, Orthopedic Surgery Department, 13009 Marseille (France); Champsaur, Pierre [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13284 Marseille (France); APHM, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, Radiology Department, 13009 Marseille (France); Chabrand, Patrick [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13284 Marseille (France); Argenson, Jean-Noël [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, 13284 Marseille (France); APHM, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, Orthopedic Surgery Department, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Femoral neck fracture is a major public health problem in elderly persons, representing the main source of osteoporosis-related mortality and morbidity. In this study, we aimed at comparing radiographic texture analysis with three-dimensional (3D) microarchitecture in human femurs, and at evaluating whether bone texture analysis improved the assessment of the femoral neck fracture risk other than that obtainable by bone mineral density (BMD). Materials and methods: Thirteen osteoporotic femoral heads from patients who fractured their femoral neck and twelve non-fractured femoral heads from osteoarthritic patients were studied using respectively (1) a new high-resolution digital X-ray device (BMA™, D3A Medical Systems) allowing for bone texture analysis with fractal parameter Hmean, and (2) a micro-computed tomograph (CT) for 3D microarchitecture. BMD was measured postoperatively by DXA in all patients in the contralateral femur. Results: In these femoral heads, we found that fractal parameter Hmean was correlated with 3D microarchitecture parameters: bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) and fractal dimension (FD) respectively (p < 0.05). Then, fractal parameter Hmean was significantly lower in the femoral heads from the fractured group than from the non-fractured group (p < 0.01). Finally, multiple regression analysis showed that combining bone texture analysis and total hip BMD significantly improved the estimation of the femoral neck fracture risk from adjusted r{sup 2} = 0.46 to adjusted r{sup 2} = 0.67 (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Radiographic bone texture analysis was correlated with 3D microarchitecture parameters in the femoral head, provided accurate discrimination between the femoral heads from the fractured and non-fractured groups, and significantly improved the estimation of the femoral neck fracture risk when combined with BMD.

  15. Comparative cortical bone thickness between the long bones of humans and five common non-human mammal taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Sarah L; Reed, Warren; Donlon, Denise

    2016-03-01

    The task of identifying fragments of long bone shafts as human or non-human is difficult but necessary, for both forensic and archaeological cases, and a fast simple method is particularly useful. Previous literature suggests there may be differences in the thickness of the cortical bone between these two groups, but this has not been tested thoroughly. The aim of this study was not only to test this suggestion, but also to provide data that could be of practical assistance for future comparisons. The major limb bones (humerus, radius, femur and tibia) of 50 Caucasoid adult skeletons of known age and sex were radiographed, along with corresponding skeletal elements from sheep, pigs, cattle, large dogs and kangaroos. Measurements were taken from the radiographs at five points along the bone shaft, of shaft diameter, cortical bone thickness, and a cortical thickness index (sum of cortices divided by shaft diameter) in both anteroposterior and mediolateral orientations. Each variable for actual cortical bone thickness as well as cortical thickness indices were compared between the human group (split by sex) and each of the non-human groups in turn, using Student's t-tests. Results showed that while significant differences did exist between the human groups and many of the non-human groups, these were not all in the same direction. That is, some variables in the human groups were significantly greater than, and others were significantly less than, the corresponding variable in the non-human groups, depending on the particular non-human group, sex of the human group, or variable under comparison. This was the case for measurements of both actual cortical bone thickness and cortical thickness index. Therefore, for bone shaft fragments for which the skeletal element is unknown, the overlap in cortical bone thickness between different areas of different bones is too great to allow identification using this method alone. However, by providing extensive cortical bone

  16. A lincRNA connected to cell mortality and epigenetically-silenced in most common human cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, Lukas; Garbe, James C; Stampfer, Martha R; Futscher, Bernard W

    2015-01-01

    Immortality is an essential characteristic of human carcinoma cells. We recently developed an efficient, reproducible method that immortalizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in the absence of gross genomic changes by targeting 2 critical senescence barriers. Consistent transcriptomic changes associated with immortality were identified using microarray analysis of isogenic normal finite pre-stasis, abnormal finite post-stasis, and immortal HMECs from 4 individuals. A total of 277 genes consistently changed in cells that transitioned from post-stasis to immortal. Gene ontology analysis of affected genes revealed biological processes significantly altered in the immortalization process. These immortalization-associated changes showed striking similarity to the gene expression changes seen in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) clinical breast cancer data. The most dramatic change in gene expression seen during the immortalization step was the downregulation of an unnamed, incompletely annotated transcript that we called MORT, for mortality, since its expression was closely associated with the mortal, finite lifespan phenotype. We show here that MORT (ZNF667-AS1) is expressed in all normal finite lifespan human cells examined to date and is lost in immortalized HMEC. MORT gene silencing at the mortal/immortal boundary was due to DNA hypermethylation of its CpG island promoter. This epigenetic silencing is also seen in human breast cancer cell lines and in a majority of human breast tumor tissues. The functional importance of DNA hypermethylation in MORT gene silencing is supported by the ability of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine to reactivate MORT expression. Analysis of TCGA data revealed deregulation of MORT expression due to DNA hypermethylation in 15 out of the 17 most common human cancers. The epigenetic silencing of MORT in a large majority of the common human cancers suggests a potential fundamental role in cellular immortalization during human carcinogenesis. PMID

  17. Detection of a common chimeric transcript between human chromosomes 7 and 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wenwen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interchromosomal chimeric RNA molecules are often transcription products from genomic rearrangement in cancerous cells. Here we report the computational detection of an interchromosomal RNA fusion between ZC3HAV1L and CHMP1A from RNA-seq data of normal human mammary epithelial cells, and experimental confirmation of the chimeric transcript in multiple human cells and tissues. Our experimental characterization also detected three variants of the ZC3HAV1L-CHMP1A chimeric RNA, suggesting that these genes are involved in complex splicing. The fusion sequence at the novel exon-exon boundary, and the absence of corresponding DNA rearrangement suggest that this chimeric RNA is likely produced by trans-splicing in human cells. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Rory Johnson (nominated by Fyodor Kondrashov; Gal Avital and Itai Yanai

  18. Meta-analysis of inter-species liver co-expression networks elucidates traits associated with common human diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Co-expression networks are routinely used to study human diseases like obesity and diabetes. Systematic comparison of these networks between species has the potential to elucidate common mechanisms that are conserved between human and rodent species, as well as those that are species-specific characterizing evolutionary plasticity. We developed a semi-parametric meta-analysis approach for combining gene-gene co-expression relationships across expression profile datasets from multiple species. The simulation results showed that the semi-parametric method is robust against noise. When applied to human, mouse, and rat liver co-expression networks, our method out-performed existing methods in identifying gene pairs with coherent biological functions. We identified a network conserved across species that highlighted cell-cell signaling, cell-adhesion and sterol biosynthesis as main biological processes represented in genome-wide association study candidate gene sets for blood lipid levels. We further developed a heterogeneity statistic to test for network differences among multiple datasets, and demonstrated that genes with species-specific interactions tend to be under positive selection throughout evolution. Finally, we identified a human-specific sub-network regulated by RXRG, which has been validated to play a different role in hyperlipidemia and Type 2 diabetes between human and mouse. Taken together, our approach represents a novel step forward in integrating gene co-expression networks from multiple large scale datasets to leverage not only common information but also differences that are dataset-specific.

  19. Simultaneous pharmacokinetics evaluation of human cytochrome P450 probes, caffeine, warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam, in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Shotaro; Inoue, Takashi; Utoh, Masahiro; Toda, Akiko; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes (caffeine, racemic warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam) composite, after single intravenous and oral administrations at doses of 0.20 and 1.0 mg kg(-1), respectively, to four male common marmosets were investigated. 2. The plasma concentrations of caffeine and warfarin decreased slowly in a monophasic manner but those of omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam decreased extensively after intravenous and oral administrations, in a manner that approximated those as reported for pharmacokinetics in humans. 3. Bioavailabilities were ∼100% for caffeine and warfarin, but midazolam was 4% in marmosets, presumably because of contribution of marmoset P450 3A4 expressed in small intestine and liver, with a high catalytic efficiency for midazolam 1'-hydroxylation as evident in the recombinant system. 4. These results suggest that common marmosets, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 probe substrates, could be an experimental model for humans and that marmoset P450s have functional characteristics that differ from those of human and/or cynomolgus monkey P450s in some aspects, indicating their importance in modeling in P450-dependent drug metabolism studies in marmosets and of further studies.

  20. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  1. The common germline Arg72Pro polymorphism of p53 and increased longevity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2008-01-01

    substitution in the p53 protein has important influence on cell death via increased apoptosis. Thus, the increased longevity may be due to a generally increased robustness after a diagnosis of any life-threatening disease. In contrast to widespread skepticism on the importance of SNPs in humans, this gain...

  2. Dietary fiber analysis of common pulses using AOAC 2011.25: Implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary fiber is an important non-nutritive component of food and is believed to have various benefits to human health. In many countries, such as the United States and Canada, the intake of dietary fiber is 50 to 70% below recommended levels in greater than 95% of the population. We recently adva...

  3. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  4. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Jason L.; Medland, Sarah E.; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P.; Senstad, Rudy E.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Orjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A.; Cannon, Dara M.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J.; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hwang, Kristy S.; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H.; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Munoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; O'Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Putz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roddey, J. Cooper; Rose, Emma J.; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G. M.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Brohawn, David G.; Cantor, Rita M.; Carless, Melanie A.; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E.; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A. A.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gill, Michael; Goering, Harald H. H.; Hagler, Donald J.; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P.; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liewald, David C.; Mandl, Rene; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Nauck, Matthias; Noethen, Markus M.; Olvera, Rene L.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G. Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Renteria, Miguel E.; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G.; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Hernandez, Maria C. Valdes; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Veltman, Joris A.; Voelzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Dale, Anders M.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W.; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Starr, John M.; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W.; Veltman, Dick J.; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Bis, Joshua C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Smith, Albert V.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W.; Launer, Lenore J.; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Bastin, Mark E.; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernandez, Guillen; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Hardy, John; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, Rene S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W.; Potkin, Steven G.; Saemann, Philipp G.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer's disease(1,2) and is reduced in schizophrenia(3), major depression(4) and mesia

  5. Common genetic variation and the control of HIV-1 in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellay, J.; Ge, D.; Shianna, K.V.

    2009-01-01

    To extend the understanding of host genetic determinants of HIV-1 control, we performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 2,554 infected Caucasian subjects. The study was powered to detect common genetic variants explaining down to 1.3% of the variability in viral load at set point. ...... genetic variation in HIV-1 control in Caucasians Udgivelsesdato: 2009/12......To extend the understanding of host genetic determinants of HIV-1 control, we performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 2,554 infected Caucasian subjects. The study was powered to detect common genetic variants explaining down to 1.3% of the variability in viral load at set point. We...

  6. Identification of a common deletion region in 10q26 associated with human gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Alves Margarida; Liberato Paulo; Conde Ana; Mafra Manuela; Inverno Alexandra; Maia Ana; Bagrel Denise; Carreira Isabel; Brito Miguel; Monteiro Carolino

    2010-01-01

    RIGHTS : This article is licensed under the BioMed Central licence at http://www.biomedcentral.com/about/license which is similar to the 'Creative Commons Attribution Licence'. In brief you may : copy, distribute, and display the work; make derivative works; or make commercial use of the work - under the following conditions: the original author must be given credit; for any reuse or distribution, it must be made clear to others what the license terms of this work are.

  7. Molecular Epidemiological Study on Prevalence of Human Papillomaviruses in Patients with Common Warts in Beijing Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN-JUN LEI; RUN AN; CHEN-FANG DONG; YU-KANG YUAN; XIAO-PING DONG; CHEN GAO; CHEN WANG; JUN HAN; JIAN-MING CHEN; GUANG-CAI XIANG; QI SHI; HuI-YING JIANG; WEI ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the circulation, distribution, and genomic diversity of HPVs in common warts in Beijing area of China. Methods Forty eight patients with pathologically diagnosed common warts were screened for the presence of HPV with HPV type-specific PCR and direct .sequencing analysis. The genomic diversity of HPVs prevalent in Chinese patients was analyzed based on LCR. Results Forty one (85.5%) samples were positive for HPV DNA, 13(31.7%)-HPV-57, 12(29.3%)-HPV-1 a, 7(17%)-HPV-27 and 5(12.2%)-HPV-2a. Four cases were infected with two different HPV types, two (4.9%) with HPV-1a and HPV-27, one (2.4%) with HPV-1 and HPV-57 and one (2.4%) with HPV-27 and HPV-57. In contrast to the prevalence of single strain of novel HPV-57 variant and HPV-1 prototype, two HPV-2 and three HPV-27 novel variants were found to circulate in Beijing. Conclusion HPV-1, -2, -27 and -57 are predominantly prevalent in patients with common warts in Beijing.

  8. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  9. Human placental glucose dehydrogenase: IEF polymorphism in two Italian populations and enzyme activity in the six common phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacchi, R; Corbo, R M; Calzolari, E; Laconi, G; Palmarino, R; Lucarelli, P

    1985-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) has been assayed qualitatively and quantitatively in more than 600 human placentae collected in two Italian populations. The gene frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were, respectively, 0.66, 0.21 and 0.12 in Continental Italy and 0.65, 0.23 and 0.12 in Sardinia. Among the six common phenotypes there was no difference in catalytic activity.

  10. Evolution of life history and behavior in Hominidae: towards phylogenetic reconstruction of the chimpanzee-human last common ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Pavel; Zrzavý, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The origin of the fundamental behavioral differences between humans and our closest living relatives is one of the central issues of evolutionary anthropology. The prominent, chimpanzee-based referential model of early hominin behavior has recently been challenged on the basis of broad multispecies comparisons and newly discovered fossil evidence. Here, we argue that while behavioral data on extant great apes are extremely relevant for reconstruction of ancestral behaviors, these behaviors should be reconstructed trait by trait using formal phylogenetic methods. Using the widely accepted hominoid phylogenetic tree, we perform a series of character optimization analyses using 65 selected life-history and behavioral characters for all extant hominid species. This analysis allows us to reconstruct the character states of the last common ancestors of Hominoidea, Hominidae, and the chimpanzee-human last common ancestor. Our analyses demonstrate that many fundamental behavioral and life-history attributes of hominids (including humans) are evidently ancient and likely inherited from the common ancestor of all hominids. However, numerous behaviors present in extant great apes represent their own terminal autapomorphies (both uniquely derived and homoplastic). Any evolutionary model that uses a single extant species to explain behavioral evolution of early hominins is therefore of limited use. In contrast, phylogenetic reconstruction of ancestral states is able to provide a detailed suite of behavioral, ecological and life-history characters for each hypothetical ancestor. The living great apes therefore play an important role for the confident identification of the traits found in the chimpanzee-human last common ancestor, some of which are likely to represent behaviors of the fossil hominins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. OF THE COMMON GOOD TO THE COMMON GOOD OF HUMANITY. DE LOS BIENES COMUNES AL BIEN COMÚN DE LA HUMANIDAD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Houtart.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is no place in the world, where a deep discomfort manifests against the increase of the social gaps, to the disrespect for justice, to the unemployment of young people, the abuse of power, and the destruction of nature. A new wave of social movements has been developed. The social forums allowed its globalization. A collective social conscience grows: we cannot continue like this. The kind of economic development that we go thorough today, with its political, psychological, and cultural consequences is the source of the imbalances. At the same time, the need for solutions is essential urgently. It is time to consider new directions and not only adaptations. Gathering forces to act and to think for this purpose, is a priority. This is why, along with the initiative of the Referendum on the water (one of the Common Good in Italy, the Rosa Luxembourg Foundation made the decision to organize a Conference on the concept of the Common Good of Humanity, to promote a reflection on the links between the two concepts and to integrate the demands and social struggles for a change of society, scenario in which this article is framed. RESUMEN: No hay lugar en el mundo, donde un profundo malestar se manifiesta frente al aumento de las brechas sociales, al irrespeto a la justicia, al desempleo de los jóvenes, a los abusos de poder, a la destrucción de la naturaleza. Una nueva ola de movimientos sociales se ha desarrollado. Los Foros sociales permitieron su globalización. Una conciencia social colectiva crece: no se puede seguir así. El tipo de desarrollo económico que vivimos actualmente, con sus consecuencias políticas, culturales y sicológicas, es el origen de los desequilibrios. Al mismo tiempo, la necesidad de soluciones se impone de manera urgente. Es el momento de plantear nuevas orientaciones y no solamente adaptaciones. Reunir fuerzas para actuar y pensar por este fin, es una prioridad. Es por esto que, junto a la iniciativa del Refer

  12. Tension free femoral hernia repair with plug

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milivoje Vukovi; Neboja Moljevi; Sinia Crnogorac

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the conventional technique involves treatment of femoral hernia an approximation inguinal ligament to pectineal ligament. In technique which uses mesh closure for femoral canal without tissue tension. Method: A prospective study from January 01. 2007-May 30. 2009. We analyzed 1 042 patients with inguinal hernia, of which there were 83 patients with 86 femoral hernia. Result: Femoral hernias were present in 7.96% of cases. Males were 13 (15.66%) and 70 women (84.34%). The gender distribution of men: women is 1:5.38. Urgent underwent 69 (83%), and the 14 election (17%) patients. Average age was 63 years, the youngest patient was a 24 and the oldest 86 years. Ratio of right: left hernias was 3.4:1. With bilateral femoral hernias was 3.61% of cases. In 7 patients (8.43%) underwent femoral hernia repair with 9 Prolene plug. Conclusions: The technique of closing the femoral canal with plug a simple. The plug is made from monofilament material and is easily formed. This technique allows the reduction of recurrence and can be used safely, quickly and easily in elective and emergency situations.

  13. Hoffa fracture associated with ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture: clinical feature and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu-Bao; Li, Qing-Song; Yang, Chen; Li, Shu-Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Qi, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hoffa fracture associated with ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture is very rare. Three cases of this rare type of injury were retrospectively reviewed. The sites of femoral shaft fractures and Hoffa fractures were documented. All femoral shaft fractures were managed with internal fixation. The rate of misdiagnosis for the Hoffa fractures was documented. Functions of the affected knees were evaluated according to the modified Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores at two years follow-up. Femoral fractures were either transverse or composite in all three cases. Ipsilateral Hoffa fractures occurred at medial condyle in two cases, and lateral condyle in one case. Only one Hoffa fracture was identified preoperatively. All the femoral shaft fractures healed uneventfully. In the patient whose Hoffa fracture was correctly diagnosed, the modified HSS score was 94. In another patient, whose Hoffa fracture was treated by a second operation, the modified HSS score was 93. And in the third case, who refused additional operation for the Hoffa fracture, the modified HSS score was only 70. Conclusively femoral shaft fracture can be associated with ipsilateral Hoffa fracture, especially in motorcycle accident. This type of injury is very rare and misdiagnosis is common.

  14. Hoffa fracture associated with ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture: clinical feature and treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Yu-bao; LI Qing-song; YANG Chen; LI Shu-qiang; LIU Jian-guo; QI Xin

    2011-01-01

    Hoffa fracture associated with ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture is very rare.Three cases of this rare type of injury were retrospectively reviewed.The sites of femoral shaft fractures and Hoffa fractures were documented.All femoral shaft fractures were managed with internal fixation.The rate of misdiagnosis for the Hoffa fractures was documented.Functions of the affected knees were evaluated according to the modified Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores at two years follow-up.Femoral fractures were either transverse or composite in all three cases.Ipsilateral Hoffa fractures occurred at medial condyle in two cases,and lateral condyle in one case.Only one Hoffa fracture was identified preoperatively.All the femoral shaft fractures healed uneventfully.In the patient whose Hoffa fracture was correctly diagnosed,the modified HSS score was 94.In another patient,whose Hoffa fracture was treated by a second operation,the modified HSS score was 93.And in the third case,who refused additional operation for the Hoffa fracture,the modified HSS score was only 70.Conclusively femoral shaft fracture can be associated with ipsilateral Hoffa fracture,especially in motorcycle accident.This type of injury is very rare and misdiagnosis is common.

  15. A comparison of Percutaneous femoral access in Endovascular Repair versus Open femoral access (PiERO) : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Saleem, Ben R.; Ott, Alewijn; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; de Kempenaer, Ties D. van Andringa; Pierie, Maurice E. N.; Bottema, Jan T.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access for endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) is obtained through surgical cutdown or percutaneously. The only devices suitable for percutaneous closure of the 20 French arteriotomies of the common femoral artery (CFA) are the Prostar (TM) and Proglide (TM) devices

  16. Ultrasound in evaluation of post-interventional femoral vein obstruction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdts Eva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality in diagnosis of vascular complications following cardiac catheterization and intervention. In some cases, however, bleeding surrounding the femoral vessels, may severely distort the color Doppler images, making detection of venous complications especially difficult. This report refers to such a case where post-catheterization haematoma was suspected to cause an obstruction of the femoral vein. Spectral Doppler recordings of blood flow in the common femoral vein, up-stream, distal to the hemorrhagic area, confirmed the diagnosis of obstruction by demonstrating changes in the venous flow pattern in the common femoral vein, consistent with venous hypertension. Due to the poor quality of the ultrasound images, the exact cause of the obstruction had to be established by another imaging modality, not affected by haemorrhages. CT showed that the common femoral vein was compressed at the puncture site by surrounding haemorrhages. Thus, when bleeding due to cardiac catheterization is associated with possible venous obstruction and findings by color Doppler are equivocal due to degradation of the color-Doppler image, detection of venous hypertension by spectral Doppler, performed distal to the bleeding area, strongly supports the presence of venous obstruction where the exact cause may be established by CT.

  17. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien Andersen, L.; Karim, A. B.; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, w...... of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P ...

  18. Normal Human Aging and Early-Stage Schizophrenia Share Common Molecular Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Bin; Chang, Wei-Li; Lanigan, Caroline M.; Dean, Brian; Sutcliffe, J. Gregor; Thomas, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    We examined genome-wide expression datasets from human frontal cortex of normal and schizophrenic individuals ranging from 19 to 81 years of age. We found that changes in gene expression that are correlated with aging in normal subjects differ dramatically from those observed with aging in schizophrenic subjects. Only 2.5% of genes were correlated with age in both groups. Surprisingly, we also found a significant overlap (29−34%) between those genes whose expression was correlated with aging ...

  19. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  20. Hip resurfacing femoral neck fracture influenced by valgus placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, Carolyn; Masri, Bassam A; Tonetti, Jérôme; Hodgson, Antony J; Greidanus, Nelson V

    2007-12-01

    Femoral neck fracture is the most common short-term concern after hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Currently, there is little basis to decide between neutral and valgus placement. We loaded 10 notched cadaveric femur pairs to failure; one side was implanted at 0 degrees relative to the femoral neck and the other at 10 degrees valgus. All 20 were dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-scanned. Failure load correlated with bone mineral density. Valgus placement increased the fracture load by an average of 28% over neutral for specimens with normal bone mineral density but had no effect on fracture load in specimens with low bone mineral density. For specimens with normal bone mineral density (typical of patients undergoing resurfacing arthroplasty), neutral-valgus placement had a greater effect than bone mineral density, explaining 54% of the fracture load variance. Component placement greater than 10 degrees valgus is likely undesirable because this can lead to an increase in component size and a greater likelihood of notching. To reduce fracture risk, we recommend placing the femoral component in valgus and selecting patients with higher bone mineral density.

  1. The surgical treatment of ilio-femoral venous obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, G; Caliò, F G; D'Urso, A; Mancini, P; Papaspyropoulos, V; Ceccanei, G; Lorusso, R; Vietri, F

    2004-01-01

    A series of 9 patients of a mean age of 48 years, operated on for compression of the ilio-femoral venous axis is reported. The cause of obstruction was external compression in 3 cases, a retroperitoneal sarcoma in 1 case, and an infrarenal aortic aneurysm in 2. Two patients presented with a Cockett's syndrome, 3 with a chronic ilio-femoral thrombosis, and one with a post-traumatic segmentary stenosis. Treatment consisted in a resection/Dacron grafting of 2 infrarenal aortic aneurysms, one femoro-caval bypass graft, 2 transpositions of the right common iliac artery in the left hypogastric artery for Cockett's syndrome, 3 Palma's operations for chronic thrombosis, and one internal jugular vein interposition for segmentary stenosis. There were no postoperative deaths and no early thromboses of venous reconstructions performed. All the patients were relieved of symptoms during the follow-up period, whose mean length was 38 months. The cause of venous obstruction and the presence of symptoms which are resistant to medical treatment are the main indications to ilio-femoral venous revascularization. The choice of the optimal treatment in each single case yields satisfactory results.

  2. Varus distal femoral osteotomy in young adults with valgus knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazlumi Mahdi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders specially knee osteoarthritis are the most common causes of morbidity in old patients. Disturbance of the mechanical axis of the lower extremity is one of the most important causes in progression of knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the surgical results of distal femoral varus osteotomy in patients with genu valgum. Methods In this study, after recording history and physical examination, appropriate radiographs were taken. We did varus distal femoral osteotomy by standard medial subvastus approach and 90-angle blade plate fixation then followed the patients clinically and radiographically. Results This study was done on 23 knees (16 patients age 23.3 years (range, 17 to 41 years. The mean duration of following up was 16.3 months (range, 8 to 25 months. Based on paired T test, there were statistically significant difference between pre- and postoperative tibiofemoral and congruence angles (p Conclusion Distal femoral varus osteotomy with blade plate fixation can be a reliable procedure for the treatment of valgus knee deformity. In this procedure, with more tibiofemoral angle correction, more congruence angle correction can be achieved. Therefore, along with genu valgum correction, the patella should be stabilized simultaneously.

  3. Serological proteome analysis of dogs with breast cancer unveils common serum biomarkers with human counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Canine mammary tumor is being touted as a model for investigating the human breast cancer. Breast cancer of the both species has similar biological behavior, histopathologic characteristics, and metastatic pattern. In this study, we used the serological proteome analysis to detect autoantigens that elicit a humoral response in dogs with mammary tumor in order to identify serum biomarkers with potential usefulness as diagnostic markers and to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying canine breast cancer development. Protein extract from a cell line was subject to 2DE followed by Western blotting using sera from 15 dogs with mammary tumor and sera from 15 healthy control dogs. Immunoreactive autoantigens were subsequently identified by the MALDI-TOF MS. Four autoantigens, including manganese-superoxide dismutase, triose phosphate isomerase, alpha-enolase, and phosphoglycerate mutase1, with significantly higher immunoreactivity in the tumor samples than in the normal samples were identified as biomarker candidates. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting revealed higher expression of these biomarkers in the malignant tumors than in the normal or benign tumors. The autoantigens found in this study have been reported to elicit autoantibody response in the human breast cancer, indicating the similarity of breast cancer proteome profile in dogs with that in human beings.

  4. Identification of a common immune signature in murine and human systemic Salmonellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Liang, Li; Juarez, Silvia; Nanton, Minelva R.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Kayala, Matthew A.; Necchi, Francesca; Heath, Jennifer N.; Hart, Peter; Tsolis, Renée M.; Heyderman, Robert S.; MacLennan, Calman A.; Felgner, Philip L.; Davies, D. Huw; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of Salmonella infections in human and animal health, the target antigens of Salmonella-specific immunity remain poorly defined. We have previously shown evidence for antibody-mediating protection against invasive Salmonellosis in mice and African children. To generate an overview of antibody targeting in systemic Salmonellosis, a Salmonella proteomic array containing over 2,700 proteins was constructed and probed with immune sera from Salmonella-infected mice and humans. Analysis of multiple inbred mouse strains identified 117 antigens recognized by systemic antibody responses in murine Salmonellosis. Importantly, many of these antigens were independently identified as target antigens using sera from Malawian children with Salmonella bacteremia, validating the study of the murine model. Furthermore, vaccination with SseB, the most prominent antigenic target in Malawian children, provided mice with significant protection against Salmonella infection. Together, these data uncover an overlapping immune signature of disseminated Salmonellosis in mice and humans and provide a foundation for the generation of a protective subunit vaccine. PMID:22331879

  5. Humidity sensation, cockroaches, worms, and humans: are common sensory mechanisms for hygrosensation shared across species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide

    2015-08-01

    Although the ability to detect humidity (i.e., hygrosensation) represents an important sensory attribute in many animal species (including humans), the neurophysiological and molecular bases of such sensory ability remain largely unknown in many animals. Recently, Russell and colleagues (Russell J, Vidal-Gadea AG, Makay A, Lanam C, Pierce-Shimomura JT. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 111: 8269-8274, 2014) provided for the first time neuromolecular evidence for the sensory integration of thermal and mechanical sensory cues which underpin the hygrosensation strategy of an animal (i.e., the free-living roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans) that lacks specific sensory organs for humidity detection (i.e., hygroreceptors). Due to the remarkable similarities in the hygrosensation transduction mechanisms used by hygroreceptor-provided (e.g., insects) and hygroreceptor-lacking species (e.g., roundworms and humans), the findings of Russell et al. highlight potentially universal mechanisms for humidity detection that could be shared across a wide range of species, including humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Femoral hernia sac laparoscopy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Valderrama, Alexander; Ruiz, Dan; Malik, Manmeet; Tiszenkel, Howard

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 64-year-old female with an incarcerated right femoral hernia, associated with a small bowel obstruction that was successfully treated with an open femoral hernia repair with plug. At the same time we performed a hernia sac laparoscopy to evaluate the viability of the previously reduced small bowel. The hernioscopy was performed with a 0° 5 mm scope with reliable evaluation of the peritoneal cavity. We confirm that hernioscopy is a safe and feasible procedure and provides useful information for the appropriate management of acute incarcerated femoral/inguinal hernias.

  7. An animal model that reflects human disease: the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L

    2012-06-01

    The common marmoset is a new world primate belonging to the Callitrichidae family weighing between 350 and 400 g. The marmoset has been shown to be an outstanding model for studying aging, reproduction, neuroscience, toxicology, and infectious disease. With regard to their susceptibility to infectious agents, they are exquisite NHP models for viral, protozoan and bacterial agents, as well as prions. The marmoset provides the advantages of a small animal model in high containment coupled with the immunological repertoire of a nonhuman primate and susceptibility to wild type, non-adapted viruses.

  8. Femoral nerve block versus intravenous fentanyl in adult patients with hip fractures - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Vieira Guimarães Hartmann

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hip fractures configure an important public health issue and are associated with high mortality taxes and lose of functionality. Hip fractures refer to a fracture occurring between the edge of the femoral head and 5 cm below the lesser trochanter. They are common in orthopedic emergencies. The number of proximal femoral fractures is likely to increase as the population ages. The average cost of care during the initial hospitalization for hip fracture can be estimated about US$ 7,000 per patient. Femoral fractures are painful and need immediate adequate analgesia. Treating pain femoral fractures is difficult because there are limited numbers of analgesics available, many of which have side effects that can limit their use. Opiates are the most used drugs, but they can bring some complications. In this context, femoral nerve blocks can be a safe alternative. It is a specific regional anesthetic technique used by doctors in emergency medicine to provide anesthesia and analgesia of the affected leg. Objective: To compare the analgesic efficacy of intravenous fentanyl versus femoral nerve block before positioning to perform spinal anesthesia in patients with femoral fractures assessed by Pain Scales. Methods: A systematic review of scientific literature was conducted. Studies described as randomized controlled trials comparing femoral nerve block and traditional fentanyl are included. Two reviewers (MR and FH independently assessed potentially eligible trials for inclusion. The methodology assessment was based on the tool developed by the Cochrane Collaboration for assessment of bias for randomized controlled trials. The Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Medline and Lilacs were searched for all articles published, without restriction of language or time. Results: Two studies were included in this review. Nerve blockade seemed to be more effective than intravenous fentanyl for preventing pain in patients suffering from a femoral fracture

  9. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-06-18

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca(2+) dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved.

  10. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-01-01

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca2+ dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved. PMID:23778582

  11. The white morphotype of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is common in infected humans and virulent in infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S; Petrofsky, M; Yaraei, K; Bermudez, L E; Cangelosi, G A

    2001-12-01

    Isolates of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) form multiple colony types named red-opaque, white-opaque, red-transparent (RT), and white-transparent (WT). The newly discovered WT morphotype is multidrug resistant relative to other variants in vitro. To determine whether the WT morphotype occurs in humans, 32 MAI-positive clinical samples from 2 sites were plated directly onto indicator agar without prior passage in vitro. WT was the predominant morphotype in 26 (81%) of these samples and was absent in only 2 samples. WT variants grew better than isogenic RT variants in mouse and human macrophage models of infection, and RT clones that passed through such systems underwent rapid shifts to the WT morphotype. The RT morphotype was heterogeneous with regard to infectivity. In summary, the white morphotype was common in humans and was favored in disease models. It may play an important role in the establishment and persistence of MAI infection.

  12. Does Tranexamic Acid Reduce Bleeding during Femoral Fracture Operation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Haghighi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Proximal Femoral shaft fractures are commonly associated with marked blood loss which can lead topostoperative acute anemia and some other complications.Tranexamic acid (TA is an antifibrinolytic medication that reduces intra-and postoperative blood loss and transfusionrequirements during some elective surgeries (1-3.The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of intravenous Tranexamic acid (TA on intraoperative blood loss and asubsequent need for transfusion in patients who were undergoing surgery for femoral shaft fractures in trauma setting.Methods:Thirty-eight ASA grade I-II patients undergoing proximal femoral shaft fracture surgery with intra medullarynailing were included in this double blind randomized controlled clinical trial. They were allocated into two groups. GroupI, the intervention group with eighteen patients received 15 mg/kg (TA via intravenous infusion before surgical incision.Patients in the placebo group received an identical volume of normal saline.Hemoglobin level was measured four hours before and after the surgeries. Postoperative blood loss and hemoglobinchange as well as transfusion rates and volumes were compared between the two groups.Results:Mean Percentage fall in hemoglobin after surgery were 1.75±0.84 and 2.04±1.9 in the study and placebo groups,respectively (P=0.570. Hemoglobin loss was higher in the placebo group. Transfusion rates was lower in TA group(5.6% compared to the placebo group (30% (P=0.06. No significant difference in The Allowable Blood Loss during thesurgery was found between the two groups (P=0.894.Conclusion:Preoperative treatment with TA reduces postoperative blood loss and the need for blood transfusion duringtraumatic femoral fracture operation.

  13. Pediatric femoral shaft fractures treated by flexible intramedullary nailing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.C.Kapil Mani; R.C.Dirgha Raj; Acharya Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Background:Nowadays pediatric femoral fractures are more commonly managed with operative treatment rather than conservative treatment because of more rapid recovery and avoidance of prolonged immobilization.Children between the ages of 5-13 years are treated either by traction plus hip spica and flexible/elastic stable retrograde intramedullary nail,or external fixators in the case of open fractures.The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcome of pediatric femoral shaft fractures treated by stainless steel flexible intramedullary nail in children between 5 and 13 years of age.Methods:There were 32 cases of femoral shaft fractures which were all fixed with stainless steel flexible intramedullary nail under fluoroscopy.Long leg cast was applied at the time of fixation.Partial weight bearing was started 2 weeks after surgery.Patients were evaluated in follow-up study to observe the alignment of fracture,infection,delayed union,nonunion,limb length discrepancy,motion of knee joint,and time to unite the fracture.Results:We were able to follow up 28 out of 32 patients.The patients were 8.14 years of age on average.The mean hospital stay after operation was 4 days and fracture union time was 9.57 weeks.There were 3 cases of varus angulation,2 cases of anterior angulation,and 4 cases of limb lengthening.Conclusion:Patients aged between 5 and 13 years treated with flexible intramedullary nail for closed femoral shaft fracture have rapid union and recovery,short rehabilitation period,less immobilization and psychological impact,and cost-effective.

  14. Titanium elastic nailing in pediatric femoral diaphyseal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Roop

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The need for operative fixation of pediatric femoral fractures is increasingly being recognised in the present decade. The conventional traction and casting method for management of pediatric femoral fractures is giving way for the operative stabilisation of the fracture. Methods : Thirty five pediatric patients in age group 6-14 years with diaphyseal femoral fractures were stabilised with two titanium nails. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for two years. The final results were evaluated using the criteria of Flynn et al. Technical problems and complications associated with the procedure were also analysed. Results : Overall results observed were excellent in 25, satisfactory in 8 and poor in 2 patients. Hospital time averaged 12.30 days in the series. All the fractures healed with an average time to union of 9.6 (6-14.4 weeks. Return to school was early with an average of 7.8 weeks. The soft tissue discomfort near the knee produced by the nails ends was the most common problem encountered. Shortening was observed in three cases and restriction of knee flexion in 5 patients. There was no delayed union, infection or refractures. Per operative technical problems included failure of closed reduction in 2 cases and cork screwing of nails in one case. Conclusion : We believe that with proper operative technique and aftercare TENs may prove to be an ideal implant for pediatric femoral fracture fixation. The most of the complication associated with the procedure are infact features of inexact technique and can be eliminated by strictly adhering to the basic principles and technical aspects.

  15. Prevalence of Some Human Enteroparasites in Commonly Consumed Raw Vegetables in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabre, Refaat M; Shakir, Abdelazim

    2016-04-01

    The problem of parasitic contamination of food, especially fresh vegetables, is not limited to personal hygiene during food preparation but is also widely dependent on the source of the food and the handling it undergoes before it gets to the consumer. The objective of the present study was to evaluate parasitic contamination in eight common raw vegetables in Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 400 samples of raw vegetables obtained from wholesale and retail markets were examined for helminth eggs and larvae and for cysts of different parasites, using standard methods. The prevalence of the parasites was 20.65% in cucumber, 15.76% in cabbage, 14.67% in pea, 14.13% in cress, 13.04% in lettuce, 10.33% in carrot, 8.70% in green onion, and 2.72% in tomato. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (P parasite cysts. Parasites are common in vegetables that are frequently eaten raw and, for this reason, may pose a health risk for consumers in Tabuk.

  16. A common currency for the computation of motivational values in the human striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yansong; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Reward comparison in the brain is thought to be achieved through the use of a ‘common currency’, implying that reward value representations are computed on a unique scale in the same brain regions regardless of the reward type. Although such a mechanism has been identified in the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum in the context of decision-making, it is less clear whether it similarly applies to non-choice situations. To answer this question, we scanned 38 participants with fMRI while they were presented with single cues predicting either monetary or erotic rewards, without the need to make a decision. The ventral striatum was the main brain structure to respond to both cues while showing increasing activity with increasing expected reward intensity. Most importantly, the relative response of the striatum to monetary vs erotic cues was correlated with the relative motivational value of these rewards as inferred from reaction times. Similar correlations were observed in a fronto-parietal network known to be involved in attentional focus and motor readiness. Together, our results suggest that striatal reward value signals not only obey to a common currency mechanism in the absence of choice but may also serve as an input to adjust motivated behaviour accordingly. PMID:24837478

  17. Cadaveric study: study of lateral circumflex femoral arterial origin in Rajkot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip Rameshbhai Chauhan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lateral circumflex femoral artery contributes cruciate, trochanteric and knee joint anastomosis. In addition Lateral circumflex femoral artery flaps are used for the reconstruction of large tissue loss in the head and neck region, aortopopliteal bypass, coronary artery bypass grafting and extracranial intracranial bypass surgery. This work was carried out (a to study the origin of lateral circumflex femoral artery and (b to measure and compare (between male and female the circumference at its origin. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 51 femoral triangles from 26 (18 male and 08 female human adult cadavers were dissected and studied at P.D.U. government medical college, Rajkot, Gujarat. Site of origin of lateral circumflex femoral artery was identified and noted. The distance of origin of the artery from the origin of profunda femoris artery was measured and noted. Circumference at the level of origin was measured and diameter was calculated. Collected data was analysed by standard statistical formulas with the help of Microsoft excel 2013 and Epi info 7TM software. Results: 90.19% lateral circumflex femoral arteries originated from the profunda femoris artery and remaining 9.81% from the femoral artery. The mean distance of origin of the artery from the origin of profunda femoris artery was 18.44 mm. Lateral circumflex femoral artery circumference and diameter were significantly different between male and female (95% confidence interval, P <0.05. Conclusion: In this presented study maximum distance of origin of the artery from the origin was 65 mm while minimum distance of origin was 6 mm. In addition difference in circumference of the artery was statistically significant. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(5.000: 1066-1069

  18. Human bocavirus infections are common in Beijing population indicated by sero-antibody prevalence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lin-qing; QIAN Yuan; ZHU Ru-nan; DENG Jie; WANG Fang; DONG Hui-jin; SUN Yu; LI Yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified human parvovirus that was originally detected in the respiratory secretions of children with respiratory infections. This study aimed to learn about the importance of HBoV infections by revealing the prevalence of serum antibodies against HBoV in Beijing population.Methods Two batches of serum specimens collected in different periods were tested by Western blotting for specific IgG against HBoV using recombinant VP2 as antigen.Results Out of 677 serum specimens collected during April 1996 to March 1997, 400 (59.1%) were positive and antibody positive rate for another batch of 141 serum specimens collected in August, 2005 from adults aged from 20 years to over 60 years was 78.7% (111/141). Comparison of the sero-prevalence profiles for serum specimens collected during 1996-1997 to those collected in 2005 indicated that the antibody positive rate for specimens collected in 2005 was higher than that of the corresponding age groups collected during 1996-1997.Conclusions The data suggest that HBoV has been circulating in Beijing population for at least over 10 years, and most of children had been exposed to HBoV by age of 7 years. Higher HBoV antibody positive rate shown in the serum specimens collected in 2005 suggested that infections by HBoV have been increased in Beijing population in recent years.

  19. Meralgia paresthetica and femoral acetabular impingement: a possible association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-12-11

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies.

  20. A new method to catheterize a femoral artery in mice using a nylon suture as a 'guide wire'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, S; Nawshiro, H; Wada, K; Shima, K; Hallenbeck, J M

    2001-09-01

    Mice are commonly used in laboratory experiments. Their femoral arteries are so tiny that catheterization is quite difficult. We describe a new method to catheterize the femoral artery in mice. The key feature of this new method is the use of a nylon suture as a 'guide wire'. The full catheterization system consists of two sizes of polyethylene tubes (PE-10, PE-50) and a 4-0 nylon suture. We have been able to repeatedly catheterize mouse femoral arteries (n = 57) successfully and easily with this new system. We believe that this new method can facilitate vascular catheterization in small animals such as mice.

  1. Mini-mesh repair for femoral hernia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kulacoglu, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    Femoral hernia consists only 4% of all primary groin hernias. It is described as "the Bête Noire of Hernias" because of its nature and anatomy which is difficult to understand for the surgeons and tendency to recurrence...

  2. Radiation-induced femoral head necrosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-25

    Mar 25, 2011 ... osteonecrosis of the femoral head, following radiotherapy for a squamous cell .... therapy, alcoholism, gout/hyperuricemia, and idiopathic osteonecrosis. ... 15 pediatric patients treated for cancer in a major pediatric oncology ...

  3. Herniography off femoral, obturator and perineal hernias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, O.; Nordblom, I.; Fork, F.T.; Gullmo, A.

    1985-08-01

    Positive contrast herniography was used in the workup of 550 patients with unclear groin pain. The majority of these patients had rather characteristic hernias of indirect, direct or femoral type. However, now and then diagnostic problems arose. A femoral hernia may look like a direct or even obturator hernia. There is also a variety of multilocular femoral hernias and other types. A femoral hernia may be present together with other hernias in the ipsilateral or contralateral groin. Obturator hernias are usually small but are always confined to the obturator canal laterally in the obturator foramen. Abnormalities in the pouch of Douglas may include a deep rectogenital pouch, diverticula and true herniations. These uncommon herniographic findings are described and discussed.

  4. Acute appendicitis in a femoral hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravković Darko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis in a femoral hernia is an uncommon condition that can be serious. Complications are more frequent if the diagnosis is delayed and surgery is not performed on time. CASE REPORT We present a 71-year-old man with a painful swollen mass. The patient presented with fatigue and loss of appetite, while body temperature was normal. The abdomen was not painful, and peristaltic was normal. All laboratory findings were normal. After anamnesis and physical examination, the presumed diagnosis was incarcerated femoral hernia and the patient was sent to the operating room. Intraoperative findings revealed an incarcerated femoral hernia within a phlegmonous inflammated appendix. Appendectomy and McVay hernioplastics were done. The postoperative course was without complications. CONCLUSION It is very important to bear in mind that right femoral hernia with signs of incarceration and inflammation may contain an acutely inflamed appendix. Delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis cause greater morbidity and mortality.

  5. Multiple bony lesions other than femoral heads on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scan in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Young; Yang, Seoung Oh; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Ryu, Jin Sook; Weon, Young Cheol; Shin, Myung Jin; Lee, Soo Ho; Lee, Hee Kyung [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Hae Kyung [St. Francisco Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of the multiple increased uptake lesions other than in femoral heads as seen on whole body bone scan in patients with avascular necrosis of femoral heads. One hundred and seventy three patients with clinical diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the emoral head underwent a bone scan using Tc-99m MDP. Increased uptake lesions other than in femoral heads were evaluated, including frequency and common sites of in volvement, and correlated with clinical information and plain radiographic findings. Two hundred patients without AVN, who had undergone a bone scan, were included as a control group. Increased uptake lesions in extrafemoral head locations were found in 36 of 173 patients(20.8%); the location of 79 lesions was other than the femoral head. This result is statistically different from patients without avascular necrosis of femoral head(p<0.0001). The most common site of involvement was the knee joint area(62.5%). Other lesions were located in the mid-shafts of the long bones of the lower extremities, calcaneus, proximal humerus, etc., in order of decreasing frequency. Plain radiographs of 17 lesions were nonspecific, except for three lesions showing definite changes associated with avascular necrosis. The risk factors included alcoholism, the prolonged use of steroids, renal transplantation, herbal medication and working as a working as deep-sea diver. Most patients did not complain of pain, except for two with irreversible osteonecrotic changes as seen on plain radiograph. in patients with avascular necrosis of the femur, increased uptake lesions other than in the femoral head as seen on bone scan, may represent the early stage of osteonecrosis, which shows a characteristic appearance on bone scan. In order to aveid possible misdiagnoses of multiple extrafemoral lesions as bony metastasis or traumatic lesions, in patients with avascular necrosis of the femur these should be carefully evaluated.

  6. Common corruption of the mTOR signaling network in human tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Suchithra; Manning, Brendan D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) is responsive to numerous extracellular and intracellular cues and, through the formation of two physically and functionally distinct complexes, plays a central role in the homeostatic control of cell growth, proliferation and survival. Through aberrant activation of mTOR signaling, the perception of cellular growth signals becomes disconnected from the processes promoting cell growth, and this underlies the pathophysiology of a number of genetic tumor syndromes and cancers. Here, we review the oncogenes and tumor suppressors comprising the regulatory network upstream of mTOR, highlight the human cancers in which mTOR is activated, and discuss how dysregulated mTOR signaling gives tumors a selective growth advantage. In addition, we discuss why activation of mTOR, as a consequence of distinct oncogenic events, results in diverse clinical outcomes, and how the complexity of the mTOR signaling network might dictate therapeutic approaches. PMID:19956179

  7. Catalytic deficiency of human aldolase B in hereditary fructose intolerance caused by a common missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, N C; Tolan, D R; Cox, T M

    1988-06-17

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a human autosomal recessive disease caused by a deficiency of aldolase B that results in an inability to metabolize fructose and related sugars. We report here the first identification of a molecular lesion in the aldolase B gene of an affected individual whose defective protein has previously been characterized. The mutation is a G----C transversion in exon 5 that creates a new recognition site for the restriction enzyme Ahall and results in an amino acid substitution (Ala----Pro) at position 149 of the protein within a region critical for substrate binding. Utilizing this novel restriction site and the polymerase chain reaction, the patient was shown to be homozygous for the mutation. Three other HFI patients from pedigrees unrelated to this individual were found to have the same mutation: two were homozygous and one was heterozygous. We suggest that this genetic lesion is a prevailing cause of hereditary fructose intolerance.

  8. Efficient expression and purification of a protease from the common cold virus, human rhinovirus type 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, L. E.-C.; Walker, P. A.; Porter, A. G.

    1992-08-01

    The protease (3C pro) from human rhinovirus serotype-14 (HRV-14) has been cloned and efficiently expressed in E. coli. A straightforward single-step purification of the recombinant 3C pro has been achieved by fusing the protein to the car☐y-terminus of the glutathione-S-transferase from Schistosoma japonicum. Modifications made to the 5' end of the PCR fragment coding for the 3C pro have allowed the specific cleavage of the fusion protein using thrombin to yield mature 3C pro with the correct amino-terminal amino acid. This protease has been shown to be active when assayed using synthetic peptides corresponding to the natural cleavage recognition sequences within the polyprotein. Other substrates are being developed for this protease for possible use in the screening of inhibitors of 3C pro. Sufficient protease 3C pro has been purified for initial attempts at crystallization.

  9. Profunda Anchor Technique for Ipsilateral Antegrade Approach in Endovascular Treatment of Superficial Femoral Artery Ostial Occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2015-04-15

    Endovascular treatment of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is challenging in the presence of flush ostial occlusion. One of the main challenges is the availability of access sites for intervention. Contralateral retrograde femoral access followed by cross-over and antegrade intervention while commonly used, may not be feasible in cases of altered iliac anatomy (e.g. kissing iliac stents). Ipsilateral antegrade intervention using common femoral artery (CFA) access in these instances while possible is typically challenging due to inadequate working length of the CFA for interrogation of the SFA ostium, compounded by the lack of sheath stability. The “profunda anchor” technique uses a buddy wire in the profunda femoris artery (PFA) to stabilize the sheath and allow catheter manipulation for antegrade intervention at the level of the SFA ostium. The PFA is further used as a conduit for deployment of closure device to avoid interference with the treated SFA.

  10. Deletion of ribosomal protein genes is a common vulnerability in human cancer, especially in concert with TP53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajore, Ram; Raiser, David; McConkey, Marie; Jöud, Magnus; Boidol, Bernd; Mar, Brenton; Saksena, Gordon; Weinstock, David M; Armstrong, Scott; Ellis, Steven R; Ebert, Benjamin L; Nilsson, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are associated with hematopoietic and developmental abnormalities, activation of p53, and altered risk of cancer in humans and model organisms. Here we performed a large-scale analysis of cancer genome data to examine the frequency and selective pressure of RPG lesions across human cancers. We found that hemizygous RPG deletions are common, occurring in about 43% of 10,744 cancer specimens and cell lines. Consistent with p53-dependent negative selection, such lesions are underrepresented in TP53-intact tumors (P ≪ 10(-10)), and shRNA-mediated knockdown of RPGs activated p53 in TP53-wild-type cells. In contrast, we did not see negative selection of RPG deletions in TP53-mutant tumors. RPGs are conserved with respect to homozygous deletions, and shRNA screening data from 174 cell lines demonstrate that further suppression of hemizygously deleted RPGs inhibits cell growth. Our results establish RPG haploinsufficiency as a strikingly common vulnerability of human cancers that associates with TP53 mutations and could be targetable therapeutically. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  11. THE COMMON HUMANE SHARING IN DIFFERENT MYTHOLOGIES OF THE LORD OF THE RINGS AND 1984

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Bülbül CANDAŞ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available John Ronald Reuel Tolkien's collection The Silmarillion, which is a utopic creation myth of Middle-earth, Valinor, Numenor and Beleriand, and his novel The Lord of the Rings, which is a saga taking place only in Middle-earth, seem to be completely irrelevant to George Orwell's dystopian world 1984 at first view but when they are examined in detail, two striking common points would be obvious that these myths support the idea of cultural variety's importance and they consist of a war against cultural dominance. In The Lord of the Rings, it is the battle and collaboration of cultures that makes sense in the mythological surrounding of the plot; the creatures come together to defend their cultural history against a single body; Sauron and the Orcs under his rule. As for 1984, the reader is presented with the struggle of a couple, Winston and Julia, to continue their cultural heritage against the dictatorship of Ingsoc which offers the society with an artificial and prototypical culture.

  12. A common genetic influence on human intensity ratings of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Zhu, Gu; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    The perception of sweetness varies among individuals but the sources of this variation are not fully understood. Here, in a sample of 1,901 adolescent and young adults (53.8% female; 243 MZ and 452 DZ twin pairs, 511 unpaired individuals; mean age 16.2±2.8, range 12–26 years), we studied the variation in the perception of sweetness intensity of two monosaccharides and two high-potency sweeteners: glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame. Perceived intensity for all sweeteners decreased with age (2–5% per year) and increased with the history of otitis media (6–9%). Males rated aspartame slightly stronger than females (7%). We found similar heritabilities for sugars (glucose: h2=0.31, fructose: h2=0.34) and high-potency sweeteners (NHDC: h2=0.31, aspartame: h2=0.30); all were in the modest range. Multivariate modeling showed that a common genetic factor accounted for >75% of the genetic variance in the four sweeteners, suggesting that individual differences in perceived sweet intensity, which are partly due to genetic factors, may be attributed to a single set of genes. This study provided evidence of the shared genetic pathways between the perception of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

  13. The Allelic Landscape of Human Blood Cell Trait Variation and Links to Common Complex Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, William J; Elding, Heather; Jiang, Tao; Allen, Dave; Ruklisa, Dace; Mann, Alice L; Mead, Daniel; Bouman, Heleen; Riveros-Mckay, Fernando; Kostadima, Myrto A; Lambourne, John J; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Downes, Kate; Kundu, Kousik; Bomba, Lorenzo; Berentsen, Kim; Bradley, John R; Daugherty, Louise C; Delaneau, Olivier; Freson, Kathleen; Garner, Stephen F; Grassi, Luigi; Guerrero, Jose; Haimel, Matthias; Janssen-Megens, Eva M; Kaan, Anita; Kamat, Mihir; Kim, Bowon; Mandoli, Amit; Marchini, Jonathan; Martens, Joost H A; Meacham, Stuart; Megy, Karyn; O'Connell, Jared; Petersen, Romina; Sharifi, Nilofar; Sheard, Simon M; Staley, James R; Tuna, Salih; van der Ent, Martijn; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Shuang-Yin; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wilder, Steven P; Iotchkova, Valentina; Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Kaptoge, Stephen; Kuijpers, Taco W; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Juan, David; Rico, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso; Chen, Lu; Ge, Bing; Vasquez, Louella; Kwan, Tony; Garrido-Martín, Diego; Watt, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Guigo, Roderic; Beck, Stephan; Paul, Dirk S; Pastinen, Tomi; Bujold, David; Bourque, Guillaume; Frontini, Mattia; Danesh, John; Roberts, David J; Ouwehand, Willem H; Butterworth, Adam S; Soranzo, Nicole

    2016-11-17

    Many common variants have been associated with hematological traits, but identification of causal genes and pathways has proven challenging. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the UK Biobank and INTERVAL studies, testing 29.5 million genetic variants for association with 36 red cell, white cell, and platelet properties in 173,480 European-ancestry participants. This effort yielded hundreds of low frequency (<5%) and rare (<1%) variants with a strong impact on blood cell phenotypes. Our data highlight general properties of the allelic architecture of complex traits, including the proportion of the heritable component of each blood trait explained by the polygenic signal across different genome regulatory domains. Finally, through Mendelian randomization, we provide evidence of shared genetic pathways linking blood cell indices with complex pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, schizophrenia, and coronary heart disease and evidence suggesting previously reported population associations between blood cell indices and cardiovascular disease may be non-causal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Andrographolide: antibacterial activity against common bacteria of human health concern and possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-01-17

    Increasing bacterial resistance to common drugs is a major public health concern for the treatment of infectious diseases. Certain naturally occurring compounds of plant sources have long been reported to possess potential antimicrobial activity. This study was aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity and possible mechanism of action of andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone from a traditional medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. Extent of antibacterial action was assessed by minimal bactericidal concentration method. Radiolabeled N-acetyl glucosamine, leucine, thymidine, and uridine were used to determine the effect of Andro on the biosyntheses of cell wall, protein, DNA, and RNA, respectively. In addition, anti-biofilm potential of this compound was also tested. Andro showed potential antibacterial activity against most of the tested Gram-positive bacteria. Among those, Staphylococcus aureus was found to be most sensitive with a minimal inhibitory concentration value of 100 μg/mL. It was found to be bacteriostatic. Specific inhibition of intracellular DNA biosynthesis was observed in a dose-dependent manner in S. aureus. Andro mediated inhibition of biofilm formation by S. aureus was also found. Considering its antimicrobial potency, Andro might be accounted as a promising lead for new antibacterial drug development.

  15. Experimental animal models of osteonecrosis of the femoral head:classification and experimental applications%股骨头坏死实验动物模型:分类与实验应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王懋; 张长青

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:So far there is not an ideal animal model for clinical research of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, which hinders its development. OBJECTIVE:To compare the merits and characteristics of different methods and various animal models, and to provide a reference for selection of models of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. METHODS:Literature search was performed in databases of PubMed, EMBASE, Wanfang, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, published from 2006 to 2014 by computers. The key words were“Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head, Animal model, Vivo Experiment, Legg Calve Perthes disease, Osteoarthritis, Col apse of the Femoral Head, Trauma, Corticosteroid, Alcohol, Liquid Nitrogen”in English and Chinese, respectively. Final y, 48 articles were included. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head models simulates the most common clinical type, which is more effective in Legg Calve Perthes disease. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head models is more suitable for etiology, pathology and comprehensive research. Physical osteonecrosis of the femoral head models could be used for evaluating treatment methods, such as surgery. The ideal animal models should be similar with human in anatomy, histology and biomechanics;pathology, pathophysiology, and radiographic progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can simulate the whole process of human osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and it is easy to be obtained, cost-effective and good repeatable.%背景:迄今没有一种理想的动物模型用于股骨头坏死相关研究,是其研究进展缓慢的一个重要原因。目的:比较各种方式及各种动物造模的优劣及特点,为股骨头坏死的研究模型选择提供参考。方法:应用计算机检索2006至2014年PubMed 数据库、EMBASE数据库、万方数据知识服务平台、CNKI中国期刊全文数据库,英文检索词“Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

  16. Femoral nerve entrapment: a new insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, M T; Murillo, J; Maranillo, E; Parkin, I G; Sanudo, J

    2007-03-01

    Compression of the femoral nerve in the iliac fossa has been reported as a consequence of several pathologies, but never as a result of muscular compression. Aberrant slips of iliacus, however, have occasionally been reported to cover or split the femoral nerve. This study aimed to assess such variations as potential factors in femoral nerve compression. A large and homogeneous sample of 121 embalmed cadavers (242 specimens) was studied. Statistical comparisons were made using the chi-squared test. Muscular slips from iliacus and psoas, piercing or covering the femoral nerve, were found in 19 specimens (7.9%). No significant differences by sex or side were found. The more frequent variation was piercing of the femoral nerve by a muscular slip (17 specimens, 7.0%). The nerve then entered the thigh as one or more branches. The less frequent variation found was a muscular slip or sheet covering the femoral nerve as it lay on iliacus (2 specimens, 0.8%). Each disposition may be a potential risk for nerve entrapment.

  17. Common cortical responses evoked by appearance, disappearance and change of the human face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kida Tetsuo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To segregate luminance-related, face-related and non-specific components involved in spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical activations to a face stimulus, we recorded cortical responses to face appearance (Onset, disappearance (Offset, and change (Change using magnetoencephalography. Results Activity in and around the primary visual cortex (V1/V2 showed luminance-dependent behavior. Any of the three events evoked activity in the middle occipital gyrus (MOG at 150 ms and temporo-parietal junction (TPJ at 250 ms after the onset of each event. Onset and Change activated the fusiform gyrus (FG, while Offset did not. This FG activation showed a triphasic waveform, consistent with results of intracranial recordings in humans. Conclusion Analysis employed in this study successfully segregated four different elements involved in the spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical activations in response to a face stimulus. The results show the responses of MOG and TPJ to be associated with non-specific processes, such as the detection of abrupt changes or exogenous attention. Activity in FG corresponds to a face-specific response recorded by intracranial studies, and that in V1/V2 is related to a change in luminance.

  18. Common Genetic Variant in VIT Is Associated with Human Brain Asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Sayed H; Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Kahali, Pegah; Ansari Dezfouli, Mitra; Abbassian, Abdolhossein

    2016-01-01

    Brain asymmetry varies across individuals. However, genetic factors contributing to this normal variation are largely unknown. Here we studied variation of cortical surface area asymmetry in a large sample of subjects. We performed principal component analysis (PCA) to capture correlated asymmetry variation across cortical regions. We found that caudal and rostral anterior cingulate together account for a substantial part of asymmetry variation among individuals. To find SNPs associated with this subset of brain asymmetry variation we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in an independent cohort. We identified one SNP (rs11691187) that had genome-wide significant association (P Combined = 2.40e-08). The rs11691187 is in the first intron of VIT. In a follow-up analysis, we found that VIT gene expression is associated with brain asymmetry in six donors of the Allen Human Brain Atlas. Based on these findings we suggest that VIT contributes to normal brain asymmetry variation. Our results can shed light on disorders associated with altered brain asymmetry.

  19. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways.

  20. A method to quantify and visualize femoral head intraosseous arteries by micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xing; Shi, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Jun; Xu, Dachuan; Zhao, Dewei

    2016-08-01

    We describe a technique for perfusing a barium sulphate suspension into the intraosseous artery. Following the perfusion of abarium sulphate suspension into 14 fresh lower limbs of Chinese cadavers, micro-CT scanning was applied to digitize, quantify and visualize the intraosseous arteries in the human femoral heads. Then, the femoral heads were removed and subjected to micro-CT scanning. The data were imported into the amira and mimics programs to reconstruct and quantify the intraosseous arteries. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas, volumes, and femoral head bone volumes were quantified. The artery densities and artery ratios were calculated and analysed with independent-samples t-tests. The intraosseous vasculature volume renderings were displayed as screenshots and videos made with amira. Many intraosseous artery study technologies were compared. The barium sulphate suspension was milky white in colour. The perfusion of the barium sulphate suspension followed by micro-CT scanning provided a good representation of the intraosseous artery. The femoral head intraosseous artery lengths, areas and volumes, and the femoral head bone volumes were displayed as the X¯±S . No differences were observed between the left and right femoral head intraosseous arteries in terms of the artery densities or artery ratios. The volume renderings and 3-D orthogonal projections displayed the overall distributions of the intraosseous arteries. The videos clearly demonstrated the entry sites of the nutrition-carrying arteries, their courses and branches, and the intraosseous arterial anastomoses. Our technique is the simplest and least time-consuming method of producing accurate vascular three-dimensional reconstructions. The perfusion of a barium sulphate suspension into intraosseous arteries combined with micro-CT scanning can deliver high-resolution 3-D digitized data and images of intraosseous arteries. This technique does not require bone decalcification or bone

  1. Altered aquaporin-4 expression in human muscular dystrophies: a common feature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigeri, Antonio; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Repetto, Silvia; Bado, Massimo; Minetti, Carlo; Svelto, Maria

    2002-07-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive lethal muscle disease that affects young boys. Dystrophin, absent in DMD and reduced in the milder form Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD), binds to several membrane-associated proteins known as dystrophin-associated proteins (DAPs). Once this critical structural link is disrupted, muscle fibers become more vulnerable to mechanical and osmotic stress. Recently, we have reported that the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water-selective channel expressed in the sarcolemma of fast-twitch fibers and astrocyte end-feet, is drastically reduced in the muscle and brain of the mdx mouse, the animal model of DMD. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of AQP4 in several DMD/BMD patients of different ages with different mutations in the dystrophin gene. Immunofluorescence results indicate that, compared with healthy control children, AQP4 is reduced severely in all the DMD muscular biopsies analyzed and in 50% of the analyzed BMD. Western blot analysis revealed that the deficiency in sarcolemma AQP4 staining is due to a reduction in total AQP4 muscle protein content rather than to changes in immunoreactivity. Double-immunostaining experiments indicate that AQP4 reduction is independent of changes in the fiber myosin heavy chain composition. AQP4 and a-syntrophin analysis of BMD muscular biopsies revealed that the expression and stability of AQP4 in the sarcolemma does not always decrease when a-syntrophin is strongly reduced. Finally, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy biopsies and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy revealed that AQP4 expression was not altered in these forms of muscular dystrophy. These experiments provide the first evidence of AQP4 reduction in a human pathology and show that this deficiency is an important feature of DMD/BMD.

  2. A common allele in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) impacts prosocial temperament and human hypothalamic-limbic structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, Heike; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Hakimi, Shabnam; Lemaitre, Herve; Verchinski, Beth A; Mattay, Venkata S; Weinberger, Daniel R; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2010-08-03

    The evolutionarily highly conserved neuropeptide oxytocin is a key mediator of social and emotional behavior in mammals, including humans. A common variant (rs53576) in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been implicated in social-behavioral phenotypes, such as maternal sensitivity and empathy, and with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with social impairment, but the intermediate neural mechanisms are unknown. Here, we used multimodal neuroimaging in a large sample of healthy human subjects to identify structural and functional alterations in OXTR risk allele carriers and their link to temperament. Activation and interregional coupling of the amygdala during the processing of emotionally salient social cues was significantly affected by genotype. In addition, evidence for structural alterations in key oxytocinergic regions emerged, particularly in the hypothalamus. These neural characteristics predicted lower levels of reward dependence, specifically in male risk allele carriers. Our findings identify sex-dependent mechanisms impacting the structure and function of hypothalamic-limbic circuits that are of potential clinical and translational significance.

  3. Assisted reproductive technologies in the common marmoset: an integral species for developing nonhuman primate models of human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Jenna; Di Marzo, Andrea; Golos, Thaddeus

    2017-02-01

    Generation of nonhuman primate models of human disease conditions will foster the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Callithrix jacchus, or the common marmoset, is a New World, nonhuman primate species that exhibits great reproductive fitness in captivity with an ovarian cycle that can be easily managed with pharmacological agents. This characteristic, among others, provides an opportunity to employ assisted reproductive technologies to generate embryos that can be genetically manipulated to create a variety of nonhuman primate models for human disease. Here, we review methods to synchronize the marmoset ovarian cycle and stimulate oocyte donors, and compare various protocols for in vitro production of embryos. In light of advances in genomic editing, recent approaches used to generate transgenic or genetically edited embryos in the marmoset and also future perspective are reviewed.

  4. Human embryonic stem cells and metastatic colorectal cancer cells shared the common endogenous human microRNA-26b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Feng; Moyer, Mary Pat; Yang, Jian-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Peng, Jia-Yuan; Chen, Hong-Qi; Zhou, Yu-Kun; Liu, Wei-Jie; Qin, Huan-Long

    2011-09-01

    The increase in proliferation and the lack of differentiation of cancer cells resemble what occur in the embryonic stem cells during physiological process of embryogenesis. There are also striking similarities in the behaviour between the invasive placental cells and invasive cancer cells. In the present study, microarrays were used to analyse the global expression of microRNAs in a human embryonic stem cell line (i.e. HUES-17) and four colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (i.e. LoVo, SW480, HT29 and Caco-2) with different metastatic potentialities. Only the expression of miR-26b was significant decreased in HUES-17s and LoVo cells, compared with other three cell lines (P cell growth and the induction of apoptosis in LoVo cells in vitro, and the inhibition of tumour growth in vivo. Moreover, the potential targets of miR-26b was predicted by using bioinformatics, and then the predicted target genes were further validated by comparing gene expression profiles between LoVo and NCM460 cell lines. Four genes (TAF12, PTP4A1, CHFR and ALS2CR2) with intersection were found to be the targets of miR-26b. MetaCore network analysis further showed that the regulatory pathways of miR-26b were significantly associated with the invasiveness and metastasis of CRC cells. These data suggest that miR-26b might serve as a novel prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target for CRC.

  5. A pilot study on the feasibility of European harmonized human biomonitoring: Strategies towards a common approach, challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteleyn, L., E-mail: Ludwine.Casteleyn@med.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven (Belgium); Dumez, B. [KU Leuven (Belgium); Becker, K.; Kolossa-Gehring, M. [Federal Environment Agency (UBA) (Germany); Den Hond, E.; Schoeters, G. [VITO (Belgium); Castaño, A. [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Koch, H.M.; Angerer, J. [Ruhr Universität Bochum (Germany); Esteban, M. [Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Exley, K.; Sepai, O. [Public Health England (United Kingdom); Bloemen, L. [Environmental Health Sciences International (Netherlands); Horvat, M. [Jožef Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Knudsen, L.E. [Kobenhavns Universitet (Denmark); Joas, A.; Joas, R. [BiPRO (Germany); Biot, P. [Federal Public Service Health, Food chain safety and Environment (Belgium); Koppen, G. [VITO (Belgium); Dewolf, M-C. [Hainaut Vigilance Sanitaire (HVS) and Hygiene Publique in Hainaut (HPH) (Belgium); and others

    2015-08-15

    In 2004 the European Commission and Member States initiated activities towards a harmonized approach for Human Biomonitoring surveys throughout Europe. The main objective was to sustain environmental health policy by building a coherent and sustainable framework and by increasing the comparability of data across countries. A pilot study to test common guidelines for setting up surveys was considered a key step in this process. Through a bottom-up approach that included all stakeholders, a joint study protocol was elaborated. From September 2011 till February 2012, 17 European countries collected data from 1844 mother–child pairs in the frame of DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (DEMOCOPHES). Mercury in hair and urinary cadmium and cotinine were selected as biomarkers of exposure covered by sufficient analytical experience. Phthalate metabolites and Bisphenol A in urine were added to take into account increasing public and political awareness for emerging types of contaminants and to test less advanced markers/markers covered by less analytical experience. Extensive efforts towards chemo-analytical comparability were included. The pilot study showed that common approaches can be found in a context of considerable differences with respect to experience and expertize, socio-cultural background, economic situation and national priorities. It also evidenced that comparable Human Biomonitoring results can be obtained in such context. A European network was built, exchanging information, expertize and experiences, and providing training on all aspects of a survey. A key challenge was finding the right balance between a rigid structure allowing maximal comparability and a flexible approach increasing feasibility and capacity building. Next steps in European harmonization in Human Biomonitoring surveys include the establishment of a joint process for prioritization of substances to cover and biomarkers to develop

  6. Preinguinal Splitting and Reunion of Femoral Nerve Entrapping the Fleshy Fibres of Iliacus Muscle - A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwini, L S; Somayaji, S Nagabhooshana; Rao, Mohandas; Marpalli, Sapna

    2017-04-01

    Division of nerves close to their origin and muscular entrapments by nerves in the limbs is not very common. Femoral nerve is the largest branch of the lumbar plexus and arises from dorsal divisions of ventral rami of L2 to L4 spinal nerves. During routine cadaveric dissection for first year medical students at Melaka Manipal Medical College (Manipal Campus), Karnataka, India, we observed a variation in the division and course of left femoral nerve in about 65-year-old male cadaver. The femoral nerve was split into two divisions above the inguinal ligament after its origin from the lumbar plexus. The lower division of the nerve passed deep to the iliopsoas muscle fibres and the upper division ran superficial to iliacus muscle deep to fascia iliaca. Both the divisions joined just above the inguinal ligament to form the trunk of the femoral nerve. Further course and distribution of the nerve was normal. The reports have shown that compression neuropathies of femoral nerve in the limbs are caused by neoplastic masses, vascular abnormalities and also by different anomalous muscles. Such neuropathies may also result from indirect compression of femoral nerve between the fibres of psoas major muscle and lateral pelvic wall. The potential clinical importance of above mentioned variations in the division of femoral nerve would emphasize the surgeons to diagnose the neuromuscular entrapments and consequent alterations of sensation in the anterior and medial aspects of the thigh.

  7. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  8. Comparison of femoral morphology and bone mineral density between femoral neck fractures and trochanteric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuki; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Saito, Masanobu; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2011-03-01

    Many studies that analyzed bone mineral density (BMD) and skeletal factors of hip fractures were based on uncalibrated radiographs or dual-energy xray absorptiometry (DXA). Spatial accuracy in measuring BMD and morphologic features of the femur with DXA is limited. This study investigated differences in BMD and morphologic features of the femur between two types of hip fractures using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Forty patients with hip fractures with normal contralateral hips were selected for this study between 2003 and 2007 (trochanteric fracture, n=18; femoral neck fracture, n=22). Each patient underwent QCT of the bilateral femora using a calibration phantom. Using images of the intact contralateral femur, BMD measurements were made at the point of minimum femoral-neck cross-sectional area, middle of the intertrochanteric region, and center of the femoral head. QCT images also were used to measure morphologic features of the hip, including hip axis length, femoral neck axis length, neck-shaft angle, neck width, head offset, anteversion of the femoral neck, and cortical index at the femoral isthmus. No significant differences were found in trabecular BMD between groups in those three regions. Patients with trochanteric fractures showed a smaller neck shaft angle and smaller cortical index at the femoral canal isthmus compared with patients with femoral neck fractures. We conclude that severe osteoporosis with thinner cortical bone of the femoral diaphysis is seen more often in patients with trochanteric fracture than in patients with femoral neck fracture. Level IV, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. First clinical experience with Celt ACD(®) : a femoral arterial puncture closure device.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jan, Aftab

    2013-08-01

    This prospective nonrandomized study compared the safety and efficacy of a novel arterial closure device (ACD) in common femoral artery procedures to that of the FDA submitted historical manual pressure control group, who underwent either a diagnostic angiogram (DA) or a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedure.

  10. e-Human Grid Ecology - understanding and approaching the inverse tragedy of the commons in the e-Grid society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Tobias A; Baumgärtner, Volkmar; de Zeeuw, Luc V; Grosveld, Frank G; Egger, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    With ever-new technologies emerging also the amount of information to be stored and processed is growing exponentially and is believed to be always at the limit. In contrast, however, huge resources are available in the IT sector alike e.g. the renewable energy sector, which are often even not at all used. This under-usage bares any rational especially in the IT sector where e.g. virtualisation and grid approaches could be fast implemented due to the great technical and fast turnover opportunities. Here, we describe this obvious paradox for the first time as the Inverse Tragedy of the Commons, in contrast to the Classical Tragedy of the Commons where resources are overexploited. From this perspective the grid IT sector attempting to share resources for better efficiency, reveals two challenges leading to the heart of the paradox: i) From a macro perspective all grid infrastructures involve not only mere technical solutions but also dominantly all of the autopoietic social sub-systems ranging from religion to policy. ii) On the micro level the individual players and their psychology and risk behaviour are of major importance for acting within the macro autopoietic framework. Thus, the challenges of grid implementation are similar to those of e.g. climate protection. This is well described by the classic Human Ecology triangle and our extension to a rectangle: invironment-individual-society-environment. Extension of this classical interdisciplinary field of basic and applied research to an e-Human Grid Ecology rational, allows the Inverse Tragedy of the Commons of the grid sector to be understood and approached better and implies obvious guidelines in the day-to-day management for grid and other (networked) resources, which is of importance for many fields with similar paradoxes as in (e-)society.

  11. Increased frequency of white matter lesions in patients with osteonecrosis (WMLeOn) of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M. E-mail: gmhadji@med.uth.gr; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Zibis, Aristidis; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Aggelakis, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Malizos, Konstantinos

    2004-06-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are commonly seen in cerebral MR imaging in normal and demented elderly people or young people suffering from migraine. We present data showing that WML are detected in an unexpectedly high frequency (56.9%) in patients with non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head compared to age and sex-matched controls. We designated the coexistence of WML and osteonecrosis as white matter lesions in osteonecrosis (WMLeON). We examined the possible association of WMLeON with hyperlipidaemia and other risk factors for WML or osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The frequency of history of corticosteroid treatment was statistically lower in patients with WMLeON (58.6%) compared to those without it (90.1%) (P=0.03). We found no association of WMLeON with diabetes, stroke, hyperlipidaemia, migraine, smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, or systemic lupus erythematosus. Although, the clinical significance of WMLeON is still unknown, this finding supports, at least, the hypothesis that non-traumatic osteonecrosis is indeed a multisystem disorder rather than a disease of human skeleton.

  12. [Injury of femoral artery complicated with infection from injection of heroine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Li, L; Zhao, H

    1998-11-01

    Drug addiction has been one of the serious social problems. The peripheral phlebitis caused by drug injection is common, but the occurrence of pseudoaneurysm with infection of femoral artery from injection injury was rarely reported in China. From January 1995 to March 1996, six cases of injury of femoral artery with infection from heroine injection were admitted. The characteristics of the injury were described. The therapeutic measures and details of attention to be needed were discussed. It was concluded that this type of injury was different from the injury caused in agricultural, industrial or traffic accidents. The treatment of choice depended upon the type of injury.

  13. Aneurysmal femoral neck cyst: Report of a paediatric case and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumar Ndour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC is a benign tumour of children and young adults. It represents approximately 1-2% of all bone tumours. The ABC may develop on all skeletal bones, but the proximal end of the femur is the most common location. The authors report a ABC femoral neck in a child of 13 years. This location is pretty special. Indeed, the fragility of the femoral neck due partly to the pathology itself and secondarily curettage requires a judicious attitude surgical (excisional curettage + bone graft + screw to prevent the risk of high local recurrence and pathological fracture.

  14. Fluoroscopically-guided micropuncture femoral artery access for large-caliber sheath insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Feldman, Ted; Salinger, Michael H; Levisay, Justin; Turi, Zoltan G

    2011-04-01

    Over the last decade, significant developments have been made in the treatment of structural heart disease. Some of these techniques require placement of large arterial sheaths for device delivery. Optimal vascular access is essential for successful large-vessel sheath insertion as well as to avoid vascular complications. The critical step for ideal percutaneous vessel entry is single anterior wall-only puncture of the common femoral artery in a location above the femoral bifurcation and below the inguinal ligament. We describe a fluoroscopically-guided micropuncture technique for accurate placement of large-caliber arterial sheaths.

  15. Pseudoarthrosis in atypical femoral fracture: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, S; Bottai, V; Dell'Osso, G; De Paola, G; Ghilardi, M; Guido, G

    2013-11-01

    Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment; they have a high frequency of delayed healing. The authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy. Atypical femoral fractures can be subsequent to a long-term biphosphonates treatment even if, in the literature, there is no clarity on the exact pathogenetic mechanism. The Task Force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research described the major and minor features to define atypical fractures and recommends that all the five major features must be present while minor features are not necessary. Another controversial aspect regarding the atypical femoral fractures is the higher frequency of the delayed healing that can be probably related to a suppressed bone turnover caused by a prolonged period of bisphosphonates treatment. This concept could be corroborated by the Spet Tc exam. In the case of a pseudoarthrosis, there is not a standardization of the treatment. In this report, the authors describe a femoral pseudoarthrosis of an atypical fracture treated with intramedullary nailing in a female after prolonged alendronate therapy; the patient was studied with clinical, bioumoral end SPECT-Tc exam of both femurs. Many studies show the relationship between bisphosphonates and the presence of atypical fractures. These fractures should be monitored more closely due to the risk of nonunion and they require considering an initial treatment with pharmacological augmentation to reduce the complications for the patient and the health care costs.

  16. Leptospira Serovars for Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in Humans and Animals in Africa: Common Leptospira Isolates and Reservoir Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgode, Georgies F; Machang'u, Robert S; Mhamphi, Ginethon G; Katakweba, Abdul; Mulungu, Loth S; Durnez, Lies; Leirs, Herwig; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Belmain, Steven R

    2015-12-01

    The burden of leptospirosis in humans and animals in Africa is higher than that reported from other parts of the world. However, the disease is not routinely diagnosed in the continent. One of major factors limiting diagnosis is the poor availability of live isolates of locally circulating Leptospira serovars for inclusion in the antigen panel of the gold standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for detecting antibodies against leptospirosis. To gain insight in Leptospira serovars and their natural hosts occurring in Tanzania, concomitantly enabling the improvement of the MAT by inclusion of fresh local isolates, a total of 52 Leptospira isolates were obtained from fresh urine and kidney homogenates, collected between 1996 and 2006 from small mammals, cattle and pigs. Isolates were identified by serogrouping, cross agglutination absorption test (CAAT), and molecular typing. Common Leptospira serovars with their respective animal hosts were: Sokoine (cattle and rodents); Kenya (rodents and shrews); Mwogolo (rodents); Lora (rodents); Qunjian (rodent); serogroup Grippotyphosa (cattle); and an unknown serogroup from pigs. Inclusion of local serovars particularly serovar Sokoine in MAT revealed a 10-fold increase in leptospirosis prevalence in Tanzania from 1.9% to 16.9% in rodents and 0.26% to 10.75% in humans. This indicates that local serovars are useful for diagnosis of human and animal leptospirosis in Tanzania and other African countries.

  17. Leptospira Serovars for Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in Humans and Animals in Africa: Common Leptospira Isolates and Reservoir Hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgies F Mgode

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The burden of leptospirosis in humans and animals in Africa is higher than that reported from other parts of the world. However, the disease is not routinely diagnosed in the continent. One of major factors limiting diagnosis is the poor availability of live isolates of locally circulating Leptospira serovars for inclusion in the antigen panel of the gold standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT for detecting antibodies against leptospirosis. To gain insight in Leptospira serovars and their natural hosts occurring in Tanzania, concomitantly enabling the improvement of the MAT by inclusion of fresh local isolates, a total of 52 Leptospira isolates were obtained from fresh urine and kidney homogenates, collected between 1996 and 2006 from small mammals, cattle and pigs. Isolates were identified by serogrouping, cross agglutination absorption test (CAAT, and molecular typing. Common Leptospira serovars with their respective animal hosts were: Sokoine (cattle and rodents; Kenya (rodents and shrews; Mwogolo (rodents; Lora (rodents; Qunjian (rodent; serogroup Grippotyphosa (cattle; and an unknown serogroup from pigs. Inclusion of local serovars particularly serovar Sokoine in MAT revealed a 10-fold increase in leptospirosis prevalence in Tanzania from 1.9% to 16.9% in rodents and 0.26% to 10.75% in humans. This indicates that local serovars are useful for diagnosis of human and animal leptospirosis in Tanzania and other African countries.

  18. Leptospira Serovars for Diagnosis of Leptospirosis in Humans and Animals in Africa: Common Leptospira Isolates and Reservoir Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgode, Georgies F.; Machang’u, Robert S.; Mhamphi, Ginethon G.; Katakweba, Abdul; Mulungu, Loth S.; Durnez, Lies; Leirs, Herwig; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Belmain, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of leptospirosis in humans and animals in Africa is higher than that reported from other parts of the world. However, the disease is not routinely diagnosed in the continent. One of major factors limiting diagnosis is the poor availability of live isolates of locally circulating Leptospira serovars for inclusion in the antigen panel of the gold standard microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for detecting antibodies against leptospirosis. To gain insight in Leptospira serovars and their natural hosts occurring in Tanzania, concomitantly enabling the improvement of the MAT by inclusion of fresh local isolates, a total of 52 Leptospira isolates were obtained from fresh urine and kidney homogenates, collected between 1996 and 2006 from small mammals, cattle and pigs. Isolates were identified by serogrouping, cross agglutination absorption test (CAAT), and molecular typing. Common Leptospira serovars with their respective animal hosts were: Sokoine (cattle and rodents); Kenya (rodents and shrews); Mwogolo (rodents); Lora (rodents); Qunjian (rodent); serogroup Grippotyphosa (cattle); and an unknown serogroup from pigs. Inclusion of local serovars particularly serovar Sokoine in MAT revealed a 10-fold increase in leptospirosis prevalence in Tanzania from 1.9% to 16.9% in rodents and 0.26% to 10.75% in humans. This indicates that local serovars are useful for diagnosis of human and animal leptospirosis in Tanzania and other African countries. PMID:26624890

  19. Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Trygve E; Roddey, J Cooper; Djurovic, Srdjan; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Casey, B J; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Gruen, Jeffrey R; Jernigan, Terry L; Kaufmann, Walter E; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David N; Kuperman, Joshua M; Murray, Sarah S; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Rimol, Lars M; Mattingsdal, Morten; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Schork, Nicholas J; Dale, Anders M; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q; Toga, Arthur W; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C; Saykin, Andrew J; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Cairns, Nigel J; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J Q; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M Y; Korecka, Magdalena; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L; Lord, Joanne L; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S; Bell, Karen L; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Coleman, R Edward; Arnold, Steven E; Karlawish, Jason H; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M; Porsteinsson, Anton P; Goldstein, Bonnie S; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M; Ismail, M Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J; Cellar, Janet S; Burns, Jeffrey M; Anderson, Heather S; Swerdlow, Russell H; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H S; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H; Carson, Richard E; MacAvoy, Martha G; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Ging-Yuek; Hsiung, Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Potkin, Steven G; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B; Schwartz, Eben S; Sink, Kaycee M; Williamson, Jeff D; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabether; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Jernigan, Terry; McCabe, Connor; Grant, Ellen; Ernst, Thomas; Kuperman, Josh; Chung, Yoon; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Darst, Burcu; Pritchett, Lexi; Saito, Ashley; Amaral, David; DiNino, Mishaela; Eyngorina, Bella; Sowell, Elizabeth; Houston, Suzanne; Soderberg, Lindsay; Kaufmann, Walter; van Zijl, Peter; Rizzo-Busack, Hilda; Javid, Mohsin; Mehta, Natasha; Ruberry, Erika; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Gebhard, Nitzah; Manigan, Holly; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Yakutis, Lauren; Hill, Michael; Gruen, Jeffrey; Bosson-Heenan, Joan; Carlson, Heatherly

    2012-03-06

    Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.

  20. Fusarium ramigenum, a novel human opportunist in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency and cellular immune defects: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroti, Ruxandra V; Gheorghita, Valeriu; Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meis, Jacques F; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-02-15

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous environmental fungi that occasionally provoke serious invasive infections in immunocompromised hosts. Among Fusarium species, Fusarium ramigenum, belonging to the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex, has thus far never been found to cause human infections. Here we describe the first case of invasive fusariosis caused by Fusarium ramigenum in a human and also identify immunological deficiencies that most likely contributed to invasiveness. A 32-year-old Caucasian male with a seemingly insignificant medical history of mild respiratory illness during the preceding two years, developed invasive pulmonary fusariosis. Detailed immunological assessment revealed the presence of common variable immunodeficiency, complicated by a severe impairment of the capacity of T-cells to produce both gamma-interferon and interleukin-17. In-depth microbiological assessment identified the novel human opportunistic pathogen Fusarium ramigenum as cause of the infection. This report demonstrated that an opportunistic invasive fungal infection may indicate an underlying cellular immune impairment of the host. The unexpected invasive infection with Fusarium ramigenum in this case unmasked a complex combined humoral and cellular immunological deficiency.

  1. Appendiceal pus in a hernia sac simulating strangulated femoral hernia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Tien-Fa; Chou, Yenn-Hwei

    2011-03-23

    Acute appendicitis involving the hernia sac is infrequent but well-documented in medical literature. In most instances, it occurs within the right inguinal (Amyand's hernia) or right femoral hernia (de Garengeot hernia). The diagnosis is always mistaken for incarcerated groin hernia. During surgery, the appendix itself, either perforated or strangulated, is most commonly encountered within the hernia sac. In very rare occasions, only appendiceal pus is found in the hernia sac. In this paper, we report the case of a 90-year-old woman with acute appendicitis and a tender mass in the right groin. Typical findings of acute appendicitis by computed tomography (CT) and incarcerated femoral hernia with groin cellulitis misled us into preoperative diagnosis of strangulated femoral hernia. Acute phlegmonous inflammation of the incarcerated femoral hernia sac containing pus only and acute suppurative appendicitis were found intraoperatively. This case presents a rare complication of acute appendicitis and the first report of CT-documented appendiceal pus-contained femoral hernia. Knowledge of this rare condition is helpful in establishing preoperative diagnosis and patient management decisions.

  2. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Femoral Hernia; Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Akrami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Femoral hernias account for 2% to 4% of groin hernias, are more common in women, and are more appropriate to present with strangulation and require emergency surgery.This condition may lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction or strangulation and possible bowel resection-anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is few reports of strangulated femoral hernia.We herein present an 82-year-old lady who presented with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On examination, the patient had a generalized tenderness and distention. The working diagnosis at this time was a bowel obstruction. A computed tomography scan revealed the hernia occurring medial to the femoral vessels and below the inguinal ligament .Laparotomy was performed and patient was treated successfully with surgical therapy.Herniawas repaired and a small bowel resection was performed with end to end anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was doing well at a 12-month follow-up visit. Obstructing femoral hernia of the small bowel is rare and the physician should suspect femoral hernia as a bowel obstruction cause.

  3. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Femoral Hernia; Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Majid; Karami, MohamamdYasin; Zangouri, Vahid; Deilami, Iman; Maalhagh, Mehrnoush

    2016-01-01

    Femoral hernias account for 2% to 4% of groin hernias, are more common in women, and are more appropriate to present with strangulation and require emergency surgery.This condition may lead to symptoms of bowel obstruction or strangulation and possible bowel resection-anastomosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is few reports of strangulated femoral hernia.We herein present an 82-year-old lady who presented with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. On examination, the patient had a generalized tenderness and distention. The working diagnosis at this time was a bowel obstruction. A computed tomography scan revealed the hernia occurring medial to the femoral vessels and below the inguinal ligament .Laparotomy was performed and patient was treated successfully with surgical therapy.Herniawas repaired and a small bowel resection was performed with end to end anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was doing well at a 12-month follow-up visit. Obstructing femoral hernia of the small bowel is rare and the physician should suspect femoral hernia as a bowel obstruction cause.

  4. Survivorship and Complications of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty with a Mid-Modular Femoral Stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesgo, Aldo M; Hochfelder, Jason P; Adler, Edward M; Slover, James D; Specht, Lawrence M; Iorio, Richard

    2015-12-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 161 revision THAs with diaphyseal fitting, mid-modular femoral components performed by ten surgeons at two academic medical centers. The average follow-up was 6.1 years. At final follow-up, 4 patients required re-revision for failure of the femoral component; 3 (2%) for aseptic loosening and 1 for mechanical failure of stem in setting of periprosthetic fracture. There were a total of 24 (14.9%) revisions for any reason, with the most common reason being septic failure (10 of 24). To our knowledge, this is the largest reported series of mid-term survivorship and complications of revision THA with mid-modular femoral components. Our results show that these stems have a low rate of aseptic loosening, subsidence, and mechanical failure.

  5. In vivo evaluation of femoral blood flow measured with magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C;

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of blood flow based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using conventional multiple spin echo sequences were evaluated in vivo in healthy young volunteers. Blood flow was measured using MRI in the femoral vein. The initial slope of the multiple spin echo decay curve...... that in vivo blood flow measurements made with MRI based on wash-out effects, commonly used in multiple spin echo imaging, do not give reliable absolute values for blood flow in the femoral artery or vein......., corrected for the T2 decay of non-flowing blood was used to calculate the blood flow. As a reference, the blood flow in the femoral artery was measured simultaneously with an invasive indicator dilution technique. T2 of non-flowing blood was measured in vivo in popliteal veins during regional circulatory...

  6. Evoked potentials elicited by stimulation of the lateral and anterior femoral cutaneous nerves in meralgia paresthetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordato, Dennis J; Yiannikas, Con; Stroud, Jill; Halpern, Jean-Pierre; Schwartz, Raymond S; Akbunar, Mehmet; Cook, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-five consecutive patients with clinical symptoms and signs of meralgia paresthetica underwent bilateral somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) studies involving stimulation of skin areas innervated by the lateral and anterior femoral cutaneous nerves of the thighs. The most common abnormality was an absolute lateral femoral cutaneous SEP latency > 40 ms in 35 patients (47%), followed by an absent response in 14 patients (19%), an absolute latency 50% compared with the contralateral response in 8 patients (11%), and an absolute latency 5 ms interside latency difference in 5 patients (7%). Anterior femoral cutaneous SEPs were of value in distinguishing meralgia paresthetica from a proximal lumbar radiculopathy in an additional 4 patients and confirming bilateral meralgia paresthetica in 10 patients.

  7. Multiple Small Diameter Drillings Increase Femoral Neck Stability Compared with Single Large Diameter Femoral Head Core Decompression Technique for Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip J; Mannava, Sandeep; Seyler, Thorsten M; Plate, Johannes F; Van Sikes, Charles; Stitzel, Joel D; Lang, Jason E

    2016-10-26

    Femoral head core decompression is an efficacious joint-preserving procedure for treatment of early stage avascular necrosis. However, postoperative fractures have been described which may be related to the decompression technique used. Femoral head decompressions were performed on 12 matched human cadaveric femora comparing large 8mm single bore versus multiple 3mm small drilling techniques. Ultimate failure strength of the femora was tested using a servo-hydraulic material testing system. Ultimate load to failure was compared between the different decompression techniques using two paired ANCOVA linear regression models. Prior to biomechanical testing and after the intervention, volumetric bone mineral density was determined using quantitative computed tomography to account for variation between cadaveric samples and to assess the amount of bone disruption by the core decompression. Core decompression, using the small diameter bore and multiple drilling technique, withstood significantly greater load prior to failure compared with the single large bore technique after adjustment for bone mineral density (pcore decompression techniques. When considering core decompression for the treatment of early stage avascular necrosis, the multiple small bore technique removed less bone volume, thereby potentially leading to higher load to failure.

  8. The most commonly available woody plant species are the most useful for human populations: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Paulo Henrique Santos; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino; Medeiros, Patrícia Muniz de

    2016-10-01

    An increasing number of studies have aimed to clarify the factors leading human groups to prioritize the use of some woody plant species compared to others. Some of these studies have tested the apparency hypothesis in aiming to understand this phenomenon. According to the apparency hypothesis, the most commonly available local plant species on a forest path are the most useful to that local human population. However, the sparse and diverse nature of the results from studies investigating the factors that influence human exploitation of plant resources motivated us to perform a meta-analysis on the apparency hypothesis. We searched in the main databases (Scopus, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Scielo) for studies that correlated the environmental availability of woody species (estimated through vegetation parameters) with the degree of importance of such species to the local human population (estimated by means of the use value index). Overall, this meta-analysis supported the apparency hypothesis, although we also found high levels of heterogeneity in these studies. When the distinct uses of woody flora were considered separately, we found that local species availability is important for fuelwood (firewood and charcoal) and construction (houses, fences, etc.) purposes but does not explain medicinal and technological (object manufacture) plant use. We found no important differences in correlation values between the degree of species importance for people and the different vegetation parameters, although correlations are slightly higher for the dominance and importance value index. Our findings suggest that the exploitation of woody flora is influenced by local availability.

  9. Bilateral femoral hernia in a male cadaver with vascular variations: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, K; Totlis, T; Papadopoulou, A L; Apostolidis, S; Skandalakis, P

    2006-08-01

    Femoral hernia, which is a less common occurrence than inguinal hernia, is not congenital in most cases and is uncommon in young males. It is considered to be more common in females than in males due to an enlarged femoral ring in the former. A case of bilateral femoral hernia in a 64-year-old male cadaver is described within the framework of an anatomical approach. On the right side, the protrusion of the viscus appeared as a small intestine coil, whereas on the left side the protruded viscus appeared as a pelvic colon's appendix appiplocae. On both sides, the protruded viscus was located in front of an aberrant obturator artery, which oriented from the external iliac artery and not from the internal iliac artery as should be the case. The puberal branch of the inferior epigastric artery was absent. The cadaver's medical history and his skin examination excluded an abdominal surgery. In the literature, case reports of bilateral femoral hernia appear only seldom, especially those of male patients who had not undergone inguinal hernia repair surgery. In femoral hernias more often than in other types of hernia, the protruded viscus is strangulated and undergoes a tissue necrosis. Morbidity and mortality for complicated femoral hernia is high. Knowledge of vascular variation such as presented by the cadaver under study is extremely useful to the surgeon because any iatrogenic injury of the aberrant obturator artery during a laparoscopic repair may result in dangerous hemorrhage.

  10. Femoral head blood flow in long-term steroid therapy: study of rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.J.; Hubbard, S.L.; Reger, S.I.; Miller, E.D.; Stamp, W.G.

    1983-12-01

    Using a rabbit model, previous studies showed steroid-induced hyperlipidemia with subsequent fatty embolization of the subchondral arteries and hypertrophy of the marrow fat cells, followed by elevation of femoral head pressure from the normal level of 25 cm to nearly 60 cm H2O after eight weeks of treatment. This has led us to believe that pressure changes lead to decreased blood flow in the femoral head. In our study of 22 New Zealand white adult rabbits, weighing an average of 4.0 kg, 14 received a weekly dose of 12.45 mg of methylprednisolone (Depo-Medrol), and eight served as control. Femoral head blood flow was established using the radioactive microsphere technique. Control and cortisone-treated rabbits had femoral head blood flow measured 6, 8 and 10 weeks after treatment. The average blood flow in the control femoral heads averaged 0.2039 +/- 0.076 ml/min/gm, with no difference in the left side and the right side. In the treated group, the average blood flow at ten weeks was 0.162 +/- 0.039 ml/min/gm on the right and 0.164 +/- 0.037 ml/min/gm on the left, which was significantly different. This is parallel to unpredictable clinical findings in human beings.

  11. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Curvature of the Femoral Canal in 426 Chinese Femurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Yun Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The human femur has long been considered to have an anatomical anterior curvature in the sagittal plane. We established a new method to evaluate the femoral curvature in three-dimensional (3D space and reveal its influencing factors in Chinese population. Methods. 3D models of 426 femurs and the medullary canal were constructed using Mimics software. We standardized the positions of all femurs using 3ds Max software. After measuring the anatomical parameters, including the radius of femoral curvature (RFC and banking angle, of the femurs using the established femur-specific coordinate system, we analyzed and determined the relationships between the anatomical parameters of the femur and the general characteristics of the population. Results. Pearson’s correlation analyses showed that there were positive correlations between the RFC and height (r=0.339, p<0.001 and the femoral length and RFC (r=0.369, p<0.001 and a negative correlation between the femoral length and banking angle (r=-0.223, p<0.001. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that the most relevant factors for the RFC and banking angle were the femoral length and gender, respectively. Conclusions. This study concluded that the banking angle of the femur was significantly larger in female than in male.

  12. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampat S Dumbre Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22-65 years and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27-72 months. Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion.

  13. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  14. Femoral hernia: a review of 83 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoglu, O; Kaya, B; Okan, I; Dasiran, F; Guzey, D; Bas, G; Sahin, M

    2006-03-01

    We evaluate the factors that affect morbidity and mortality in patients who underwent surgery due to femoral hernia. The medical records of 83 patients who underwent femoral hernia repair between January 1996 and June 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. The femoral hernias were repaired either with McVay or mesh plug hernioplasty. Sex, age, surgical repair technique, presence of incarceration/strangulation, incarcerated/strangulated organs, postoperative complications, duration of hospitalization, recurrence rate, and factors that affect mortality and morbidity were studied. There were 83 patients with femoral hernia in our study. Patients' age ranged from 10 to 75 years (mean age was 46.84) with a predominance of female (71%). Thirty-six patients (40%) underwent emergency surgery with the diagnosis of strangulation or incarceration of femoral hernia. Seventeen patients had strangulation and underwent resection; eleven of these patients had omentum in the hernial sac, whereas six patients had intestines. Four of these patients underwent laparotomy. The remaining 19 patients had incarceration and underwent simple reduction of hernial sac content without resection. Forty-seven (60%) patients underwent elective surgery. McVay technique was used for 79 patients, while the other four patients were treated with mesh-plug. Twelve patients (15%) developed a variety of complications (nine patients (25%) in emergency, three patients (6%) in elective group). There was one mortality. Recurrences occurred in two patients. Femoral hernia is an important surgical pathology with high rates of incarceration/strangulation and intestinal resection. Emergency surgery can increase morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly. Early elective surgery may reduce complication.

  15. [Detection of common determinants of HLA antigens A2 and B17 by absorption using human HLA serum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Májský, A; Korínková, P

    1983-01-01

    Attempts of cross absorption where sera of anti-HLA A2 + B17, anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 with thrombocytes were absorbed from donors of HLA A2 positive, B17 negative and HLA A2 negative, B17 positive, revealed that anti-HLA A2 and anti-HLA B17 could be eliminated from the sera of both HLA types on the platelets. Thus, the findings allow the existence of a common determinant of HLA A2 and B17-antigens to be assumed. This is the first case where the evidence of a cross reaction between antigens of two different HLA loci with human sera could be established.

  16. Can local Erythropoietin administration enhance bone regeneration in osteonecrosis of femoral head?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Hooman; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Parvizi, Javad

    2012-08-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a challenging disease. Regardless of underlying causes, the ultimate result in all cases is disruption of femoral head blood supply. Once the disease starts, it is progressive in 80% of cases. Since the majority of the affected individuals are young, every effort should be focused on preserving the patients own femoral head. These years, the role of angiogenic growth factors has been investigated with promising results in animal models of ONFH. Erythropoietin (EPO) is a well known hormone that has been used in treatment of chronic anemia for many years with few side effects. Considering the angiogenic properties of EPO, we hypothesize that local delivery of recombinant human EPO during core decompression will enhance bone regeneration in ONFH. In this way we also can avoid systemic side effects of EPO.

  17. Femoral component loosening after hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zustin, Jozef; Sauter, Guido [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Institute of Pathology, Hamburg (Germany); Hahn, Michael [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center for Biomechanics and Skeletal Biology, Hamburg (Germany); Morlock, Michael M. [TUHH Hamburg University of Technology, Biomechanics Section, Hamburg (Germany); Ruether, Wolfgang [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Orthopaedics, Hamburg (Germany); Amling, Michael [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center for Biomechanics and Skeletal Biology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Before the re-introduction of the current generation of total hip resurfacing arthroplasty, component loosening and osteolysis were of great concern to the orthopaedic community. Early, mid- and long-term clinical results are encouraging, but component loosening still exists. Macroscopic, contact radiographic and histopathological analyses after undecalcified preparation of bone tissue specimens were performed. To investigate the frequency and morphological patterns of the loosening of the femoral component, we analysed a series of 190 retrieved femoral remnants that were revised for aseptic failures. Thirty-five (18.4%) hips were revised for clinical and/or radiographic loosening of the femoral component. Pseudoarthrosis (n = 17; median in situ time: 16 weeks, interquartile range [IQR]: 9 to 34), collapsed osteonecrosis (n = 5; median in situ time: 79 weeks, IQR: 63 to 97), cement-socket debonding (n = 3; median in situ time: 89 weeks, IQR: 54 to 97) and at later follow-up bone-cement loosening (n = 10; median in situ time: 175 weeks; IQR 112 to 198; p =0.005) were distinct patterns of the femoral remnant-implant loosening. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia of interface bone trabeculae (n = 38; median in situ time: 61 weeks, IQR: 32 to 138) was strongly associated with femoral component loosening (p = 0.009). Both the trabecular hyperosteoidosis (n = 32; median in situ time: 71 weeks, IQR 50 to 129) and excessive intraosseous lymphocyte infiltration (n = 12; median in situ time: 75 weeks, IQR 51 to 98) at the bone-cement interface correlated strongly with fibrocartilaginous metaplasia (p = 0.001 and p = 0.016 respectively) and all three lesions were associated with the female gender (p = 0.021, p = 0.009, and p = 0.051). Femoral component loosening at early follow-up was mostly caused by pathological changes of the femoral remnant bone tissue: pseudoarthrosis and collapsed osteonecrosis. Fibrocartilaginous metaplasia was frequently observed in hips with femoral

  18. Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli, a Common Human Pathogen: Challenges for Vaccine Development and Progress in the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolman, Jan T; Wacker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the most common gram-negative bacterial pathogen in humans. ExPEC causes the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), is a leading cause of adult bacteremia, and is the second most common cause of neonatal meningitis. Increasing multidrug resistance among ExPEC strains constitutes a major obstacle to treatment and is implicated in increasing numbers of hospitalizations and deaths and increasing healthcare costs associated with ExPEC infections. An effective vaccine against ExPEC infection is urgently needed. The O antigen, a component of the surface lipopolysaccharide, has been identified as a promising vaccine target. With the availability of a novel bioconjugation technology it is expected that multivalent O antigen conjugate vaccines can be produced at industrial scale. Clinical proof of concept of a 4-valent O antigen conjugate vaccine is ongoing. An ExPEC vaccine effective against strains that are associated with major diseases and resistant to multiple drugs could be routinely delivered to individuals at risk of developing severe E. coli infection, such as elderly people, individuals undergoing abdominal surgery and prostatic biopsy procedures, and persons at risk of recurrent and/or complicated UTI.

  19. Reflections on Ethics and Humanity in Pediatric Neurology: the Value of Recognizing Ethical Issues in Common Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Gabriel M; Rosenbaum, Peter L

    2017-05-01

    Our goals in this reflection are to (i) identify the ethical dimensions inherent in any clinical encounter and (ii) bring to the forefront of our pediatric neurology practice the myriad of opportunities to explore and learn from these ethical questions. We highlight specifically Beauchamp and Childress's principles of biomedical ethics. We use the terms ethics in common clinical practice and an ethical lens to remind people of the ubiquity of ethical situations and the usefulness of using existing ethical principles to analyze and resolve difficult situations in clinical practice. We start with a few common situations with which many of us tend to struggle. We describe what we understand as ethics and how and why developments in technology, novel potential interventions, policies, and societal perspectives challenge us to think about and debate ethical issues. Individual patients are not a singular population; each patient has their own unique life situations, culture, goals, and expectations that need to be considered with a good dose of humanity and humility. We believe that using an ethical lens-by which we mean making an explicit effort to identify and consider these issues openly-will help us to achieve this goal in practice, education, and research.

  20. Evidence of a human-mediated invasion of the tropical western Atlantic by the 'world's most common brittlestar'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M S; Sponer, R

    2002-05-22

    Approximately three million years ago the Isthmus of Panama formed an impenetrable land barrier between the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean and the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. Since this time, isolated geminate species have evolved from once contiguous populations, either side of the barrier. One such organism whose distribution is divided by the Isthmus is the tropical brittlestar Ophiactis savignyi, once suggested to be the most common brittlestar in the world. Rather than showing a genetic pattern consistent with a history of isolation, we show that this species has recently dispersed between the Pacific Ocean and the western Atlantic Ocean. This conclusion is based upon a phylogenetic analysis using sequences of the COI mitochondrial DNA gene from these populations. Identical haplotypes between oceans, and a genetic signature of population expansion, provide compelling evidence that the western Atlantic contains at least one cluster of haplotypes recently derived from the Indo-Pacific. Inadvertent human-aided translocation of individuals, presumably in ballast water or fouling communities, is strongly implicated as a mechanism for dispersal between oceans. We believe that cryptic marine invasions are likely to be common and our awareness of them will rapidly increase as systematic and phylogeographic knowledge of marine taxa grow.

  1. Treatment of Femoral Neck Fractures: Unipolar Versus Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somashekar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Intracapsular femoral neck fractures are common in the elderly population. To avoid the poor outcome of internal fixation and for early mobilization, hemiarthroplasty is performed. However, there is inadequate evidence to support the choice between unipolar or bipolar hemiarthroplasty. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of unipolar with the bipolar prosthesis in geriatric patients. METHODS: Forty-one patients above 60 years of age and an acute displaced fracture of the femoral neck were randomly allocated to treatment by either unipolar or bipolar hemiarthroplasty, in the Department of Orthopaedics, between September 2009 and October 2012. Functional outcome was assessed and compared using Harris hip score and radiological parameters with a follow-up of one year. RESULTS: The two groups of patients with mean age of 67.3 in bipolar group and 75.6 in unipolar group did not differ in their pre-injury characteristics and perioperative parameters. The mean Harris hip score in bipolar and unipolar groups was 86.18±12.18 and 79.79±15.55, respectively (p=0.183; range of motion was 210.63±28.39 and 181.58±37(p=0.015 with bipolar and unipolar groups, respectively. Functional activities were better in the bipolar group. Complications like painful hip, posterior dislocation, periprosthetic fracture and acetabular erosion were encountered in unipolar prostheses. CONCLUSION: The use of bipolar endoprosthesis in the management of displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly was associated with better mean Harris hip score and incidence of complications was limited. Hence, bipolar would be a better option in elderly patients with fracture neck of femur.

  2. Assessing health in agriculture--towards a common research framework for soils, plants, animals, humans and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieweger, Anja; Döring, Thomas F

    2015-02-01

    In agriculture and food systems, health-related research includes a vast diversity of topics. Nutritional, toxicological, pharmacological, epidemiological, behavioural, sociological, economic and political methods are used to study health in the five domains of soils, plants, livestock, humans and ecosystems. An idea developed in the early founding days of organic agriculture stated that the health of all domains is one and indivisible. Here we show that recent research reveals the existence and complex nature of such health links among domains. However, studies of health aspects in agriculture are often separated by disciplinary boundaries. This restrains the understanding of health in agricultural systems. Therefore we explore the opportunities and limitations of bringing perspectives together from the different domains. We review current approaches to define and assess health in agricultural contexts, comparing the state of the art of commonly used approaches and bringing together the presently disconnected debates in soil science, plant science, veterinary science and human medicine. Based on a qualitative literature analysis, we suggest that many health criteria fall into two paradigms: (1) the Growth Paradigm, where terms are primarily oriented towards continued growth; (2) the Boundary Paradigm, where terms focus on maintaining or coming back to a status quo, recognising system boundaries. Scientific health assessments in agricultural and food systems need to be explicit in terms of their position on the continuum between Growth Paradigm and Boundary Paradigm. Finally, we identify areas and concepts for a future direction of health assessment and research in agricultural and food systems.

  3. Anatomical evaluation of CT-MRI combined femoral model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Gyu-Ha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both CT and MRI are complementary to each other in that CT can produce a distinct contour of bones, and MRI can show the shape of both ligaments and bones. It will be ideal to build a CT-MRI combined model to take advantage of complementary information of each modality. This study evaluated the accuracy of the combined femoral model in terms of anatomical inspection. Methods Six normal porcine femora (180 ± 10 days, 3 lefts and 3 rights with ball markers were scanned by CT and MRI. The 3D/3D registration was performed by two methods, i.e. the landmark-based 3 points-to-3 points and the surface matching using the iterative closest point (ICP algorithm. The matching accuracy of the combined model was evaluated with statistical global deviation and locally measure anatomical contour-based deviation. Statistical analysis to assess any significant difference between accuracies of those two methods was performed using univariate repeated measures ANOVA with the Turkey post hoc test. Results This study revealed that the local 2D contour-based measurement of matching deviation was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in the femoral condyle, and in the middle femoral shaft. The global 3D contour matching deviation of the landmark-based matching was 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, but local 2D contour deviation through anatomical inspection was much larger as much as 3.0 ± 1.8 mm. Conclusion Even with human-factor derived errors accumulated from segmentation of MRI images, and limited image quality, the matching accuracy of CT-&-MRI combined 3D models was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in terms of local anatomical inspection.

  4. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Serour, Francis [Department of Pediatric Surgery, The E. Wolfson Medical Center, Holon (Israel); Chaouat, Malka [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Karem, Jerusalem (Israel); Gonen, Pinhas [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Tommasino, Massimo [International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon (France); Sherman, Levana [Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Primary keratinocytes were used to evaluate transforming and carcinogenic abilities of cutaneous HPVs. • E6E7 of cancer associated β HPV types transform primary human keratinocytes. • E6 proteins of cancer and wart associated HPVs inhibit UVB induced cell death. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced proliferation arrest. • E6s of cancer and wart associated HPVs attenuate UVB induced apoptosis signaling.

  5. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  6. Postmortem Femoral Blood Concentrations of Risperidone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Kristian; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2014-01-01

    Postmortem femoral blood concentrations of the antipsychotic drug risperidone and the active metabolite 9-hydroxyrisperidone were determined by an achiral LC-MS/MS method in 38 cases. The cause of death was classified as unrelated to risperidone in 30 cases, in which the sum of the concentration ...

  7. Inadvertent femoral artery "stripping": surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, J E; Bekassy, S M; Daniell, M B; De Bakey, M E

    1975-02-01

    Following "vein stripping" for varicosities, two patients were referred to our service for evaluation of arterial insufficiency of the lower extremities. Both patients had had surgical interruption of the femoral arterial system which required reconstruction. This paper emphasizes the importance of understanding surgical anatomy and presents the techniques of successful surgical management of both cases.

  8. Radographic changes of the revascularized femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rindell, K. (Orthopaedic Hospital of the Invalid Foundation, Helsinki (Finland). Department of Orthopeadic Surgery); Tallroth, K. (Orthopaedic Hospital of the Invalid Foundation, Helsinki (Finland). Department of Radiology); Lindholm, T.S. (Tampere University Central Hospital (Finland). Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopaedics and Traumatology)

    Twenty-two nerotic femoral heads in young adults were radiologically followed-up after grafting with vascularized bone by comparing the preoperative and the postoperative state of the hip joint. Three parameters were observed and followed; the flattening of the femoral head: the degree of osteoarthrosis of the joints; and the degree of incorporation of the graft into the recipient bone. The results, expressed by index figures, showed that the femoral head flattened during the first two years postoperatively; that the maximal incorporation occurred during the same period of time; and that the appearance of postoperative osteoarthrosis was slow during the first year and increased subsequently. This numerical characterization of radiological finding allows systematic individual analysis after revascularization of the femoral head with bone grafts. It is also suited for comparisons between patients, between series of patients and of various treatment techniques. Furthermore, this quatification provides a numerical index that seems to correlate with the outcome of the treated hip joint. (author). 12 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab.

  9. Prophylactic Nailing of Incomplete Atypical Femoral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wug Oh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent reports have described the occurrence of low-energy subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures associated with long-term bisphosphonate use. Although information regarding the surgical treatment of these atypical femoral fractures is increasing, it is unclear if the preventive operation is useful in incomplete fractures. This study examined the results of preventive intramedullary nailing for incomplete atypical femoral fractures. Material and Methods. A retrospective search was conducted for patients older than 50 years receiving bisphosphonate therapy, with incomplete, nondisplaced fractures in either the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal area of the femur. Seventeen patients with a total of 20 incomplete, non-displaced lesions were included. The mean duration of bisphosphonate use was 50.5 months. Eleven of the 17 (64.7% patients had complete or incomplete fractures on the contralateral femur. All were treated with prophylactic fixation of an intramedullary (IM nail. The minimum followup was 12 months. Results. All cases healed with a mean period of 14.3 weeks. Nineteen of the 20 cases healed with the dissolution of incomplete fractures of the lateral aspect. A complete fracture developed at the time of nailing in one patient, but it healed with callus bridging. Conclusion. IM nailing appears to be a reliable way of preventing the progress of incomplete atypical femoral fractures.

  10. Tension free femoral hernia repair with plug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milivoje Vuković

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The technique of closing the femoral canal with plug a simple. The plug is made from monofilament material and is easily formed. This technique allows the reduction of recurrence and can be used safely, quickly and easily in elective and emergency situations.

  11. Human hematopoietic cells express two forms of the cytokine receptor common γ—chain(γc)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIYUFANG; MARYHILL; 等

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the γ-chain of the IL-2 receptor is shared by the receptors for IL-4,IL-7,IL-9,IL-13,and IL-15,and it is therefore also referred to as the common γ-chain (γc).Mutations of γc result in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome in humans,indicating that γc is essential for normal development and function of the immune system.We demonstrate that human hematopoietic cells express two γc transcripts differing in their carboxyl terminal coding region.One transcript is the previously reported sequence (γc-long), whereas the newly identified sequence exhibits a deletion of 72 nucleotides close to the 3'-end of the open reading frame (γc-short).This alteration predicts a loss of 24 amino acids including a conserved tyrosine residue which is shared by several members of the cytokine receptor family.The presencfe of these two distinct forms of γc transcripts was demonstrated by sequencing of reversely transcribed and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplified mRNA,restriction diestion of the RT-PCR products,RNAse protection,and Northern blotting from human cell lines and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.Furthermore,the two variants were present in peripheral blood lymphocytes from both female and male donors,which rules out allelic variants since γc is a single copy gene located on the X chromosome.A truncation mutant at a site near the observed changes in γc-short has been reported by others to alter biochemical events activated by cytokines.This combined with the loss of a potential SH2 “docking” site in γc-short suggests that γ-long and γc-short may link to different signaling pathways and may play an important role in detenmining the cellular response to IL-2,IL-4,IL-7,IL-9,IL-13,IL-15.

  12. Femoral Intertrochanteric Fracture With Spontaneous Lumbar Hernia: A Case Report

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    Luo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The diagnosis of lumbar hernia can be easily missed, as it is a rare case to which most orthopedists are not exposed in their common clinical practice. Approximately 300 cases have been reported in the literature since it was first described by Barbette in 1672. Case Presentation A 76-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with a femoral intertrochanteric fracture was sent to our department. Physical examination revealed a smooth, soft, and movable mass, with no tenderness, palpable on her left flank, which had gradually increased during the last seven years and presented with a slight feeling of swelling. We initially misdiagnosed the case as a left lipoma combined with the femoral intertrochanteric fracture. However, after six hours, the patient presented with a sudden onset of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distension. Afterward, computed tomography (CT examination confirmed that the mass was a spontaneous lumbar hernia. Conclusions A lumbar hernia may, on rare occasions, become incarcerated or strangulated, with the consequent complication of mechanical bowel obstruction. We suggest that a patient with a flank mass should always raise suspicions of a lumbar hernia.

  13. Femoral Intertrochanteric Fracture With Spontaneous Lumbar Hernia: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng; HE, Xing-Wen; Chen, Qing-Yun; Hong, Hao; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The diagnosis of lumbar hernia can be easily missed, as it is a rare case to which most orthopedists are not exposed in their common clinical practice. Approximately 300 cases have been reported in the literature since it was first described by Barbette in 1672. Case Presentation A 76-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with a femoral intertrochanteric fracture was sent to our department. Physical examination revealed a smooth, soft, and movable mass, with no tenderness, palpable on her left flank, which had gradually increased during the last seven years and presented with a slight feeling of swelling. We initially misdiagnosed the case as a left lipoma combined with the femoral intertrochanteric fracture. However, after six hours, the patient presented with a sudden onset of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distension. Afterward, computed tomography (CT) examination confirmed that the mass was a spontaneous lumbar hernia. Conclusions A lumbar hernia may, on rare occasions, become incarcerated or strangulated, with the consequent complication of mechanical bowel obstruction. We suggest that a patient with a flank mass should always raise suspicions of a lumbar hernia.

  14. Arterial Ligation for Infected Femoral Psuedo-Aneurysm in Drug Injecting Abusers

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    Mohammadzade Mohammad Ali

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-aneurysm of the femoral artery is the most common arterial complication in drug injecting abusers. Scholars in vascular surgery have published debating statements regarding techniques of successful surgical management during last two decades. We present the results of simple arterial ligation in a series of 32 patients presenting with infected femoral pseudo-aneurysm. Most of the patients were males (89%. Young persons in the age group of 15-44 years were mostly affected. Site of lesion included common femoral artery in 65% , superficial femoral artery 28% and at bifurcation 6.2%. celulitis in 14 (53%, abscess & "ncelulitis in 6 (19%, necrosing fasciitis in 2 (6.2% and vascular abscess in 7 (22% cases were the forms of associated local infection. There was no hemorrhage, vascular thrombosis, amputation, or mortality. Claudicating were the only complications identified in 2 patients with Tripe ligation. Ligation is the optimal management for infected pseudo-aneurysms because it is easy, cost-effective, and safe. Early reconstruction is not recommended, since there is an extended infection in the location of the pseudo-aneurysm.

  15. MRI differentiates femoral condylar ossification evolution from osteochondritis dissecans. A new sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jans, Lennart B.O.; Huysse, Wouter C.; Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, Jacob L.; Ditchfield, Michael [University of Melbourne Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Melbourne, Vic (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    To determine if MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) of the femoral condyles in children can differentiate variations in ossification from osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). MRI studies of the knee of 315 patients demonstrated ossification defects of the femoral condyles involving the subchondral bone plate. MRI features categorized the defects as ossification variability (N = 150) or OCD (N = 165). Both groups were compared for age, residual physeal cartilage, site, configuration, 'lesion angle' and associated findings. (a) Ossification variability did not occur in girls >10 year. and boys >13 year., OCD did not occur in children younger than 8 year. (b) Ossification variability was not seen in patients with 10% or less residual physeal cartilage, OCD was rare in patients with 30% or greater residual physeal cartilage. (c) Ossification variability was located in the posterior third of the femoral condyle, OCD occurred most commonly in the middle third. (d) Intracondylar extension was seen in OCD and not in ossification variability. (e) Perilesional oedema was very common with OCD and absent with ossification variability. (f) Lesion angle <105 was a feature of ossification variability. MRI may help differentiate variations in ossification of the femoral condyles from OCD. (orig.)

  16. Isolated acetabular revision with femoral stem retention after bipolar hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Nobuhiro; Tabata, Tomonori; Tagomori, Hiroaki; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    In bipolar hemiarthroplasty, migration of the outer cup component into the acetabular cup, with evidence of severe osteolysis in the acetabulum, commonly occurs without loosening of the femoral component. The merits of retaining the stable femoral component in these cases have been debated. Our study aimed to determine whether revision of the acetabular component in isolation could be successfully performed. The data of 54 patients (61 hips), 44 women, and 10 men, aged 67.7 (range 47-86) years at the time of the index revision, were analyzed. The average time from primary operation to revision surgery was 14.9 (range 1.0-27.0) years, with an average follow-up time after revision of 5.2 (range, 1.0-18.7) years. Indications for acetabular revision included migration of the outer cup component (N = 55), disassembly of the bipolar cup (N = 4), and recurrent dislocation (N = 2). Fixation of the femoral stem was cementless in 49 hips and cemented in 12. Bone grafting for osteolysis of the proximal femur around the stem was performed in six hips. An acetabular reinforcement ring with a cemented cup was used in 31 hips, with cementless cup fixation in 29 hips, and cemented cup in one case. On average, the Harris hip score improved from 57.0 ± 21.6 to 87.4 ± 6.40 points after revision. Two cases of femoral periprosthetic fracture were treated with osteosynthesis 3 year post-revision. There was no evidence of loosening of the femoral stem or subsidence, with a non-progressive radiolucent line acetabular revision can be reliably performed in cases of failed bipolar hemiarthroplasty with a well-fixed femoral component.

  17. Ipsilateral Acetabular and Femoral Neck and Shaft Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto Irifune

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Floating hip injuries and ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures are rare. Additionally, the simultaneous occurrence of these injuries is extremely rare, and only one case report of the simultaneous occurrence of these injuries has been published. Here, we report the case of a patient with ipsilateral acetabular and femoral neck and shaft fractures following a suicide attempt. The patient experienced nonunion of the femoral neck and shaft after the initial operation and therefore underwent reconstruction using a femoral head prosthesis with a long stem and interlocking screws. Our procedure may be used in primary and/or secondary reconstruction for ipsilateral acetabular and femoral neck and shaft fractures.

  18. Heavy Metals Concentrations and Human Health Risk Assessment for Three Common Species of Fish from Karkheh River, Iran

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    Habib Janadeleh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The concentrations of heavy metals in the tissues and organs of fishes indicate the concentrations of heavy metals in water and their accumulation in food chains. In the present study, the concentrations of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, V and Pb in three common species of fish and the potential health risks to local residents via consumption of the fishes were estimated. Methods: The concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, V and Pb in the muscles, heart, liver, and gills of Liza abu, Barbus grypus and Cyprinus carpio, collected from Karkheh River, Southern Iran were measured. Associated human health risk was also evaluated by hazard quotient (HQ and hazard index (HI of muscle tissues. Results: Bioaccumulation of heavy metals was the highest in the livers followed by gills, heart and muscle. Zn was the most accumulated metal in liver of C. Carpio while Cd had the lowest concentration in the muscle of L. abu. There were significant differences in metal concentration among different fish and different tissues (P<0.05.Zinc showed the highest concentrations in different tissues of all analyzed fish, while Cd had the lowest concentration in all tissue samples. The hazard quotients from consumption of the collected fish did not exceed the limit of 1.0. Conclusion: The present study was a large-scale investigation of heavy metals in three common species of fish in Karkheh River. Occasional consumption of these fish is not likely to cause adverse effects. However, hazard indices for C. carpio and Liza abu were 1.751 and 1.21, respectively, which implies that continuous and excessive intake of these fish could result in chronic non-carcinogenic adverse effects.

  19. [The origin of femoral trochlear dysplasia: comparative anatomy, evolution, and growth of the patellofemoral joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, C; Dupont, J Y

    2001-06-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of the femoropatellar morphology examining the evolutionary aspects to search for the origin of trochelar dysplasia. Trochlear dysplasia is frequent in the human population and, when associated with morphological and positional abnormalities of the patella, can lead to patellar pain syndrome in minor cases or patellar dislocation in severe cases. There is no strict relationship between the observed anomalies and clinical expression. The shape of the articular surfaces is variable in mammals depending on their type of locomotion: unguligrade, digitigrade, plantigrade. In greater apes, the femoral diaphysis is straight and the trochlea is flat and symmetrical. The patella does not tend to dislocate laterally since the knee under load is always flexed. In human adults, the femoral diaphysis has a valgus obliquity angle of 8 degrees to 10 degrees. Consequently, the trochlea has a deepened sulcus and an elevated lateral lip, avoiding lateral patellar dislocation, especially during initial knee flexion. In the human newborn, the femoral diaphysis is vertical. As the child starts walking, the femoral obliquity angle develops between 1 and 7 years of age, inducing a secondary valgus of the extensor apparatus. This obliquity does not develop in non-walking children. Fossil femurs of australopithecus demonstrate that a high obliquity angle had appeared more than 3 million years ago, but also exhibit a poorly deepened trochlea and a slight elevation of the lateral facet. At 1.8 million years, the fossils have the oblique diaphysis, the strongly deepened sulcus and the strongly elevated lateral facet. The obliquity angle of the femoral diaphysis is the leading feature which initiated the later modifications of the patellofemoral joint that over 3 million years were never inscribed in the human genoma. Lateral trochleal lip and deep sulcus are features that were first acquired, then once selected, genetically assimilated, and now appear on

  20. Non-obstructed femoral hernia containing ascending colon, caecum, appendix and small bowel with concurrent bilateral recurrent inguinal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R B; Vasava, N; Hukkeri, S

    2012-04-01

    Femoral hernias, which are less common than inguinal hernias and more often found in females, occasionally contain more than just small intestine and omentum. Uncommon contents reported in femoral hernia sacs include caecum, appendix, Meckel's diverticulum (Littre hernia), testis, ovary, transverse colon and even stomach or kidney. Strangulation of femoral hernias containing appendix, small intestine and caecum, and Meckel's diverticulum are well reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of a male patient having bilateral femoral hernia with bilateral recurrent inguinal hernia. A huge, right-sided femoral hernia contained terminal ileum, appendix, caecum and ascending colon, which were irreducible but neither obstructed nor strangulated. The patient was operated on with a Pfannenstiel incision together with an infrainguinal incision. For reduction of content, an inguinal ligament was also incised. Bilateral preperitoneal, polypropylene mesh hernioplasty was performed along with rolled plug placement in the right femoral canal. The patient had an uneventful post operative recovery and no recurrence in 6 months of follow up.

  1. Outcome of non-operative management of femoral shaft fractures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinyoola A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femoral shaft fractures are common injuries in childhood. There is paucity of information on their presentation and outcome of the available treatment methods in the African population. This study evaluated the outcome of non-operative methods of treatment of femoral shaft fractures in our centre. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of the database of children aged 14 years and below with femoral shaft fractures treated non-operatively over a 10-year period. Results: A total of 134 patients with 138 fractures met the study criteria. This consisted of 71 boys (mean age = 6.1 years ± SD and 63 girls (mean age = 6.5 years ± SD. Pedestrian vehicular accident was the most common cause of femoral shaft fractures in the study population. The midshaft was the most common site of fractures. There were associated injuries to other parts of the body (especially head injury in 34.3% of the patients. The commonest mode of treatment was skin traction only (87.7%. The mean time to fracture union was 4.9 weeks ± SD (range = 3-15 weeks. The mean length of hospitalisation was 6.7 weeks ± SD (range = 5 days-11 weeks. There was a fairly strong positive correlation between the length of hospitalisation and the presence of associated injuries, especially head injury, upper limb fractures and bilaterality of the fractures. The mean total cost of treatment was #7685 (Naira or $51.2 (range = $14.2-$190. At the last follow up, 97.8% of the fractures united without significant angulation or shortening. Conclusion: The outcome of non-operative treatment of femoral shaft fractures in our setting is comparable to the results of other workers. Methods of treatment that shorten the length of hospitalisation without unduly increasing cost should be encouraged.

  2. Computerized tomography analysis of aceptic necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichioka, Yoshiaki; Masuda, Takeshi; Matsuno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Isao; Sugano, Hiroki; Konno, Takushi.

    1988-03-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) findings of the normal femoral head in 14 patients with unilateral aceptic necrosis of the femoral head (ANF) and in healthy adults were analyzed for early diagnostic significance. CT appearance of the bone trabeculae fell into normal finding, diffuse sclerosis, and mottled sclerosis. The development of necrosis during the process was accompanied by diffuse sclerosis, suggesting that diffuse sclerosis is an early CT appearance in the case of ANF. In a three-dimensional quantification of the necrotic area for 20 patients before rotational osteotomy of the femoral head, deformation of the femoral head after the surgery was found to frequently result from 50 % or more of the necrotic area in the femoral head, irrespective of the size of necrosis on the surface of the femoral head. This suggested the influence of the three-dimensional spread of necrosis on the intensity of the femoral head. (Namekawa, K.).

  3. The effect of patulin on femoral bone structure in male rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Kováčová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A lot of kinds of crops are susceptible to fungal attack, leading to considerable financial losses and damage the health of humans and animals. Patulin, a toxic fungal metabolite, can be found mainly in apple and apple products, with much less frequent contamination in other food products. Because of its high incidence and harmful health effects, patulin belongs to a class of mycotoxins, which are strictly monitored. However, its effect on bone structure is still unknown. This study was designed to investigate the impact of patulin on femoral bone structure in adult male rabbits. Four month-old male rabbits were randomly divided into two groups of three animals each. Rabbits from the experimental group (group A, n=3 were intramuscularly administered with patulin at dose 10 μg.kg-1 body weight (b.w. twice a week for 4 weeks. The second group without patulin administration served as a control (group B, n=3. At the end of the experiment, body weight, femoral weight and length, cortical bone thickness and histological structure of femoral bones from all rabbits were determined. The results did not show any significant differences in body weight, femoral weight and length between experimental and control groups of rabbits. On the other hand, intramuscular application of patulin induced a significant increase in cortical bone thickness (p <0.05 and considerable changes in qualitative histological characteristics of compact bone in adult male rabbits. In patulin-intoxicated males, the primary vascular longitudinal bone tissue was absent near endosteal border. On the other hand, this tissue occurred near periosteum and also in the middle part of the femoral bone in these rabbits. The values for the primary osteons' vascular canals were significantly lower (p <0.05 in males exposed to patulin as compared to the control group. Based on these findings we can conclude that intramuscular patulin administration demonstrably influences cortical bone thickness

  4. Insight into different environmental niches adaptation and allergenicity from the Cladosporium sphaerospermum genome, a common human allergy-eliciting Dothideomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Su Mei; Chan, Chai Ling; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Toh, Yue Fen; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng; Kuan, Chee Sian

    2016-05-31

    Cladosporium sphaerospermum, a dematiaceous saprophytic fungus commonly found in diverse environments, has been reported to cause allergy and other occasional diseases in humans. However, its basic biology and genetic information are largely unexplored. A clinical isolate C. sphaerospermum genome, UM 843, was re-sequenced and combined with previously generated sequences to form a model 26.89 Mb genome containing 9,652 predicted genes. Functional annotation on predicted genes suggests the ability of this fungus to degrade carbohydrate and protein complexes. Several putative peptidases responsible for lung tissue hydrolysis were identified. These genes shared high similarity with the Aspergillus peptidases. The UM 843 genome encodes a wide array of proteins involved in the biosynthesis of melanin, siderophores, cladosins and survival in high salinity environment. In addition, a total of 28 genes were predicted to be associated with allergy. Orthologous gene analysis together with 22 other Dothideomycetes showed genes uniquely present in UM 843 that encode four class 1 hydrophobins which may be allergens specific to Cladosporium. The mRNA of these hydrophobins were detected by RT-PCR. The genomic analysis of UM 843 contributes to the understanding of the biology and allergenicity of this widely-prevalent species.

  5. Common genetic variation near MC4R has a sex-specific impact on human brain structure and eating behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Horstmann

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with genetic and environmental factors but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS identified obesity- and type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants located within or near genes that modulate brain activity and development. Among the top hits is rs17782313 near MC4R, encoding for the melanocortin-4-receptor, which is expressed in brain regions that regulate eating. Here, we hypothesized rs17782313-associated changes in human brain regions that regulate eating behavior. Therefore, we examined effects of common variants at rs17782313 near MC4R on brain structure and eating behavior. Only in female homozygous carriers of the risk allele we found significant increases of gray matter volume (GMV in the right amygdala, a region known to influence eating behavior, and the right hippocampus, a structure crucial for memory formation and learning. Further, we found bilateral increases in medial orbitofrontal cortex, a multimodal brain structure encoding the subjective value of reinforcers, and bilateral prefrontal cortex, a higher order regulation area. There was no association between rs17782313 and brain structure in men. Moreover, among female subjects only, we observed a significant increase of 'disinhibition', and, more specifically, on 'emotional eating' scores of the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire in carriers of the variant rs17782313's risk allele. These findings suggest that rs17782313's effect on eating behavior is mediated by central mechanisms and that these effects are sex-specific.

  6. Comparison between five commonly used two-dimensional methods of human bite mark overlay production from the dental study casts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloth, Saritha; Ganapathy, K S

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the most accurate bite mark overlay fabrication technique by studying two physical characteristics, i.e., area and rotation of biting edges of anterior teeth of thirty volunteers. The objective of the study was to evaluate the reliability and efficacy of five commonly used methods of human bite mark overlays using two dimensional (2D) digital images of dental study casts as a gold standard, to rank different methods according to statistically based determination of relative accuracy of each method and to determine its feasibility in Forensic science. Overlays were produced from the biting surfaces of six upper and six lower anterior teeth of 30 volunteers using the following five methods: a) hand tracing from study casts, b) hand tracing from wax impressions, c) xerographic method, d) radiopaque impression method and e) 2D computer-based method. Area of the biting edges of the anterior teeth and relative rotation of each anterior tooth were measured and compared. The xerographic method was determined to be the more accurate method with respect to tooth area and rotation. Hand tracing methods, from either wax impressions of teeth or directly from study casts, were determined to be inaccurate and subjective. It is recommended that forensic odontologists discontinue the use of hand tracing overlays in bite mark comparison cases as there is lot of scope for manipulation and observer bias.

  7. Induction of a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease in mice by a common human anti-DNA idiotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendlovic, S.; Brocke, S.; Meshorer, A.; Mozes, E. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)); Shoenfeld, Y.; Bakimer, R. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel)); Ben-Bassat, M. (Beilinson Medical Center, Petah-Tiqva (Israel))

    1988-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered to be the quintessential autoimmune disease. It has not been possible to induce SLE in animal models by DNA immunization or by challenge with anti-DNA antibodies. The authors report a murine model of SLE-like disease induced by immunization of C3H.SW female mice with a common human monoclonal anti-DNA idiotype (16/6 idiotype). Following a booster injection with the 16/6 idiotype, high levels of murine anti-16/6 and anti-anti-16/6 antibodies (associated with anti-DNA activity) were detected in the sera of the immunized mice. Elevated titers of autoantibodies reacting with DNA, poly(I), poly(dT), ribonucleoprotein, autoantigens (Sm, SS-A (Ro), and SS-B (La)), and cardiolipin were noted. The serological findings were associated with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, leukopenia, proteinuria, immune complex deposition in the glomerular mesangium, and sclerosis of the glomeruli. The immune complexes in the kidneys were shown to contain the 16/6 idiotype. This experimental SLE-like model may be used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying SLE.

  8. Ex Vivo and in Silico Study of Human Common Carotid Arteries Pressure Response in Physiological and Inverted State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechna, A.; Cieślicki, K.; Lombarski, L.; Ciszek, B.

    2015-02-01

    Arterial walls are a multilayer structures with nonlinear material characteristics. Furthermore, residual stresses exist in unloaded state (zero-pressure condition) and they affect arterial behavior. To investigate these phenomena a number of theoretical and numerical studies were performed, however no experimental validation was proposed and realized yet. We cannot get rid of residual stresses without damaging the arterial segment. In this paper we propose a novel experiment to validate a numerical model of artery with residual stresses. The inspiration for our study originates from experiments made by Dobrin on dogs' arteries (1999). We applied the idea of turning the artery inside out. After such an operation the sequence of layer is reversed and the residual stresses are re-ordered. We performed several pressure-inflation tests on human Common Carotid Arteries (CCA) in normal and inverted configurations. The nonlinear responses of arterial behavior were obtained and compared to the numerical model. Computer simulations were carried out using the commercial software which applied the finite element method (FEM). Then, these results were discussed.

  9. Pulsatility Index of Blood Echogenicity of the Human Radial and Common Carotid Arteries: Relation with Age and Stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bok, Tae Hoon; Kong, Qi; Nam, Kweon Ho; Choi, Jay Chol; Paeng, Dong Guk [Department of Ocean System Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    In the present paper, the ultrasound blood images were measured at both the human radial artery(RA) and common carotid artery(CCA), depending on the age, and the pulsatility index of blood echogenicity(PIBE) was analyzed. In addition, the ultrasound blood images were measured at both RA and CCA of both the stroke patients and the control group, and PIBE was compared. PIBE of RA for the young group was similar with that for the old group (0.13{+-}0.21 and 0.16{+-}0.03). PIBE of CCA for the young group, however, was larger than that for the old group (0.70{+-}0.21 and 0.32{+-}0.01), and was more variable depending on the subject. Similarly, the fibrinogen concentrations of the patients (336{+-}61 and 340{+-}126 mg/dl) were more than that of the control group (264{+-}38 and 43 mg/dl), for both RA and CCA. The results indicate the possibility of the ultrasonic test on the correlation between erythrocyte aggregation and stroke, and it is expected that the in-vivo EA measurement would be clinically useful.

  10. Human papillomavirus types detected in skin warts and cancer differ in their transforming properties but commonly counteract UVB induced protective responses in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shterzer, Naama; Heyman, Dariya; Shapiro, Beny; Yaniv, Abraham; Jackman, Anna; Serour, Francis; Chaouat, Malka; Gonen, Pinhas; Tommasino, Massimo; Sherman, Levana

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, E6E7 and E6 proteins of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with skin warts and cancer were compared for their transforming and carcinogenic abilities in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). We show that E6E7 of cancer associated beta HPV types, notably 49 and 24, were able to extend the life span and enhance the clonogenic efficiency of PHKs when maintained in serum free/low calcium medium. Activities of the beta HPV E6E7 were lower than those of HPV16 E6E7. In contrast, E6 proteins from HPV types detected in skin warts or cancer, notably 10, 49 and 38, attenuated UVB induced protective responses in PHKs including cell death, proliferation arrest and accumulation of the proapoptotic proteins, p53, bax or bak. Together, this investigation revealed functional differences and commonalities between HPVs associated with skin warts and cancer, and allowed the identification of specific properties of beta HPVs supporting their involvement in skin carcinogenesis.

  11. Revision of a nonunited subtrochanteric femoral fracture around a failed intramedullary nail with the use of RIA products, BMP-7 and hydroxyapatite: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiridis Eleftherios

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Femoral subtrochanteric fractures are commonly treated using intramedullary devices. Failure of the implant and subsequent nonunion is still an issue, however, and limited evidence exists regarding the most appropriate treatment. Case presentation We report the case of an 80-year-old Caucasian woman with a subtrochanteric fracture originally treated using a trochanteric gamma nail which failed, resulting in a nonunion and fracture of its proximal end. The nonunion was revised with the removal of the broken trochanteric gamma nail, application of a condylar blade plate, ipsilateral Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator autografting, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7 and injectable hydroxyapatite cement. The fracture united fully at ten months following revision surgery, with no signs of femoral head avascular necrosis at 18-month follow-up. Conclusion The essential requirements for success when revising a nonunited fracture are to provide anatomical reduction, mechanical stability, bone defect augmentation and biological stimulation to achieve healing. Current advances in molecular biology, such as recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7, and biotechnology such as the Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator system and hydroxyapatite injectable cement can improve patient outcomes over the use of our traditional revision techniques.

  12. The Association of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures with Femoral Acetabular Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Marc R.; Goldin, Michael; Anderson, Christian; Fredericson, Michael; Stevens, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if there is an increased incidence of femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) in patients presenting with stress fractures of the femoral neck. Methods: After IRB approval, the imaging studies of 25 athletes (22 females, 3 males, mean age 26, range 19 - 39 years) with femoral neck stress injuries were assessed for the presence of features suggesting FAI, including acetabular retroversion, coxa profunda, abnormal femoral head-neck junction, fibrocystic change, os acetabulae, labral tear and chondral injury. All subjects had to have an adequate AP Pelvis radiograph, a lateral radiograph of the affected hip, and an MRI of the affected hip. The alpha angle, anterior offset ratio, and center to edge (CE) angle were measured on radiographs. The grade of stress injury was determined on MR images. All images and measurements were made by a musculoskeletal fellowship trained radiologist, a fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon, an orthopaedic sports medicine fellow and a physical medicine and rehabilitation resident. Charts were reviewed to determine treatment of the stress fracture, outcome and final follow up, as well as to determine if the patient had any further treatment for their hip. Results: Of the 25 hips (18 right, 7 left) with femoral neck stress reactions, 9 were grade 2 (bone marrow edema), 5 were grade 3 (high T2 and low T1 marrow signal), and 11 were grade 4 (stress fracture). Twenty patients (80%) had coxa profunda - where the floor of the cotyloid fossa touches or extends beyond the ilioischial line (incidence in general population is 15.2% of males, and 19.4% of females). Coxa profunda, defined by the floor of the cotyloid fossa touching or extending beyond the ilioischial line and a center edge angle of more than 35o, was present in 28% of subjects. Acetabular retroversion as assessed by the crossover sign was present in 42% (normal incidence is 5% of population). Center edge angle was greater than 35o in 20% and greater than 40 o

  13. Managing the mismatches to provide ecosystem services human well-being: a conceptual framework for understanding the New Commons

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Duraiappah, AK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hardin in his seminal paper described the management of the commons as a tragedy. Three decades later, Ostrom and colleagues argued that the management of the commons was more of a drama than a tragedy. They identified that the management of common...

  14. Who is Represented in the Teaching Commons?: SoTL Through the Lenses of the Arts and Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Potter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the community of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL scholars has flourished across Canada and around the world, there has been a growing sense among humanists that SoTL work has been dominated by the epistemologies, philosophies, and research methods of the social sciences. This is a view that has been supported by SoTL journal editors and resources dedicated to introducing faculty to SoTL. To quote Nancy Chick (2012 in a recent book on the current state of SoTL in the disciplines, “while many well-known SoTL leaders come from humanities backgrounds …, the on-the-ground work largely marginalizes the practices of their disciplines” (p. 15. The question then follows: “How does the apparent under-representation of (arts and humanities-based disciplines affect expectations for SoTL, from norms for research design and methodology to the genre and style of its products?” (McKinney & Chick, 2010, p. 10. This paper, which frames the special issue looking at “SoTL through the lenses of the Arts and Humanities,” explores the difficulties with, and opportunities provided by, creating an inclusive teaching commons where the scholarly traditions of the arts and humanities are recognized for the value they bring to the SoTL research imaginary. Alors que la communauté des universitaires qui oeuvrent dans le domaine de l’avancement des connaissances en enseignement et en apprentissage (ACEA s’est épanouie à travers le Canada et dans le monde, on constate l’éclosion d’un sentiment, parmi les humanistes, que le travail de l’ACEA a été dominé par les épistémologies, les philosophies et les méthodes de recherche des sciences sociales. C’est une opinion qui a été appuyée par les rédacteurs de revues sur l’ACEA et par les ressources consacrées à l’introduction des enseignants à l’ACEA. Pour citer Nancy Chick (2012 dans un livre récemment publié sur l’état actuel de l’ACEA dans diverses disciplines,

  15. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-03-06

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head.

  16. Femoral bifurcation disease: balloon or knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, Marc; Deloose, Koen

    2009-10-01

    Arterial occlusive disease at the level of the femoral bifurcation mostly occurs in combination with inflow and/or outflow lesions. Surgical endarterectomy of the femoral bifurcation is a well-proven low-risk and easy surgical intervention with known durable success, while, although proven to be safe, evidence is lacking about the durability of the endovascular approach. Based on the evidence at hand, the surgical approach should be recommended for the vast majority of patients and the endovascular approach should only be indicated as the first strategy in selected cases presenting with factors that might compromise the outcome of surgery in the groin. If feasible, the hybrid approach with endarterectomy at the level of the bifurcation and endovascular repair of the inflow and outflow lesions is preferred in patients with multilevel disease.

  17. Femoral head fracture without hip dislocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aditya K Aggarwal; Ashwani Soni; Daljeet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Femoral head fractures without dislocation or subluxation are extremely rare injuries.We report a neglected case of isolated comminuted fracture of femoral head without hip dislocation or subluxation of one year duration in a 36-year-old patient who sustained a high energy trauma due to road traffic accident.He presented with painful right hip and inability to bear full weight on right lower limb with Harris hip score of 39.He received cementless total hip replacement.At latest follow-up of 2.3 years,functional outcome was excellent with Harris hip score of 95.Such isolated injuries have been described only once in the literature and have not been classified till now.The purpose of this report is to highlight the extreme rarity,possible mechanism involved and a novel classification system to classify such injuries.

  18. Regions of common inter-individual DNA methylation differences in human monocytes: genetic basis and potential function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christopher; Leitão, Elsa; Wallner, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Sinha, Anupam; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Steffens, Michael; Ebert, Peter; Rahmann, Sven; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2017-07-26

    There is increasing evidence for inter-individual methylation differences at CpG dinucleotides in the human genome, but the regional extent and function of these differences have not yet been studied in detail. For identifying regions of common methylation differences, we used whole genome bisulfite sequencing data of monocytes from five donors and a novel bioinformatic strategy. We identified 157 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with four or more CpGs, almost none of which has been described before. The DMRs fall into different chromatin states, where methylation is inversely correlated with active, but not repressive histone marks. However, methylation is not correlated with the expression of associated genes. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of the five donors revealed evidence for a role of cis-acting genetic variation in establishing methylation patterns. To validate this finding in a larger cohort, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using SNP genotypes and 450k array methylation data from blood samples of 1128 individuals. Only 30/157 (19%) DMRs include at least one 450k CpG, which shows that these arrays miss a large proportion of DNA methylation variation. In most cases, the GWAS peak overlapped the CpG position, and these regions are enriched for CREB group, NF-1, Sp100 and CTCF binding motifs. In two cases, there was tentative evidence for a trans-effect by KRAB zinc finger proteins. Allele-specific DNA methylation occurs in discrete chromosomal regions and is driven by genetic variation in cis and trans, but in general has little effect on gene expression.

  19. A germ-line-selective advantage rather than an increased mutation rate can explain some unexpectedly common human disease mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2008-07-22

    Two nucleotide substitutions in the human FGFR2 gene (C755G or C758G) are responsible for virtually all sporadic cases of Apert syndrome. This condition is 100-1,000 times more common than genomic mutation frequency data predict. Here, we report on the C758G de novo Apert syndrome mutation. Using data on older donors, we show that spontaneous mutations are not uniformly distributed throughout normal testes. Instead, we find foci where C758G mutation frequencies are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining tissue. We conclude this nucleotide site is not a mutation hot spot even after accounting for possible Luria-Delbruck "mutation jackpots." An alternative explanation for such foci involving positive selection acting on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonia experiencing the rare mutation could not be rejected. Further, the two youngest individuals studied (19 and 23 years old) had lower mutation frequencies and smaller foci at both mutation sites compared with the older individuals. This implies that the mutation frequency of foci increases as adults age, and thus selection could explain the paternal age effect for Apert syndrome and other genetic conditions. Our results, now including the analysis of two mutations in the same set of testes, suggest that positive selection can increase the relative frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying such mutations, although individuals who inherit them have reduced fitness. In addition, we compared the anatomical distribution of C758G mutation foci with both new and old data on the C755G mutation in the same testis and found their positions were not correlated with one another.

  20. Additive inhibition of human α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors by mixtures of commonly used drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondebrink, Laura; Tan, Sijie; Hermans, Elise; van Kleef, Regina G D M; Meulenbelt, Jan; Westerink, Remco H S

    2013-03-01

    Yearly, exposure to drugs of abuse results in ∼1 million emergency department visits in the US. In ∼50% of the visits, stimulant drugs like cocaine and amphetamine-like substances (e.g. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, the main active ingredient of ecstasy)) are involved, whereas in ∼60% multiple drugs are involved. These drugs induce higher dopamine and serotonin levels resulting in drug-induced toxicity. Since GABA receptors (GABA-R) provide the main inhibitory input on dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons, drug-induced inhibition of GABA-R could contribute to higher neurotransmitter levels and thus toxicity. We therefore investigated the effects of combinations of commonly abused stimulant drugs (cocaine, MDMA, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP)) on the function of the human α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor (hGABAA-R), expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. These drugs concentration-dependently inhibited the GABA-evoked current (mCPP>cocaine>MDMA>MDA). Most drug combinations decreased the GABA-evoked current stronger than the single drug. Additivity was observed during combined exposure to low concentrations of cocaine and mCPP as well as during combined exposure to MDA with cocaine or mCPP. However, combinations containing MDMA mainly resulted in sub-additivity or no additivity. At drug concentrations relevant for clinical toxicology, co-exposure to ≥2 drugs can decrease the GABA-evoked current in an additive manner. Thus, in patients exposed to multiple drugs, inhibitory GABA-ergic input is reduced more prominently, likely resulting in higher brain dopamine levels. As this will increase the risk for drug-induced toxicity, treatment of drug-intoxicated patients with drugs that enhance GABA-ergic input should be further optimized.

  1. Treatment of subtrochanteric femoral fracture with long proximal femoral nail antirotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-yue; YANG Tian-fu; FANG Yue; LEI Ming-ming; WANG Guang-lin; LIU Lei

    2010-01-01

    Objective:Subtrochanteric femoral fractures are severe injuries.Although many treatment methods have been developed,controversy exists regarding the optimal management of these fractures.This study evaluated the clinical outcome of subtrochanteric femoral fractures fixed with long proximal femoral nail antirotation(PFNA-long).Methods:Between October 2006 and February 2008,25 patients with traumatic subtrochanteric fractures of the femur were treated with PFNA-long.Closed reduction and fixation were performed in 20 cases.In the remaining 5 cases,closed reduction was difficult,so limited open reduction was performed,with bone grafting in 4 cases and circumferential wiring in 4 cases.Results:The average follow-up time was 16.1 months.All subtrochanteric femoral fractures healed uneventfully except one case of delayed union.The mean union time was 26.2 weeks.Technical difficulties with nail insertion were encountered in 3 cases.No implant failure was observed.Conclusion:PFNA-long is effective in treatment of subtrochanteric femoral fractures,with a high rate of bone union,minor soft tissue damage,early return to functional exercise and few implant-related complications.

  2. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K.; Higuera, Carlos A.; Barsoum, Wael K.; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing li...

  3. Proximal femoral reconstruction with custom mega prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Seventy-seven patients with proximal femoral tumours underwent limb salvage surgery with custom mega prostheses between July 1989 and January 2002. We describe 44 cases with a mean follow-up of 57.8 months. Forty-one patients presented with malignant neoplasms of which 11 were malignant giant cell tumours, eight were chondrosarcoma and five were metastases. Wide margins were achieved for all malignant tumours, and marginal resection was done for all benign and metastatic lesions. Six patients...

  4. Radiofrequency ablation of two femoral head chondroblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petsas, Theodore [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece); Megas, Panagiotis [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Patras (Greece)]. E-mail: panmegas@med.upatras.gr; Papathanassiou, Zafiria [Department of Radiology, University of Patras (Greece)

    2007-07-15

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign cartilaginous bone tumor. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for pain relief and prevention of further growth. Open surgical techniques are associated with complications, particularly when the tumors are located in deep anatomical sites. The authors performed RF ablation in two cases of subarticular femoral head chondroblastomas and emphasize its positive impact. The clinical course, the radiological findings and the post treatment results are discussed.

  5. Bisphosphonate-induced atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The use of bisphosphonates (BPs) is universally accepted in the management of osteoporosis. However, a small percentage of patients have been recognised to develop atypical subtrochanteric fractures of the femur with the prolonged use of BPs. We report a rare case of bilateral insufficiency lesions in the proximal femora, where a major subtrochanteric fracture developed with a minor fall. This was successfully treated with internal fixation using proximal femoral nail.

  6. Ipsilateral femoral neck and trochanter fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devdatta S Neogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ipsilateral fractures in the neck and trochanteric region of the femur are very rare and seen in elderly osteoporotic patients. We present a case of a young man who presented with ipsilateral fracture of the femoral neck and a reverse oblique fracture in the trochanteric region following a motor vehicle accident. A possible mechanism, diagnostic challenge, and awareness required for identifying this injury are discussed.

  7. Femoral access in 100 consecutive subarachnoid hemorrhage patients: the "craniotomy" of endovascular neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Judy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Femoral access is a fundamental element of catheter-based cerebral angiography. Knowledge of location of the common femoral artery (CFA bifurcation is important as the risk of retroperitoneal bleeding is increased if the puncture is superior to the inguinal ligament and there is an increased risk of thrombosis and arteriovenous fistula formation if the puncture is distal into branch vessels. We sought to characterize the location of the CFA bifurcation along with the presence of significant atherosclerosis or iliac tortuosity in a contemporary series of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients. Findings The records of a prospective single-center aneurysm database were reviewed to identify 100 consecutive SAH patients. Using an oblique femoral arteriogram, the presence of significant atherosclerosis, iliac tortuosity, and the CFA bifurcation were assessed. The CFA bifurcation was graded according to its position with respect to the femoral head: below (grade 1, lower half (grade 2, and above the upper half (grade 3. We found a CFA bifurcation grade 1 in 50 patients (50%, mean age 51.2 years, grade 2 in 40 patients (40%, mean age 55.5 years, and grade 3 in 10 patients (10%, mean age 58.2 years. Whereas 30 of 90 patients with CFA grades I or II were male (33%, only 10% with grade 3 were male (1 of 10, p = 0.12. Mean age for significant atherosclerosis was 65.5 +/- 2.6 years versus 50.9 +/- 1.6 years (p Conclusions Although a requisite element of endovascular treatment in SAH patients, femoral access can be complicated by a high common femoral artery bifurcation and the presence of atherosclerotic disease and/or iliac artery tortuosity. In this study, we found a grade 3 (above the femoral head CFA bifurcation in 10% patients, with 90% of these patients being female. We also found the presence of atherosclerotic disease and iliac tortuosity to be significantly more likely in patients older than 65 years of age.

  8. A Huge Capital Drop with Compression of Femoral Vessels Associated with Hip Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Takasago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A capital drop is a type of osteophyte at the inferomedial portion of the femoral head commonly observed in hip osteoarthritis (OA, secondary to developmental dysplasia. Capital drop itself is typically asymptomatic; however, symptoms can appear secondary to impinge against the acetabulum or to irritation of the surrounding tissues, such as nerves, vessels, and tendons. We present here a case of unilateral leg edema in a patient with hip OA, caused by a huge bone mass occurring at the inferomedial portion of the femoral head that compressed the femoral vessels. We diagnosed this bone mass as a capital drop secondary to hip OA after confirming that the mass occurred at least after the age of 63 years based on a previous X-ray. We performed early resection and total hip arthroplasty since the patient’s hip pain was due to both advanced hip OA and compression of the femoral vessels; moreover, we aimed to prevent venous thrombosis secondary to vascular compression considering the advanced age and the potent risk of thrombosis in the patient. A large capital drop should be considered as a cause of vascular compression in cases of unilateral leg edema in OA patients.

  9. Genu valgum in Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease treated with femoral varus osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glard, Yann; Katchburian, Marcos V; Jacquemier, Michel; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Bollini, Gérard

    2009-06-01

    Femoral varus osteotomy is one of the most common treatments for patients with symptomatic Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease with more severe deformities. We hypothesized knee valgus alignment at maturity in patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease is an effect of the disease and not an effect of femoral varus osteotomy. We retrospectively compared matched groups of 28 patients with and without femoral varus osteotomy. The two groups were similar with respect to age at onset and classification of Herring et al. The distribution of valgus alignment among patients who had surgery and patients who did not have surgery was assessed at maturity and was similar between the operative and nonoperative groups. The data suggest valgus malalignment (genu valgum) is not a side effect of femoral varus osteotomy in patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, but rather an effect of the disease. Level III, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Biomechanical rationale for implant choices in femoral neck fracture fixation in the non-elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Michalis; Rodham, Paul; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2015-03-01

    Femoral neck fractures represent a relatively uncommon injury in the non-elderly population often resulting from high-energy trauma. The cornerstone of their management is anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation of the femoral neck in an attempt to salvage the femoral head. Complications including avascular necrosis of the femoral head, non-union and post-traumatic osteoarthritis are not uncommon. The clinical outcomes of these patients can be improved with good pre-operative planning, optimization of surgical procedures and introduction of new improved implants and techniques. In the herein study, we attempt to describe the biomechanical properties of the hip and compare the performance of the most commonly used devices. Experimental evidence suggests that in Pauwels type III fracture patterns a cephalomedullary nail was significantly stronger in axial loading. Moreover, in unstable basicervical patterns cannulated screws (triangular configuration) demonstrated a lower ultimate load to failure, whereas in subcapital or transervical patterns both the cannulated screws (triangular configuration) and the sliding hip screw demonstrated no compromise in fixation strength. The fracture pattern appears to be the major determinant of the ideal type of implant to be selected. For a successful outcome each patient needs to be considered on an individual basis taking into account all patient and implant related factors.

  11. A Rare Case of Richter's Variety of Obstructed Femoral Hernia in a Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, V S; Vaghasiya, G N; Dave, J P

    2015-04-01

    Femoral hernias are elusive conditions that, despite having life-threatening complications, are often undiagnosed in asymptomatic patients. They are less common than inguinal hernias and occur more frequently in females [Purushotham et al. (2014) J Evol Med Dent Sci 3(05):1160-1163]. In the first place, femoral hernia in a male patient is itself, a very rare clinical presentation, let alone complications like obstruction or strangulation in the second place. Thus, despite the fact that femoral hernias account for only 2-4 % of all groin hernias, their timely and correct diagnosis is vital due to the increased mortality associated with emergency surgery for their complications [Arkoulis et al. (2012) Ox J Med, J Surg Case Rep 2012(6):6]. This, however, is not always easy, where mortality has been found to be tenfold. Here, we present a case of right-sided obstructed femoral hernia of Richter's variety in a male of 52 years of age.

  12. Prophylactic pinning for slipped capital femoral epiphysis: does it affect proximal femoral morphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Gerard R; Campbell, Donald M; Wilson, Neil I L; Maclean, Jamie G B

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to determine whether prophylactic pinning of the unaffected hip in unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis affects the proximal femoral morphology. Twenty-four hips prophylactically pinned were compared with 26 cases observed. The articulotrochanteric distance (ATD) and the trochanteric-trochanteric distance (TTD) were measured. Postoperative radiographs were compared with final follow-up radiographs. The final TTD : ATD ratio was higher (P=0.048) in the pinned group, suggesting relative coxa vara/breva. There was a smaller difference between the two hips in the prophylactically pinned group (0.7) as opposed to those observed (1.47). Prophylactic pinning does not cause growth to stop immediately but alters the proximal femoral morphology.

  13. Hybrid approach to limb salvage in the setting of an infected femoral-femoral bypass graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Douglas W; Meltzer, Andrew J; Schneider, Darren B

    2014-08-01

    Prosthetic vascular graft infection in patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease can lead to multiple additional procedures, including extra-anatomic bypass or even amputation. We report the case of an 88-year-old woman with critical limb ischemia and an infected prosthetic femoral-femoral bypass graft. Using a planned hybrid 2-stage approach, we performed endovascular recanalization of the native left iliac arterial system using remote access via the superficial femoral artery to avoid infected groin wounds. Recanalization of the patient's Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus II D chronic iliac occlusion allowed for removal of the infected graft and placement of a profunda femoris artery to proximal posterior tibial artery bypass, thereby restoring inflow and avoiding the infected left groin. Newer endovascular techniques coupled with open surgical options may lead to limb salvage in patients with previously unreconstructable peripheral arterial disease.

  14. Using biomechanics to improve the surgical technique for internal fixation of intracapsular femoral neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in science and technology, the success rate for the treatment of displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures in high-energy injuries remains disappointing. The blood supply system in the femoral head of humans does not favor recovery from these fractures. Once these fractures occur, osteonecrosis and nonunion rates may be as high as 30%, even if the newest technique is used. There are some surgical techniques used to supplement internal fixation to reestablish the blood supply in the femoral head, but none have been evidently successful. After analysis of related studies, the author concludes that immediate surgical treatment using improved techniques incorporating the principles of biomechanics can improve the success rate of treatment of these fractures. Using these principles, the fracture site can achieve sufficient stability. Consequently, the blood supply in the femoral head and neck can be reestablished earlier and loss of reduction of fragments during treatment can be minimized. Thus, the chance of full recovery from these complicated fractures can be maximized. In this study, the biomechanical characteristics of these fractures and the principles associated with the surgical techniques used for treating them are reviewed and clarified. Finally, a surgical technique which is ideal from the author's viewpoint is presented. The author believes that the recommended surgical technique may become the best method for treating these complicated fractures.

  15. Comparison of effects of different screw materials in the triangle fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Kadir; Inal, Sermet; Gok, Arif; Gulbandilar, Eyyup

    2017-05-01

    In this study, biomechanical behaviors of three different screw materials (stainless steel, titanium and cobalt-chromium) have analyzed to fix with triangle fixation under axial loading in femoral neck fracture and which material is best has been investigated. Point cloud obtained after scanning the human femoral model with the three dimensional (3D) scanner and this point cloud has been converted to 3D femoral model by Geomagic Studio software. Femoral neck fracture was modeled by SolidWorks software for only triangle configuration and computer-aided numerical analyses of three different materials have been carried out by AnsysWorkbench finite element analysis (FEA) software. The loading, boundary conditions and material properties have prepared for FEA and Von-Misses stress values on upper and lower proximity of the femur and screws have been calculated. At the end of numerical analyses, the best advantageous screw material has calculated as titanium because it creates minimum stress at the upper and lower proximity of the fracture line.

  16. Organisational and human factors in risk management: common beliefs, deceived ideas; Les Facteurs Organisationnels et Humains de la gestion des risques: idees recues, idees decues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-09-22

    The author propose critical discussions of common beliefs about the ineluctability of human error, individual ability, the validity of written procedures, good organisation, the culture of safety, the contribution of quality approaches to safety, the continuous improvement of safety, the good usage of the return on experience, the rigour and objectivity of the FOH (organisational and human factor) approach, and appealing to experts in FOHs

  17. MR evaluation of femoral neck version and tibial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, James Karl; Dwek, Jerry R. [University of California, San Diego, Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Pring, Maya E. [Rady Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Abnormalities of femoral neck version have been associated with a number of hip abnormalities in children, including slipped capital femoral epiphysis, proximal femoral focal deficiency, coxa vara, a deep acetabulum and, rarely, developmental dysplasia of the hip. Orthopedic surgeons also are interested in quantifying the femoral neck anteversion or retroversion in children especially to plan derotational osteotomies. Historically, the angle of femoral version and tibial torsion has been measured with the use of radiography and later by CT. Both methods carry with them the risks associated with ionizing radiation. Techniques that utilize MR are used less often because of the associated lengthy imaging times. This article describes a technique using MRI to determine femoral neck version and tibial torsion with total scan times of approximately 10 min. (orig.)

  18. Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures: An overlooked association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (USA) Medical Coll. of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)); Riemer, B.L.; Butterfield, S.L. (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (USA) Medical Coll. of Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1991-05-01

    A total of 304 patients with injuries to the femoral shaft and ipsilateral hip presented between 1984 and 1990. Some 253 of them suffered fractures of the femoral shaft and dislocated hips or fractures of the acetabulum, and 51 of these sustained fractures of the femoral shaft and neck or trochanteric region. All of the trochanteric injuries were demonstrated on the initial radiographs. However, in 11 of the patients with combined femoral shaft and neck fractures, the diagnosis was delayed by as much as 4 weeks. This delay related to the fact that these fractures tended not to separate in the initial evaluation period and that there was external rotation of the proximal femoral fragment due to the femoral shaft fracture. (orig./GDG).

  19. Femoral neuropathy and meralgia paresthetica secondary to an iliacus hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tae Im; Yoon, Tae Hee; Kim, Joo Sup; Lee, Ga Eun; Kim, Bo Ra

    2012-04-01

    Compressive femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies from an iliacus hematoma are unusual presentation. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy who developed right femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies as a complication of traumatic ipsilateral iliacus hematoma formation. The patient complained of numbness in the right thigh and calf as well as right leg weakness, and pain in the right inguinal area. Nerve conduction study and needle electromyography identified the neuropathies. After the electrodiagnostic studies, the pelvic bone MRI revealed a large, 9×5×4.5 cm right iliacus hematoma. As a result, diagnosis of a right iliacus hematoma compressing the femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves was made, and the patient underwent an operation to remove the hematoma. Symptoms and neurological signs showed notable improvement after surgical decompression. Subsequent follow-up electrodiagnostic studies after 11 weeks demonstrated regeneration evidence.

  20. Management of femoral artery pseudoaneurysm due to addictive drug injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建文; 王三明; 陈小东

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study surgical management for patients with femoral pseudoaneurysm resulting from addictive druginjection.Methods: Clinical data of 34 patients with femoral pseudoaneurysm resulting from addictive drug injection were retrospectively reviewed.Results: Thirteen patients underwent bypass graft ( end to side) of external iliac artery and superficial femoral artery using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE).Three patients who had an autogenous saphenous vein graft in situs, one of whom was then performed an ePTFE graft when rupture and bleeding occurred at the anastomotic site. Color Doppler image showed patent grafted blood vessels in all the patients after operation. Eighteen patients had their femoral arteries ligated. Limbs of all the 34 patients were saved.Conclusions: Ligating femoral artery is an effective way to treat femoral artery pseudoaneurysm if autogenous saphenous vein graft or artificial vessel graft is notapplicable.

  1. Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Pia; Zaric, Dusanka; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm

    2013-01-01

    Femoral nerve block (FNB), a commonly used postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), reduces quadriceps muscle strength essential for mobilization. In contrast, adductor canal block (ACB) is predominately a sensory nerve block. We hypothesized that ACB preserves quadriceps...... muscle strength as compared with FNB (primary end point) in patients after TKA. Secondary end points were effects on morphine consumption, pain, adductor muscle strength, morphine-related complications, and mobilization ability....

  2. Ischemia of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve during periacetabular osteotomy using Smith-Petersen approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyama, Takahiko; Naito, Masatoshi; Shiramizu, Kei; Shinoda, Tuyoshi; Maeyama, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Background Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) injury is a common complication in the Smith-Petersen approach to the hip. This complication may be induced by neural ischemia or direct trauma during the procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the neural ischemia of LFCN and postoperative sensory disturbance. Materials and methods Nineteen patients who underwent periacetabular osteotomy through the Smith-Petersen approach were investigated. To evaluat...

  3. Subtrochanteric Femur Fracture after Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis Pinning: A Novel Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a common injury suffered by adolescents worldwide. Treatment of most slips can be accomplished by percutaneous screw fixation, as this is an accepted and proven method associated with minimal morbidity. Complications, although limited, can be problematic for both the patient and treating physician. These include avascular necrosis, chondrolysis, infection, and fracture. We report a case of an individual who sustained a subtrochanteric...

  4. Pseudoaneurysm of profunda femoris artery following dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric femoral fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shailendra Singh; Sumit Arora; Ankit Thora; Ram Mohan; Sumit Sural; Anil Dhal

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a commonly performed procedure for internal fixation of intertrochanteric femoral fractures.Arterial injury following the operative fixation is a rare but serious event.We present a patient who developed pseudoaneurysm of profunda femoris artery after internal fixation of intertrochanteric fracture with a dynamic hip screw.The diagnosis was confirmed by angiographic study and it was successfully treated by coil embolization.

  5. Appendiceal pus in a hernia sac simulating strangulated femoral hernia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Tien-Fa; Chou,

    2011-01-01

    Tien-Fa Hsiao, Yenn-Hwei ChouDepartment of Surgery, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Acute appendicitis involving the hernia sac is infrequent but well-documented in medical literature. In most instances, it occurs within the right inguinal (Amyand’s hernia) or right femoral hernia (de Garengeot hernia). The diagnosis is always mistaken for incarcerated groin hernia. During surgery, the appendix itself, either perforated or strangulated, is most commonly...

  6. Compartment Syndrome following Open Femoral Fracture with an Isolated Femoral Vein Injury Treated with Acute Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Walmsley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency and its diagnosis is more difficult in obtunded or insensate patients. We present the case of a 34-year-old woman who sustained a Gustilo-Anderson grade III open midshaft femur fracture with an isolated femoral vein injury treated with direct repair. She developed lower leg compartment syndrome at 48 hours postoperatively, necessitating fasciotomies. She was subsequently found to have a DVT in her femoral vein at the level of the repair and was started on therapeutic anticoagulation. This case highlights the importance of recognition of isolated venous injuries in a trauma setting as a risk factor for developing compartment syndrome.

  7. Distal Femoral Locking Compression Plate Fixation in Distal Femoral Fractures: Early Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EJ Yeap

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a retrospective review on eleven patients who were treated for Type A and C distal femoral fractures (based on AO classification between January 2004 and December 2004. All fractures were fixed with titanium distal femoral locking compression plate. The patient’s ages ranged from 15 to 85 with a mean of 44. Clinical assessment was conducted at least 6 months post-operatively using the Schatzker scoring system. Results showed that four patients had excellent results, four good, two fair and one failure.

  8. Venous velocity of the right femoral vein decreases in the right lateral decubitus position compared to the supine position: a cause of postoperative pulmonary embolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato,Shizou

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The right lateral decubitus position is a risk factor for postoperative pulmonary embolism. We examined postural changes of femoral vein velocity in order to elucidate the mechanism. Thirty patients scheduled for general thoracic surgery were enrolled in this study. The common femoral veins on both sides were examined by color-duplex ultrasound for venous caliber and velocity when the patients were in the right lateral, left lateral, and supine positions. The maximum diameters of the right femoral vein in the right lateral decubitus position and the left femoral vein in the left decubitus position were significantly larger than those in the other positions. The venous velocity of the right femoral vein in the right lateral decubitus position was significantly smaller than that in the supine position, while the velocity of the left femoral vein in the left lateral decubitus position was not significantly decreased. We speculate that the decreased venous velocity of the right femoral vein in the right lateral decubitus position could result in a deep venous thromboembolism in the right leg, making this position a possible risk factor for postoperative pulmonary embolism.

  9. Human Papillomavirus Infections are Common and Predict Mortality in a Retrospective Cohort Study of Taiwanese Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Huang, Chung-Guei; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Liao, Chun-Ta; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Yang, Shu-Li; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chang, Tung-Chieh; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are deemed to play a role in the pathogenesis of oral cavity cancer (OCC). However, their exact prevalence and clinical significance remain unclear. Herein, we investigated the prevalence and prognostic value of HPV infections in a large sample of Taiwanese OCC patients.This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Between 2004 and 2011, we identified 1002 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed OCC who were scheduled for standard treatment. HPV genotyping was performed in tumor specimens using polymerase chain reaction-based HPV blots. To investigate the temporal trends of HPV infections and their impact on 5-year overall survival (OS), patients were divided into 2 cohorts according to calendar periods: "2004 cohort" (2004-2007; n = 466) and "2008 cohort" (2008-2011; n = 536). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models were also used to identify the independent predictors of OS in the 2 cohorts. A weighted risk score was assigned to each factor based on the range of their corresponding hazard ratios and validated in both cohorts using the c-statistic.The overall prevalence of HPV infections was 19%, with a trend toward decreasing rates from 2004 to 2011. In patients without risky oral habits, the 5-year OS rate of HPV-positive patients was significantly lower than that of HPV-negative cases (49% vs 80%; P = 0.021). In the 2004 cohort, multivariate analysis identified HPV16, pathological T3/T4, pathological N1/N2, and extracapsular spread as independent adverse prognostic factors for OS. In the 2008 cohort, pathological N1/N2, pathological stage III/IV, and histological tumor depth >8 mm were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. Using a weighted grading system incorporating HPV16 infection, we devised a prognostic index that identified 4 distinct risk categories with 5-year OS rates ranging from 25% to 89% (c-statistic = 0.76) in the 2004 cohort. The validity of the index was internally

  10. Synchronous femoral hernias diagnosed during endoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnis, Soni; Wong, April; Berney, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    During totally extraperitoneal (TEP) endoscopic repair of inguinal hernias, it is possible to see the internal opening of the femoral canal. The aim of our study was to determine the incidence of synchronous femoral hernias found in patients undergoing TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair. This was a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 362 consecutive patients who underwent 484 TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repairs during a 5-year period, May 2005 to May 2010. During surgery, both inguinal and femoral canal orifices were routinely inspected. The presence of unilateral or bilateral inguinal and femoral hernias was recorded and repaired accordingly. There were a total of 362 patients. More males (343, 95%) underwent a TEP hernia repair than females (19, 5%). There were more cases of unilateral (240/362, 66%) than bilateral (122/362, 34%) inguinal hernias. A total of 18 cases of synchronous femoral hernias were found during operation. There was a higher incidence of femoral hernia in females (7/19, 37%) compared to males (11/343, 3%) (P hernias were clinically detectable preoperatively. Females undergoing elective inguinal hernia repair are more likely to have a synchronous femoral hernia than males. We suggest that all women presenting with an inguinal hernia also have a formal assessment of the femoral canal. TEP endoscopic inguinal hernia repair is an ideal approach as both inguinal and femoral orifices can be assessed and hernias repaired simultaneously during surgery.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology in the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatori, Yoshio; Kamogawa, Morihide; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ninomiya, Setsuo; Kokubo, Takashi

    1989-05-01

    To correlate the magnetic resonance (MR) images with the histopathological findings in the femoral head, the histopathology of 24 femoral heads, 15 with osteonecrosis, five with osteoarthritis and four with other hip disorders were subjected to preoperative MR imaging which demonstrated low intensity areas due to long T1 relaxation time in the femoral head. The MR signal was low where fibrovascular tissue, disintegrated fibrovascular tissue, amorphous necrotic material, bone, or cartilagenous tissue occupied the medullary space. From this study, it seems possible to predict the histopathologic changes in the femoral head using MR images. (author).

  12. A rare and frequently unrecognised pathology in children: femoral hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, A; Akcora, B; Temiz, M; Canbolant, E

    2008-10-01

    A femoral hernia is the protrusion of the abdominal contents through the femoral canal. It accounts for less than 1% of all groin hernias in children and is often confused with inguinal hernia or other inguinal pathologies. Preoperative misdiagnosis has been reported to be between 40 and 75%. We believe that misdiagnosis and mistreatment usually occur due to insufficient physical examination, knowledge and experience about childhood femoral hernias. Here, we report and discuss the clinical appearance and treatment approach of three patients operated with the diagnosis of femoral hernias.

  13. Complications, effects on dialysis dose, and survival of tunneled femoral dialysis catheters in acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, Kada; Amigues, Laurent; Deleuze, Sebastien; Beraud, Jean-Jacques; Canaud, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Availability of a functional vascular access is a mandatory prerequisite for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in patients with acute renal failure. The femoral site of insertion commonly is chosen because it is an easy and convenient access. However, an array of complications may substantially alter the quality of treatment, and it appears that catheter-related morbidity and dysfunction are more frequent with the femoral than internal jugular site. This study is designed to evaluate the potential benefits of using soft silicone tunneled catheters ((ST)Caths) at the femoral site. Thirty patients with acute renal failure treated by intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and/or continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) were assigned to either twin (ST)Caths or twin polyurethane nontunneled femoral catheters. Time necessary for catheter insertion, catheter-related complications, and catheter lifespan were monitored. Catheter performance during IHD and the effect of catheter type on dialysis dose were evaluated. The time necessary for (ST)Cath insertion was significantly longer. The incidence of vein thrombosis and catheter-related infection was lower, and the ratio of venous return pressure to catheter blood flow was better with an (ST)Cath. Recirculation rates were similar for both types of catheters. Whether treated by using IHD or CVVHDF, patients with an (ST)Cath benefited from a greater delivered dialysis dose. Multivariate analysis confirmed that (ST)Cath use was a determinant factor to optimize dialysis dose delivery. (ST)Cath patency was significantly longer. In patients with acute renal failure, use of an (ST)Cath minimizes catheter-related morbidity and improves dialysis efficiency compared with conventional femoral catheters.

  14. Accuracy of methods to measure femoral head penetration within metal-backed acetabular components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Howie, Donald W

    2016-06-30

    A number of different software programs are used to investigate the in vivo wear of polyethylene bearings in total hip arthroplasty. With wear rates below 0.1 mm/year now commonly being reported for highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) components, it is important to identify the accuracy of the methods used to measure such small movements. The aims of this study were to compare the accuracy of current software programs used to measure two-dimensional (2D) femoral head penetration (FHP) and to determine whether the accuracy is influenced by larger femoral heads or by different methods of representing the acetabular component within radiostereometric analysis (RSA). A hip phantom was used to compare known movements of the femoral head within a metal-backed acetabular component to FHP measured radiographically using RSA, Hip Analysis Suite (HAS), PolyWare, Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse (EBRA), and Roentgen Monographic Analysis Tool (ROMAN). RSA was significantly more accurate than the HAS, PolyWare, and ROMAN methods when measuring 2D FHP with a 28 mm femoral head. Femoral head size influenced the accuracy of HAS and ROMAN 2D FHP measurements, EBRA proximal measurements, and RSA measurements in the proximal and anterior direction. The use of different acetabular reference segments did not influence accuracy of RSA measurements. The superior accuracy and reduced variability of RSA wear measurements allow much smaller cohorts to be used in RSA clinical wear studies than those utilizing other software programs. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  15. Do changes in torsional magnetic resonance imaging reflect improvement in gait after femoral derotation osteotomy in patients with cerebral palsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braatz, Frank; Wolf, Sebastian I.; Gerber, Annette; Klotz, Matthias C.; Dreher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Femoral derotation osteotomy (FDO) is commonly used to correct internal rotation gait (IRG) in spastic diplegia. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the extent of intraoperative derotation is reflected in changes in static (clinical ROM and anteversion angle measured on tors

  16. Pseudoaneurisma de artéria poplítea secundário a osteocondroma femoral: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Mascarenhas de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Osteochondromas are the most common benign tumor of the bone. They are sometimes responsible for vascular complications involving either veins or arteries, principally around the knee. Pseudoaneurysms are considered a rare condition. The authors describe the occurrence of a pseudoaneurysm of the popliteal artery in association with a femoral osteochondroma in a 30-years-old man.

  17. Necrosis avascular de cabeza y cuello de fémur en un paciente con sida Avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head and neck in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Villafañe

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available La osteonecrosis avascular (ONA es una complicación que se describe con frecuencia creciente en pacientes infectados por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana tipo-1 (HIV-1. En su localización más común compromete la cabeza y cuello del fémur con dolor e impotencia funcional, en una o ambas caderas. Su etiología es multifactorial y la terapia antirretroviral de alta eficacia (HAART con inhibidores de proteasa (IP puede estar relacionada con la patogenia. En su evolución puede requerir el reemplazo total de la cadera con la colocación de una prótesis. Se presenta un paciente hemofílico, HIV-1 seropositivo, que desarrolló una ONA bilateral de cabeza y cuello de fémur mientras se encontraba bajo HAART.Avascular osteonecrosis (AON has increased in the last few years in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1. The most commonly affected bone is the femoral head and neck. Frequently these bilateral and clinical findings include moderate to severe pain and functional impotence of the affected joints. The etiology is multifactorial and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART with protease inhibitors (PI is probably related to its development. In the evolution, a total hip replacement may be needed. We present an hemophilic patient with AIDS, who developed a bilateral AON of the femoral head and neck during HAART.

  18. The effect of femoral neck osteotomy on femoral component position of a primary cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, Dimitris; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Kwon, Young-Min

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the femoral canal diameter and version at different femoral neck osteotomy locations, and to investigate the effect of the osteotomy plane on femoral component position in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Preoperative and postoperative three-dimensional models were reconstructed in 15 patients (19 hips) who underwent primary cementless THA with tapered non-anatomical femoral stem. On the pre-operative models, the osteotomy plane was simulated at different levels (-5, 0, 5, and 10 mm from the femoral saddle [piriformis fossa]) and angles (30, 40, 50, and 60° from the femoral anatomical axis). Medullary canal version and mediolateral diameter were measured on the osteotomy surfaces. On the postoperative models, the femoral neck osteotomy plane, stem anteversion and alignment were measured. The average canal diameter ranged from 22.8 to 26.3 mm at different osteotomy levels and from 20.8 to 29.0 mm at different osteotomy angles. The average canal version ranged from 11.4 to 23.2° at different resection levels and from 12.8 to 21° at different resection angles. The femoral stem anteversion was correlated with neck osteotomy angle (R = 0.72), whereas stem alignment in frontal plane (varus/valgus) was correlated with neck osteotomy level (R = 0.87). The femoral neck osteotomy plane in THA affects the postoperative stem position due to the complex morphology of the proximal femoral medullary canal, suggesting that both femoral neck resection level and angle should be considered in optimizing femoral component alignment in THA patients.

  19. Correlation Between Residual Displacement and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Cannulated Screw Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Gui-Jun; Han, Zhe; Jiang, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng-Bao; Dong, Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a new method for measuring the residual displacement of the femoral head after internal fixation and explore the relationship between residual displacement and osteonecrosis with femoral head, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with femoral neck fractures treated by closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation.One hundred and fifty patients who sustained intracapsular femoral neck fractures between January 2011 and April 2013 were enrolled in the study. All were treated with closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw internal fixation. The residual displacement of the femoral head after surgery was measured by 3-dimensional reconstruction that evaluated the quality of the reduction. Other data that might affect prognosis were also obtained from outpatient follow-up, telephone calls, or case reviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the intrinsic relationship between the risk factors and the osteonecrosis of the femoral head.Osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 27 patients (18%). Significant differences were observed regarding the residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification. Moreover, we found more or less residual displacement of femoral head in all patients with high quality of reduction based on x-ray by the new technique. There was a close relationship between residual displacement and ONFH.There exists limitation to evaluate the quality of reduction by x-ray. Three-dimensional reconstruction and digital measurement, as a new method, is a more accurate method to assess the quality of reduction. Residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification were risk factors for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. High-quality reduction was necessary to avoid complications.

  20. A semi-automated method for measuring femoral shape to derive version and its comparison with existing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, F; Pynsent, P; McBryde, C

    2014-11-01

    The measurement of femoral version is important in surgical planning of derotational osteotomies particularly for patients with proximal femoral deformity. It is, however, difficult to measure version accurately and differences of 10° to 15° have been found between repeated measurements. The aim of this work was first to develop a method of measuring femoral version angle where the definition of the neck axis is based on the three-dimensional point cloud making up the neck, second to automate many of the processes involved thus reducing the influence of human error and third to ensure the method could run on freely available software suitable for most computer platforms. A CT scan was performed on 44 cadaveric femurs to generate point clouds of the femoral surfaces. The point clouds were then analysed semi-automatically to determine femoral version angle between a neck axis defined by the bone surface points belonging only to the neck and a femoral condylar axis. The results from the neck fitting method were compared against three other methods typically used in the clinic (Murphy, Reikeras and Lee methods). Version angle measured by the new method gave 19.1° ± 7.3° (mean ± standard deviation) for the set of cadaveric femurs, 3.5° lower than the Murphy method and 6.8° and 11.0° higher than the Reikeras and Lee 2D methods respectively. The results demonstrate a method of measuring femoral version angle incorporating a high level of automation running on free software.

  1. Assisted reproductive technologies in the common marmoset: an integral species for developing nonhuman primate models of human diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kropp, Jenna; Di Marzo, Andrea; Golos, Thaddeus

    2017-01-01

    .... Callithrix jacchus, or the common marmoset, is a New World, nonhuman primate species that exhibits great reproductive fitness in captivity with an ovarian cycle that can be easily managed with pharmacological agents...

  2. Identification of an antigenic domain in the N-terminal region of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein that is not common to swine and human HEVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhen; Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Liu, Lihong; Widén, Frederik; Hsu, Walter H; Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-12-01

    The antigenic domains located in the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein have been characterized. This region shares common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. However, epitopes in the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues have never been reported. In this study, an antigenic domain located between amino acids 23 and 85 was identified by indirect ELISA using the truncated recombinant capsid proteins as coating antigens and anti-avian HEV chicken sera as primary antibodies. In addition, this domain did not react with anti-swine and human HEV sera. These results indicated that the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues of avian HEV capsid protein do not share common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. This finding is important for our understanding of the antigenicity of the avian HEV capsid protein. Furthermore, it has important implications in the selection of viral antigens for serological diagnosis.

  3. To study the role of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing the femoral head vascularity in intracapsular femoral neck fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Abhishek, E-mail: abhiortho27@gmail.co [Department of Orthopedics, 513, Thermal Colony, Sector-22, Faridabad 121005, Haryana (India); Sankaran, Balu; Varghese, Mathew [Department of Orthopedics, St Stephen' s Hospital, Tis hazari, Delhi, New Delhi 110054 (India)

    2010-09-15

    Intracapsular femoral neck fractures remain unsolved fractures even after improvement in techniques of diagnosis and internal fixation. Individuals who sustain displaced femoral neck fractures are at high risk of developing avascular necrosis and non-union. Although several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, they are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications and technical difficulties. Dynamic MRI was introduced in the recent past as a simple, non-invasive technique to predict the femoral head viability after the femoral neck fractures. In this study role of dynamic MRI was studied in 30 patients with 31 intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Fractures were divided in to three types according to dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation and were followed up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome. Sensitivity, Specificity and the Accuracy of dynamic MRI in predicting vascularity after femoral neck fracture are 87%, 88% and 87%, respectively. Type A or Type B curve pattern is a positive factor to successful osteosynthesis with p value <0.0001 (Chi-square test). This is a statistically significant value. From this finding it can be suggested that the reliability of dynamic curves A and B in predicting maintained vascularity of femoral head is high. This investigation can be used to predict the vascularity of femoral head after intracapsular femoral neck fractures. There was a good correlation between the outcomes of fractures and dynamic MRI curves done within 48 h of injury. This signifies the role of dynamic MRI in predicting the vascularity of femoral head as early as 48 h. A treatment algorithm can be suggested on the basis of dynamic MRI curves. The fractures with Type C dynamic curve should be considered as fractures with poor vascularity of femoral head and measures to enhance the vascularity of femoral head along with rigid internal fixation should be undertaken to promote

  4. Persistent knee complaints after retrograde unreamed nailing of femoral shaft fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Moumni, Mostafa; Schraven, Pim; ten Duis, Henk Jan; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde nailing is an attractive method for stabilisation of femoral shaft fractures in cases of polytrauma, ipsilateral pelvic, acetabular, tibial and femoral neck fractures, bilateral femoral fractures, obese and pregnant patients. However, retrograde nailing may result in complaints about the

  5. Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Common warts By Mayo Clinic Staff Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny ...

  6. Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament femoral fixation: the trans-iliotibial band endoscopic portal for direct visualization of ideal button placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistovich, R Justin; O'Toole, Patrick O J; Ganley, Theodore J

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric and adolescent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a commonly performed procedure that has been increasing in incidence. Multiple techniques for graft fixation have been described. Button-based femoral cortical suspension fixation of the anterior cruciate ligament graft allows for fast, secure fixation with strong load-to-failure biomechanical properties. The biomechanical properties of button-based femoral cortical suspension fixation are especially beneficial with soft-tissue grafts such as hamstring autografts. Confirmation of a successfully flipped button can be achieved with intraoperative fluoroscopy or indirect viewing; however, these techniques do not provide direct visualization of the flipped button. Our trans-iliotibial band endoscopic portal allows the surgeon to safely and directly visualize the flipped button on the lateral femoral cortex and ensure that there is no malpositioning in the form of an incompletely flipped button or from soft-tissue interposition between the button and the lateral femoral cortex. This portal therefore allows for direct visual confirmation that the button is fully flipped and resting flush against the femoral cortex, deep to the iliotibial band and vastus lateralis.

  7. A Case of Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula Causing High-Output Cardiac Failure, Originally Misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous arterial catheterisation is commonly undertaken for a range of diagnostic and interventional procedures. Iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistulas are an uncommon complication of these procedures. Most are asymptomatic and close spontaneously, but can rarely increase in size leading to the development of symptoms. We report a case of an iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistula, causing worsening congestive cardiac failure, in a 34-year-old marathon runner. This was originally diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome. Following clinical examination, duplex ultrasound, and CT angiography a significant arteriovenous fistula was confirmed. Elective open surgery was performed, leading to a dramatic and rapid improvement in symptoms. Femoral arteriovenous fistulas have the potential to cause significant haemodynamic effects and can present many years after the initial procedure. Conservative, endovascular, and open surgical management strategies are available.

  8. Role of Sonography in Clinically Occult Femoral Hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandel, David W; Girish, Gandikota; Brandon, Catherine J; Dong, Qian; Yablon, Corrie; Jamadar, David A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of sonography in clinically occult femoral hernias and to describe our sonographic technique. The clinical and imaging data for 93 outpatients referred by general surgeons, all of whom underwent sonographic evaluation and surgery, were reviewed retrospectively. Of these, 55 patients who underwent surgical exploration for groin hernias within 3 months of sonography and met all inclusion criteria were included in the study. The sonographic technique involves using the pubic tubercle as an osseous landmark to identify and appropriately visualize the femoral canal. The Valsalva maneuver is then used to differentiate the movement of normal fat (a potential pitfall) from true herniation in the femoral canal. Surgical findings were used as the reference standard by which sonographic results were judged. Two-by-two contingency tables were used to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. In these 55 patients, surgery revealed 15 femoral hernias. Eight femoral hernias occurred in women, and 7 occurred in men. For diagnosing femoral hernias, sonography demonstrated sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 88%, a positive predictive value of 71%, and a negative predictive value of 92%. True-positive cases of femoral hernias have a sonographic appearance of a hypoechoic sac with speckled internal echoes. When examining during the Valsalva maneuver, a femoral hernia passes deep to the inguinal ligament, expands the femoral canal, displacing the normal canal fat, and effaces the femoral vein. Sonography can exclude femoral hernias with high confidence in light of its exceptional negative predictive value. With attention to technique and imaging criteria, the diagnostic accuracy of sonography can be enhanced.

  9. Biogeometry of femoral neck for implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwa J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Treatment of fracture neck femur with three cannulated cancellous screws in an apex proximal configuration is practised in many parts of the world. Methods : Dimensions of femoral neck at the middle of transcervical neck using CT scan (live neck and vernier caliper (dry cadeveric neck in 20 subjects respectively were measured. Results : Inferior half of the neck is narrower than superior half. Conclusion : Biogeometry of the neck of femur does not accomodate two inferior screws and thus fixation of fracture neck femur with three canulated cancellous screws in an apex distal configuration is recommended.

  10. Eosinophilic granuloma of the capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takahiro; Nemoto, Tetsuo; Ogura, Koichi; Imanishi, Jungo; Hozumi, Takahiro; Funata, Nobuaki

    2011-05-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma occurs almost exclusively in the diaphysis or metaphysis, when tubular bones are affected. The investigators present an extremely rare case of eosinophilic granuloma arising at the epiphysis of the femoral head in an 8-year-old boy. Plain radiographs and computed tomography showed a well-circumscribed radiolucent lesion, suggesting chondroblastoma or Brodie's abscess. However, the findings on magnetic resonance images were different from typical features of chondroblastoma or Brodie's abscess. The lesion was curetted. Histological diagnosis was eosinophilic granuloma. Differential diagnoses of a radiolucent lesion at the epiphysis in a child should include, though quite rare, eosinophilic granuloma.

  11. Experimental fixation of femoral osteotomies by cerclage with nylon straps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinelander, F W; Stewart, C L

    1983-10-01

    Following the successful experience of Partridge in the fixation of human femoral fractures by nylon-strap cerclage, this research in 23 mature dogs was performed to compare nylon-strap with wire-loop cerclage for healing periods of up to 12 weeks. Supplemented by intramedullary fixation with Steinmann pins, long oblique femoral osteotomies were fixed in one femur of each dog by nylon straps and in the other femur by wire loops, at separate operations. The nylon straps were all secured at the same tension by a special "gun." The wire loops were all secured at the same tension by the Rhinelander tightener-twister. Half of the nylon straps had "bumps" along the inner surface, which were added by Partridge in an effort to circumvent the microvascular disturbance reported with Parham bands. On examination by microangiography and correlated histology, all of the osteotomies, regardless of the type of fixation, showed good progress toward osseous union. After fixation by wire cerclage no loss of position or disturbance of blood supply was noted. After fixation by nylon straps slight (clinically insignificant) longitudinal displacement, attributed to slight lengthening of the straps, with consequent loosening was noted in all cases. This loosening was considered advantageous because it appeared to be responsible for the unexpected lack of impairment of the vascularization of the underlying cortical bone by any of the straps. The bumps on the undersurface of some of the straps were, thus, of no vascular advantage, and their presence made accurate fixation of the ostectomy fragments more difficult on the small bones. These studies support the value of fixation by plain nylon straps and show their advantage over straps with bumps for fixation of long oblique single osteotomies of bones the size of the canine femur.

  12. Osteosynthesis of ununited femoral neck fracture by internal fixation combined with iliac crest bone chips and muscle pedicle bone grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D D Baksi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ununited femoral neck fracture is seen commonly in developing countries due to delayed presentation or failure of primary internal fixation. Such fractures, commonly present with partial or total absorption of femoral neck, osteonecrosis of femoral head in 8-30% cases with upward migration of trochanter posing problem for osteosynthesis, especially in younger individuals. Several techniques for treatment of such conditions are described like osteotomies or nonvascularied cortical or cancellous bone grafting provided varying degrees of success in terms of fracture union but unsatisfactory long term results occurred due to varying incidence of avascular necrosis (AVN of femoral head. Moreover, in presence of AVN of femoral head neither free fibular graft nor cancellous bone graft is satisfactory. The vascularied bone grafting by deep circumflex iliac artery based on iliac crest bone grafting, free vascularied fibular grafting and muscle pedicle periosteal grafting showed high incidence of success rate. Osteosynthesis is the preferred treatment of choice in ununited femoral neck fracture in younger individuals. Materials and Methods: Of the 293 patients operated during the period from June 1977 to June 2009, 42 were lost to followup. Seven patients with gluteus medius muscle pedicle bone grafting (MPBG were excluded. Thus, out of 244 patients, 208 (85.3% untreated nonunion and 36 (14.7% following failure of primary internal fixation were available for studies. Time interval between the date of injury and operation in untreated nonunion cases was mean 6.5 months and in failed internal fixation cases was mean 11.2 months. Ages of the patients varied from 16 to 55 years. Seventy patients had partial and 174 had subtotal absorption of the femoral neck. Evidence of avascular necrosis (AVN femoral head was found histologically in 135 (54.3% and radiologically in 48 (19.7% patients. The patients were operated by open reduction of fracture

  13. Revaluation of the concept of the human condition and the common heritage of mankind: Keys to the social benefits of space technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca, Aldo Armando

    Men may do many things, but they must never forget the human condition in any act or relation with a fellow human being. Space Law has vindicated the supreme value of man as a legal subject par excellence. The dignity of the human being is a value that rates above any scientific or technological advance. A benefit, by definition and derivation, is anything contributing to an improvement in a condition. Social benefits pertain only to human beings, who are their sole beneficiaries. Developing countries are young nations that through their international relations may, and indeed must, realize the benefits of space technology. The principle of the "common heritage of Mankind" was created to satisfy the aspirations of all peoples and to meet the needs of both industrialized and developing countries. Only a groundless fear and lack of vision of the future can induce governments to delay its implementation. We must not forget that the concept was transformed into a principle of international positive law by the unanimous decision of the international community, which enshrined it in the Moon Agreement. The social and individual responsibility of the scientist is becoming even more clearly defined, and scientists play an important role in the conduct of nations. Through education, including education in the humanities and a graduation pledge, the scientist has embarked on the road leading to an active presence in society, facing his responsibility. Inter-generational equity contributes to strengthening the concept of the human condition and the legal principle of the common heritage of mankind.

  14. STUDY OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED CONTINUOUS FEMORAL NERVE BLOCKADE WITH EPIDURAL ANALGESIA FOR PAIN RELIEF AFTER TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rapolu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Total knee replacement causes moderate-to-severe pain requiring effective analgesia. With use of ultrasound guidance, we may prove a more suitable approach compared with the epidural technique. Aim of this study is the comparison between Continuous Epidural Analgesia (CEA and Continuous Femoral Block (CFB techniques in Total Knee Replacement surgeries. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted on 60 adult male and female patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery for a period of 2 years. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group - 1: Continuous epidural analgesia patients, Group - 2: Continuous femoral blockage patients. All patients were assessed clinically preoperatively and investigated to rule out any systemic disease. RESULTS The mean age of patient in Group - 1 was 66.54 ± 4.98 and in Group - 2 was 66.98 ± 5.02 years. P value was > 0.05, which was not significant. No significant differences in gender is observed between the groups. VAS scores were significantly high (P < 0.05 in the femoral group at 6 h, after which there was a declining trend and scores were essentially similar from 24 h. The use of rescue analgesic was also higher in the femoral group. Analysis of side-effects showed that all the five common sideeffects were twice as common in the epidural group than in the femoral study group. Only one patient in the femoral group had urinary retention when compared with four in the epidural group. The differences were not statistically significant. Muscle power at 48 h, time getting out of the bed and time stay in hospital (days are significant in comparison in 2 groups, range of movement is insignificant in groups. Patient satisfaction score was measured on a scale of 1 - 10. Patients in the Femoral group were slightly more satisfied with a mean ± SD score of 8.1 ± 1.2 when compared with the epidural group 7.3 ± 1.01. CONCLUSION Continuous femoral blockade using US guidance provides equivalent analgesia

  15. fibular osteosynthesis of neglected femoral neck fracture in a young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where there are no facilities for microvascular surgery, non- ... fixation of a neglected femoral neck fracture associated with aseptic necrosis of femoral head in ... After a follow-up of two years, he had a Harris hip ... applied on the fifth postoperative day and patient was ... radiographic features that suggested aseptic necrosis.

  16. Femoral herniorrhaphy and its affect on fibrinogen levels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... The study consists of 10 patients with features suggestive of femoral hernia ... development of post-operative thrombo embolic complications. ... the blood amongst our patients for femoral herniorrhaphy ... plasma fibrinogen level occur during and after surgery ... spinal anaesthesia has not been studied.

  17. Normal neurodynamic responses of the femoral slump test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Weng-Hang; Shih, Yi-Fen; Lin, Pei-Ling; Chen, Wen-Yin; Ma, Hsiao-Li

    2012-04-01

    Femoral slump test is a neurodynamic testing, which could be used to assess the mechanosensitivity of the femoral component of the nervous system. Although Trainor and Pinnington reported the diagnosis accuracy of the femoral slump test, the neurodynamic responses of the femoral slump test have never been studied. The purposes of this study were to evaluate whether maneuvers that changed the nerve tension altered the responses of the femoral slump test and if these responses were influenced by gender and leg dominance; and to identify the correlations between flexibility and measured hip extension angle. Thirty-two asymptomatic subjects (16 males, 16 females) were recruited. The femoral slump test was performed in trunk slump and neutral positions, and cervical extension was used as the structure differential technique. Hip extension angle and visual analog scale (VAS) of thigh pain was measured during the test. Our results showed the decrease of nerve tension significantly increased hip extension ROM (P  0.05). These findings indicated that femoral slump test resulted in normal neurodynamic responses in individuals free of lower extremity problems, and these responses were independent of the influence of muscle flexibility or gender. Future research should emphasize the use of femoral slump test in patient groups such as low back and anterior knee pain.

  18. Reference values for local arterial stiffness. Part B : femoral artery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossuyt, Jelle; Engelen, Lian; Ferreira, Isabel; Stehouwer, Coen D; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stéphane; Segers, Patrick; Reesink, Koen; Van Bortel, Luc M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered the gold standard measure of arterial stiffness, representing mainly aortic stiffness. As compared with the elastic carotid and aorta, the more muscular femoral artery may be differently associated with cardiovascular risk factors (C

  19. Femoral compressive neuropathy from iliopsoas haematoma complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sneha Ganu; Yesha Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is a debilitating mosquito-borne disease caused by dengue virus. We reported a case of femoral compression neuropathy due to iliopsoas hematoma complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever. Iliopsoas muscle hematoma can cause femoral neuropathy with resultant pain and paralysis. Such manifestations are not well documented in the literature. The pathogenesis of hematoma and compressive neuropathy with its appropriate management is discussed.

  20. STRANGULATED FEMORAL HERNIA IN A MALE PATIENT – DIAGNOSTIC DILEMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strangulated femoral hernia in a male patient is a very rare clinical presentation. Here we report a case of right inguinal swelling mimicking that of lymphadenopathy , later developing perforation due to strangulation of femoral hernia. Laparotomy with ileostomy was done

  1. Differential DNA methylation with age displays both common and dynamic features across human tissues that are influenced by CpG landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Kenneth; Waite, Lindsay L; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna; West, Andrew; Bamman, Marcas M; Brooks, James D; Myers, Richard M; Absher, Devin

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that changes with age in human tissues, although the mechanisms and specificity of this process are still poorly understood. We compared CpG methylation changes with age across 283 human blood, brain, kidney, and skeletal muscle samples using methylation arrays to identify tissue-specific age effects. We found age-associated CpGs (ageCGs) that are both tissue-specific and common across tissues. Tissue-specific age CGs are frequently located outside CpG islands with decreased methylation, and common ageCGs show the opposite trend. AgeCGs are significantly associated with poorly expressed genes, but those with decreasing methylation are linked with higher tissue-specific expression levels compared with increasing methylation. Therefore, tissue-specific gene expression may protect against common age-dependent methylation. Distinguished from other tissues, skeletal muscle age CGs are more associated with expression, enriched near genes related to myofiber contraction, and closer to muscle-specific CTCF binding sites. Kidney-specific ageCGs are more increasingly methylated compared to other tissues as measured by affiliation with kidney-specific expressed genes. Underlying chromatin features also mark common and tissue-specific age effects reflective of poised and active chromatin states, respectively. In contrast with decreasingly methylated ageCGs, increasingly methylated ageCGs are also generally further from CTCF binding sites and enriched within lamina associated domains. Our data identified common and tissue-specific DNA methylation changes with age that are reflective of CpG landscape and suggests both common and unique alterations within human tissues. Our findings also indicate that a simple epigenetic drift model is insufficient to explain all age-related changes in DNA methylation.

  2. Current concepts in total femoral replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo Bp; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-12-18

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20(th) century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure.

  3. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  4. Patellar instability treated with distal femoral osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Ishaan; Elattar, Osama; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2017-06-01

    Patellar instability can cause significant disability in both pediatric and adult patients, and it is associated with several factors including genu valgum. In this study, we describe the role of a lateral opening wedge distal femoral osteotomy (DFO) combined with lateral retinacular release in addressing genu valgum with associated patellar instability. The rationale for this approach is to medialize the patellar tendon insertion and decrease the Q angle with DFO. A consecutive series of patients were studied, and our outcomes of interest included improvements in radiographic measures and patient outcomes. Radiographic improvement was assessed using patella congruency angle (PCA), mechanical axis deviation (MAD), and lateral distal femoral angle (LDFA). Patient outcomes were assessed using Oxford Knee scores, KOOS-PS scores, VAS pain scores, and Kujala scores. We studied eight patients (10 knees) that underwent a lateral opening wedge DFO for genu valgum and patellar instability. Mean follow-up duration was 27 months. PCA improved from 30.4° lateral preoperatively to 5.7° lateral postoperatively (p=0.016). Similarly, MAD improved from 33.1mm lateral to 6.5mm medial, and LDFA improved from 82.4° to 92.7° after surgery (p=0.002). There were significant improvements in VAS pain and Kujala scores after surgery (pgenu valgum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Injury of the knee ligaments associated with ipsilateral femoral shaft fractures

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    Marco Tulio Lopes Caldas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: With the objective of identifying the incidence of ipsilateral knee ligament injury, thirty-six patients with femoral shaft fractures were evaluated. METHODS: During the osteosynthesis procedure to repair the femur while under anesthesia, all patients underwent a physical examination and X-ray examination. RESULTS: The most common mechanism of injury observed was motorcycle accidents. Of the thirty-six patients that were studied, eleven patients (30.5% had a knee ligament injury. Of the eleven patients, 64% had a cruciate ligament injury. The ligament injury was not treated at the time of the osteosynthesis procedure. CONCLUSION: We highlight the difficulty of diagnosis at the time of admission and the need for systematic physical examination before and after surgical treatment of femoral fracture.

  6. Osseous femoral avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament origin in an adult

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    Samir H. Shah, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament are commonly encountered in clinical practice, and occur in a wide variety of settings, from sports-related injuries to polytrauma. Tears of the anterior cruciate ligament supersede osseous avulsion in the adult demographic; however, in the pediatric population, osseous avulsion reflects the most frequent injury. When osseous avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament occurs in children or adults, the injury typically occurs at the level of the tibial eminence. Conversely, osseous avulsion injuries from the femur are rare, with all cases reported in the literature occurring in the skeletally immature. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who suffered an osseous avulsion of her anterior cruciate ligament from her lateral femoral condyle. To our knowledge, this reflects the first reported case of femoral osseous avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament origin in an adult.

  7. Anatomy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve relevant to clinical findings in meralgia paresthetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Hyo; Shin, Kang-Jae; Gil, Young-Chun; Ha, Tae-Jun; Koh, Ki-Seok; Song, Wu-Chul

    2017-05-01

    Compression of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN), known as meralgia paresthetica (MP), is common. We investigated the topographic anatomy of the LFCN focusing on the inguinal ligament and adjacent structures. Distances from various bony and soft-tissue landmarks to the LFCN were investigated in 33 formalin-embalmed cadavers. The mean distance from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the LFCN was 8.8 mm. In approximately 90% of cases, the LFCN lay <2 cm from the medial tip of the ASIS, whereas, in 76% of cases, it was <1 cm away. The mean angle between the inguinal ligament and LFCN was 83.3°. We determined the variability of the location of the LFCN at the boundary between the pelvic and femoral portions. The reported results will be helpful for diagnosis and treatment of MP. Muscle Nerve 55: 646-650, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    OpenAIRE

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma,Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.; Bray, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    White individuals have a high frequency of the common PAR4 gene (F2RL3) variant Ala120; blacks have a high frequency of Thr120.PAR4 Thr120 induces greater signaling and is associated with greater platelet aggregation and reduced inhibition by a PAR4 antagonist.

  9. Distal femoral osteotomy using a novel deformity reduction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichi, Enrico; Cappellari, Fulvio; Olimpo, Matteo; Piras, Lisa A; Radasch, Robert; Ferretti, Antonio; Peirone, Bruno

    2016-09-20

    Distal femoral osteotomy is a surgical procedure used to correct patellar luxation, secondary to a femoral deformity. A distal femoral osteotomy using the tibial plateau levelling osteotomy-jig to temporarily provide stability of the distal femoral osteotomy, maintaining limb alignment in the frontal and axial planes prior to internal plate fixation of the osteotomy, has been described. This report describes a novel jig named Deformity Reduction Device (DRD). This device was developed with the specific aim of increasing precision and predictability during corrective osteotomy execution in order to be consistent with the preoperative planning. The distal femoral osteotomy DRD-assisted procedure is described in detail, discussing the theoretical and practical principles of the application.

  10. Extensively Coated Cementless Femoral Components in Revision Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greidanus, Nelson; Antoniou, John; Paprosky, Wayne

    2000-10-01

    A septic loosening and osteolysis can compromise the available host bone in patients requiring revision hip arthroplasty. Secure fixation of revision femoral components may not be possible if reliant only on proximal femoral bone for biologic fixation or cement interdigitation. The challenge for the revision arthroplasty surgeon is to find the best method to secure the implant in a femur with deficient bone proximally that will provide stability for load bearing and motion. In addition to providing stability, the implant must be durable and maintain long-term fixation. With over 16 years of experience with fully porous coated femoral revision implants, we have found that maximizing prosthetic-bone fit in the proximal femoral diaphyseal bone provides reliable long-term fixation in the majority of femoral revision cases.

  11. A shared promoter region suggests a common ancestor for the human VCX/Y, SPANX, and CSAG gene families and the murine CYPT family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin A; Nielsen, John E; Retelska, Dorota

    2008-01-01

    Many testis-specific genes from the sex chromosomes are subject to rapid evolution, which can make it difficult to identify murine genes in the human genome. The murine CYPT gene family includes 15 members, but orthologs were undetectable in the human genome. However, using refined homology search...... with the murine SPANX gene and the CYPT family may share a common ancestor. Finally, we present evidence that VCX/Y and SPANX may be paralogs with a similar protein structure consisting of C terminal acidic repeats of variable lengths....

  12. Estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has similar predictive value as measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Sara V; Blicher, Marie K; Kruger, Ruan;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) adds significantly to traditional cardiovascular risk prediction, but is not widely available. Therefore, it would be helpful if cfPWV could be replaced by an estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV) using age and mean blood pres...

  13. Outcomes of trochanteric femoral fractures treated with proximal femoral nail: an analysis of 100 consecutive cases

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    Korkmaz MF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Fatih Korkmaz,1 Mehmet Nuri Erdem,2 Zeliha Disli,3 Engin Burak Selcuk,4 Mustafa Karakaplan,1 Abdullah Gogus5 1Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Inonu University School of Medicine, Malatya, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Nisantasi University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Anesthesiology, Malatya Government Hospital, Malatya, Turkey; 4Department of Family Medicine, Inonu University School of Medicine, Malatya, Turkey; 5Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Purpose: In this study, we aimed to report the results of a retrospective study carried out at our institute regarding cases of patients who had suffered proximal femoral fractures between January 2002 and February 2007, and who were treated with a proximal femoral nail. Materials and methods: One hundred consecutive cases were included in the study. A case documentation form was used to obtain intraoperative data including age, sex, mechanism of injury, type of fracture according to Association for Osteosynthesis/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF classification and the American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA physical status classification (ASA grade. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at the time of admission and at the 6th week; subsequent visits were organized on the 3rd month, 6th month, and 12th month, and in patients with longer follow-up and annually postoperatively. The Harris score of hip function was used, and any change in the position of the implants and the progress of the fracture union, which was determined radiologically, was noted. Results: The mean age of the patients was 77.66 years (range: 37–98 years, and the sex distribution was 32 males and 68 females. Seventy-three fractur